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Sample records for locoregionally advanced head-and-neck

  1. Induction Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Past, Present, Future?

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    Hanna, Glenn J.; Haddad, Robert I.; Lorch, Jochen H.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes how induction chemotherapy for patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck has evolved over the years, provides an update of recent developments, and discusses how induction chemotherapy may develop in the future.

  2. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy with Concurrent Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil for Locoregional Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Analysis of 105 Consecutive Patients

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    David Zaboli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We reviewed a cohort of patients with previously untreated locoregional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC who received a uniform chemoradiotherapy regimen. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 105 patients with stage III or IV HNSCC treated at Greater Baltimore Medical Center from 2000 to 2007. Radiation included 125 cGy twice daily for a total 70 Gy to the primary site. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (12 mg/m2/h daily for five days and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/20 h daily for five days, given with weeks one and six of radiation. All but seven patients with N2 or greater disease received planned neck dissection after chemoradiotherapy. Primary outcomes were overall survival (OS, locoregional control (LRC, and disease-free survival (DFS. Results. Median followup of surviving patients was 57.6 months. Five-year OS was 60%, LRC was 68%, and DFS was 56%. Predictors of increased mortality included age ≥55, female gender, hypopharyngeal primary, and T3/T4 stage. Twelve patients developed locoregional recurrences, and 16 patients developed distant metastases. Eighteen second primary malignancies were diagnosed in 17 patients. Conclusions. The CRT regimen resulted in favorable outcomes. However, locoregional and distant recurrences cause significant mortality and highlight the need for more effective therapies to prevent and manage these events.

  3. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy with Concurrent Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil for Locoregional Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Analysis of 105 Consecutive Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaboli, David; Tan, Marietta; Gogineni, Hrishikesh; Lake, Spencer; Fan, Katherine; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Messing, Barbara; Ulmer, Karen; Zinreich, Eva S.; Levine, Marshall A.; Tang, Mei; Pai, Sara I.; Blanco, Ray G.; Saunders, John R.; Best, Simon R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We reviewed a cohort of patients with previously untreated locoregional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) who received a uniform chemoradiotherapy regimen. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 105 patients with stage III or IV HNSCC treated at Greater Baltimore Medical Center from 2000 to 2007. Radiation included 125 cGy twice daily for a total 70 Gy to the primary site. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (12 mg/m2/h) daily for five days and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/20 h) daily for five days, given with weeks one and six of radiation. All but seven patients with N2 or greater disease received planned neck dissection after chemoradiotherapy. Primary outcomes were overall survival (OS), locoregional control (LRC), and disease-free survival (DFS). Results. Median followup of surviving patients was 57.6 months. Five-year OS was 60%, LRC was 68%, and DFS was 56%. Predictors of increased mortality included age ≥55, female gender, hypopharyngeal primary, and T3/T4 stage. Twelve patients developed locoregional recurrences, and 16 patients developed distant metastases. Eighteen second primary malignancies were diagnosed in 17 patients. Conclusions. The CRT regimen resulted in favorable outcomes. However, locoregional and distant recurrences cause significant mortality and highlight the need for more effective therapies to prevent and manage these events. PMID:22778748

  4. IMRT With Simultaneous Integrated Boost and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

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    Montejo, Michael E.; Shrieve, Dennis C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Bentz, Brandon G.; Hunt, Jason P.; Buchman, Luke O. [Division of Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Agarwal, Neeraj [Department of Internal Medicine, Oncology Division, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Hitchcock, Ying J., E-mail: ying.hitchcock@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and May 2008, 43 consecutive patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma received accelerated chemoradiation with concurrent cisplatin or cetuximab. The doses for intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost were 67.5, 60.0, and 54 Gy in 30 daily fractions of 2.25, 2.0, and 1.8 Gy to the planning target volumes for gross disease, high-risk nodes, and low-risk nodes, respectively. Results: Of the patients, 90.7% completed chemoradiotherapy as prescribed. The median treatment duration was 43 days (range, 38-55 days). The complete response rate was 74.4%. With median follow-up of 36.7 months (range, 16.8-78.1 months) in living patients, the estimated 1-, 2-, and 5-year locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 82%, 82%, and 82%; 73%, 65%, and 61%; and 73%, 73%, and 70%, respectively. One treatment-related death occurred from renal failure. Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis occurred in 13 patients (30.2%) and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 12 patients (27.9%). In patients with adequate follow-up, 82% were feeding tube free by 6 months after therapy; 13% remained feeding tube dependent at 1 year. Grade 3 soft-tissue fibrosis, esophageal stricture, osteoradionecrosis, and trismus occurred in 3 patients (6.9%), 5 patients (11.6%), 1 patient (2.3%), and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost with concurrent chemotherapy improved local and regional control. Acute and late toxicities were tolerable and acceptable. A prospective trial of this fractionation regimen is necessary for further assessment of its efficacy and toxicity compared with other approaches.

  5. Sequential induction chemotherapy followed by radical chemo-radiation in the treatment of locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer

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    Bhide, S A; M. Ahmed; Barbachano, Y; K Newbold; Harrington, K J; Nutting, C M

    2008-01-01

    We describe a retrospective series of patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer who were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by radical chemo-radiation. Patients treated with two cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by definitive chemo-radiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck region, from 2001 – 2006 at the Royal Marsden Hospital, formed the basis of this study. Cisplatin (75 mg m−2) on day 1 and 5-FU (1000 mg m−2) day 1 – 4 was the standard regimen used for ...

  6. Sequential induction chemotherapy followed by radical chemo-radiation in the treatment of locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhide, S A; Ahmed, M; Barbachano, Y; Newbold, K; Harrington, K J; Nutting, C M

    2008-07-08

    We describe a retrospective series of patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer who were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by radical chemo-radiation. Patients treated with two cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by definitive chemo-radiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck region, from 2001 - 2006 at the Royal Marsden Hospital, formed the basis of this study. Cisplatin (75 mg m(-2)) on day 1 and 5-FU (1000 mg m(-2)) day 1 - 4 was the standard regimen used for induction treatment. Cisplatin (100 mg m(-2)) on day 1 and day 29 was used for concomitant treatment. The radiation was delivered using conformal technique. Tissues containing macroscopic and microscopic disease were treated to doses of 65 Gray (Gy) in 30 fractions and 50 Gy in 25 fractions, respectively. Data on patterns of relapse and acute toxicity (NCICTCv.3.0) were collected. A total of 129 patients were included, median age was 58 (range: 27 - 78). The site of tumour was: oropharynx 70 (54%), larynx 30 (23%), hypopharynx 24 (19%) and other 5 (4%). The median follow-up was 19 months (range: 4 - 58). Local control, disease-specific survival and overall survival at 2 years were 71%, 68% and 63%, respectively. The distant recurrence rate at 2 years was 9%. Ten patients required dose reduction during induction chemotherapy due to toxicity. The dose of 5-FU was reduced in six patients and that of cisplatin in four patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 toxicity was: neutropenia 5%, thrombocytopenia 1%, nausea and vomiting 3%. One cycle of concurrent cisplatin was omitted in 23 patients due to toxicity. Full-dose radiotherapy was administered to 98% of patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 toxicity was: skin 20%, dysphagia 65%, mucositis 60%, neutropenia 3%, anaemia 1%, nausea and vomiting 4%, nephrotoxicity 1%. Induction chemotherapy followed by radical chemo-radiation is a safe and tolerable regimen in the treatment of advanced head-and-neck cancer. Distant recurrence rates

  7. Phase II clinical trial of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and ifosfamide as treatment for advanced locoregional head and neck carcinoma.

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    Sánchez Parra, M; Churruca, C; Paredes, A; Lacasta, A; López de Argumedo, G; Alvárez, I; Abad, T; Egana, L; Guimón, E; Piera, J M

    1999-02-01

    The association of ifosfamide with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for the management of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck was assessed in this trial. Ifosfamide was given initially to 12 patients in combination with standard fixed doses of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, at 1,000 mg/m2 daily on days 2, 3, and 4. Two patients died of neutropenia and severe infection, and the authors recruited seven more patients who were treated with a lower dose of ifosfamide, 800 mg/m2 daily on days 2, 3, and 4. One of the seven patients died of neutropenia and severe infection. Three complete remission were observed in 18 patients evaluable for efficacy. The study was closed early because of the severe toxicity profile demonstrated by this scheme and because of no clear advantage in efficacy versus cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil combinations.

  8. The current status and future perspectives of the combined chemo-radiotherapy for locoregionally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer%局部或区域晚期头颈鳞癌放化疗联合治疗现状和展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志勇; 张艳清; 郑艳群; 朱步东

    2013-01-01

    头颈部鳞状细胞癌的全身治疗包括细胞毒药物治疗(简称化疗)、靶向治疗和支持治疗;而局部治疗主要包括放射治疗和手术。放化疗联合是局部晚期或区域晚期头颈部鳞癌主要治疗模式,包括同步化放疗、诱导化疗、序贯化放疗。本文综述了原发于口腔、口咽、下咽、喉的鳞癌的化放疗联合治疗现状和进展。%The systemic treatments of locoregionally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer include cytotoxic therapy (referred to chemotherapy), targeted therapies and supportive care, in addition to local therapy consisted of surgery and/or radiation therapy (RT). Approaches combining chemotherapy and radiation therapy is primarily treatment modalities in patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer, comprising of concurrent chemoradiotherapy, induction chemotherapy and sequential chemoradiotherapy. This article reviews the current status and progress in the combined chemo-radiotherapy approaches to patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer arising in the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx.

  9. Image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer

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    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer remains a challenge because of the head and neck complex anatomy and the tumor invasion to the adjacent organs and/or metastases to the cervical nodes. Postoperative irradiation or concurrent chemoradiation may lead to damage of radiosensitive structures such as the salivary glands, mandible, cochlea, larynx, and pharyngeal muscles. Xerostomia, osteoradionecrosis, deafness, hoarseness of the voice, dysphagia, and aspiration remain serious complications of head and neck irradiation and impair patient quality of life. Intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy by virtue of steep dose gradient and daily imaging may allow for decreased radiation of the organs at risk for complication while preserving loco-regional control.

  10. Recent advances and controversies in head and neck reconstructive surgery

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    Kuriakose Moni

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in head and neck reconstruction has made significant improvement in the quality of life and resectability of head and neck cancer. Refinements in microsurgical free tissue transfer leave made restoration of form and complex functions of head and region a reality. Standardized reconstructive algorithms for common head and neck defects have been developed with predictable results. Some of the major advances in the field include- sensate free tissue transfer, osseo integrated implant and dental rehabilitation, motorized tissue transfer and vascularized growth center transfer for pediatric mandible reconstruction. However there exist several controversies in head and neck reconstructive surgery. Some are old; resolved partially in the light of recent clinical evidences and others are new, developed as a result of newly introduced reconstructive techniques. These include, primary versus secondary reconstruction, pedicled versus free flaps, primary closure versus free tissue transfer for partial glossectomy defects, reconstruction of posterior mandible and reconstruction of orbital exenteration defects. Rapid advances in the field of tissue engineering and stem cell research is expected to make radical change in the field of reconstructive surgery. This manuscript review progress in head and neck reconstructive surgery during the last decade, current controversies and outline a road map for the future.

  11. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

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    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National Yonsei University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yea, Ji Woon [Dongguk University Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  12. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy improves loco-regional recurrence of head and neck mucosal melanoma.

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    Wushou, Alimujiang; Hou, Jing; Zhao, Ya-Jun; Miao, Xin-chao

    2015-05-01

    Primary head and neck mucosal melanoma (HNMM) is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Controversy remains as to whether postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (PORT) achieves a significant benefit in HNMM treatment. Because of the lack of available conclusive prospective data, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all relevant available studies to clarify the benefits of PORT. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases was conducted to collect relevant studies until April 30, 2014. Studies published in the English language comparing surgery alone and surgery plus PORT for HNMM were included, with more than 15 study populations. All statistical analyses were performed using STATA version 12.0. A total of 423 patients were available from eight studies and the median sample size was 53 cases. The median follow-up time was 38.2 months (range 18.3-65.2 months). There was a positive association between PORT and loco-regional recurrence of HNMM (odds ratio [OR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.22-0.60, P = 0.000). No associations were found between the PORT and 3-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.94-2.09, P = 0.093 and OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.70-1.61, P = 0.161, respectively). PORT had no impact on 3-year and 5-year OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.80-1.61, P = 0.472 and HR = 1.34, 95% CI = 0.97-1.85, P = 0.227, respectively). PORT improved loco-regional recurrence of HNMM independent of OS.

  13. Concurrent chemoradiation for unresectable advanced head and neck cancer

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    Shimizu, Wakako; Ogino, Takashi; Ishikura, Satoshi [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East] [and others

    1998-03-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy were performed for 18 patients with unresectable head and neck squamous cell cancer. Chemotherapy, consisting of CDDP (40 mg/m{sup 2}, Day 1 and 8) and 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}, 24-h continuous infusion through Day 1-5 and 8-12), with concurrent radiotherapy (2 Gy/day, 5 days/w) were administered and repeated 2-3 courses in every 5 weeks. Mucositis and myelo-suppression were the main side effects observed, but all of them were tolerable. Total response rate and complete response rate was 94.4% and 55.6%, respectively. Out of six patients requiring tracheotomy for airway obstruction due to bulky tumor, four achieved sufficient tumor shrinkage by the treatment and could obtain closure of the stoma. Two patients whose neck lymph nodes were still remaining after chemoradiotherapy, could obtain local control by supplemental neck dissection surgery. These regimen is feasible and effective for locally advanced head and neck cancer. (author)

  14. Concurrent Chemoradiation with Low-Dose Weekly Cisplatin in Locally Advanced Stage IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    Kang, Myoung Hee; Kang, Jung Hun; Song, Haa-Na; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Kimun; Woo, Seung Hoon; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with 3-weekly doses of cisplatin is a standard treatment for loco-regionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, treatment with 3-weekly doses of cisplatin is often associated with several adverse events. Therefore, we conducted this retrospective analysis to determine the efficacy and tolerance of CRT with a low weekly dose of cisplatin in stage IV HNSCC patients. Materials and Methods Medical records of patients who were d...

  15. Cutaneous Angiosarcoma of Head and Neck: A New Predictive Score for Locoregional Metastasis

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    J.E.H. Gründahl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cutaneous angiosarcoma of head and neck (cAS-HN is a malignant neoplasm with deficient data on prognostic factors. The aim of this study is to present our monocenter database on cAS-HN so far and a new predictive score for locoregional metastasis (LRM. METHODS: Retrospectively, tumor characteristics and outcome of 103 consecutive patients with cAS-HN were analyzed. The main predictors of LRM (identified by univariate and multivariate statistics were combined to a LRM risk score. The prognostic values of stratification into high-, medium-, and low-risk groups concerning disease-specific survival (DSS, distant metastasis (DM, and progression-free survival (PFS were evaluated. RESULTS: LRM (n = 29 and control (n = 74 groups differed significantly concerning several tumor characteristics and outcome (DM, PFS, and DSS. Patients developing LRM showed 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates of 32%, 16%, and 11% (mean DSS time of 36.7 months [95% confidence interval (CI 20.5-52.8] compared to 81%, 73%, and 69% (mean DSS time of 292.4 months [95% CI 208.4-376.5] in controls without LRM (P < .001. The main predictors were American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC stage, tumor extent, and origin of the primary tumor. The LRM risk score revealed significant higher values for the LRM group [7.14 (SD 1.46 vs 4.88 (SD 1.89, P < .001]. The high-risk group showed significantly higher risk for DM and more unfavorable DSS and PFS. CONCLUSION: The LRM risk score is a simple way to estimate the risk for LRM and DM, to stage patients, and to determine treatment options.

  16. Advances in otolaryngology-Head and neck surgery. Volume 1

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    Myers, E.N. (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Bluestone, C.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 14 sections. The section titles are: The impact of AIDS on otolaryngology--head and neck surgery; The management of sleep apneas and snoring; Antimicrobial agents for infections in the ear, nose, and throat--head and neck; Nasal allergy: Medical and surgical treatment; Uses of computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in temporal bone imaging; Surgical management of otitis media with effusion; middle ear reconstruction: Current status; Cochlear implants: an overview; Diagnosis and management of acute facial paralysis; The use of the laser in head and neck surgery; The management and prevention of subglottic stenosis in infants and children; Management of the mass in the thyroid; Suction-assisted lipectomy of the head and neck area; and Ambulatory surgery.

  17. Pretreatment nutritional status and locoregional failure of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

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    Platek, Mary E; Reid, Mary E; Wilding, Gregory E; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R; Hicks, Wesley L; Popat, Saurin R; Warren, Graham W; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L; Khan, Mohamed K; Loree, Thom R; Singh, Anurag K

    2011-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pretreatment %IBW should be examined further. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. PRETREATMENT NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND LOCOREGIONAL FAILURE IN PATIENTS WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER UNDERGOING DEFINITIVE CONCURRENT CHEMORADIATION THERAPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Mary E.; Reid, Mary E.; Wilding, Gregory E.; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Popat, Saurin R.; Warren, Graham W.; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L.; Khan, Mohamed K.; Loree, Thom R.; Singh, Anurag K.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Results Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pre-treatment %IBW should be examined further. PMID:21990220

  19. Voice and speech outcomes of chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer: a systematic review

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    Jacobi, I.; van der Molen, L.; Huiskens, H.; van Rossum, M.A.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of this review is to systematically assess the effects on voice and speech of advanced head and neck cancer and its treatment by means of chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The databases Medline, Embase and Cochrane were searched (1991-2009) for terms head and neck cancer, chemoradiation, voice and

  20. Technical Advances and Pitfalls in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

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    Upendra Parvathaneni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT is the standard of care in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC based on level 1 evidence. Technical advances in radiotherapy have revolutionized the treatment of HNSCC, with the most tangible gain being a reduction in long term morbidity. However, these benefits come with a serious and sobering price. Today, there is a greater chance of missing the target/tumor due to uncertainties in target volume definition by the clinician that is demanded by the highly conformal planning process involved with IMRT. Unless this is urgently addressed, our patients would be better served with the historically practiced non conformal radiotherapy, than IMRT which promises lesser morbidity. Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT ensures the level of set up accuracy warranted to deliver a highly conformal treatment plan and should be utilized with IMRT, where feasible. Proton therapy has a theoretical physical advantage over photon therapy due to a lack of “exit dose”. However, clinical data supporting the routine use of this technology for HNSCC are currently sparse. The purpose of this article is to review the literature, discuss the salient issues and make recommendations that address the gaps in knowledge.

  1. Cetuximab with radiotherapy in patients with loco-regionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck unsuitable or ineligible for concurrent platinum-based chemo-radiotherapy: Ready for routine clinical practice?

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    J P Agarwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To report outcomes of cetuximab concurrent with radiotherapy in advanced head-neck cancer unsuitable for platinum-based chemo-radiotherapy. Materials and Methods : Retrospective chart review of 37 patients treated with cetuximab and radiotherapy at a comprehensive cancer centre. Results : Median age of study cohort was 59 years. Thirty four (92% patients had advanced stage disease (stage III-IV. Reasons for ineligibility for platinum included impaired creatinine-clearance, old age, and/or co-morbidities. Thirty-two (86% patients completed planned radiotherapy without interruption; 29 (80% patients received ≥6 cycles of cetuximab. Fifteen patients (40.5% developed ≥grade 3 dermatitis; 9 patients (25% experienced ≥grade 3 mucositis. At a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year loco-regional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival was 35.5%, 29.5%, and 44.4% respectively. Stage grouping and severe dermatitis were significant predictors of outcome. Conclusions : Cetuximab concurrent with radiotherapy is a reasonable alternative in advanced head-neck cancer patients with acceptable compliance and outcomes, but higher skin toxicity.

  2. Utility of FMISO PET in advanced head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation incorporating a hypoxia-targeting chemotherapy agent

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    Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, St Vincent' s Medical School, Melbourne (Australia); Rischin, Danny [University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, St Vincent' s Medical School, Melbourne (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Haematology and Medical Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Fisher, Richard [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Melbourne (Australia); Binns, David [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, Melbourne (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [Austin Hospital, Centre for PET, and Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Melbourne (Australia); Peters, Lester J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Radiation Oncology, Melbourne (Australia)

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET in advanced head and neck cancer during hypoxia-targeting therapy. Fifteen of 16 patients in a phase I trial of chemoradiation plus tirapazamine (specific cytotoxin for hypoxic cells) in advanced (T3/4 and/or N2/3) head and neck cancer underwent serial [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and FMISO PET. We have previously reported excellent early clinical outcome of these patients and now review FMISO PET results in the context of longer follow-up of this patient cohort. Based on blinded qualitative scoring by two readers, FMISO PET was positive in 13/15 patients at baseline: 12/15 of primary sites and 8/13 neck nodes were scored as positive. All sites of corresponding FDG and FMISO abnormality at baseline showed marked qualitative reduction of uptake within 4 weeks of commencing therapy, consistent with effective hypoxia-targeted therapy. With a median follow-up of 6.9 years, there have been only four locoregional failures, while three other patients have died of metachronous lung cancer. The 5-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI 27-73%), the 5-year failure-free survival was 44% (95% CI 22-68%) and the 5-year freedom from locoregional failure was 68% (95% CI 38-88%). The high prevalence of hypoxia demonstrated on FMISO PET imaging is consistent with the advanced disease stage of these patients and would be expected to predict an adverse prognosis. Evidence of the early resolution of FMISO abnormality during treatment, associated with excellent locoregional control in this patient cohort, supports further investigation of hypoxia-targeting agents in advanced head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  3. Pemetrexed disodium in recurrent locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

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    Pivot, X; Raymond, E; Laguerre, B.; Degardin, M; Cals, L; Armand, J P; Lefebvre, J L; Gedouin, D; Ripoche, V; Kayitalire, L; Niyikiza, C; Johnson, R.; Latz, J.; Schneider, M.

    2001-01-01

    This phase II study determined response rate of patients with locally advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer treated with pemetrexed disodium, a new multitargeted antifolate that inhibits thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. 35 patients with local or metastatic relapse of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (31 male, 4 female; median age 53 years) were treated with pemetrexed 500 mg m2 administered as a 10-minute infusi...

  4. Airway management before chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langerman, Alexander; Patel, Riddhi M; Cohen, Ezra E W; Blair, Elizabeth A; Stenson, Kerstin M

    2012-02-01

    Patients with upper aerodigestive tract tumors can have development of airway compromise both before and during chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Tracheotomy is the classic method for securing a safe airway, but tumor debulking may also be used. This was a retrospective review of locoregionally advanced tumors of the base of tongue, larynx, or hypopharynx undergoing CRT between 1995 and 2007. Forty-two of the 109 patients presented with signs or symptoms of airway obstruction. Of these, 28 underwent tracheotomy before CRT, and 11 had tumor debulking. Two of the 11 patients who underwent debulking required tracheotomy within 1 year after CRT for persistent edema and fibrosis. Larynx tumors were more likely to require tracheotomy or debulking than other tumors (p = .01). Debulking is a safe and effective alternative to tracheotomy in select patients with tumor-related airway obstruction before CRT. Patients who undergo debulking should be monitored closely for recurrence of airway compromise during and after CRT. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. MiR-422a promotes loco-regional recurrence by targeting NT5E/CD73 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnin, Nathalie; Armandy, Emma; Carras, Julien; Ferrandon, Sylvain; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Aubry, Marc; Guihard, Sébastien; Meyronet, David; Foy, Jean-Philippe; Saintigny, Pierre; Ledrappier, Sonia; Jung, Alain; Rimokh, Ruth; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Poncet, Delphine

    2016-07-12

    At the time of diagnosis, 60% of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) present tumors in an advanced stage (III-IV) of disease and 80% will relapse within the first two years post-treatment, due to their frequent radio(chemo)resistance. To identify new molecular targets and companion biomarkers, we have investigated the miRNome of 75 stage III-IV oropharynx tumors without relapse (R) or with loco-regional relapse (non-responder, NR) within two years post-treatment. Interestingly, miR-422a was significantly downregulated in NR tumors, in agreement with the increase in cell proliferation and adhesion induced by miR-422a inhibition in vitro. Furthermore, we identified CD73/NT5E oncogene as target of miR-422a. Indeed, modulation of the endogenous level of miR-422a inversely influences the expression and the enzymatic activity of CD73. Moreover, knocking down CD73 mimics the effects of miR-422a upregulation. Importantly, in tumors, miR-422a and CD73 expression levels are inversely correlated, and both are predictive of relapse free survival - especially considering loco(regional) recurrence - in vitro two independent cohorts of advanced oropharynx or HNSCC (N=255) tumors. In all, we reported, for the first time, that MiR-422a and its target CD73 are involved in early loco(regional) recurrence of HNSCC tumors and are new targets for personalized medicine.

  6. Salivary gland carcinoma : Independent prognostic factors for locoregional control, distant metastases, and overall survival: Results of the Dutch Head and Neck Oncology Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terhaard, CHJ; Lubsen, H; Van der Tweel, [No Value; Hilgers, FJM; Eijkenboom, WMH; Marres, HAM; Tjho-Heslinga, RE; de Jong, JMA; Roodenburg, JLN

    2004-01-01

    Background. We analyzed the records of patients with malignant salivary gland tumors, as diagnosed in centers of the Dutch Head and Neck Oncology Cooperative Group, in search of independent prognostic factors for locoregional control, distant metastases, and overall survival. Methods. In 565 patient

  7. Accelerated fractionation in advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmi, P.; Cellai, E. (Florence University (Italy). Department of Radiotherapy); Chiavacci, A.; Fablai, C. (Florence Hospital (Italy). Department of Radiotherapy)

    1990-03-01

    From 1975 to 1985, 161 patients affected by head and neck cancer (58 oropharynx, 67 oral cavity, 36 paranasal sinuses) were treated with radiotherapy using an accelerated fractionation (AF) schedule at the University and Hospital Radiotherapy Departments of Florence. Five-year actuarial local control and survival was 38% for the oropharynx, 18% and 20% for the oral cavity, and 38% and 31% for the paranasal sinuses. Results were analysed according to T and N stage as well. Severe late sequelae were evaluated in 53 patients without local disease and with a minimum follow-up of one year: 8 patients developed osteonecrosis; there were 3 cases of trismus, 2 cases of laryngeal oedema, one case of blindness and one case of opththalmitis. (author). 19 refs.; 2 figs.; 9 tabs.

  8. Supportive care in early rehabilitation for advanced-stage radiated head and neck cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, J.A.M. de; Berg, M.G. van den; Achterberg, T. van; Merkx, M.A.W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and supportive follow-up care needs 1 month posttreatment for patients with advanced-stage (stage III or IV) radiated head and neck cancer (HNC) who were treated with curative intent. Study Design An exploratory, descriptive analysi

  9. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiochemotherapy (HFA-RCT) with mitomycin C for advanced head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, J; Dobrowsky, W; Schmid, R; Pokrajac, B; Selzer, E; Potter, R

    2004-01-01

    To investigate efficacy and feasibility of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy combined with mitomycin C, patients with locally advanced unresectable squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region were administered 64-66 Gy in four weeks and mitomycin C (20 mg/m(2)) on day five. Twenty-

  10. Two Cases of Pneumatosis Intestinalis during Cetuximab Therapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Miller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatosis intestinalis is a rare but known potential complication of treatment with cetuximab. Here we present two cases of pneumatosis intestinalis occurring in patients who were receiving cetuximab as treatment for advanced head and neck cancer. In both cases, cetuximab was discontinued after discovery of the pneumatosis intestinalis.

  11. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and short infusional 5-FU in advanced head and neck malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aich Ranen Kanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Combination of radical surgery and radiotherapy is the standard management of head and neck malignancies. But due to considerable morbidity of surgery and associated cosmetic and functional deficiencies, often aggravated by adjuvant radiotherapy, many patients prefer only radiotherapy with its′ decreased chance of survival. Proper surgical facilities are also not accessible to most of our patients. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and loco-regional management by surgery and / or radiotherapy have emerged as a viable alternative. Aims: The purpose of this study is to find out the survival outcome as well as toxicity profile of Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and short infusional (3 hours 5-FU followed by radiotherapy in advanced head and neck malignancies. Materials and Methods: From June 2002 to December 2003, seventy four patients with advanced head and neck malignancies were planned to be treated with Cisplatin (50 mg / sq. meter on Days 1 and 2 and 5 - FU (600 mg / sq. meter on Days 1, 2 and 3 by 3 hour infusion on Day care basis. On completion of four cycles of chemotherapy at 21 days interval, all patients were destined to receive 6000 cGy of radiotherapy to the loco - regional site. Results: At one year follow up on completion of therapy, 57% patients were alive and 31% patients were disease free. These 31% patients enjoyed a good quality of life in terms of cosmetic and functional deficits. Toxicities were moderate and easily manageable. Conclusion: The study indicated that neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with Cisplatin and short infusional 5 - FU may be delivered on day care basis and results are comparable with Cisplatin and 96 hours continuous infusional 5 - FU. Thus avoiding the continuous infusional 5 - FU, 7 to 10 days in-patient hospitalization during each cycle may be avoided which is a constrain in developing countries like us.

  12. Methods for estimating the site of origin of locoregional recurrence in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Due, A.K.; Vogelius, I.R.; Berthelsen, A.K.; Kristensen, C.A.; Specht, L. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Aznar, M.C. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Niels Bohr Institute; Bentzen, S.M. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Wisconsin Univ., MD (United States). Depts. of Human Oncology and Medical Physics; Korreman, S.S. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Niels Bohr Institute; Roskilde Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Science, Systems, and Models

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Methods to estimate the likely origin of recurrences after radiation therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma are compared. Methods and materials: A total of 25 patients meeting the following inclusion criteria were randomly selected: curatively intended intensity-modulated radiotherapy planned on a positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) scan during the period 2005-2009; squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity, pharynx or larynx; complete clinical response followed by locoregional recurrence; and a CT scan at recurrence before any salvage therapy. Exclusion criteria were previous cancer in the area, surgery prior to radiotherapy, or a synchronous cancer. Three methods of estimating focal points of recurrence origin and two volume overlap methods assigning the recurrences to the most central target volumes encompassing at least 50% or 95% of the recurrence volumes were tested. Treatment planning and recurrence scans were rigid and deformable co-registered in order to transfer focal points to the treatment planning scan. Double determinations of all volumes, points, and co-registrations were made. Results: The volume overlap methods assigned the recurrences to significantly more peripheral target volumes than focal methods (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons of 95% overlap vs. focal methods, p < 0.028 for all comparisons of 50% overlap vs. focal methods). Repeated registrations of the same point had higher reproducibility with deformable registration than with rigid registration (median distance 0.31 vs. 0.35 cm, p = 0.015). No significant differences were observed among the focal methods. Conclusion: Significant differences between methods were found which may affect strategies to improve radiotherapy based on pattern of failure analyses. (orig.)

  13. Twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, Kumiko; Kojima, Nahoko; Himei, Kengo; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kita, Midori; Okawa, Tomohiko; Ishii, Tetsuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    Twenty-nine patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were treated with twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy (TDFR) for a total dose of 72 Gy to 82 Gy combined with Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) of CDDP+5FU and concurrent chemotherapy of low dose CBDCA between 1994 and 1997. Twenty-one cases (72%) had complete response and sixteen cases recurred. The relapse-free rate at 2 years was 23.4% and the actual 2-year survival rate was 42.0%. No severe toxicity has been observed. Based on this investigation, it was concluded that TDFR with chemotherapy is a promising modality for locally advanced head and neck cancer and toxicity is acceptable. (author)

  14. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Irene A.; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Tan, Marietta; Fan, Katherine Y.; Lake, Spencer T.; Zaboli, David; Messing, Barbara P.; Ulmer, Karen; Harrer, Karen B.; Gold, Dorothy; Ryniak, Keri L.; Zinreich, Eva S.; Tang, Mei; Levine, Marshall A.; Blanco, Ray G.; Saunders, John R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients. PMID:23118755

  15. Advancements in the Management of HPV-Associated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Zeitlin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck carcinomas have long been linked to alcohol and tobacco abuse; however, within the last two decades, the human papillomavirus (HPV has emerged as a third etiology and is specifically associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC. In this anatomical region, the oncogenic HPV-16 mediates transformation and immortalization of epithelium, most commonly in the oropharynx. Nevertheless, the recent identification of novel HPV mechanisms thought to be specific to oropharyngeal carcinogenesis has coincided with observations that HPV-associated HNSCC has differing clinical behavior—in terms of natural history, therapeutic response, and prognosis—than HPV-negative head and neck tumors. Taken together with the growing incidence of HPV transmission in younger populations, these discoveries have sparked a rapid expansion in both laboratory and clinical studies on the infection and disease. Herein, we review the clinical characteristics of HPV-associated HNSCC, with particular emphasis on recent advancements in our understanding of the management of this infectious malignancy.

  16. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Junn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

  17. Five versus ten fractions per week radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanjis Viranna Tallari

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: After induction chemotherapy, HFRT seems to be more efficacious than CFRT in locally advanced HNSCC, by increasing significantly the probability of progression-free survival and locoregional control.

  18. Early FDG PET at 10 or 20 Gy under chemoradiotherapy is prognostic for locoregional control and overall survival in patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentschel, Maria [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Clinic and Polyclinic of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Appold, Steffen; Baumann, Michael [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Clinic and Polyclinic of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Schreiber, Andreas [Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Department of Radiotherapy, Dresden (Germany); Abolmaali, Nasreddin [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Institute and Polyclinic of Diagnostic Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Abramyuk, Andrij [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Clinic and Polyclinic of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg; Zoephel, Klaus [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Clinic and Polyclinic of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Our study aimed to explore the optimal timing as well as the most appropriate prognostic parameter of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for an early prediction of outcome for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Serial PET data (before and three times during CRT) of 37 patients with advanced stage HNSCC, receiving combined CRT between 2005 and 2009, were evaluated. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), the average SUV (SUV{sub mean}) and the gross tumour volume determined by FDG PET (GTV PET), based on a source to background algorithm, were analysed. Stratified actuarial analysis was performed for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and locoregional control (LRC). The median follow-up time was 26 months (range 8-50). For all patients, OS was 51%, DFS 44% and LRC 55% after 2 years. The 2-year OS (88%) and 2-year LRC (88%) were higher for patients whose SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour decreased 50% or more from the beginning (0 Gy) to week 1 or 2 (10 or 20 Gy) of CRT ({delta}SUV{sub max10/20} {>=} 50%) than for patients with {delta}SUV{sub max20} < 50% (2-year OS = 38%; p = 0.02; 2-year LRC 40%; p = 0.06). A pretreatment GTV PET below the median of 10.2 ml predicted a better 2-year OS (34% for GTV PET {>=} 10.2 ml vs 83% for GTV PET < 10.2 ml; p = 0.02). The decrease of SUV{sub max} from before (0 Gy) to week 1 or 2 (10 or 20 Gy) of CRT is a potential prognostic marker for patients with HNSCC. Because GTV PET depends on the applied method of analysis, we suggest the use of SUV{sub max}, especially {delta}SUV{sub max10/20}, for an early estimation of therapy outcome. Confirmatory studies are warranted. (orig.)

  19. Combined radiochemotherapy with docetaxel in patients with unresectable locally advanced head and neck tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, K.; Heinrich, B.; Zimmermann, F.; Molls, M.; Feldmann, H.J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Kau, R. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkranke; Sommer, G.; Achterrath, W. [Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, Koeln (Germany)

    2000-02-01

    Background: As the treatment with Docetaxel in metastatic head and neck cancer resulted in an encouraging response rate, the following phase-I study examined the effects of a combined radiochemotherapy with weekly Docetaxel in patients with inoperable advanced head and neck tumors. Patients and Methods: Six patients with Stage IV head and neck cancer were included into the study. Within the treatment regimen the primary tumor and the involved lymph nodes were irradiated up to a total dose of 70 Gy, the non involved cervical and supraclavicular lymph nodes received 50 Gy in conventional fractionation. Simultaneously Docetaxel was given 1 hour before radiotherapy. The initial dose was 15 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: A dose escalation was impossible because of several dose limiting toxicities (NCI-CTC) already in the first dose level. Two patients showed skin reactions Grade 4, 2 patients pulmonary complications Grade 4, 2 patients neurologic side effects Grade 3 and 1 a thrombocytopenia Grade 3. The response rate resulted in 3 complete and 1 partial remission, 1 death, 1 patient was not evaluable. Conclusion: Unexpectedly already in the first dose level several dose limiting toxicities were evaluated. For that reason the treatment scheme is not feasible. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Da die Behandlung mit Docetaxel bei metastasierten HNO-Tumoren eine guenstige Ansprechrate ergeben hat, untersuchte die folgende Phase-I-Studie die Effekte einer kombinierten Radiochemotherapie mit woechentlicher Gabe von Docetaxel bei Patienten mit inoperablen fortgeschrittenen HNO-Tumoren. Patienten und Methoden: In der Zeit von September 1997 bis Maerz 1998 wurden sechs Patienten mit fortgeschrittenen HNO-Tumoren im Stadium IV in die Studie eingeschlossen. Innerhalb des Therapieregimes wurden der Primaertumor und die befallenen Lymphknoten bis 70 Gy bestrahlt, die nicht befallenen zervikalen und supraklavikulaeren Lymphknoten erhielten 50 Gy in konventioneller Fraktionierung. Simultan wurde

  20. Thermochemoradiotherapy for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer. Analysis of clinical results and background variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshina, Hideyuki; Takagi, Ritsuo; Nagashima, Katsuhiro; Fujita, Hajime; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Sohma, Yoh; Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Imai, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Masaki [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    2001-03-01

    Eighteen patients with 25 unresectable advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers (squamous cell carcinomas) received thermochemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy. The total radiation dose ranged from 50 to 82 Gy (mean, 65.6 Gy). Patients received thermochemotherapy twice a week, for a total number of 8.8 sessions, on average. The temperature in the tumor, as a result of the hyperthermia, was over 42 deg C in 185 (84.5%) of the 219 treatments. Three kinds of heating systems were used: a 13.56-MHz radiofrequency system, a 2450-MHz microwave system, and a radiofrequency interstitial system. The total amount of administered CDDP ranged from 40 to 300 mg (mean, 110 mg), combined with PEP and/or 5FU. Background factors (tumor factors and treatment factors) were investigated in detail, and the clinical results (tumor response and the 5-year cumulative focal control rate) were evaluated. The relationship between these two results was then analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistics. The clinical results of patients with a WHO histological classification of grade 3 were poor compared with patients with a classification of grade 1 or 2. The difference between these two results was significant when analyzed using univariate statistics, but not significant when analyzed using multivariate statistics. The clinical results of patients with primary lesions surrounded by bony tissues were slightly poor compared with those of patients whose lesions were surrounded by soft tissues, but the difference between these two results was not significant. Successful treatment of refractory recurrent tumors, large tumor masses, and diffuse invasive carcinomas was not affected by the treatment factors (heating systems, heating sessions, radiation dose, and CDDP dose and drug combination). These results suggest that refractory recurrence, proximity to bony tissues, tumor size, and histological malignancy might not be prognostic variables for thermochemoradiotherapy strategy

  1. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  2. Assessment of voice, speech, and related quality of life in advanced head and neck cancer patients 10-years+ after chemoradiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijenga, S.A.C.; Oskam, I.M.; van Son, R.J.J.H.; Hamming-Vrieze, O.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; van der Molen, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Assessment of long-term objective and subjective voice, speech, articulation, and quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for advanced, stage IV disease. Materials and methods: Twenty-two disease-free survivors, treated

  3. Assessment of voice, speech, and related quality of life in advanced head and neck cancer patients 10-years+ after chemoradiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijenga, S.A.C.; Oskam, I.M.; van Son, R.J.J.H.; Hamming-Vrieze, O.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; van der Molen, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Assessment of long-term objective and subjective voice, speech, articulation, and quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for advanced, stage IV disease. Materials and methods: Twenty-two disease-free survivors, treated

  4. A phase II study using vinorelbine and continuous 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Susanne; Serup-Hansen, Eva; Andersen, Lisbeth J

    2007-01-01

    Seventy patients with advanced head and neck cancer were treated with vinorelbine and continuous 5-FU administered in a central venous catheter. Over all response was 36% with 9% complete responses. The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities were stomatitis (13), infection (5), pain related...

  5. Comparing two lower-dose cisplatin programs for radio-chemotherapy of locally advanced head-and-neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rades, Dirk; Seidl, Daniel; Janssen, Stefan; Strojan, Primoz; Karner, Katarina; Bajrovic, Amira; Hakim, Samer G; Wollenberg, Barbara; Schild, Steven E

    2017-02-01

    Radio-chemotherapy is a common treatment for locally advanced squamous cell head-and-neck cancers (LA-SCCHN). Cisplatin (100 mg/m(2)) every 3 weeks is very common but associated with considerable toxicity. Therefore, cisplatin programs with lower daily doses were introduced. There is a lack of studies comparing lower-dose programs. In this study, 85 patients receiving radio-chemotherapy with 20 mg/m(2) cisplatin on 5 days every 4 weeks (group A) were retrospectively compared to 85 patients receiving radio-chemotherapy with 30-40 mg/m(2) cisplatin weekly (group B). Groups were matched for nine factors including age, gender, performance score, tumor site, T-/N-category, surgery, hemoglobin before radio-chemotherapy, and radiation technique. One- and 3-year loco-regional control rates were 83 and 69 % in group A versus 74 and 63 % in group B (p = 0.12). One- and 3-year survival rates were 93 % and 73 % in group A versus 91 and 49 % in group B (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, survival was significantly better for group A (HR 1.17; p = 0.002). In groups A and B, 12 and 28 % of patients, respectively, did not receive a cumulative cisplatin dose ≥180 mg/m(2) (p = 0.016). Toxicity rates were not significantly different. On subgroup analyses, group A patients had better loco-regional control (p = 0.040) and survival (p = 0.005) than group B patients after definitive radio-chemotherapy. In patients receiving adjuvant radio-chemotherapy, outcomes were not significantly different. Thus, 20 mg/m(2) cisplatin on 5 days every 4 weeks resulted in better loco-regional control and survival in patients receiving definitive radio-chemotherapy and may be preferable for these patients. Confirmation of these results in a randomized trial is warranted.

  6. Prospective randomized trial to compare accelerated (six fractions a week radiotherapy against concurrent chemoradiotherapy (using conventional fractionation in locally advanced head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT is currently considered to be the standard of care in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The optimum radiotherapy schedule for best local control and acceptable toxicity is not yet clear. We aimed at shortening of treatment time by using accelerated radiation, thereby comparing the disease response, loco-regional tumor control and tolerability of accelerated radiation (six fractions per week against CCRT in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: We conducted the prospective randomized study for a period of 2 years from June 2011 to May 2013 in 133 untreated patients of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. Study group (66 patients received accelerated radiotherapy with 6 fractions per week (66Gy/33#/5½ weeks. Control group (67 patients received CCRT with 5 fractions per week radiation (66 Gy/33#/6½ weeks along with intravenous cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 weekly. Tumor control, survival, acute and late toxicities were assessed. Results: Median overall treatment time was 38 days and 45 days in the accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiation arm, respectively. At a median follow up of 12 months, 41 patients (62.1% in the accelerated radiotherapy arm and 47 patients (70.1% in the CCRT arm were disease free (P = 0.402. Local disease control was comparable in both the arms. Acute toxicities were significantly higher in the CCRT arm as compared with accelerated radiotherapy arm. There was no difference in late toxicities between the two arms. Conclusion: We can achieve, same or near to the same local control, with lower toxicities with accelerated six fractions per week radiation compared with CCRT especially for Indian population.

  7. Taxane-containing induction chemotherapy followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy. Outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broemme, J.O.; Schmuecking, M.; Leiser, D.; Geretschlaeger, A.; Ghadjar, P.; Aebersold, D.M. [Bern Univ. Hospital and Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Arnold, A.; Giger, R. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Head and Neck Surgery; Rauch, D. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Medical Oncology; Plasswilm, L. [Kantonsspital, St. Gallen (Switzerland). Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Background: Induction chemotherapy followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy is an intensified treatment approach for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) that might be associated with high rates of toxicity. Materials and methods: The data of 40 consecutive patients who underwent induction chemotherapy with docetaxel-containing regimens followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concomitant systemic therapy for unresectable locally advanced HNSCC were retrospectively analyzed. Primary objectives were RT-related acute and late toxicity. Secondary objectives were response to induction chemotherapy, locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), overall survival (OS), and influencing factors for LRRFS and OS. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 21 months (range, 2-53 months). Patients received a median of three cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT to 72 Gy. Three patients died during induction chemotherapy and one during chemoradiotherapy. Acute RT-related toxicity was of grade 3 and 4 in 72 and 3 % of patients, respectively, mainly dysphagia and dermatitis. Late RT-related toxicity was mainly xerostomia and bone/cartilage necrosis and was of grade 3 and 4 in 15 % of patients. One- and 2-year LRRFS and OS were 72 and 49 % and 77 and 71 %, respectively. Conclusion: Induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy using IMRT was associated with a high rate of severe acute and late RT-related toxicities in this selected patient cohort. Four patients were lost because of fatal complications. Induction chemotherapy did not compromise the delivery of full-dose RT; however, the use of three cycles of concomitant cisplatin was impaired. (orig.)

  8. Definitive radiochemotherapy of advanced head and neck cancer with carboplatin and paclitaxel. A phase II study

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    Semrau, Robert; Temming, Susanne; Mueller, Rolf-Peter [Cologne Univ., Koeln (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Preuss, Simon Florian [Cologne Univ., Koeln (Germany). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery; Klussmann, Jens Peter [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando [Friedrich-Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery

    2011-10-15

    To report outcome and toxicity of concurrent radiochemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel in advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx and hypopharynx. Advanced inoperable carcinomas of the oropharynx and hypopharynx were treated with either hyper-fractionated, accelerated radiotherapy (50.0 Gy/2.0 with concomitant boost to 69.2 Gy/1.6) or conventional fractionated radiotherapy (70.2-72 Gy/1.8) concurrent with paclitaxel 40 mg/m{sup 2} and carboplatin AUC 1 weekly for 6 weeks. Acute and long-term toxicity was measured according to WHO- and CTC-criteria. A total of 84 patients were included between 2000 and 2008. Median follow-up time of patients alive was 36 months. Conventionally fractionated radiotherapy was given to 16 patients, while 68 patients were treated with concomitant boost. Finally, 88.1% of patients received full dose paclitaxel. Acute mucositis {>=} grade 3 was present in 51.2% of patients, while 6% of patients experienced {>=} grade 3 leucopenia and thrombopenia. A supportive gastric feeding tube was implanted in 89.1% of patients. Overall survival after 2 years was 46.3%, progression-free survival after 2 years was 41.0%. There was no significant survival difference between the different radiotherapy protocols. Concomitant carboplatin and paclitaxel is feasible and effective in advanced carcinomas of the head and neck.

  9. Combined cetuximab and reirradiation for locoregional recurrent and inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

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    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Hambek, Markus [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Dept. of Oral Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to investigate the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of external-beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods: seven patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were treated between August and December 2008 with Re-RT (1.8 Gy/fraction to 50.4 Gy) and cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} initial dose in the 1st week, and then 250 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly). Recurrence had to be located at least {>=} 50% in the preirradiated field. Long term toxicity from previous treatment was recorded before Re-RT as a baseline value. Acute and late toxicity derived from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT, and then every 3 months. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after end of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter (Tables 1 and 2). Results: only mild localized mucositis occurred in all patients. Two patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. After treatment one patient developed a grade 2 trismus, another showed grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation with severe pain requiring opioid medication. Two patients achieved a complete response after 7 months, one remained stable, three progressed, and one died from pneumonia without having restaging magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: A second course of RT combined with cetuximab in patients with inoperable, recurrent HNSCC proved to be feasible with mild or moderate toxicity and encouraging response to treatment. (orig.)

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy outcomes for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Kato, Ituro; Aihara, Teruhito; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Niimi, Miyuki; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Haginomori, Shin-ichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Fukushima, Masanori; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively review outcomes of applying boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to unresectable advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. Patients who were treated with BNCT for either local recurrent or newly diagnosed unresectable head or neck cancers between December 2001 and September 2007 were included. Clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrieved from hospital records. Either a combination of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine (BPA) or BPA alone were used as boron compounds. In all the treatment cases, the dose constraint was set to deliver a dose <10–12 Gy-eq to the skin or oral mucosa. There was a patient cohort of 62, with a median follow-up of 18.7 months (range, 0.7–40.8). A total of 87 BNCT procedures were performed. The overall response rate was 58% within 6 months after BNCT. The median survival time was 10.1 months from the time of BNCT. The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 43.1% and 24.2%, respectively. The major acute Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were hyperamylasemia (38.6%), fatigue (6.5%), mucositis/stomatitis (9.7%) and pain (9.7%), all of which were manageable. Three patients died of treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced carotid artery hemorrhage, two of whom had coexistent infection of the carotid artery. This study confirmed the feasibility of our dose-estimation method and that controlled trials are warranted. PMID:23955053

  11. Personalized therapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Escribano R

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients (LAHNSCC represents a truly heterogeneous population with differences in comorbidities, primary tumor location and etiology. These are key factors in optimal treatment selection. Material and methods: An extensive literature review was made in order to identify the most relevant factor in the therapeutic decision, with special interest in induction chemotherapy as the latest and most debatable option. Results: In the therapeutic decision we have to take into account factors related to the patient, age and performance status are the most important, and others related to the tumor as stage, site of origin and etiology, between this ones l, viral subtypes (EBV and HPV are becoming relevant in the later decades. Chemoradiotherapy is considered the gold standard treatment, supported by several randomized trials and metaanalysis. Induction chemotherapy is one of the later options appeared in the therapeutic arena, improving results in organ preservation and survival. Although a substantial increase in toxicities and lack of prospective comparisons with the standard concurrent chemoradioterapy, warrants a cautious use. Conclusions: Therapeutic choice in the LAHNSCC patient is a complex and multidimensional process, that should be carried in a specialized and multidisciplinary team that can assure the highest efficiency and security for the patient

  12. Recent advances of novel targeted therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jed A. Katzel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies have proven beneficial for patients suffering from a number of different malignancies, including cancers of the head and neck. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor has shown benefit in combination with radiation for untreated patients or as a single agent for patients with platinum resistant disease. Cetuximab is the only targeted agent currently approved by the Federal Drug Administration for the treatment of head and neck cancer. A number of other agents have shown promising initial results including intracellular tyrosine kinase inhibitors, agents targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, as well as other classes of novel therapies. Some of the data supporting the use of targeted therapy, including agents not yet approved in head and neck cancer, will be presented in this review. As our understanding of the cancer cell signaling pathways and novel targeted agents increases, the potential for treatment with reduced toxicity and improved clinical outcomes will become a reality.

  13. Lhermitte's Sign Developing after IMRT for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong C.; Gagnon, Patrick J.; Meranvil, Sophia; Kaurin, Darryl; Lipp, Linda; Holland, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Lhermitte's sign (LS) is a benign form of myelopathy with neck flexion producing an unpleasant electric-shock sensation radiating down the extremities. Although rare, it can occur after head and neck radiotherapy. Results. We report a case of Lhermitte's developing after curative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for a patient with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. IMRT delivers a conformal dose of radiation in head and neck cancer resulting in a gradient of radiation dose throughout the spinal cord. Using IMRT, more dose is delivered to the anterior spinal cord than the posterior cord. Conclusions. Lhermitte's sign can develop after IMRT for head and neck cancer. We propose an anterior spinal cord structure, the spinothalamic tract to be the target of IMRT-caused LS. PMID:20628529

  14. Lhermitte's Sign Developing after IMRT for Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong C. Lim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lhermitte's sign (LS is a benign form of myelopathy with neck flexion producing an unpleasant electric-shock sensation radiating down the extremities. Although rare, it can occur after head and neck radiotherapy. Results. We report a case of Lhermitte's developing after curative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for a patient with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. IMRT delivers a conformal dose of radiation in head and neck cancer resulting in a gradient of radiation dose throughout the spinal cord. Using IMRT, more dose is delivered to the anterior spinal cord than the posterior cord. Conclusions. Lhermitte's sign can develop after IMRT for head and neck cancer. We propose an anterior spinal cord structure, the spinothalamic tract to be the target of IMRT-caused LS.

  15. Palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancers: Evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talapatra Kaustav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is one of the commonest cancers seen in India, constituting up to 25% of their overall cancer burden. Advanced SCCHN is a bad disease with a poor prognosis and patients usually die of uncontrolled loco-regional disease. Curative intent management of loco-regionally advanced SCCHN has become more evidence-based with active clinical research in the form of large prospective randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. However, little has been written about palliative radiotherapy (PRT in head and neck cancers. It is widely recognized that PRT provides effective palliation and improved quality-of-life in advanced incurable malignancies. It is in this context that this study proposes to review the existing literature on palliative radiotherapy in advanced incurable SCCHN to help formulate consensus guidelines and recommendations.

  16. Induction chemotherapy followed by simultaneous hyperfractionated radiochemotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer. A pilot study

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    Jereczek-Fossa, B. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy]|[Medical Univ. Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy; De Braud, F.; Gasparetto, M.; De Pas, T. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Div. of Medical Oncology; Tradati, N. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Div. of Head and Neck Surgery; Leonardi, M.C.; Marsiglia, H.R. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy; Orecchia, R. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy]|[Milan Univ. (Italy). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemotherapy and hyperfractionated irradiation in locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods: A pilot study was undertaken comprising 3 cycles of cisplatinum (100 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1) and 5-fluorouracil (1000 mg/m{sup 2} in continuous intravenous infusion over the first 120 h) followed by bifractionated radiotherapy applied to tumor/involved lymph nodes up to the dose of 74.4 Gy given in 2 fractions of 1.2 Gy daily for 5 days a week combined with concomitant weekly cisplatinum infusion (50 mg/m{sup 2}). Results: Six patients were enrolled in the study. All of them completed the protocol therapy. Severe mucositis and myelotoxicity were the most common acute side effects observed in all and in 5 of the patients, respectively. Acute toxicity required interruption of concomitant chemotherapy in 5 cases and in 2 interruption of radiotherapy was necessary. Opioid analgesic parenteral therapy was administered in 4 patients. Three of them had to be hospitalized. One patient experienced cerebral stroke 1 day after the completion of therapy and died 7 days later. Due to high acute toxicity, patient accrual was terminated after 6 patients. At the mean follow-up of 17 months, 4 patients are alive, 3 of them are free of disease and in 1 local progression has been diagnosed. Conclusions: High acute toxicity of induction cisplatinum and 5-fluorouracil followed by concomitant cisplatinum and hyperfractionated irradiation calls for less toxic treatment schedules in locally advanced inoperable head and neck cancer. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Bewertung der Durchfuehrbarkeit der Induktionschemotherapie gefolgt von begleitender hyperfraktionierter Radiotherapie und Chemotherapie, bei inoperablen, lokal fortgeschrittenen Hals-Kopf-Karzinomen. Methoden: Es wurde eine Pilotstudie mit sechs Patienten durchgefuehrt: Sie umfasste drei Zyklen mit cis-Platin (100 mg/m{sup 2}, Tag 1) und 5

  17. Adjuvant chemotherapy (Nedaplatin/UFT) after radiotherapy for locallu advanced head and neck cancer

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    Kubota, Akira; Furukawa, Madoka; Kawano, Toshiro; Yamashita, Kohsuke; Sugiyama, Masato [Kanagawa Cancer Center (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy after radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cancer, 40 patients, previously untreated (6 with stage III and 34 with stage IV; 26 with resectable, 10 with unresectable and 4 patients with inoperable) were treated with radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (Nedaplatin /tegafur-uracil (UFT)) at our outpatient clinic. The primary site was identified in the larynx or hypopharynx in 15, oral cavity or oropharynx in 11, sinuses in 6, nasopharynx in 4, unknown primary in 3, and parotis in 1 patient. Treatment consisted of 6 courses of Nedaplatin 80 mg/m{sup 2} repeated at 4 weeks intervals, and one-year oral administration of UFTE 400mg/day, after radiotherapy. Toxicities included leukopenia (grade 3, 20.5%, grade 4, 2.6%), thrombocytopenia (grade 3, 7.7%). There was one death due to gastric ulcer. Twenty-five patients (62.5%) received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy. Two-year overall survival rate was 100% for stage III and 61.1% for stage IV. Over the same period, the progression-free survival rate was 83.3% for stage III and 46.1% for stage IV. 85.7% of complete response (CR) (12/14 patients) and 63.6% of partial response (PR) (14/22 patients) to radiotherapy showed that the effect of radiotherapy was maintained during adjuvant chemotherapy. If the effect of radiotherapy was maintained during adjuvant chemotherapy, the two-year progression free survival rate was not different between 81.8% for CR to radiotherapy and 81.3% for PR. The rate of distant failure was 2.5%, which was lower than that citedin previous reports. This adjuvant chemotherapy regimen is tolerable at outpatient clinics and might suppress distant metastasis after radiotherapy. (author)

  18. Roles of chemoradio therapy for stage III or IV advanced head and neck cancers

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    Tachikawa, Takuya; Iwai, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Minamino, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yukawa, Hisaya; Inoue, Toshiya; Yamashita, Toshio [Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    The effectiveness of chemoradio therapy (CRT), which was performed on 31 patients with advanced head and neck cancers of stage III or IV at Kansai Medical University between September 1999 and December 2000, was examined. The CRT consisted of continuous infusion of 5FU (500 mg/m{sup 2}) for 120 hours, prior to drip infusion of CDDP (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for 2 hours and conventional radiotherapy (2 Gy/day, 5 days/w). The 31 patients with these cancers were divided into two groups; a non-operative group (16 patients) and an operative group (15 patients). The patients in the non-operative group (16 patients) and an operative group (15 patients). The patients in the non-operative group underwent CRT (60-70 Gy of total radiation dose and two courses of chemotherapy) without surgery. The patients in the operative group received surgical treatment followed by CRT (40 Gy of total radiation dose and one course of chemotherapy). The results of CRT indicated 87.1% of the response rate (RR), and 29.0% of the complete response rate (CR) in the group. The CR rate was lower than in other reports. However, the combination of CRT and the subsequent operation indicated a disease-free survival rate of 61.3% and reduction of the recurrence rate to 17.4%. Eight of 9 patients of CR after CRT without surgery revealed NED. On the other hand, the results indicated that all 10 patients of PR after CRT showed tumor residue, 9 of 10 patients of PR showed NED after additional surgery. Therefore, it is likely that the patients of CR do not need the additional surgery, however, the patients of PR are strongly recommended the surgery to improve the local control rate as well as survival rate. Although adverse reactions of CRT on patients included mucositis, leucopenia, thrombopenia and dermatitis, the symptoms ranged within grade 3. (author)

  19. Postoperative concurrent radio-chemotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer;Avaliacao de radio e quimioterapia concomitantes pos-operatorias nos pacientes portadores de tumores de cabeca e pescoco localmente avancados

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    Fortuna, Ana Paula Diniz; Carvalho, Ravenna Nogueira; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo, E-mail: segreto.dmed@epm.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Oncologia Clinica e Experimental. Setor de Radioterapia

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer treated with postoperative concurrent radio-chemotherapy. Material and method: thirty nine patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer submitted to resection of all visible and palpable disease, followed by radiotherapy (60-66 Gy in 30 to 33 fractions over a period of 6 to 6.6 weeks) and concurrent cisplatin between May 2004 and June 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: a predominance of male with a median age of 54 years was observed; 30.8% of patients were in stage III and 61.5% in stage IVA; 77% of patients received a radiation dose of 66 Gy; dermatitis grade III occurred in 46.2% and fibrosis in 48.7% of patients. The 5-year loco-regional failure and overall survival were 30% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion: data show that surgery followed by concurrent radio-chemotherapy presents reasonable rate of loco-regional control and disease-free survival in high-risk patients. Our index of loco-regional and distant failure and the rate of acute and late complication are compatible with other series in the literature (author)

  20. Radiochemotherapy including cisplatin alone versus cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced unresectable stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribius, Silke; Kilic, Yasemin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kronemann, Stefanie [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Schroeder, Ursula [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Hakim, Samer [Dept. of Oro-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Rades, Dirk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Background and purpose: the optimal radiochemotherapy regimen for advanced head-and-neck cancer is still debated. This nonrandomized study compares two cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy regimens in 128 patients with locally advanced unresectable stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods: concurrent chemotherapy consisted of either two courses cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/d1-5 + 29-33; n = 54) or two courses cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/d1-5 + 29-33) + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 600 mg/m{sup 2}/d1-5 + 29-33; n = 74). Results: at least one grade 3 toxicity occurred in 25 of 54 patients (46%) receiving cisplatin alone and in 52 of 74 patients (70%) receiving cisplatin + 5-FU. The latter regimen was particularly associated with increased rates of mucositis (p = 0.027) and acute skin toxicity (p = 0.001). Seven of 54 (13%) and 20 of 74 patients (27%) received only one chemotherapy course due to treatment-related acute toxicity. Late toxicity in terms of xerostomia, neck fibrosis, skin toxicity, and lymphedema was not significantly different. The 2-year locoregional control rates were 67% after cisplatin alone and 52% after cisplatin + 5-FU (p = 0.35). The metastases-free survival rates were 79% and 69%, respectively (p = 0.65), and the overall survival rates 70% and 51%, respectively (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, outcome was significantly associated with performance status, T-category, N-category, hemoglobin level prior to radiotherapy, and radiotherapy break > 1 week. Conclusion: two courses of fractionated cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day) alone appear preferable, as this regimen resulted in similar outcome and late toxicity as two courses of cisplatin + 5-FU, but in significantly less acute toxicity. (orig.)

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy. Effect on outcome and toxicity in locally advanced head and neck cancer

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    Lambrecht, M.; Nevens, D.; Nuyts, S. [University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-03-15

    Background and purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has rapidly become standard of care in the management of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In this study, our aim was to retrospectively investigate the effect of the introducing IMRT on outcome and treatment-related toxicity compared to parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Material and methods: A total of 245 patients with stage III and IV HNSCC treated with primary radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2010 were included in this analysis: 135 patients were treated with 3DCRT, 110 patients with IMRT. Groups were compared for acute and late toxicity, locoregional control (LRC), and overall survival (OS). Oncologic outcomes were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared using a log-rank test. Acute toxicity was analyzed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 and late toxicity was scored using the RTOG/EORTC late toxicity scoring system. Results: Median follow-up was 35 months in the IMRT group and 68 months in the 3DCRT group. No significant differences were found in 3-year LRC and OS rates between the IMRT group and 3DCRT group. Significantly less acute mucositis {>=} grade 3 was observed in the IMRT group (32% vs. 44%, p = 0.03). There was significantly less late xerostomia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group than in the 3DCRT group (23% vs. 68%, p < 0.001). After 24 months, there was less dysphagia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group although differences failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The introduction of IMRT in the radiotherapeutic management of locally advanced head and neck cancer significantly improved late toxicity without compromising tumor control compared to a parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. (orig.)

  2. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

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    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  3. Functional outcomes and rehabilitation strategies in patients, treated with chemo-radiation for advanced head and neck cancer: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    van der Molen, L.; van Rossum, M.A.; Burkhead, L.M.; Smeele, L.E.; HILGERS, F.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Organ preservation with radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy has become an accepted treatment modality in advanced head and neck cancer. Unfortunately, organ preservation is not synonymous with function preservation. The aim of this review was to systematically assess the effects of the disease and chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on functions such as swallowing, mouth opening, nutrition, pain and quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer. Another aim was to search for (evidence-based...

  4. Improved VMAT planning for head and neck tumors with an advanced optimization algorithm

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    Klippel, Norbert; Schmuecking, Michael; Terribilini, Dario; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Manser, Peter [Bern University Hospital - Inselspital (Switzerland). Div. of Medical Radiation Physics and Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the ''Progressive Resolution Optimizer PRO3'' (Varian Medical Systems) is compared to the previous version PRO2'' with respect to its potential to improve dose sparing to the organs at risk (OAR) and dose coverage of the PTV for head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods For eight head and neck cancer patients, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans were generated in this study. All cases have 2-3 phases and the total prescribed dose (PD) was 60-72 Gy in the PTV. The study is mainly focused on the phase 1 plans, which all have an identical PD of 54 Gy, and complex PTV structures with an overlap to the parotids. Optimization was performed based on planning objectives for the PTV according to ICRU83, and with minimal dose to spinal cord, and parotids outside PTV. In order to assess the quality of the optimization algorithms, an identical set of constraints was used for both, PRO2 and PRO3. The resulting treatment plans were investigated with respect to dose distribution based on the analysis of the dose volume histograms. Results For the phase 1 plans (PD = 54 Gy) the near maximum dose D{sub 2%} of the spinal cord, could be minimized to 22±5 Gy with PRO3, as compared to 32±12 Gy with PRO2, averaged for all patients. The mean dose to the parotids was also lower in PRO3 plans compared to PRO2, but the differences were less pronounced. A PTV coverage of V{sub 95%} = 97±1% could be reached with PRO3, as compared to 86±5% with PRO2. In clinical routine, these PRO2 plans would require modifications to obtain better PTV coverage at the cost of higher OAR doses. Conclusion A comparison between PRO3 and PRO2 optimization algorithms was performed for eight head and neck cancer patients. In general, the quality of VMAT plans for head and neck patients are improved with PRO3 as compared to PRO2. The dose to OARs can be reduced significantly, especially for the spinal cord. These reductions are achieved

  5. Treatment of advanced head and neck cancer: multiple daily dose fractionated radiation therapy and sequential multimodal treatment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, M; Browde, S; Bezwoda, W R; de Moor, N G; Derman, D P

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients with advanced head and neck cancer were entered into a randomised trial comparing chemotherapy (DDP + bleomycin) alone, multiple daily fractionated radiation therapy, and multimodality therapy consisting of chemotherapy plus multiple fractionated radiation therapy. Multimodal therapy gave a significantly higher response rate (69%) than either single-treatment modality. The use of a multiple daily dose fractionation allowed radiation therapy to be completed over 10 treatment days, and the addition of chemotherapy to the radiation treatment did not significantly increase toxicity. Patients receiving multimodal therapy also survived significantly longer (median 50 weeks) than those receiving single-modality therapy (median 24 weeks).

  6. CELECOXIB - Chemoradiation therapy for reducing mucositis and other acute side effects in advance head and neck carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izadi Sh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Chemo-radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis represents a therapeutic challenge frequently encountered in cancer patients. This side effect causes significant morbidity and may delay or interruption of treatment plan, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2 is an inducible enzyme primarily expressed in inflamed and tumoral tissues. COX-2 inhibitors have shown promise to reduce chemoradiation induce toxicities. We conducted a phase III, randomized double blind clinical trial to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of celecoxib, a selective COX2 inhibitor, administered concurrently with chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Here in we report the first report about the role of COX-2 inhibitor in acute toxicicities. "nMethods: Patients with stage III/IV (locally advance head and neck carcinoma who referred to department of radiation-oncology were eligible. Patients were treated with chemotherapy with cisplatin concurrently with radiation (60-70Gy. Celecoxib (100mg qid was started at the first day of radiotherapy and was given for a total of 8 weeks. Acute toxicities were evaluated every week by WHO scale. "nResults: One hundred twenty two patients were enrolled into the study, (61 patients for each group. In repeated mesurment analysis of variance there is a significant difference in the time of onset of grade II acute toxicities between the two groups; The mucositis, dysphagia, epidermitis and oral pain score changed significantly over the typical five weeks in two groups but these changes were more sever in placebo group (p=0.0001. In the analysis of the overall changes in the following laboratory parame-ters: WBC, hemoglobin and platelet showed that these parameters decreased over time in both groups without a significant difference between groups. "nConclusion: The results of these study showed that the use of a COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib that is a safe and inexpensive drug may reduce acute toxicities of chemoradiation specially

  7. Improving Therapeutic Ratio in Head and Neck Cancer with Adjuvant and Cisplatin-Based Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana G. Marcu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced head and neck cancers are difficult to manage despite the large treatment arsenal currently available. The multidisciplinary effort to increase disease-free survival and diminish normal tissue toxicity was rewarded with better locoregional control and sometimes fewer side effects. Nevertheless, locoregional recurrence is still one of the main reasons for treatment failure. Today, the standard of care in head and neck cancer management is represented by altered fractionation radiotherapy combined with platinum-based chemotherapy. Targeted therapies as well as chronotherapy were trialled with more or less success. The aim of the current work is to review the available techniques, which could contribute towards a higher therapeutic ratio in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer patients.

  8. Locoregional tumour evaluation of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck area: a comparison between MRI, PET/CT and integrated PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp; Buchbender, Christian; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Ruhlmann, Marcus; Ruhlmann, Verena [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Bergmann, Christoph [University Hospital Essen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Essen (Germany); Schlamann, Marc [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Marburg (Germany); Forsting, Michael; Wetter, Axel [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging for locoregional tumour evaluation compared to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MR imaging in initial tumour and recurrence diagnosis in histopathologically confirmed head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging were performed for initial tumour staging or recurrence diagnosis in 25 patients with HNSCC. MR, fused {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and fused {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR images were analysed by two independent readers in separate sessions in random order. In initial tumour staging, T and N staging was performed while individual lesions were analysed in patients with suspected cancer recurrence. In T and N staging, histopathological results after tumour resection served as the reference standard while histopathological sampling as well as cross-sectional and clinical follow-up were accepted in cancer recurrence diagnosis. The diagnostic accuracy of each modality was calculated separately for T and N staging as well as for tumour recurrence, and compared using McNemar's test. Values of p <0.017 were considered statistically significant after Bonferroni correction. In 12 patients undergoing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR for initial tumour staging, T staging was accurate in 50 % with MRI, in 59 % with PET/CT and in 75 % with PET/MR while N staging was accurate in 75 % with MRI, in 77 % with PET/CT and in 71 % with PET/MR in relation to the reference standard. No significant differences were observed in T and N staging among the three modalities (p > 0.017). In 13 patients undergoing hybrid imaging for cancer recurrence diagnosis, diagnostic accuracy was 57 % with MRI and in 72 % with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR, respectively. Again, no significant differences were found among the three modalities (p > 0.017). In this initial study, no significant differences were found among {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR, {sup 18}F

  9. Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery in undergraduate medical education: advances and innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    Medical students graduate with the knowledge and skills to be undifferentiated general physicians. Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OtoHNS) is an essential component of primary healthcare, but is disproportionately under-represented in undergraduate medical education (UME). Advances and innovations in educational technology may represent an exciting and creative solution to this important problem. Failure to meet this educational need will result in substantial downstream effects in primary healthcare delivery. The objectives of this study were to 1) demonstrate current deficits in OtoHNS teaching at the UME level; 2) develop, validate, and critically appraise educational innovations that may enrich OtoHNS teaching in medical school curricula; and 3) propose a process for standardization of learning objectives for OtoHNS in UME as it relates to development and deployment of such educational tools. A white paper, prepared as a Triological Society thesis, which consolidates a prospective 10-year investigation of the problem of and potential solutions for under-representation of OtoHNS in UME. Cited datasets include multicenter surveys, cohort studies, and prospective, randomized controlled trials. A series of published and unpublished data were synthesized that addresses the following: 1) the current state of OtoHNS teaching at the UME level with respect to content, volume, structure, and methods; and 2) educational innovations including e-learning and simulation with emphasis on validity and learning effectiveness. Educational innovations specific to postgraduate (residency) training were excluded. Data support the observation that there is uniformly disproportionate under-representation of OtoHNS within UME curricula. Medical school graduates, especially those pursuing primary care specialties, report poor overall comfort levels in managing OtoHNS problems. A series of novel teaching methods were developed and validated using e-learning and simulation

  10. Head and Neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques......, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories....

  11. Concurrent use of cisplatin or cetuximab with definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Antonin; Blanchard, Pierre; Bellefqih, Sara; Brahimi, Nacera; Deutsch, Eric; Daly-Schveitzer, Nicolas; Tao, Yungan [Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Villejuif (France); Guigay, Joel [Gustave Roussy, Department of Medical Oncology, Villejuif (France); Janot, Francois; Temam, Stephane [Gustave Roussy, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Villejuif (France); Bourhis, Jean [Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Villejuif (France); University Hospital Lausanne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present work was to compare outcomes of definitive concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with cetuximab-based bioradiotherapy (BRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Between 2006 and 2012, 265 patients with locally advanced HNSCC were treated at our institution with CRT (n = 194; 73 %) with three cycles of cisplatin (100 mg/m{sup 2}, every 3 weeks) or BRT (n = 71; 27 %) with weekly cetuximab. Patients receiving BRT had more pre-existing conditions (Charlson index ≥ 2) than the CRT group (p = 0.005). Median follow-up was 29 months. In all, 56 % of patients treated with CRT received the planned three cycles (92 % at least two cycles) and 79 % patients treated with BRT received six cycles or more. The 2-year actuarial overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 72 % and 61 %, respectively. In the multivariate analysis (MVA), T4 stage, N2-3 stage, smoking status (current smoker as compared with never smoker), and non-oropharyngeal locations predicted for OS, whereas BRT association with OS was of borderline significance (p = 0.054). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control (LRC) and distant control (DC) rates were 73 and 79 %, respectively. CRT was independently associated with an improved LRC (2-year LRC: 76 % for CRT vs. 61 % for BRT) and DC (2-year LRC: 81 % for CRT vs. 68 % for BRT) in comparison with BRT (p < 0.001 and p = 0.01 in the MVA). Subgroup analyses showed that T4 patients benefited significantly from CRT (vs. BRT) in LRC, while T1-3 did not. BRT patients had more G3-4 skin complications (p < 0.001) and CRT patients had higher rates of feeding tube placement (p = 0.006) and G3-4 gastrointestinal toxicities (p < 0.001). This retrospective analysis showed a better LRC in locally advanced HNSCC treated by cisplatin-based CRT than cetuximab-based BRT, and a nonsignificant trend towards an improved OS. (orig.) [German] Die Therapieeffektivitaet mit Platin

  12. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Strome, Scott [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Regine, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Suntharalingam, Mohan, E-mail: msuntha@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm{sup 3}, and patients with a tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm{sup 3} at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = < .001). On multivariate analysis, the primary tumor volume was the best predictor of recurrence (hazard ratio 4.7, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11.6; p = .001) and survival (hazard ratio 10.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9-35.1; p = < .001). In contrast, the T stage and N stage were not significant factors. Analysis of variance revealed that tumors with locoregional failure were on average 21.6 cm{sup 3} larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm{sup 3} larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer

  13. A phase II study of concomitant boost radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin for locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José Antonio; Rueda, Antonio; de Pasos, Antonio Sacchetti; Contreras, Jorge; Cobo, Manuel; Moreno, Paloma; Benavides, Manuel; Villanueva, Asunción; Alba, Emilio

    2006-04-01

    This phase II study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of weekly cisplatin along with concomitant boost accelerated radiation regimen in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma. A total of 94 patients (median age, 58 years) with UICC stage III (n = 19) and IV (n = 75) cancer of the oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx and oral cavity were included. Patients received radiotherapy with a concomitant boost scheme (1.8 Gy on days 1-40 and 1.5 Gy boost on days 25-40 with a total dose of 72 Gy) and concurrent cisplatin, 40 mg/m(2) weekly, for the first 4 weeks. Most patients (95%) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to protocol. Toxicity was manageable with grade III mucositis and pharyngeal-oesophageal toxicity in 85 and 50% of patients, respectively. Haematological toxicity was mild. Four patients (4%) died due to complications. With a median follow of 41 months, median overall survival and time to progression were 27 and 25 months, respectively. The estimated overall survival at 4 years was 41%. Concomitant boost accelerated radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin is a feasible schedule in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma, with acceptable toxicity and survival data.

  14. Phase II Study of Erlotinib and Docetaxel with Concurrent Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Min; Lavertu, Pierre; Savvides, Panayiotis; Woods, Charles; Fu, Pingfu; Gibson, Michael; Rezaee, Rod; Zender, Chad; Wasman, Jay; Sharma, Neelesh; Machtay, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Background To establish the efficacy and toxicities of concurrent erlotinib and docetaxel with IMRT for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods Patients received daily erlotinib for two weeks, followed by daily IMRT with concurrent weekly docetaxel and daily erlotinib, followed by daily erlotinib for up to two years. The primary objective was disease-free survival (DFS). Secondary objectives included overall survival (OS), patterns of failure, and toxicities. Forty-three patients were recruited. Results With a median follow-up of 48.7 months, the 3 year DFS, OS, locoregional failure free survival and distant metastasis free survival was 69.5%, 81%, 82.4%, and 83.7%, respectively. The most common grade III/IV local toxicities were dysphagia, dermatitis and mucositis. Patients with P16+ tumor had significantly better outcomes. Conclusions The regimen is tolerable and effective. It is worthy of further investigation in selected patients and may be useful in patients who cannot tolerate cisplatin. PMID:26918562

  15. Phase II study of OSI-211 (liposomal lurtotecan) in patients with metastatic or loco-regional recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. An EORTC New Drug Development Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffaud, F; Borner, M; Chollet, P; Vermorken, J B; Bloch, J; Degardin, M; Rolland, F; Dittrich, C; Baron, B; Lacombe, D; Fumoleau, P

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity and safety of OSI-211, the liposomal form of lurtotecan, in patients ineligible for curative surgery or radiotherapy and with metastatic/locoregional recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and target lesions either within a previously irradiated field ("within") or outside a previously irradiated field ("outside"). OSI-211 was given intravenously over 30 min on days 1 and 8 at 2.4 mg/m2/day, repeated every 21 days (1 cycle). From July 2001 to March 2002, 32 patients from 14 institutions were enrolled in the "within" arm and 18 in the "outside" arm. In the "within" arm, two patients were ineligible because their tumour site was not allowed in the protocol (nasopharynx, skin) and two other patients never started treatment. Of the 46 eligible patients who started treatment, there was one objective response (response rate: 2.2% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): [0-11.5%]). Twelve patients in the "within" arm and 6 in the "outside" arm had stable disease, with a median duration of 18 weeks, 95% CI (12.7-25.7). The median time to progression was 6 weeks (95%CI: [5.9-12.7] weeks). Haematological toxicity was moderate in both arms. The most common haematological toxicity was grade 1-2 anaemia in 79% of patients. Non-haematological toxicity was mild in both arms. The most common grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicity was infection in 8.5% of patients. OSI-211 administered on d1 and d8, every 3 weeks, is well tolerated, but shows only minimal activity in locally advanced/metastatic SCCHN.

  16. Pretreatment performance status and nutrition are associated with early mortality of locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Huang, Jen-Seng; Lai, Chien-Hong; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lan, Yii-Jenq; Tsai, Jason Chien-Sheng; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Yang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Hsu

    2013-05-01

    Unexpected fatal events in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy are a clinical concern. Malnutrition, which is reported frequently in head and neck cancer patients, are associated with immunity derangement. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for early death of patients undergoing chemoradiation. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 194 stage III, IVA, and IVB head and neck cancer patients who were treated with chemoradiation between 2007 and 2009. We defined early death as death while receiving chemoradiation or within 60 days of treatment completion. Risk factors for early death were tested using univariate and multivariate analyses. Fourteen patients (7.2 %) experienced early death, 78.6 % of whom died of infection. Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between early death and several pretreatment variables, including Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) >1, hemoglobin total lymphocyte count 1, BMI total lymphocyte count malnutrition before chemoradiation independently predict early death in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation. Cautious management of head and neck cancer patients with these risk factors is required throughout chemoradiation period.

  17. Enhanced skin toxicity with concomitant cetuximab and radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujor, L.; Grillo, I.M.; Pimentel, N. [Hospital Santa Maria, Radioterapia, Lisboa (Portugal); Macor, C.; Catarina, M. [Hospital Santa Maria, ORL, Lisboa (Portugal); Ribeiro, L. [Hospital Santa Maria, Oncologia, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: When associated with radiotherapy the monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab might be exacerbate skin toxicity. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze acute dermatological toxicity in ten consecutive patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated from march 2008 to May 2009 according to Bonner protocol. Patients and methods: We have treated with radiotherapy and cetuximab ten patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx or oral cavity, stage 3-4B and non metastatic. All our patients were 3D planned and scheduled for conventional fractionation 70 Gy/35 fractions over 47 days, five days weekly. Uninvolved neck received 50 Gy and gross nodal disease received 70 Gy as the primary tumor. Cetuximab was administered one week before radiotherapy at a loading dose of 400 mg per square meter of body surface area over 120 minutes, followed by weekly 60 minutes infusions at 250 mg per square meter for the duration of radiotherapy. Results: In eight patients (80%) grade 3 radiation dermatitis occurred as early as with 28 Gy at a median dose of 42 Gy (range 28-60 Gy). the median radiotherapy dose was 6 Gy with an overall treatment time of 57.7 days (range 41-70 days). were administered 78 cycles of cetuximab, one patient discontinued after five cycles due to infusion reactions. There was no correlation between toxicity and acne-like rash due to cetuximab. Conclusion: Our results albeit in disagreement with the original study are rather similar with the experience of other European centers that encounter grade 3-4 radiation dermatitis in 49% of their patients or Australian centers that reported 79% of same degree of toxicity. (authors)

  18. Comparison of Acute Toxicities in Two Primary Chemoradiation Regimens in the Treatment of Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Katherine Y.; Gogineni, Hrishikesh; Zaboli, David; Lake, Spencer; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Best, Simon R.; Levine, Marshall A.; Tang, Mei; Zinreich, Eva S.; Saunders, John R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Blanco, Ray G.; Pai, Sara I.; Messing, Barbara; Ha, Patrick K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The optimal dosage and frequency of platinum-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) regimen for treating advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains unresolved. This study aims to compare the toxicity and efficacy of weekly versus more dose-intensive cisplatin-based CRTs. Methods We reviewed 155 stage III/IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients with no evidence of distant metastasis treated with one of two CRT regimens from 2000 to 2010 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Twice-daily radiation was provided as a split course over a 45-day period. Regimen A consisted of concomitant cisplatin (30 mg/m2/1 h) weekly for 6 cycles; regimen B consisted of concomitant cisplatin (12 mg/m2/1 h) and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/20 h) on days 1 through 5 and days 29 through 33. Main outcome measures included acute toxicities (myelosuppression, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, gastrointestinal dysfunction), unplanned hospitalizations, and disease control at 12 months. Results Patients on regimen A were much less likely to experience ototoxicity due to their treatment (0% vs. 9.8%, P = 0.04). They were more likely to experience thrombocytopenia acutely (46% vs. 26%, P = 0.02), but the toxicity was not limiting (grade 1–2). No significant differences exist in the incidence of other toxicities or unplanned hospitalizations. At 1 year, 97% of patients on A vs. 86% of patients on regimen B were free of disease (P = 0.11). Conclusions With concurrent radiotherapy, low-dose, single-agent, weekly cisplatin is less likely than higher-dose daily cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil provided at the beginning and end of treatment to be associated with ototoxicity. The preliminary data suggest at least equivalent efficacy, but longer follow-up is required. PMID:22290566

  19. Assessment of an advanced monoenergetic reconstruction technique in dual-energy computed tomography of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Moritz H.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Kraft, Johannes; Bauer, Ralf W.; Kaup, Moritz; Dewes, Patricia; Bucher, Andreas M.; Burck, Iris; Lehnert, Thomas; Kerl, J.M.; Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wichmann, Julian L. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-08-15

    To define optimal keV settings for advanced monoenergetic (Mono+) dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). DECT data of 44 patients (34 men, mean age 55.5 ± 16.0 years) with histopathologically confirmed SCC were reconstructed as 40, 55, 70 keV Mono + and M0.3 (30 % 80 kV) linearly blended series. Attenuation of tumour, sternocleidomastoid muscle, internal jugular vein, submandibular gland, and noise were measured. Three radiologists with >3 years of experience subjectively assessed image quality, lesion delineation, image sharpness, and noise. The highest lesion attenuation was shown for 40 keV series (248.1 ± 94.1 HU), followed by 55 keV (150.2 ± 55.5 HU; P = 0.001). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at 40 keV (19.09 ± 13.84) was significantly superior to all other reconstructions (55 keV, 10.25 ± 9.11; 70 keV, 7.68 ± 6.31; M0.3, 5.49 ± 3.28; all P < 0.005). Subjective image quality was highest for 55 keV images (4.53; κ = 0.38, P = 0.003), followed by 40 keV (4.14; κ = 0.43, P < 0.001) and 70 keV reconstructions (4.06; κ = 0.32, P = 0.005), all superior (P < 0.004) to linear blending M0.3 (3.81; κ = 0.280, P = 0.056). Mono + DECT at low keV levels significantly improves CNR and subjective image quality in patients with head and neck SCC, as tumour CNR peaks at 40 keV, and 55 keV images are preferred by observers. (orig.)

  20. Head and neck teratomas

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ajaz; Latoo, Suhail; Ahmed, Irshad; Malik, Altaf H

    2009-01-01

    Teratomas are complex lesions composed of diverse tissues from all 3 germinal cell layers and may exhibit variable levels of maturity. Head and neck teratomas are most commonly cervical with the oropharynx (epignathus) being the second commonest location. In this article, clinical presentation, behaviour and associated significance of head and neck teratomas have been highlightened. Because of their obscure origin, bizarre microscopic appearance, unpredictable behaviour and often dramatic cli...

  1. Differential risk assessments from five hypoxia specific assays: The basis for biologically adapted individualized radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Gebski, Val

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely relates with prognosis in human tumours. Five hypoxia specific predictive marker assays were compared and correlated with definitive radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven patients with advanced head and neck carcinomas were studied for pre-treatment plasma...

  2. Functional outcomes and rehabilitation strategies in patients, treated with chemo-radiation for advanced head and neck cancer: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van der Molen; M.A. van Rossum; L.M. Burkhead; L.E. Smeele; F.J.M. Hilgers

    2009-01-01

    Organ preservation with radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy has become an accepted treatment modality in advanced head and neck cancer. Unfortunately, organ preservation is not synonymous with function preservation. The aim of this review was to systematically assess the effects of the disease

  3. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer: a phase I-II feasibility study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijvers, D.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Kerger, J.; Joosens, E.; Laer, C. van; Awada, A.; Weyngaert, D. van den; Nguyen, H.V.; Bouder, C. Le; Castelijns, J.A.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Mulder, P.; Vermorken, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the safety profile and activity of the combination of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in chemotherapy-naive patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with locally advanced unresectable SCCHN were treated wi

  4. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer : a phase I-II feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijvers, D; Van Herpen, C; Kerger, J; Joosens, E; Van Laer, C; Awada, A; Van den Weyngaert, D; Nguyen, H; Le Bouder, C; Castelijns, JA; Kaanders, J; De Mulder, P; Vermorken, JB

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety profile and activity of the combination of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in chemotherapy-naive patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods: Patients with locally advanced unresectable SCCHN were treated wi

  5. Functional outcomes and rehabilitation strategies in patients, treated with chemo-radiation for advanced head and neck cancer: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, L.; van Rossum, M.A.; Burkhead, L.M.; Smeele, L.E.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Organ preservation with radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy has become an accepted treatment modality in advanced head and neck cancer. Unfortunately, organ preservation is not synonymous with function preservation. The aim of this review was to systematically assess the effects of the disease

  6. Evaluation of long term (10-years+) dysphagia and trismus in patients treated with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijenga, S.A.C.; Oskam, I.M.; van der Molen, L.; Hamming-Vrieze, O.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of long term (10-years+) swallowing function, mouth opening, and quality of life (QoL) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) for advanced stage IV disease. Materials and Methods Twenty-two disease-free survivors, participating in a

  7. A cost-effectiveness analysis of a preventive exercise program for patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with concomitant chemo-radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retel, Valesca; Retèl, Valesca P.; van der Molen, Lisette; Hilgers, Frans J.M.; Rasch, Coen R.N.; l'Ortye, Annemiek A.A.M.H.J.; Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; van Harten, Willem H.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, concomitant chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) has become an indispensable organ preserving treatment modality for advanced head and neck cancer, improving local control and overall survival in several anatomical sites [1]. Unfortunately, CCRT can have a detrimental effect on many functions

  8. Low skeletal muscle mass is a predictive factor for chemotherapy dose-limiting toxicity in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendrich, Anne W; Swartz, Justin E; Bril, Sandra I; Wegner, Inge; de Graeff, Alexander|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/187695997; Smid, Ernst J; de Bree, Remco; Pothen, Ajit J

    OBJECTIVES: Low skeletal muscle mass (SMM) or sarcopenia is emerging as an adverse prognostic factor for chemotherapy dose-limiting toxicity (CLDT) and survival in cancer patients. Our aim was to determine the impact of low SMM on CDLT in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell

  9. The role of EGFR-targeting strategies in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dequanter D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Didier Dequanter, Mohammad Shahla, Pascal Paulus, Philippe H LothaireDepartment of Surgery, CHU Charleroi (Hopital Andre Vésale, Montigny le Tilleul, BelgiumAbstract: With its targeted mechanism of action and synergistic activity with current treatment modalities, cetuximab is a potentially valuable treatment option for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell cancer of the head and neck who have progressed on cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The use of cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy as definitive treatment for locoregionally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is generally restricted to patients unfit to receive cisplatin-based chemoradiation, which is still considered the standard of care. The effect of this epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist occurs without any change in the pattern and the severity of toxicity usually associated with head and neck radiation.Keywords: cetuximab, SCCHN, radiotherapy

  10. High-grade acute organ toxicity as positive prognostic factor in primary radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Bosch, Jan; Hennies, Steffen; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Jung, Klaus [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Overbeck, Tobias [Dept. of Haematology and Oncology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Matthias, Christoph; Roedel, Ralph M. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: to test for a possible correlation between high-grade acute organ toxicity during primary radio(chemo)therapy and treatment outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and methods: from 05/1994 to 01/2009, 216 HNSCC patients were treated with radio(chemo)therapy in primary approach. They received normofractionated (2 Gy/fraction) irradiation including associated nodal drainage sites to a cumulative dose of 70 Gy. 151 patients received additional concomitant chemotherapy (111 patients 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin C, 40 patients cisplatin-based). Toxicity during treatment was monitored weekly according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), and any toxicity grade CTC {>=} 3 of mucositis, dysphagia or skin reaction was assessed as high-grade acute organ toxicity for later analysis. Results: a statistically significant coherency between high-grade acute organ toxicity and overall survival as well as locoregional control was found: patients with CTC {>=} 3 acute organ toxicity had a 5-year overall survival rate of 4% compared to 8% in patients without (p < 0.01). Thereby, multivariate analyses revealed that the correlation was independent of other possible prognostic factors or factors that may influence treatment toxicity, especially concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy technique or treatment-planning procedure. Conclusion: these data indicate that normal tissue and tumor tissue may behave similarly with respect to treatment response, as high-grade acute organ toxicity during radio(chemo)therapy showed to be an independent prognostic marker in the own patient population. However, the authors are aware of the fact that a multivariate analysis in a retrospective study generally has statistical limitations. Therefore, their hypothesis should be further analyzed on biomolecular and clinical levels and other tumor entities in prospective trials. (orig.)

  11. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrgias, George; Hajiioannou, Jiannis; Tolia, Maria; Kouloulias, Vassilios; Lachanas, Vasileios; Skoulakis, Charalambos; Skarlatos, Ioannis; Rapidis, Alexandros; Bizakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Multimodality therapy constitutes the standard treatment of advanced and recurrent head and neck cancer. Since locoregional recurrence comprises a major obstacle in attaining cure, the role of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) as an add-on in improving survival and local control of the disease has been investigated. IORT allows delivery of a single tumoricidal dose of radiation to areas of potential residual microscopic disease while minimizing doses to normal tissues. Advantages of IORT include the conformal delivery of a large dose of radiation in an exposed and precisely defined tumor bed, minimizing the risk of a geographic miss creating the potential for subsequent dose reduction of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). This strategy allows for shortening overall treatment time and dose escalation. The aim of this review is to summarize recent published work on the use of IORT as an adjuvant modality to treat common head and neck cancer in the primary or recurrent setting. Methods: We searched the Medline, Scopus, Ovid, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases for articles published from 1980 up to March 2016. Results: Based on relevant publications it appears that including IORT in the multimodal treatment may contribute to improved local control. However, the benefit in overall survival is not so clear. Conclusion: IORT seems to be a safe, promising adjunct in the management of head and neck cancer and yet further well organized clinical trials are required to determine its role more precisely. PMID:27977569

  12. Pretreatment organ function in patients with advanced head and neck cancer: clinical outcome measures and patients' views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasch Coen RN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of this study is to thoroughly assess pretreatment organ function in advanced head and neck cancer through various clinical outcome measures and patients' views. Methods A comprehensive, multidimensional assessment was used, that included quality of life, swallowing, mouth opening, and weight changes. Fifty-five patients with stage III-IV disease were entered in this study prior to organ preserving (chemoradiation treatment. Results All patients showed pretreatment abnormalities or problems, identified by one or more of the outcome measures. Most frequent problems concerned swallowing, pain, and weight loss. Interestingly, clinical outcome measures and patients' perception did no always concur. E.g. videofluoroscopy identified aspiration and laryngeal penetration in 18% of the patients, whereas only 7 patients (13% perceived this as problematic; only 2 out of 7 patients with objective trismus actually perceived trismus. Conclusion The assessment identified several problems already pre-treatment, in this patient population. A thorough assessment of both clinical measures and patients' views appears to be necessary to gain insight in all (perceived pre-existing functional and quality of life problems.

  13. Modified Weekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Is Acceptable in Postoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Ju Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Triweekly cisplatin-based postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT has high intolerance and toxicities in locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC. We evaluated the effect of a modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy in postoperative CCRT. Methods. A total of 117 patients with LAHNC were enrolled between December 2007 and December 2012. Survival, compliance/adverse events, and independent prognostic factors were analyzed. Results. Median follow-up time was 30.0 (3.1–73.0 months. Most patients completed the entire course of postoperative CCRT (radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy, 94.9%; ≥6 times weekly chemotherapy, 75.2%. Only 17.1% patients required hospital admission. The most common adverse effect was grade 3/4 mucositis (28.2%. No patient died due to protocol-related adverse effects. Multivariate analysis revealed the following independent prognostic factors: oropharyngeal cancer, extracapsular spread, and total radiation dose. Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 70.9% and 79.5%, respectively. Conclusion. Modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy is an acceptable regimen in postoperative CCRT for LAHNC.

  14. Clinical evaluation of accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer with concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin (CBDCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Sekiya, Yuichi; Araki, Hitoshi [Chiba Cancer Center (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    From May 1994 to May 1996, 39 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation (1.6 Gy, twice daily, 10 times a week, with minimum interval of 6 hours between fractions and the total tumor dose to 70.4 Gy) and concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin (30 mg/body). The average age was 64.2 years (38-85). The median follow-up period was 16.4 months with a range of 2-36 months. Complete response rate was 66.7%. The organ preservation rates were almost acceptable in advanced cases. The major acute toxicity was stomatitis, but no therapeutic interruption was observed. Grade 4 laryngeal late sequelae was observed in 2 cases. We think this method is effective for locally advanced head and neck cancer but total dose should be reduced to 67.2 Gy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. (author)

  15. Clinical Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Austin; Bhavsar, Sheila; Riley, Erinn; Caponetti, Gabriel; Agrawal, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    Introduction High mobility group box 1 is a versatile protein involved in gene transcription, extracellular signaling, and response to inflammation. Extracellularly, high mobility group box 1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Expression of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products has been described in many cancers. Objectives To systematically review the available literature using PubMed and Web of Science to evaluate the clinical value of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Data synthesis A total of eleven studies were included in this review. High mobility group box 1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and many clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients. Additionally, the receptor for advanced glycation end-products demonstrates potential value as a clinical indicator of tumor angiogenesis and advanced staging. In diagnosis, high mobility group box 1 demonstrates low sensitivity. Conclusion High mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Further investigation of the prognostic and diagnostic value of these molecules is warranted.

  16. Clinical Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen, Austin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction High mobility group box 1 is a versatile protein involved in gene transcription, extracellular signaling, and response to inflammation. Extracellularly, high mobility group box 1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Expression of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products has been described in many cancers. Objectives To systematically review the available literature using PubMed and Web of Science to evaluate the clinical value of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Data synthesis A total of eleven studies were included in this review. High mobility group box 1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and many clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients. Additionally, the receptor for advanced glycation end-products demonstrates potential value as a clinical indicator of tumor angiogenesis and advanced staging. In diagnosis, high mobility group box 1 demonstrates low sensitivity. Conclusion High mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Further investigation of the prognostic and diagnostic value of these molecules is warranted.

  17. Parenteral Nutrition for Patients Treated for Locally Advanced Inoperable Tumors of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage IV; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage IV; Locally Advanced Malignant Neoplasm

  18. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What are my ... and neck cancer. For updated information on new cancer treatments that are available, you should discuss these issues ...

  19. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oncologist will listen to the history of your problem and perform a physical examination. Consultations with other members of the head and neck team, such as the head and neck surgeon, pathologist, ...

  20. A cost-effectiveness analysis of a preventive exercise program for patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with concomitant chemo-radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Retel, Valesca; Retèl, Valesca P.; van der Molen, Lisette; Hilgers, Frans J. M.; Rasch, Coen R.N.; l'Ortye, Annemiek A.A.M.H.J.; Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; van Harten, Willem H.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, concomitant chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) has become an indispensable organ preserving treatment modality for advanced head and neck cancer, improving local control and overall survival in several anatomical sites [1]. Unfortunately, CCRT can have a detrimental effect on many functions of the upper respiratory and digestive system. Sequellae such as pain, oedema, xerostomia and fibrosis negatively affect mouth opening (trismus), chewing, swallowing and speech [1]. Several studies...

  1. Advanced and rapidly progressing head and neck cancer: good palliation following intralesional bleomycin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quintyne, Keith Ian

    2011-09-01

    The authors herein report the case of a 61-year-old man undergoing adjuvant therapy for locally advanced laryngeal cancer, who developed parastomal recurrence in his radiation field around his tracheotomy site, while he was undergoing radiation therapy, and compromised the secure placement of his tracheotomy tube and maintenance of his upper airway. MRI restaging and biopsy confirmed recurrence and progressive disease in his mediastinum. He underwent local therapy with intralesional bleomycin with good palliation, and ability to maintain the patency of his upper airway.

  2. Intraoperative radiation of canine carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve. Therapeutic applications in the management of advanced head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, B.B.; Pelzer, H.; Tsao, C.S.; Ward, W.F.; Johnson, P.; Friedman, C.; Sisson, G.A. Sr.; Kies, M. (Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-12-01

    As a step in the application of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for treating advanced head and neck cancers, preliminary information was obtained on the radiation tolerance of the canine common carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve to a single, high-dose electron beam. Both sides of the neck of eight mongrel dogs were operated on to expose an 8-cm segment of common carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve. One side of the neck was irradiated, using escalating doses of 2500, 3500, 4500, and 5500 cGy. The contralateral side of the neck served as the unirradiated control. At 3 and 6 months after IORT, one dog at each dose level was killed. None of the dogs developed carotid bleeding at any time after IORT. Light microscopic investigations using hematoxylin-eosin staining on the common carotid artery and internal jugular vein showed no consistent changes that suggested radiation damage; however, the Masson trichrome stain and hydroxyproline concentration of irradiated common carotid artery indicated an increase in the collagen content of the tunica media. Marked changes in the irradiated vagus nerve were seen, indicating severe demyelination and loss of nerve fibers, which appeared to be radiation-dose dependent. Four patients with advanced recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with surgical resection and IORT without any acute or subacute complications. The role of IORT as a supplement to surgery, external beam irradiation, and chemotherapy in selected patients with advanced head and neck cancer needs further exploration.

  3. Functional results of endoscopic laser surgery in advanced head and neck tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadick, Haneen; Baker-Schreyer, Antonio; Bergler, Wolfgang; Maurer, Joachim; Hoermann, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Functional results following lasersurgery of minor laryngeal carcinomas were very encouraging. The indication for lasersurgical intervention was then extended to larger carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx. The purpose of this study was to assess vocal function and swallowing ability after endoscopic lasersurgery and to compare the results with conventional surgical procedures. From January 1994 to December 1996, 72 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx were examined prospectively. The patients underwent endoscopic lasersurgery instead of laryngopharyngectomy. The voice quality was evaluated pre- and postoperatively by subjective assessment, registration of voice parameters and sonegraphic classification. The swallowing ability was judged according to individual scores. The necessity of tracheostomy and nasogastric tube were registered and the duration of hospitalization was documented. The results showed that laryngeal phonation and swallowing ability were significantly better 12 months after lasersurgery compared to the preoperative findings whereas the recurrence rate was similar or even better after conventional pharyngolaryngectomy. Lasersurgery as an alternative surgical procedure to laryngectomy enables patients to retain a sufficient voice function and swallowing ability.

  4. Comparative study of four advanced 3d-conformal radiation therapy treatment planning techniques for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrassi, Mohamed Yassine; Bentayeb, Farida; Malisan, Maria Rosa

    2013-04-01

    For the head-and-neck cancer bilateral irradiation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most reported technique as it enables both target dose coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. However, during the last 20 years, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques have been introduced, which are tailored to improve the classic shrinking field technique, as regards both planning target volume (PTV) dose conformality and sparing of OAR's, such as parotid glands and spinal cord. In this study, we tested experimentally in a sample of 13 patients, four of these advanced 3DCRT techniques, all using photon beams only and a unique isocentre, namely Bellinzona, Forward-Planned Multisegments (FPMS), ConPas, and field-in-field (FIF) techniques. Statistical analysis of the main dosimetric parameters of PTV and OAR's DVH's as well as of homogeneity and conformity indexes was carried out in order to compare the performance of each technique. The results show that the PTV dose coverage is adequate for all the techniques, with the FPMS techniques providing the highest value for D95%; on the other hand, the best sparing of parotid glands is achieved using the FIF and ConPas techniques, with a mean dose of 26 Gy to parotid glands for a PTV prescription dose of 54 Gy. After taking into account both PTV coverage and parotid sparing, the best global performance was achieved by the FIF technique with results comparable to that of IMRT plans. This technique can be proposed as a valid alternative when IMRT equipment is not available or patient is not suitable for IMRT treatment.

  5. Concurrent hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with 5-FU and once weekly cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The 10-year results of a prospective phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, V.; Boehmer, D.; Badakhshi, H.; Jahn, U.; Stromberger, C. [Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiooncology, Clinic for Radiooncology, Berlin (Germany); Becker, E.T. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany); Wernecke, K.D. [Sostana Statistics GmbH, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    In this study, the acute toxicity and long-term outcome of a hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation regimen with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck were evaluated. From 2000-2002, 38 patients with stage III (5.3 %) and stage IV (94.7 %) head and neck cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. Patients received hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy with 72 Gy in 15 fractions of 2 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily with concurrent, continuous infusion 5-FU of 600 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 6 cycles of weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2}). Acute toxicities (CTCAEv2.0), locoregional control (LRC), metastases-free (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed and exploratively compared with the ARO 95-06 trial. Median follow-up was 11.4 years (95 % CI 8.6-14.2) and mean dose 71.6 Gy. Of the patients, 82 % had 6 (n = 15) or 5 (n = 16) cycles of cisplatin, 5 and 2 patients received 4 and 3 cycles, respectively. Grade 3 anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 15.8, 15.8, and 2.6 %, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis in 50 %, grade 3 and 4 dysphagia in 55 and 13 %. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year LRC was 65, 53.6, and 48.2 %, the MFS was 77.5, 66.7, and 57.2 % and the OS 59.6, 29.2, and 15 %, respectively. Chemoradiation with 5-FU and cisplatin seems feasible and superior in terms of LRC and OS to the ARO 95-06C-HART arm at 2 years. However, this did not persist at the 5- and 10-year follow-ups. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Akuttoxizitaet und des Langzeitueberlebens einer hyperfraktioniert-akzelerierten simultanen Radiochemotherapie mit Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) bei Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Von 2000 bis 2002 wurden 38 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region im Stadium III (5,3 %) und IV (94,7 %) eingeschlossen. Es erfolgte eine simultane hyperfraktionierte akzelerierte Radiochemotherapie mit 72 Gy in 15 Fraktionen a 2 Gy

  6. [SIB-IMRT radiotherapy given concomitantly with cisplatin for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCHNC). Evaluation of the early results and toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiprian, Dorota; Jarząbski, Andrzej; Pawłowska, Beata; Michalski, Wojciech; Kawecki, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    Concomitant radiochemotherapy become the treatment of choice for locally advanced SCHNC. This strategy of treatment has a limitation, which is an acute and late toxicity. The IMRT technique provides the possibility of better sparing of healthy tissue. Radiobiological and clinical data also suggest that accelerated fractionation and higher dose per fraction given in GTV may produce better locoregional control. Therefore it might be expected that concomitant chemotherapy and SIB-IMRT radiotherapy could increase locoregional control and reduce acute and late radiation reactions. The evaluation of early results and toxicity of this treatment modality is presented. The evaluation of the early results and toxicity of SIB-IMRT radiotherapy given concomitantly with cisplatin for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCHNC). SIB-IMRT technique was applied. The boost volume was limited to the GTV + 3mm margin (macroscopic tumor extension was defined on the basis of CT and/or MRI examinations). Dose per fraction given to this volume was 2.25 Gy up to 67.5 Gy of total dose. The PTV-CTV + 3mm - was defined as an area of increased risk of microscopic spread. Dose per fraction given to this volume was 2 Gy up to 60 Gy. The PTV1-ETV+ 3mm (electively irradiated volume) received dose per fraction -1.8 Gy up to 54-56 Gy. Overall treatment time was 6 weeks (5 fractions per week, 30 fractions). Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin in daily dose100mg/m2 given two times during irradiation (1 and 22 day of treatment). The evaluation of early tolerance was performed once weekly during the treatment than during the follow up every 2 months. The early reactions were scored according to the EORTC/RTOG scale. Between June 2006 and December 2009 99 patients diagnosed with III and IV clinical stage of SCHNC were treated with this method. 65 patients were diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer, 18 with laryngeal cancer and 16 with hypopharyngeal cancer. PEG was performed at

  7. Reirradiation With Cetuximab in Locoregional Recurrent and Inoperable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Feasibility and First Efficacy Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Keller, Christian [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hambek, Markus; Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Department of Oral Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Roedel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Weiss, Christian, E-mail: christian.weiss@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with a prospective protocol of external beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable, recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: Between August 2008 and June 2010, 18 patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were enrolled. Acute and late toxicity from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT and every 3 months thereafter. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after completion of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 9.4 (range: 3.85-31.7) months and for patients alive 30.4 (range: 15.7-31.7) months. Acute toxicity was generally mild or moderate. Five patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. Late toxicity occurred as grade 3 trismus in five and as grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation in one patient, respectively. Overall response rate was 47%. Median overall and progression-free survival for all patients was 8.38 months and 7.33 months, respectively. The overall survival rate was 44% at 1 year, with a 1 year local control rate of 33%. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of our preliminary data Re-RT combined with cetuximab for recurrent and inoperable SCCHN is feasible and the integration of newer targeted agents seems to be less toxic compared to conventional chemotherapy with encouraging response rates at least for a subset of patients.

  8. c-Met Expression Is a Marker of Poor Prognosis in Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baschnagel, Andrew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Williams, Lindsay [Department of Pathology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Hanna, Alaa; Chen, Peter Y.; Krauss, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Pruetz, Barbara L. [Beaumont BioBank, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Akervall, Jan [Beaumont BioBank, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Wilson, George D., E-mail: George.Wilson@Beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Beaumont BioBank, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic significance of c-Met expression in relation to p16 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Archival tissue from 107 HNSCC patients treated with chemoradiation was retrieved, and a tissue microarray was assembled. Immunohistochemical staining of c-Met, p16, and EGFR was performed. c-Met expression was correlated with p16, EGFR, clinical characteristics, and clinical endpoints including locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Fifty-one percent of patients were positive for p16, and 53% were positive for EGFR. Both p16-negative (P≤.001) and EGFR-positive (P=.019) status predicted for worse DFS. Ninety-three percent of patients stained positive for c-Met. Patients were divided into low (0, 1, or 2+ intensity) or high (3+ intensity) c-Met expression. On univariate analysis, high c-Met expression predicted for worse LRC (hazard ratio [HR] 2.27; 95% CI, 1.08-4.77; P=.031), DM (HR 4.41; 95% CI, 1.56-12.45; P=.005), DFS (HR 3.00; 95% CI, 1.68-5.38; P<.001), and OS (HR 4.35; 95% CI, 2.13-8.88; P<.001). On multivariate analysis, after adjustment for site, T stage, smoking history, and EGFR status, only high c-Met expression (P=.011) and negative p16 status (P=.003) predicted for worse DFS. High c-Met expression was predictive of worse DFS in both EGFR-positive (P=.032) and -negative (P=.008) patients. In the p16-negative patients, those with high c-Met expression had worse DFS (P=.036) than did those with low c-Met expression. c-Met expression was not associated with any outcome in the p16-positive patients. Conclusions: c-Met is expressed in the majority of locally advanced HNSCC cases, and high c-Met expression predicts for worse clinical outcomes. High c-Met expression predicted for worse DFS in p16

  9. Feasibility of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy after taxane-based induction chemotherapy for nonoperated locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Antonin; Blanchard, Pierre; Bellefqih, Sara; Brahimi, Nacéra; Guigay, Joël; Janot, François; Temam, Stéphane; Daly-Schveitzer, Nicolas; Bourhis, Jean; Tao, Yungan

    2014-11-01

    To assess the use of radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) following taxane-based induction chemotherapy (T-ICT) in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (LAHNSCC) and to evaluate the tolerability of CRT after T-ICT. From 01/2006 to 08/2012, 173 LAHNSCC patients treated as a curative intent by T-ICT, followed by definitive RT/CRT were included in this analysis. There was an 86% objective response (OR) after ICT among 154 evaluable patients. Forty-four patients received less than three cycles (25%) and 20 received only one cycle of T-ICT. The 3-year actuarial overall survival (OS) was 49% and there was no OS difference according to the type of ICT (regimen or number of cycle) or the addition of concurrent CT (cisplatin, carboplatin, or cetuximab) to RT. In multivariate analysis (MVA), clinically involved lymph node (cN+), age more than 60 years, the absence of OR after ICT, and performance status of at least 1 predicted for a decreased OS, with hazard ratios (HR) of 2.8, 2.2, 2.1, and 2, respectively. The 3-year actuarial locoregional control (LRC) and distant control (DC) rates were 52 and 73%, respectively. In MVA, the absence of OR after ICT (HR: 3.2), cN+ (HR: 3), and age more than 60 years (HR: 1.7) were prognostic for a lower LRC whereas cN+ (HR: 4.2) and carboplatin-based T-ICT (HR: 2.9) were prognostic for a lower DC. The number of cycles (≤ 2) received during ICT was borderline significant for DC in the MVA (P=0.08). Among patients receiving less than or equal to three cycles of ICT, higher outcomes were observed in patients who received cisplatin-based T-ICT (vs. carboplatin-based T-ICT) or subsequent CRT (vs. RT). T-ICT in our experience, followed by RT or CRT, raises several questions on the role and type of induction, and the efficacy of CRT over RT. The role of RT or CRT following induction, although feasible in these advanced patients, awaits answers from randomized trials.

  10. Palliative radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer after failure of induction chemotherapy: Comparison of two fractionation schemes

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    Kailash Chandra Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Among patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancers (LAHNSCC, the prognosis after nonresponse or progression despite induction chemotherapy (IC is dismal, and further treatment is often palliative in intent. Given that nonresponse to chemotherapy could indicate subsequent radioresistance, we intended to assess the outcomes with two different fractionation schemes. Aims: To compare the outcomes of two fractionation schemes- ′standard′ (consisting 3GyX5 daily fractions for 2 consecutive weeks versus ′hybrid′ (6GyX3 fractions on alternate days during the 1 st week, followed by 2GyX5 daily fractions in the 2 nd week. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized controlled two-arm unblinded trial. Materials and Methods: Patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal, laryngeal, and hypopharyngeal cancers treated with a minimum of two cycles of taxane, platinum, and fluorouracil-based IC were eligible if residual disease volume amounted >30 cm 3 . Kaplan-Meier survival curves were compared by the log-rank test. Response rates were compared using the unpaired t-test. Quality of life (QOL was measured via patient reported questionnaires. Results: Of the initially enrolled 51 patients, 45 patients (24 from standard arm, and 21 from the hybrid arm were eligible for analysis. Despite being underpowered to attain statistical significance, there still seemed to be a trend towards improvement in progression-free (Hazard ratio (HR for progression: 0.5966; 95% CI 0.3216-1.1066 and overall survival (HR for death: 0.6062; 95% CI 0.2676-1.3734 with the hybrid arm when compared to the standard arm. Benefits were also observed with regards to response rates and QOL. Rate of complications were similar in both arms. Conclusions: In comparison to the routinely used palliative fractionation scheme of 30 Gray (Gy in 10 fractions (Fr, the use of hybrid fractionation which integrates hypofractionation in the 1 st week, followed by

  11. Cerebral revascularization and carotid artery resection at the skull base for treatment of advanced head and neck malignancies.

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    Kalani, M Yashar S; Kalb, Samuel; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Lettieri, Salvatore C; Spetzler, Robert F; Porter, Randall W; Feiz-Erfan, Iman

    2013-03-01

    Resection of cancer and the involved artery in the neck has been applied with some success, but the indications for such an aggressive approach at the skull base are less well defined. The authors therefore evaluated the outcomes of advanced skull base malignancies in patients who were treated with bypass and resection of the internal carotid artery (ICA). The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients with advanced head and neck cancers who underwent ICA sacrifice with revascularization in which an extracranial-intracranial bypass was used between 1995 and 2010 at the Barrow Neurological Institute. Eighteen patients (11 male and 7 female patients; mean age 46 years, range 7-69 years) were identified. There were 4 sarcomas and 14 carcinomas that involved the ICA at the skull base. All patients underwent ICA sacrifice with revascularization. One patient died of a stroke after revascularization. A second patient died of the effects of a fistula between the oral and cranial cavities (surgery-related mortality rate 11.1%). Eight months after the operation, 1 patient developed occlusion of the bypass and died. Complications associated with the bypass surgery included 1 case of subdural hematoma (SDH) with blindness, 1 case of status epilepticus, and 1 case of asymptomatic bypass occlusion (bypass-related morbidity 16.7%). Complications associated with tumor resection included 3 cases of CSF leakage requiring repair and shunting, 1 case of hydrocephalus requiring shunting, 1 case of SDH, and 1 case of contralateral ICA injury requiring a bypass (tumor resection morbidity rate 33.3%). In 1 patient treated with adjuvant therapy before surgery, the authors identified only a radiation effect and no tumor on resection. In a second patient the bypass was occluded, and her tumor was not resected. The other 16 patients underwent gross-total resection of their tumor. Excluding the surgery-related deaths, the mean and median lengths of survival in this series were

  12. Compliance and outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with alternating chemo-radiotherapy in clinical practice.

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    Franciosi, Vittorio; Fumagalli, Marco; Biscari, Luciana; Martinelli, Roberto; Ferri, Teore; Bella, Mariangela; Ceci, Guido; Delisi, Vincenzo; Di Blasio, Beatrice; Leonardi, Francesco; Michiara, Maria; Pucci, Francesca; Vasini, Giovanna; Camisa, Roberta; Cascinu, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility in clinical practice of alternating chemo-radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. From August 1993 to April 1998 at the Division of Medical Oncology of Parma, 48 consecutive patients were observed, and 38 (79%) started the Merlano chemo-radiotherapy. The characteristics of the patients were: males (32, 84%); median age, 57 years; PS <2 (32, 84%). The primary sites were the oropharynx (18, 47%), oral cavity (8, 21%), hypopharynx (7, 19%), larynx (5, 13%); stage IV disease was present in 29 (76%) patients. Twenty-five (66%) patients were married, and 24 (63%) resided outside of the city. The compliance was very low: 21 patients (55%) performed all the programmed cycles of chemotherapy, whereas only 5 patients (13%) performed the chemo-radiotherapy at full doses without any delay. The objective responses were 3 (8%) complete and 21 (55%) complete plus partial responses. Failures were 2 (5%) stable disease and 2 (5%) progressive disease, and the response was not assessable in 10 (26%). The median duration of the response was 8 months. The median overall survival and the time to progression were 18 and 13 months, respectively; the 5-year overall and relapse-free survival were 36% and 26%, respectively. Nine (24%) patients were still alive as of August 30, 2001, 8 (21%) of them without progression. Twenty-six patients (68%) died with a local-regional relapse. One patient (3%) died for a second cancer. Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was leukopenia (n = 25, 66%) and thrombocytopenia (n = 9, 24%); grade 3-4 non-hematologic toxicity was diarrhea (n = 3, 8%) and mucositis (n = 2, 5%). Two patients (5%) died for intestinal infarction and perforation possibly related to treatment. Compliance to the chemo-radiotherapy was very poor. The response rate was lower than that reported in clinical trials, whereas overall survival was comparable. The alternating chemo-radiotherapy is a very complex treatment that cannot be easily

  13. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

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    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  14. A comparative study of low dose weekly paclitaxel versus cisplatin with concurrent radiation in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancers

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    R K Jain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare low dose weekly paclitaxel versus cisplatin with concurrent radiation in locally advanced head and neck cancers. Materials and Methods: From August 2005 to July 2006, a total of 100 biopsy proven, locally advanced head and neck cancers were enrolled for the study. All the patients were stratified in two groups, study group A and control group B. Study group patients received injection Paclitaxel 20 mg/m 2 , I/V 1 hr infusion weekly for 6 weeks and control group patients received injection Cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 , I/V 2 hrs infusion weekly for 6 weeks. All patients received 66-70 Gy concurrent radiation at the rate of 2 Gy/day, 5 #/week, in 6-7 weeks by cobalt theratron phoenix - 80 teletherapy units. Result: Complete response achieved in 73% of patients in study group and 64% of patients in control group. There was no statistically significant difference observed between the study group and the control group (χ2 = 1.167, df = 1, level of significance 0.05. On 3-10 months of follow-up 59% of patients in the study group and 42% of patients in the control group are alive and disease free. Local toxicities including mucositis, dysphasia and skin reactions were more in the study group but tolerable. Conclusion: Efficacy of paclitaxel in low dose weekly schedule is comparable to cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Further analysis and follow-up are needed to evaluate if this benefit will translate into prolonged survival.

  15. Hyperthermia with radiation in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer: A report of randomized trial

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    Huilgol Nagraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Head and neck cancer is the leading cause of male mortality due to cancer in India. Surgery, radiation alone or in combination has been the backbone of treatment strategies. Chemo-radiation has emerged as the standard of care in most types of head and neck cancer. This strategy has the advantage of maintaining both structure and functions, albeit with increased acute and delayed side effects. Radiation with hyperthermia can achieve the same objective without additional toxicities. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 patients were randomized to radiation therapy (RT alone or RT-hyperthermia (RT-HT arm. Twenty-six patients were included in RT alone arm and 28 patients in the RT-HT arm. Both groups were evenly matched for age, sex, and stage. Patients in both the arms received radiation to a dose of 66-70 Gy in 6.5-7 weeks. Patients in the study group received weekly HT. HT was started after impedance matching to last for 30 minutes. Results: Complete response was seen in 42.4% of RT alone group compare to 78.6% in the HT group. The difference was statistically significant ( < 0.05. Kaplan-Meir analysis of survival also showed a significant improvement in favor of RT-HT. No dose limiting thermal burns and excessive mucosal or thermal toxicity were recorded. Conclusion: Radiofrequency (RF based heating and radical radiation of head and neck cancers is better than in RT alone group. HT should be considered as a valid option wherever the facility for HT is available. This report should infuse greater confidence in radiation Oncologists to practice HT as an adjuvant treatment modality.

  16. Accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost technique (69.5 Gy/5 weeks). An alternative in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer

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    Kubes, Jiri; Vondracek, Vladimir; Pala, Miloslav [Prague Univ., Prag (Czech Republic). Inst. of Radiation Oncology; Cvek, Jakub; Feltl, David [Faculty Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology

    2011-10-15

    To present the feasibility and results of accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost technique (69.5 Gy/5 weeks) in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. A total of 65 patients were treated between June 2006 and August 2009. The distribution of clinical stages was as follows: II 11%, III 23%, IV 61%, and not defined 5%. The median follow-up was 30.5 months. The treatment plan was completed in 94% of patients. Patients were treated using the conformal or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. The median overall treatment time was 37 days (13-45 days). The mean radiotherapy dose was 68.4 Gy (16-74 Gy). Overall survival was 69% after 2 years. Disease-free survival was 62% after 2 years. Acute toxicity {>=} grade 3(RTOG scale) included mucositis (grade 3: 42.6%), pharynx (grade 3: 42.3%), skin (grade 3: 9.5%), larynx (grade 3: 4%), while late toxicity affected skin (grade 3: 6.25%) and salivary glands (grade 3: 3.7%). Accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost technique is feasible in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer, has an acceptable toxicity profile, and yields promising treatment results.

  17. Nodal parameters of FDG PET/CT performed during radiotherapy for locally advanced mucosal primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma can predict treatment outcomes: SUVmean and response rate are useful imaging biomarkers

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    Lin, Peter [Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Liverpool BC, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Min, Myo; Forstner, Dion [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lee, Mark [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Holloway, Lois [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Bray, Victoria; Fowler, Allan [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the prognostic utility of nodal metabolic parameters derived from FDG PET/CT performed before radiotherapy (prePET) and during the third week of radiotherapy (iPET) in patients with mucosal primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (MPHNSCC). This analysis included 75 patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced node-positive MPHNSCC treated with radical radiotherapy and concurrent systemic therapy who underwent prePET and iPET: N1 11 patients, N2a 38, N2b 12, N2c 9, N3 5. The median follow-up was 28 months (9 - 70 months). The maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesional glycolysis (TLG) of the index lymph node (node with the highest TLG) and the combined total lymph nodes, and their percentage reductions on iPET were determined, and the results were correlated with 3-year Kaplan-Meier locoregional, regional and distant metastatic failure-free survival (FFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Optimal cut-off values were derived from receiver operating characteristic curves. Cox regression univariate and multivariate analyses with clinical covariates were performed. Based on assessment of residual nodal metabolic burden during treatment, the iPET index node SUVmean (optimal cut-off value 2.95 g/ml) and the total node SUVmean (optimal cut-off value 3.25) were the best independent predictors of outcome in the multivariate analysis: index node SUVmean for DFS and OS p = 0.033 and 0.003, respectively, and the total node SUVmean for locoregional FFS, DFS and OS p = 0.028, 0.025 and 0.014, respectively. Based on the assessment of response rates during treatment, a reduction of more than 50 % in the total node TLG was the best biomarker for locoregional and regional FFS, DFS and OS in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.001, 0.016, 0.001 and 0.004, respectively), and reduction in the total node MTV for locoregional FFS, DFS and OS (p = 0.026, 0.003 and 0

  18. Functional and aesthetic outcome and survival after double free flap reconstruction in advanced head and neck cancer patients.

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    Posch, Nicole A S; Mureau, Marc A M; Dumans, Antoine G; Hofer, Stefan O P

    2007-07-01

    Extensive composite defects in the head and neck area may require the use of double free flap reconstructions. These reconstructions are not only surgically challenging but also challenging to patients. A realistic perspective on general outcome for the patient seems important. From January of 2002 to August of 2003, double free flap reconstructions were used in 12 patients with extensive composite head and neck defects following malignant tumor (n = 7) and osteoradionecrosis (n = 5) resection. Six patients had a standardized interview, physical examination, and clinical photographs. All reconstructions were performed using an osteocutaneous fibula flap in combination with an anterolateral thigh flap (n = 8), a radial forearm flap (n = 1), or a lateral thigh flap (n = 1). The total flap survival rate was 96 percent. Mean mandibular bone defects were 10 cm. Mean skin island sizes of osteocutaneous fibula flaps were 67 cm. Mean external skin reconstruction flap sizes were 117 cm. Mean overall survival time was 20 months in patients with malignant tumors. Patients with osteoradionecrosis reconstruction survived free of disease for an average period of 38 months. Three patients (50 percent) were very satisfied, one was neutral, and two were very dissatisfied with their functional and aesthetic results. Objective evaluation of function showed mainly deteriorated speech (83 percent) and oral incontinence (67 percent). Objective evaluation of aesthetics showed mainly color mismatch (67 percent) and flap contracture of external flaps (50 percent). Reconstruction of these major composite through-and-through defects will often result in a modest functional and aesthetic outcome. Because selected patients require these procedures, the authors give information that matches with realistic expectations.

  19. Concomitant Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy for High-Risk Nonmelanoma Skin Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

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    Smith Apisarnthanarax

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To report on the use and feasibility of a multimodality approach using concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with high-risk nonmelanoma skin carcinoma (NMSC of the head and neck. Methods. Records of patients with NMSC of the head and neck who received concomitant CRT at the University of North Carolina between 2001 and 2007 were reviewed. Results. Fifteen identified patients had at least one of the following high-risk factors: T4 disease (93%, unresectability (60%, regional nodal involvement (40%, and/or recurrence (47%. Ten patients were treated in the definitive setting and five in the postoperative setting. Platinum based chemotherapy was given in 14 (93% patients. Ten of fifteen (67% patients completed all planned chemotherapy treatments, and thirteen patients (87% completed at least 80% of planned chemotherapy. Mild radiation dermatitis occurred in all patients and reached grade 3 in 13% of patients. No patients experienced grade 4 or 5 toxicity. With a median followup of 31 months in surviving patients, the 2-year actuarial locoregional control and relapse-free survival were 79% and 49%, respectively. Conclusions. Definitive or postoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced or regionally metastasized NMSC of the head and neck appears feasible with acceptable toxicities and favorable locoregional control.

  20. Prognostic role of metabolic parameters of {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT scan performed during radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

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    Min, Myo; Forstner, Dion [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lin, Peter; Shon, Ivan Ho; Lin, Michael [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Positron Emission Tomography, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lee, Mark T. [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Bray, Victoria; Fowler, Allan [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Chicco, Andrew [Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Positron Emission Tomography, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Tieu, Minh Thi [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Department of Radiation Oncology, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT performed in the third week (iPET) of definitive radiation therapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced mucosal primary head and neck squamous-cell-carcinoma (MPHNSCC). Seventy-two patients with MPHNSCC treated with radical RT underwent staging PET-CT and iPET. The maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesional glycolysis (TLG) of primary tumour (PT) and index node (IN) [defined as lymph node(s) with highest TLG] were analysed, and results were correlated with loco-regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), metastatic failure-free survival(MFFS) and overall survival (OS), using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Optimal cutoffs (OC) were derived from receiver operating characteristic curves: SUV{sub max-PT} = 4.25 g/mL, MTV{sub PT} = 3.3 cm{sup 3}, TLG{sub PT} = 9.4 g, for PT, and SUV{sub max-IN} = 4.05 g/mL, MTV{sub IN} = 1.85 cm{sup 3} and TLG{sub IN} = 7.95 g for IN. Low metabolic values in iPET for PT below OC were associated with statistically significant better LRFS and DFS. TLG was the best predictor of outcome with 2-year LRFS of 92.7 % vs. 71.1 % [p = 0.005, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.03) and MTV (p = 0.022)], DFS of 85.9 % vs. 60.8 % [p = 0.005, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.025) and MTV (p = 0.018)], MFFS of 85.9 % vs. 83.7 % [p = 0.488, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.52) and MTV (p = 0.436)], and OS of 81.1 % vs. 75.0 % [p = 0.279, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.345) and MTV (p = 0.512)]. There were no significant associations between the percentage reduction of primary tumour metabolic parameters and outcomes. In patients with nodal disease, metabolic parameters below OC (for both PT and IN) were significantly associated with all oncological outcomes, while TLG was again the best predictor: LRFS of 84.0 % vs. 55.3 % (p = 0.017), DFS of 79.4 % vs. 38.6 % (p = 0.001), MFFS 86.4 % vs. 68.2 % (p = 0

  1. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

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    Sprague Lisa D

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol "SCHARC" and the overall survival of our patients. Methods From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %, one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 % and one fifth (19 % suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1–5: 20 mg/m2/d DDP + 750–1000 mg/m2/d 5FU (cont. infusion. This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69–70.5 Gy. All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Results Forty patients (63 % received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d, respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 % had acute grade 2–3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 % suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient 10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. Conclusion The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer. It led to long-term disease control and survival in about 50 % of the patients with significant but acceptable toxicity. Most patients

  2. Using Phenomenology to Examine the Experiences of Family Caregivers of Patients with Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Reflections of a Novice Researcher

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    Jamie L. Penner RN, BN, BPE

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Faced with a number of research methods, astute researchers carefully choose the method of research most appropriate for their inquiry. Even when there is a goodness of fit between the research design selected to conduct the study and the topic of interest, all designs pose challenges for investigators that need to be considered and addressed. This paper represents the reflections of a novice researcher regarding the issues and decisions made in the course of selecting a phenomenological approach to conduct research examining family caregivers' experiences caring for tube feeding–dependent patients with advanced head and neck cancer. As such, the article is aimed at sensitizing other novice investigators about things to consider in selecting a phenomenological perspective to answer their own research questions.

  3. Prolonged radiation time and low nadir hemoglobin during postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy are both poor prognostic factors with synergistic effect on locally advanced head and neck cancer patients

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    Su NW

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nai-Wen Su,1 Chung-Ji Liu,2 Yi-Shing Leu,3 Jehn-Chuan Lee,3 Yu-Jen Chen,4 Yi-Fang Chang1,51Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, 5Good Clinical Research Center, Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Anemia, a common complication of head and neck cancer treatment, is regarded as a poor prognostic factor. We evaluated the impact of low hemoglobin (Hb levels, measured at different time points, on a consecutive cohort of patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LA-SCCHN who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT.Materials and methods: From 2002 to 2009, 140 patients were enrolled and reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative (pre-op Hb, pre-CCRT Hb, and nadir Hb during CCRT were measured and recorded. The three Hb parameters were analyzed against several well-established pathologic risk factors and radiation-associated variables. Prognostic impacts were investigated with multivariate analysis by Cox proportional hazards model.Results: On Cox regression analysis, significantly higher risk of death was associated with pre-op Hb %13 g/dL (hazard ratio [HR] =1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.1; P=0.023, nadir Hb %11 g/dL (HR =1.9; 95% CI, 1.1–3.3; P=0.020, radiation treatment time (RTT >7 weeks (HR =1.9; 95% CI, 1.1–3.3; P=0.022, and multiple positive lymph nodes (HR =2.1; 95% CI, 1.2–3.7; P=0.010, after adjusting for primary tumor site and pathologic lymphovascular invasion. Patients with poor prognosticators including low nadir Hb %11 g/dL and RTT >7 weeks had a higher risk of death (HR =4.0; 95% CI =1.6–10.2; P=0.004.Conclusion: In the treatment setting of LA-SCCHN patients who underwent postoperative CCRT, coexistance of lower nadir Hb during CCRT and prolonged RTT resulted in

  4. SU-E-T-275: Radiobiological Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

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    Rekha Reddy, B.; Ravikumar, M.; Tanvir Pasha, C.R; Anil Kumar, M.R; Varatharaj, C. [Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Pyakuryal, A [University Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Narayanasamy, Ganesh [UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiobiological outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using HART (Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy; J Appl Clin Med Phys 11(1): 137–157, 2010) program and compare with the clinical outcomes. Methods: We have treated 20 patients of stage III and IV HNSCC Oropharynx and hypopharynx with accelerated IMRT technique and concurrent chemotherapy. Delineation of tumor and normal tissues were done using Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) contouring guidelines and radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70Gy in 35 fractions to the primary and involved lymph nodes, 63Gy to intermediate risk areas and 56 Gy to lower risk areas, Monday to Saturday, 6 Days/week using 6 MV Photons with an expected overall treatment time of 6 weeks. The TCP and NTCP's were calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics using the Poisson Statistics (PS) and JT Lyman models respectively and the Resultwas correlated with clinical outcomes of the patients with mean follow up of 24 months. Results: Using HART program, the TCP (0.89± 0.01) of primary tumor and the NTCP for parotids (0.20±0.12), spinal cord (0.05±0.01), esophagus (0.30±0.2), mandible (0.35±0.21), Oral cavity (0.37±0.18), Larynx (0.30±0.15) were estimated and correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT with Chemotherapy is a clinical feasible option in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC with encouraging initial tumour response and acceptable acute toxicities. The correlation between the clinical outcomes and radiobiological model estimated parameters using HART programs are found to be satisfactory.

  5. Analysis of carotid artery deformation in different head and neck positions for maxillofacial catheter navigation in advanced oral cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohya Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve the accuracy of catheter navigation, it is important to develop a method to predict shifts of carotid artery (CA bifurcations caused by intraoperative deformation. An important factor affecting the accuracy of electromagnetic maxillofacial catheter navigation systems is CA deformations. We aimed to assess CA deformation in different head and neck positions. Methods Using two sets of computed tomography angiography (CTA images of six patients, displacements of the skull (maxillofacial segments, C1–C4 cervical vertebrae, mandible (mandibular segment, and CA along with its branches were analyzed. Segmented rigid bones around CA were considered the main causes of CA deformation. After superimposition of maxillofacial segments, C1–C4 and mandible segments were superimposed separately for displacement measurements. Five bifurcation points (vA–vE were assessed after extracting the CA centerline. A new standardized coordinate system, regardless of patient-specific scanning positions, was employed. It was created using the principal axes of inertia of the maxillofacial bone segments of patients. Position and orientation parameters were transferred to this coordinate system. CA deformation in different head and neck positions was assessed. Results Absolute shifts in the center of gravity in the bone models for different segments were C1, 1.02 ± 0.9; C2, 2.18 ± 1.81; C3, 4.25 ± 3.85; C4, 5.90 ± 5.14; and mandible, 1.75 ± 2.76 mm. Shifts of CA bifurcations were vA, 5.52 ± 4.12; vB, 4.02 ± 3.27; vC, 4.39 ± 2.42; vD, 4.48 ± 1.88; and vE, 2.47 ± 1.32. Displacements, position changes, and orientation changes of C1–C4 segments as well as the displacements of all CA bifurcation points were similar in individual patients. Conclusions CA deformation was objectively proven as an important factor contributing to errors in maxillofacial navigation. Our study results suggest that

  6. PET-CT–Guided Surveillance of Head and Neck Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  7. Examination of the patient with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Rachel; Liu, Jeffrey C

    2015-07-01

    Head and neck cancer typically refers to epithelial malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract and may include neoplasms of the thyroid, salivary glands, and soft tissue, bone sarcomas, and skin cancers. Two-thirds of patients present with advanced disease involving regional lymph nodes at the time of diagnosis. A thorough history and detailed examination are integral to oncologic staging and treatment planning. This article begins with an overview of the head and neck examination (with special attention to detailed findings with clinical implications), followed by a discussion of the major head and neck subsites, and clinical pearls surrounding the examination.

  8. A cost-effectiveness analysis of using TheraBite in a preventive exercise program for patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with concomitant chemo-radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retel, Valesca P.; van der Molen, Lisette; Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; van den Brekel, Michiel W.; Hilgers, Frans J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a “Preventive Exercise Program” (PREP) is cost-effective compared to the standard exercise program provided in “Usual Care” (UC) in patients with advanced head and neck cancer. The current paper specifically estimates the cost-effectiveness of the TheraBite jaw

  9. Cetuximab in the treatment of head and neck cancer: preliminary results outside clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Dequanter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Didier Dequanter, Mohammad Shahla, Pascal Paulus, Phillippe LothaireDepartment of Head and Neck Surgery, CHU Charleroi, Montigny le Tilleul, BelgiumIntroduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy in our daily practice, outside clinical trials, of cetuximab plus radiotherapy in a majority of treatment-naive patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.Methods: A retrospective study was performed to evaluate outcomes in patients who were treated definitively with cetuximab and radiotherapy (ExRT. Patients with stage III or IV, nonmetastatic, measurable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN were eligible.Results: There were 18 males and two females. The median age was 61 years (range from 49 to 87 years old. Concurrent radiotherapy and cetuximab was used, in first line, in 17 patients with locally advanced disease; two patients with recurrent SCCHN, who were intolerant of Cisplatin-based regimens, were treated with radiotherapy combined with weekly cetuximab; and 1 patient received cetuximab and radiotherapy postoperatively. The median time of response was 10 months (range from 2 to 24 months. A partial response was observed in 11 cases; a complete response in nine cases. The occurrence of grade 2–3 skin toxicity was observed in 11 cases. Skin toxicity was clearly correlated with a better response and the duration of the response to the treatment. The use of cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy does not increase the side effects of radiotherapy. At the end of the follow-up, 17 patients died.Conclusion: Cetuximab, with its highly targeted mechanism of action and synergistic activity with current treatment modalities, is a valuable treatment option in head and neck patients. The effect of the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist occurs without any change in the pattern and the severity of toxicity usually associated with head and neck radiation. Cetuximab seems

  10. Docetaxel in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Rapidis

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Rapidis1, Nicholas Sarlis2, Jean-Louis Lefebvre3, Merrill Kies41Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Greek Anticancer Institute, Saint Savvas Hospital, Athens, Greece; 2Department of Medical Affairs, Oncology – US Sanofi-Aventis, Bridgewater, NJ, USA; 3Head and Neck Department, Centre Régional de Lutte Contre le Cancer de Lille, Lille, France; 4Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas – M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN presents at a locally advanced (LA stage in many patients. Chemotherapy has been successfully integrated into first-line treatment programs, either during or prior to radiotherapy (RT – the cornerstone modality for local disease control of inoperable disease or when organ preservation is desired. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT provides an absolute survival benefit when compared with other types of locoregional therapy that exclude chemotherapy. Nonetheless, distant metastases still represent the most common cause of treatment failure. Consequently, adding induction chemotherapy (ICT to definitive non-surgical local therapies with a curative intent has been vigorously explored in LA SCCHN. Recently, it has been shown that ICT using the combination of the taxane docetaxel with cisplatin–5-fluorouracil provides significant survival benefit over cisplatin–5-FU, when used before either definitive RT (TAX323 trial or carboplatin-based CCRT (TAX324 trial. Docetaxel is also being investigated in metastatic or recurrent (M/R disease, with promising initial results. It is very likely that the future management strategies of SCCHN will incorporate biologic agents as an add-on to docetaxel-containing schemas, administered either as ICT prior to CCRT in the LA setting or for the management of M/R disease.Keywords: chemoradiotherapy, chemotherapy, docetaxel, head and neck carcinoma, induction, locally

  11. Evaluation of the prognostic role of tumor cell podoplanin expression in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttenlocher, Stefan; Seibold, Nina D.; Rades, Dirk [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Gebhard, Maximilian P.; Noack, Frank; Thorns, Christoph [University of Luebeck, Institute of Pathology, Luebeck (Germany); Hasselbacher, Katrin; Wollenberg, Barbara [University of Luebeck, Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Luebeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdalel, Department of Radiation Oncology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2014-11-15

    To investigate the potential prognostic role of tumor cell podoplanin expression in patients treated with resection followed by irradiation or chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Podoplanin expression (≤10 % versus > 10 %) and 12 other factors were evaluated in 160 patients for their association with locoregional control (LRC), metastases-free (MFS) and overall survival (OS). Other factors were age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, preradiotherapy (pre-RT) hemoglobin level, tumor site, histological grading, T category, N category, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, human papillomavirus (HPV) status, extent of resection and concurrent chemotherapy. In multivariate analysis, ECOG performance status 0-1 (risk ratio, RR: 3.01; 95 % confidence interval, CI: 1.42-7.14; p = 0.003), pre-RT hemoglobin levels ≥ 7.45 mmol/l (12 g/dl; RR: 2.03; 95 % CI: 1.04-3.94; p = 0.038), oropharyngeal cancer (RR: 1.25; 95 % CI: 1.01-1.55; p = 0.038) and T category T1-2 (RR: 1.81; 95 % CI: 1.24-2.79; p = 0.002) were significantly associated with improved LRC. T category T1-2 (RR: 1.90; 95 % CI: 1.25-3.06; p = 0.002) and N category N0-2a (RR: 5.22; 95 % CI: 1.96-18.09; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with better MFS. Pre-RT hemoglobin levels ≥ 7.45 mmol/l (RR: 2.44; 95 % CI: 1.27-4.74; p = 0.007), T category T1-2 (RR: 1.97; 95 % CI: 1.36-3.04; p < 0.001) and N category N0-2a (RR: 2.87; 95 % CI: 1.37-6.61; p = 0.005) were significantly associated with improved OS. Podoplanin expression ≤ 10 % showed a trend towards improved OS on both univariate (p = 0.050) and multivariate analysis (RR: 1.86; 95 % CI: 0.96-3.59; p = 0.07). Treatment outcomes were significantly associated with performance status, pre-RT hemoglobin level, tumor site and tumor stage. Tumor cell expression of podoplanin ≤ 10 % showed a trend towards improved OS when compared to podoplanin expression of

  12. [Taxane-cisplatin-fluorouracil as induction chemotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer: a Meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jiejun; Li, Guoyi; Yu, Zizhong; Tian, Lei

    2016-02-01

    To systematically review the efficacy and safety of taxane, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (Tax-PF) as induction chemotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer. Literature about the efficacy and safety of Taxane-cisplatin-fluorouracil as induction chemotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer was retrieved from digital databases of PubMed, Embase, SpringerLink, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library before February 2015. Data extraction and quality assessment of included studies were conducted by two reviewers independently. Stata 13.0 was then used to perform Meta-analysis. A total 7 randomized controlled trials involving 2,702 were included. The 3-year OS rate [HR = 1.14, 95% CI (1.03, 1.25), P < 0.01], 3-year PFS rate [HR = 1.24, 95% CI (1.08, 1.43), P < 0.01], 5-year OS rate [HR = 1.30, 95% CI (1.09, 1. 55), P < 0. 01], 5-year PFS rate [HR = 1.39, 95% CI (1.14, 1.70), P < 0.01] and ORR to chemotherapy [OR = 1.66, 95% CI (1.35, 2.05), P < 0.01] of the patients in the Tax-PF group were statistically superior to those in the PF group. In terms of toxicities, the incidence of febrile neutropenia [OR = 2.36, 95% CI (1.62, 3.46), P < 0.01], alopecia [OR = 8.22, 95% CI (3.99, 16.92), P < 0.01], diarrhea [OR = 1.57, 95% CI (1.05, 2.36), P< 0.05] and leucopenia [OR = 2.79, 95% CI (1.86, 4.21), P < 0.01] was higher in the Tax-PF group than that in the PF group. The Tax-PF induction chemotherapy improved PFS and OS, and the ORR was better as compared to PF-based therapy regimens at the cost of a higher incidence of adverse events.

  13. Treatment of locally advanced carcinomas of head and neck with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in combination with cetuximab and chemotherapy: the REACH protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Christian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary treatment of carcinoma of the oro-/hypopharynx or larynx may consist of combined platinum-containing chemoradiotherapy. In order to improve clinical outcome (i.e. local control/overall survival, combined therapy is intensified by the addition of the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab (Erbitux®. Radiation therapy (RT is carried out as intensity-modulated RT (IMRT to avoid higher grade acute and late toxicity by sparing of surrounding normal tissues. Methods/Design The REACH study is a prospective phase II study combining chemoradiotherapy with carboplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU and the monoclonal epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGFR antibody cetuximab (Erbitux® as intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced squamous-cell carcinomas of oropharynx, hypopharynx or larynx. Patients receive weekly chemotherapy infusions in the 1st and 5th week of RT. Additionally, cetuximab is administered weekly throughout the treatment course. IMRT is delivered as in a classical concomitant boost concept (bid from fraction 16 to a total dose of 69,9 Gy. Discussion Primary endpoint of the trial is local-regional control (LRC. Disease-free survival, progression-free survival, overall survival, toxicity, proteomic and genomic analyses are secondary endpoints. The aim is to explore the efficacy as well as the safety and feasibility of this combined radioimmunchemotherapy in order to improve the outcome of patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Trial registration ISRCTN87356938

  14. Combined radiotherapy with cis- or carboplatin in advanced head and neck tumours. Kombinierte Radiotherapie mit Cis- oder Carboplatin bei fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, N.; Pape, H.; Schnabel, T.; Wurm, R.; Bannach, B.; Fuerst, G.; Schmitt, G. (Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie)

    1989-09-01

    This report reviews the treatment results of 111 patients with stage T3-4, N0-3, M0, biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx and oral cavity. All patients were treated by primary irradiation with 1.8 to 2 Gy per day for five days a week up to a target volume dose of 39,6 or 40 Gy. Simultaneously 20 mg/m{sup 2} cisplatin was given under hyperhydration and mannitol diuresis on days 1 to 5. In case of partial tumour regression radiotherapy was continued up to 70 Gy with another course of cisplatin. In case of minor response surgery was interposed followed by subsequent irradiation with 30 Gy and a second course of cisplatin. 67% of the patients showed an initial complete tumour involution and 27% a partial response. The five year actuarial survival rate with a minimum follow-up of two years is 47,6%. More than 96% of the long term survivors showed a complete response after the end of treatment. Carboplatin (CBDCA) is a second generation platinum analogon and has shown comparable antitumour activity but less nephro- and neurotoxicity than cisplatin in head and neck cancer. In order to determine the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous application of CBDCA and radiotherapy a phase I-II study is going on. Patients with advanced squamous carcinoma of the head and neck were separated into three groups which received 60 mg/m{sup 2}, 70 mg/m{sup 2} and 80 mg/m{sup 2} CBDCA from days 1 to 5 and 28 to 32. Radiotherapy was administrated up to a target absorbed dose of 70 Gy, 5x2 Gy/week in shrinking field technique. The group which received 80 mg/m{sup 2} CBDCA reached the myelotoxicity limit so that subsequent patients were treated with 70 mg/m{sup 2}. Among 30 patients who completed the treatment, 22 showed a complete (CR) and eight a partial remission (PR). (orig./MG).

  15. Effect of Ozone/Oxygen-Pneumoperitoneum on Tumour Growth and Metastatic Spread of the Rabbit VX2 Head and Neck Cancer Model

    OpenAIRE

    Häußler, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    About 6% of all newly diagnosed malignancies worldwide are cancers of the head and neck. They account for nearly 5% of all cancer-related deaths. Surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy as well as combinations of these three are currently regarded as the standard treatment. While high cure rates can be achieved for the early stage disease, cure and survival rates for locoregionally advanced and distant metastatic disease are s...

  16. Head and Neck Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Aljabab, A. S.; Nason, R. W.; Kazi, R; Pathak, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcomas are malignant neoplasms originating from mesodermal tissues and constitute less than 1% of body’s tumors, including those of the head and neck region. 5–15% of adult sarcomas are in the head and neck region (20% from bones and cartilages and 80% in soft tissues). Commonly encountered sarcomas in the head and neck region are - osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, fibrosarcoma and angiosarcoma. This article reviews the available literature on head and neck sa...

  17. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  18. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume Measured by {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated by Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyu Ho; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Han, Eun Ji; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Gi Wom; Na, Sea Jung; Sun, Dong Il; Jung, So Lyung; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Min Sik; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Sung Hoon [The Cathholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    We assessed the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured using {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) inpatients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients (51 men, five women; mean age 56.0{+-}8.8 years) who had locally advanced HNSCC and underwent FDG PET/CT for initial evaluation. All patients had surgical resection and radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. The peak standardized uptake (SUV{sup peak)} and MTV of the target lesion, including primary HNSCC and metastatic cervical lymph nodes, were measured SUV{sup peak,} MTV, and clinico pathologic variables such as age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, pN stage, pT stage, TNM stage, histologic grade and treatment modality to disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). On the initial FDG PET/CT scans, the median SUV{sup peakw}as 7.8 (range, 1.8-19.0) and MTV was 17.0cm{sup 3(}range, 0.1-131.0cm{sup 3)}. The estimated 2 year DFS and OS rates were 67.2% and 81.8%. The cutoff points of SUV{sup peak6}.2 and MTV 20.7cm{sup 3w}ere the best discriminative values for predicting clinical outcome. MTV and ECOG performance status were significantly related to DFS and OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (P=0.05). The MTV obtained from initial FDG PET/CT scan is a significant prognostic factor for disease recurrence and mortality in locally advanced HNSCC treated with surgery and radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

  19. The role of induction chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with locally advanced head and neck cancers: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sarraf, M D; El Hariry, I

    2008-07-01

    Induction CT have evolved since its introduction in the mid of 1970s for patients with previously untreated locally advanced HNC. We went from single agent cisplatin to cisplatin bleomycin combinations, to PF and now to the three drugs combination of TPF or its safer modification. We started with single cycle of induction CT, to two courses and now the best to give is the three cycles of CT. We not only improved on the effectiveness of the induction CT, but also reduced the possible side effects and improved the quality of life for those receiving such treatment. Induction CT followed by RT alone is superior to RT only in patients with previously untreated unresectable/inoperable HNC. Although, the "standard" of care of these patients today is concurrent CT+RT. Induction TPF followed by the best local treatment(s) usually concurrent CT+RT was superior to PF followed by the best local therapy in these patients. Will this mean that in patients with locally advanced unresectable/inoperable HNC induction TPF followed by concurrent CT+RT is the treatment of choice, in our opinion is yes, but this is not acceptable by the majority of investigators. This is why we do have more than four prospective randomized phase III trials trying to answer such an important question. In our opinion and strong believe that all patients with locally advanced HNC including patients with NPC not on active protocol(s) may be offered induction three drugs combination followed by concurrent CT+RT as their primary planned treatment. In those patients who are resectable/operable before any such therapy and did not respond (CR or PR) to such induction CT may offer surgical resection followed by post-operative concurrent CT + RT. Table 5 summarize the rational of the continue use of the total treatment of induction CT followed by concurrent CT+RT in patients with previously untreated and locally advanced HNC.

  20. Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cells and Their Expression of EGFR/Phospho-EGFR During Combined Radiotherapy Regimens in Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinhofer, Ingeborg, E-mail: ingeborg.tinhofer@charite.de [Translational Radiooncology Laboratory, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Charite Campus Mitte, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Hristozova, Tsvetana; Stromberger, Carmen [Translational Radiooncology Laboratory, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Charite Campus Mitte, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); KeilhoIz, Ulrich [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Budach, Volker [Translational Radiooncology Laboratory, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Charite Campus Mitte, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: The numbers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and their expression/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) during the course of combined chemo- or bioradiotherapy regimens as potential biomarkers of treatment efficacy in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) were determined. Methods and Materials: Peripheral blood samples from SCCHN patients with locally advanced stage IVA/B disease who were treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy or induction chemotherapy followed by bioradiation with cetuximab were included in this study. Using flow cytometry, the absolute number of CTCs per defined blood volume as well as their expression of EGFR and its phosphorylated form (pEGFR) during the course of treatment were assessed. Results: Before treatment, we detected {>=}1 CTC per 3.75 mL blood in 9 of 31 patients (29%). Basal expression of EGFR was detected in 100% and pEGFR in 55% of the CTC+ cases. The frequency of CTC detection was not influenced by induction chemotherapy. However, the number of CTC+ samples significantly increased after radiotherapy. This radiation-induced increase in CTC numbers was less pronounced when radiotherapy was combined with cetuximab compared to its combination with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. The former treatment regimen was also more effective in reducing pEGFR expression in CTCs. Conclusions: Definitive radiotherapy regimens of locally advanced SCCHN can increase the number of CTCs and might thus contribute to a systemic spread of tumor cells. Further studies are needed to evaluate the predictive value of the radiation-induced increase in CTC numbers and the persistent activation of the EGFR signalling pathway in individual CTC+ cases.

  1. Increase in tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities in advanced head-and-neck cancer for dose-escalated intensity-modulated photon and proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika eJakobi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Presently used radio-chemotherapy regimens result in moderate local control rates for patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Dose escalation (DE may be an option to improve patient outcome, but may also increase the risk of toxicities in healthy tissue. The presented treatment planning study evaluated the feasibility of two DE levels for advanced HNSCC patients, planned with either intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMXT or proton therapy (IMPT.Materials and Methods:For 45 HNSCC patients, IMXT and IMPT treatment plans were created including DE via a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB in the high-risk volume, while maintaining standard fractionation with 2 Gy per fraction in the remaining target volume. Two DE levels for the SIB were compared: 2.3 Gy and 2.6 Gy. Treatment plan evaluation included assessment of tumor control probabilities (TCP and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP.Results:An increase of approximately 10% in TCP was estimated between the DE levels. A pronounced high-dose rim surrounding the SIB volume was identified in IMXT treatment. Compared to IMPT, this extra dose slightly increased the TCP values and to a larger extent the NTCP values. For both modalities, the higher DE level led only to a small increase in NTCP values (mean differences < 2% in all models, except for the risk of aspiration, which increased on average by 8% and 6% with IMXT and IMPT, respectively, but showed a considerable patient dependence. Conclusions:Both DE levels appear applicable to patients with IMXT and IMPT since all calculated NTCP values, except for one, increased only little for the higher DE level. The estimated TCP increase is of relevant magnitude. The higher DE schedule needs to be investigated carefully in the setting of a prospective clinical trial, especially regarding toxicities caused by high local doses that lack a sound dose response description, e.g., ulcers.

  2. FEASIBILITY OF INDUCTION DOCETAXEL, CISPLATIN, 5-FLUOROURACIL, CETUXIMAB (TPF-C FOLLOWED BY CONCURRENT CETUXIMAB RADIOTHERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED HEAD AND NECK SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos eCharalambakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report our experience with a sequential regimen of induction TPF-C followed by radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Patients and Methods: Toxicity and outcome was retrospectively analyzed in 22 patients receiving sequential therapy with induction TPF-C followed by radioimmunotherapy between October 2008 and December 2011. Outcome was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analyses. In addition, we performed mutation analysis for PIK3CA genes and high-risk HPV-DNA detection using PCR. Results: Median follow-up was 16 months. Six patients were TNM Stage III, 15 patients IV (IVA or IVB and 1 patient Stage II with bulky disease. During TPF-C, Grade 3 and 4 toxicities occurred in 8 patients (36.4%, dose modifications in 7 (31.8%, delays in 1 (4.5%, and unplanned admissions in 5 (22.7%. Clinical tumor response was documented in 18 of the 21 patients who completed at least 3 cycles of TPF-C (85.7% with 3 patients developing complete response and 15 partial responses. Grade 3/4 mucositis was observed in 6 (31.6% patients. At a median follow up of 19 months, 13 patients were alive and 9 (40.9% had died including 7 patients as a result of disease persistence or recurrence and two as a result of unrelated causes. PIK3CA mutations were not identified and our 2 oropharynx cases were HPV negative.Conclusions: The combination of induction TPF-C with concurrent cetuximab radioimmunotherapy in patients with locally advanced HNSCC is tolerable, with encouraging efficacy.Keywords: HNSCC, TPF-C, cetuximab radiotherapy, toxicity and outcome, mutation analysis, PIK3CA, HPV-DNA.

  3. A Phase I Trial to Evaluate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity of Cetuximab and Lenalidomide in Advanced Colorectal and Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertino, Erin M; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Mo, Xiaokui; Trikha, Prashant; Davis, Melanie; Paul, Bonnie; Grever, Michael; Carson, William E; Otterson, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    mAbs can induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) via the innate immune system's ability to recognize mAb-coated cancer cells and activate immune effector cells. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent with the capacity to stimulate immune cell cytokine production and ADCC activity. This phase I trial evaluated the combination of cetuximab with lenalidomide for the treatment of advanced colorectal and head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). This trial included patients with advanced colorectal cancer or HNSCC. Treatment consisted of cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) i.v. every two weeks with lenalidomide given orally days 1-21 on a 28-day cycle. Three dose levels of lenalidomide were evaluated (15, 20, 25 mg). Correlative studies included measurement of ADCC, FcγRIIIA polymorphism genotyping, measurement of serum cytokine levels, and flow cytometric analysis of immune cell subtypes. Twenty-two patients were enrolled (19 colorectal cancer, 3 HNSCC). Fatigue was the only dose-limiting toxicity. One partial response was observed and 8 patients had stable disease at least 12 weeks. The recommended phase II dose is cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) with lenalidomide 25 mg daily, days 1-21. Correlative studies demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in natural killer cytotoxic activity with increasing doses of lenalidomide. Cetuximab and lenalidomide were well tolerated. There was a lenalidomide dose-dependent increase in ADCC with higher activity in patients enrolled in cohort 3 than those enrolled in cohorts 1/2. Although response was not a primary endpoint, there was evidence of antitumor activity for the combination therapy. Further investigation of lenalidomide as an immunomodulator in solid tumors is warranted. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2244-50. ©2016 AACR.

  4. Evaluation of long term (10-years+) dysphagia and trismus in patients treated with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijenga, S A C; Oskam, I M; van der Molen, L; Hamming-Vrieze, O; Hilgers, F J M; van den Brekel, M W M

    2015-08-01

    Assessment of long term (10-years+) swallowing function, mouth opening, and quality of life (QoL) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) for advanced stage IV disease. Twenty-two disease-free survivors, participating in a multicenter randomized clinical trial for inoperable HNC (1999-2004), were evaluated to assess long-term morbidity. The prospective assessment protocol consisted of videofluoroscopy (VFS) for obtaining Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS) and presence of residue scores, Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) scores, maximum mouth opening measurements, and (SWAL-QOL and study-specific) questionnaires. At a median follow-up of 11-years, 22 patients were evaluable for analysis. Ten patients (46%) were able to consume a normal oral diet without restrictions (FOIS score 7), whereas 12 patients (54%) had moderate to serious swallowing issues, of whom 3 (14%) were feeding tube dependent. VFS evaluation showed 15/22 patients (68%) with penetration and/or aspiration (PAS⩾3). Fifty-five percent of patients (12/22) had developed trismus (mouth opening⩽35mm), which was significantly associated with aspiration (p=.011). Subjective swallowing function (SWAL-QOL score) was impaired across almost all QoL domains in the majority of patients. Patients treated with IMRT showed significantly less aspiration (p=.011), less trismus (p=.035), and less subjective swallowing problems than those treated with conventional radiotherapy. Functional swallowing and mouth opening problems are substantial in this patient cohort more than 10-years after organ-preservation CRT. Patients treated with IMRT had less impairment than those treated with conventional radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Post-treatment PET/CT and p16 status for predicting treatment outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer after definitive radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awan, Musaddiq J.; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min [Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lavertu, Pierre; Zender, Chad; Rezaee, Rod; Fowler, Nicole [University Hospitals, Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States); Karapetyan, Lilit; Gibson, Michael [University Hospitals, Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wasman, Jay [University Hospitals, Department of Pathology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Faulhaber, Peter [University Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To retrospectively review post-treatment (post-tx) FDG-PET/CT scans in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and known p16 status, treated with definitive (chemo)radiation (RT). A total of 108 eligible patients had N2A or greater HNSCC treated with chemoRT from August 1, 2008, to February 28, 2015, with post-tx PET/CT within 6 months after RT. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank statistics, and Cox proportional hazards regression were used for statistical analysis. Median follow-up was 2.38 years. Sixty-eight (63.0%) patients had p16+ and 40 (37.0%) had p16- status. Two-year overall survival and recurrence-free survival were 93.4% and 77.8%, respectively. The negative predictive value (NPV) of PET/CT for local recurrence (LR) was 100%. The NPV for regional recurrence (RR) was 96.5% for all patients, 100% for p16+ patients, and 88.5% for p16- patients. The positive predictive value (PPV) of PET/CT for recurrence was 77.3% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+, and 78.6% for p16-. The PPV for LR was 72.7% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+ patients, and 72.7% for p16- patients. The PPV for RR was 50.0% for all patients, 33% for p16+, and 66.6% for p16-. Post-tx PET/CT and p16 status were independent predictors of recurrence-free survival (p < 0.01). Post-tx PET/CT predicts treatment outcomes in both p16 + and p16- patients, and does so independently of p16 status. P16- patients with negative PET have a 10% risk of nodal recurrence, and closer follow-up in these patients is warranted. (orig.)

  6. TU-AB-BRA-10: Prognostic Value of Intra-Radiation Treatment FDG-PET and CT Imaging Features in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J; Pollom, E; Durkee, B; Aggarwal, S; Bui, T; Le, Q; Loo, B; Hara, W [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Cui, Y [Hokkaido University, Global Institute for Collaborative Research and Educat, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Li, R [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Hokkaido University, Global Institute for Collaborative Research and Educat, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To predict response to radiation treatment using computational FDG-PET and CT images in locally advanced head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods: 68 patients with State III-IVB HNC treated with chemoradiation were included in this retrospective study. For each patient, we analyzed primary tumor and lymph nodes on PET and CT scans acquired both prior to and during radiation treatment, which led to 8 combinations of image datasets. From each image set, we extracted high-throughput, radiomic features of the following types: statistical, morphological, textural, histogram, and wavelet, resulting in a total of 437 features. We then performed unsupervised redundancy removal and stability test on these features. To avoid over-fitting, we trained a logistic regression model with simultaneous feature selection based on least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). To objectively evaluate the prediction ability, we performed 5-fold cross validation (CV) with 50 random repeats of stratified bootstrapping. Feature selection and model training was solely conducted on the training set and independently validated on the holdout test set. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the pooled Result and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated as figure of merit. Results: For predicting local-regional recurrence, our model built on pre-treatment PET of lymph nodes achieved the best performance (AUC=0.762) on 5-fold CV, which compared favorably with node volume and SUVmax (AUC=0.704 and 0.449, p<0.001). Wavelet coefficients turned out to be the most predictive features. Prediction of distant recurrence showed a similar trend, in which pre-treatment PET features of lymph nodes had the highest AUC of 0.705. Conclusion: The radiomics approach identified novel imaging features that are predictive to radiation treatment response. If prospectively validated in larger cohorts, they could aid in risk-adaptive treatment of HNC.

  7. Curative and organ-preserving treatment with intra-arterial carboplatin induction followed by surgery and/or radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer: single-center five-year results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinelli Carmine

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the feasibility, toxicity, response rate and survival of neoadjuvant superselective intra-arterial infusion of high dose carboplatin in advanced head and neck cancer. Methods Forty-six patients with primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma received 3 cycles of intra-arterial carboplatin (300 to 350 mg/m2 per cycle every 2 weeks, followed by radiotherapy or surgery plus radiotherapy. Results No complications or severe toxicity occurred. Sixteen patients (35% were complete responders, 20 (43% partial responders while 10 (22% did not respond to treatment. After completion of the multimodality treatment, 38/46 patients (83% were complete responders. After a 5-year follow-up period, 18/46 patients (39% are alive and disease-free, 3 (6,5% have died of a second primary tumor and 25 (54,5% have died of the disease. Conclusion Intra-arterial carboplatin induction chemotherapy is a safe, well-tolerated technique that discriminates between responders and non-responders and so may have prognostic significance in planning further integrated treatments aimed to organ preservation for advanced head and neck carcinomas.

  8. Salivary gland and associated complications in head and neck cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Ram, Saravanan; Navazesh, Mahvash

    2011-09-01

    Xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction are two of the most common and significant complications of head and neck cancer therapy in the head and neck region. This article will provide a brief overview of salivary gland hypofunction and associated complications in head and neck cancer therapy, mainly in radiation therapy. The discussion will include quality of life issues as well as current advances in cancer therapy to reduce xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction.

  9. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  10. Preventing head and neck injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  11. Fusobacterial head and neck infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2015-07-01

    Fusobacterium species are increasingly recognized as a cause of head and neck infections in children. These infections include acute and chronic otitis, sinusitis, mastoiditis, and tonsillitis; peritonsillar and retropharyngeal abscesses; Lemierre syndrome; post-anginal cervical lymphadenitis; and periodontitis. They can also be involved in brain abscess and bacteremia associated with head and neck infections. This review describes the clinical spectrum of head and neck fusobacterial infection in children and their management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A quantitative comparison of gross tumor volumes delineated on [18F]-FDG-PET/CT scan and contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan in locally advanced head and neck carcinoma treated with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarjuna Burela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate tumor diagnosis is important in highly conformal techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT, which aims for high therapeutic ratio. We compared Gross Tumor Volume (GTV (primary and nodal delineated on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]-FDG-PET scan to those delineated on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT scan and its impact on staging treated by IMRT. A total of 30 consecutive patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck were included in this study. FDG-PET and CECT scans were performed with dedicated positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET/CT scanner in a single session as part of radiotherapy treatment planning for IMRT. After treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, all patients were followed for one year. Three out of 30 patients were excluded from the final analysis, as there was complete remission in PET/CT after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For remaining 27 cases, the primary sites were 17 oropharynx, 2 hypopharynx, 7 larynx and 1 unknown primary with secondary neck node. PET–CT resulted in changes of CT-based staging in 25% patients (up-staged in 3 and down-staged in 4. GTV delineated on PET vs CT scan was GTV-PET (primary of 20.15 cm3 vs GTV-CT (primary of 18.75 cm3, p = 0.803; and GTV-PET (nodes of 28.45 cm3 vs GTV-CT (nodes of 21.56 cm3, p = 0.589. The mismatch between two target volumes was statistically insignificant (p = 0.635 for GTV primary, p = 0.187 for nodes. The mean GTV-PET outside CT for primary was 5.83 cm3, and for node was 8.47 cm3. Median follow-up was 12 months. One-year loco-regional control was 92%. The target delineation of GTV can be improved with functional imaging [18F]-FDG-PET/CT.

  13. VX-970, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced HPV-Negative Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-14

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  14. Identification of Patient Benefit From Proton Therapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients Based on Individual and Subgroup Normal Tissue Complication Probability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobi, Annika, E-mail: Annika.Jakobi@OncoRay.de [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Bandurska-Luque, Anna [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Stützer, Kristin; Haase, Robert; Löck, Steffen [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Wack, Linda-Jacqueline [Section for Biomedical Physics, University Hospital for Radiation Oncology, Eberhard Karls Universät Tübingen (Germany); Mönnich, David [Section for Biomedical Physics, University Hospital for Radiation Oncology, Eberhard Karls Universät Tübingen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, Tübingen (Germany); Thorwarth, Daniela [Section for Biomedical Physics, University Hospital for Radiation Oncology, Eberhard Karls Universät Tübingen (Germany); and others

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine, by treatment plan comparison along with normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling, whether a subpopulation of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) could be identified that would gain substantial benefit from proton therapy in terms of NTCP. Methods and Materials: For 45 HNSCC patients, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was compared to intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Physical dose distributions were evaluated as well as the resulting NTCP values, using modern models for acute mucositis, xerostomia, aspiration, dysphagia, laryngeal edema, and trismus. Patient subgroups were defined based on primary tumor location. Results: Generally, IMPT reduced the NTCP values while keeping similar target coverage for all patients. Subgroup analyses revealed a higher individual reduction of swallowing-related side effects by IMPT for patients with tumors in the upper head and neck area, whereas the risk reduction of acute mucositis was more pronounced in patients with tumors in the larynx region. More patients with tumors in the upper head and neck area had a reduction in NTCP of more than 10%. Conclusions: Subgrouping can help to identify patients who may benefit more than others from the use of IMPT and, thus, can be a useful tool for a preselection of patients in the clinic where there are limited PT resources. Because the individual benefit differs within a subgroup, the relative merits should additionally be evaluated by individual treatment plan comparisons.

  15. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  16. Reirradiation in head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, Francois; Thariat, Juliette; Daly-Schweitzer, Nicolas

    2011-08-01

    Salvage surgery is the mainstay of treatment for recurrences or secondary primary tumors in areas that were irradiated earlier. However, locoregional recurrence remains the main cause of death after surgery. Adjuvant reirradiation dramatically reduces locoregional recurrences but the risk-benefit ratio seems to be advantageous mostly for residual microscopic disease. In contrast, the rate of distant metastasis among reirradiated patients indicates that the local treatment alone is not sufficient. Full-dose exclusive chemo-reirradiation (over 60 Gy) can cure a subset of patients when surgery is not feasible. However, reirradiation is associated with a significant rate of severe toxicity and should, therefore, be compared with chemotherapy in randomized trials. Accrual may be difficult because of selection biases such as tumor volume, small volumes (largest axis less than 3-4 cm) being more likely to be irradiated. In addition, patients in poor general condition with severe comorbidities, organ dysfunction, or incomplete healing after salvage surgery, are unlikely to benefit from reirradiation. Noteworthy volumes to be reirradiated must be established between the head and neck surgeon and the radiation oncologist: the definition of the clinical target volume should be taken into account, the natural history of recurrent tumors, especially with regard to extension modalities, and the absence of strict correlation between imaging and histological real extension. This is even more critical with the advent of new irradiation techniques. Chemotherapy associations and new radiosensitizing agents are also under investigation. Comparison between reirradiation modalities is difficult because most trials are phase 2 mono-institutional trials. As selection of patients is a key issue, only phase 3 multiinstitutional trials can provide definitive results.

  17. Final Results of Local-Regional Control and Late Toxicity of RTOG 9003: A Randomized Trial of Altered Fractionation Radiation for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitler, Jonathan J., E-mail: jjbeitl@emory.edu [Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fu, Karen K. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Trotti, Andy [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center at the University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida (United States); Spencer, Sharon A. [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Garden, Adam S. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Shenouda, George [McGill University, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, Kian K. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To test whether altered radiation fractionation schemes (hyperfractionation [HFX], accelerated fractionation, continuous [AFX-C], and accelerated fractionation with split [AFX-S]) improved local-regional control (LRC) rates for patients with squamous cell cancers (SCC) of the head and neck when compared with standard fractionation (SFX) of 70 Gy. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV (or stage II base of tongue) SCC (n=1076) were randomized to 4 treatment arms: (1) SFX, 70 Gy/35 daily fractions/7 weeks; (2) HFX, 81.6 Gy/68 twice-daily fractions/7 weeks; (3) AFX-S, 67.2 Gy/42 fractions/6 weeks with a 2-week rest after 38.4 Gy; and (4) AFX-C, 72 Gy/42 fractions/6 weeks. The 3 experimental arms were to be compared with SFX. Results: With patients censored for LRC at 5 years, only the comparison of HFX with SFX was significantly different: HFX, hazard ratio (HR) 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.62-1.00), P=.05; AFX-C, 0.82 (95% confidence interval 0.65-1.05), P=.11. With patients censored at 5 years, HFX improved overall survival (HR 0.81, P=.05). Prevalence of any grade 3, 4, or 5 toxicity at 5 years; any feeding tube use after 180 days; or feeding tube use at 1 year did not differ significantly when the experimental arms were compared with SFX. When 7-week treatments were compared with 6-week treatments, accelerated fractionation appeared to increase grade 3, 4 or 5 toxicity at 5 years (P=.06). When the worst toxicity per patient was considered by treatment only, the AFX-C arm seemed to trend worse than the SFX arm when grade 0-2 was compared with grade 3-5 toxicity (P=.09). Conclusions: At 5 years, only HFX improved LRC and overall survival for patients with locally advanced SCC without increasing late toxicity.

  18. Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Combination With Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo, E-mail: gusviani@gmail.com [Radiation Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine of Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Afonso, Sergio Luis [Clinical Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine of Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Tavares, Vivian [Head and Neck Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine of Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bernardes Godoi da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose [Radiation Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine of Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose by describing the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of weekly gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck (LAHN) cancer concomitant to irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LAHN cancer were enrolled in a prospective, dose-escalation Phase I study. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria score. Maximum tolerated dose was defined when DLT developed in 2 of 6 patients. The starting dose of cisplatin was 20 mg/m{sup 2} and that of gemcitabine was 10 mg/m{sup 2} in 3 patients, with a subsequent dose escalation of 10 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin only for 3 new patients. In the next levels, only a dose escalation of gemcitabine with 10 mg/m{sup 2} for each new cohort was used (Level 1, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 20 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; Level 2, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; and Level 3, 20 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin). Radiation therapy was administered by use of a conformal technique over a period of 6 to 7 weeks in 2.0-Gy daily fractions for 5 consecutive days per week to a total dose of 70 Gy. Results: From 2008 to 2009, 12 patients completing 3 dose levels were included in the study. At Dose Level 3, 1 of 3 patients had DLT with Grade 3 mucositis. Of the next 3 required patients, 2 showed DLT with Grade 3 dermatitis. At a follow-up of 3 months, 10 of 12 evaluable patients (83.3%) obtained a complete response and 1 patient (8.3%) obtained a partial response. Among the complete responders, at a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 6-14 months), 9 patients are alive and disease free. Conclusion: Gemcitabine at low doses combined with cisplatin is a potent radiosensitizer effective in patients with LAHN cancer. The recommended Phase II dose is 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin with an acceptable tolerability profile.

  19. Comparison of acute toxicities of two chemotherapy schedules for head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemo-radiotherapy has become the standard of care for loco-regionally advanced head and neck cancers. Platinum based regimens are the most effective. Although benefits are proven with chemo-radiation, acute toxicities are markedly increased. The dose and delivery schedules of Cisplatin have ranged from intermittent higher dose [100 mg/m2] every 3 weeks to low dose [6 mg/m2] daily administration. At present there is no data indicating which regimen is superior. Purpose: To compare acute toxicities of two chemotherapy schedules for head and neck cancers. Materials and Methods: A total of 83 head and neck cancer patients treated with two schedules of concurrent chemo RT were analyzed, retrospectively, for treatment toxicity. In group A [51 patients], chemotherapy [CT] was administered on week 1, 4 and 7 [cisplatin 100 mg/m2] over a period of 2-3 days. In group B [32 patients], CT was delivered weekly [cisplatin 40 mg/m2]. Radiotherapy dose was 7000 cGy in 35 fractions for definitive concurrent chemo-radiation and 6600 cGy in 33 fractions for adjuvant treatment. Results: Group B patients had increased grade III skin and hematological toxicity, where as patients in group A had more pharyngeal toxicity. Treatment interruptions and percentage of weight loss were higher in group B. Weekly CT schedule had higher rate of severe mucositis, which was statistically significant on both univariate [ P =0.005] and multivariate [ P =0.007] analysis. Conclusions: Three weekly CT is less toxic than weekly. Weekly CT can be made more acceptable by reducing the dose and using feeding tubes for nutrition.

  20. Ultrasound examination of the head and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Baatenburg de Jong (Robert Jan); R.J. Rongen (Robert Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractStructure of this thesis Part I deals with basic bio-physics and bio-effects of clinical ultrasound of the head and neck. Furthermore, the ultrasound anatomy of the head and neck is described and illustrated. In addition, the technique of ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (

  1. Patient Modeling for Simulation Guided Head and Neck Hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.F. Verhaart (René)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe prognosis for patients with advanced head and neck (H&N) cancer is very poor and treatment is challenging. These patients are standardly treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. These treatments are associated with a high treatment related late toxicity that affect

  2. Is open surgery for head and neck cancers truly declining?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartl, D.M.; Brasnu, D.F.; Shah, J.P.; Hinni, M.L.; Takes, R.P.; Olsen, K.D.; Kowalski, L.P.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Strojan, P.; Wolf, G.T.; Rinaldo, A.; Suarez, C.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Paleri, V.; Forastiere, A.A.; Werner, J.A.; Ferlito, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades, major modifications in the way we treat head and neck cancers, due to advances in technology and medical oncology, have led to a decline in the use of open surgery as first-line treatment of cancers arising from several primary tumor sites. The incidence of tobacco- and alco

  3. Patient Modeling for Simulation Guided Head and Neck Hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.F. Verhaart (René)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe prognosis for patients with advanced head and neck (H&N) cancer is very poor and treatment is challenging. These patients are standardly treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. These treatments are associated with a high treatment related late toxicity that affect

  4. A cost-effectiveness analysis of using TheraBite in a preventive exercise program for patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with concomitant chemo-radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retèl, Valesca P; van der Molen, Lisette; Steuten, Lotte M G; van den Brekel, Michiel W; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that a "Preventive Exercise Program" (PREP) is cost-effective compared to the standard exercise program provided in "Usual Care" (UC) in patients with advanced head and neck cancer. The current paper specifically estimates the cost-effectiveness of the TheraBite jaw rehabilitation device (TB) which is used as part of the PREP, compared to Speech Language Pathology (SLP) sessions as part of UC, and herewith intents to inform reimbursement discussions regarding the TheraBite device. Costs and outcomes [quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs)] of the TB compared to SLP were estimated using a Markov model of advanced head and neck cancer patients. Secondary outcome variables were trismus, feeding substitutes, facial pain, and pneumonia. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated from a health care perspective of the Netherlands, with a time horizon of 2 years. The total health care costs per patient were estimated to amount to €5,129 for the TB strategy and €6,915 for the SLP strategy. Based on the current data, the TB strategy yielded more quality-adjusted life-years (1.28) compared to the SLP strategy (1.24). Thus, the TB strategy seems more effective (+0.04) and less costly (-€1,786) than the SLP only strategy. At the prevailing threshold of €20,000/QALY the probability for the TB strategy being cost-effective compared to SLP was 70 %. To conclude, analysis of presently available data indicates that TB is expected to be cost-effective compared to SLP in a preventive exercise program for concomitant chemo-radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer patients.

  5. Cisplatin, hyperthermia, and radiation (trimodal therapy) in patients with locally advanced head and neck tumors: A phase I-II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amichetti, M.; Graiff, C.; Fellin, G.; Pani, G.; Bolner, A.; Maluta, S. (Divisione di Radioterapia Oncologica, Trento (Italy)); Valdagni, R. (Divisione di Radioterapia Oncologica, Trento (Italy) Istituto per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Trento (Italy))

    1993-08-01

    Hyperthermia is now being widely used to treat clinical malignancies, especially combined with radiotherapy and more rarely with chemotherapy. The combination of heat, radiation, and chemotherapy (trimodality) can lead to potent interaction. The present Phase I-II study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and acute toxicity of a combination of cisplantin, hyperthermia, and irradiation in the treatment of superficial cervical nodal metastases from head and neck cancer. Eighteen patients with measurable neck metastases from previously untreated squamous cell head and neck tumors were entered into the trial. Therapy consisted of a conventional irradiation (total dose 70 Gy, 2 Gy five times a week) combined with a weekly administration of 20 mg/m[sup 2] iv of cisplatin and a total of two sessions of local external microwave hyperthermia (desired temperature of 42.5[degrees]C for 30 min). Feasibility of the treatment was demonstrated. Acute local toxicity was mild; no thermal blisters or ulcerations were reported and only two patients experienced local pain during hyperthermia. Cutaneous toxicity appeared greater than in previous studies with irradiation plus hyperthermia and irradiation plus cisplatin. Systematic toxicity was moderate with major toxic effects observed in three patients (World Health Organization (WHO) grade 3 anaemia). Even though it was not an aim of the study to evaluate the nodal response, they observed a complete response rate of 72.2% (95% confidence interval 51-93.4%), 16.6% of partial response and 11.1% of no change. The study confirms the feasibility of the combination of cisplantin, heat, and radiation with an acceptable toxicity profile. The trimodal therapy deserves further evaluation as a way to enhance the efficacy of irradiation in the treatment of nodal metastases from head and neck tumors. 43 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Planned Neck Dissection Following Radiation Treatment for Head and Neck Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Dautremont

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Optimal therapy for patients with metastatic neck disease remains controversial. Neck dissection following radiotherapy has traditionally been used to improve locoregional control. Methods. A retrospective review of 28 patients with node-positive head and neck malignancy treated with planned neck dissection following radiotherapy between January 2002 and December 2005 was performed to assess treatment outcomes. Results. Median interval to neck dissection was 9.6 weeks with a median number of 21 + 9 lymph nodes per specimen. Ten of 31 (32% neck dissection specimens demonstrated evidence of residual carcinoma. Overall survival at two years was 85%; five-year overall survival was 65%. Concurrent chemotherapy did not impact the presence of residual neck disease. Conclusion. Based on the frequency of residual malignancy in the neck of patients treated with primary radiotherapy, a planned, postradiotherapy neck dissection should be strongly advocated for all patients with advanced-stage neck disease.

  7. Tumor and Stromal-Based Contributions to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwell, Steven M.; Weed, Scott A., E-mail: scweed@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Program in Cancer Cell Biology, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-02-27

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages with evident loco-regional and/or distal metastases. The prevalence of metastatic lesions directly correlates with poor patient outcome, resulting in high patient mortality rates following metastatic development. The progression to metastatic disease requires changes not only in the carcinoma cells, but also in the surrounding stromal cells and tumor microenvironment. Within the microenvironment, acellular contributions from the surrounding extracellular matrix, along with contributions from various infiltrating immune cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells facilitate the spread of tumor cells from the primary site to the rest of the body. Thus far, most attempts to limit metastatic spread through therapeutic intervention have failed to show patient benefit in clinic trails. The goal of this review is highlight the complexity of invasion-promoting interactions in the HNSCC tumor microenvironment, focusing on contributions from tumor and stromal cells in order to assist future therapeutic development and patient treatment.

  8. Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiation Therapy In Head And Neck Cancers- A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thejaswini B

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion:CHART achieves good locoregional response in stages III and IV of head and neck cancer. The acute mucosal reactions were within acceptable limits. The compliance to the treatment was good. [Natl J Med Res 2014; 4(3.000: 218-221

  9. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy With Cisplatin Versus Cetuximab for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Nadeem; Sherman, Eric; Koutcher, Lawrence; Shapiro, Lauren; Katabi, Nora; Zhang, Zhigang; Shi, Weiji; Fury, Mathew; Wong, Richard; Wolden, Suzanne; Rao, Shyam; Lee, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We previously reported inferior outcomes for locally advanced head and neck cancer treated with cetuximab (C225) versus cisplatin (CDDP). We now examine if this difference persists when accounting for HPV status and update outcomes on the entire cohort. Materials and Methods From 3/106 to 4/1/08, 174 locally advanced head and neck cancer patients received definitive treatment with RT and CDDP (n = 125) or RT and C225 (n = 49). Of these, 62 patients had tissue available for HPV analysis. Results The median follow-up was 47 months. The 3-year loco-regional failure, disease-free survival, and overall survival for CDDP versus C225 were 5.7% versus 40.2% (P < 0.0001), 85.1% versus 35.4% (P < 0.0001), and 90.0% versus 56.6% (P < 0.0001), respectively. In the subset with tissue, there was no difference in rates of HPV or p16 positivity between the 2 groups. In this subset, the 3-year loco-regional failure, disease-free survival, and overall survival for CDDP versus C225 were 5.3% versus 32.0% (P = 0.01), 86.8% versus 43.2% (P = 0.002), and 86.7% versus 76.9% (P = 0.09), respectively. Multivariate analysis continued to show a benefit for CDDP. Conclusions With longer follow-up and the inclusion of HPV and p16 status for about one third of patients where tissue was available, we continued to find superior outcomes with concurrent CDDP versus C225. PMID:24401670

  10. Residual deficits in quality of life one year after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Results of a prospective study

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    Tribius, Silke; Raguse, Marieclaire; Voigt, Christian; Petersen, Cordula; Kruell, Andreas [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Muenscher, Adrian [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Groebe, Alexander [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Bergelt, Corinna [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Medical Psychology, Hamburg (Germany); Singer, Susanne [University Medical Center Mainz, Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics (IMBEI), Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-08

    Patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC) undergo life-changing treatments that can seriously affect quality of life (QoL). This prospective study examined the key QoL domains during the first year after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and identified predictors of these changes in order to improve patient outcomes. A consecutive series of patients with LAHNC completed the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire Core module (QLQ-C30) and the HNC-specific QLQ-HN35 before (t0) and at the end (t1) of definitive or adjuvant IMRT, then at 6-8 weeks (t2), 6 months (t3), and 1 year (t4) after IMRT. Patients (n = 111) completing questionnaires at all five time points were included (baseline response rate: 99 %; dropout rate between t0 and t4: 5 %). QoL deteriorated in all domains during IMRT and improved slowly during the first year thereafter. Many domains recovered to baseline values after 1 year but problems with smelling and tasting, dry mouth, and sticky saliva remained issues at this time. Increases in problems with sticky saliva were greater after 1 year in patients with definitive versus adjuvant IMRT (F = 3.5, P = 0.05). QoL in patients with LAHNC receiving IMRT takes approximately 1 year to return to baseline; some domains remain compromised after 1 year. Although IMRT aims to maintain function and QoL, patients experience long-term dry mouth and sticky saliva, particularly following definitive IMRT. Patients should be counseled at the start of therapy to reduce disappointment with the pace of recovery. (orig.) [German] Die Therapie von Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (LFKHT) geht mit einschneidenden Veraenderungen einher und beeinflusst die Lebensqualitaet (LQ) erheblich. Diese prospektive Studie untersucht die LQ waehrend des ersten Jahres nach intensitaetsmodulierter Strahlentherapie (IMRT) und hat Praediktoren dieser Veraenderungen herausgearbeitet, um

  11. High response rates following paclitaxel/5-FU and simultaneous radiotherapy in advanced head and neck carcinoma; Hohe Remissionsraten unter simultaner Radio- und Chemotherapie mit Paclitaxel/5-FU in der Behandlung fortgeschrittener Kopf-Hals-Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, M.; Westerhausen, M. [St.-Johannes-Hospital, Duisburg (Germany). Medizinische Klinik II; Makoski, H.B. [Staedtische Kliniken, Duisburg (Germany). Radioonkologie; Sesterhenn, K. [St. Anna-Krankenhaus, Duisburg (Germany). HNO-Klinik; Schroeder, R. [Bristol Myers Squibb, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Oncology

    1997-11-01

    The main stay of treatment for head and neck cancer patients with advanced disease has been chemotherapy with Cisplatin/5-FU and simultaneous applied radiotherapy. With this multimodality treatment including radical surgery after two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 40 Gy radiotherapy we reported 60% complete remission after 5 years for patients with stage III/IV of head and neck cancer. Paclitaxel, a new plant product, has demonstrated significant antineoplastic activity in head and neck tumors (ECOG-Study: 40% RR). Therefore we performed a trial with Taxol/5-FU and simultaneous radiation in a neoadjuvant and postoperative adjuvant setting of stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with pre-existent contraindication against Cisplatin. Patients and Methods: 30 patients with a primarily inoperable stage III/IV of SCC of the head and neck were enrolled to receive day 1 and 29 Taxol 175 mg/m{sup 2} as a 3-hour-infusion, followed by 120-hour-cvi of 1000 mg/m{sup 2}/d 5-FU. Locally irradiation was given ad 40 Gy (2 Gy/d/day 1-26). Radical surgery followed about day 56. Postoperatively patients received again 2 cycles of Taxol/5-FU and simultaneous irradiation with 30 Gy. Results: So far 30 patients were treated and all patients reached a CR after complete treatment, ongoing for 23/30 patients for 6 till 34 months: 4 patients developed a second neoplasia, and 3 patients gloved a local relapse. The principal toxicity was moderate (neutropenia, peripheral neuropathy, arthralgia/myalgia) and sensible with supportive care (e.g. PEG). Conclusions: The results suggest that the treatment of SCC of the head and neck with Taxol/5-FU and simultaneous radiation and radical surgery is a highly effective schedule and comparable with the treatment with Cisplatin/5-FU. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Standard in der Behandlung weit forgeschrittener, primaer inoperabler Kopf-Hals-Tumoren stellte die Cisplatinhaltige Chemotherapiekombination mit 5-FU dar mit simultan

  12. Genetic alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic alterations observed in head and neck cancer are mainly due to oncogene activation (gain of function mutations and tumor suppressor gene inactivation (loss of function mutations, leading to deregulation of cell proliferation and death. These genetic alterations include gene amplification and overexpression of oncogenes such as myc, erbB-2, EGFR and cyclinD1 and mutations, deletions and hypermethylation leading to p16 and TP53 tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In addition, loss of heterozygosity in several chromosomal regions is frequently observed, suggesting that other tumor suppressor genes not yet identified could be involved in the tumorigenic process of head and neck cancers. The exact temporal sequence of the genetic alterations during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC development and progression has not yet been defined and their diagnostic or prognostic significance is controversial. Advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of head and neck cancer should help in the identification of new markers that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease.

  13. Pictorial essay: Vascular interventions in extra cranial head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyash S Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicine is an ever changing field and interventional radiology (IR procedures are becoming increasingly popular because of high efficacy and its minimally invasive nature of the procedure. Management of disease processes in the extra cranial head and neck (ECHN has always been a challenge due to the complex anatomy of the region. Cross sectional imaging of the ECHN has grown and evolved tremendously and occupies a pivotal and integral position in the clinical management of variety of head and neck pathologies. Advances in angiographic technologies including flat panel detector systems, biplane, and 3-dimensional rotational angiography have consolidated and expanded the role of IR in the management of various ECHN pathologies. The ECHN is at cross roads between the origins of great vessels and the cerebral vasculature. Thorough knowledge of functional and technical aspects of neuroangiography is essential before embarking on head and neck vascular interventions. The vessels of the head and neck can be involved by infectious and inflammatory conditions, get irradiated during radiotherapy and injured due to trauma or iatrogenic cause. The ECHN is also a common site for various hypervascular neoplasms and vascular malformations, which can be treated with endovascular and percutaneous embolization. This pictorial essay provides a review of variety of ECHN pathologies which were managed by various IR procedures using different approaches.

  14. Feasibility of NonInvasive Brain Modulation for Management of Pain Related to Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosu Hu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with head and neck cancer often experience a significant decrease in their quality of life during chemoradiotherapy (CRT due to treatment-related pain, which is frequently classified as severe. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a method of non-invasive brain stimulation that has been frequently used in experimental and clinical pain studies. In this pilot study, we investigated the clinical impact and central mechanisms of twenty primary motor cortex (M1 stimulation sessions with tDCS during seven weeks of CRT for head and neck cancer. From 48 patients screened, seven met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled. Electroencephalography (EEG data were recorded before and after tDCS stimulation as well as across the trial to monitor short and long-term impact on brain function. The compliance rate during the long trial was extremely high (98.4%, and patients mostly reported mild side effects in line with the literature (e.g., tingling. Compared to a large standard of care study from our institution, our initial results indicate that M1-tDCS stimulation has a pain relief effect during the CRT that resulted in a significant attenuation of weight reduction and dysphagia normally observed in these patients. These results translated to our patient cohort not needing feeding tubes or IV fluids. Power spectra analysis of EEG data indicated significant changes in α, β and γ bands immediately after tDCS stimulation and, in addition, α, δ and θ bands over the long term in the seventh stimulation week (p < 0.05. The independent component EEG clustering analysis showed estimated functional brain regions including precuneus and superior frontal gyrus (SFG in the seventh week of tDCS stimulation. These areas colocalize with our previous positron emission tomography (PET study where there was activation in the endogenous μ-opioid system during M1-tDCS. This study provides preliminary evidence demonstrating the feasibility and

  15. Head and neck position sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or

  16. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Schwannomas of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Kanatas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign encapsulated nerve sheath tumors composed of Schwann cells. Malignant change in head and neck schwannomas is rare, with the incidence varying between 8 and 13.9%. In this review, we discuss the presentation and the management of head and neck schwannomas. The issues and difficulties based on our own experience as well as the experience of published reports from the literature are presented.

  18. Should PET/CT be implemented in the routine imaging work-up of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma? A prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacicedo, Jon; Fernandez, Iratxe; Del Hoyo, Olga; Dolado, Ainara; Gómez-Suarez, Javier; Hortelano, Eduardo; Sancho, Aintzane; Pijoan, Jose I; Alvarez, Julio; Espinosa, Jose M; Gaafar, Ayman; Bilbao, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incremental staging information provided by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and its impact on management plans in patients with untreated stage III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We prospectively studied, between September 2011 and February 2013, 84 consecutive patients [median age 63.5 years (39-84); 73 men] with histologically confirmed HNSCC. First, based on a conventional work-up (physical examination, CT imaging of the head, neck and chest), the multidisciplinary Head and Neck Tumour Board documented the TNM stage and a management plan for each patient, outlining the modalities to be used, including surgery, radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy or a combination. After release of the PET/CT results, new TNM staging and management plans were agreed on by the multidisciplinary Tumour Board. Any changes in stage or intended management due to the PET/CT findings were then analysed. The impact on patient management was classified as: low (treatment modality, delivery and intent unchanged), moderate (change within the same treatment modality: type of surgery, radiation technique/dose) or high (change in treatment intent and/or treatment modality → curative to palliative, or surgery to chemoradiation or detection of unknown primary tumour or a synchronous second primary tumour). TNM stage was validated by histopathological analysis, additional imaging or follow-up. Accuracy of the conventional and PET/CT-based staging was compared using McNemar's test. Conventional and PET/CT stages were discordant in 32/84 (38 %) cases: the T stage in 2/32 (6.2 %), the N stage in 21/32 (65.7 %) and the M stage 9/32 (28.1 %). Patient management was altered in 22/84 (26 %) patients, with a moderate impact in 8 (9.5 %) patients and high impact in 14 (16.6 %) patients. PET/CT TNM classification was significantly more accurate (92.5 vs 73.7 %) than conventional staging with a p value < 0

  19. Should PET/CT be implemented in the routine imaging work-up of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma? A prospective analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacicedo, Jon; Bilbao, Pedro [Cruces University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Barakaldo, Bizkaia (Basque Country) (Spain); BioCruces Health Research Institute, Bizkaia, Basque Country (Spain); Fernandez, Iratxe [Cruces University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Hoyo, Olga del; Hortelano, Eduardo [Cruces University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Barakaldo, Bizkaia (Basque Country) (Spain); Dolado, Ainara [Cruces University Hospital, Radiodiagnostic and Medical Imaging Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Gomez-Suarez, Javier [Cruces University Hospital, Otolaryngology Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Sancho, Aintzane [Cruces University Hospital, Medical Oncology Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Pijoan, Jose I. [BioCruces Health Research Institute, Bizkaia, Basque Country (Spain); Cruces University Hospital, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Barakaldo (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); Alvarez, Julio [Cruces University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Espinosa, Jose M. [Cruces University Hospital, Medical Physics Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Gaafar, Ayman [Cruces University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Barakaldo (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the incremental staging information provided by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and its impact on management plans in patients with untreated stage III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We prospectively studied, between September 2011 and February 2013, 84 consecutive patients [median age 63.5 years (39-84); 73 men] with histologically confirmed HNSCC. First, based on a conventional work-up (physical examination, CT imaging of the head, neck and chest), the multidisciplinary Head and Neck Tumour Board documented the TNM stage and a management plan for each patient, outlining the modalities to be used, including surgery, radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy or a combination. After release of the PET/CT results, new TNM staging and management plans were agreed on by the multidisciplinary Tumour Board. Any changes in stage or intended management due to the PET/CT findings were then analysed. The impact on patient management was classified as: low (treatment modality, delivery and intent unchanged), moderate (change within the same treatment modality: type of surgery, radiation technique/dose) or high (change in treatment intent and/or treatment modality → curative to palliative, or surgery to chemoradiation or detection of unknown primary tumour or a synchronous second primary tumour). TNM stage was validated by histopathological analysis, additional imaging or follow-up. Accuracy of the conventional and PET/CT-based staging was compared using McNemar's test. Conventional and PET/CT stages were discordant in 32/84 (38 %) cases: the T stage in 2/32 (6.2 %), the N stage in 21/32 (65.7 %) and the M stage 9/32 (28.1 %). Patient management was altered in 22/84 (26 %) patients, with a moderate impact in 8 (9.5 %) patients and high impact in 14 (16.6 %) patients. PET/CT TNM classification was significantly more accurate (92.5 vs 73.7 %) than conventional staging with a p value < 0

  20. [Balloon occlusion test of the internal carotid artery for evaluating resectability of blood vessel infiltrating cervical metastasis of advanced head and neck cancers--Heidelberg experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, A; von Kummer, R; Adams, H P; Kneip, M; Galito, P; Maier, H

    1993-11-01

    During the last two years 17 patients of the ENT-Department of the University of Heidelberg suffering from squamous-cell carcinomas of the head and neck underwent a balloon occlusion test of the internal carotid artery (ICA). The investigation was performed because of tumorous infiltration of the large cervical vessels. The balloon occlusion of the ICA was accomplished at the Department of Neuroradiology of the University of Heidelberg. While stopping bloodflow in the ICA of one side for 15-20 min, clinical, electrophysiological and Doppler sonographic monitoring was performed, to detect severe cerebral complications. The specific electrophysiological monitoring contained the detection of MSSEP's (median nerve stimulated somatosensorial evoked potentials) and TCMEP's (transcortical motor evoked potentials) during test occlusion. Balloon occlusion was not possible in three patients because of severe arteriosclerosis. Test occlusion had to be discontinued in three patients because of clinical complications (temporary amaurosis, orthostatic complications). Finally, seven patients showed contraindications during test occlusion for permanent occlusion of the ICA. Four patients had a permanent occlusion of the ICA after tumour resection. In two patients the ICA was removed without problems in test occlusion. The third patient underwent a permanent carotid occlusion because of bleeding complications (in spite of poor clinical tolerance of the test occlusion). In the fourth patient, only intraoperative neuromonitoring with MSSEP's was conducted before permanent carotid occlusion. All four patients did not show any neurological deficits after resection of the ICA. Neurophysiological monitoring played an important role in predicting cerebral complications after permanent occlusion of the ICA.

  1. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in locally advanced head and neck cancer can influence the stage migration and nodal radiation treatment volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Rosario; Alongi, Pierpaolo; Ricchetti, Francesco; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Salgarello, Matteo; Alongi, Filippo

    2017-08-28

    To analyze the impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT (PET/CT) in the radiotherapy (RT) planning strategy in HNC, correlating CT-scan and PET/CT performances. Inclusion criteria were: age >18 years old, histologically proven head and neck cancer (HNC), patients candidate to definitive RT ± chemotherapy, stage of disease by means of PET/TC and CT-scan performed at our Cancer Care Center. Sixty patients were analyzed. The following primary tumor sites were investigated: nasopharynx (13%), oropharynx (42%), oral cavity (32%) and larynx non-glottic (13%). Globally, PET/CT findings caused changes on nodal radiation treatment volumes in 10% of all the population of study. Specifically, in 5 cases out of 19 oral cavity tumors (26%), PET/CT detected neck-nodes positive (not detected at CT-scan). These findings have allowed to change the patients management, including PET/CT neck-nodes positive in the high-risk RT volumes. In the RT planning strategy, the present findings support the use of PET/CT to improve upfront regional staging of HNC disease, particularly for oral cavity tumors. Further investigations are advocated to evaluate if this strategy could impact on long-term outcomes in terms of local control and overall survival.

  2. 头颈部鳞癌分子靶向治疗进展%Advancement of molecular targeted therapies in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李正才

    2010-01-01

    Current reseach of molecular targeted therapies in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck(SCCHN) is particularly active.As epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR) signaling pathway and angiogenesis play a key role in the growth of SCCHN,EGFR with its downstream effectors and molecular factors implicated in the angiogenesis process,such as vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors,represent the main targets of new therapeutic agents now.%当前分子靶向治疗头颈部鳞状细胞癌(SCCHN)的进展非常快.由于表皮生长因子受体(EGFR)信号传导和血管发生在SCCHN的生长中起关键作用,因此EGFR及其下游效应器与血管发生过程相关的分子及其受体就成为目前SCCHN分子靶向治疗的主要靶点.

  3. Phase I study of vandetanib with radiation therapy with or without cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitrakopoulou, VA; Frank, SJ; Cohen, EW; Hirsch, FR; Myers, JN; Heymach, JV; Lin, H; Tran, HT; Chen, CR; Jimeno, A; Nedzi, L; Vasselli, JR; Lowe, ES; Raben, D

    2014-01-01

    Background Vandetanib, added to cisplatin and radiation (RT) overcomes chemo RT and EGFR inhibitor resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) lines and models. Methods Patients with previously untreated HNSCC received vandetanib daily for 14 days (starting dose 100 mg) then vandetanib +RT (2.2 Gy/day, 5 days/week) for 6 weeks (regimen 1) or vandetanib +RT (2 Gy/day, 5 days/week) + cisplatin (30 mg/m2 weekly) for 7 weeks (regimen 2). Primary objective was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of vandetanib with RT +/− cisplatin. Results Of 33 treated patients, 30 completed therapy (regimen 1, n=12; regimen 2, n=18). MTD in regimen 2 was 100 mg [3 dose limiting toxicities (DLT) at 200 mg], while regimen 1 was stopped due to poor recruitment (one DLT at 200 mg). Most common grade ≥3 AEs were dysphagia (30%), stomatitis (33%) and mucosal inflammation (27%). Five patients discontinued vandetanib due to AEs. Conclusions Vandetanib with chemo RT was feasible. PMID:25352401

  4. Economic analysis of amifostine as adjunctive support for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: preliminary results from a randomized phase II clinical trial from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C L; Lane, D; Stinson, T; Glatzel, M; Buntzel, J

    2001-01-01

    In a randomized phase II trial in Germany, we investigated the clinical and economic impact of amifostine protection against the hematological and oral toxicities of carboplatin administered concurrently with standard fractions of radiotherapy. 28 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck received adjunctive or primary radiotherapy (5 days per week with daily fractions of 2 Gy, up to a total dose of 60 Gy) in conjunction with carboplatin (70 mg/m2) on days 1-5 and days 21-26. All patients received radiation encompassing at least 75% of the major salivary glands. Patients were randomized to receive radiation and carboplatin (RCT) alone or RCT preceded by rapid infusion of amifostine (500 mg) on days carboplatin was administered. The 14 patients who received amifostine, in comparison to 14 patients in the control arm, had significantly fewer episodes of grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia (p = 0.001), mucositis (p = 0.001), and xerostomia (p = 0.001). The patients receiving amifostine accrued significantly lower supportive care costs for resources related to infection ($241 vs. $1,275, p alimentation ($343 vs. $894, p = .01), and hospitalization ($286 vs. $2,429, p cancer receiving radiochemotherapy. Additional economic studies alongside randomized phase III trials and from other countries are needed.

  5. The case for therapeutic positivism in head and neck malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J E

    1980-10-01

    A negative attitude toward the treatment of advanced malignancy of the head and neck is frequently encountered. Aggressive therapy, at least for certain patients, is reasonable, and the assessment of certain factors in choosing candidates for such therapy is important. Illustrative case presentations demonstrate that a meaningful number of patients receive palliation or even cure with radical therapy. In view of the grim choices, it seems appropriate to take a positive, if radical, approach when the patient is highly motivated.

  6. Hedgehog pathway inhibitor in combination with radiation therapy for basal cell carcinomas of the head and neck. First clinical experience with vismodegib for locally advanced disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Bjoern; Roedel, Claus; Balermpas, Panagiotis [University Hospital Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Frankfurt (Germany); Meissner, Markus [University Hospital Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Dermatology, Frankfurt (Germany); Ghanaati, Shahram [University Hospital Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Craniofacial and Plastic Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Burck, Iris [University Hospital Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Definitive radiotherapy and vismodegib, an oral inhibitor of the hedgehog pathway, are both established treatment options for locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (BCC). Both have shown good results in local tumor control; however, the effects concerning advanced tumors are often not of a lasting nature and to date no systematic data about the combination of the two modalities are available. We retrospectively analyzed four patients who received vismodegib and radiotherapy in combination. Radiation doses varied between 50.4 Gy and 66.0 Gy. Three patients had recurrent BCC. One patient had locoregional lymph node involvement. Vismodegib was taken once a day (150 mg) during the entire time of irradiation and beyond upon instructions of the attending dermatologist. In three cases a persistent complete response was observed, in one case the tumor remained stable for approximately 6 months until further tumor progression was documented. The combined therapy was well tolerated in all cases. No exceptional side effects pointing at a drug-radiation interaction were observed. The combination of vismodegib and radiation seems feasible and the initial results are promising. In our cohort, there was no increase in unexpected side effects. Further research is needed to evaluate the significance of this combined therapy. (orig.) [German] Sowohl definitive Radiotherapie als auch Vismodegib, ein oraler Inhibitor der Hedgehog-Signalkaskade, sind etablierte Behandlungsoptionen fuer lokal fortgeschrittene Basalzellkarzinome (BCC). Beide Therapien zeigen fuer sich gute Ansprechraten, aber die lokale Tumorkontrolle ist oft nicht dauerhaft und bis heute existieren kaum Daten ueber eine Kombination der beiden Modalitaeten. Wir analysierten retrospektiv vier Patientenfaelle nach simultaner Applikation von Vismodegib und Bestrahlung. Die Bestrahlungsdosis variierte zwischen 50,4 Gy und 66,0 Gy. Drei der Patienten hatten ein rezidiviertes BCC. Ein Patient hatte einen befallenen regionalen

  7. Integrative Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matovina, Chloe; Birkeland, Andrew C; Zick, Suzanna; Shuman, Andrew G

    2017-02-01

    Objective Complementary and alternative medicine, or integrative medicine, has become increasingly popular among patients with head and neck cancer. Despite its increasing prevalence, many patients feel uncomfortable discussing such therapies with their physicians, and many physicians are unaware and underequipped to evaluate or discuss their use with patients. The aim of this article is to use recent data to outline the decision making inherent to integrative medicine utilization among patients with head and neck cancer, to discuss the ethical implications inherent to balancing integrative and conventional approaches to treatment, and to highlight available resources to enhance head and neck cancer providers' understanding of integrative medicine. Data Sources Randomized controlled trials involving integrative medicine or complementary and alternative medicine treatment for cancer patients. Review Methods Trials were drawn from a systematic PubMed database search categorized into cancer prevention, treatment, and symptom management. Conclusions Integrative medicine is gaining popularity for the management of cancer and is most commonly used for symptom management. A number of randomized controlled trials provide data to support integrative therapies, yet physicians who treat head and neck cancer may be faced with ethical dilemmas and practical barriers surrounding incorporation of integrative medicine. Implications for Practice In the management of head and neck cancer, there is an increasing demand for awareness of, dialogue about, and research evaluating integrative medicine therapies. It is important for otolaryngologists to become aware of integrative therapy options, their risks and benefits, and resources for further information to effectively counsel their patients.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor 2 is of prognostic value for patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D.; Seibold, N.D. [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Gebhard, M.P.; Noack, F. [University of Luebeck, Institute of Pathology, Luebeck (Germany); Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Radiation Oncology, Scottsdale (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Patients with locally advanced SCCHN have a poor prognosis. This study investigated the prognostic value of the tumor cell expression of the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in patients treated with surgery followed by radiotherapy. The impact of FGF-2-expression and 11 additional potential prognostic factors on loco-regional control (LRC), metastases-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) was retrospectively evaluated in 146 patients. Additional factors included age, gender, performance status, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin levels, tumor site, histologic grade, T-category, N-category, human papilloma virus (HPV) status, extent of resection, and chemotherapy. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test, multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model. On multivariate analysis, improved LRC was significantly associated with FGF-2-negativity [risk ratio (RR): 7.33; 95 %-confidence interval (CI): 2.88-19.05; p < 0.001], lower T-category (RR: 2.42; 95 %-CI: 1.47-4.33; p < 0.001), lower N-category (RR: 12.36; 95 %-CI: 3.48-78.91; p < 0.001), and pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin levels ≥12 g/dl (RR: 4.18; 95 %-CI: 1.73-10.53; p = 0.002). No factor was significantly associated with improved MFS. Lower T-category showed a trend (RR: 1.59; 95 %-CI: 0.97-2.82; p = 0.069). Better OS was significantly associated with FGF-2-negativity (RR: 5.10; 2.22-11.80; p < 0.001), lower T-category (RR: 2.17; 95 %-CI: 1.38-3.68; p < 0.001), lower N-category (RR: 3.86; 95 %-CI: 1.60-10.85; p = 0.002), and pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin levels ≥12 g/dl (RR: 3.20; 95 %-CI: 1.46-7.30; p = 0.004). HPV-positivity showed a trend (RR: 2.36; 95 %-CI: n.a.; p = 0.054). Tumor cell expression of FGF-2 proved to be an independent prognostic factor for LRC and OS. This factor can help personalize treatment and stratify patients in future trials. (orig.)

  9. Imaging of the head and neck. 2. rev. and enl. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mafee, M.F.; Valvassori, G.E. [University of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Becker, M. [Geneva University Hospital (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    Remarkable advances in medical diagnostic imaging have been made during the past three decades. The development of new imaging techniques and continuous improvements in the display of digital images have opened new horizons in the study of head and neck anatomy and pathology. The American Society of Head and Neck Radiology (ASHNR) and its European and Asiatic counterparts evolved because of the emerging awareness of the roles that head and neck radiologists play in the diagnosis and management of head and neck, base of the skull, neuro-ophthalmologic and neuro-otologic diseases. This edition continues the tradition of excellence set by the first edition of Valvassori's Head and Neck Imaging (which was also the first textbook in head and neck radiology), and provides a comprehensive review of the most pertinent and up-to-date knowledge in the field of head and neck imaging. The content of this edition has been organized into 12 chapters according to anatomic regions. It now includes new material on the temporomandibular joint, the lacrimal drainage system, dental scanning, fibro-osseous and cartilaginous lesions of the head and neck, MRI sialography, MR interventional technique, and thyroid and parathyroid glands. All chapters have been expanded to address new developments in the field and to stress the importance of imaging anatomy, pathologic correlation, and pertinent clinical data. For each anatomic region, the embryology and anatomy are introduced, followed by congenital and developmental disorders, inflammatory processes, benign and malignant neoplastic diseases, trauma, and postoperative changes. The detailed reference lists in each chapter include key references and are as recent as possible. Care has been taken to include exquisitely reproduced illustrations that provide the maximum of pertinent information. It is our hope that this textbook will be useful to students and physicians in the fields of radiology, otolaryngology, neurootology, rhinology

  10. Perfusion CT of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek Abdel, E-mail: arazek@mans.edu.eg; Tawfik, Ahmed Mohamed, E-mail: ahm_m_tawfik@hotmail.com; Elsorogy, Lamiaa Galal Ali, E-mail: lamia2elsorogy@hotmail.com; Soliman, Nermin Yehia, E-mail: nermin_eid@hotmail.com

    2014-03-15

    We aim to review the technique and clinical applications of perfusion CT (PCT) of head and neck cancer. The clinical value of PCT in the head and neck includes detection of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) as it allows differentiation of HNSCC from normal muscles, demarcation of tumor boundaries and tumor local extension, evaluation of metastatic cervical lymph nodes as well as determination of the viable tumor portions as target for imaging-guided biopsy. PCT has been used for prediction of treatment outcome, differentiation between post-therapeutic changes and tumor recurrence as well as monitoring patient after radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. PCT has a role in cervical lymphoma as it may help in detection of response to chemotherapy and early diagnosis of relapsing tumors.

  11. [Functional surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, François; Julieron, Morbize

    2002-12-01

    Surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma can alter speech, swallowing, and cosmoses. Recent tendency is to avoid mutilating surgery unless the tumour is aggressive or resistant to chemotherapy and or radiotherapy. Functional surgery is being widely employed, and for example it may vary between conventional partial surgery and endoscopic laser surgery for small sized vocal cord cancers. Various new reconstructive procedures have been developed to help early functional restoration. Loco-regional flaps can be used to replace gums and avoid dental extractions. Free flaps with micro-vascular anastomosis can be employed for immediate reconstruction of extensive surgical defects involving pharyngeal wall, tongue, mandible and mid-face to restore better function and cosmoses. Few recently developed techniques can be also employed in selected cases of laryngo-pharyngeal cancers to avoid permanent laryngeal mutilation. Another goal of functional surgery is to decrease the postoperative radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy sequelae, and obtain successful postoperative functional rehabilitation.

  12. Carotid Artery Management in Head and Neck Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Haluk Özkul

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Prevention and management of intraoperative and postoperative bleeding are of a great importance in performing successful head and neck surgery. Since the carotid artery is the major source of cerebral vascular supply, the management of carotid artery diseases including replacement, when needed, necessitates special knowledge and skill as well as experience. Delayed postoperative hemorrhage usually comes from carotid artery due to increasing frequency of radiotherapy treatment of head and neck cancers nowadays. This is the most catastrophic complication of the head and neck surgery. Carotid resection can be planned as part of surgical treatment or salvage. Carotid resection is performed mostly to salvage patients when radiotherapy and chemotherapy are ineffective and less for carotid invasion caused by either direct extension of a malign tumor originating from the nasopharynx and oropharynx or extracapsular invasion of advanced jugular node metastasis. The purpose of this presentation was to enlighten the readers about carotid artery problems and management emphasizing the importance of preoperative evaluation. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 71-4

  13. Cervicopectoral flap in head and neck cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivrioglu Nazan S

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstruction of the head and neck after adequate resection of primary tumor and neck dissection is a challenge. It should be performed at one sitting in advanced tumors. Defects caused by the resection should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Cervicopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the cheek defects. Methods This study included twelve patients presenting with cancer of the head and neck to Izmir Ataturk Training Hospital and Adnan Menderes University Hospital. Tumor resection and neck dissection was performed in one session by the same surgeon. A single incision was made and a medially based cervicopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure in neck dissection and for closure of defects after tumor resection. Results There was no major complication. Two flaps had partial superficial epidermolysis at the suture line. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved. Conclusion The cervicopectoral flap is an excellent alternative for the reconstruction of head and neck. Harvesting and application of the flap is rapid and safe. Only a single incision is sufficient for dissection and flap elevation. This flap achieves perfect surgical exposure, makes neck dissection easy and allows one to perform both tumor resection and neck dissection in one session.

  14. Palliative treatment of patients with inoperable locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer, using a low-dose and personalized chemotherapeutic regimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Rohit; Bennett, Jeffery; Reisman, David N.

    2017-01-01

    Inoperable or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is known to be associated with a poor patient prognosis. First line therapies include a Taxol, platinum-based antineoplastic and fluorouracil (FU) treatment regimen (TPF) or a platinum-based antineoplastic, FU and EGFR inhibitor treatment regimen (PFE). The toxicity of these regimens is one of the major limiting factors, particularly for palliative treatment. The present study is a retrospective study of 15 patients with HNSCC, where the treatment goal was palliative. Of the 15 patients, 8 received a TPF, while 7 received a PFE. A total of 129 treatment cycles were administered with a median of 9 cycles (range, 3–14). Chemotherapy began with low doses and was subsequently titrated up based on tolerance and response. Positive responses were noted with the lower doses compared with the conventional doses, and maximal doses were not required. The median dose of cisplatin, paclitaxel and 5-FU administered was 40 mg/m2, 80 mg/m2 and 360 mg/m2/day for 5 days, respectively. Cetuximab was used at a standard dose. At the initial follow-up (mean, 64 days; 3 cycles), a 100% disease control rate (DCR) and 80% overall response rate (ORR) was achieved. A positive response, 60% DCR and 60% ORR, was maintained until the late stages of the study (mean, 217 days; 9 cycles). Following termination of chemotherapy after >9 cycles, 4 patients remained disease free for ~1 year. A total of 3 patients exhibited a pathologic complete response despite radiologically exhibiting residual disease. The median progression-free survival time was 10.03 months and the overall survival time was 15.77 months. The only grade 3 hematologic toxicity noted was neutropenia in 3 (20%) patients. Grade 3 vomiting was noted in 1 (6.67%) patient and grade 3 stomatitis was noted in 1 (6.67%) patient. Due to low toxicity patients exhibited improved tolerance to this approach, particularly in terms of palliative care. Furthermore, these results

  15. Malignant neoplasms of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Paxton V; Davidoff, Andrew M

    2006-05-01

    Head and neck masses represent a common clinical entity in children. In general, these masses are classified as developmental, inflammatory, or neoplastic. Having a working knowledge of lesions within this region and conducting a thorough history and physical examination generally enables the clinician to facilitate an appropriate workup and establish a diagnosis. The differential diagnosis is broad, and expeditiously distinguishing benign from malignant masses is critical for instituting a timely multidisciplinary approach to the management of malignant lesions. Neoplasms of the head and neck account for approximately 5% of all childhood malignancies. A diagnosis of malignancy may represent a primary tumor or metastatic foci to cervical nodes. In this review, we discuss the general approach to evaluating suspicious masses and adenopathy in the head and neck region and summarize the most common malignant neoplasms of the head and neck with regard to their incidence, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, staging, and management. Thyroid, parathyroid, and salivary gland tumors are discussed elsewhere in this issue of Seminars in Pediatric Surgery.

  16. Evaluation of head and neck postures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delleman, N.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the literature and two experiments on the evaluation of head and neck postures. It is concluded that health and safety professiona1s and ergonomists during posture evaluation should consider neck flexion/extension (head vs. trunk), besides the traditionally used inclination of t

  17. Oral sequelae of head and neck radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissink, A; Jansma, J; Spijkervet, FKL; Burlage, FR; Coppes, RP

    In addition to anti-tumor effects, ionizing radiation causes damage in normal tissues located in the radiation portals. Oral complications of radiotherapy in the head and neck region are the result of the deleterious effects of radiation on, e. g., salivary glands, oral mucosa, bone, dentition,

  18. [Photodynamic therapy for head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, C.B.; Specht, Lena; Kirkegaard, J.

    2006-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new treatment for head and neck cancer. The principle of the treatment is a photochemical reaction initiated by light activation of a photosensitizer, which causes the death of the exposed tissue. This article presents the modes of action of PDT and the techniques...

  19. Evaluation of head and neck postures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delleman, N.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the literature and two experiments on the evaluation of head and neck postures. It is concluded that health and safety professiona1s and ergonomists during posture evaluation should consider neck flexion/extension (head vs. trunk), besides the traditionally used inclination of

  20. Preliminary results of SIB-IMRT in head and neck cancers: Report from a regional cancer center in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty Santam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Intensity-modulated radiotherapy using simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT is an attractive method for the treatment of head and neck cancers with sparing of the salivary function. Aims : To assess the feasibility, toxicity, and tumor control using SIB-IMRT in locally advanced head and neck cancers in the Indian setting. Settings and Design : The study was conducted in a regional cancer center in northern India. A review of the treatment result of the first 20 patients is presented. Methods and Materials : SIB-IMRT was planned for 20 patients-14 patients were treated with the SIB-72 schedule delivering a dose of 72 Gy, 66 Gy, and 57 Gy to the PTV GTV , PTV CTV1 , and PTV CTV2 in 33 fractions. Six patients were treated with the SIB-66 schedule delivering 66 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy to the above-mentioned volumes in 30 fractions. Patients were monitored for toxicity using the CTCAE v 3.0 criteria. Descriptive analysis of toxicity and actuarial estimates of the loco-regional control and survival are presented. Results : Grade III mucositis was seen in 65% patients. None of the patients had Grade III dermatitis. The projected 2-year overall survival was 95%. Conclusion : SIB-IMRT schedules evaluated were found to be safe and effective and are being subjected to further prospective studies.

  1. Metal concentrations in hair of patients with various head and neck cancers as a diagnostic aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Anna; Napierala, Marta; Golasik, Magdalena; Herman, Małgorzata; Walas, Stanisław; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Szyfter, Witold; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Golusinski, Wojciech; Baralkiewicz, Danuta; Florek, Ewa

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck cancers are one of the most frequent cancers worldwide. This paper attempts to evaluate disturbances of homeostasis of the necessary elements (calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, iron, manganese) and changes in the levels of toxic metals (lead, cadmium, cobalt, chromium VI) in hair of patients with head and neck cancers, as well as people without a diagnosed neoplastic disease. In order to quantify the necessary elements and toxic metals, a method using ICP-MS and ICP-OES techniques had been developed and validated. The studies have shown that patients with head and neck cancer used to drink alcohol and smoked much more frequently than healthy individuals, both in the past and presently. Statistically significant differences in concentrations of average metal content in the group of patients with head and neck cancers compared to the control group were confirmed. Significant differences in metal content between the group of patients with head and neck cancers and healthy individuals were found which enabled distinguishing between the study groups. To this end, a more advanced statistical tool, i.e. chemometrics, was used. The conducted research analyses and the use of advanced statistical techniques confirm the benefits of using alternative material to distinguish the patients with head and neck cancers from the healthy individuals.

  2. Delays in diagnosis, referral and management of head and neck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delays in diagnosis, referral and management of head and neck cancer presenting at Kenyatta National ... Background: The most important prognostic factor in head and neck cancer is the stage of the disease at presentation. ... Article Metrics.

  3. American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neck Mass in Adults is now available in Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. The guideline addresses the ... Interested in systematic review training? SAGE, publisher of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery , will offer three grants ...

  4. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiation Therapy (HART) of 70.6 Gy With Concurrent 5-FU/Mitomycin C Is Superior to HART of 77.6 Gy Alone in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Long-term Results of the ARO 95-06 Randomized Phase III Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, Volker, E-mail: volker.budach@charite.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Stromberger, Carmen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Essen (Germany); Baumann, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Dresden (Germany); Budach, Wilfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heinrich Heine Universität Düsseldorf (Germany); Grabenbauer, Gerhard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals of Erlangen (Germany); Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Olze, Heidi [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter [Sostana GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Ghadjar, Pirus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term results of the ARO 95-06 randomized trial comparing hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation with mitomycin C/5-fluorouracil (C-HART) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (HART) alone in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: The primary endpoint was locoregional control (LRC). Three hundred eighty-four patients with stage III (6%) and IV (94%) oropharyngeal (59.4%), hypopharyngeal (32.3%), and oral cavity (8.3%) cancer were randomly assigned to 30 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total of 70.6 Gy concurrently with mitomycin C/5-FU (C-HART) or 16 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total dose of 77.6 Gy alone (HART). Statistical analyses were done with the log-rank test and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 8.7 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.8-9.7 years). At 10 years, the LRC rates were 38.0% (C-HART) versus 26.0% (HART, P=.002). The cancer-specific survival and overall survival rates were 39% and 10% (C-HART) versus 30.0% and 9% (HART, P=.042 and P=.049), respectively. According to multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combined treatment was associated with improved LRC (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.6 [95% CI: 0.5-0.8; P=.002]). The association between combined treatment arm and increased LRC appeared to be limited to oropharyngeal cancer (P=.003) as compared with hypopharyngeal or oral cavity cancer (P=.264). Conclusions: C-HART remains superior to HART in terms of LRC. However, this effect may be limited to oropharyngeal cancer patients.

  5. Complications in head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christison-Lagay, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Head and neck anatomy is topographically complex and the region is densely populated by vital nerves and vascular and lymphatic structures. Injury to many of these structures is associated with significant morbidity and may even be fatal. A thorough knowledge of regional anatomy is imperative and complications need to be managed in a thoughtful directed manner. The pediatric surgeon may be called upon to address both congenital and acquired conditions and should be prepared to encounter reoperative fields after failed initial surgery. This review summarizes the current literature on four frequently encountered surgical conditions of the head and neck: branchial cleft anomalies, thyroglossal duct cyst, thyroid disease, and lymphatic malformations, with a focus on the prevention and treatment of complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Imaging of head and neck venous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flis, Christine M.; Connor, Stephen E. [King' s College Hospital, Neuroradiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are non proliferative lesions that consist of dysplastic venous channels. The aim of imaging is to characterise the lesion and define its anatomic extent. We will describe the plain film, ultrasound (US) (including colour and duplex Doppler), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conventional angiographic and direct phlebographic appearances of venous malformations. They will be illustrated at a number of head and neck locations, including orbit, oral cavity, superficial and deep facial space, supraglottic and intramuscular. An understanding of the classification of such vascular anomalies is required to define the correct therapeutic procedure to employ. Image-guided sclerotherapy alone or in combination with surgery is now the first line treatment option in many cases of head and neck venous malformations, so the radiologist is now an integral part of the multidisciplinary management team. (orig.)

  7. SBRT for recurrent head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, M.; Kabarriti, R.; Baliga, S.; Guha, C.; Tome, W.; Kalnicki, S.

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancers is complex. Concerns over toxicity with re-irradiation have limited its use in the clinical setting. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a highly conformal and precise type of radiotherapy and has the advantage of sparing normal tissue. Although SBRT is an attractive treatment modality, its use in the clinic is limited, given the technically challenging nature of the procedure. In this review, we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of re-irradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancers, with particular attention to the advent of SBRT and its use with systemic therapies such as cetuximab.

  8. The Danish Head and Neck Cancer database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jens; Jovanovic, Aleksandar; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ) of cancer in the nasal sinuses, salivary glands, or thyroid gland (corresponding to the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision, classifications C.01-C.11, C.30-C.32, C.73, and C.80). MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables used in the study were symptoms and the duration of the symptoms......AIM OF THE DATABASE: The Danish Head and Neck Cancer database is a nationwide clinical quality database that contains prospective data collected since the early 1960s. The overall aim of this study was to describe the outcome of the national strategy for multidisciplinary treatment of head and neck...... cancer in Denmark and to create a basis for clinical trials. STUDY POPULATION: The study population consisted of all Danish patients referred for treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, or neck nodes from unknown primary or any histopathological type (except lymphoma...

  9. Malnutrition associated with head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifeh Haghjoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancerous patients, under the chemotherapy or radiotherapy, are at high risk of malnutrition due to the associated complications with the treatment procedures such as chewing problems, dysphagia, nausea etc. Considering the patients’ history of alcohol consumption, smoking or any other diseases and performing several physical examinations are essential in early identification of high-risk patients for nutritional complications, losing unintentional weight and fat free mass. In this review, we tried to briefly explain the risk of malnutrition in patients with head and neck cancers who are undergoing surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oral nutrition, nasogastric tube and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy  are different methods of nutritional interventions, which have been compared due to their efficacy in maintaining the patients’ weight. In this study, we reviewed the results obtained in clinical trials about the efficacy of intense nutritional intervention on limiting the chemoradiotherapy-associated complications in patients with head and neck cancers.

  10. Cutaneous Angiosarcoma of Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Vora; Gopikrishnan Anjaneyan; Rajat Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous angiosarcoma is a rare aggressive tumor of capillary and lymphatic endothelial cell origin. Cutaneous angiosarcoma of the head and neck regions seems to be a distinctive neoplasm with characteristic clinicopathologic features that differ from angiosarcoma in other anatomic locations. Angiosarcoma, regardless of their setting, has a bad prognosis. We presented here a case of 80 years old male, with multiple nontender grouped purple to red hemorrhagic vesicular and bullous lesions ove...

  11. Skin Cancer of the Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Yun-Hsuan

    2010-01-01

    The majority of skin cancers of the head and neck are nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent types of NMSC. Malignant melanoma is an aggressive neoplasm of skin, and the ideal adjuvant therapy has not yet been found, although various options for treatment of skin cancer are available to the patient and physician, allowing high cure rate and excellent functional and cosmetic outcomes. Sunscreen protection and early evaluation of ...

  12. Reirradiation of head and neck cancer in the era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy: Patient selection, practical aspects, and current evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Sil [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Locoregional failure is the most frequent pattern of failure in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients and it leads to death in most of the patients. Second primary tumors occurring in the other head and neck region reach up to almost 40% of long-term survivors. Recommended and preferred retreatment option in operable patients is salvage surgical resection, reporting a 5-year overall survival of up to 40%. However, because of tumor location, extent, and underlying comorbidities, salvage surgery is often limited and compromised by incomplete resection. Reirradiation with or without combined chemotherapy is an appropriate option for unresectable recurrence. Reirradiation is carefully considered with a case-by-case basis. Reirradiation protocol enrollment is highly encouraged prior to committing patient to an aggressive therapy. Radiation doses greater than 60 Gy are usually recommended for successful salvage. Despite recent technical improvement in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the use of concurrent chemotherapy, and the emergence of molecularly targeted agents, careful patient selection remain as the most paramount factor in reirradiation. Tumors that recur or persist despite aggressive prior chemoradiation therapy imply the presence of chemoradio-resistant clonogens. Treatment protocols that combine novel targeted radiosensitizing agents with conformal high precision radiation are required to overcome the resistance while minimizing toxicity. Recent large number of data showed that IMRT may provide better locoregional control with acceptable acute or chronic morbidities. However, additional prospective studies are required before a definitive conclusion can be drawn on safety and effectiveness of IMRT.

  13. ASCO highlights podcast: head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A critical review of the head and neck cancer research highlights of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing trials reported at the meeting, the key trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin against 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) plus cisplatin in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is highlighted. The GORTEC2007-02 trial comparing induction docetaxel/platinum/5-FU followed by cetuximab-radiotherapy against concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for N2b/c-N3 non operated stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is also discussed. An overview of the research reported using immunotherapy in head and neck cancer is also given, considering maturing data and particularly in relapsing patients, where response rates, though low, are better than with current therapies, and the responses are long lasting. Future developments are also considered, again with a focus on immunotherapy, but also considering combination with radiotherapy and chemoradiation.

  14. [Rare tumors of the head and neck; on behalf of the REFCOR, the French Network of rare head and neck tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baujat, Bertrand; Thariat, Juliette; Baglin, Anne Catherine; Costes, Valérie; Testelin, Sylvie; Reyt, Emile; Janot, François

    2014-05-01

    Malignant tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract may be rare by their histology (sarcoma, variants of conventional squamous cell carcinomas) and/or location (sinuses, salivary glands, ear, of various histologies themselves). They represent less than 10% of head and neck neoplasms. The confirmation of their diagnosis often requires a medical expertise and sometimes biomolecular techniques complementary to classical histology and immunohistochemistry. Due to their location, their treatment often requires a specific surgical technique. Radiation therapy is indicated based on histoclinical characteristics common to other head and neck neoplasms but also incorporate grade. Further, the technique must often be adapted to take into account the proximity of organs at risk. For most histologies, chemotherapy is relatively inefficient but current molecular advances may allow to consider pharmaceutical developments in the coming years. The REFCOR, the French Network of head and neck cancers aims to organize and promote the optimal management of these rare and heterogeneous diseases, to promote research and clinical trials.

  15. Radio-chemotherapy of head- and neck tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrowsky, W.; Dobrowsky, E.; Strassl, H.; Rausch, E.M.; Pavelka, R.; Braun, O.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced cancers of the head and neck region render a poor prognosis due to high recurrence rates. Various trials are ongoing with the aim of increasing local tumor control, thus resulting in higher survival rates. A combination of irradiation with simultaneous application of 5-Fluorouacil and Mitomycin C has been used with good effect in squamous cell cancers of different sites. In a prospective non-randomized trial we have used radiotherapy with concomitant application of Mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil. Treatment was performed either as therapy with curative intension or as a preoperative combined modality treatment. This report describes the interim results of our trial which was started in 1985.

  16. Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarev, Stanislav [University of Vermont, College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont (United States); Gupta, Vishal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hu, Kenneth; Harrison, Louis B. [Beth Israel Medical Center, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York (United States); Bakst, Richard, E-mail: Richard.Bakst@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Primary mucosal melanoma of the head and neck (MMHN) comprises approximately 1% of all malignant melanomas. It presents more commonly in an elderly population and has no significant gender predominance. Given its rarity, most evidence of the causes, behavior, and treatment approaches for MMHN originates from isolated case reports and retrospective series. Between 1945 and 2011, at least 1951 cases of MMHN have been reported in the literature. Despite numerous technological developments in surgery and radiation therapy, as well as advances in systemic modalities, MMHN is an aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Complete surgical excision with clear margins remains the primary treatment modality. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy may improve locoregional control but does not appear to affect survival. Definitive particle radiation therapy promises to provide high rates of local control for nonoperable patients. Recent molecular evidence suggests that proto-oncogene KIT aberrations in a subset of mucosal melanomas may represent a potential diagnostic value and serve as a therapeutic target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors in an adjuvant setting for patients with advanced MMHN.

  17. MMP9 but Not EGFR, MET, ERCC1, P16, and P-53 Is Associated with Response to Concomitant Radiotherapy, Cetuximab, and Weekly Cisplatin in Patients with Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Fountzilas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Concomitant administration of radiotherapy with cisplatin or radiotherapy with cetuximab appear to be the treatment of choice for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. In the present retrospective analysis, we investigated the predictive role of several biomarkers in an unselected cohort of patients treated with concomitant radiotherapy, weekly cisplatin, and cetuximab (CCRT. We identified 37 patients treated with this approach, of which 13 (35% achieved a complete response and 10 (27% achieved a partial response. Severe side effects were mainly leucopenia, dysphagia, rash, and anemia. Tumor EGFR, MET, ERCC1, and p-53 protein and/or gene expression were not associated with treatment response. In contrast, high MMP9 mRNA expression was found to be significantly associated with objective response. In conclusion, CCRT is feasible and active. MMP9 was the only biomarker tested that appears to be of predictive value in cetuximab treated patients. However, this is a hypothesis generating study and the results should not be viewed as definitive evidence until they are validated in a larger cohort.

  18. Progress and challenges in the vaccine-based treatment of head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venuti Aldo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Head and neck (HN cancer represents one of the most challenging diseases because the mortality remains high despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment. Although vaccine-based approaches for the treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck have achieved limited clinical success, advances in cancer immunology provide a strong foundation and powerful new tools to guide current attempts to develop effective cancer vaccines. This article reviews what has to be rather what has been done in the field for the development of future vaccines in HN tumours.

  19. Efficacy and feasibility of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma classified as clinical nodal stage N2c, N3, or N2b with supraclavicular lymph node metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Naoki; Onozawa, Yusuke; Hikosaka, Tomomi; Hamauchi, Satoshi; Tsushima, Takahiro; Todaka, Akiko; Machida, Nozomu; Haraguchi, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Fuke, Tomohito; Iida, Yoshiyuki; Kamijo, Tomoyuki; Onitsuka, Tetsuro; Boku, Narikazu; Yasui, Hirofumi; Yokota, Tomoya

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and feasibility of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with a high risk of distant metastases compared with CRT alone. We retrospectively analyzed 29 HNSCC patients with clinical nodal stage N2c, N3, or N2b disease and supraclavicular lymph node metastases receiving CRT alone (CRT group; n = 16) or TPF induction chemotherapy followed by CRT (TPF group; n = 13) between April 2008 and May 2012. The median follow-up periods were 14.5 (range 5.0-65.0) and 25.0 (range 14.0-32.0) months for CRT and TPF groups, respectively. A greater proportion of patient characteristics in the CRT group had advanced T and N stages. The overall response rate to induction TPF was 50.0%; grade 3-4 toxicities included neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, anorexia, and hyponatremia. Complete response rates after CRT completion were 55.5% in the TPF and 42.9% in the CRT group; median overall survival was not reached in the TPF group and was 14.0 months in the CRT group (p = 0.037). Multivariate analysis revealed that induction TPF and T stage were independent prognostic factors [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.196; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.043-0.898; p = 0.036, HR = 9.966; 95% CI 2.270-43.75; p = 0.002, respectively). TPF followed by CRT is tolerated and may be an option for the treatment of locally advanced stage N2c, N3, or N2b HNSCC.

  20. INTRAOPERATIVE NEUROMONITORING DURING HEAD AND NECK SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Rumyantsev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical trial comparatively analyzed the frequency of postoperative neurological complications due to damage to motor (facial, recurrent, laryngeal, and accessory nerves after head and neck operations using the traditional procedure or intraoperative neuromonitoring. Neuromonitoring made during operations on the thyroid and level VI central neck could reduce the rate of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis by more than twice (OR = 0.32; 95 % CI 0.11–0.86; p = 0.028. The author considers the absolute indication for intraoperative neuromonitoring to be high-risk surgery for nondeliberate damage to the motor nerves and impossibility of their visual detection.

  1. Anatomic Eponyms in Neuroradiology: Head and Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    In medicine, an eponym is a word-typically referring to an anatomic structure, disease, or syndrome-that is derived from a person's name. Medical eponyms are ubiquitous and numerous. They are also at times controversial. Eponyms reflect medicine's rich and colorful history and can be useful for concisely conveying complex concepts. Familiarity with eponyms facilitates correct usage and accurate communication. In this article, 22 eponyms used to describe anatomic structures of the head and neck are discussed. For each structure, the author first provides a biographical account of the individual for whom the structure is named. An anatomic description and brief discussion of the structure's clinical relevance follow.

  2. Penetrating wounds of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahrsdoerfer, R A; Johns, M E; Cantrell, R W

    1979-12-01

    Wounding capability of bullets is primarily releated to velocity. Bullet mass and shape, and specific gravity of body tissues being struck by the missile, are lesser factors. Seventy cases of penetrating wounds of the head and neck were treated during a six-year period. Vascular injuries were more common with neck wounds, while face and head injuries (extracranial) were similar to maxillofacial trauma. It is recognized that hemorrhage at the base of the skull is difficult to treat, and contemporary training in temporal bone and base of skull surgery is mandatory for the critical management of these wounds.

  3. Response evaluation after chemoradiotherapy for advanced nodal disease in head and neck cancer using diffusion-weighted MRI and 18F-FDG-PET-CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, C.S.; Graaf, P. de; Alberts, F.M.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Comans, E.F.; Bloemena, E.; Witte, B.I.; Sanchez, E.; Leemans, C.R.; Castelijns, J.A.; Bree, R. de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of accuracy and interobserver variation of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDGPET-CT) to detect residual lymph node metastases after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in advanced

  4. Response evaluation after chemoradiotherapy for advanced nodal disease in head and neck cancer using diffusion-weighted MRI and 18F-FDG-PET-CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, C.S.; Graaf, P. de; Alberts, F.M.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Comans, E.F.; Bloemena, E.; Witte, B.I.; Sanchez, E.; Leemans, C.R.; Castelijns, J.A.; Bree, R. de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of accuracy and interobserver variation of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDGPET-CT) to detect residual lymph node metastases after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in advanced stag

  5. Response evaluation after chemoradiotherapy for advanced nodal disease in head and neck cancer using diffusion-weighted MRI and 18F-FDG-PET-CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, C.S.; de Graaf, P.; Alberts, F.M.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Comans, E.F.I.; Bloemena, E.; Witte, B.I.; Sanchez, E.; Leemans, C.R.; Castelijns, J.A.; de Bree, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Evaluation of accuracy and interobserver variation of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDGPET-CT) to detect residual lymph node metastases after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in advanced stage

  6. Response evaluation after chemoradiotherapy for advanced nodal disease in head and neck cancer using diffusion-weighted MRI and 18F-FDG-PET-CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, C.S.; Graaf, P. de; Alberts, F.M.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Comans, E.F.; Bloemena, E.; Witte, B.I.; Sanchez, E.; Leemans, C.R.; Castelijns, J.A.; Bree, R. de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of accuracy and interobserver variation of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDGPET-CT) to detect residual lymph node metastases after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in advanced stag

  7. Re-irradiation for recurrent and second primary cancers of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Maria A; Veruttipong, Darlene; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Chin, Robert; Beron, Philip; Abemayor, Elliot; St John, Maie; Chen, Allen M

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate a single-institutional experience with the use of re-irradiation for recurrent and new primary cancers of the head and neck. The medical charts of 80 consecutive patients who underwent re-irradiation for local-regionally recurrent or second primary head and neck cancer between November 1998 and December 2015 were analyzed. Multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard and logistic regression to determine predictors of clinical outcomes. Seventy-six of the 80 patients were evaluable. The median age was 57.5 (range 26.6-84.9); Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was used in 71 (93.4%) patients with a median dose of 60Gy. Thirty-one patients (40.8%) underwent salvage surgery before re-irradiation and 47 (61.8%) received concurrent systemic therapy. The median time interval between radiation courses was 25.3months (range 2-322months). The 2-year estimates of overall survival, progression free survival, locoregional control, and distant control were 51.0%, 31.3%, 36.8% and 68.3%, respectively. Patients who underwent salvage surgery prior to re-irradiation had significantly improved locoregional control, progression free survival, and overall survival (p<0.05, for all). On multivariate analysis, gross tumor volume (GTV) at re-irradiation and interval between radiation courses were associated with improved overall survival. Severe (grade⩾3) late complications were observed in 25 patients (32.8%). Re-irradiation for recurrent or second primary head and neck cancer is feasible and effective in select patients with head and neck cancer. The high observed rate of treatment-related morbidity highlights the continue challenges that accompany this approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assembly and initial characterization of a panel of 85 genomically validated cell lines from diverse head and neck tumor sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei; Sano, Daisuke; Pickering, Curtis R; Jasser, Samar A; Henderson, Ying C; Clayman, Gary L; Sturgis, Erich M; Ow, Thomas J; Lotan, Reuben; Carey, Thomas E; Sacks, Peter G; Grandis, Jennifer R; Sidransky, David; Heldin, Nils Erik; Myers, Jeffrey N

    2011-12-01

    Human cell lines are useful for studying cancer biology and preclinically modeling cancer therapy, but can be misidentified and cross-contamination is unfortunately common. The purpose of this study was to develop a panel of validated head and neck cell lines representing the spectrum of tissue sites and histologies that could be used for studying the molecular, genetic, and phenotypic diversity of head and neck cancer. A panel of 122 clinically and phenotypically diverse head and neck cell lines from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, thyroid cancer, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, oral leukoplakia, immortalized primary keratinocytes, and normal epithelium was assembled from the collections of several individuals and institutions. Authenticity was verified by carrying out short tandem repeat analysis. Human papillomavirus (HPV) status and cell morphology were also determined. Eighty-five of the 122 cell lines had unique genetic profiles. HPV-16 DNA was detected in 2 cell lines. These 85 cell lines included cell lines from the major head and neck primary tumor sites, and close examination shows a wide range of in vitro phenotypes. This panel of 85 genomically validated head and neck cell lines represents a valuable resource for the head and neck cancer research community that can help advance understanding of the disease by providing a standard reference for cell lines that can be used for biological as well as preclinical studies. ©2011 AACR.

  9. Dysphagia and trismus after concomitant chemo-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (chemo-IMRT) in advanced head and neck cancer; dose-effect relationships for swallowing and mastication structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, L.; Heemsbergen, W.D.; de Jong, R.; van Rossum, M.A.; Smeele, L.E.; Rasch, C.R.N.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Prospective assessment of dysphagia and trismus in chemo-IMRT head and neck cancer patients in relation to dose-parameters of structures involved in swallowing and mastication. Material and methods: Assessment of 55 patients before, 10-weeks (N=49) and 1-year post-treatment

  10. Manual of head and neck imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, Prashant [Maryland University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States). Div. of Neuroradiology; Mukherjee, Sugoto [Virginia University Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Div. of Neuroradiology; Jameson, Mark J. [Virginia University Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Div. of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology; Wintermark, Max [Virginia University Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Medical Imaging

    2014-06-01

    Easy-to-read short chapters. Tables, checklists, and algorithms to assist in arriving at a quick diagnosis. Clinical pearls that will enable the radiologist to issue a relevant report. One-stop resource when preparing for radiology and otolaryngology exams. Line diagrams to illustrate key concepts. This book is designed as an easily readable manual that will be of great practical value for radiology and otolaryngology residents during their clinical rotations. Key facts on head and neck imaging are presented in short chapters written in an easily readable style. Line drawings are used to illustrate key concepts, and tables, checklists, and algorithms will enable the readers to arrive at a quick diagnosis. In addition, emphasis is placed on clinical pearls that will assist them in preparing suitable reports. The Manual of Head and Neck Imaging is sized to allow residents to read it completely within a matter of days, and it will also serve as an ideal quick reference guide as different clinical situations arise.

  11. Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Accorona, Remo; Botti, Gerardo; Farina, Davide; Fossati, Piero; Gatta, Gemma; Gogas, Helen; Lombardi, Davide; Maroldi, Roberto; Nicolai, Piero; Ravanelli, Marco; Vanella, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck is a very rare and aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. The nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and oral cavity are the most common locations. One-, 3- and 5-year survival rates between 2000 and 2007 were 63%, 30% and 20%, respectively. Cigarette smoking seems to be a risk factor even though the evidence for this is very low. Clinical signs and symptoms are usually nonspecific. While surgery is considered the mainstay of treatment for most mucosal melanomas of the head and neck region, radiotherapy has a role in local control of the disease after surgery. Many new treatment options in the last years, in particular targeted therapies (i.e. inhibitors of c-KIT, NRAS/MEK or BRAF) and immunotherapies (anti CTLA-4 and anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies), have changed the history of cutaneous melanoma. Despite the different biology, mucosal melanoma is currently treated in the same way as cutaneous melanoma; however, patients with mucosal melanoma were excluded from the majority of recent clinical trials. Recent molecular findings offer new hope for the development of more effective systemic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Photodynamic therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H Nelke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a special type of treatment involving the use of a photosensitizer or a photosensitizing agent along with a special type of light, which, combined together, induces production of a form of oxygen that is used to kill surrounding cells in different areas of the human body. Specification of the head and neck region requires different approaches due to the surrounding of vital structures. PDT can also be used to treat cells invaded with infections such as fungi, bacteria and viruses. The light beam placed in tumor sites activates locally applied drugs and kills the cancer cells. Many studies are taking place in order to invent better photosensitizers, working on a larger scale and to treat deeply placed and larger tumors. It seems that PDT could be used as an alternative surgical treatment in some tumor types; however, all clinicians should be aware that the surgical approach is still the treatment of choice. PDT is a very accurate and effective therapy, especially in early stages of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC, and can greatly affect surgical outcomes in cancerous patients. We present a detailed review about photosensitizers, their use, and therapeutic advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Photodynamic therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H Nelke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a special type of treatment involving the use of a photosensitizer or a photosensitizing agent along with a special type of light, which, combined together, induces production of a form of oxygen that is used to kill surrounding cells in different areas of the human body. Specification of the head and neck region requires different approaches due to the surrounding of vital structures. PDT can also be used to treat cells invaded with infections such as fungi, bacteria and viruses. The light beam placed in tumor sites activates locally applied drugs and kills the cancer cells. Many studies are taking place in order to invent better photosensitizers, working on a larger scale and to treat deeply placed and larger tumors. It seems that PDT could be used as an alternative surgical treatment in some tumor types; however, all clinicians should be aware that the surgical approach is still the treatment of choice. PDT is a very accurate and effective therapy, especially in early stages of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC, and can greatly affect surgical outcomes in cancerous patients. We present a detailed review about photosensitizers, their use, and therapeutic advantages and disadvantages.

  14. Head and neck mycetoma: the mycetoma research centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahal, Ahmed; Mahgoub, El Sheikh; El Hassan, Ahmed Mohamed; Jacoub, Angom Osman; Hassan, Doaa

    2015-03-01

    Mycetoma is a unique neglected tropical disease which is endemic in what is known as the "mycetoma belt". The disease has many devastating impacts on patients and communities in endemic area and is characterised by massive deformity, destruction and disability. Mycetoma is commonly seen in the foot and hand and less frequent in other parts of the body. Mycetoma of the head and neck is a rarity and is associated with high morbidity and even mortality if not treated early. In this communication we report on 49 patients with head and neck mycetoma followed up at the Mycetoma Research Centre in Khartoum. Most of the reported patients had actinomycetoma and the majority were young adult males from mycetoma endemic areas in the Sudan. Most of them were students, farmers and workers. Prior to presentation the majority had long disease duration and the cause was multifactorial. Advanced disease with massive lesion, deformity and disability was the common presentation. There was no obvious history of local trauma, familial tendency or other predisposing factor identified in this group of patients. MRI and CT scan were the most accurate diagnostic tools to determine the disease extent. The treatment outcome was rather poor and characterised by low cure rate, poor outcome and high follows-up dropout. Such a gloomy outcome calls for structured and objective health education programs.

  15. Head and neck mycetoma: the mycetoma research centre experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fahal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a unique neglected tropical disease which is endemic in what is known as the "mycetoma belt". The disease has many devastating impacts on patients and communities in endemic area and is characterised by massive deformity, destruction and disability. Mycetoma is commonly seen in the foot and hand and less frequent in other parts of the body. Mycetoma of the head and neck is a rarity and is associated with high morbidity and even mortality if not treated early. In this communication we report on 49 patients with head and neck mycetoma followed up at the Mycetoma Research Centre in Khartoum. Most of the reported patients had actinomycetoma and the majority were young adult males from mycetoma endemic areas in the Sudan. Most of them were students, farmers and workers. Prior to presentation the majority had long disease duration and the cause was multifactorial. Advanced disease with massive lesion, deformity and disability was the common presentation. There was no obvious history of local trauma, familial tendency or other predisposing factor identified in this group of patients. MRI and CT scan were the most accurate diagnostic tools to determine the disease extent. The treatment outcome was rather poor and characterised by low cure rate, poor outcome and high follows-up dropout. Such a gloomy outcome calls for structured and objective health education programs.

  16. Superficial Head and Neck Anatomy for Dermatologic Surgery: Critical Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Steven; Bennett, Richard G

    2015-10-01

    Thorough understanding of head and neck anatomy is useful and necessary for dermatologic surgery. To highlight pertinent head and neck anatomic structures that are encountered during dermatologic surgery and correlate these with common surgical problems. Important anatomic structures and regional cutaneous anatomy are discussed and illustrated. Several important anatomic structures exist within the head and neck that can influence surgical outcomes. Anatomic knowledge is helpful to the dermatologic surgeon to optimize reconstructive outcomes.

  17. Atypical fractionation in advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Atypische Fraktionierung bei fortgeschrittenen Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrowsky, W.; Naude, J.; Toth, M. (Universitaetsklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Strahlenbiologie, Vienna (Austria)); Millesi, W. (Universitaetsklinik fuer Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Vienna (Austria)); Grasl, M. (1. Universitaetsklinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Vienna (Austria)); Koehler, W.; Kautzky, M. (2. Universitaetsklinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Vienna (Austria)); Pavelka, R. (Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Abt. des Allgemeinen Oeffentlichen Krankenhauses der Stadt Wiener Neustadt (Austria)); Dobrowsky, E. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Allgemeine und Experimentelle Pathologie)

    1992-12-01

    From May 1990 to May 1991, 23 patients with advanced, inoperable squamous cell cancers, clinically staged as III or IV, were treated by unconventional fractionation radiotherapy. Treatment consisted of a continuous hyper-fractionated accelerated radiotherapy, delivering a total dose of 55.3 Gy within 17 consecutive days. In ten patients radiation therapy was combined with chemotherapy: 20 mg mitomycin C/m[sup 2], administered by intravenous bolus injection on day 5 of treatment. Apart from a confluent mucositis, treatment tolerance was good. Haematological toxicity from mitomycin C was minor and did not require any specific therapy. The mucosal reaction lasted six weeks (median duration) and was not thought to be increased by additional chemotherapy. In twelve of 23 patients a complete remission of the primary tumour was seen, in patients with lymph node metastases there was a complete response in 14 out of 20 patients. After a median follow-up of 18 months, ten of 23 patients have survived (8/23 without evidence of disease). Eleven patients have died due to local tumour progression and one patient died with distant metastases, being without evidence of local tumour. The advantage of this unconventional fractionation, which takes the described short potential tumour doubling time for heat and neck cancers into account, is discussed. (orig.).

  18. Radiation dose to the tongue and velopharynx predicts acoustic-articulatory changes after chemo-IMRT treatment for advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Irene; Navran, Arash; van der Molen, Lisette; Heemsbergen, Wilma D; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent changes in speech after C-IMRT treatment are related to mean doses to the tongue and velopharynx (VP). In 34 patients with advanced hypopharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, or oropharyngeal cancer, changes in speech from pretreatment to 10 weeks and 1 year posttreatment were correlated with mean doses to the base of tongue (BOT), oral cavity (OC) and tonsillar fossa/soft palate (VP). Differences in anteroposterior tongue position, dorsoventral degree of tongue to palate or pharynx constriction, grooving, strength, nasality, and laryngeal rise, were assessed by acoustic changes in three speech sounds that depend on a (post-) alveolar closure or narrowing (/t/, /s/, /z/), three with a tongue to palate/pharyngeal narrowing (/l/, /r/, /u/), and in vowel /a/ at comfortable and highest pitch. Acoustically assessed changes in tongue positioning, shape, velopharyngeal constriction, and laryngeal elevation were significantly related to mean doses to the tongue and velopharynx. The mean dose to BOT predicted changes in anteroposterior tongue positioning from pre- to 10-weeks posttreatment. From pretreatment to 1-year, mean doses to BOT, OC, and VP were related to changes in grooving, strength, laryngeal height, nasality, palatalization, and degree of pharyngeal constriction. Changes in speech are related to mean doses to the base of tongue and velopharynx. The outcome indicates that strength, motility, and the balance between agonist and antagonist muscle forces change significantly after radiotherapy.

  19. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  20. Head and neck soft tissue sarcomas treated with radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas K. Vitzthum

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck soft tissue sarcomas (HNSTSs are rare and heterogeneous cancers in which radiation therapy (RT has an important role in local tumor control (LC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes and patterns of treatment failure in patients with HNSTS treated with RT. A retrospective review was performed of adult patients with HNSTS treated with RT from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2012. LC, locoregional control (LRC, disease-free survival (DFS, overall survival (OS, and predictors thereof were assessed. Forty-eight patients with HNSTS were evaluated. Five-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of LC, LRC, DFS, and OS were 87, 73, 63, and 83%, respectively. Angiosarcomas were found to be associated with worse LC, LRC, DFS, and OS. Patients over the age of 60 had lower rates of DFS. HNSTSs comprise a diverse group of tumors that can be managed with various treatment regimens involving RT. Angiosarcomas have higher recurrence and mortality rates.

  1. Immunotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Current and Future Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D. Rapidis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC are at considerable risk for death, with 5-year relative survival rates of approximately 60%. The profound multifaceted deficiencies in cell-mediated immunity that persist in most patients after treatment may be related to the high rates of treatment failure and second primary malignancies. Radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy commonly have severe acute and long-term side effects on immune responses. The development of immunotherapies reflects growing awareness that certain immune system deficiencies specific to HNSCC and some other cancers may contribute to the poor long-term outcomes. Systemic cell-mediated immunotherapy is intended to activate the entire immune system and mount a systemic and/or locoregional antitumor response. The delivery of cytokines, either by single cytokines, for example, interleukin-2, interleukin-12, interferon-, interferon-, or by a biologic mix of multiple cytokines, such as IRX-2, may result in tumor rejection and durable immune responses. Targeted immunotherapy makes use of monoclonal antibodies or vaccines. All immunotherapies for HNSCC except cetuximab remain investigational, but a number of agents whose efficacy and tolerability are promising have entered phase 2 or phase 3 development.

  2. Clinical features of the head and neck mucosal melanoma. А review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ignatova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is an aggressive and rare neoplasm of melanocytic origin. Mucosal melanomas of the head and neck account for 1 % of neoplasms, 0,2–8,0 4 % of all melanomas and over 50 % of all mucosal melanomas. To date, in Russian and foreign literature only few retrospective series and case reports have been reported on mucosal melanoma. Despite melanoma’s common histological origin, head and neck mucosal melanoma presentation has some specific features due to its anatomical localization and poor clinical outcomes compared with those of cutaneous melanomas. Mucosal melanoma has a high metastatic potential. Five-year overall survival does not exceed 30 %. Advances in understanding of the clinical presentation can be used for prediction of behaviour and prognosis of this disease. We considered and analised articles devoted to clinical features of head and neck mucosal melanoma according to its localization.

  3. Nanoparticle-based targeted therapeutics in head-and-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Shui-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Head-and-neck cancer is a major form of the disease worldwide. Treatment consists of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but these have not resulted in improved survival rates over the past few decades. Versatile nanoparticles, with selective tumor targeting, are considered to have the potential to improve these poor outcomes. Application of nanoparticle-based targeted therapeutics has extended into many areas, including gene silencing, chemotherapeutic drug delivery, radiosensitization, photothermal therapy, and has shown much promise. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field of nanoparticle-mediated targeted therapeutics for head-and-neck cancer, with an emphasis on the description of targeting points, including future perspectives.

  4. Design of a phase I clinical trial to evaluate intratumoral delivery of ErbB-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cells in locally advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, May C I; Papa, Sophie E; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Guerrero Urbano, Teresa; Spicer, James F; Maher, John

    2013-09-01

    Despite several advances, 5-year survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains unchanged at only 50%. The commonest cause of death is locally advanced/recurrent disease. Consequently, there is an unmet need for new approaches to improve local control in HNSCC. T4 immunotherapy is an autologous cell therapy in which peripheral blood T-cells are genetically engineered using a retroviral vector to coexpress two chimeric receptors: (i) T1E28z is a chimeric antigen receptor that engages multiple ErbB dimers that are commonly upregulated in HNSCC; (ii) 4αβ is a chimeric cytokine receptor that converts the weak mitogenic stimulus provided by interleukin (IL)-4 into a strong and selective growth signal, allowing preferential expansion and enrichment of T4(+) T-cells ex vivo. T4 immunotherapy exerts antitumor activity against HNSCC cell lines and tumors in vivo, without significant toxicity. Human T4(+) T-cells also engage mouse ErbB receptors, permitting safety testing in SCID Beige mice. Severe toxicity caused by cytokine release syndrome ensues when human T4(+) T-cells are administered at high doses to mice, particularly with advanced tumor burdens. However, such toxicity is not required for efficacy and is never seen if T-cells are administered by the intratumoral route. To exploit this, we have designed a first-in-man clinical trial in which T4(+) T-cells are administered to patients with locally advanced/recurrent HNSCC. Cells will be administered at a single sitting to multiple sites around the viable tumor circumference. A 3+3 dose escalation design will be used, starting at 10(7) cells (cohort 1), escalating to 10(9) cells (cohort 5). If maximum tolerated dose remains undefined, cohorts 6/7 will receive either low- or high-dose cyclophosphamide before 10(9) T4(+) T-cells. A panel of routine/in-house assays and imaging techniques will be used to monitor safety, efficacy, perturbation of endogenous antitumor immunity

  5. Cutaneous angiosarcoma of head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Vora

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous angiosarcoma is a rare aggressive tumor of capillary and lymphatic endothelial cell origin. Cutaneous angiosarcoma of the head and neck regions seems to be a distinctive neoplasm with characteristic clinicopathologic features that differ from angiosarcoma in other anatomic locations. Angiosarcoma, regardless of their setting, has a bad prognosis. We presented here a case of 80 years old male, with multiple nontender grouped purple to red hemorrhagic vesicular and bullous lesions over left lower cheek and upper neck area, with bilateral cervical lymph nodes since 1 month. Computed tomography thorax showed nodular opacities in the right upper and midzones. Excisional biopsy showed characterstic "dissection of collagen" with mild nuclear atypia. Immunohistochemistry showed tumor cell positive for CD-31 and Fli-1. Patient died within 1 month of presentation.

  6. [Plasmacytomas of the head and neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, E; Marzetti, A; Palma, O; Pezzuto, R W

    1996-02-01

    Neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells results in a population of immunologically homogeneous cells that can produce diffuse (multiple myeloma) or localized (extramedullary plasmacytomas and solitary plasmacytoma of bone) disease. In otorhinolaryngologic literature these neoplasms are rarely described and their nosological arrangement is often confused. The presence of a plasma cell neoplasm can be a surprise and sometimes a diagnostic challenge to the head and neck surgeon. Proper management of such lesions needs to be individualized according to their expected biologic behaviour. The recent observation of a case of maxillary sinus plasmacytoma suggested the Authors to carefully review the literature, drawing their attention mainly on the current histogenetic hypotheses and their consequences in therapeutic strategy. The correct diagnostic procedure is also explained, highlighting the difficulties due to both the protean nature of the disease and the still existing nosological confusion. The possibility of a plasma cell tumour should be never forgotten in presence of an head and neck neoplasm. Because these neoplasms may signal the presence of multiple mieloma, full evaluation is required to exclude disseminated disease. In light of recent histogenetic acquisitions it is suggested that extramedullary plasmacytomas can be classified among the so-called "mucosa-associated" lymphomas. Possible following differences in therapeutic approach and long-term follow-up are also indicated, stressing the role of surgery in managing these disorders. Surgical excision of extramedullary plasmacytomas followed by complementary radiotherapy on the site of tumour is proposed as the best treatment for these kind of neoplasms. This is in opposition with "classical" statement considering radiotherapy the only treatment for this kind of disorders.

  7. Accuracy of Computed Tomography for Predicting Pathologic Nodal Extracapsular Extension in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Undergoing Initial Surgical Resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, Roshan S., E-mail: roshansprabhu@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Magliocca, Kelly R. [Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hanasoge, Sheela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Aiken, Ashley H.; Hudgins, Patricia A. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Susie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas (United States); Eaton, Bree R.; Higgins, Kristin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Saba, Nabil F. [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Beitler, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Nodal extracapsular extension (ECE) in patients with head-and-neck cancer increases the loco-regional failure risk and is an indication for adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). To reduce the risk of requiring trimodality therapy, patients with head-and-neck cancer who are surgical candidates are often treated with definitive CRT when preoperative computed tomographic imaging suggests radiographic ECE. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of preoperative CT imaging for predicting pathologic nodal ECE (pECE). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 432 consecutive patients with oral cavity or locally advanced/nonfunctional laryngeal cancer who underwent preoperative CT imaging before initial surgical resection and neck dissection. Specimens with pECE had the extent of ECE graded on a scale from 1 to 4. Results: Radiographic ECE was documented in 46 patients (10.6%), and pECE was observed in 87 (20.1%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 43.7%, 97.7%, 82.6%, and 87.3%, respectively. The sensitivity of radiographic ECE increased from 18.8% for grade 1 to 2 ECE, to 52.9% for grade 3, and 72.2% for grade 4. Radiographic ECE criteria of adjacent structure invasion was a better predictor than irregular borders/fat stranding for pECE. Conclusions: Radiographic ECE has poor sensitivity, but excellent specificity for pECE in patients who undergo initial surgical resection. PPV and NPV are reasonable for clinical decision making. The performance of preoperative CT imaging increased as pECE grade increased. Patients with resectable head-and-neck cancer with radiographic ECE based on adjacent structure invasion are at high risk for high-grade pECE requiring adjuvant CRT when treated with initial surgery; definitive CRT as an alternative should be considered where appropriate.

  8. Overview of the 8th Edition TNM Classification for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shao Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2017-07-01

    The main purpose of the TNM system is to provide an anatomic-based classification to adequately depict cancer prognosis. Accurate cancer staging is important for treatment selection and outcome prediction, research design, and cancer control activities. To maintain clinical relevance, periodical updates to TNM are necessary. The recently published 8th edition TNM classification institutes the following changes to the staging of head and neck (excluding thyroid cancer): new stage classifications [HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer (HPV+ OPC) and soft tissue sarcoma of the head and neck (HN-STS)] and modification of T and N categories [T and N categories for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC), T categories for oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC), N categories for non-viral related head and neck cancer and unknown primary (CUP), and T categories for head and neck cutaneous carcinoma]. These changes reflect better understanding tumor biology and clinical behavior (e.g., HPV+ OPC and HN-STS), improved outcomes associated with technical advances in diagnosis and treatment (e.g., NPC), evolving knowledge about additional prognostic factors and risk stratification from research and observation (e.g., inclusion of depth of invasion variable for OSCC, inclusion of extranodal extension variable for all non-viral head and neck cancer, and reintroduction of size criteria for non-Merkel cell cutaneous carcinoma of the head and neck). This review summarizes the changes and potential advantages and limitations/caveats associated with them. Further evidence is needed to evaluate whether these changes would result in improvement in TNM stage performance to better serve the needs for clinical care, research, and cancer control.

  9. Survival of head and neck cancer in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ramon Gordon; Friborg, Jeppe; Rosborg, Jørn

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is frequent in the Inuit population of Greenland and is characterized by a very high incidence of Epstein-Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, information on the treatment and survival of Inuit head and neck cancer patients is practically non-existen...

  10. Exercise therapy for trismus in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; Sterken, M.W.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.; Pater, R.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze retrospectively effects of exercise therapy on trismus related to head and neck cancer or as a consequence of its treatment, and to compare these effects with trismus not related to head and neck cancer. Medical records of patients referred to the department of p

  11. Exercise therapy for trismus in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; Sterken, M.W.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.; Pater, R.

    The aim of this study was to analyze retrospectively effects of exercise therapy on trismus related to head and neck cancer or as a consequence of its treatment, and to compare these effects with trismus not related to head and neck cancer. Medical records of patients referred to the department of

  12. Exercise therapy for trismus in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; Sterken, M.W.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.; Pater, R.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze retrospectively effects of exercise therapy on trismus related to head and neck cancer or as a consequence of its treatment, and to compare these effects with trismus not related to head and neck cancer. Medical records of patients referred to the department of p

  13. Quality assurance in head and neck surgical oncology : EORTC 24954 trial on larynx preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, C. R.; Tijink, B. M.; Langendijk, J. A.; Andry, G.; Hamoir, M.; Lefebvre, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Head and Neck Cancer Group (HNCG) of the EORTC conducted a quality assurance program in the EORTC 24954 trial on larynx preservation. In this multicentre study, patients with resectable advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx or hypopharynx were randomly assigned for treatment

  14. Head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy leads to an increase of opportunistic oral pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M.; Stokman, Monique A.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.; Vissink, Arjan; Spijkervet, Frederik K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has led to new possibilities in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC). Limited information is available on how this more advanced radiation technique affects the oral microflora. In a prospective study we assessed the

  15. MODERN METHODS OF RADIATION TREATMENT OF TUMORS OF THE HEAD AND NECK (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Absalyamov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the current trends in radiation therapy of primary and recurrent, localized and locally advanced head and neck tumors. Address the use of radiation therapy as a stand-alone options, or in combination with surgery. Describe the characteristics and evaluate the use of the most modern methods.

  16. Molecular diagnostic alterations in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and potential diagnostic applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, J.L.; Barnes, L.; Lewis Jr, J.S.; Mahfouz, M.E.; Slootweg, P.J.; Thompson, L.D.; Cardesa, A.; Devaney, K.O.; Gnepp, D.R.; Westra, W.H.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Woolgar, J.A.; Rinaldo, A.; Triantafyllou, A.; Takes, R.P.; Ferlito, A.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a common malignancy that continues to be difficult to treat and cure. In many organ systems and tumor types, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the molecular basis for tumorigenesis, disease progression and genetic

  17. Dysphagia and trismus after concomitant chemo-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (chemo-IMRT) in advanced head and neck cancer; dose-effect relationships for swallowing and mastication structures

    OpenAIRE

    van der Molen, L.; Heemsbergen, W.D.; de Jong, R.; van Rossum, M.A.; Smeele, L.E.; Rasch, C. R. N.; HILGERS, F.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Prospective assessment of dysphagia and trismus in chemo-IMRT head and neck cancer patients in relation to dose-parameters of structures involved in swallowing and mastication. Material and methods: Assessment of 55 patients before, 10-weeks (N=49) and 1-year post-treatment (N=37). Calculation of dose-volume parameters for swallowing (inferior (IC), middle (MC), and superior constrictors (SC)), and mastication structures (e.g. masseter). Investigation of relationships ...

  18. Cooperation between medicine and sociology in head and neck oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Emmanuel; Grandazzi, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-first-century medicine is facing many challenges--knowledge and command of technical advances, research development, team management, knowledge transmission, and adaptation to economic constraints--without neglecting "human" aspects, via transformed carer-patient relationships, social change, and so on. The "modern" physicians know that simply treating disease is no longer enough. One of their essential missions lies in offering the individual patient overall care, which implies acknowledging the latter as an individual within a family, social, and professional environment. Indeed, medical practice requires pluridimensional knowledge of the patients' experience of their disease. Yet the contribution sociology can offer to health care remains largely unknown to many physicians, and medical training includes only limited instruction in the human sciences. On the basis of a few observations taken from sociological research, we would like to demonstrate how, in head and neck oncology, interdisciplinary collaboration between medicine and sociology can prove propitious to improving patient care and attention to their close relations.

  19. Immune Suppression in Head and Neck Cancers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duray, Anaëlle; Demoulin, Stéphanie; Hubert, Pascale; Delvenne, Philippe; Saussez, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) are the sixth most common cancer in the world. Despite significant advances in the treatment modalities involving surgery, radiotherapy, and concomitant chemoradiotherapy, the 5-year survival rate remained below 50% for the past 30 years. The worse prognosis of these cancers must certainly be link to the fact that HNSCCs strongly influence the host immune system. We present a critical review of our understanding of the HNSCC escape to the antitumor immune response such as a downregulation of HLA class I and/or components of APM. Antitumor responses of HNSCC patients are compromised in the presence of functional defects or apoptosis of T-cells, both circulating and tumor-infiltrating. Langerhans cells are increased in the first steps of the carcinogenesis but decreased in invasive carcinomas. The accumulation of macrophages in the peritumoral areas seems to play a protumoral role by secreting VEGF and stimulating the neoangiogenesis. PMID:21437225

  20. Pedicled perforator flaps in the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Stefan O P; Mureau, Marc A M

    2010-10-01

    Perforator flaps, since their first description in 1989, have in many ways revolutionized reconstructive surgery. Whereas little more than a decade ago many surgeons were still hesitant to fully trust perforator flaps to be a reliable option, nowadays these flaps are often first choice. Investigators have to remain critical, however, of their advances and realize that not every reconstruction will require or benefit from a perforator flap, as previously well-established, nonperforator flaps still have their indication and can give excellent results. The most important skill in reconstructive surgery of the head and neck is not cutting the flap but assessing the defect, planning the reconstruction, and choosing wisely from the ever-increasing options available.

  1. Prediction of treatment response in head and neck carcinomas using IVIM-DWI: Evaluation of lymph node metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Hauser@klinikum-augsburg.de [Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Augsburg, Augsburg (Germany); Essig, Marco [Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada); Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Therapy, Ruprecht-Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany); Laun, Frederik B. [Quantitative imaging based disease characterization (E011), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiology (E020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Münter, Marc [Department of Radiation Therapy, Ruprecht-Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Therapy, Katharinenhospital, Stuttgart (Germany); Maier-Hein, Klaus H. [Quantitative imaging based disease characterization (E011), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Division of Medical and Biological Informatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Stieltjes, Bram [Quantitative imaging based disease characterization (E011), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To obtain diffusion and microperfusion measures in lymph node metastases of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) using intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging. The obtained IVIM parameters were used to characterize lymph nodes in the staging phase and longitudinal follow-up was performed to evaluate the potential predictive value of these parameters considering therapy response. Methods: Fifteen patients with lymph node metastases of histologically confirmed locally advanced HNSCC were examined using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) before a nonsurgical organ preserving therapy. DWI imaging was performed at 3 T using eight different b-values ranging from 0 to 800 s/mm{sup 2}. Using the IVIM-approach, the perfusion fraction f and the diffusion coefficient D were extracted using a biexponential fit. A follow-up period of 13.5 months was available for all patients. One patient with a macroscopically necrotic lymph node was excluded from analyses. A region of interest (ROI)-analysis was performed in all patients. Results: Locoregional failure (LRF) was present in 3 of 15 patients within 13.5 months follow-up. The initial f-value was significantly higher (p = 0.01) in patients with LRF (14.5 ± 0.6% vs. 7.7 ± 2.6%) compared to patients with locoregional control (LRC). The initial diffusion coefficient D did not differ significantly (p = 0.30) between the two groups (0.97 ± 0.15 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 0.88 ± 0.13 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s). Conclusions: Our results indicate that a high initial perfusion fraction f in lymph nodes may predict poor treatment response in patients with HNSCC due to locoregional failure.

  2. Hypofractionated versus conventional radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in head and neck cancer: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate tumor response and toxicities in head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC upon hypofractionated radiotherapy compared with conventional fractionation. Settings and Design: Data from patients with squamous cell cancer of oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx (AJCC, 2010 Stage II to IVB; who received hypofractionated (n = 30 or conventionally fractionated (n = 30 radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, between January 2010 to June 2011 were retrieved and retrospectively analyzed. Materials and Methods: In conventional arm (Arm A, each patient received 70 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction over 7 weeks, along with concurrent cisplatin (100 mg/m 2 on days 1, 22, and 43 for locally advanced stage. In hypofractionated arm (Arm B, each patient received 55 Gy at 2.75 Gy per fraction over 4 weeks, along with concurrent cisplatin (100 mg/m 2 on days 1 and 22 for locally advanced stage. The end points were tumor response, acute and late toxicities, overall survival (OS, and diseases-free survival (DFS. Results: The tumor response distribution was comparable - 24 (80% patients in arm A and 23 (76% in arm B achieved a complete response. Significant differences in frequencies of acute grade ≥ 2 skin toxicity, mucositis were found, with higher frequencies in Arm B. Higher frequencies of late grade ≥ 2 dysphagia, laryngeal edema, xerostomia, and confluent mucositis were encountered in Arm B at 6 months from start of chemoradiation. However, OS, DFS, and loco-regional recurrence rates were comparable between the two arms. Conclusions: Hypofractionated radiotherapy can achieve similar tumor response to conventionally fractionated radiotherapy in HNSCC, although with some increase of toxicity.

  3. Risk-group definition by recursive partitioning analysis of patients with squamous cell head and neck carcinoma treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langendijk, JA; Slotman, BJ; van der Waal, [No Value; Doornaert, P; Berkof, J; Leemans, CR

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The objective of this study was to define different prognostic groups with regard to locoregional control (LRC) derived from recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). METHODS. Eight hundred one patients with squamous cell head and neck carcinoma underwent with primary surgery and received p

  4. Targeted therapies and radiation for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update on novel radiation treatments for head and neck cancer. Despite the remarkable advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy techniques, the management of advanced head and neck cancer remains challenging. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an appealing target for novel therapies in head and neck cancer because not only EGFR activation stimulates many important signaling pathways associated with cancer development and progression, and importantly, resistance to radiation. Furthermore, EGFR overexpression is known to be portended for a worse outcome in patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Two categories of compounds designed to abrogate EGFR signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies (Cetuximab) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (ZD1839 and OSI-774) have been assessed and have been most extensively studied in preclinical models and clinical trials. Additional TKIs in clinical trials include a reversible agent, Cl-1033, which blocks activation of all erbB receptors. Encouraging preclinical data for head and neck cancers resulted in rapid translation into the clinic. Results from initial clinical trials show rather surprisingly that only minority of patients benefited from EGFR inhibition as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy. In this review, we begin with a brief summary of erbB-mediated signal transduction. Subsequently, we present data on prognostic-predictive value of erbB receptor expression in HNC followed by preclinical and clinical data on the role of EGFR antagonists alone or in combination with radiation in the treatment of HNC. Finally, we discuss the emerging thoughts on resistance to EGFR blockade and efforts in the development of multiple-targeted therapy for combination with chemotherapy or radiation. Current challenges for investigators are to determine (1) who will benefit from targeted agents and which agents are most appropriate to combine with radiation and/or chemotherapy, (2

  5. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-08-05

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV-) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC.

  6. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in advanced head and neck cancer Gastrostomia endoscópica percutânea em pacientes com tumores avançados de cabeça e pescoço

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Moacir de Oliveira Campoli

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy performed as proposed by Gauderer et al. in 1980, has been used quite frequently in patients with head and neck tumors. Some authors believe that this so-called pull technique would be associated to the risk of a tumor implantation in the wound as well as high levels of peristomal wound infection. Although some alternative techniques provide better results, doubts about their technical applicability in daily practice still persists. AIM: To assess the feasibility, safety and morbidity of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy performed through a well-defined and standardized technique in patients with nonresectable or advanced head and neck cancer. METHODS: A consecutive series of patients who had either nonresectable or advanced tumors and were unable to be fed orally were submitted to an oncologic-hospital-based tertiary-referral endoscopy practice. Tubes were implanted through an introducer technique comprised of two main stages. The first consisted of the application of two stitches aiming to fixate the anterior gastric wall to the abdominal wall, and the second being the inserting of the gastrostomy tube. RESULTS: Between February 2003 and May 2004, 129 percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomies were performed. This study included 60 patients. They were all able to receive food on the same day. Operative morbidity was observed in six patients (10% and one procedure-related mortality was also observed (1.6%. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is both feasible and safe, associated to low morbidity, and to acceptable mortality rates.RACIONAL: A gastrostomia endoscópica percutânea executada conforme a técnica proposta por Gauderer et al., em 1980, tem sido freqüentemente utilizada em pacientes com tumores de cabeça e pescoço. Diversos autores relatam que ela, conhecida como técnica de “puxar”, está associada a risco de implante de tumor na parede abdominal assim como risco

  7. Head and neck cancers masquerading as deep neck abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Sue Rene; Kanagalingam, Jeevendra; Johari, Shirish; Yuen, Heng Wai

    2012-12-01

    Deep neck space abscesses are common otolaryngological emergencies, and prompt incision and drainage is the treatment of choice. Head and neck cancers often present with cervical metastases that may become secondarily infected. Clinical presentation is similar to a deep neck abscess. Surgical drainage of such collections has implications on subsequent treatment. In this case series, we describe six cases with this unusual presentation that were subsequently found to have a head and neck malignancy, and where three patients had their abscesses treated surgically. We aim to raise awareness of this unusual presentation of a head and neck carcinoma, and to avoid a potential pitfall in the management of deep neck abscess.

  8. Exercise therapy for trismus in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkstra, P.U.; Sterken, M.W.; Spijkervet, F K L; Roodenburg, J.L.N.; Pater, R.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze retrospectively effects of exercise therapy on trismus related to head and neck cancer or as a consequence of its treatment, and to compare these effects with trismus not related to head and neck cancer. Medical records of patients referred to the department of physical therapy with the diagnosis trismus were retrieved and analyzed. Data of 27 patients with trismus related to head and neck cancer and data of eight patients with trismus not related to cance...

  9. Unusual head and neck injury in elevator: autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, B; Türkmen, N; Dokgöz, H

    2012-10-01

    Industrial injuries related to auto-load-carrying vehicles were not frequently reported in the literature. Presented case was, 31-year-old male furniture worker. Deceased was found in awkward position in furniture workshop. Victim was observed on his knees in front of the elevator, head and neck lodged within openings of the elevator, and head and neck structures compressed-guillotined by the lower platform of the elevator were detected. We presented rare case of head and neck compression by elevator. Key words: head - neck - accidents - elevator - autopsy.

  10. Prognostic factors and epidemiological characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal head and neck melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzina, Anna; Azarjana, Kristine; Cema, Ingrida; Pjanova, Dace; Rivosh, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To describe the prognostic factors and epidemiological characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal head and neck melanoma and to identify the variables associated with mortality from this disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Patients treated for head and neck melanoma in the Oncology Centre of Latvia, Riga during a 10-year period were identified. Records from 124 cases were analyzed in a descriptive, retrospective study. For each patient, information regarding age, sex, tumor anatomic site, as well as ulceration, histological tumor subtypes, Breslow thickness and Clark invasion level was viewed. Disease specific survival rates were calculated. The frequencies of all study variables and their 95% confidence intervals were determined. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were produced to illustrate the survival differences for each variable. RESULTS. The patients' mean age was 67.36 years. The study included 81 females (65.32%) and 43 males (34.67%). The prevalent anatomical site for cutaneous head and neck melanoma was the cheek - 49% (n=55) and the intraocular site for mucosal melanoma (61.5%). A high percentage of thick cutaneous melanoma was detected. In 53 cases (47.3%) out of 112 cutaneous melanoma the tumor ulceration was found. Nodular melanoma subtype was predominating (38%). The incidence of cutaneous melanoma has increased unequally whereas mucosal melanoma of the head and neck is an uncommon cancer and the incidence rates in Latvia during a ten year period are decreasing. CONCLUSION. Female sex, advanced age, facial skin, tumor thickness, nodular subtype and ulceration carried a relevant risk of poor prognosis.

  11. Multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap for reconstruction of complex defects in head and neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canhua Jiang

    Full Text Available The anterolateral thigh flap has been the workhouse flap for coverage of soft-tissue defects in head and neck for decades. However, the reconstruction of multiple and complex soft-tissue defects in head and neck with multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps is still a challenge for reconstructive surgeries. Here, a clinical series of 12 cases is reported in which multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps were used for complex soft-tissue defects with several separately anatomic locations in head and neck. Of the 12 cases, 7 patients presented with trismus were diagnosed as advanced buccal cancer with oral submucous fibrosis, 2 tongue cancer cases were found accompanied with multiple oral mucosa lesions or buccal cancer, and 3 were hypopharyngeal cancer with anterior neck skin invaded. All soft-tissue defects were reconstructed by multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps, including 9 tripaddled anterolateral thigh flaps and 3 bipaddled flaps. The mean length of skin paddle was 19.2 (range: 14-23 cm and the mean width was 4.9 (range: 2.5-7 cm. All flaps survived and all donor sites were closed primarily. After a mean follow-up time of 9.1 months, there were no problems with the donor or recipient sites. This study supports that the multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap is a reliable and good alternative for complex and multiple soft-tissue defects of the head and neck.

  12. IMRT reirradiation with concurrent cetuximab immunotherapy in recurrent head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicker, Felix; Roeder, Falk; Thieke, Christian; Timke, Carmen; Huber, Peter E. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Muenter, Marc W.; Debus, Juergen [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: In this retrospective investigation, the outcome and toxicity after reirradiation with concurrent cetuximab immunotherapy of recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) in patients who had contraindications to platinum-based chemotherapy were analyzed. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with locally advanced recurrent HNC were retrospectively evaluated. In 9 cases, histology was squamous cell carcinoma, in one case adenoid cystic carcinoma. External beam radiotherapy was part of the initial treatment in all cases. Reirradiation was carried out using step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Cetuximab was applied as loading dose (400 mg/m{sup 2}) 1 week prior to reirradiation and then weekly concurrently with radiotherapy (250 mg/m{sup 2}). Results: The median overall survival time after initiation of reirradiation was 7 months; the 1-year overall survival (OS) rate was 40%. Local failure was found in 3 patients, resulting in a 1-year local control (LC) rate of 61%. The 1-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 44%, while the 1-year distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was 75%. Acute hematological toxicity was not observed in the group. Severe acute toxicity included one fatal infield arterial bleeding and one flap necrosis. Severe late toxicities were noted in 2 patients: fibrosis of the temporomandibular joint in 1 patient and stenosis of the cervical esophagus in another. Conclusions: IMRT reirradiation with concurrent cetuximab immunotherapy in recurrent HNC is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity. Further investigations are necessary to determine the clinical role of this therapy concept. (orig.)

  13. 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nutritionists, and speech therapists. About half of throat cancers occur in the larynx (voice box). Because of the location of head and neck cancer, it often affects breathing, eating, drinking, voice, speaking, ...

  14. Head and neck malignancies in Croatian renal transplant recipients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Basić-Jukić, Nikolina; Bubić-Filipi, Ljubica; Prgomet, Drago; Djanić Hadzibegović, Ana; Bilić, Mario; Kovac, Lana; Kastelan, Zeljko; Pasini, Josip; Mokos, Ivica; Basić-Koretić, Martina; Kes, Petar

    2010-01-01

    Renal transplantation is associated with increased incidence of cancer. We reviewed a large series of renal transplant recipients to determine the incidence and outcome of patients with malignant changes located at the head and neck...

  15. Free Flap Procedures for Reconstruction After Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kini, Erin

    2015-12-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer are seeking improved surgical procedures to avoid severe defects that result from head and neck cancer resection. Free flap reconstruction provides vascularized tissue that has been transferred from a distant donor site on a patient's body to a recipient site, markedly improving wound closure and protecting structures of the head and neck. This article discusses free flap procedures for reconstruction after head and neck cancer resection, including the following procedure phases: airway protection and neck dissections, tumor resection, flap harvest, microvascular anastomosis of the flap, and reconstruction and closure. The article also explains specific risk factors for patients undergoing free flap procedures that have been identified in the literature and include procedure length, hypothermia, and pressure injuries. Each of these factors is discussed regarding its specific effect on this patient population, and the nursing interventions to reduce these risks are identified.

  16. Analysis of 120 Pectoralis Major Flaps for Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Sun You

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA pectoralis major flap is one of the standard tools for the reconstruction of defects of the head and neck. Despite the technical advancement in free tissue transfer in head and neck reconstruction, the benefits of a pectoralis major flap should not be overlooked. The purpose of this study is to evaluate our 17 years of experience in reconstructing defects of the head and neck region using the pectoralis major flap.MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 112 patients (120 cases who underwent pectoralis major flap operations for head and neck reconstruction during a period ranging from 1994 to 2010.ResultsIn our series, no total necrosis of the flap occurred. Of the total cases, 30.8% presented with flap-related complications. Major complications occurred in 20% of all of the cases but were then all successfully treated. The male sex was correlated with the occurrence of overall complications (P=0.020 and major complications (P=0.007. Preoperative albumin levels of <3.8 g/dL were correlated with the formation of fistula (P=0.030. Defects of the hypopharynx were correlated with the occurrence of major complications (P=0.019 and the formation of fistula (P=0.012. Secondary reconstructions were correlated with the occurrence of overall complications (P=0.013 and the formation of fistula (P=0.030.ConclusionsA pectoralis major flap is still considered to be a safe, versatile one-stage reconstruction procedure in the management of the defects of head and neck and the protection of the carotid artery.

  17. 人乳头状瘤病毒相关头颈部鳞状细胞癌的研究进展%Research advances of human papillomavirus-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾汶; 费继敏

    2015-01-01

    Recently,the prevalence of human papillomavirus(HPV)infection in head and neck squa-mous cancers has shown an upward trend,especially in the oropharynx squamous carcinoma. This subset of head and neck cancers possesses distinct clinical and laboratory features and outcome,and is particulary com-mon in individuals who lack the traditional risk factors of tobacco and alcohol abuse. The biological markers and treatment of HPV associated head neck cancers are hot topic in current international research.%近年来,人乳头状瘤病毒(HPV)相关头颈部鳞状细胞癌的发病率呈上升趋势,尤其表现在口腔鳞状细胞癌中。HPV 相关头颈部鳞状细胞癌具有独特的临床特征、生物学特点及良好预后,且不暴露于吸烟、饮酒等危险因素,其生物标记物及治疗是国际的研究热点。

  18. Surgical errors and risks - the head and neck cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-12-13

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery.

  19. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy with carboplatin in patients with unresectable advanced head and neck tumors stages III and IV; Simultane Radiochemotherapie mit Carboplatin bei Patienten mit inoperablen fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren der Stadien UICC III und IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muecke, R.; Ziegler, P.G.; Libera, T.; Fietkau, R. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Blynow, M.; Dommerich, S.; Kramp, B. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). HNO-Klinik und Poliklinik; Kundt, G. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Informatik und Biometrie

    1999-05-01

    Background: The results of treating advanced tumors in the head and neck region with radiotherapy alone are disappointing. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy may improve this situation. The treatment results of concurrent radiochemotherapy at the University of Rostock were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six weeks after radiochemotherapy 56.5% of patients had a complete remission, 36% a partial remission and 7.5% `no change`. With a median follow-up of 42 months (6 to 74 months) overall survival, disease-free survival and local control were 24.3%, 28.9%, 18.0% 5 years after treatment. All these criteria were significantly better in patients with palliative tumor resection compared to no surgical treatment (uni- and multivariate) and in patients with Stage III than in patients with Stage IV carcinomas (univariate), overall survival was significantly better in patients with Stage III (multivariate). A pretherapeutic Hb level below 7.0 mmol/l (11.27 g/dl) reduced the local control significantly (uni- and multivariate). Grade III and IV mucositis was detected in 10%, Grade III leucopenia in 12% of treated patients. Grade IV leucopenia and Grade III thrombopenia were observed in 1 patient each. Conclusion: The toxicity of this treatment is tolerable. However, additional trials must be conducted before considering the palliative tumor resection as standard therapy. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Die Therapieergebnisse der Behandlung fortgeschrittener Tumoren der Kopf-Hals-Region mit alleiniger Bestrahlung sind unbefriedigend. Eine simultane Radiochemotherapie verbessert diese Resultate vermutlich. In einer retrospektiven Analyse wurden Ergebnisse nach simultaner Radiochemotherapie an der Universitaet Rostock ausgewertet. Ergebnisse: Sechs Wochen nach Radiochemotherapie erreichten 56,5% der Patienten eine komplette und 36% der Patienten eine partielle Remission, ein `no change` war bei 7,5% der Patienten festzustellen. Bei einer medianen Beobachtungszeit von

  20. Distant Metastases in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Min, E-mail: min.yao@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lu Minggen [School of Public Health, University of Nevada at Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Savvides, Panayiotis S. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rezaee, Rod; Zender, Chad A.; Lavertu, Pierre [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the pattern and risk factors for distant metastases in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after curative treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 284 HNSCC patients treated in a single institution with IMRT. Sites included were oropharynx (125), oral cavity (70), larynx (55), hypopharynx (17), and unknown primary (17). American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution includes I (3), II (19), III (42), and IV (203). There were 224 males and 60 females with a median age of 57. One hundred eighty-six patients were treated with definitive IMRT and 98 postoperative IMRT. One hundred forty-nine patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 22.8 months (range, 0.07-77.3 months) and 29.5 months (4.23-77.3 months) for living patients. The 3-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 94.6%, 96.4%, 92.5%, 84.1%, and 68.95%, respectively. There were 45 patients with distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, distant metastasis was strongly associated with N stage (p = 0.046), T stage (p < 0.0001), and pretreatment maximum standardized uptake value of the lymph node (p = 0.006), but not associated with age, gender, disease sites, pretreatment standardized uptake value of the primary tumor, or locoregional control. The freedom from distant metastasis at 3 years was 98.1% for no factors, 88.6% for one factor, 68.3% for two factors, and 41.7% for three factors (p < 0.0001 by log-rank test). Conclusion: With advanced radiation techniques and concurrent chemotherapy, the failure pattern has changed with more patients failing distantly. The majority of patients with distant metastases had no local or regional failures, indicating that these patients might have microscopic distant

  1. Targeting cellular and molecular drivers of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: current options and emerging perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausoni, Simonetta; Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina; Spinato, Giacomo; Tirelli, Giancarlo; Spinato, Roberto; Azzarello, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Despite improvements in functional outcomes attributable to advances in radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgical techniques, and imaging techniques, survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients has improved only marginally during the last couple of decades, and optimal therapy has yet to be devised. Genomic complexity and intratumoral genetic heterogeneity may contribute to treatment resistance and the propensity for locoregional recurrence. Countering this, it demands a significant effort from both basic and clinical scientists in the search for more effective targeted therapies. Recent genomewide studies have provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of HNSCC, uncovering potential new therapeutic opportunities. In addition, several studies have elucidated how inflammatory, immune, and stromal cells contribute to the particular properties of these neoplasms. In the present review, we introduce recent findings on genomic aberrations resulting from whole-genome sequencing of HNSCC, we discuss how the particular microenvironment affects the pathogenesis of this disease, and we describe clinical trials exploring new perspectives on the use of combined genetic and cellular targeted therapies.

  2. Prospect of Functional Salivary Gland Enhancement with Biomedical Strategies for Head and Neck Cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyu Zhu; Bingqiang Hu; Xiao Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Xerostomia is the main complication inflicting head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy.Conventional treatment is not very effective in alleviating this morbidity.Biomedical strategies such as gene transfer and tissue engineering have made substantial progress that will potentially lead to successful new treatment options for this condition.This report reviews the process of radiation damage to the salivary glands and the advances in functional salivary gland enhancement with these two brand-new technologies.

  3. Genome Stability Pathways in Head and Neck Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Jenkins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability underlies the transformation of host cells toward malignancy, promotes development of invasion and metastasis and shapes the response of established cancer to treatment. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of genomic stability in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC, with an emphasis on DNA repair pathways. HNSCC is characterized by distinct profiles in genome stability between similarly staged cancers that are reflected in risk, treatment response and outcomes. Defective DNA repair generates chromosomal derangement that can cause subsequent alterations in gene expression, and is a hallmark of progression toward carcinoma. Variable functionality of an increasing spectrum of repair gene polymorphisms is associated with increased cancer risk, while aetiological factors such as human papillomavirus, tobacco and alcohol induce significantly different behaviour in induced malignancy, underpinned by differences in genomic stability. Targeted inhibition of signalling receptors has proven to be a clinically-validated therapy, and protein expression of other DNA repair and signalling molecules associated with cancer behaviour could potentially provide a more refined clinical model for prognosis and treatment prediction. Development and expansion of current genomic stability models is furthering our understanding of HNSCC pathophysiology and uncovering new, promising treatment strategies.

  4. Accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Sekiya, Yuichi; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Togawa, Takashi [Chiba Cancer Center (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    From May 1994 to May 1997, 52 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation (1.6 Gy, twice daily, 10 times a week, with minimum interval of 6 hours between fractions and the total dose to 67.2-70.4 Gy) and concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin. The median follow-up period was 19.8 months with a range of 2-44 months. Complete response rate was 73% (38/52). Cumulative survival rate at 3 years was 46.7% and the relapse rate was 21.1% (8/38). The relapse sites were as follows, primary site; 2 cases, lymphnodes; 4 cases and distant metastases; 2 cases. The major acute toxicity was stomatitis. Grade 3-4 late sequelae was observed in 7 cases. Grade 3 xerostomia was observed in 2 cases, esophageal stenosis was observed in 2 cases and arytenoid necrosis was observed in 2 cases. There were no fatal sequelae. Acute sequelae are very variable and it will be necessary to individualize the treatment time according to the state of their stomatitis. (author)

  5. Response Evaluation in Head and Neck Oncology: Definition and Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, T K; Schuler, P J; Laban, S; Grässlin, R; Beer, M; Beer, A J; Friebe-Hoffmann, U; Bullinger, L; Möller, P; Wiegel, T

    2017-01-01

    Curative treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma includes surgery and/or (chemo)radiation, whereas in the palliative setting, chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy represent(s) the standard approach. With regard to quality control, methods for determining treatment response are sorely needed. For surgical therapy, histopathology is the standard quality control. Established criteria for high-risk patients include resection margins of the primary tumor and extracapsular extension of lymph node metastases. After definitive chemoradiation, treatment response is generally evaluated by tomographic imaging combined with endoscopy including re-biopsy of the tumor region. Single-cycle induction chemotherapy may be used to determine the radiosensitivity of tumors, helping to define surgical and nonsurgical treatment options. Innovative approaches with implications for prognosis include the analysis of immune infiltrates, liquid biopsy, molecular characterization (proteomics, genomics), molecular and functional imaging (PET-CT, PET-MRI), as well as advanced imaging data analysis (radio[geno]mics/texture analysis). Human papilloma virus, as a prognostically relevant parameter, is currently being investigated for de-escalation strategies. With regard to the extended personalization of oncologic therapy, markers predicting treatment response are desirable and seem to be important, also from a socioeconomic perspective. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Effectiveness of BNCT for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Itsuro E-mail: katoitsu@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ono, Koji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ohmae, Masatoshi; Maruhashi, Akira; Imahori, Yoshio; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Nakazawa, Mitsuhiro; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2004-11-01

    Recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM) are often radio-/chemo-resistant and show extensive growth, necessitating a wide resection including surrounding tissues. To avoid severe impairment of oro-facial structures and functions, it is necessary to explore new treatments for HNM. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy that has significant superiority over conventional radiotherapies in principle. We report here, first in the world, six patients with a recurrent HNM who have been treated with BNCT. The BNCT in combination with boronophenylalanine (BPA) and borocaptate sodium (BSH) was performed using the epithermal neutrons with Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The results of BNCT were as follows: (1) {sup 10}B concentration of tumor/normal tissue ratios (T/N ratio) of PET studies were SCC:1.8-4.4, sarcoma:3.1-4.0, parotid tumor:3.5. (2) Relative volume (%) of each tumor to the prior were 6-46%. (3) Remarkable reduction (46-100%) of huge tumor such as 40-675 cm{sup 3} (average: 315 cm{sup 3}), improvement of QOL and very mild side effects were recognized in all cases. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach even for a huge or far advanced HNM.

  7. MicroRNA as a Novel Modulator in Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hsin Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have emerged as important regulators of cell proliferation, development, cancer formation, stress responses, cell death, and other physiological conditions in the past decade. On the other hand, head and neck cancer is one of the top ten most common cancers worldwide. Recent advances in microRNAs have revealed their prominent role in regulating gene expression and provided new aspects of applications in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic strategies in head and neck squamous carcinoma. In the present paper, we focus on microRNAs showing significant differences between normal and tumor cells or between cells with differential ability of metastasis. We also emphasize specific microRNAs that could modulate tumor cell properties, such as apoptosis, metastasis, and proliferation. These microRNAs possess the potential to be applied on clinical therapy in the future.

  8. Functional preservation and quality of life in head and neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harari, Paul M. [Wisconsin Univ. School of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Human Oncology; Connor, Nadine P. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Div. of Otolaryngology; Grau, Cai (eds.) [Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2009-07-01

    This book focuses on functional treatment outcomes in head and neck cancer patients from the perspective of experts from around the world in medical and allied health fields. Recent advances in management strategies are presented as they relate to functional preservation and quality of life. Clinical and research knowledge is organized in an approachable manner by means of short chapters, key point tables, and high-quality illustrations and graphics. This method of presentation is very effective for busy clinical practitioners and researchers. Information is provided on site-specific epidemiology and treatment outcome, the impact of different treatment techniques and toxicities on quality of life, and the relationship of toxicity prevention, rehabilitation, and supportive care to quality of life after treatment, Among literature on the treatment of head and neck cancer, this book is unique because of the outstanding list of contributors and the specific focus on functional preservation and quality of life. (orig.)

  9. Expression signature in peripheral blood cells for molecular diagnosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhuis, B J M; Graveland, A P; Dijk, F; Ylstra, B; van Wieringen, W N; Leemans, C R; Brakenhoff, R H

    2013-07-01

    Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have a poor prognosis due to the development of locoregional recurrences, distant metastases, and second primary tumors. There is an urgent need for biomarkers that enable detection and monitoring of the disease to provide adequate therapeutic strategies. In this study, we have investigated markers in peripheral blood cells (PBC) of 28 HNSCC patients who underwent surgery by means of expression profiling. Our hypothesis is that nucleated blood cells circulate continuously, also pass the tumor, and change their expression profile in response to tumor cell factors. For comparison, we enrolled a control group of 11 patients who underwent surgery in the head and neck region for non-HNSCC reasons. A set of 2949 genes was found to be statistically different between the groups (P < 0.05, false discovery rate-corrected) and the most prominently different pathways were EIF2, EIF4, and mTOR signaling. These preliminary results are promising and warrant further studies on the definitive role of PBC gene expression as a biomarker for HNSCC detection and monitoring.

  10. 10th International Symposium on Head And Neck Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Balm, Alfons J M; Lohuis, Peter J F M; van der Veen, J P Wietse

    2011-07-01

    Since 1993, ten multidisciplinary symposia were organized at The Netherlands Cancer Institute on the diagnosis and treatment of malignancies of the head and neck. The symposia are meant to provide up-to-date teaching for physicians by world-renowned speakers. The previous symposia dealt with sarcomas, reconstruction, cancer in young patients, salivary glands, melanoma, unknown primaries, as well as several other topics. This 10th symposium focused on skin cancer of the head and neck. There are many types of skin cancer and the differential diagnosis can often be difficult. In this symposium, diagnosis, molecular biology, epidemiology, staging and the treatment of various skin cancers were discussed by leaders in the field. There were over 200 participants from many different countries in Europe and overseas, representing specialties in the fields of dermatology, maxillofacial surgery, otolaryngology, head and neck surgery, general surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and radiotherapy.

  11. Evaluation of the benefit and use of multidisciplinary teams in the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licitra, Lisa; Keilholz, Ulrich; Tahara, Makoto; Lin, Jin-Ching; Chomette, Pauline; Ceruse, Philippe; Harrington, Kevin; Mesia, Ricard

    2016-08-01

    Given the complexities of multimodality treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, the rationale for the use of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) to define individual optimal treatment strategies on a per-patient basis is apparent. Increased use of guideline-directed approaches, reduced time to treatment and improved outcomes, which result from use of an MDT approach in head and neck cancer, have been documented. A discussion of these recent advances, as well as presentation of available country-specific guidance on the roles and responsibilities of team members, supports the creation of similar local-language recommendations for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. Finally, expert practical advice on the implementation of MDTs may enable the establishment of the MDT approach more universally around the world.

  12. Head and neck pain review: traditional and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M H; Nelson, A J

    1996-10-01

    A variety of conditions are frequently associated with the occurrence of head and neck pain. The purposes of this review are: to describe the characteristics of several musculoskeletal, neurological, and systemic conditions frequently cited as possible causes of head and neck pain and to suggest a new technique for treating head and neck pain. The characteristics of musculoskeletal conditions, such as muscle spasm, tendinitis, trigger points, and joint inflammation, and their relationship to head and neck pain are considered. The features and clinical implications of neurologic conditions, such as atypical facial pain, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and neurogenic inflammation, are also described. The distinguishing characteristics of headaches, including cluster, tension, chronic daily, rebound, posttraumatic, and postlumbar puncture, are detailed. This review also addresses the contributions of systemic disorders, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and the variants, and rheumatoid-related conditions, like dermatomyositis, temporal arteritis, Lyme's disease, and fibromyalgia, to head and neck pain. The results of a recent pilot study of the effectiveness of intraoral circulating ice water for resolving symptoms related to head and neck pain secondary to neurogenic inflammation are presented in this work. Ice water circulating through hollow metal tubes was placed intraorally for 15 minutes in the posterior maxillary area on 12 individuals with cervical pain and muscle spasm. In nine of these individuals, reduced cervical pain perception, upper trapezius electromyography signal reduction, and increased cervical range of motion was produced. Six out of 12 individuals had accompanying headache, which was reduced or eliminated in four cases. These findings suggest a strong trigemino-cervical relationship to neck pain and headache.

  13. Integrated media presentation in multidisciplinary head and neck oncology meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, Ricard; Morgan, Peter; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Odell, Edward; Harrison, John; Almeida, Bernice; McGurk, Mark; Lyons, Andrew; Hussain, Karim; Gleeson, Michael; O'Connell, Mary; Calman, Frances; Ng, Roy; Roblin, Paul; Connor, Steve; Fenlon, Michael; Burke, Mary; Chandra, Ashish; Herbert, Amanda; Patt, Sarah; Steward-Bagley, Lizzie; Donnelly, Rachael; Freeman, Lesley; Twinn, Claire; Mason, Carolyn

    2009-02-01

    Multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs) are an essential part of the management of head and neck cancer. Practice care guidance set up by the British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists has recommended that MDMs should have appropriate projection equipment for computer-generated images so that all members of group have access to the same information. The aim of this paper is to review our experience with the integrated visual presentation of head and neck oncology patients and to demonstrate its advantages over conventional approaches. Digital photographs are taken of patients and of their index tumour at presentation or at the time of diagnostic endoscopy. All relevant pre-treatment digitised images from tumour sites and radiological images and histological slides are incorporated into a single presentation using Microsoft PowerPoint software. During the past 2 years, on-line radiological scans have also become accessible for the meeting to aid treatment planning. Subsequently, all peri-operative pictures and post-surgical macroscopic and microscopic histopathological images are added to each patient's presentation, which is then hyperlinked into the agenda. The Guy's and St Thomas' Head and Neck Cancer Centre treats over 400 patients a year, and since 2002, all new cancer diagnoses have been discussed in the weekly MDM as described above. A total of 1,638 presentations have been incorporated in a centralized database that is updated in the event of recurrence, further primary tumours or other clinical developments. Satisfactory documentation and staging of head and neck tumours must include a verbal description, accurate measurement, diagrammatic representation, photographic recording and appropriate radiological imaging. Integrated presentation at MDM collates all relevant findings for clinical management decisions on patients with head and neck cancer. This approach is also an extremely valuable adjunct to long-term clinical monitoring.

  14. Impact of genetic targets on therapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikhoutdinov, Irina; Goldenberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical technique, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, the mortality from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not improved significantly. Squamous cell carcinoma is caused by tobacco use, alcohol consumption and infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus. It is the 6th most common cancer in the world, with upwards of 45,000 new cases reported yearly in the United States alone.In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the understanding of the molecular and genetic pathogenesis of head and neck cancer, shedding light on the unexpected heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic analysis has led to new classification schemes for HNSCC, with different subgroups exhibiting different prognoses. In addition, multiple targets in aberrant signaling pathways have been identified using increasingly sophisticated bio-informatics tools. Advances in technology have allowed for novel delivery mechanisms to introduce genetic material into cells to produce a therapeutic effect by targeting cancer cells via a number of different approaches.A pressing need to develop novel therapies to augment current treatment modalities has led to a number of translational studies involving gene therapy in the treatment of HNSCC. This article will focus on a review of the most recent developments in molecular biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in regards to possible targets for gene therapy, as well as the array of novel therapeutic strategies directed at these targets.

  15. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Amit; Bali, Deepika; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2013-07-01

    Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA) and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction and expression, mediation of apoptosis and clinical response including pathological complete responses. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the current available gene therapies for head and neck cancer.

  16. Prognosis of thin cutaneous head and neck melanoma (

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A P; Dahlstrøm, Karin Kjærgaard; Drzewiecki, K T

    1996-01-01

    Thin malignant melanomas, i.e. tumours less than 1 mm, are generally considered to have a good prognosis. The records of 148 patients with thin invasive melanomas located to the head and neck region were reviewed. All patients were followed for the excision of the primary tumour until death...... of these 16 patients (75%) died of disseminated melanoma. We conclude that thin head and neck melanomas do not necessarily carry an excellent prognosis. Prognosis is not dependent upon tumour thickness when less than 1.00 mm....

  17. Digital subtraction angiography in head and neck radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmody, R.F.; Seeger, J.F.; Smith, R.L.; Horsley, W.W.; Miller, R.W.

    1984-07-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was used to evaluate 44 patients with suspected otolaryngologic abnormalities. Sixteen had IVDSA for pulsatile tinnitus or suspected glomus tumor of the petrous bone. Nine patients were evaluated because of pulsatile neck masses, and 12 others had suspected tumors of the neck, face, and paranasal sinuses. Seven had IVDSA following head and neck trauma. The technique of examination is described. The current indications of IVDSA in head and neck radiology are discussed. It is concluded that IVDSA is a suitable substitute for conventional angiography for many otolaryngologic conditions and, because of its safety, can be used more liberally.

  18. Prognosis of thin cutaneous head and neck melanoma (

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A P; Dahlstrøm, Karin Kjærgaard; Drzewiecki, K T

    1996-01-01

    Thin malignant melanomas, i.e. tumours less than 1 mm, are generally considered to have a good prognosis. The records of 148 patients with thin invasive melanomas located to the head and neck region were reviewed. All patients were followed for the excision of the primary tumour until death...... of these 16 patients (75%) died of disseminated melanoma. We conclude that thin head and neck melanomas do not necessarily carry an excellent prognosis. Prognosis is not dependent upon tumour thickness when less than 1.00 mm....

  19. Diagnosis and Management of Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Current Trends and Controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Mark S.; Sinha, Uttam K., E-mail: sinha@med.usc.edu [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo St, Suite 4600, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an aggressive neuroendocrine cutaneous malignancy with a predilection for regional and distant metastasis. This malignancy presents most commonly on the head and neck of elderly Caucasian males, with a higher prevalence in the immunosuppressed. A high index of suspicion must be maintained due to the often asymptomatic presentation. Lip tumors, scalp tumors, local invasion, nodal metastasis, distant metastasis, and lymphovascular invasion are poor prognostic factors. Up to 8.7% of patients present with distant metastasis, and PET-CT is an accurate staging tool with a 90% sensitivity. Combined aggressive surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy affords the best regional control rates. The regional lymphatics must be addressed with either sentinel lymph node biopsy, surgery, or elective radiation due to the risk of occult metastasis. Addition of chemotherapy has no proven benefit in locoregional control.

  20. Postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean-contaminated head and neck oncologic surgery: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, C-J; Knecht, R; Münscher, A; Matern, J; Dalchow, C; Lörincz, B B

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is commonly used in head and neck oncologic surgery, due to the clean-contaminated nature of these procedures. There is a wide variety in the use of prophylactic antibiotics regarding the duration of application and the choice of agent. The purpose of this study was to determine whether short-term or long-term antibiotic prophylaxis has an impact on the development of head and neck surgical wound infection (SWI). Retrospective chart review was carried out in 418 clean-contaminated head and neck surgical oncology cases at our department. More than 50 variables including tumour type and stage, type of surgical treatment, co-morbidities, duration and choice of antibiotic prophylaxis, and the incidence of SWI were analysed. Following descriptive data analysis, Chi square test by Pearson and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical evaluation. Fifty-eight of the 418 patients (13.9 %) developed SWI. Patients with advanced disease and tracheotomy showed a significantly higher rate of SWI than those with early stage disease and without tracheotomy (p = 0.012 and p = 0.00017, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between the SWI rates in the short term and long term treatment groups (14.6 and 13.2 %, respectively; p = 0.689). Diabetes and body weight were not found to be risk factors for SWI. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis was not associated with a decrease in SWI in the entire cohort of patients undergoing clean-contaminated major head and neck oncologic surgery. Our data confirmed the extent of surgery and tracheotomy as being risk factors for postoperative SWI.

  1. Analysis of 120 Pectoralis Major Flaps for Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Sun You

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background A pectoralis major flap is one of the standard tools for the reconstruction ofdefects of the head and neck. Despite the technical advancement in free tissue transfer inhead and neck reconstruction, the benefits of a pectoralis major flap should not be overlooked.The purpose of this study is to evaluate our 17 years of experience in reconstructing defectsof the head and neck region using the pectoralis major flap.Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 112 patients (120 cases whounderwent pectoralis major flap operations for head and neck reconstruction during a periodranging from 1994 to 2010.Results In our series, no total necrosis of the flap occurred. Of the total cases, 30.8% presentedwith flap-related complications. Major complications occurred in 20% of all of the casesbut were then all successfully treated. The male sex was correlated with the occurrence ofoverall complications (P=0.020 and major complications (P=0.007. Preoperative albuminlevels of <3.8 g/dL were correlated with the formation of fistula (P=0.030. Defects of thehypopharynx were correlated with the occurrence of major complications (P=0.019 and theformation of fistula (P=0.012. Secondary reconstructions were correlated with the occurrenceof overall complications (P=0.013 and the formation of fistula (P=0.030.Conclusions A pectoralis major flap is still considered to be a safe, versatile one-stagereconstruction procedure in the management of the defects of head and neck and theprotection of the carotid artery.

  2. Dysphagia and trismus after concomitant chemo-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (chemo-IMRT) in advanced head and neck cancer; dose-effect relationships for swallowing and mastication structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Lisette; Heemsbergen, Wilma D; de Jong, Rianne; van Rossum, Maya A; Smeele, Ludi E; Rasch, Coen R N; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2013-03-01

    Prospective assessment of dysphagia and trismus in chemo-IMRT head and neck cancer patients in relation to dose-parameters of structures involved in swallowing and mastication. Assessment of 55 patients before, 10-weeks (N=49) and 1-year post-treatment (N=37). Calculation of dose-volume parameters for swallowing (inferior (IC), middle (MC), and superior constrictors (SC)), and mastication structures (e.g. masseter). Investigation of relationships between dose-parameters and endpoints for swallowing problems (videofluoroscopy-based laryngeal Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS), and study-specific structured questionnaire) and limited mouth-opening (measurements and questionnaire), taking into account baseline scores. At 10-weeks, volume of IC receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) and mean dose IC were significant predictors for PAS. One-year post-treatment, reported problems with swallowing solids were significantly related to masseter dose-parameters (mean, V20, V40 and V60) and an inverse relationship (lower dose related to a higher probability) was observed for V60 of the IC. Dose-parameters of masseter and pterygoid muscles were significant predictors of trismus at 10-weeks (mean, V20, and V40). At 1-year, dose-parameters of all mastication structures were strong predictors for subjective mouth-opening problems (mean, max, V20, V40, and V60). Dose-effect relationships exist for dysphagia and trismus. Therefore treatment plans should be optimized to avoid these side effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Head and neck cancer in elderly patients: is microsurgical free-tissue transfer a safe procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarsitano, A; Pizzigallo, A; Sgarzani, R; Oranges, C M; Cipriani, R; Marchetti, C

    2012-12-01

    The safety and success of microvascular transfer have been well documented in the general population, but the good results achieved with the use of free flaps in elderly patients have received little attention. This study sought to identify differences in complications, morbidity and functional outcomes between elderly (≥ 75 years) and younger (patients treated surgically for advanced head and neck cancer using the Head and Neck 35 module of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire. Patient treatment consisted of composite resection, including excision of the primary tumour with ipsilateral or bilateral neck dissection and microvascular reconstruction. Eighty-five microvascular tissue transfers were performed to reconstruct major surgical defects. Postoperative radiation therapy was performed when indicated. Total flap loss occurred in three cases in elderly patients and two cases in younger patients. The rates of major surgical complication were 9% in young patients and 11% in elderly patients. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in the rates of major and minor flap complications, morbidity or long-term functional outcome. The results of the present analysis indicate that free-flap microvascular reconstruction can be considered a safe procedure in elderly patients with head and neck cancer.

  4. Oxygen microenvironment affects the uptake of nanoparticles in head and neck tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Hodge, Sasson; Tai, Katherine; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Hoopes, P. Jack; Samkoe, Kimberley S.

    2013-02-01

    Survival of head and neck cancer patients has not improved in several decades despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers is a critical factor that leads to poor prognosis, resistance to radiation and chemotherapies, and increased metastatic potential. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPHT) is a promising therapy for hypoxic tumors because nanoparticles (NP) can be directly injected into, or targeted to, hypoxic tumor cells and exposed to alternating magnetic fields (AMF) to induce hyperthermia. Magnetic NPHT can improve therapeutic effectiveness by two modes of action: 1) direct killing of hypoxic tumor cells; and 2) increase in tumor oxygenation, which has the potential to make the tumor more susceptible to adjuvant therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy. Prior studies in breast cancer cells demonstrated that a hypoxic microenvironment diminished NP uptake in vitro; however, mNPHT with intratumoral NP injection in hypoxic tumors increased tumor oxygenation and delayed tumor growth. In this study, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were incubated in normoxic, hypoxic, and hyperoxic conditions with iron oxide NP for 4-72 hours. After incubation, the cells were analyzed for iron uptake by mass spectrometry, Prussian blue staining, and electron microscopy. In contrast to breast cancer cells, uptake of NPs was increased in hypoxic microenvironments as compared to normoxic conditions in HNSCC cells. In future studies, we will confirm the effect of the oxygen microenvironment on NP uptake and efficacy of mNPHT both in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Sentinel node biopsy in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Gary L; Soutar, David S; Gordon MacDonald, D

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to determine the reliability and reproducibility of sentinel node biopsy (SNB) as a staging tool in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for T1/2 clinically N0 patients by means of a standardized technique. METHODS: Between June 1998 and June 2002, 227 SNB...

  6. Trismus in head and neck oncology : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Kalk, WWI; Roodenburg, JLN

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify systematically, criteria for trismus in head and neck cancer, the evidence for risk factors for trismus and the interventions to treat trismus. Three databases were searched (time period 1966 to June 2003) for the text "trismus" or "restricted mouth opening". I

  7. [Quality assurance in head and neck medical oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digue, Laurence; Pedeboscq, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    In medical oncology, how can we be sure that the right drug is being administered to the right patient at the right time? The implementation of quality assurance criteria is important in medical oncology, in order to ensure that the patient receives the best treatment safely. There is very little literature about quality assurance in medical oncology, as opposed to radiotherapy or cancer surgery. Quality assurance must cover the entire patient care process, from the diagnosis, to the therapeutic decision and drug distribution, including its selection, its preparation and its delivery to the patient (administration and dosage), and finally the potential side effects and their management. The dose-intensity respect is crucial, and its reduction can negatively affect overall survival rates, as shown in breast and testis cancers for example. In head and neck medical oncology, it is essential to respect the few well-standardized recommendations and the dose-intensity, in a population with numerous comorbidities. We will first review quality assurance criteria for the general medical oncology organization and then focus on head and neck medical oncology. We will then describe administration specificities of head and neck treatments (chemoradiation, radiation plus cetuximab, postoperative chemoradiation, induction and palliative chemotherapy) as well as their follow-up. Lastly, we will offer some recommendations to improve quality assurance in head and neck medical oncology.

  8. Head and neck paragangliomas : genetics, heredity and clinical characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, Erik Frans

    2012-01-01

    Paragangliomas are rare neoplasms that occur predominantly in the head and neck region. They originate from the neural crest derived cells within paraganglions, and are closely related to the pheochromocytomas of the adrenal medulla. In contrast to other European countries, the majority of head and

  9. Genetic susceptibility to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacko, M.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Sturgis, E.M.; Boedeker, C.C.; Suarez, C.; Rinaldo, A.; Ferlito, A.; Takes, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is growing. Although environmental carcinogens and carcinogenic viruses are the main etiologic factors, genetic predisposition obviously plays a risk-modulating role, given that not all individ

  10. Trismus in head and neck oncology : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Kalk, WWI; Roodenburg, JLN

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify systematically, criteria for trismus in head and neck cancer, the evidence for risk factors for trismus and the interventions to treat trismus. Three databases were searched (time period 1966 to June 2003) for the text "trismus" or "restricted mouth opening". I

  11. [Psychological care of patients with head and neck cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Mélanie

    2015-09-01

    Treatments for head and neck cancers are generally complex and debilitating. Surgery, often mutilating, profoundly affects the relationship between oneself and others and causes verbal communication, breathing and swallowing difficulties. The functional and aesthetic sequelae are a constant reminder to the patient of the disease and make them conscious of their appearance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Head and neck paragangliomas : genetics, heredity and clinical characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, Erik Frans

    2012-01-01

    Paragangliomas are rare neoplasms that occur predominantly in the head and neck region. They originate from the neural crest derived cells within paraganglions, and are closely related to the pheochromocytomas of the adrenal medulla. In contrast to other European countries, the majority of head and

  13. Immunotherapy for head and neck cancer patients: shifting the balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turksma, A.W.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Bloemena, E.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Leemans, C.R.; Hooijberg, E.

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer in the western world. Over the last few decades little improvement has been made to increase the relatively low 5-year survival rate. This calls for novel and improved therapies. Here, we describe opportunities in immunotherapy fo

  14. Adaptation of median partial sternotomy in head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpitzer, Thomas; Saute, Milton; Gilat, Hanna; Raveh, Eyal; Koren, Ilan; Shvero, Jacob; Bahar, Gideon; Feinmesser, Raphael

    2007-12-01

    Upper mediastinum involvement in diseases of the head and neck may require a sternal split. This study describes our adaptation of the upper median or "minimal" sternotomy technique for the treatment of head and neck pathologies. Between April 2002 and October 2005, 17 patients aged 4 to 82 years underwent minimal sternotomy in our institution for a variety of head and neck pathologies. The 17 patients included 11 adults with metastatic thyroid disease (six metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma, two medullary carcinoma, and one Hiirthle cell carcinoma) and huge retrosternal goiter (n = 2), four adults with parathyroid disease (two primary parathyroid adenoma, one secondary hyperplasia, and one parathyroid carcinoma), and two children with lymphangioma and huge thymic cyst (one each). Average hospitalization was 8 days. Four patients needed a thoracic drain for 2 days, one had recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, and one had phrenic nerve paresis. There were no postoperative deaths. Minimal sternotomy appears to be an excellent alternative for surgical exploration of the mediastinum and may be used in head and neck surgery for a range of indications.

  15. Estimation of Relative Blood Volume in Head and Neck Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Introduction: The calculation of relative blood volume in head and neck tumor with MR imaging is anew approach that may provide additional hemodynamic information relevant to both untreated and treated tumors. This hemodynamic information is especially usefu l for the differentiation between viable tumor and postsurgical changes or rad iation induced scar, and is also beneficial for tumor staging and tumor biopsy.

  16. Preradiation dental decisions in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, H.H. (Hubert Herman)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a series of studies that investigated preradiation dental decision making in patients with head and neck cancer. In Chapter 1, it is ascertained that in view of the risk for oral sequelae resulting from high-dose radiotherapy, special attention to preradiation dental planning ap

  17. Rhabdomyoblastic Differentiation in Head and Neck Malignancies Other Than Rhabdomyosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bishop, J.A.; Thompson, L.D.; Cardesa, A.; Barnes, L.; Lewis, J.S., Jr.; Triantafyllou, A.; Hellquist, H.; Stenman, G.; Hunt, J.L.; Williams, M.D.; Slootweg, P.J.; Devaney, K.O.; Gnepp, D.R.; Wenig, B.M.; Rinaldo, A.; Ferlito, A.

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common soft tissue sarcoma that frequently affects children and adolescents and may involve the head and neck. Rhabdomyosarcoma is defined by skeletal muscle differentiation which can be suggested by routine histology and confirmed by immunohistochemistry for the

  18. Morbidity of the neck after head and neck cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; van der Laan, B.F.; Plukker, J.T.; Roodenburg, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Studies on morbidity of the neck after head and neck cancer therapy are scarcely described. Methods. Patients who underwent surgery, including neck dissection, with and without radiation therapy at least 1 year before the study were asked to participate. We assessed neck pain, loss of se

  19. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TMJ DISORDER AND HEAD AND NECK POSTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sesi R. Puspita Dewi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint disorders may be caused by variety of factors; one of which is the posture of head and neck. However, this remains controversial and a subject of debate by experts. The objective of this study was to know whether there was a relation between temporomandibular disorders and the head and neck posture seen radiographically. Subjects were 40 dental students from University of Indonesia who met the inclusion criteria, selected through questionnaire, and subjective examination based on Helkimo’s dysfunction index. Then, lateral cephalometric radiographs were done to all subjects. In the radiogram, a horizontal line was made from the nasion point to the sella tursica, and a vertical line was drawn along the prominent bone of C1 – C5. The angle between the two lines was measured, and used to represent the head and neck posture. The design of the study was cross sectional. Based on statistical analysis, there was no significant relationship between the anamnestic dysfunction index as well as the clinical dysfunction index that represented the temporomandibular joint disorders and the posture of the head and neck seen radiographically.

  20. Morbidity of the neck after head and neck cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; van der Laan, B.F.; Plukker, J.T.; Roodenburg, J.L.

    Background. Studies on morbidity of the neck after head and neck cancer therapy are scarcely described. Methods. Patients who underwent surgery, including neck dissection, with and without radiation therapy at least 1 year before the study were asked to participate. We assessed neck pain, loss of

  1. Trismus in head and neck oncology : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Kalk, WWI; Roodenburg, JLN

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify systematically, criteria for trismus in head and neck cancer, the evidence for risk factors for trismus and the interventions to treat trismus. Three databases were searched (time period 1966 to June 2003) for the text "trismus" or "restricted mouth opening".

  2. Criteria for trismus in head and neck oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Roodenburg, JLN; Huisman, P.

    The aim of this study was to determine a functional cut-off point for trismus in head and neck oncology. In total, 89 patients (13 dentate, 30 partially dentate and 46 edentulous) treated for cancer of the oral cavity or oropharynx were asked whether they experienced a limited mouth opening. The

  3. Preradiation dental decisions in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, H.H. (Hubert Herman)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a series of studies that investigated preradiation dental decision making in patients with head and neck cancer. In Chapter 1, it is ascertained that in view of the risk for oral sequelae resulting from high-dose radiotherapy, special attention to preradiation dental planning ap

  4. Neurofibromatosis of the head and neck: classification and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Kerry; Buchanan, Edward P; Suver, Daniel; Gruss, Joseph S

    2015-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis is common and presents with variable penetrance and manifestations in one in 2500 to one in 3000 live births. The management of these patients is often multidisciplinary because of the complexity of the disease. Plastic surgeons are frequently involved in the surgical management of patients with head and neck involvement. A 20-year retrospective review of patients treated surgically for head and neck neurofibroma was performed. Patients were identified according to International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for neurofibromatosis and from the senior author's database. A total of 59 patients with head and neck neurofibroma were identified. These patients were categorized into five distinct, but not exclusive, categories to assist with diagnosis and surgical management. These categories included plexiform, cranioorbital, facial, neck, and parotid/auricular neurofibromatosis. A surgical classification system and clinical characteristics of head and neck neurofibromatosis is presented to assist practitioners with diagnosis and surgical management of this complex disease. The surgical management of the cranioorbital type is discussed in detail in 24 patients. The importance and safety of facial nerve dissection and preservation using intraoperative nerve monitoring were validated in 16 dissections in 15 patients. Massive involvement of the neck extending from the skull base to the mediastinum, frequently considered inoperable, has been safely resected by the use of access osteotomies of the clavicle and sternum, muscle takedown, and brachial plexus dissection and preservation using intraoperative nerve monitoring. Therapeutic, IV.

  5. Head and neck injuries in young taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieter, W; Zemper, E D

    1999-06-01

    To investigate the location, type, situation and mechanism of head and neck injuries in young taekwondo athletes. Prospective. National and international taekwondo tournaments. 3,341 boys and 917 girls, aged 6 to 16 years. Injury rates per 1,000 athlete-exposures (A-E) for total number of head and neck injuries, location, type, situation, and mechanism of injury. There was a significant difference between young male and female taekwondo athletes in total head and neck injury rate (p injury type for both boys (8.41/1,000 A-E) and girls (7.80/1,000 A-E). The cerebral concussion ranked second in both boys (5.11/1,000 A-E) and girls (4.55/1,000 A-E). The unblocked attack was the major injury situation for both boys (19.78/1,000 A-E) and girls (14.96/1,000 A-E). As a consequence, the major injury mechanism was receiving a blow (20.93/1,000 A-E and 16.25/1,000 A-E for boys and girls, respectively). Only the boys (0.66/1,000 A-E) incurred the most serious head and neck injuries that resulted in > or = 21 days away from participation. The national and international taekwondo governing bodies should review their current injury prevention measures. Given the potentially debilitating nature of these injuries, implications for any diagnostic capabilities on site should be carefully reviewed.

  6. Nonparameningeal head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbach, Daniel; Mosseri, Veronique; Gallego, Soledad

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article reports risk factors and long-term outcome in localized nonparameningeal head and neck rhabdomyosarcomas in children and adolescents from a combined dataset from 3 consecutive international trials. METHODS: Data from 140 children (9.3% of total) prospectively enrolled...

  7. Feasibility of primary tumor culture models and preclinical prediction assays for head and neck cancer : A narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohmen, Amy J C; Swartz, Justin E.; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W M; Willems, Stefan M.; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated

  8. Feasibility of primary tumor culture models and preclinical prediction assays for head and neck cancer : A narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohmen, Amy J C; Swartz, Justin E.; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W M; Willems, Stefan M.; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated

  9. Augmented reality visualization in head and neck surgery: an overview of recent findings in sentinel node biopsy and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profeta, Andrea Corrado; Schilling, Clare; McGurk, Mark

    2016-07-01

    "Augmented reality visualisation", in which the site of an operation is merged with computer-generated graphics, provides a way to view the relevant part of the patient's body in better detail. We describe its role in relation to sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB), current advancements, and future directions in the excision of tumours in early-stage cancers of the head and neck.

  10. Multi-modality management for loco-regionally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer: balancing the benefit of efficacy and functional preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei; Zhu, Guopei; Wang, Yulong; Wang, Xiaoshen; Ji, Qinghai; Wang, Yu; Dou, Shengjin

    2014-09-01

    The 5-year overall survival (OS) of loco-regionally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma (LA-LHC) has declined over the past two decades following the wide application of non-surgical approaches. We aimed to define the new role of open surgery combined with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of LA-LHC for improving survival while maintaining a functional larynx. In the current study, 90 LA-LHC patients treated with open surgery followed by postoperative RT/CRT in our institute from May 2005 to December 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. OS, disease-free survival (DFS), loco-regional failure-free survival (LRFFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were calculated, and prognostic factors were analyzed. Functional larynx preservation results were evaluated according to the head and neck quality of life (QoL) Scale. With a median follow-up period of 37 months, the 3- and 5-year OS, DFS, LRFFS and DMFS were 71.3, 63.7, 85.9, 73.7 and 55.9, 53.0, 81.6, 71.9 %, respectively. Vascular embolism and extracapsular extension (ECE) of the lymph nodes were prognostic factors for poorer OS (p = 0.045 and 0.046, respectively). Vascular embolism was the only prognostic factor for poorer DMFS (p = 0.005). Patients who underwent a conservative partial laryngectomy (CPL) experienced a higher QoL in the domains of speech, swallowing and emotion. Functional larynx preservation was achieved in 36/45 patients (80 %) who received CPL. The results of our study demonstrated that CPL followed by adequate adjuvant therapy could achieve superior oncological results compared with non-surgical approaches in LA-LHC patients while also maintaining satisfactory functional larynx in a majority of patients.

  11. Advances of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in head and neck neoplasms%定量动态增强MRI在头颈部肿瘤中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫铄; 夏爽(审校)

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) images were generated according to the signal changes aroused by the different perfusion and permeability of micro-molecule contrast agents in tissues. The common T 1WI sequences include volumetric interpolated breathhold examination (VIBE), liver acquisition with volume acceleration (LAVA), time-resolved angiography with interleaved stochastic trajectories (TWIST). The qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative conclusions could be drawn after the post-processing of the original DCE-MRI images. Among them, the quantitative analysis was conducted according to different parameters, and then was applied in the diagnosis, differentiate diagnosis, and the classification of tumors and tumors’ therapeutic evaluations. In this review we summarized the applications of the quantitative DCE-MRI in the head and neck neoplasms.%动态增强MRI基于小分子对比剂在灌注程度和渗透性不同的组织中分布不同而引起信号变化进行成像,常用T1WI扫描序列如快速三维容积内插屏气检查(VIBE)、肝脏快速容积采集(LAVA)序列、时间分辨随机轨道成像(TWIST)。这些序列各有优缺点。动态对比增强MR(DCE-MRI)原始图像经过后处理,可以进行定性、半定量、定量分析。定量分析根据不同的参数值,对肿瘤进行诊断、鉴别诊断,肿瘤分级及疗效评价等。就定量DCE-MRI在头颈部肿瘤中的应用进展进行综述。

  12. Advances in development of young-pediatric anthropometric and anthropomorphic head and neck phantoms for dosimetry; Avancos no desenvolvimento de fantomas antropomorfico e antropometrico de cabeca e pescoco infanto-juvenil para dosimetria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: thompson@nuclear.ufmg.br; campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2005-07-01

    The neck malign cancer in pediatric population differs significantly than adult cancer. The pediatric primary malign tumors result in the neck and head fence 5% . The malign cervical tumors, generally, are rabdomyossarcoms and lymphomas. The least frequent malign cancer includes metastasis, scammous cells and thyroid cancer. The larynx cancer treatment is surgery, preferentially. However, lesions with little infiltration, that do not compromise the vocals cords mobile, do not infiltrate cartilage, and do not compromise neither the anterior comissure neither the arytenoid, can be controlled with exclusive radiotherapy. The traditional dose for sub-clinical disease in larynx cancer, neck and head region, has been 50 to 60 Gy to standard fraction of 2 Gy/day, five times for week. When the treatment is consummated with exclusive radiotherapy in primary tumor. The dose must be higher, diversifying from 66 (for small tumors T1) to 70 Gy (for higher tumors, that T2 or T3). Phantoms are simulators utilized for dose prediction in patient simulating radiation interactions with matter. Also it is applied for radio diagnosis equipment calibration and quality control of medical image. Many kind of phantoms are developed, handmade and commercialized, with matters and forms most varied, holding distinct purpose, in senses of establishing double check parameters for reducing planning and calibration errors. This study addresses the development of a object for simulating young-pediatric anthropometric and anthropomorphic head and neck, called phantom, for dosimetric studies. The methodology will be based on the preparation of a phantom respecting the anatomic standards and its tissue equivalent composition. The hope is that phantom can be used in the scientific researches of radiation protocols applied to young-pediatric patient. (author)

  13. Public knowledge of head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, T E

    2010-04-01

    Studies show 60% of patients with newly diagnosed Head & Neck Squamous Cell Cancer in Ireland, present with advanced disease. A poor level of knowledge and awareness among the public of Head & Neck Cancer, is an important consideration in the often delayed presentation for medical attention in many of these cases. Our study surveyed 200 members of the public to assess their knowledge and awareness of Head & Neck Cancer. One hundred and forty (70%) of respondents had never encountered the term "Head & Neck Cancer". One hundred and forty six (73%) failed to identify excessive alcohol consumption as a risk factor. Less than 100 (50%) would have concern about persisting hoarseness or a prolonged oral ulcer. An urgent need exists to raise awareness of Head & Neck Cancer among the public in Ireland.

  14. [Phoniatrics in the rehabilitation for head and neck cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Krisztina; Remenár, Eva; Kásler, Miklós

    2008-09-01

    The aim of treating head and neck cancer is to eliminate the tumor and save functions as much as possible. Despite all efforts the vital (swallowing) and communicative (phonation, articulation) functions can be injured. The treatment of dysphagia is the most important in the rehabilitation, because it can lead to fatal complications: aspiration pneumonia (for example aspiration of saliva), dehydration, malnutrition. According to the localization of the lesion we distinguish oropharyngeal and esophageal dysphagia. The aspiration may be pre-, intra- and post-deglutition. The aspiration without coughing is called silent aspiration which is mainly seen in neurogenic dysphagia, but can also happen in head and neck cancer patients. There are different possibilities to compensate the failing functions in the phoniatric rehabilitation. The swallowing therapy includes causal, compensatory and dietary strategies. In addition to the swallowing therapy the treatment of communicative dysfunctions with articulation exercises will also improve the quality of life of the patients.

  15. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction and expression, mediation of apoptosis and clinical response including pathological complete responses. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the current available gene therapies for head and neck cancer.

  16. Imaging appearance of granulomatous lesions of head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek, E-mail: arazek@mans.eun.e [Diagnostic Radiology Department, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, 62 ElNokrsi Street-Meet Hadr, Mansoura (Egypt); Castillo, Mauricio [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2010-10-15

    We aim to review the imaging appearance of granulomatous lesions of the head and neck. Granulomatous lesions are seen in different regions of the head and neck and a difficult diagnostic challenge for the radiologist. Infective granulomas may be due to bacterial or fungal agents. Non-infective granulomas are Wegener's granulomatosis, sarcoidosis, amyloidosis, chemical granuloma and reparative giant cell granuloma. Familiarity with the clinical presentation and imaging features of these lesions can suggest diagnosis in some cases. CT and MR imaging demonstrate the exact location, extension and effect on surrounding structures. A thorough knowledge of age, gender, common location, clinical features and imaging appearance of granulomatous lesions are important for diagnosis.

  17. Metastasis of genitourinary tumors to the head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunyemi, Ore; Rojas, A; Hematpour, K; Rogers, D; Head, C; Bennett, C

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the present study is to characterize genitourinary tumors (GU) metastatic to the head and neck and to determine long-term prognoses. Using a retrospective chart review of 734 patients treated between January 1995 and May 2005 with an ICD-9 code pertaining to a metastatic head and neck cancer, we found 37 patients with primary GU tumors. There were 24 cases of prostate cancer, 10 cases of renal cell carcinoma, and 4 cases of transitional cell carcinoma. Sixteen of 24 patients (67%) with prostate cancer had a cranial metastasis while 6 of 9 (67%) patients with renal cell carcinoma had cerebral metastasis. We concluded that prolonged survival is possible in prostate cancer patients treated aggressively with radiation and chemotherapy, indicating that early detection and aggressive screening are important in these patients.

  18. [Managment of head and neck cancers during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiciński, Krzysztof; Skorek, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Czesław

    2011-01-01

    The coincidence of malignant disease during pregnancy is uncommon. The incidence of cancer in pregnancy has increased, due to the tendency to postpone childbirth to an older age. Cancer complicates approximately 0.1% of all pregnancies. Managing head and neck cancers during pregnancy requires additional pregnancy-related understanding of the aetiological effect of pregnancy on cancer, knowledge of the direct and indirect effects of cancer on pregnancy, and the effect of diagnostic and treatment modalities on pregnancy. The timing of treatment is an important determinant on foetal wellbeing. A multidisciplinary approach should be adopted to enable parents and clinicians to make the best clinical decision. Clinicians must be cognizant with the ethical dilemmas of treatment. In head and neck cancers, pregnancy has no effect on maternal prognosis when compared to non-pregnant patients matched by age, cancer stage and treatment. Copyright © 2011 Polish Otolaryngology Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner (Poland). All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of the incidence and factors predictive of outcome in patients with head and neck cancer with pulmonary nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Richard; Macmillan, Mark T; Tikka, Theofano; Bruce, Lorna; Murchison, John T; Nixon, Iain J

    2017-07-25

    The management of pulmonary nodules is challenging; unfortunately, little is known about the incidence and significance of pulmonary nodules in patients with head and neck cancer. A review was conducted of 400 consecutive patients with head and neck cancer. Imaging was reviewed to identify the incidence of nodules and patient, tumor, and radiological factors associated with the risk of malignancy. Nodules were found in 58% of patients, with a malignant rate of 6%. Age was the only predictor of having a nodule and advanced-stage III + IV was a predictor of malignancy (P = .023; odds ratio [OR] 10.64; confidence interval 1.33-84.98). Patients presenting with head and neck cancer have a higher incidence of pulmonary nodules and a higher risk of malignancy. In contrast to the British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines, which use size to guide the need for serial scans, we would recommend follow-up imaging in all patients with head and neck cancer with nodules, irrespective of size. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Prospective randomized trial to compare the outcome and tolerability of delivering the same total dose of radiation in 61/2 weeks versus 51/2 weeks time in head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concurrent chemoradiation is currently considered to be the standard of care in the treatment of head and neck cancer. In developing countries like ours, a good number of patients cannot tolerate chemoradiation because of the poor general condition and financial constraints. Those patients are treated with radiation alone. The optimum radiotherapy (RT schedule for best local control and acceptable toxicity is not yet clear. We aimed to find out whether shortening of treatment time using six instead of five RT fractions per week improves the locoregional control in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective randomized study for a period of 2 years from September 2007 to August 2009 in 109 untreated patients of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck with histologically confirmed diagnosis and no evidence of distant metastasis. Study group (55 patients received accelerated RT with 6 fractions per week (66 Gy/33#/51/2 weeks. Control group (54 patients received conventional RT with 5 fractions per week (66 Gy/33#/61/2 weeks. Tumor control, survival, acute and late toxicities were assessed. Results: At a median follow-up of 43 months, 29 patients (52.7% in the 6 fractions group and 24 patients (44.4% in the 5 fractions group were disease-free (P = 0.852. The benefit of shortening was higher for advanced disease control though it was not statistically significant. Grade 3 and 4 skin toxicity was significantly higher in the accelerated RT (70.9% arm as compared to conventional (35.1% arm (P = 0.04. Grade 3 mucositis was significantly higher in the accelerated RT arm (32.7% vs. 16.6%; P = 0.041. Those acute toxicities were managed conservatively. There was no difference in late toxicities between the two arms. Conclusion: Use of 6 fractions per week instead of 5 fractions per week is feasible, tolerable, and results in a better outcome in the patients of head and neck cancers.

  1. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA) and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction...

  2. Trismus in head and neck oncology: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkstra, PU; Kalk, WWI; Roodenburg, JLN

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify systematically, criteria for trismus in head and neck cancer, the evidence for risk factors for trismus and the interventions to treat trismus. Three databases were searched (time period 1966 to June 2003) for the text "trismus" or "restricted mouth opening". Included in the review were clinical studies (greater than or equal to 10 patients). Two observers independently assessed the papers identified. In 12 studies nine different criteria for trismus wer...

  3. Cutaneous metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovaneswaran, Sangeetha; Paleri, Vinidh; Charlton, Fraser; Dobrowsky, Werner; Kelly, Charles

    2012-08-01

    The presence of cutaneous metastases in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) is rare and associated with a dismal prognosis. It is vital to distinguish these lesions from direct invasion of the skin by SCCHN or primary cutaneous malignancies as the prognosis is vastly different and so is the management. In this case report, we present four cases of cutaneous metastases and also briefly review the literature pertaining to this phenomenon.

  4. Adjuvant Intraoperative Photodynamic Therapy in Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigual, Nestor R.; Shafirstein, Gal; Frustino, Jennifer; Seshadri, Mukund; Cooper, Michele; Wilding, Gregory; Sullivan, Maureen A.; Henderson, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE There is an immediate need to develop local intraoperative adjuvant treatment strategies to improve outcomes in patients with cancer who undergo head and neck surgery. OBJECTIVES To determine the safety of photodynamic therapy with 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) in combination with surgery in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Nonrandomized, single-arm, single-site, phase 1 study at a comprehensive cancer center among 16 adult patients (median age, 65 years) with biopsy-proved primary or recurrent resectable head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. INTERVENTIONS Intravenous injection of HPPH (4.0 mg/m2), followed by activation with 665-nm laser light in the surgical bed immediately after tumor resection. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Adverse events and highest laser light dose. RESULTS Fifteen patients received the full course of treatment, and 1 patient received HPPH without intraoperative laser light because of an unrelated myocardial infarction. Disease sites included larynx (7 patients), oral cavity (6 patients), skin (1 patient), ear canal (1 patient), and oropharynx (1 patient, who received HPPH only). The most frequent adverse events related to photodynamic therapy were mild to moderate edema (9 patients) and pain (3 patients). One patient developed a grade 3 fistula after salvage laryngectomy, and another patient developed a grade 3 wound infection and mandibular fracture. Phototoxicity reactions included 1 moderate photophobia and 2 mild to moderate skin burns (2 due to operating room spotlights and 1 due to the pulse oximeter). The highest laser light dose was 75 J/cm2. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The adjuvant use of HPPH-photodynamic therapy and surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma seems safe and deserves further study. PMID:23868427

  5. Surgical technique refinements in head and neck oncologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jeffrey C; Shah, Jatin P

    2010-06-15

    The head and neck region poses a challenging arena for oncologic surgery. Diseases and their treatment can affect a myriad of functions, including sight, hearing, taste, smell, breathing, speaking, swallowing, facial expression, and appearance. This review discusses several areas where refinements in surgical techniques have led to improved patient outcomes. This includes surgical incisions, neck lymphadenectomy, transoral laser microsurgery, minimally invasive thyroid surgery, and the use of vascularized free flaps for oromandibular reconstruction.

  6. Surgical Technique Refinements in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jeffrey C.; Shah, Jatin P.

    2010-01-01

    The head and neck region poses a challenging arena for oncologic surgery. Diseases and their treatment can affect a myriad of functions, including sight, hearing, taste, smell, breathing, speaking, swallowing, facial expression and appearance. This review discusses several areas where refinements in surgical techniques have led to improved patient outcomes. This includes surgical incisions, neck lymphadenectomy, transoral laser microsurgery, minimally invasive thyroid surgery, and the use of ...

  7. Keratin 8 expression in head and neck epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berghaus Alexander

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intermediate filament forming protein keratin 8 (K8 is a tumour-associated antigen, which was shown to be over-expressed in a variety of malignancies. Here, we present a study of K8 expression in squamous epithelia of the head and neck area, including normal mucosa, hyperplastic and dysplastic leukoplakia, carcinomas of different sub-localisations, and lymph node metastases. Methods K8 expression was assessed upon immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies in cryosections of primary tumours of the head and neck area. Results K8 expression was characteristic of transformed tissue and marked early stages of disease, i.e. dysplastic oral leukoplakia, but not normal or hyperplastic epithelium. With the exception of carcinomas of the larynx and the tongue, K8 expression also strictly differentiated carcinomas from normal epithelium of the same origin. Furthermore, K8high was characteristic of cells, which had detached from the sites of primary tumours and had been invading the surrounding tissue at the time point of surgery. Conclusion K8 is an excellent marker for head and neck malignancies, which allows for early detection as well as for visualisation of potentially disseminating tumour cells in vivo.

  8. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J. (Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, TX (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck.

  9. A computational phantom of head and neck - SISCODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa; Trindade, Bruno Machado; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: larissa.thompson@ig.com.br; bmtrindade@yahoo.com; campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    A computational voxel model of a head and neck adult male was built through the SISCODES code, in order to complement and to optimize the radiotherapic treatment in head and neck cancer, in terms of dosimetric evaluation and prediction. This computational simulator object, namely computational phantom, is a useful tool for the elaboration and simulation of the three-dimensional radiation planning. The present phantom was assembled based on information generated by photographic images of the visible human project. The images were digitalized and converted one by one to a matrix of voxel, in which tissues and its respective chemical composition were identified, with the helping of a biomedical and nuclear data bank including in SISCODES. A computational simulation of an external beam mimicking a Co-60 irradiator was prepared, reproducing a radiation window equivalent to one found in a lateral irradiation of a nasopharyngeal tumour in situ. Absorbed dose evaluation in the internal regions of the phantom are presented and demonstrated through spatial dose distribution, superimposed with the 2D phantom sections. The present article illustrates the possibility of generating information of the spatial dose distribution including all adjacent tissues, far from tumour, improving the radiodosimetry and creating the possibility of investigating neurological deficits, dysphagia, and speaking and hearing alterations, non evaluated in the present stage of radiation therapy of head and neck. (author)

  10. Trismus following treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremic, Goran; Venkatesan, Varagur; Hallock, Abhirami; Scott, Danielle; Hammond, Alexander; Read, Nancy; Franklin, Jason; Yoo, John; Fung, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to determine the prevalence of trismus in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy and surgery. Patients with malignant lesions in the head and neck treated with curative intent were comprehensively evaluated for trismus using subjective and objective measures. A large proportion of the 70 patients recruited demonstrated moderate to severe subjective trismus (45.7%). Similarly, the vast majority of patients showed slight to severe trismus (91.4%) according to objective secondary outcome measures. Of these patients, 21 (65.6%) were also treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. When the radiation field involved the pterygoid muscles, 30 (93.8%) patients reported subjective trismus. Similarly, bilateral pterygoid muscle inclusion resulted in 28 (87.5%) patients with trismus. Trismus is a significantly prevalent consequence of treatment for head and neck cancer. Predictive factors include treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy and bilateral inclusion of the structures of mastication in the high-dose radiotherapy volume.

  11. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally unresectable head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohno, Naoyuki; Kitahara, Satoshi; Tamura, Etuyo; Tanabe, Tetuya; Nakanoboh, Manabu; Itoh, Yasuo; Murata, Yasuhiro; Furukawa, Taichi [National Defense Medical Coll., Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    In patients with locally unresectable head and neck cancer with large nodal involvement, the expected five-year survival is as low as 1-2%. To improve the prognosis of these patients, we studied the usefulness of concurrent chemoradiotherapy in a phase 11 trial. Between September 1996 and May 1999, thirty-five patients with locally unresectable head and neck cancer were administered concurrent chemoradiotherapy consisting of low-dose and long-term treatment with cisplatin (CDDP) plus 5-fluorouracil (5FU), or (L-CF); the L-CF regimen consisted of CDDP, 3 mg/m{sup 2} on 5 days of the week and 5FU, 150 mg/m{sup 2} as a 24-hour infunsion on 5 days of the week. Concurrently, conventional radiotherapy was given up to total dose of around 60 Gy. In the 33 patients evaluable for response, 17 complete and 9 partial responses were noted, with an overall response rate of 79%. Oral mucositis and myelosuppression were the major side effects and mucositis was a dose limiting toxicity. This study demonstrates increase in survival among the responders (complete+partial) in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy setting. However 8 local relapses were eventually noted in the 17 complete responders. We concluded that this treatment strategy was beneficial in patients with locally unresectable head and neck cancer. (author)

  12. Predictors of pain among patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Andrew G; Terrell, Jeffrey E; Light, Emily; Wolf, Gregory T; Bradford, Carol R; Chepeha, Douglas; Jiang, Yunyun; McLean, Scott; Ghanem, Tamer A; Duffy, Sonia A

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine predictors of pain 1 year after the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. DESIGN Prospective, multisite cohort study. SETTING Three academically affiliated medical centers. PATIENTS The study population comprised 374 previously untreated patients with carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Participants were surveyed before treatment and 1 year thereafter. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictors of the 36-Item Short-Form Instrument (SF-36) bodily pain score 1 year after diagnosis. RESULTS The mean SF-36 bodily pain score at 1 year was 65, compared with 61 at the time of diagnosis (P = .004), and 75, the population norm (lower scores indicate worse pain). Variables independently associated with pain included pretreatment pain score (P neck dissection (P = .001), feeding tube (P = .05), xerostomia (P pain medication (P neck cancer pain and current smoking and problem drinking did not reach significance (P = .07 and P = .08, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Aggressive pain management may be indicated for patients with head and neck cancer who undergo neck dissections, complain of xerostomia, require feeding tubes, and have medical comorbidities. Treatment of modifiable risk factors such as depression, poor sleep quality, tobacco use, and alcohol abuse may also reduce pain and improve quality of life among patients with head and neck cancer.

  13. Metabolic microscopy of head and neck cancer organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amy T.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-03-01

    Studies for head and neck cancer have primarily relied on cell lines or in vivo animal studies. However, a technique that combines the benefits of high-throughput in vitro studies with a complex, physiologically relevant microenvironment would be advantageous for understanding drug effects. Organoids provide a unique platform that fulfills these goals. Organoids are generated from excised and digested tumor tissue and are grown in culture. Fluorescence microscopy provides high-resolution images on a similar spatial scale as organoids. In particular, autofluorescence imaging of the metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD can provide insight into response to anti-cancer treatment. The optical redox ratio reflects relative amounts of NAD(P)H and FAD, and the fluorescence lifetime reflects enzyme activity of NAD(P)H and FAD. This study optimizes and characterizes the generation and culture of organoids grown from head and neck cancer tissue. Additionally, organoids were treated for 24 hours with a standard chemotherapy, and metabolic response in the organoids was measured using optical metabolic imaging. Ultimately, combining head and neck cancer organoids with optical metabolic imaging could be applied to test drug sensitivity for drug development studies as well as treatment planning for cancer patients.

  14. INVASIVE FUNGAL INFECTIONS OF HEAD AND NECK: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Somu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infection of the head and neck is an emerging problem with diverse presentation. It has recently gained clinical importance as it causes considerable morbidity and mortality. It is more common in patients with diabetics, chronic renal disease, patients undergoing chemotherapy etc. Early recognition of this entity will enable treating surgeon to institute appropriate treatment. AIM OF THE STUDY: To review the microbiological and clinicopathological profile of patients diagn osed as invasive fungal infections of the head and neck in a tertiary referral hospital. METHODOLOGY: In this retrospective study we reviewed the clinical data ( M icrobiology, clinical manifestations, radiological investigation, diagnosis, therapy and histolopathology of 25 patients diagnosed and treated for invasive fungal infection of the head and neck in our unit in a tertiary care hospital. The period of study was July 2006 to July 2010 (4 years. All cases with a diagnosis of invasive fungal infection of the head and neck region, confirmed either by fungal smear, culture or histopathological examination were included in the study. RESULTS: In this study, Of the 25 patients, majority had invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (52%, mucormycosis (32% and zygomycotic necrotizing fasciitis (12%. One patient had invasive subcutaneous aspergillosis. Most of the patients presented in the fifth decade of life, 86% of these patients had uncontrolled diabetes. The commonest presentation in mucormycosis was head ache or facial pain (100% along with ptosis (88%. Fungal smear was positive in 81%, fungi were isolated in culture in 54% and histopathological study was positive for fungal hyphae in all these patients (100%. Though all these patients had florid fungal infection of the head and neck only one patient had clinical and radiological evidence of cervical lymphadenitis. CONCLUSION: A clinical suspicion of mucormycosis should be kept in mind in an immunocompromised patient

  15. Olfaction in chemotherapy for head and neck malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxel, Boris R; Berg, Stephanie; Boessert, Patrick; Mann, Wolf J; Fruth, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Systemic chemotherapy for different malignancies occurs alongside various side effects, including reduced sensory function. To date, little is known about the effect of chemotherapeutic agents on olfaction. The aim of this study was to provide new data about changes in sense of smell during chemotherapy among patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region. In a prospective, controlled cohort study of patients undergoing up to three courses of chemotherapy (cis- or carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel), olfaction was evaluated prior to and directly following completing a cycle, as well as 3 weeks later with the beginning of the next cycle. For evaluation of sense of smell, the established Sniffin' Sticks test with a determination of threshold, discrimination and identification (TDI) was used. Thirty-three patients (44-85 years old, 25 men and 8 women) were included in the study. Most malignancies were located in the oropharynx. Among the 28 patients who scored normosmic or hyposmic at the beginning of the study, the mean decrease in TDI-score was 0.72 points (24.0-23.2) in the first cycle, 2.1 points (24.5-22.4) in the second cycle and 0.77 points (24.2-23.4) in the third cycle. The decrease during the second cycle was significant. Age (>55 years) had a significant (negative) influence in the first and the second cycles. Smoking only showed a tendency to decreased TDI-scores in chemotherapy. In-between consecutive cycles an increase in TDI-score was obvious (+1.0 points after the first and +1.5 points after the second cycle). Chemotherapy with cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel significantly affected sense of smell to a small extent. This effect was more pronounced in elderly patients and smokers. This fact must be taken into account as a possible additional negative effect in usually prevailing malnutrition in these patients. Furthermore, no cumulative effect of the administered therapeutic agents on olfaction could be proven

  16. Advances in radiochemotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer Avanços no tratamento quimioterápico e radioterápico do câncer de cabeça e pescoço

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    Daniel Herchenhorn

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available New advances are being incorporated into the radiochemotherapy treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Although the overall prognosis is poor in advanced stages, the possibility of incorporating combined protocols of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for organ preservation or for palliation in cases of recurrent/locally advanced stages that are not good surgical candidates must not be forgotten. In this context, there is an urgent need to incorporate quality of life questionnaires and functional evaluation into organ-preservation studies, as well as to assure the importance of surgical salvage after radiotherapy and chemotherapy protocols. The authors provide an extensive review of the advances occurring in the nonsurgical treatment of head and neck cancer. Special attention is given to different radiotherapy protocols, new chemotherapy combinations, molecular markers, and molecular therapy as well as the possibility of incorporating re-irradiation and adjuvant therapy after surgery.Novos avanços vêm sendo incorporados no tratamento radio e quimioterápico do Câncer Epidermóide de Cabeça e Pescoço. Apesar do prognóstico reservado dos tumores avançados, não devemos esquecer da possibilidade de incorporarmos protocolos combinados de quimioterapia e radioterapia com intuito de preservação de órgãos ou paliação em estágios de doença recorrente ou localmente avançada que não são bons candidatos à cirurgia. Nesse contexto, há uma necessidade urgente de incorporar questionários de qualidade de vida e avaliação funcional nos estudos de preservação de órgãos, além de assegurar a importância do resgate cirúrgico depois de protocolos radio-quimioterápicos. Os autores realizam uma extensa revisão dos avanços que vêm ocorrendo no tratamento não cirúrgico do câncer de cabeça e pescoço, com especial atenção à diferentes protocolos de radioterapia, novas combinações de quimioterapia, terapia e

  17. Genetic variability of vascular endothelial growth factor and prognosis of head and neck cancer in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Ruiz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is one of the most potent endothelial cell mitogens and plays a critical role in angiogenesis. Polymorphisms in this gene have been evaluated in patients with several types of cancer. The objectives of this study were to determine if there was an association of the -1154G/A polymorphism of the VEGF gene with head and neck cancer and the interaction of this polymorphism with lifestyle and demographic factors. Additionally, the distribution of the VEGF genotype was investigated with respect to the clinicopathological features of head and neck cancer patients. The study included 100 patients with histopathological diagnosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Patients with treated tumors were excluded. A total of 176 individuals 40 years or older were included in the control group and individuals with a family history of neoplasias were excluded. Analysis was performed after extraction of genomic DNA using the real-time PCR technique. No statistically significant differences between allelic and genotype frequencies of -1154G/A VEGF polymorphism were identified between healthy individuals and patients. The real-time PCR analyses showed a G allele frequency of 0.72 and 0.74 for patients and the control group, respectively. The A allele showed a frequency of 0.28 for head and neck cancer patients and 0.26 for the control group. However, analysis of the clinicopathological features showed a decreased frequency of the A allele polymorphism in patients with advanced (T3 and T4 tumors (OR = 0.36; 95%CI = 0.14-0.93; P = 0.0345. The -1154A allele of the VEGF gene may decrease the risk of tumor growth and be a possible biomarker for head and neck cancer. This polymorphism is associated with increased VEGF production and may have a prognostic importance.

  18. Hearing and tinnitus in head and neck cancer patients after chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemensivu, Riina; Saarilahti, K; Ylikoski, J; Aarnisalo, A; Mäkitie, A A

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck cancer patients treated with high-dose cisplatin and radiotherapy will suffer from hearing deficits. The current low-dose regimen seldom causes hearing threshold decrease. Tinnitus in this patient population has not been investigated earlier. We aimed to evaluate the possible ototoxicity of low-dose (40 mg/m(2)) weekly administered cisplatin with concomitant radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were prospectively recruited to participate the study after treatment recommendation for chemoradiotherapy with low-dose cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. They filled in a Tinnitus Handicap Inventory and undertook audiologic evaluations before and after treatment. Ototoxicity was determined by >10 dB threshold shift at frequencies 4 and 8 kHz or in pure tone average. A historical cohort of nine patients treated with high-dose (100 mg/m(2)) cisplatin and radiotherapy was used for comparison. After treatment, study patients demonstrated no significant changes in their hearing over frequencies 0.5-4 kHz, and the threshold shifts were minor at 4 and 8 kHz. More than 50 % of patients reported no tinnitus after treatment and the remainder only had slight to moderate tinnitus causing no interference with their daily activities. In contrast, five of the nine patients having received high-dose cisplatin reported disturbing tinnitus. Further, changes in pure tone averages were exhibited in three of these patients and six had significant threshold shifts at 4 and 8 kHz. Head and neck cancer patients treated with concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy and low-dose cisplatin seem to experience only minor audiological sequelae and therefore, these patients appear to require no routine audiological monitoring. Such evaluation could be performed only when needed.

  19. miRNAs Signature in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastasis: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Head and neck cancers include epithelial tumors arising in the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, paranasal sinuses, and nasal cavity. Metastasis is a hallmark of cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs involved in cell proliferation, development, differentiation and metastasis. It is believed that miRNA alterations correlate with initiation and progression of cancer cell proliferation or inhibition of tumorigenesis. Moreover, miRNAs have different roles in development, progression, and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Altered expression of miRNAs could be novel molecular biomarkers for the definite diagnosis of cancer, metastatic site, cancer stage, and its progression. Purpose The purpose of this review was to provide a comprehensive literature review of the role of miRNAs in head and neck cancer metastasis. Search strategy A relevant English literature search in PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar was performed. The keywords ‘miRNA’, ‘head and neck’, and ‘cancer’ were searched in title and abstract of publications; limited from 1990 to 2015. The inclusion criterion was the role of miRNAs in cancer metastasis. The exclusion criterion was the other functions of miRNAs in cancers. Out of 15221 articles, the full texts of 442 articles were retrieved and only 133 articles met the inclusion criteria. Conclusion Despite the advances in cancer treatment, the mortality rate of HNSCC is still high. The potential application of miRNAs for cancer therapy has been demonstrated in many studies; miRNAs function as either tumor suppressor or oncogene. The recognition of metastamir and their targets may lead to better understanding of HNSCC oncogenesis, and consequently, development of new therapeutic strategies which is a necessity in cancer treatment. Development of therapeutic agents based on miRNAs is a promising target. PMID:27284551

  20. CHK1 Inhibition Radiosensitizes Head and Neck Cancers to Paclitaxel-Based Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Holly E; Patel, Radhika; McLaughlin, Martin; Schick, Ulrike; Zaidi, Shane; Nutting, Christopher M; Newbold, Katie L; Bhide, Shreerang; Harrington, Kevin J

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, with increasingly more cases arising due to high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy is a standard-of-care for locally advanced head and neck cancer but is frequently ineffective. Research into enhancing radiation responses as a means of improving treatment outcomes represents a high priority. Here, we evaluated a CHK1 inhibitor (CCT244747) as a radiosensitiser and investigated whether a mechanistically rational triple combination of radiation/paclitaxel/CHK1 inhibitor delivered according to an optimized schedule would provide added benefit. CCT244747 abrogated radiation-induced G2 arrest in the p53-deficient HNSCC cell lines, HN4 and HN5, causing cells to enter mitosis with unrepaired DNA damage. The addition of paclitaxel further increased cell kill and significantly reduced tumor growth in an HN5 xenograft model. Importantly, a lower dose of paclitaxel could be used when CCT244747 was included, therefore potentially limiting toxicity. Triple therapy reduced the expression of several markers of radioresistance. Moreover, the more radioresistant HN5 cell line exhibited greater radiation-mediated CHK1 activation and was more sensitive to triple therapy than HN4 cells. We analyzed CHK1 expression in a panel of head and neck tumors and observed that primary tumors from HPV(+) patients, who went on to recur postradiotherapy, exhibited significantly stronger expression of total, and activated CHK1. CHK1 may serve as a biomarker for identifying tumors likely to recur and, therefore, patients who may benefit from concomitant treatment with a CHK1 inhibitor and paclitaxel during radiotherapy. Clinical translation of this strategy is under development. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2042-54. ©2016 AACR.

  1. Phase II study of capecitabine as palliative treatment for patients with recurrent and metastatic squamous head and neck cancer after previous platinum-based treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Trufero, J; Isla, D; Adansa, J C; Irigoyen, A; Hitt, R; Gil-Arnaiz, I; Lambea, J; Lecumberri, M J; Cruz, J J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Platinum-based therapy (PBT) is the standard therapy for recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer (HNC), but the incidence of recurrence remains high. This study evaluates the efficacy and tolerability of capecitabine as palliative monotherapy for recurrent HNC previously treated with PBT. Methods: Patients aged 18–75 years, with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0–2, squamous HNC with locoregional and/or metastatic recurrence previously treated with PBT and adequate organ functions, were included. Capecitabine (1.250 mg m−2 BID) was administered on days 1–14 every 21 days for at least two cycles. Results: A total of 40 male patients with a median age of 58 years were analysed. All patients received a median number of four cycles of capecitabine (range: 1–9) and the median relative dose intensity was 91%. Seven patients were not evaluable for response. Overall response rate was 24.2%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 4.8 and 7.3 months, respectively. Haematological adverse events (AEs) grade 3/4 were reported in six patients. Most common grade 3/4 non-haematological AEs were asthenia (12.5%), palmar-plantar eritrodisestesia (10%), mucositis (10%), dysphagia (10%) and diarrhoea (7.5%). Conclusions: Capecitabine seems to be an active, feasible and well-tolerated mode of palliative treatment for advanced HNC patients who have previously received PBT schedules. PMID:20485287

  2. Targeted sequencing reveals TP53 as a potential diagnostic biomarker in the post-treatment surveillance of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Joost H; de Leng, Wendy W J; de Bree, Remco; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M

    2016-09-20

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) form a large heterogeneous group of tumors and have a relatively poor outcome in advanced cases. Revealing the underlying genetic mutations in HNSCC facilitates the development of diagnostic biomarkers, which might lead to improved diagnosis and post treatment surveillance. We retrospectively analyzed mutational hotspots using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 239 HNSCC tumor samples in order to examine the mutational profile of HNSCC. Furthermore, we assessed prevalence, co-occurrence, and synonymy of gene mutations in (matched) tumor samples. TP53 was found mutated the most frequent with mutation rates of up to 83% in all tumors, compared to mutation rates of between 0 and 21% of CDKN2A, PIK3CA, HRAS, CDK4, FBXW7 and RB1. Mutational co-occurrence predominantly existed between TP53 and PIK3CA, TP53 and CDKN2A, and HRAS and PIK3CA. Mutational synonymy between primary tumor and associated metastasis and recurrence was present in respectively 88% and 89%. TP53 mutations were concordantly mutated in 95% of metastases and in 91% of recurrences. This indicates TP53 mutations to be highly prevalent and concordant in primary tumors and associated locoregional metastases and recurrences. In turn, this provides ground for further investigating the use of TP53 mutations as diagnostic biomarkers in HNSCC patients.

  3. [Malignant mucosal melanoma of the head and neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavícek, A; Astl, J; Válková, D; Betka, J; Petruzelka, L

    2000-01-01

    Mucosal melanoma comparison to cutaneous melanoma of the head and neck are rare and do poorly. Approximately 0.5-2% of all melanomas occur from the mucous membranes of aerodigestive tract. Most common site of the tumor are the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses but melanoma of the oral cavity are described too. Therapy usually consists of surgical resection with or without postoperative radiotherapy and immunochemotherapy eventually. The definite role of a kind of therapy in the treatment of mucosal melanoma is not remains to be defined as the small number of cases make prospective study challenging. This article reviews 19 patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck treated at the Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery Charles University of Prague since 1980 to 1999. Clinical data were obtained from the patient's charts. Analysis of the metastatic disease, type of therapy and follow-up was retrospectively reviewed. The site of the tumor was the lateral wall of the nasal cavity (five cases), nasal septum (four cases), maxilar cavity (two cases), and ethmoidal cavity, orbitoethmoidal complex, nasopharynx, saccus lacrimalis to ethmoidal sinuses diffused, tonsilla (one case each) and hypopharynx (two cases). Primary treatment was surgical resection in ten cases, in one case with radiation therapy, and in seven cases chemotherapy. In three cases were diagnostic surgery only and one patient was without therapy. Three patients received radical neck dissection more. Four patients were treated radiation therapy and three chemotherapy after surgery. In two cases were surgery after primary radiotherapy. For nine cases of recurrence of the disease were surgery (in five cases) and chemotherapy (in four cases). Overal and disease free interval was from 2 to 22 month, approximately 9.3 month and 3-year survival was 41.18%.

  4. Head and neck reconstruction using infrahyoid myocutaneous flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfio José Tincani

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The use of pedicled myocutaneous flaps in head and neck reconstruction is widely accepted. Here we describe our experience with infrahyoid flaps (IHFs employed to cover surgical defects in the oral cavity and oropharynx in patients with benign and malignant tumors. The aim was to evaluate the success rate for infrahyoid myocutaneous flap procedures performed at a single institution. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective study, at the Head and Neck Surgery Service, Unicamp. METHODS: Fourteen IHFs were used to reconstruct surgical defects in eleven men (78.5% and three women (21.5% with a mean age of 66.4 years. The anterior floor of the mouth was reconstructed in nine patients (64.2%, the base of tongue in three (21.4%, the lateral floor in one (7.1%, and the retromolar area (7.1% in one. Thirteen patients (92.8% had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and one (7.2% ameloblastoma. The disease stage was T3 in eight (61.5% of the SCC cases and T4 in five (38.5%. RESULTS: No patient presented total flap loss or fistula. The most common complication was epidermolysis, which delayed the beginning of oral ingestion. The patients with SCC received postoperative radiotherapy without major consequences to the flap. CONCLUSION: IHF is a safe and reliable procedure for reconstructing head and neck surgical defects. Due to its thinness and malleability, its use for oral cavity and oropharynx defects provides favorable cosmetic and functional outcomes. Complications, when present, are easy to manage.

  5. Delayed damage after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki [Osaka Dental Univ., Hirakata (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    I investigated radiation damage, including osteoradionecrosis, arising from tooth extraction in fields that had received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and evaluated the effectiveness of pilocarpine for xerostomia. Between January 1990 and April 1996, I examined 30 patients for bone changes after tooth extraction in fields irradiated at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. Nineteen of the patients had been treated for nasopharyngeal cancer and 11 for oropharyngeal cancer. Between January and April 1996, 4 additional patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (3-mg, 6-mg and 9-mg of KSS-694 orally three times a day) for 12 weeks and evaluated every 4 weeks as a base line. One had been treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, two for cancer of the cheek and one for an unknown carcinoma. Eighteen of the patients (11 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 7 with oropharyngeal carcinoma) had extractions. Use of preoperative and postoperative radiographs indicated that damage to the bone following tooth extraction after radiation exposure was related to whether antibiotics were administered the day before the extraction, whether forceps or elevators were used, and whether the tooth was in the field of radiation. Xerostomia improved in all 4 of the patients who received 6-mg or 9-mg of pilocarpine. It improved saliva production and relieved the symptoms of xerostomia after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, although there were minor side effects such as fever. This information can be used to improve the oral environment of patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and to better understand their oral environment. (author)

  6. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzek, Ivan; Laniado, Michael [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias [Dresden University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg [Dresden University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid system. FDG was administered intravenously prior to the conventional PET scan (267-395 MBq FDG, 348 MBq on average). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumour and of both cerebellar hemispheres were determined for both PET datasets. The numbers of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake were compared between the two PET datasets. No MRI-induced artefacts where observed in the PET images. The tumour was detected by PET/MRI in 17 of the 20 patients, by PET in 16 and by MRI in 14. The PET/MRI examination yielded significantly higher SUV{sub max} than the conventional PET scanner for both the tumour (p < 0.0001) and the cerebellum (p = 0.0009). The number of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake detected using the PET dataset from the PET/MRI system was significantly higher the number detected by the stand-alone PET system (64 vs. 39, p = 0.001). The current study demonstrated that PET/MRI of the whole head and neck region is feasible with a whole-body PET/MRI system without impairment of PET or MR image quality. (orig.)

  7. [Distant metastases of malignant tumors of head and neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totan, C; Dincă, O; Negureanu, M; Vlădan, C; Bucur, Al

    2010-01-01

    The charts of 176 previously untreated patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who completed treatment during 2006 in Oro-Maxillo-Facial Clinic, UMF "Carol Davila" Bucharest were reviewed. These patients had no evidence of distant metastases when initially evaluated. The overall incidence of distant metastases was 27.84%, varying from 10.52% for buccal mucosa to 63.63% for tongue and floor of the mouth (p < 0.05). 80% of the metastases were detected within two years after treatment. The rate also increased with the T and N classification; however, the N stage had greater influence on the rate of metastases than the T stage.

  8. Bipaddle radial forearm flap for head and neck reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi Xin; Xi, Wenjing; Lazzeri, Davide; Zhou, Xiao; Li, Zan; Nicoli, Fabio; Zenn, Michael R; Torresetti, Matteo; Grassetti, Luca; Spinelli, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    Although the radial forearm free flap has become a workhorse flap in head and neck reconstruction, the skin grafting of the donor is the main drawback resulting in an unacceptable contour deformity and an unsightly appearance. Several technical modifications have been therefore applied to the radial forearm (RF) flap marking, elevation, and inset to overcome this major shortcoming. In this article, we report our clinical series with the bipaddle RF flap. The authors described their 11 cases of head and neck oncologic reconstruction with the bipaddle RF flap. The skin island is designed longer and narrower and split into 2 separate skin paddles each nourished by a proximal and a distal independent perforators raising from the radial artery so that the donor site could be closed directly. The narrow design of the skin paddle and the subsequent splitting in its 2 components applying the "perforator-pedicle propeller flap method" allow for the changing of the flap shape according to the shape of the recipient site defect. From 2007 to 2013, the bipaddle RF flap method was used in 11 patients to restore head and neck defects following cancer ablation. The mean age of the patients was 43 years, ranging from 31 to 50 years. The location of the defects was the tongue (n = 7) and the intraoral region (n = 4). The defect sizes varied from 4 × 5 cm to 5 × 6 cm, and the flap maximum width was 3 cm with mean area of 26.4 cm. The healing was uneventful in all patients with excellent cosmetic and functional results of both donor site and recipient site after 20 months of mean follow-up. The bipaddle RF free flap is a reliable and versatile option for the reconstruction of a wide range of soft tissue defects of head and neck region. This method allows for a customized resurfacing of the defect because of its large variability in shape and size. The harvesting site is closed primarily, and a second donor site for skin graft is avoided.Clinical Question, Level of Evidence

  9. Cancer Stem Cells in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jing Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer (HNC is the sixth most common malignancy world-wide, however the survival rate has not improved for the past 20 years. In recent years, the cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis has gained ground in several malignancies and there is mounting evidence suggesting CSCs mediate tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. However, the CSC theory is also challenged at least in certain types of cancer. Here we review the progress of CSC studies in HNC, which suggest that HNC conforms to the CSC model. The identified CSC markers and their tumor initiation properties provide a framework for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for HNC.

  10. Interventional neuroradiologic procedures in the head and neck

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wayne F.Yakes

    2008-01-01

    Interventional radiology and interventional neuroradiology are evolving specialties which can aid the head and neck surgeons in the clinical management of patients with complex vascular lesions.The vast majority of procedures performed by interventionalists are preoperative.Because of the vast array of catheter technology,multiple embolic agents,sophisticated digital imaging,and the minimal invasiveness of these techniques will only allow their growth to blossom.A multidisciplinary approach involving interventionalists will diminish the morbidity of managing these patients,increase the efficacy of therapeutic strategies,and decrease the overall costs of care.

  11. Prophylactic Swallowing Exercises in Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, H R; Jensen, Kenneth; Aksglæde, K

    2015-01-01

    Many head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors experience reduced quality of life due to radiotherapy (RT)-related dysphagia. The aim of this prospective randomized trial was to evaluate the impact of prophylactic swallowing exercises on swallowing-related outcomes in HNC patients treated with curative...... of the dysphagia outcomes during and after treatment. Adherence to exercises was poor and dropouts due to especially fatigue were very frequent in both groups. Systematic swallowing exercises had no impact on swallowing outcomes within the first year after RT. Despite repeated supervised sessions, adherence...

  12. Chemotherapy: Is it Warranted in Curable Head and Neck Cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuiyiTu

    2004-01-01

    Since the last century, many physicians have been trying to utilize chemotherapy to replace conventional surgical treatment for cases of cancer of the oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx, which would otherwise be candidates for total laryngectomy. Some authors claim that the preservation rate of the larynx increases after treatment by chemotherapy, which even may take the place of routine surgical methods. However, when calculated in a more rigorous way following accepted statistical methods, what they claim is questionable. As a result, the routine application of chemotherapy in its present form is not advisable for curable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. Further research is required to justify its benefit.

  13. Epidermoid and dermoid cysts of the head and neck region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samrat S. Sabhalok; Lakshmi S. Shetty; Pallavi H. Sarve; Sneha V. Setiya; Swati R. Bharadwaj

    2016-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts, dermoid cysts and teratoid cysts are cystic malformations lined with squamous epithelium. They present as soft nodular lesions with a sessile base. Their prevalence is 7% in head and neck patients and 1.6% within the oral cavity. The authors present a case series of 21 patients with dermoid and epidermoid cysts who underwent surgical removal. One year of follow-up was carried out without evidence of recurrence. The removal of these cysts is of great concern as it can cause serious social stigma, aesthetic and functional impairment, dysphagia and dysphonia.

  14. Complications of head and neck radiation therapy and their management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmeier, R.L.; King, G.E.

    1983-04-01

    Patients who receive radiation therapy to the head and neck suffer potential complications and undesirable side-effects of this therapy. The extent of undesirable responses is dependent on the source of irradiation, the fields of irradiation, and the dose. The radiotherapist determines these factors by the extent, location, and radiosensitivity of the tumor. The potential undesirable side-effects are xerostomia, mucositis, fibrosis, trismus, dermatitis, photosensitivity, radiation caries, soft tissue necrosis, and osteoradionecrosis. Each of these clinical entities and their proposed management have been discussed.

  15. Molecular biology and immunology of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Theresa; Califano, Joseph A

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, our knowledge and understanding of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has expanded dramatically. New high-throughput sequencing technologies have accelerated these discoveries since the first reports of whole-exome sequencing of HNSCC tumors in 2011. In addition, the discovery of human papillomavirus in relationship with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma has shifted our molecular understanding of the disease. New investigation into the role of immune evasion in HNSCC has also led to potential novel therapies based on immune-specific systemic therapies.

  16. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Esther; Thippsandra, Shwetha; Yanamadala, Anusha; Redy, Siddaling; Pattanayak, Puskar; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    The concept of using tumor genomic profiling information has revolutionized personalized cancer treatment. Head and neck (HN) cancer management is being influenced by recent discoveries of activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor and related targeted therapies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, targeted therapies for Kristen Rat Sarcoma, and MET proto-oncogenes. Molecular imaging using PET plays an important role in assessing the biologic behavior of HN cancer with the goal of delivering individualized cancer treatment. This review summarizes recent genomic discoveries in HN cancer and their implications for functional PET imaging in assessing response to targeted therapies, and drug resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Conventional vs accelerated fractionation in head and neck cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    From October 1990 to March 1994, 90 patients entered a prospectively randomised trial in head and neck cancer. All patients had verified squamous cell carcinoma and were referred for primary radiation therapy. Tumours originated in the oral cavity in 25, oropharynx in 37, larynx in 15 and hypopharynx in 13 cases. Patients' stages were predominantely T3 and T4 (71/90) and had lymph node metastases (60/90). Seventy-nine male patients and 11 female patients, with a median age of 57 years (range ...

  18. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment with Particle Beam Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Zargarzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this century, cancer incidence has become one of the most significant problems concerning human. Conventional radiotherapy damage healthy tissue and in some cases may cause new primary cancers. This problem can be partially solved by hadron therapy which would be more effective and less harmful compared to other forms of radiotherapies used to treat some cancers. Although carbon ion and proton therapy both are effective treatments, they have serious differences which are mentioned in this paper and compared between the two methods. Furthermore, various treatments have been performed on head and neck cancer with hadrons so far will be discussed.

  19. Effect of HPV-associated p16INK4A expression on response to radiotherapy and survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Pernille; Eriksen, Jesper G; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: A subset of head and neck cancers is associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Viral infection is closely correlated with expression of p16(INK4A) in these tumors. We evaluated p16(INK4A) as a prognostic marker of treatment response and survival in a well-defined and prospectively...... collected cohort of patients treated solely with conventional radiotherapy in the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) 5 trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical expression of p16(INK4A) was analyzed in pretreatment paraffin-embedded tumor blocks from 156 patients treated with conventional...... primary radiotherapy alone. The influence of p16(INK4A) status on locoregional tumor control, disease-specific survival, and overall survival after radiotherapy was evaluated. RESULTS: p16(INK4A) positivity was found in 35 tumors (22%). Tumor-positivity for p16(INK4A) was significantly correlated...

  20. The Role of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cancer Stem Cells in Tumorigenesis, Metastasis and Treatment Failure

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic methods, survival of HNSCC remains unchanged over the last 30 years with treatment failure and metastases being the strongest indicators of poor outcome. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been identified in multiple other solid tumors, including breast, prostate and pancreatic carcinoma. Recently, a subpopulation of tumor cells has been identified in HNSCC based on the...

  1. The role of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cancer stem cells in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and treatment failure

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic methods, survival of HNSCC remains unchanged over the last 30 years with treatment failure and metastases being the strongest indicators of poor outcome. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been identified in multiple other solid tumors, including breast, prostate, and pancreatic carcinoma. Recently, a subpopulation of tumor cells has been identified in HNSCC based ...

  2. Predictive factors of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patient tolerance to high-dose cisplatin in concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Kenji; SATO, YASUYOSHI; TOSHIYASU, TAKASHI; SATO, YUKIKO; INAGAKI, LINA; Tomomatsu, Junichi; Sasaki, Toru; SHIMBASHI, WATARU; FUKUSHIMA, HIROFUMI; YONEKAWA, HIROYUKI; Mitani,Hiroki; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi; Takahashi, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Although high-dose cisplatin is the standard regimen of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), varying levels of patient tolerance towards cisplatin have been reported, and the predictive factors of cisplatin tolerance remain to be elucidated. The present study retrospectively reviewed newly diagnosed HNSCC patients who received CCRT. Cisplatin (80 mg/m2) was administered every 3 weeks. The proportion of high-dose cisplatin-tole...

  3. Change of FDG uptake according to radiation dose on squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Jae Seung; Im, Ki Chun [College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2004-06-15

    To evaluate whether positron emission tomography (PET) with 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) can be used to predict of early response to definitive aim radiotherapy (RT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck using response rate and locoregional control as study endpoints. Twenty-two patients with head and neck caner underwent a FDG-PET study before RT, after a first dose of 46 Gy, and after a second dose of more than 70 Gy. Standard uptake value (SUV) was calculated for primary tumor (n=22) and neck lymph node (n=10). Attenuation corrected PET scans acquired 60 min after tracer injection were used for evaluation of FDG uptake in tumors. A quantitative FDG uptake index was expressed as SUVlean (corrected for lean body mass). The follow-up time was at least 5 months (range 5-15 months). A total of 22 primary tumors and 10 metastatic lymph nodes were analyzed in FDG-PET. In the first PET study the mean SUV in the primary tumors and nodes were 6.4 (SD, 2.6) and 4.6 (SD, 2.3), respectively. In the second PET, study performed after 46 Gy RT the mean SUV in primary tumor and node decreased to 2.9 (SD, 1.9, {rho} < 0.001) and 1.7 (SD, 1.3) respectively. In the third PET study performed at the full dose (more than 70 Gy), RT the mean SUV in the primary tumors and nodes decreased to 2.3 (SD, 1.5, {rho} < 0.001) and 1.5 (SD, 1.1) respectively. FDG uptake in tumors showed a significant decrease after the 46 Gy and more than 70 Gy of RT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Reduction of metabolic activity after 46 Gy of radiotherapy is closely correlated with radiation response.

  4. IMC-C225, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody for treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Roy S; Hong, Waun Ki

    2002-10-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck remains a clinical challenge because of the high rate of locoregional disease recurrence. The importance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the development and progression of many solid tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, is well understood; increased expression is associated with enhanced tumor invasiveness, resistance to chemotherapy, and a lower patient survival rate. Several approaches have been developed to achieve EGFR blockade as an anticancer treatment strategy, including the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody IMC-C225, which competitively binds to the extracellular receptor site and prevents binding by the natural EGFR ligands EGF and transforming growth factor-alpha. Preclinical studies to evaluate IMC-225 in human cancer cell lines in vitro and human tumor xenografts in vivo have shown its potent antitumor activity. Clinical efficacy of IMC-C225 appears to involve multiple mechanisms, including inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis, inhibition of metastasis, and enhancement of the response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Phase I studies of IMC-C225 combined with chemotherapy or radiation showed promising response rates in patients with recurrent or refractory squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Phase II and III trials to examine the efficacy and safety of these combinations are currently underway. To date, IMC-C225 has been well tolerated, with skin rashes and allergic reactions being the most clinically important adverse events reported. IMC-C225 displays dose-dependent elimination characteristics and a half-life of approximately 7 days. Current recommendations for dosing include a 400 mg/m(2) loading dose, followed by weekly infusions at 250 mg/m(2).

  5. Immunotherapy of head and neck cancer: Emerging clinical trials from a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Planning Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Julie E; Cohen, Ezra; Ferris, Robert L; Adelstein, David J; Brizel, David M; Ridge, John A; O'Sullivan, Brian; Burtness, Barbara A; Butterfield, Lisa H; Carson, William E; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Gajewski, Thomas F; Gillison, Maura L; Hodge, James W; Le, Quynh-Thu; Raben, David; Strome, Scott E; Lynn, Jean; Malik, Shakun

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances have permitted successful therapeutic targeting of the immune system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). These new immunotherapeutic targets and agents are being rapidly adopted by the oncologic community and hold considerable promise. The National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address the issue of how to further investigate the use of immunotherapy in patients with HNSCC. The goals of the meeting were to consider phase 2 or 3 trial designs primarily in 3 different patient populations: those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-initiated oropharyngeal cancers; those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-negative HNSCC; and those with recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. In addition, a separate committee was formed to develop integrative biomarkers for the clinical trials. The meeting started with an overview of key immune components and principles related to HNSCC, including immunosurveillance and immune escape. Four clinical trial concepts were developed at the meeting integrating different immunotherapies with existing standards of care. These designs were presented for implementation by the head and neck committees of the National Cancer Institute-funded National Clinical Trials Network. This article summarizes the proceedings of this Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, the purpose of which was to facilitate the rigorous development and design of randomized phase 2 and 3 immunotherapeutic trials in patients with HNSCC. Although reviews usually are published immediately after the meeting is held, this report is unique because there are now tangible clinical trial designs that have been funded and put into practice and the studies are being activated to accrual. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. Radiation-induced tumours of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, B.F.A.M. van der; Baris, G.; Gregor, R.T.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; Balm, A.J.M. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-04-01

    In order to study the induction of malignancy in normal tissues due to ionizing radiation, we reviewed the files of 2500 patients with a tumour of the head and neck treated at the Netherlands Cancer Institute (Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Ziekenhuis), Amsterdam, from 1977 to 1993. We then checked whether or not these patients had been previously irradiated. Patients with a thyroid carcinoma or skin cancer were excluded from the study, since it is generally known that previous irradiation is a risk factor in these tumours. Eighteen patients were found to have a malignancy within a previous irradiated area (0.70 per cent). The mean interval between radiation and diagnosis of the head and neck tumour was 36.5 years. There were five soft tissue sarcomas, nine squamous cell carcinomas and four salivary gland tumours. Fourteen patients were operated upon whereas four received palliative treatment only. The median survival of the total group was 3.5 years. Particularly in young patients, because of the better cancer therapy and prolonged survival, one must be aware of the increased risk of radiation-induced tumours. (author).

  7. Selective antitumor activity of roscovitine in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Cyril; Hajek, Michael; Biktasova, Asel; Bellinger, Gary; Yarbrough, Wendell G; Issaeva, Natalia

    2016-06-21

    Radiation and chemotherapy that are commonly used to treat human cancers damage cellular DNA. DNA damage appears to be more toxic to cancer cells than normal cells, most likely due to deregulated checkpoint activation and/or deficiency in DNA repair pathways that are characteristics of many tumors. However, unwanted side effects arise as a result of DNA damage to normal cells during the treatment.Here, we show that roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that inhibits CDK-1, CDK-2, CDK-5, CDK-7, and CDK-9 due to competitive binding to the ATP site on the kinases, causes significant DNA damage followed by p53-dependent cell death in human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive, but not in HPV-negative, head and neck cancer cells. Since HPV positivity was a molecular marker for increased sensitivity of cells to roscovitine, we reasoned that systemic roscovitine administration would not be toxic to healthy HPV-negative tissue. Indeed, low roscovitine doses significantly inhibited the growth of HPV-associated xenografted tumors in mice without causing any detectable side effects.Given that inhibition of CDKs has been shown to inhibit replication of several viruses, we suggest that roscovitine treatment may represent a selective and safe targeted therapeutic option against HPV-positive head and neck cancer.

  8. Clinical-histopathological concordance in head and neck lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahily Espino Otero

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical-histopathological data contributes to a better diagnosis, assessment and treatment of head and neck lesions. Objective: To determine clinical-histopathological correlation of head and neck lesions. Methods: a descriptive, retrospective, observational study was developed in a series of cases (360 patients to determine the clinical diagnostic scope in relation to the histopathological techniques used in the Maxillary Surgery Service of “Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” hospital between June 2006 and 2007. Required data was taken from clinical histories and records from Pathological Anatomy, which were transferred to a form design for that purpose. Results: The age group of 0-19 years had the higher concordance among the studied groups (72,4%. 59, 7% of the studied cases had clinical-histopathological concordance, mainly in extra-oral lesions (60, 4% particularly in the vermilion border (82, 4 % and among the intra-oral the most common were those in the vestibular duct (100%. The most important lesions where clinical diagnosis did not coincide with histopathological diagnosis were fibroma with 23 in the intra-oral and warts and a total of 34 in extra-oral, followed by basal carcinomas. Conclusions: There is a significant correlation between clinical and histopathological diagnosis, suggesting high attention quality and correct application of the clinical method as central element in patients’ management.

  9. Clinicopathological correlates of pediatric head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The spectrum of head and neck tumors in children continues to be the cause of diverse, diagnostically challenging issues. Aims : To demonstrate and compare the unique clinicopathological features in our study population and their correlations with the final histopathological diagnosis. Methods : Fifty-three children with head and neck cancer were examined thoroughly at the Otorhinolaryngology department in a tertiary care teaching hospital followed by histopathological studies. Results : Lymphomas were the most common malignant lesions seen followed by rhabdomyosarcomas, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, and others like thyroid carcinomas and eosinophilic granulomas. In the neck, the commonest cause of primary malignant disease was lymphoma; however, the most frequent lesion was reactive lymphadenitis. In the sinonasal region, the commonest malignancy was rhabdomyosarcoma, which often had extension to the orbit and the face. Recurrent epistaxis was found universally in the malignant cases of this region. In the facial region, disfiguring swelling with proptosis was mainly caused by rhabdomyosarcoma. The only case of tonsillar malignancy was due to non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The duration of disease was less than 1 year. Conclusion : The most common manifestation of the malignant lesions in the pediatric age group was with a history of an enlarging, painless neck swelling. Still, an insignificant lump in the neck or recurrent bleeding from nose may be the manifestation of an underlying cancer.

  10. Scoring irradiation mucositis in head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Panders, A.K. (Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)); Saene, H.K.F. van (Medical Microbiology, University of Liverpool (UK)); Vermey, A. (Department of Surgery Oncology Division, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)); Mehta, D.M. (Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands))

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation mucositis is defined as an inflammatory-like process of the oropharyngeal mucosa following therapeutic irradiation of patients who have head and neck cancer. Clinically, it is a serious side effect because severe mucositis can cause generalized problems (weight loss, nasogastic tube feedings) and interferes with the well-being of the patient seriously. Grading mucositis is important for the evaluation of preventive and therapeutic measures. The object of this study was to develop a scoring method based on local mucositis signs only. Four clinical local signs of mucositis were used in this score: white discoloration, erythema, pseudomembranes and ulceration. Mucositis of the oral cavity was calcualted during conventional irradiation protocol for 8 distinguishable areas using the 4 signs and their extent. A prospective evaluation of this method in 15 irradiated head and neck cancer patients displayed an S-curve reflecting a symptomless first irradiation week, followed by a rapid and steady increase of white discoloration, erythema and pseudomembranes during the second and third week. Oral candidiasis, generalized symptoms such as weight loss and the highest mucositis scores were seen after 3 weeks irradiation. The novel mucositis scoring method may be of value in studying the effect of hygiene programs, topical application of disinfectans or antibiotics on oral mucositis. (author).

  11. [Postoperative nutrition in patients with head and neck cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Villares, C; Fernández Pello, M E; San Román Carbajo, J; Tapia Risueño, M; Domínguez Calvo, J

    2003-01-01

    Patients who underwent surgery for head and neck malignant neoplasms are problematic because dysphagia, pain and postoperative secuelaes. Nutritional support is necessary in more than 90% of all patients with head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine nutritional support in these patients and problems related to nutrition. Fifty-four patients with oral and pharyngolaryngeal carcinomas underwent surgery were studied prospectively. We studied nutritional support (oral nutrition, enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition) and problems related to nutrition: aspiration neumoniae and pharyngostoma. The 7% of the patients underwent oral feeding after surgery, 87% enteral nutrition with nasogastric tube and 6% parenteral nutrition. We identified neumoniae in 6% of patients and faringocutaneous fistula in 19%. When patients leaved the hospital, 98% of the patients underwent oral feeding and one patient had nasopharyngeal tube for enteral nutrition. 1. Artificial nutrition was necessary in 93% patients with oropharyngolaryngealcancer; 2. Enteral nutrition was the most useful modality of alimentation (87%); 3.25% of patients had postoperative complications: (18% pharyngostoma, 6% neumoniae); 4. Oral feeding was possible in 98% of patients out of hospital.

  12. Regional flaps in head and neck reconstruction: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, Giacomo; Tewfik, Karim; Bardazzi, Alessandro; Allevi, Fabiana; Chiapasco, Matteo; Mandalà, Marco; Rabbiosi, Dimitri

    2015-03-01

    Starting from our experience with 45 consecutive cases of regional pedicled flaps, we have underlined the effectiveness and reliability of a variety of flaps. The marketing laws as applied to surgical innovations are reviewed to help in the understanding of why regional flaps are regaining wide popularity in head and neck reconstruction. From January 2009 to January 2014, 45 regional flaps were harvested at San Paolo Hospital to reconstruct head and neck defects. These included 35 pectoralis major muscular and myocutaneous flaps, 4 lower trapezius island or pedicled flaps, 3 supraclavicular flaps, 2 latissimus dorsi pedicled flaps, and 1 fasciocutaneous temporal flap. The basic literature of marketing regarding the diffusion of new products was also reviewed. Two myocutaneous pectoralis major flaps were complicated by necrosis of the cutaneous paddle (one complete and one partial). No complete loss of any of the 45 flaps was observed. At 6 months of follow-up, 2 patients had died of multiple organ failure after prolonged sepsis. The 43 remaining patients had acceptable morphologic and functional results. Regional and free flaps appear to compete in many cases for the same indications. From the results of the present case series, regional flaps can be considered reliable reconstructive choices that are less expensive than their free flap alternatives. The "resurrection" of regional flaps can be partially justified by the changes in the global economy and the required adaptation of developed and developing countries. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeted treatment of head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma: potential of lapatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi MD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitul D Gandhi, Mark Agulnik Division of Hematology and Oncology, Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Squamous-cell cancer of the head and neck is a heterogeneous malignancy with treatment predicated on a multimodality therapy involving surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. However, this approach results in durable responses in only a subset of patients, and is associated with significant toxicity. In advanced disease, multi-agent platinum-based chemotherapy produces only modest improvements in survival. Increased insight into tumor biology has demonstrated several critical oncogenic pathways offering prospects for targeted therapy that may improve upon the existing treatment strategies. The epidermal growth factor receptor is one such target, and directed therapy with the monoclonal antibody cetuximab has been extensively studied. Lapatinib is an oral agent that targets multiple transmembrane receptors within the epidermal growth factor receptor family, and offers a promising new approach to treatment. This paper reviews the rationale for and clinical activity of lapatinib in squamous-cell cancer of the head and neck. Keywords: epidermal growth factor receptor, targeted therapy, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx

  14. Emerging Phytochemicals for the Prevention and Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K. Katiyar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the development of more advanced medical therapies, cancer management remains a problem. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is a particularly challenging malignancy and requires more effective treatment strategies and a reduction in the debilitating morbidities associated with the therapies. Phytochemicals have long been used in ancient systems of medicine, and non-toxic phytochemicals are being considered as new options for the effective management of cancer. Here, we discuss the growth inhibitory and anti-cell migratory actions of proanthocyanidins from grape seeds (GSPs, polyphenols in green tea and honokiol, derived from the Magnolia species. Studies of these phytochemicals using human HNSCC cell lines from different sub-sites have demonstrated significant protective effects against HNSCC in both in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment of human HNSCC cell lines with GSPs, (−-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, a polyphenolic component of green tea or honokiol reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis. These effects have been associated with inhibitory effects of the phytochemicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and cell cycle regulatory proteins, as well as other major tumor-associated pathways. Similarly, the cell migration capacity of HNSCC cell lines was inhibited. Thus, GSPs, honokiol and EGCG appear to be promising bioactive phytochemicals for the management of head and neck cancer.

  15. Early clinical experience with volumetric modulated arc therapy in head and neck cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cozzi Luca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report about early clinical experience in radiation treatment of head and neck cancer of different sites and histology by volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc technology. Methods During 2009, 45 patients were treated at Istituto Clinico Humanitas with RapidArc (28 males and 17 females, median age 65 years. Of these, 78% received concomitant chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients were treated as exclusive curative intent (group A, three as postoperative curative intent (group B and six with sinonasal tumours (group C. Dose prescription was at Planning Target Volumes (PTV with simultaneous integrated boost: 54.45Gy and 69.96Gy in 33 fractions (group A; 54.45Gy and 66Gy in 33 fractions (group B and 55Gy in 25 fractions (group C. Results Concerning planning optimization strategies and constraints, as per PTV coverage, for all groups, D98% > 95% and V95% > 99%. As regards organs at risk, all planning objectives were respected, and this was correlated with observed acute toxicity rates. Only 28% of patients experienced G3 mucositis, 14% G3 dermitis 44% had G2 dysphagia. Nobody required feeding tubes to be placed during treatment. Acute toxicity is also related to chemotherapy. Two patients interrupted the course of radiotherapy because of a quick worsening of general clinical condition. Conclusions These preliminary results stated that volumetric modulated arc therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancers is feasible and effective, with acceptable toxicities.

  16. Emerging Phytochemicals for the Prevention and Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2016-11-24

    Despite the development of more advanced medical therapies, cancer management remains a problem. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a particularly challenging malignancy and requires more effective treatment strategies and a reduction in the debilitating morbidities associated with the therapies. Phytochemicals have long been used in ancient systems of medicine, and non-toxic phytochemicals are being considered as new options for the effective management of cancer. Here, we discuss the growth inhibitory and anti-cell migratory actions of proanthocyanidins from grape seeds (GSPs), polyphenols in green tea and honokiol, derived from the Magnolia species. Studies of these phytochemicals using human HNSCC cell lines from different sub-sites have demonstrated significant protective effects against HNSCC in both in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment of human HNSCC cell lines with GSPs, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic component of green tea or honokiol reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis. These effects have been associated with inhibitory effects of the phytochemicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and cell cycle regulatory proteins, as well as other major tumor-associated pathways. Similarly, the cell migration capacity of HNSCC cell lines was inhibited. Thus, GSPs, honokiol and EGCG appear to be promising bioactive phytochemicals for the management of head and neck cancer.

  17. Factors affecting wound complications in head and neck surgery: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra A Chaukar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Head and neck surgeries are complex. Wound complications are associated with considerable morbidity and can result in delay in the adjuvant treatment. Identification of factors will help in formulating preventive guidelines. Aims: The aim of this study is to identify perioperative factors responsible for wound complications. Settings and Design: Prospective study of 186 head and neck patients. Subjects and Methods: Pre-operative, intraoperative and post-operative factors were recorded. Each patient was evaluated for minor and major wound complications twice daily during the hospital stay. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test was used for univariate and log regression test was used for multivariate analysis. Results: The overall wound complication rate was 29% with 7% major and 22% minor complications. On univariate analysis, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal location, advanced T stage, poor oral hygiene, clean-contaminated surgery, low Karnofsky performance status (KPS, flap reconstruction, blood loss more than 1000 ml, perioperative blood transfusion, duration of surgery greater than 4.3 h and post-operative hemoglobin lesser than 11 g%, post-operative tracheostomy and resection of mandible were statistical significant factors. On multivariate analysis, post-operative tracheostomy, low KPS, post-operative serum albumin less than 3.7 g/dl and duration of surgery greater than 4.3 h were significant factors. Conclusion : Apart from unavoidable factors, it is essential to take care of certain factors viz nutrition, haemoglobin, oral hygiene, asepsis and repeating antibiotics in prolonged surgery.

  18. Improved normal tissue sparing in head and neck radiotherapy using biological cost function based-IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N; Lawford, C; Khoo, V; Rolfo, M; Joon, D L; Wada, M

    2011-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has reduced the impact of acute and late toxicities associated with head and neck radiotherapy. Treatment planning system (TPS) advances in biological cost function based optimization (BBO) and improved segmentation techniques have increased organ at risk (OAR) sparing compared to conventional dose-based optimization (DBO). A planning study was undertaken to compare OAR avoidance in DBO and BBO treatment planning. Simultaneous integrated boost treatment plans were produced for 10 head and neck patients using both planning systems. Plans were compared for tar get coverage and OAR avoidance. Comparisons were made using the BBO TPS Monte Carlo dose engine to eliminate differences due to inherent algorithms. Target coverage (V95%) was maintained for both solutions. BBO produced lower OAR doses, with statistically significant improvement to left (12.3%, p = 0.005) and right parotid mean dose (16.9%, p = 0.004), larynx V50_Gy (71.0%, p = 0.005), spinal cord (21.9%, p < 0.001) and brain stem dose maximums (31.5%, p = 0.002). This study observed improved OAR avoidance with BBO planning. Further investigations will be undertaken to review any clinical benefit of this improved planned dosimetry.

  19. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Bae, Jin Ho [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common type of human cancer worldwide. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common cancer of the head and neck. Since {sup 18}F-FDG PET is very sensitive to detecting squamous cell carcinoma, it has been widely used in patients with head and neck cancers for initial staging, management of recurrent cancers, and therapeutic monitoring. According to clinical research data, {sup 18}F-FDG PET is expected to be a very helpful diagnostic tool in the management of head and neck cancer.

  20. Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: Pretreatment Evaluation, Predictive Factors, and Assessment during Radio-Chemotherapy, Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaro, Nerina; Merlano, Marco C; Russi, Elvio G

    2013-09-01

    Progress in head and neck cancer (HNC) therapies has improved tumor response, loco-regional control, and survival. However, treatment intensification also increases early and late toxicities. Dysphagia is an underestimated symptom in HNC patients. Impairment of swallowing process could cause malnutrition, dehydration, aspiration, and pneumonia. A comprehensive literature review finalized in May 2012 included searches of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, and CAB abstracts) and scientific societies meetings materials (American Society of Clinical Oncology, Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica, Associazione Italiana di Oncologia Cervico-Cefalica, American Head and Neck Society, and European Society for Medical Oncology). Hand-searches of HNC journals and reference lists were carried out. Approximately one-third of dysphagia patients developed pneumonia requiring treatment. Aspiration pneumonia associated mortality ranged from 20% to 65%. Unidentified dysphagia caused significant morbidity, increased mortality, and decreased the quality of life. In this review we underline definition, causes, predictive factors of dysphagia and report on pretreatment and on-treatment evaluation, suggesting some key points to avoid underestimation. A multi-parameter assessment of swallowing problems may allow an earlier diagnosis. An appropriate evaluation might lead to a better treatment of both symptoms and cancer.

  1. Human papillomavirus, p16, and epidermal growth factor receptor biomarkers and CT perfusion values in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefling, N L; McHugh, J B; Light, E; Kumar, B; Walline, H; Prince, M; Bradford, C; Carey, T E; Mukherji, S K

    2013-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumors positive for laboratory biomarkers hrHPV and p16 and negative for EGFR often respond better to nonsurgical organ-preservation therapy than hrHPV-negative, p16-negative, and EGFR overexpressing tumors. CTP has been shown to distinguish which locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas will respond to induction chemotherapy or chemoradiation. Our purpose was to determine whether a relationship exists between CTP measures and the expression of these laboratory biomarkers, because both appear to separate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumors into similar groups. We conducted an institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of head and neck CTP in 25 patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who had signed informed consent. Eight women and 17 men, 41-80 years of age, constituted a pretreatment group of 18 patients and a palliative group of 7 patients. Tumor biopsy samples were analyzed for overexpression of hrHPV, p16, and EGFR. The hrHPV, p16, and EGFR status of the tumors was correlated with CTP parameters (MTT, BV, BF, CP) by using the Wilcoxon evaluation and Fischer exact test. There were significantly lower CP values in pretreatment tumors overexpressing EGFR (P = .04). CP values ≤17.23 were significantly correlated with EGFR overexpression (P = .015). A trend toward higher CP values was present in hrHPV-positive and p16-overexpressing pretreatment tumors (P = .14). A significant correlation exists between CTP measures and EGFR overexpression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, suggesting an association between certain imaging findings and molecular biomarkers. These results may be related to a tumor cell survival mechanism linking perfusion and biomarker expression.

  2. HPV-associated p16-expression and response to hypoxic modification of radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Pernille; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HPV/p16-positive head and neck cancers (HNSCC) show superior response to radiotherapy, compared with virus-negative tumours. Tumour hypoxia induces radioresistance and the randomised DAHANCA 5 trial found that the hypoxic cell radiosensitiser nimorazole significantly improved...... the outcome in HNSCC. Using p16-status as a retrospective stratification parameter, we aimed to assess the influence of p16-expression on the response to nimorazole in HNSCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pre-treatment tumour blocks were available from 331 of the 414 patients in the DAHANCA 5 trial and evaluated...... by immunohistochemistry for p16-expression. The influence of p16-expression on outcome was analysed as a function of treatment group (nimorazole/placebo) 5 years after radiotherapy. RESULTS: Overall, patients treated with nimorazole had significantly better loco-regional control than did those given placebo: hazard ratio...

  3. Reconstructive options in patients with late complications after surgery and radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: remember the deltopectoral flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijgh, David D; Mureau, Marc A M

    2013-08-01

    During the past 40 years, free vascularized flaps have become the golden standard in the reconstruction of postoncologic head and neck defects. When there is a need for an osteofasciocutaneous free flap, the free fibula flap is the first choice because of the advantages of its long bone structure, high reliability, and minimal donor-site morbidity. However, most of these patients receive adjuvant radiation therapy, which sometimes causes symptomatic fibrosis, contractures, and (osteo)radionecrosis. In case of these late complications, locoregional reconstructive options are often limited, and complex secondary free flap procedures are not always feasible or preferred by the patient. The present paper discusses regional and free flap reconstructive options and demonstrates with 3 cases that the delayed deltopectoral flap remains a very safe, reliable, and easy flap, which still has a place in the management of these complex reconstructive challenges.

  4. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyflot, Matthew J., E-mail: nyflot@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cadence Cancer Center at Delnor Hospital, Geneva, Illinois (United States); Traynor, Anne M. [Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Khuntia, Deepak [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Yang, David T. [Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery-Otolaryngology, H& N Surgery Division, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Wiederholt, Peggy A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Gentry, Lindell R. [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Hoang, Tien [Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jeraj, Robert [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); and others

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials: All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m{sup 2} and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [{sup 61}Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results: Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions: The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging

  5. Free tissue transfer for head and neck reconstruction: a contemporary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannady, Steven B; Rosenthal, Eben L; Knott, P Daniel; Fritz, Michael; Wax, Mark K

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular free tissue transfer is used for complex composite tissue defects in previously treated fields, in particular after treatment of malignant disease. The increasing incidence of skin cancer in the general population has increased the number of patients with massive tumors that require the expertise of the free flap reconstructive surgeon. We herein examine a number of the recent advances in the field that use free tissue transfer for orbitomaxillary and scalp reconstruction, including maxillary reconstruction, virtual surgical planning in head and neck reconstruction, and scalp reconstruction. Advanced computer algorithms allow planning of these procedures at a savings of time and cost. Free tissue transfer is a reconstructive modality that is often at the top of the reconstructive ladder and, in some instances, is the reconstructive method of choice. The ability to harvest composite tissue that matches the tissue defect in composition, surface area, and volume makes free tissue transfer a versatile modality.

  6. Salvage laryngectomy and pharyngocutaneous fistulae after primary radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau, Cai; Johansen, Lars Vendelbo; Hansen, Hanne Sand

    2003-01-01

    that the corresponding estimated fistulae risk increased significantly from 12% in 1987 to 30% in 1997. Other significant risk factors for fistulae in univariate analysis included younger patient age, primary advanced T and N stage, nonglottic primary site, resection of hyoid bone, high total radiation dose, and large...... radiation fields. Multiple logistic regression analysis of these parameters suggested that nonglottic tumor site, late laryngectomy period (1987-1992 vs 1993-1997), and advanced initial T stage were independent prognostic factors for fistulae risk. Surgical parameters like resection of thyroid/tongue base...... contribute to the development of pharyngocutaneous fistulae. PATIENTS: A total of 472 consecutive patients undergoing postirradiation salvage laryngectomy in the period July 1, 1987-June 30, 1997 were recorded at the five head and neck oncology centers in Denmark. Age ranged from 36 to 84 years, median 63...

  7. An electromechanical, patient positioning system for head and neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostyn, Mark; Dwyer, Thomas; Miller, Matthew; King, Paden; Sacks, Rachel; Cruikshank, Ross; Rosario, Melvin; Martinez, Daniel; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-09-05

    In cancer treatment with radiation, accurate patient setup is critical for proper dose delivery. Improper arrangement can lead to disease recurrence, permanent organ damage, or lack of disease control. While current immobilization equipment often helps for patient positioning, manual adjustment is required, involving iterative, time-consuming steps. Here, we present an electromechanical robotic system for improving patient setup in radiotherapy, specifically targeting head and neck cancer. This positioning system offers six degrees of freedom for a variety of applications in radiation oncology. An analytical calculation of inverse kinematics serves as fundamental criteria to design the system. Computational mechanical modeling and experimental study of radiotherapy compatibility and x-ray-based imaging demonstrates the device feasibility and reliability to be used in radiotherapy. An absolute positioning accuracy test in a clinical treatment room supports the clinical feasibility of the system.

  8. Imaging of connective tissue diseases of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek

    2016-06-01

    We review the imaging appearance of connective tissue diseases of the head and neck. Bilateral sialadenitis and dacryoadenitis are seen in Sjögren's syndrome; ankylosis of the temporo-mandibular joint with sclerosis of the crico-arytenoid joint are reported in rheumatoid arthritis and lupus panniculitis with atypical infection are reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Relapsing polychondritis shows subglottic stenosis, prominent ear and saddle nose; progressive systemic sclerosis shows osteolysis of the mandible, fibrosis of the masseter muscle with calcinosis of the subcutaneous tissue and dermatomyositis/polymyositis shows condylar erosions and autoimmune thyroiditis. Vascular thrombosis is reported in antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome; cervical lymphadenopathy is seen in adult-onset Still's disease, and neuropathy with thyroiditis reported in mixed connective tissue disorder. Imaging is important to detect associated malignancy with connective tissue disorders. Correlation of the imaging findings with demographic data and clinical findings are important for the diagnosis of connective tissue disorders.

  9. Automatic planning of head and neck treatment plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazell, Irene; Bzdusek, Karl; Kumar, Prashant;

    2016-01-01

    treatment plans were reoptimized with the Auto-Planning module. Comparison of the two types of treatment plans were performed using DVH metrics and a blinded clinical evaluation by two senior radiation oncologists using a scale from one to six. Both evaluations investigated dose coverage of target and dose......Treatment planning is time-consuming and the outcome depends on the person performing the optimization. A system that automates treatment planning could potentially reduce the manual time required for optimization and could also pro-vide a method to reduce the variation between persons performing...... radiation dose planning (dosimetrist) and potentially improve the overall plan quality. This study evaluates the performance of the Auto-Planning module that has recently become clinically available in the Pinnacle3 radiation therapy treatment planning system. Twenty-six clinically delivered head and neck...

  10. Clinical utility of head and neck aspiration cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayianis, S L; Francisco, G J; Schumann, G B

    1988-01-01

    Over the past 3.5 yr, we have examined 195 head and neck fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens from three diverse medical settings. Specimens were collected in saline solution or Saccomanno fixative and processed using cytocentrifugation or membrane filtration. This allowed us simultaneously to perform cytologic evaluations, special stains, and immunologic marker studies from a single specimen. Good correlation between clinical experience with FNA and obtaining satisfactory specimens was demonstrated. Our sensitivity (89%) and specificity (94%) reflect problems associated with specimen collection in a training environment where clinician experience with the procedure is low. A definitive diagnosis was possible in most cases, and the treatment plan was often based on the FNA results. In patients without a history of a primary malignancy, a FNA done early in the clinical course helped direct the initial workup of the patient, saving time and expense.

  11. Genetic Susceptibility to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacko, Martin [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Braakhuis, Boudewijn J.M. [Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Boedeker, Carsten C. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Albert-Ludwigs-University, Freiburg, Germany and Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund, Stralsund (Germany); Suárez, Carlos [Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio [ENT Clinic, University of Udine, Udine (Italy); Takes, Robert P., E-mail: robert.takes@radboudumc.nl [Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-01

    Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is growing. Although environmental carcinogens and carcinogenic viruses are the main etiologic factors, genetic predisposition obviously plays a risk-modulating role, given that not all individuals exposed to these carcinogens experience the disease. This review highlights some aspects of genetic susceptibility to HNSCC: among others, genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes, DNA repair pathway, apoptotic pathway, human papillomavirus-related pathways, mitochondrial polymorphisms, and polymorphism related to the bilirubin-metabolized pathway. Furthermore, epigenetic variations, familial forms of HNSCC, functional assays for HNSCC risk assessment, and the implications and perspectives of research on genetic susceptibility in HNSCC are discussed.

  12. An electromechanical, patient positioning system for head and neck radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostyn, Mark; Dwyer, Thomas; Miller, Matthew; King, Paden; Sacks, Rachel; Cruikshank, Ross; Rosario, Melvin; Martinez, Daniel; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In cancer treatment with radiation, accurate patient setup is critical for proper dose delivery. Improper arrangement can lead to disease recurrence, permanent organ damage, or lack of disease control. While current immobilization equipment often helps for patient positioning, manual adjustment is required, involving iterative, time-consuming steps. Here, we present an electromechanical robotic system for improving patient setup in radiotherapy, specifically targeting head and neck cancer. This positioning system offers six degrees of freedom for a variety of applications in radiation oncology. An analytical calculation of inverse kinematics serves as fundamental criteria to design the system. Computational mechanical modeling and experimental study of radiotherapy compatibility and x-ray-based imaging demonstrates the device feasibility and reliability to be used in radiotherapy. An absolute positioning accuracy test in a clinical treatment room supports the clinical feasibility of the system.

  13. Nontraumatic head and neck injuries: a clinical approach. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea Álvarez, B; Esteban García, L; Tuñón Gómez, M; Cepeda Ibarra, Y

    Nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck represent a challenge in the field of neuroradiology for two reasons. As explained in the first part of this update, these entities affect an area where the thorax joins the cranial cavity and can thus compromise both structures; second, they are uncommon, so they are not well known. Maintaining the same approach as in the first part, focusing on the clinical presentations in the emergency department rather than on the anatomic regions affected, we will study the entities that present with two patterns: those that present with a combination of cervical numbness, dysphagia, and dyspnea and those that present with acute sensory deficits. In the latter group, we will specifically focus on visual deficits, because this is the most common symptom that calls for urgent imaging studies. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. [Mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiochemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Renata Cristina Schmidt; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2011-12-01

    The objective of present study was to classify oral mucositis according to the Common Toxicity Criterion (CTC) international parameters in head and neck tumor patients simultaneously treated with radio and chemotherapy, and characterize a patient profile in our area, observing the individuals' habits, tumor characteristics, treatment protocol and acute reaction intensity. Fifty patients undergoing simultaneous 66 to 70 Gy megavoltage radiotherapy and cisplatin/carboplatin chemotherapy were evaluated in this study. Weekly evaluations of the degree of mucositis were perfoemed according to CTC, a four-degree ordinal scale; 36% of all patients and 100% of those with diabetes discontinued treatment due to mucositis, showing that this pathology contributes to the severity of mucositis.

  15. Outcomes measurement in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourin, Christine G

    2014-03-01

    Outcomes research is defined as clinical and population-based research that investigates the results of healthcare practices or interventions through the filter of the benefit to the patient and other stakeholders. Outcomes research is an increasingly important field or research, because of the pressing need for evidence-based information that can be used to make better informed health and healthcare decisions, and define desired health care practices in the current era of healthcare reform. This article will review the head and neck cancer (HNCA) outcomes literature published in the past year, with a focus on studies evaluating treatment and survival, short-term and long-term complications, and quality of life (QOL).

  16. Understanding Quality Measures in Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Peter M.; Schneider, John S.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Lieu, Judith E. C.

    2017-01-01

    As health care reimbursements based on pay-for-performance models become more common, there is an unprecedented demand for ways to measure health care quality and demonstrate value. Performance measures, a type of quality measure, are unique tools in a health care delivery system that allow objective monitoring of adherence to specific goals and tracking of outcomes. We sought to provide information on the development of quality measures in otolaryngology–head and neck surgery, as well as the goals of performance measurement at a national level and for our specialty. The historical development, various types, and approach to creating effective performance measures are discussed. The primary methods of developing performance measures (using clinical practice guidelines, clinical registries, and alternative methods) are also discussed. Performance measures are an important tool that can aid otolaryngologists in achieving effective, efficient, equitable, timely, safe, and patient-centered care as outlined by the Institute of Medicine. PMID:26606715

  17. The role of human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Christel Braemer; Buchwald, Christian von

    2010-01-01

    of tobacco and alcohol. Distinct molecular profiles separate them from HPV-negative cancers and show similarities with HPV-positive cervical SCC. There is evidence that HPV-positive HNSCC is a sexually transmitted disease. Patients with HPV-positive HNSCC are often diagnosed at a late stage with large cystic......-negative HNSCC, and this seems to be related to the immune system. Whether the new vaccines for HPV will protect not only against cervical cancer but also against HPV-positive HNSCC remains unknown.......Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing awareness of a subset of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC), i.e. HPV-positive HNSCC. These cancers seem to differ somewhat from HPV-negative HNSCC. Patients with HPV-positive HNSCC tend to be younger and have a lower intake...

  18. Postoperative radiotherapy after laser surgery with or without chemotherapy in head and neck evolved cancers; Radiotherapie postoperatoire apres chirurgie laser avec ou sans chimiotherapie dans les cancers evolues de la tete et du cou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryll, L.; Pradier, O. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Morvan, Dept. de Cancerologie, Brest (France); Nitsche, M.; Christiansen, H.; Hess, C. [Universitatsklinikum, Dept. de Cancerologie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    We compared concurrent combination chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy after laser surgery in patients with stage 3/4 non metastatic squamous cell head and neck cancer. Combination chemotherapy and concurrent irradiation after laser surgery was not superior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for resectable advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer. However, the collective is small, and the follow-up to short to conclude. (authors)

  19. Automatic planning of head and neck treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Irene; Bzdusek, Karl; Kumar, Prashant; Hansen, Christian R; Bertelsen, Anders; Eriksen, Jesper G; Johansen, Jørgen; Brink, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Treatment planning is time-consuming and the outcome depends on the person performing the optimization. A system that automates treatment planning could potentially reduce the manual time required for optimization and could also provide a method to reduce the variation between persons performing radiation dose planning (dosimetrist) and potentially improve the overall plan quality. This study evaluates the performance of the Auto-Planning module that has recently become clinically available in the Pinnacle3 radiation therapy treatment planning system. Twenty-six clinically delivered head and neck treatment plans were reoptimized with the Auto-Planning module. Comparison of the two types of treatment plans were performed using DVH metrics and a blinded clinical evaluation by two senior radiation oncologists using a scale from one to six. Both evaluations investigated dose coverage of target and dose to healthy tissues. Auto-Planning was able to produce clinically acceptable treatment plans in all 26 cases. Target coverages in the two types of plans were similar, but automatically generated plans had less irradiation of healthy tissue. In 94% of the evaluations, the autoplans scored at least as high as the previously delivered clinical plans. For all patients, the Auto-Planning tool produced clinically acceptable head and neck treatment plans without any manual intervention, except for the initial target and OAR delineations. The main benefit of the method is the likely improvement in the overall treatment quality since consistent, high-quality plans are generated which even can be further optimized, if necessary. This makes it possible for the dosimetrist to focus more time on difficult dose planning goals and to spend less time on the more tedious parts of the planning process.

  20. Imaging diagnosis of venous malformation in head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Doo Hoe; Kim, Dong Ik; Suh, Jung Ho; Jung, Tae Sub [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    The venous malformation in head and neck is a development vascular disease which arises from the arrest in the certain stage of vascular embryogenesis. However, the lesion extends along the fascia and has a tendency to recur after incomplete therapy. Retrospectively, the authors reviewed radiologic studies of 20 patients diagnosed as venous malformation during the last 5 years. The diagnosis was verified by histopathology (5 patients) and direct puncture angiography (15 patients). The radiologic studies included. CT with intravenous contrast injection (20 patients), RI angiography with 99mTc-pyrophosphate (6 patients), and direct puncture angiography (15 patients). Multiplicity of venous malformation was noted in 9 patients. On CT scan, the lesions had lobulated irregular shape, with heterogeneous appearance, showed delayed enhancing characteristics, and had the phleboliths (21 lesions). The venous malformations were located at the masticator space (including masseter muscle) (n = 12), retrobulbar space (n 6), submandibular space (n = 4), paravertebral space (n = 3) and so on. In two cases, the lesions were very extensive involving entire neck and parapharynx. On RI angiography using {sup 99m}Tc-pyrophosphate, all of the lesions showed persistent and delayed uptake. With direct puncture angiography the lesions could be classified as acinar pattern (n = 17) and mixed pattern (acinar and saccular) (n = 2). Venous connections were noted in 10 lesions. In conclusion, if a soft tissue mass on head and neck shows a heterogeneous attenuation density with or without calcified phlebolith on CT scan, RI angiography is recommended as a next diagnostic study. If it shows delayed persistent uptake, venous malformation can be suspected. Finally direct puncture angiography can verify the nature and extent of the lesion.

  1. Utilization of custom electron bolus in head and neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudchadker, R J; Antolak, J A; Morrison, W H; Wong, P F; Hogstrom, K R

    2003-01-01

    Conventional methods of treating superficial head and neck tumors, such as the wedge pair technique or the use of multiple electron fields of varying energies, can result in excellent tumor control. However, in some cases, these techniques irradiate healthy tissue unnecessarily and/or create hot and cold spots in junction regions, particularly in patients with complex surface contour modification or varying planning target volume (PTV) thickness. The objective of this work is to demonstrate how bolus electron conformal therapy can be used for these patients. Two patients treated using this technique are presented. The first patient was diagnosed with malignant fibrous histiocytoma involving the right ear concha and was treated with 12-MeV electrons. The second patient was diagnosed with acinic cell carcinoma of the left parotid gland and was treated with 20-MeV electrons after having undergone a complete parotidectomy. Each patient's bolus was designed using bolus design tools implemented in an in-house treatment-planning system (TPS). The bolus was fabricated using a computer-controlled milling machine. As part of the quality assurance process to ensure proper fabrication and placement of the bolus, the patients underwent a second computed tomography (CT) scan with the bolus in place. Using that data, the final dose distribution was computed using the Philips Pinnacle(3) TPS (Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA). Results showed that the 90% isodose surface conformed well to the PTV and that the dose to critical structures such as cord, brain, and lung was well below tolerance limits. Both patients showed no evidence of disease six months post-radiotherapy. In conclusion, electron bolus conformal therapy is a viable option for treating head and neck tumors, particularly patients having a variable thickness PTV or surface anatomy with surgical defects.

  2. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. C. Dohmen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well.

  3. Implant-prosthetic rehabilitation after radiation treatment in head and neck cancer patients: a case-series report of outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotic, Jasna; Jamsek, Jure; Kuhar, Milan; Ihan Hren, Natasa; Kansky, Andrej; Özcan, Mutlu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Slovenia has a high burden of head and neck cancer. Patients are mostly treated with surgery followed by radiation therapy. Advanced surgical and prosthodontic techniques have expanded the rehabilitation options. The aim of the study was to review the outcome of implant-prosthetic treatment after radiation therapy. Patients and methods Twenty irradiated head and neck cancer patients who received a removable implant-supported denture at the University Medical Centre Ljubljana were included in the study. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox proportional hazard models and logistic regression were used to assess the implant survival and success rate. Results Twenty patients had 100 implants inserted. The estimated implant survival rate was 96% after 1 year and 87% after 5 years. Failures were mostly observed before loading (91.2%). Implants inserted in the transplanted bone were significantly more likely to fail. Out of 89 implants supporting the dentures, 79 implants (88.7%) were successful, meaning that they were functionally loaded and exhibited no pain, radiolucency or progressive bone loss. Prosthetic treatment was significantly less successful in older patients. The attachment system and the number of implants did not have a statistically significant influence on the success rate. Conclusions Implant-supported dentures have been shown to be a reliable treatment modality after head and neck cancer surgery and radiation therapy. Possible early failures should be communicated with the patients.

  4. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohmen, Amy J. C., E-mail: a.dohmen@nki.nl [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Swartz, Justin E. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Van Den Brekel, Michiel W. M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Willems, Stefan M. [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Spijker, René [Medical library, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam 1100 DE (Netherlands); Dutch Cochrane Centre, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Neefjes, Jacques [Department of Cell Biology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Zuur, Charlotte L. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands)

    2015-08-28

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well.

  5. Treatment-induced hearing loss after (chemo)radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, E.A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Ototoxicity is a common adverse event after cisplatin treatment and radiotherapy to the head and neck area. Counseling patients about this adverse event is important. The thesis main objective is to improve our knowledge ototoxicity in patients with head and neck cancer. A systematic review showed

  6. 42 CFR 84.139 - Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.139 Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. Type AE, BE, and CE supplied-air respirators shall be designed and constructed...

  7. CHANGES IN NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND DIETARY INTAKE DURING AND AFTER HEAD AND NECK CANCER TREATMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Pruim, Jan; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to test whether nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer changes during and after treatment. Methods. Nutritional status (including body weight, lean mass, and fat mass) and dietary intake were assessed in 29 patients with head and neck cance

  8. The burden of chronic pain after major head and neck tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Sulieman Terkawi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study highlighted the high burden of chronic pain after therapy for major head and neck tumors. We identified demographic and clinical factors that are associated with the presence of chronic pain. Further studies are required to better understand the risk factors to implement strategies to prevent, alleviate, and treat chronic pain associated with major head and neck tumor therapies.

  9. Sepsis in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: literature review and consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mirabile; G. Numico; E.G. Russi; P. Bossi; F. Crippa; A. Bacigalupo; V. De Sanctis; S. Musso; A. Merlotti; M.G. Ghi; M.C. Merlano; L. Licitra; F. Moretto; N. Denaro; O. Caspiani; M. Buglione; S. Pergolizzi; A. Cascio; J. Bernier; J. Raber-Durlacher; J.B. Vermorken; B. Murphy; M.V. Ranieri; R.P. Dellinger

    2015-01-01

    The reporting of infection/sepsis in chemo/radiation-treated head and neck cancer patients is sparse and the problem is underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of infecti

  10. Targeted sequencing reveals TP53 as a potential diagnostic biomarker in the post-treatment surveillance of head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginkel, Joost H.; de Leng, Wendy W J; de Bree, Remco; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) form a large heterogeneous group of tumors and have a relatively poor outcome in advanced cases. Revealing the underlying genetic mutations in HNSCC facilitates the development of diagnostic biomarkers, which might lead to improved diagnosis and post tr

  11. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2 : proposed applications and treatment protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, J.A.E.M.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Nair, R.G.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Hamblin, M.R.; Barasch, A.; Migliorati, C.A.; Milstein, D.M.J.; Genot, M.T.; Lansaat, L.; van der Brink, R.; Arnabat-Dominguez, J.; van der Molen, L.; Jacobi, I.; van Diessen, J.; de Lange, J.; Smeele, L.E.; Schubert, M.M.; Bensadoun, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together

  12. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2 : proposed applications and treatment protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, J.A.E.M.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Nair, R.G.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Hamblin, M.R.; Barasch, A.; Migliorati, C.A.; Milstein, D.M.J.; Genot, M.T.; Lansaat, L.; van der Brink, R.; Arnabat-Dominguez, J.; van der Molen, L.; Jacobi, I.; van Diessen, J.; de Lange, J.; Smeele, L.E.; Schubert, M.M.; Bensadoun, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together

  13. Carotenoid intake and head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoncini, Emanuele; Edefonti, Valeria; Hashibe, Mia; Parpinel, Maria; Cadoni, Gabriella; Ferraroni, Monica; Serraino, Diego; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olshan, Andrew F; Zevallos, Jose P; Winn, Deborah M; Moysich, Kirsten; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Levi, Fabio; Kelsey, Karl; McClean, Michael; Bosetti, Cristina; Schantz, Stimson; Yu, Guo-Pei; Boffetta, Paolo; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Decarli, Adriano; La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Food and nutrition play an important role in head and neck cancer (HNC) etiology; however, the role of carotenoids remains largely undefined. We explored the relation of HNC risk with the intake of carotenoids within the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. We pooled individual-level data from 10 case-control studies conducted in Europe, North America, and Japan. The analysis included 18,207 subjects (4414 with oral and pharyngeal cancer, 1545 with laryngeal cancer, and 12,248 controls), categorized by quintiles of carotenoid intake from natural sources. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile, the risk reduction associated with total carotenoid intake was 39 % (95 % CI 29-47 %) for oral/pharyngeal cancer and 39 % (95 % CI 24-50 %) for laryngeal cancer. Intakes of β-carotene equivalents, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, and lutein plus zeaxanthin were associated with at least 18 % reduction in the rate of oral and pharyngeal cancer (95 % CI 6-29 %) and 17 % reduction in the rate of laryngeal cancer (95 % CI 0-32 %). The overall protective effect of carotenoids on HNC was stronger for subjects reporting greater alcohol consumption (p < 0.05). The odds ratio for the combined effect of low carotenoid intake and high alcohol or tobacco consumption versus high carotenoid intake and low alcohol or tobacco consumption ranged from 7 (95 % CI 5-9) to 33 (95 % CI 23-49). A diet rich in carotenoids may protect against HNC. Persons with both low carotenoid intake and high tobacco or alcohol are at substantially higher risk of HNC.

  14. The role of oral hygiene in head and neck cancer: results from International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, D; Sartori, S; Brennan, P; Curado, M P; Wünsch-Filho, V; Divaris, K; Olshan, A F; Zevallos, J P; Winn, D M; Franceschi, S; Castellsagué, X; Lissowska, J; Rudnai, P; Matsuo, K; Morgenstern, H; Chen, C; Vaughan, T L; Hofmann, J N; D'Souza, G; Haddad, R I; Wu, H; Lee, Y-C; Hashibe, M; Vecchia, C La; Boffetta, P

    2016-08-01

    Poor oral hygiene has been proposed to contribute to head and neck cancer (HNC) risk, although causality and independency of some indicators are uncertain. This study investigates the relationship of five oral hygiene indicators with incident HNCs. In a pooled analysis of 8925 HNC cases and 12 527 controls from 13 studies participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium, comparable data on good oral hygiene indicators were harmonized. These included: no denture wear, no gum disease (or bleeding), <5 missing teeth, tooth brushing at least daily, and visiting a dentist ≥once a year. Logistic regression was used to estimate the effects of each oral hygiene indicator and cumulative score on HNC risk, adjusting for tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Inverse associations with any HNC, in the hypothesized direction, were observed for <5 missing teeth [odds ratio (OR) = 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74, 0.82], annual dentist visit (OR = 0.82; 95% CI 0.78, 0.87), daily tooth brushing (OR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.79, 0.88), and no gum disease (OR = 0.94; 95% CI 0.89, 0.99), and no association was observed for wearing dentures. These associations were relatively consistent across specific cancer sites, especially for tooth brushing and dentist visits. The population attributable fraction for ≤ 2 out of 5 good oral hygiene indicators was 8.9% (95% CI 3.3%, 14%) for oral cavity cancer. Good oral hygiene, as characterized by few missing teeth, annual dentist visits, and daily tooth brushing, may modestly reduce the risk of HNC. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The Role of HPV in Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cell Formation and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Swanson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory proposes that a minority of tumor cells are capable of self-replication and tumorigenesis. It is these minority of cells that are responsible for cancer metastasis and recurrence in head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC. Human papilloma virus (HPV-related cancer of the oropharynx is becoming more prevalent, which makes understanding of the relationship between HPV and CSCs more important than ever. This relationship is critical because CSC behavior can be predicted based on cell surface markers, which makes them a suitable candidate for targeted therapy. New therapies are an exciting opportunity to advance past the stalled outcomes in HNSCC that have plagued patients and clinicians for several decades.

  16. Role of Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase Pathway in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Du

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K pathway is one of the most frequently observed molecular alterations in many human malignancies, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. A growing body of evidence demonstrates the prime importance of the PI3K pathway at each stage of tumorigenesis, that is, tumor initiation, progression, recurrence, and metastasis. Expectedly, targeting the PI3K pathway yields some promising results in both preclinical studies and clinical trials for certain cancer patients. However, there are still many questions that need to be answered, given the complexity of this pathway and the existence of its multiple feedback loops and interactions with other signaling pathways. In this paper, we will summarize recent advances in the understanding of the PI3K pathway role in human malignancies, with an emphasis on HNSCC, and discuss the clinical applications and future direction of this field.

  17. The head and neck cancer immune landscape and its immunotherapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Rajarsi; Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Havel, Jonathan J.; Dalin, Martin G.; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Ken-Wing; Ganly, Ian; Hakimi, A. Ari; Chan, Timothy A.; Morris, Luc G.T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have demonstrated a clear survival advantage in advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with immune checkpoint blockade. These emerging results reveal that HNSCC is one of the most promising frontiers for immunotherapy research. However, further progress in head and neck immuno-oncology will require a detailed understanding of the immune infiltrative landscape found in these tumors. We leveraged transcriptome data from 280 tumors profiled by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to comprehensively characterize the immune landscape of HNSCC in order to develop a rationale for immunotherapeutic strategies in HNSCC and guide clinical investigation. We find that both HPV+ and HPV– HNSCC tumors are among the most highly immune-infiltrated cancer types. Strikingly, HNSCC had the highest median Treg/CD8+ T cell ratio and the highest levels of CD56dim NK cell infiltration, in our pan-cancer analysis of the most immune-infiltrated tumors. CD8+ T cell infiltration and CD56dim NK cell infiltration each correlated with superior survival in HNSCC. Tumors harboring genetic smoking signatures had lower immune infiltration and were associated with poorer survival, suggesting these patients may benefit from immune agonist therapy. These findings illuminate the immune landscape of HPV+ and HPV– HNSCC. Additionally, this landscape provides a potentially novel rationale for investigation of agents targeting modulators of Tregs (e.g., CTLA-4, GITR, ICOS, IDO, and VEGFA) and NK cells (e.g., KIR, TIGIT, and 4-1BB) as adjuncts to anti–PD-1 in the treatment of advanced HNSCC. PMID:27777979

  18. Mouthwash use and cancer of the head and neck: a pooled analysis from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, Paolo; Hayes, Richard B; Sartori, Samantha; Lee, Yuan-Chin A; Muscat, Joshua; Olshan, Andrew; Winn, Deborah M; Castellsagué, Xavier; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Chen, Chu; Schwartz, Stephen M; Vaughan, Thomas L; Wunsch-Filho, Victor; Purdue, Mark; Koifman, Sergio; Curado, Maria P; Vilensky, Marta; Gillison, Maura; Fernandez, Leticia; Menezes, Ana; Daudt, Alexander W; Schantz, Stimson; Yu, Guopei; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Haddad, Robert I; La Vecchia, Carlo; Hashibe, Mia

    2016-07-01

    Most mouthwashes contain alcohol, a known cause of head and neck cancer (oral cavity, pharynx, larynx), likely through the carcinogenic activity of acetaldehyde, formed in the oral cavity from alcohol. We carried out a pooled analysis of 8981 cases of head and neck cancer and 10 090 controls from 12 case-control studies with comparable information on mouthwash use in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of mouthwash use with cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx, adjusting for study, age, sex, pack-years of tobacco smoking, number of alcoholic drinks/day, and education. Compared with never users of mouthwash, the odds ratio (OR) of all head and neck cancers was 1.01 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94-1.08] for ever users, based on 12 studies. The corresponding ORs of cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx were 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00-1.23) and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.06-1.56), respectively. OR for all head and neck cancer was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.01-1.30) for use for more than 35 years, based on seven studies (P for linear trend=0.01), and OR 1.31 (95% CI: 1.09-1.58) for use more than one per day, based on five studies (P for linear trend <0.001). Although limited by the retrospective nature of the study and the limited ability to assess risks of mouthwash use in nonusers of tobacco and alcohol, this large investigation shows potential risks for head and neck cancer subsites and in long-term and frequent users of mouthwash. This pooled analysis provides the most precise estimate of the association between mouthwash use and head and neck cancer.

  19. Recent advances in head and neck cancer reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of cancer is race against time! Following radical excision, breathing, speech, mastication and swallowing are hampered. Face is invariably involved. Beside functional normalcy, excellent cosmetic restoration is necessary for patient′s life quality. Primary wound healing, quick resumption of adequate oral intake, prompt initiation of chemo-radiotherapy has direct bearing on cure. Primary reconstruction with pedicle or free flap is the choice of treatment in most protocols. Composite defects are requiring bone, muscle and skin restrict choice of donor site and may have shortfalls in aesthetic and functional requirements. To improve further newer, and newer modalities are being developed and used to give best aesthetic and functions. Navigation, use of three-dimensional imaging, stereo lithic model and custom made implant for reconstruction are recommended as they promise improvement in aesthetics. Robotic surgeries allow access for resection of tumours and reconstruction with free flap in deep oropharynx obviating need of doing mandibulotomy. Researchers in stem cell and tissue engineering are looking forward to regenerating tissues and avoid the need of autologous tissue flaps. Desired tissue combination across counter may be available in the future. Excellent immunosuppressant drugs have made it possible to reconstruct composite facial anatomical units with allotransplant in a single surgery, along sensory and motor recovery! Mythological heterogenic head transplant like clone Ganesha, will be a reality in the near future!!

  20. Dysphagia. Impact on quality of life after radio(chemo)therapy of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Julia; Hipp, Matthias; Koelbl, Oliver [Regensburg Univ. Medical Center (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Schaefer, Christof [Hospital St. Elisabeth Straubing (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2011-11-15

    In the past, xerostomia was considered one of the most important determining factors of quality of life (QoL) after radiotherapy (RT) of the head and neck region. In addition, more recent studies have shown that RT-induced dysphagia has an essential influence on the QoL. Between September 2005 and August 2007, 35 patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region were included in the prospective study. Patients were treated by IMAT (intensity-modulated arc therapy) or IMRT (intensity-modulated radiotherapy) planned on 3D imaging. A total of 28 patients (80%) received concomitant chemotherapy. The evaluation of QoL (EORTC QLQ - C30, H and N C-35) and toxicities (CTC 2.0) were assessed at the beginning of, during, and after RT as well as up to 12 months after the end of therapy. At the end of therapy, 86% of the patients experienced difficulties in swallowing (62% CTC II-III ). Twelve months after the end of treatment, 15% still suffered from dysphagia CTC II-III . Concomitant chemotherapy exacerbated the incidence and gravity of dysphagia, resulting in increasing dietary problems. QoL (EORTC) was significantly affected by dysphagia. In particular, the global state of health and QoL were influenced at the end of treatment (p = 0.033) and at a later stage (p = 0.050). The findings of this study suggest that more emphasis should be placed on structured clinical diagnostics, therapy, and rehabilitation of deglutition problems. This means in particular to not only spare the parotids while planning the irradiation, but also to take into consideration the important structures for deglutition, like the retropharyngeal muscles. (orig.)

  1. Head and Neck Cancer and Sexuality: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoten, Bethany Andrews

    2016-01-01

    Individuals treated for head and neck cancer are at risk of sexual problems, particularly given the probability for disfigurement, body image disturbance, depressive symptoms, and functional difficulties that result from treatment. Because oncology nurses are an important source of information and support for patients, it is important that they be familiar with the current literature as well as opportunities for research. The aim of this study was to present a review of the literature on head and neck cancer and sexuality. PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Ovid databases were searched using the terms "head and neck cancer" and "sexuality." Publications had to be peer-reviewed, empirical studies, written in English, and published within the last 10 years. Selected publications were compared based on study aims, leading investigator, study location, conceptual framework, study design, sample, instruments, and study findings. Nine publications were analyzed in this review. Incidence of individuals reporting a negative effect of head and neck cancer on sexuality varied from 24% to 100% depending on the study. There is a paucity of data regarding sexuality among patients with head and neck cancer. Existing studies indicate that sexuality is of considerable significance, particularly after treatment for head and neck cancer. Holistic care includes information about sexuality during and after treatment for head and neck cancer. Oncology nurses should be aware that this topic is of importance to many patients, and they should familiarize themselves with available resources. It is also important that nurse scientists facilitate research in the area of sexuality.

  2. Clinical Applications of FDG PET and PET/CT in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Al-Ibraheem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 18F-FDG PET plays an increasing role in diagnosis and management planning of head and neck cancer. Hybrid PET/CT has promoted the field of molecular imaging in head and neck cancer. This modality is particular relevant in the head and neck region, given the complex anatomy and variable physiologic FDG uptake patterns. The vast majority of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT applications in head and neck cancer related to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Clinical applications of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in head and neck cancer include diagnosis of distant metastases, identification of synchronous 2nd primaries, detection of carcinoma of unknown primary and detection of residual or recurrent disease. Emerging applications are precise delineation of the tumor volume for radiation treatment planning, monitoring treatment, and providing prognostic information. The clinical role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in N0 disease is limited which is in line with findings of other imaging modalities. MRI is usually used for T staging with an intense discussion concerning the preferable imaging modality for regional lymph node staging as PET/CT, MRI, and multi-slice spiral CT are all improving rapidly. Is this review, we summarize recent literature on 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT imaging of head and neck cancer.

  3. Tea consumption and risk of head and neck cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chih Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The current study evaluated the association between tea consumption and head and neck cancer (HNC in Taiwan, where tea is a major agricultural product and a popular beverage. METHODS: Interviews regarding tea consumption (frequency, duration, and types were conducted with 396 HNC cases and 413 controls. Unconditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI of HNC risk associated with tea drinking, adjusted for sex, age, education, cigarette smoking, betel quid chewing, and alcohol drinking. RESULTS: A reduced HNC risk associated with tea drinking (OR for every cup per day = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93-0.99; OR for ≧5 cups per day = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.39-0.94 was observed. The association was especially significant for pharyngeal cancer (OR for every cup per day = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88-0.98; OR for ≧5 cups per day = 0.32, 95% CI: 0.16-0.66. A significant inverse association between HNC and tea consumption was observed particularly for green tea. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that tea drinking may reduce the risk of HNC. The anticancer property of tea, if proven, may offer a natural chemopreventive measure to reduce the occurrence of HNC.

  4. Activation of the NOTCH pathway in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenyue; Gaykalova, Daria A; Ochs, Michael F; Mambo, Elizabeth; Arnaoutakis, Demetri; Liu, Yan; Loyo, Myriam; Agrawal, Nishant; Howard, Jason; Li, Ryan; Ahn, Sun; Fertig, Elana; Sidransky, David; Houghton, Jeffery; Buddavarapu, Kalyan; Sanford, Tiffany; Choudhary, Ashish; Darden, Will; Adai, Alex; Latham, Gary; Bishop, Justin; Sharma, Rajni; Westra, William H; Hennessey, Patrick; Chung, Christine H; Califano, Joseph A

    2014-02-15

    NOTCH1 mutations have been reported to occur in 10% to 15% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). To determine the significance of these mutations, we embarked upon a comprehensive study of NOTCH signaling in a cohort of 44 HNSCC tumors and 25 normal mucosal samples through a set of expression, copy number, methylation, and mutation analyses. Copy number increases were identified in NOTCH pathway genes, including the NOTCH ligand JAG1. Gene set analysis defined a differential expression of the NOTCH signaling pathway in HNSCC relative to normal tissues. Analysis of individual pathway-related genes revealed overexpression of ligands JAG1 and JAG2 and receptor NOTCH3. In 32% of the HNSCC examined, activation of the downstream NOTCH effectors HES1/HEY1 was documented. Notably, exomic sequencing identified 5 novel inactivating NOTCH1 mutations in 4 of the 37 tumors analyzed, with none of these tumors exhibiting HES1/HEY1 overexpression. Our results revealed a bimodal pattern of NOTCH pathway alterations in HNSCC, with a smaller subset exhibiting inactivating NOTCH1 receptor mutations but a larger subset exhibiting other NOTCH1 pathway alterations, including increases in expression or gene copy number of the receptor or ligands as well as downstream pathway activation. Our results imply that therapies that target the NOTCH pathway may be more widely suitable for HNSCC treatment than appreciated currently.

  5. Imaging and management of head and neck paragangliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Rene van den [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are highly vascular lesions originating from paraganglionic tissue located at the carotid bifurcation (carotid body tumors), along the vagus nerve (vagal paragangliomas), and in the jugular fossa and tympanic cavity (jugulotympanic paragangliomas). Diagnostic imaging can be considered in two clinical situations: (1) patients who present with clinical symptoms suggestive of a paraganglioma, and (2) individuals from families with hereditary paragangliomas. It is not only necessary to detect and characterize the lesion, but also to study the presence of multiplicity. For these purposes, MR imaging, and especially 3D TOF MRA, is the modality of choice. CT scanning is especially useful to show destruction of the temporal bone. Angiography in combination with embolization will mainly be used prior to surgical resection, but can also be used for diagnostic purposes when the diagnosis is not yet clear. Many parameters play a role in the decision to treat of which multifocality and impairment of cranial nerves are the most important. The primary therapeutic option for paragangliomas is complete excision of tumor with preservation of vital neurovascular structures. Resection however, should be balanced against a more conservative ''wait and scan'' policy or palliative treatments such as radiotherapy. (orig.)

  6. Nutritional consequences of the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chencharick, J.D.; Mossman, K.L.

    1983-03-01

    Nutrition-related complications of radiotherapy were evaluated in 74 head and neck cancer patients. Subjective changes of mouth dryness, taste, dysphagia, appetite, and food preferences were determined by questionnaire before and at weekly intervals during curative radiotherapy. Changes in body weight during therapy were also recorded. In addition, 24-hour dietary histories were taken from eight patients at the beginning and end of treatment. Results of the study indicate that patients were subjectively aware of nutritional problems prior to therapy and that therapy exacerbated these problems. As many as 25% of the patients experienced oral complications such as taste loss and/or dry mouth prior to initiation of radiotherapy. By the end of radiotherapy, over 80% of the patients were aware of oral and nutritional problems. Patients had an average weight loss of 5 kg prior to therapy; this loss of weight did not change during therapy. Diet histories of eight patients indicate significant caloric deficiencies early and late in radiotherapy. The oral and nutritional problems experienced by patients, even prior to therapy, support the idea that nutritional evaluation and maintenance are important not only during therapy, but prior to radiotherapy as well. Nutritional evaluation should be made a routine, integral part of therapy for every cancer patient.

  7. Novel Immunotherapeutic Approaches for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The immune system plays a key role in preventing tumor formation by recognizing and destroying malignant cells. For over a century, researchers have attempted to harness the immune response as a cancer treatment, although this approach has only recently achieved clinical success. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and is associated with cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, betel nut use, and human papillomavirus infection. Unfortunately, worldwide mortality from HNSCC remains high, partially due to limits on therapy secondary to the significant morbidity associated with current treatments. Therefore, immunotherapeutic approaches to HNSCC treatment are attractive for their potential to reduce morbidity while improving survival. However, the application of immunotherapies to this disease has been challenging because HNSCC is profoundly immunosuppressive, resulting in decreased absolute lymphocyte counts, impaired natural killer cell function, reduced antigen-presenting cell function, and a tumor-permissive cytokine profile. Despite these challenges, numerous clinical trials testing the safety and efficacy of immunotherapeutic approaches to HNSCC treatment are currently underway, many of which have produced promising results. This review will summarize immunotherapeutic approaches to HNSCC that are currently undergoing clinical trials.

  8. [Prosthetic supply of tissue defects in head and neck surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, S; Dazert, S; Jahnke, K; Schneider, M; Neumann, A

    2007-12-01

    Cancer surgery, malformation or trauma may cause broad facial defects that cannot be covered by patients because of their exposed site. Such defects lead to functional deficits and enormous psychological strain and require rehabilitation at all ages. Prosthetic supply has been developed into a functional and aesthetic alternative to plastic and reconstructive surgery. The condensed experience with prosthetic supply after persistent surgical defects of more than twenty patients during the recent years is described. Efficient prosthetic supply in the exposed facial area requires a well scheduled and close cooperation between the surgeon and anaplastologist. Preoperative diagnostic evaluation and operative filling of the magnetic fixation in cooperation with the anaplastologist provide a satisfying functional and cosmetic prosthetic outcome for the patient. Advantages of this procedure combine early cosmetic rehabilitation with the option to directly investigate the tumor site after resection. Novel magnet systems provide a high degree of flexibility combined with confident fixation. Prosthetic rehabilitation should be offered and discussed with patients ahead of cancer surgery in the head and neck area. This procedure should be considered in particular in patients that reject or are not feasible for multi-step reconstructive surgery.

  9. Use of hyperbaric oxygen in postradiation head and neck surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, R.A.; Marx, R.E. (Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Data are presented to indicate the value of hyperbaric oxygen in all stages of treatment of patients with irradiation complications following head and neck surgery. Hyperbaric oxygen stimulates angiogenesis, with increased neovascularization and optimization of cellular levels of oxygen for osteoblast and fibroblast proliferation, collagen formation, and support of ingrowing blood vessels. The hypoxic, acellular matrix in the postirradiated field is changed to a hypercellular, hyperoxic/normoxic situation. Oxygen is used as an adjunct to appropriate surgery. By using the two modalities together, the salvage rate for osteoradionecrosis and its complications of orocutaneous fistula, pathological fractures, and severe bone losses can be increased dramatically. It may also be used prophylactically in patients with periodontal disease or teeth requiring extraction in a previously irradiated area. Finally, the use of oxygen helps support tissue flaps and grafts placed into previously irradiated areas. Economically, there is considerable cost savings in the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy with appropriate surgery. From the patient's point of view, pain relief is achieved, function is returned, and prognosis improves in a relatively short time.

  10. Serious soft tissue infections of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, R.D.; Murdock, R.T.; Davis, R.K. (University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City (USA))

    1991-09-01

    The head and neck contain a number of spaces that can be invaded by organisms of the mouth or by spread of cervical osteomyelitis. Infection in these spaces may progress from superficial infection to cellulitis to the formation of an abscess requiring immediate drainage. Spread of infection between spaces depends on anatomic location. Most patients require hospitalization and intravenous antibiotic therapy. Because a deep space infection may be occult, a high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis. Early recognition is necessary to avoid tissue damage, bacteremia or airway compromise. The possibility of deep space infection should be considered in any patient who does not respond to the usual treatment of an abscessed tooth or tonsillitis. This type of infection also should be considered in a toxic patient who has a fever of unknown origin, with or without blood cultures that show anaerobic organisms. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is usually necessary to locate the infection and to detect suppuration that will be amenable to surgical exploration and drainage. 25 references.

  11. Social media in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewumi, Modupe; Lee, John; Vescan, Allan

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the current use of social media tools within Canadian otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) programs and to assess the interest within these programs to integrate social media for networking, social, and educational programs. A prospective study from September 2013 to February 2014 was performed involving residents and faculty in Canadian OHNS programs. A 26-item questionnaire was created and sent to staff and resident physicians who met the study inclusion criteria using an online survey tool (http://surveymonkey.com). There were 101 respondents for a 10% response rate. More than half (58.4%) of respondents reported use of social media for personal and/or professional matters. Residents and junior faculty physicians 39 years and younger were more likely to have social media accounts and used them more frequently than their older counterparts. Among staff physicians, pediatric otolaryngologists had the highest rate of use, and otologists exhibited the lowest rate. Cellular phones were the most commonly used devices to access social media sites. Fewer than 35% of social media users failed to separate their personal and professional accounts. Although OHNS trainees and practicing physicians identified the potential benefits of social media tools in their specialty, most were unsure how to apply these tools to their practice. Ours is the first study to assess social media use in OHNS. Otolaryngologists are currently using social media; however, their application as a communication and educational tool in otolaryngology remains to be defined.

  12. OK-432 sclerotherapy for benign cystic head and neck lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Rho, Myung Ho; Lee, Sang Wook [Masan Samsung Hospital, Masan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of OK-432 solution for slerotheraphy of cystic lesions of the head and neck. Nineteen cystic lesions comprising ten plunging ranulas, three simple ranulas, three cystic lymphangiomas, one first branchial cleft cyst and two unknown supraclavicular cysts considered to be lymphangiomas were treated by sucking out as much liquid content as possible and then injecting the same volume of OK-432 solution under ultrasound guidance. Patients were followed up clinically and radiologically. Follow-up sonography or CT- performed after a mean interval of nine months showed total or near-total shrinkage of four plunging ranulas. However, six such lesions recurred in spite of more than one (mean, two) sclerotherapy sessions. In cases involving two simple ranulas at the floor of the mouth, failure resulted from extracystic leakage of OK-432 solution via the puncture site. Two unilocular cystic lymphangiomas completely regressed during the follow-up period (mean, seven months), but the multiocular type showed a 65% volume reduction after 12 months. A first branchial cleft cyst was markedly reduced in size, with only a small cystic portion remaining after eight months, follow-up. Two supraclavicular cysts with straw-color fluid did not respond to sclerotherapy. OK-432 sclerotherapy of macrocystic lymphangiomas is an effective and promising alternative to surgery. For other cysts, however, including plunging ranula, efficacy, varied, and 64% of such lesions recurred.

  13. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  14. A cell-targeted photodynamic nanomedicine strategy for head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Alyssa; Malamas, Anthony; Solanki, Rachna; Clausen, Dana M; Eiseman, Julie L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-05-06

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) holds great promise for the treatment of head and neck (H&N) carcinomas where repeated loco-regional therapy often becomes necessary due to the highly aggressive and recurrent nature of the cancers. While interstitial light delivery technologies are being refined for PDT of H&N and other cancers, a parallel clinically relevant research area is the formulation of photosensitizers in nanovehicles that allow systemic administration yet preferential enhanced uptake in the tumor. This approach can render dual-selectivity of PDT, by harnessing both the drug and the light delivery within the tumor. To this end, we report on a cell-targeted nanomedicine approach for the photosensitizer silicon phthalocyanine-4 (Pc 4), by packaging it within polymeric micelles that are surface-decorated with GE11-peptides to promote enhanced cell-selective binding and receptor-mediated internalization in EGFR-overexpressing H&N cancer cells. Using fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate in vitro that the EGFR-targeted Pc 4-nanoformulation undergoes faster and higher uptake in EGFR-overexpressing H&N SCC-15 cells. We further demonstrate that this enhanced Pc 4 uptake results in significant cell-killing and drastically reduced post-PDT clonogenicity. Building on this in vitro data, we demonstrate that the EGFR-targeted Pc 4-nanoformulation results in significant intratumoral drug uptake and subsequent enhanced PDT response, in vivo, in SCC-15 xenografts in mice. Altogether our results show significant promise toward a cell-targeted photodynamic nanomedicine for effective treatment of H&N carcinomas.

  15. Oral complications in the head and neck radiation patient. Introduction and scope of the problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena

    2002-01-01

    Head and neck cancer arises in the upper aerodigestive tract, most commonly in the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. The anatomy and physiology of this region are uniquely complex, and the function and appearance are critical to patients' self-image and quality of life. Head