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Sample records for lochon catalyzed d-d

  1. WILDCAT: a catalyzed D-D tokamak reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    WILDCAT is a conceptual design of a catalyzed D-D, tokamak, commercial, fusion reactor. WILDCAT utilizes the beneficial features of no tritium breeding, while not extrapolating unnecessarily from existing D-T designs. The reactor is larger and has higher magnetic fields and plasma pressures than typical D-T devices. It is more costly, but eliminates problems associated with tritium breeding and has tritium inventories and throughputs approximately two orders of magnitude less than typical D-T reactors. There are both a steady-state version with Alfven-wave current drive and a pulsed version. Extensive comparison with D-T devices has been made, and cost and safety analyses have been included. All of the major reactor systems have been worked out to a level of detail appropriate to a complete, conceptual design.

  2. A note on the B*(B),B*(B)*,D*(D),D*(D)* molecular states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-Feng; LUO Zhi-Gang; HE Jun; LIU Xiang; ZHU Shi-Lin

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the one-boson-exchange model,we have performed an extensive study of the possible B*(B),B*(B)*,D*(D),D*(D)* molecular states with various quantum numbers after considering the S-wave and D-wave mixing.We also discuss the possible experimental research of these interesting states.

  3. D-D tokamak reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K.E. Jr.; Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Finn, P.A.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Misra, B.; Smith, D.L.; Stevens, H.C.

    1980-11-01

    A tokamak D-D reactor design, utilizing the advantages of a deuterium-fueled reactor but with parameters not unnecessarily extended from existing D-T designs, is presented. Studies leading to the choice of a design and initial studies of the design are described. The studies are in the areas of plasma engineering, first-wall/blanket/shield design, magnet design, and tritium/fuel/vacuum requirements. Conclusions concerning D-D tokamak reactors are stated.

  4. Study of the Decays $B^{0} \\to D^{(*)+}D^{(*)-}$

    CERN Document Server

    Lipeles, E; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Hill, T S; Morrison, R J; Nelson, H N; Briere, R A; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams1, J; Edwards, K W; Patel, R; Janicek, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Mahmood, A H; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Menon, N; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Kwon, Y; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Kopp, S E; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; McGee, S; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J

    2000-01-01

    The decays B0 --> D*+D*-, B0 --> D*+D- and B0 --> D+D- are studied in 9.7million Y(4S) --> BBbar decays accumulated with the CLEO detector. We determineBr(B0 --> D*+D*-) = (9.9+4.2-3.3+-1.2)e-4 and limit Br(B0 --> D*+D-) D+D-) D*+D*- decay and determine that theCP-even fraction of the final state is greater than 0.11 at 90L. Futuremeasurements of the time dependence of these decays may be useful for theinvestigation of CP violation in neutral B meson decays.

  5. D & D screening risk evaluation guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

  6. INEL D&D long-range plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckland, R.J.; Kenoyer, D.J.; LaBuy, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    This Long-Range Plan presents the Decontamination and Dismantlement (D&D) Program planning status for facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The plan provides a general description of the D&D Program objectives, management criteria, and policy; discusses current activities; and documents the INEL D&D Program cost and schedule estimate projections for the next 15 years. Appendices are included that provide INEL D&D project historical information, a comprehensive descriptive summary of each current D&D surplus facility, and a summary database of all INEL contaminated facilities awaiting or undergoing the facility transition process.

  7. D&D TECHNOLOGIES FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripp, Julia L.

    2003-02-27

    A new Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project was awarded in FY 2002 to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to deploy technologies that decrease pollution and waste in the areas of facility characterization, sludge treatment, dust and contamination control, and concrete demolition. This project was called ''D&D Technologies for Pollution Prevention'' and planned to deploy four different technologies. To reduce protective equipment requirements, waste generation, and risk of radiation exposure during facility characterization, the Russian Gamma Locater Device (GLD) and Isotopic Identification Device (IID) for remote characterization was investigated. The GLD detects gamma ray readings and video images remotely and uses radio communication to transmit the readings to personnel located a safe distance from the contaminated area. The IID, an integral part of the GLD, provides real-time spectrometric analysis of radiation sources for remotely identifying the specific radioactive isotopes present in the facility. At the INEEL, sludge has accumulated in the bottom of a fuel storage pool and the presence of heavy metals in the sludge makes it a mixed waste. This project planned to use LEADX{reg_sign} to treat sludge in place to effectively make all heavy metals in the sludge insoluble. LEADX{reg_sign} is a dry granular chemical additive (apatite) used for in-situ treatment of heavy-metal-contaminated material. LEADX{reg_sign} chemically bonds to any free heavy metals that it contacts and forms a stable, non-leachable molecule. After treating the sludge with LEADX{reg_sign}, it was to be left in the basin and the pool filled with grout. The successful treatment of the sludge with LEADX{reg_sign} will reduce the amount of waste to be disposed at the burial ground by eliminating the need to remove the sludge from the basin. Many off-gas and duct systems being dismantled contain dust and lint that has been

  8. Compact D-D/D-T neutron generators and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Tak Pui [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Neutron generators based on the 2H(d,n)3He and 3H(d,n)4He fusion reactions are the most commonly available neutron sources. The applications of current commercial neutron generators are often limited by their low neutron yield and their short operational lifetime. A new generation of D-D/D-T fusion-based neutron generators has been designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) by using high current ion beams hitting on a self-loading target that has a large surface area to dissipate the heat load. This thesis describes the rationale behind the new designs and their potential applications. A survey of other neutron sources is presented to show their advantages and disadvantages compared to the fusion-based neutron generator. A prototype neutron facility was built at LBNL to test these neutron generators. High current ion beams were extracted from an RF-driven ion source to produce neutrons. With an average deuteron beam current of 24 mA and an energy of 100 keV, a neutron yield of >109 n/s has been obtained with a D-D coaxial neutron source. Several potential applications were investigated by using computer simulations. The computer code used for simulations and the variance reduction techniques employed were discussed. A study was carried out to determine the neutron flux and resolution of a D-T neutron source in thermal neutron scattering applications for condensed matter experiments. An error analysis was performed to validate the scheme used to predict the resolution. With a D-T neutron yield of 1014 n/s, the thermal neutron flux at the sample was predicted to be 7.3 x 105 n/cm2s. It was found that the resolution of cold neutrons was better than that of thermal neutrons when the duty factor is high. This neutron generator could be efficiently used for research and educational purposes at universities. Additional applications studied were positron production and

  9. Compact D-D/D-T neutron generators and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Tak Pui

    2003-05-01

    Neutron generators based on the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He and {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He fusion reactions are the most commonly available neutron sources. The applications of current commercial neutron generators are often limited by their low neutron yield and their short operational lifetime. A new generation of D-D/D-T fusion-based neutron generators has been designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) by using high current ion beams hitting on a self-loading target that has a large surface area to dissipate the heat load. This thesis describes the rationale behind the new designs and their potential applications. A survey of other neutron sources is presented to show their advantages and disadvantages compared to the fusion-based neutron generator. A prototype neutron facility was built at LBNL to test these neutron generators. High current ion beams were extracted from an RF-driven ion source to produce neutrons. With an average deuteron beam current of 24 mA and an energy of 100 keV, a neutron yield of >10{sup 9} n/s has been obtained with a D-D coaxial neutron source. Several potential applications were investigated by using computer simulations. The computer code used for simulations and the variance reduction techniques employed were discussed. A study was carried out to determine the neutron flux and resolution of a D-T neutron source in thermal neutron scattering applications for condensed matter experiments. An error analysis was performed to validate the scheme used to predict the resolution. With a D-T neutron yield of 10{sup 14} n/s, the thermal neutron flux at the sample was predicted to be 7.3 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}s. It was found that the resolution of cold neutrons was better than that of thermal neutrons when the duty factor is high. This neutron generator could be efficiently used for research and educational purposes at universities. Additional applications studied were positron production and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The

  10. A D-D/D-T fusion reaction based neutron generator system for liver tumor BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivunoro, H.; Lou, T.P.; Leung, K. N.; Reijonen, J.

    2003-04-02

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiation treatment modality used for highly malignant tumor treatments. Prior to irradiation with low energetic neutrons, a 10B compound is located selectively in the tumor cells. The effect of the treatment is based on the high LET radiation released in the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction with thermal neutrons. BNCT has been used experimentally for brain tumor and melanoma treatments. Lately applications of other severe tumor type treatments have been introduced. Results have shown that liver tumors can also be treated by BNCT. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, various compact neutron generators based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions are being developed. The earlier theoretical studies of the D-D or D-T fusion reaction based neutron generators have shown that the optimal moderator and reflector configuration for brain tumor BNCT can be created. In this work, the applicability of 2.5 MeV neutrons for liver tumor BNCT application was studied. The optimal neutron energy for external liver treatments is not known. Neutron beams of different energies (1eV < E < 100 keV) were simulated and the dose distribution in the liver was calculated with the MCNP simulation code. In order to obtain the optimal neutron energy spectrum with the D-D neutrons, various moderator designs were performed using MCNP simulations. In this article the neutron spectrum and the optimized beam shaping assembly for liver tumor treatments is presented.

  11. Evaluation of Residues of D.D.T and D.D.A in Fish Collected from Caspian Sea, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shokrzadeh lamuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pesticides are essential in modern agricultural practices but due to their biocide activity and potential risk to the consumer, the control of pesticide residues in foods is a growing source of concern for the general population. Extensive application of such agents as organochlorine pesticides in farmlands and contemporary agricultural industries has led to undesired environmental contamination and human health hazards. Thus, this study attempted to evaluate and analyze the residual values of the organochlorine insecticide D.D.T and its metabolite D.D.A in the four species of most consumed fish collected from the Caspian Sea. Methods: In this investigation, concentrations of residual values of D.D.T and D.D.A were quantitatively determined in the 4 species of fish sampled from 4 major fishing centers (Chalous and Babolsar cities and Khazar Abad and Miankaleh regions in Mazandaran province, Iran, using gas chromatography electron-capture detection (GC–ECD in 2008. Results: The results showed that the highest values of D.D.T were in Mugil auratns (0.033±0.008 mg/kg and Rutilus frisikutum (0.031±0.007 mg/kg fishes collected from Babolsar sampling center. Conclusion: Concentrations of D.D.T and D.D.A in the fish were found to be less than the standard permissible intake.

  12. Data discrepancies in and new experiments for D+D, D+T, and T+T fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarmie, N.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Brown, R.E.; Correll, F.D.; Ohlsen, G.G.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the accuracy of the basic fusion reaction data for the reactions T(d,n)/sup 4/He, T(t,2n)/sup 4/He, D(d,n)/sup 3/He, and D(d,p)T, and to describe an elaborate experiment in progress at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to remeasure the cross sections with improved accuracy.

  13. Remote Manipulation for D&D Exhibiting Teleautonomy and Telecollaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yule, Thomas J.; Colgate, J. Edward; Park, Young S.; Ewing, Thomas F.

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of the work is to enhance remote operations of robotic systems for D&D tasks by extending teleoperation with semi-autonomous functions. The work leverages the $1.2M dual-arm work platform (DAWP) developed with broad participation for the CP5 D&D, as well as 2,000 hr DAWP D&D operational experience. We propose to develop a reactive, agent-based control architecture well suited to unstructured and unpredictable environments, and robot control technology, which implements a virtual fixture that can be used to guide the application of tools with force-feedback control. Developed methodologies will be implemented using a structured light sensor and robot hand controller on the dual-arm system.

  14. Understanding the $e^+e^-\\to D^{(*)+}D^{(*)-}$ processes observed by Belle

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the production cross sections for $D^{*+}D^{*-}$, $D^+D^{*-}$ and $D^+D^-$ in $e^+e^-$ annihilation through one virtual photon in the framework of perturbative QCD with constituent quarks. The calculated cross sections for $D^{*+}D^{*-}$ and $D^+D^{*-}$ production are roughly in agreement with the recent Belle data. The helicity decomposition for $D^{*}$ meson production is also calculated. The fraction of the $D^{*\\pm}_LD^{*\\mp}_T$ final state in $e^+e^-\\to D^{*+}D^{*-}$ process...

  15. Measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->D*(+/-)D(-/+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-08-17

    We present updated measurements of CP-violating asymmetries in the decays B0-->D*(+/-)D(-/+) and B0-->D+D- using (383+/-4) x 10(6)B(B) pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory. We determine the time-integrated CP asymmetry A(D*(+/-)D(-/+))=0.12+/-0.06+/-0.02, and the time-dependent asymmetry parameters to be C(D*+D-)=0.18+/-0.15+/-0.04, S(D*+D-)=-0.79+/-0.21+/-0.06, C(D*-D+)=0.23+/-0.15+/-0.04, S(D*-D+)=-0.44+/-0.22+/-0.06, C(D+D-)=0.11+/-0.22+/-0.07, and S(D+D-)=-0.54+/-0.34+/-0.06, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  16. D. D. Kosambi selected works in mathematics and statistics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book fills an important gap in studies on D. D. Kosambi. For the first time, the mathematical work of Kosambi is described, collected and presented in a manner that is accessible to non-mathematicians as well. A number of his papers that are difficult to obtain in these areas are made available here. In addition, there are essays by Kosambi that have not been published earlier as well as some of his lesser known works. Each of the twenty four papers is prefaced by a commentary on the significance of the work, and where possible, extracts from technical reviews by other mathematicians.

  17. Uma voz que clama no D(d)esterro

    OpenAIRE

    Mazurana, Sueli Tereza Mazzucco

    2007-01-01

    Tese (doutorado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Comunicação e Expressão. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Literatura Um voz que clama no D(d)esterro é o resgate, com vistas a publicação, da obra poética inédita de Juvêncio de Araújo Figuerêdo (Florianópolis, 1864-4927). O trabalho está estruturado em três partes: A primeira apresenta as idéias introdutórias, que falam do poeta e sua vida, de vozes dele e sobre ele, do seu fazer literário, da fundamentação teórica que dá su...

  18. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  19. Catalyzing RE Project Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Kate; Elgqvist, Emma; Walker, Andy; Cutler, Dylan; Olis, Dan; DiOrio, Nick; Simpkins, Travis

    2016-09-01

    This poster details how screenings done with REopt - NREL's software modeling platform for energy systems integration and optimization - are helping to catalyze the development of hundreds of megawatts of renewable energy.

  20. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in B0 -> D(*)D Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di, E; Marco; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De, N; De Groot, J G H; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della, G; Ricca; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    We present a first measurement of CP asymmetries in neutral B decays to D+D-, and updated CP asymmetry measurements in decays to D*+D- and D*-D+. We use fully-reconstructed decays collected in a data sample of (232 +- 3) x 10^6 Y(4S) -> BBbar events in the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We determine the time-dependent asymmetry parameters to be S_{D*+D-} = -0.54 +- 0.35 +- 0.07, C_{D*+D-} = 0.09 +- 0.25 +- 0.06, S_{D*-D+} = -0.29 +- 0.33 +- 0.07, C_{D*-D+} = 0.17 +- 0.24 +- 0.04, S_{D+D-} = -0.29 +- 0.63 +- 0.06, and C_{D+D-} = 0.11 +- 0.35 +- 0.06, where in each case the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  1. Muon catalyzed fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, K. [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nagamine, K. [Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS-KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Matsuzaki, T. [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawamura, N. [Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS-KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2005-12-15

    The latest progress of muon catalyzed fusion study at the RIKEN-RAL muon facility (and partly at TRIUMF) is reported. The topics covered are magnetic field effect, muon transfer to {sup 3}He in solid D/T and ortho-para effect in dd{mu} formation.

  2. First observations of $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^+D^-$, $D_s^+D^-$ and $D^0\\bar{D}^0$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Oyanguren Campos, M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; 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    2013-01-01

    First observations and measurements of the branching fractions of the $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^+D^-$, $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D_s^+D^-$ and $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^0\\bar{D}^0$ decays are presented using $1.0$~fb$^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment. These branching fractions are normalized to those of $\\bar{B}^0\\to D^+D^-$, $B^0\\to D_s^+D^-$ and $B^-\\to D^0D_s^-$, respectively. An excess of events consistent with the decay $\\bar{B}^0\\to D^0\\bar{D}^0$ is also seen, and its branching fraction is measured relative to that of $B^-\\to D^0D_s^-$. Improved measurements of the branching fractions ${\\cal{B}}(\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D_s^+D_s^-)$ and ${\\cal{B}}(B^-\\to D^0D_s^-)$ are reported, each relative to ${\\cal{B}}(B^0\\to D_s^+D^-)$. The ratios of branching fractions are \\begin{align*} {{\\cal{B}}(\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^+D^-)\\over {\\cal{B}}(\\bar{B}^0\\to D^+D^-)} &= 1.08\\pm 0.20\\pm0.10, \

  3. Characterization of VanYn, a novel D,D-peptidase/D,D-carboxypeptidase involved in glycopeptide antibiotic resistance in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda, Elisa; Marcone, Giorgia L; Pollegioni, Loredano; Marinelli, Flavia

    2012-09-01

    VanY(n) is a novel protein involved in the mechanism of self-resistance in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727, which produces the glycopeptide antibiotic A40926, the precursor of the second-generation dalbavancin, which is in phase III of clinical development. VanY(n) (196 residues) is encoded by the dbv7 gene within the dbv biosynthetic cluster devoted to A40926 production. C-terminal His6-tagged VanY(n) was successfully expressed as a soluble and active protein in Escherichia coli. The analysis of the sequence suggests the presence of a hydrophobic transmembrane portion and two conserved sequences (SxHxxGxAxD and ExxH) in the extracytoplasmic domain that are potentially involved in coordination of Zn(2+) and catalytic activity. The presence of these conserved sequences indicates a similar mechanism of action and substrate binding in VanY(n) as in VanY, VanX and VanXY Zn(2+)-dependent D,D-carboxypeptidases and D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptidases acting on peptidoglycan maturation and involved in glycopeptide resistance in pathogens. On substrates mimicking peptidoglycan precursors, VanY(n) shows D,D-carboxypeptidase and D,D-dipeptidase activity, but lacks D,D-carboxyesterase ability on D-Ala-D-Lac-terminating peptides. VanY(n) belongs to the metallo-D,D-carboxypeptidase family, but it is inhibited by β-lactams. Its characterization provides new insights into the evolution and transfer of resistance determinants from environmental glycopeptide-producing actinomycetes (such as Nonomuraea sp.) to glycopeptide-resistant pathogens (enterococci and staphylococci). It may also contribute to an early warning system for emerging resistance mechanisms following the introduction into clinics of a second-generation glycopeptide such as dalbavancin.

  4. String Cosmological Solutions with O(d, d) Duality Symmetry and Matter Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bao-Lin; YAN Jun

    2013-01-01

    The duality properties of string cosmology model with negative energy matter are investigated by means of renormalization group equation,the cosmological solutions with exotic matter coupling are obtained in D =d + 1dimensional space-time.These inflation-power solutions can describe accelerated and decelerated process in the early universe,and the duality solutions can be generated through O(d,d) transformations.

  5. A lattice estimate of the g_{D^* D pi} coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Abada, A; Boucaud, P; Herdoiza, G; Leroy, J P; Le Yaouanc, A; Pène, O; Rodríguez-Quintero, J; Boucaud, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of the first direct determination of the g_{D^* D pi} coupling using lattice QCD. From our simulations in the quenched approximation, we obtain g_{D^* D pi} = 18.8 +/- 2.3^{+1.1}_{-2.0} and hat(g) = 0.67 +/- 0.08^{+0.04}_{-0.06}. It is in agreement with a recent experimental result from CLEO.

  6. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant

  7. Did American social and economic events from 1865 to 1898 influence D.D. Palmer the chiropractor and entrepreneur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batinić, Josip; Skowron, Mirek; Hammerich, Karin

    2013-09-01

    This paper explores how the social landscape of the latter half of the nineteenth century influenced D. D. Palmer and the many occupations he pursued. It focuses on the geographical area where D. D. lived from 1865 to 1898. This paper will show how the American social and economic events of the time provided favourable circumstances for D.D.'s entrepreneurial successes.

  8. The d'--d--d' vertical triad is less discriminating than the a'--a--a' vertical triad in the antiparallel coiled-coil dimer motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkruger, Jay D; Bartlett, Gail J; Hadley, Erik B; Fay, Lindsay; Woolfson, Derek N; Gellman, Samuel H

    2012-02-08

    Elucidating relationships between the amino-acid sequences of proteins and their three-dimensional structures, and uncovering non-covalent interactions that underlie polypeptide folding, are major goals in protein science. One approach toward these goals is to study interactions between selected residues, or among constellations of residues, in small folding motifs. The α-helical coiled coil has served as a platform for such studies because this folding unit is relatively simple in terms of both sequence and structure. Amino acid side chains at the helix-helix interface of a coiled coil participate in so-called "knobs-into-holes" (KIH) packing whereby a side chain (the knob) on one helix inserts into a space (the hole) generated by four side chains on a partner helix. The vast majority of sequence-stability studies on coiled-coil dimers have focused on lateral interactions within these KIH arrangements, for example, between an a position on one helix and an a' position of the partner in a parallel coiled-coil dimer, or between a--d' pairs in an antiparallel dimer. More recently, it has been shown that vertical triads (specifically, a'--a--a' triads) in antiparallel dimers exert a significant impact on pairing preferences. This observation provides impetus for analysis of other complex networks of side-chain interactions at the helix-helix interface. Here, we describe a combination of experimental and bioinformatics studies that show that d'--d--d' triads have much less impact on pairing preference than do a'--a--a' triads in a small, designed antiparallel coiled-coil dimer. However, the influence of the d'--d--d' triad depends on the lateral a'--d interaction. Taken together, these results strengthen the emerging understanding that simple pairwise interactions are not sufficient to describe side-chain interactions and overall stability in antiparallel coiled-coil dimers; higher-order interactions must be considered as well.

  9. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0-->D(*)+/-D+/- decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Buono, L Del; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Marco, E Di; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-09-23

    We present a first measurement of CP asymmetries in neutral B decays to D+D-, and updated CP asymmetry measurements in decays to D(*+)D- and D(*-)D+. We use fully reconstructed decays collected in a data sample of (232+/-3) x 10(6) gamma(4S)-->BB events in the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We determine the time-dependent asymmetry parameters to be SD(*+)(D-)=-0.54+/-0.35+/-0.07, CD(*+)(D-)=0.09+/-0.25+/-0.06, SD(*-)(D+)=-0.29+/-0.33+/-0.07, CD(*-)(D+)=0.17+/-0.24+/-0.04, SD+(D-)=-0.29+/-0.63+/-0.06, and CD+(D-)=0.11+/-0.35+/-0.06, where in each case the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  10. Measurement of the branching fraction for the decay B^0 --> D^{*+}D^{*-}

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    Decays of the type B --> D^{(*)} anti-D^{(*)} can be used to provide a measurement of the parameter sin2beta of the Unitarity Triangle that is complementary to the measurement derived from the mode B^0 --> J/psi K_s^0. In this document we report a measurement of the branching fraction for the decay B^0 --> D^{*+}D^{*-} with the BABAR detector. With data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.7 fb^{-1} collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance during 1999-2000, we have reconstructed 38 candidate signal events in the mode B^0 --> D^{*+}D^{*-} with an estimated background of 6.2+/-0.5 events. From these events, we determine the branching fraction to be BF(B^0 --> D^{*+}D^{*-}) = (8.0+/-1.6(stat)+/-1.2(syst))x10^{-4} (preliminary).

  11. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and CP Content for the Decay B0 --> D*+ D*-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fraction of the decay B^0 --> D^{*+} D^{*-} and of the CP-odd component of its final state using the BaBar detector. With data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.4 fb^{-1} collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance during 1999-2000, we have reconstructed 38 candidate signal events in the mode B^0 --> D^{*+}D^{*-} with an estimated background of 6.2 \\pm 0.5 events. From these events, we determine the branching fraction to be BR(B^0 --> D^{*+}D^{*-}) = (8.3 +/- 1.6(stat) +/- 1.2(syst)) x 10^{-4}. The measured CP-odd fraction of the final state is 0.22 +/- 0.18(stat) +/- 0.03(syst).

  12. Neutronics optimization study for D-D fusion reactor blanket/shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, T.; Kanda, Y.; Nakashima, H.

    1985-12-01

    Position-dependent optimization calculations have been carried out on a D-D fusion reactor blanket/shield to maximize the energy gain in the blanket and to minimize the atomic displacement rate of the copper stabilizer in the superconducting magnet. The results obtained by using the optimization code SWAN indicate the advantage of D/sub 2/O coolant over H/sub 2/O coolant with respect to increasing the energy gain, and the difference in the optimal shield distributions between D-T and D-D neutron sources. The possibility of improving both the energy gain and radiation shielding characteristics is also discussed.

  13. Scattering of polarized D-D neutrons in a diffusion cloud chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Jan Pieter Fokke

    1968-01-01

    In dit proefschrift wordt een onderzoek naar de bruikbaarheid van een met helium gevulde diffusie -nevelkamer als neutronenpolarimeter beschreven. De behoefte aan een betrouwbare meetmethode blijkt uit de sterk uiteenlopende waarden van de polarisatie van D-D neutronen bij lage deuteronenenergieen d

  14. Measurement of CP Violation in B-0 -> D+D- Decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Romeu, J. Arnau; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Perez, D. H. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Sobral, C. M. Costa; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Deleage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Lima, V. Franco; Frei, C.; Furfaro, E.; Farber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Cazon, B. R. Gruberg; Gruenberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Gobel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Lefevre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, I. T.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-01-01

    The CP violation observables S and C in the decay channel B-0 -> D+D- are determined from a sample of proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1). The observable S describes CP violatio

  15. EG & G Mount Plant, December 1990 and January 1991, D & D soil box sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    Six hundred eighty-two (682) containers of soil were generated at Mound Plant between April 1 and October 31, 1990 as a result of the excavation of soils containing plutonium-238 at two ongoing Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program sites; these areas are known as Area 14, the waste transfer system (WTS) hillside, and Area 17, the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building Area. The soils from these areas are part of the Mound Plant waste stream number AMDM-000000010, Contaminated Soil, and are proposed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. These containers of soil are currently in storage at Mound Plant. The purpose of this sampling and analysis was to demonstrate that the D&D soils comply with the waste acceptance requirements of the NTS, as presented In Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements (DOE 1988). The sealed waste packages, constructed of wood or metal, are currently being stored In Building 31 and at other locations throughout the Mound Plant. For additional historical information concerning the D&D soils, Including waste stream evaluations and past sampling data see the Sampling and Analysis Plan for Mound Plant D&D Soils Packages (EG&G 1991).

  16. Observation of a Neutral Structure near the D(D)over-bar* Mass Threshold in e(+)e(-) -> (D(D)over-bar*)(0)pi(0) at root s=4.226 and 4.257 GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X.C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Tiemens, M.

    2015-01-01

    A neutral structure in the D (D) over bar* system around the D (D) over bar* mass threshold is observed with a statistical significance greater than 10 sigma in the processes e(+)e(-) -> D+D*(-)pi(0) + c.c. and e(+)e(-) -> D-0(D) over bar*(0)pi(0) + c.c. at root s = 4.226 and 4.257 GeV in the BESIII

  17. Measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0→D(*)+D(*)- decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Schott, G.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.

    2009-02-01

    We present new measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries for B0→D(*)+D(*)- decays using (467±5)×106 B Bmacr pairs collected with the BABAR detector located at the PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We determine the CP-odd fraction of the B0→D*+D*- decays to be R⊥=0.158±0.028±0.006 and find CP asymmetry parameters S+=-0.76±0.16±0.04 and C+=+0.00±0.12±0.02 for the CP-even component of this decay and S⊥=-1.80±0.70±0.16 and C⊥=+0.41±0.49±0.08 for the CP-odd component. We measure S=-0.63±0.36±0.05 and C=-0.07±0.23±0.03 for B0→D+D-, S=-0.62±0.21±0.03 and C=+0.08±0.17±0.04 for B0→D*+D-, and S=-0.73±0.23±0.05 and C=+0.00±0.17±0.03 for B0→D+D*-. For the B0→D*±D∓ decays, we also determine the CP-violating asymmetry A=+0.008±0.048±0.013. In each case, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The measured values for the asymmetries are all consistent with the standard model.

  18. Muon Catalyzed Fusion in 3 K Solid Deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Knowles, P E; Bailey, J M; Beer, G A; Beveridge, J L; Fujiwara, M C; Huber, T M; Jacot-Guillarmod, R; Kammel, P; Kim, S K; Kunselman, A R; Marshall, G M; Martoff, C J; Mason, G R; Mulhauser, F; Olin, A; Petitjean, C; Porcelli, T A; Zmeskal, J; Zmeskal, and J.

    1997-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion in deuterium has traditionally been studied in gaseous and liquid targets. The TRIUMF solid-hydrogen-layer target system has been used to study the fusion reaction rates in the solid phase of D_2 at a target temperature of 3 K. Products of two distinct branches of the reaction were observed; neutrons by a liquid organic scintillator, and protons by a silicon detector located inside the target system. The effective molecular formation rate from the upper hyperfine state of $\\mu d$ and the hyperfine transition rate have been measured: $\\tilde{\\lambda}_(3/2)=2.71(7)_{stat.}(32)_{syst.} The molecular formation rate is consistent with other recent measurements, but not with the theory for isolated molecules. The discrepancy may be due to incomplete thermalization, an effect which was investigated by Monte Carlo calculations. Information on branching ratio parameters for the s and p wave d+d nuclear interaction has been extracted.

  19. The beta-lactam-sensitive D,D-carboxypeptidase activity of Pbp4 controls the L,D and D,D transpeptidation pathways in Corynebacterium jeikeium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavollay, Marie; Arthur, Michel; Fourgeaud, Martine; Dubost, Lionel; Marie, Arul; Riegel, Philippe; Gutmann, Laurent; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2009-11-01

    Corynebacterium jeikeium is an emerging nosocomial pathogen responsible for vascular catheters infections, prosthetic endocarditis and septicemia. The treatment of C. jeikeium infections is complicated by the multiresistance of clinical isolates to antibiotics, in particular to beta-lactams, the most broadly used class of antibiotics. To gain insight into the mechanism of beta-lactam resistance, we have determined the structure of the peptidoglycan and shown that C. jeikeium has the dual capacity to catalyse formation of cross-links generated by transpeptidases of the d,d and l,d specificities. Two ampicillin-insensitive cross-linking enzymes were identified, Ldt(Cjk1), a member of the active site cysteine l,d-transpeptidase family, and Pbp2c, a low-affinity class B penicillin-binding protein (PBP). In the absence of beta-lactam, the PBPs and the l,d-transpeptidase contributed to the formation of 62% and 38% of the cross-links respectively. Although Ldt(Cjk1) and Pbp2C were not inhibited by ampicillin, the participation of the l,d-transpeptidase to peptidoglycan cross-linking decreased in the presence of the drug. The specificity of Ldt(Cjk1) for acyl donors containing a tetrapeptide stem accounts for this effect of ampicillin since the essential substrate of Ldt(Cjk1) was produced by an ampicillin-sensitive d,d-carboxypeptidase (Pbp4(Cjk)). Acquisition and mutational alterations of pbp2C accounted for high-level beta-lactam resistance in C. jeikeium.

  20. Nitrogen Detection in Bulk Samples Using a D-D Reaction-Based Portable Neutron Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Naqvi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen concentration was measured via 2.52 MeV nitrogen gamma ray from melamine, caffeine, urea, and disperse orange bulk samples using a newly designed D-D portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma ray setup. Inspite of low flux of thermal neutrons produced by D-D reaction-based portable neutron generator and interference of 2.52 MeV gamma rays from nitrogen in bulk samples with 2.50 MeV gamma ray from bismuth in BGO detector material, an excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated yields of nitrogen gamma rays indicates satisfactory performance of the setup for detection of nitrogen in bulk samples.

  1. The D&D of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Boling, L.E.; Yule, T.J.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.

    1996-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has completed the D&D of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor. The Project consisted of decontaminating and for packaging as radioactive waste the reactor vessel and internals, contaminated piping systems, miscellaneous tanks, pumps, and associated equipment. The D&D work involved dismantling process equipment and associated plumbing, ductwork drain lines, etc., performing size reduction of reactor vessel internals in the fuel pool, packaging and manifesting all radioactive and mixed waste, and performing a thorough survey of the facility after the removal of activated and contaminated material. Non-radioactive waste was disposed of in the ANL-E landfill or recycled. In January 1996 the EBWR facility was formally decommissioned and transferred from EM-40 to EM-30. This paper will discuss the details of this ten year effort.

  2. O(D,D) covariant Noether currents and global charges in double field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Hyuck [Department of Physics, Sogang University,Seoul, 04107 (Korea, Republic of); Rey, Soo-Jong [School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University,Seoul, 08862 (Korea, Republic of); Fields, Gravity & Strings, Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe,Institute for Basic Sciences, Daejeon, 34047 (Korea, Republic of); Rim, Woohyun; Sakatani, Yuho [School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University,Seoul, 08862 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-20

    Double field theory is an approach for massless modes of string theory, unifying and geometrizing all gauge invariance in manifest O(D,D) covariant manner. In this approach, we derive off-shell conserved Noether current and corresponding Noether potential associated with unified gauge invariance. We add Wald-type counter two-form to the Noether potential and define conserved global charges as surface integral. We check our O(D,D) covariant formula against various string backgrounds, both geometric and non-geometric. In all cases we examined, we find perfect agreements with previous results. Our formula facilitates to evaluate momenta along not only ordinary spacetime directions but also dual spacetime directions on equal footing. From this, we confirm recent assertion that null wave in doubled spacetime is the same as macroscopic fundamental string in ordinary spacetime.

  3. Intensity of d-d symmetry-forbidden electronic transition in Cr(CO)6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Alexandre B

    2007-05-31

    Absolute absorption intensities (oscillator strengths) are calculated for the d-d symmetry-forbidden transition in hexacarbonyl chromium. The vibronic coupling mechanism is taken into account in a way that represents an alternative to the traditional perturbative approach of Herzberg and Teller. In the so-called direct method, the electronic transition moment is directly expanded in a power series of the vibrational normal coordinates of suitable symmetry. In the present case, i.e., d-d ligand field transitions, or more specifically (1)A(1g) --> (1)T(1g) and (1)A(1g) --> (1)T(2g) transitions, the dipole selection rule is broken by vibronic interaction induced by normal modes that transform like T(1u) and T(2u) representations of the O(h) group. An analysis of the relative importance of normal modes in promoting electronic transitions is carried out.

  4. Measurement of $CP$ Violation in $B^0 \\to D^{(*)}D$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Belloli, Nicoletta

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of parameters associated with $CP$ Violation in $B^0 \\to D^+D^-$ and $B^0 \\to D^{+*}D^-$ decays are presented. The first analysis is concluded and the values obtained from a fit to the decay time distribution of flavor-tagged candidates provides an evidence of $CP$ violation at a significance level of 4.0 standard deviations, allowing to constrain the phase shift due to higher-order SM corrections to the world’s most precise value. The analysis associated to the second channel is ongoing and preliminary studies performed on the sensitivity to $CP$ observables show that LHCb can rival the results obtained by previous experiments.

  5. Electron screening in the d(d,p)t reaction for deuterated metals

    CERN Document Server

    Gyuerky, G; Somorjai, E

    2003-01-01

    Recently, the electron screening effect in d(d,p)t has been studied for the metals Al, Zr, and Ta, where the deuterated metals were produced via implantation of low-energy deuterons. This surprising result motivated the present systematic work. More than 25 deuterated metals and 15 insulators/semiconductors have been studied at the 100 kV accelerator of the Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum. (R.P.)

  6. The Cu d-d excitation model: Studies of the insulating limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W. (Inst. f. Physik, Univ. Dortmund (Germany, F.R.) Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP (Germany, F.R.)); Shelankov, A.L. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP (Germany, F.R.) A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., Leningrad (USSR)); Zotos, X. (Inst. f. Theorie d. Kond. Materie, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-12-01

    In the Cu d-d excitation model the Jahn-Teller levels of Cu{sup ++} act as excitonic centers for the pairing of oxygen p holes. In this paper we survey studies of the model which have focussed first on superconductivity. In view of recent neutron data, the insulating limit is of specific interest. In this limit, the model describes cooperative Jahn-Teller systems as coupled systems of spin and orbital (pseudo-spin) degrees of freedom. (orig.).

  7. Sampling and analysis plan for Mount Plant D & D soils packages, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-02-01

    There are currently 682 containers of soils in storage at Mound Plant, generated between April 1 and October 31, 1990 as a result of excavation of soils containing plutonium-238 at two ongoing Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program sites. These areas are known as Area 14, the waste transfer system (WTS) hillside, and Area 17, the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building area. The soils from these areas are part of Mound Plant waste stream number AMDM-000000010, Contaminated Soil, and are proposed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. The sealed waste packages, constructed of either wood or metal, are currently being stored in Building 31 and at other locations throughout the Mound facility. At a meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada on October, 26, 1990, DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE-NV) and NTS representatives requested that the Mound Plant D&D soils proposed for shipment to NTS be sampled for Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) constituents. On December 14, 1990, DOE-NV also requested that additional analyses be performed on the soils from one of the soils boxes for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), particle size distribution, and free liquids. The purpose of this plan is to document the proposed sampling and analyses of the packages of D&D soils produced prior to October 31, 1990. In order to provide a thorough description of the soils excavated from the WTS and SM areas, sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide historical Information concerning the D&D soils, including waste stream evaluations and past sampling data.

  8. Temperature derivatives for fusion reactivity of D-D and D-T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenbrunner, James R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makaruk, Hanna Ewa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-29

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) and deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction rates are observable using leakage gamma flux. A direct measurement of γ-rays with equipment that exhibits fast temporal response could be used to infer temperature, if the detector signal is amenable for taking the logarithmic time-derivative, alpha. We consider the temperature dependence for fusion cross section reactivity.

  9. An O(D,D) Invariant Hamiltonian Action for the Superstring

    CERN Document Server

    Blair, Chris D A; Routh, Alasdair J

    2013-01-01

    We construct O(D,D) invariant actions for the bosonic string and RNS superstring, using Hamiltonian methods and ideas from double field theory. In this framework the doubled coordinates of double field theory appear as coordinates on phase space and T-duality becomes a canonical transformation. Requiring the algebra of constraints to close leads to the section condition, which splits the phase space coordinates into spacetime coordinates and momenta.

  10. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry in the Decay B0->D*+D*-Ks

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del, P; Amo Sanchez; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo, M; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del, L; Buono; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We study the decay B0->D*+D*-Ks using (230 +/- 2) x 10^{6} BBbar pairs collected by the Babar detector at the PEP-II B factory. We measure a branching fraction B(B0->D*+D*-Ks)=(4.4\\pm0.4\\pm0.7)\\times 10^{-3} and find evidence for the decay B0->D*- D+_{s1}(2536) with a statistical significance of $4.6 \\sigma$. A time-dependent CP asymmetry analysis is also performed to study the possible resonant contributions to B0->D*+D*-Ks and the sign of cos2beta . Our measurement indicates that there is a sizable resonant contribution to the decay B0->D*+D*-Ks from a unknown $D^+_{s1}$ state with large width, and that cos2beta is positive at the 94 % confidence level under certain theoretical assumptions.

  11. Theory of optically forbidden d-d transitions in strongly correlated crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsnelson, M I; Lichtenstein, A I

    2010-09-29

    A general multiband formulation of the linear and nonlinear optical response functions for realistic models of correlated crystals is presented. Dipole-forbidden d-d optical transitions originate from vertex functions, which we consider assuming the locality of an irreducible four-leg vertex. The unified formulation for second- and third-order response functions in terms of the three-leg vertex is suitable for practical calculations in solids. We illustrate the general approach by consideration of intra-atomic spin-flip contributions, with an energy of 2J, where J is a Hund exchange, in the simplest two-orbital model.

  12. TIMSKO DELO V POSLOVALNICAH PODJETJA SI.MOBIL D.D.

    OpenAIRE

    Ožek, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Magistrska naloga obsega predstavitev timskega dela. Razdeljena je na teoretični in praktični del. V teoretičnem delu smo opisali timsko delo, karakteristike timov ter prikazali konkretno delovanje timskega dela v podjetju Si.mobil d.d. Podali smo primerjavo med skupino in timom, opredelili vrste timov in vloge v timu, razpravljali o vlogah vodje, pomenu motivacije in seznanjenosti s cilji. Odgovorili smo na vprašanje kdaj in zakaj uvesti timsko delo, kakšne time poznamo ter kakšne vloge imaj...

  13. Gold-Catalyzed Synthesis of Heterocycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcadi, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Synthesis of Heterocycles via Gold-Catalyzed Heteroatom Addition to Unsaturated C-C Bonds * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Cyclization of Polyunsaturated Compounds * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Compounds via α-Oxo Gold Carbenoid * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Cycloaddition Reactions * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Activation of Carbonyl Groups and Alcohols * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Compounds through Gold-Mediated C-H Bond Functionalization * Gold-Catalyzed Domino Cyclization/Oxidative Coupling Reactions * Conclusions * References

  14. TFTR D&D Project: Final Examination and Testing of the TFTR TF-Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving J. Zatz

    2003-01-31

    In operation for nearly 15 years, TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) was not only a fusion science milestone, but a milestone of achievement in engineering as well. The TFTR D&D (Decommissioning and Decontamination) program provided a rare opportunity to examine machine components that had been exposed to a unique performance environment of greater than 100,000 mechanical and thermal load cycles. In particular, the possible examination of the TFTR toroidal-field (TF) coils, which met, then exceeded, the 5.2 Tesla magnetic field machine specification, could supply the answers to many questions that have been asked and debated since the coils were originally designed and built. A test program conducted in parallel with the D&D effort was the chance to look inside and examine, in detail, the TFTR TF coils for the first time since they were delivered encased to PPPL (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory). The results from such a program would provide data and insight that would not only be nefit PPPL and the fusion community, but the broader scientific community as well.

  15. TFTR D&D Project: Final Examination and Testing of the TFTR TF-Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving J. Zatz

    2003-01-31

    In operation for nearly 15 years, TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) was not only a fusion science milestone, but a milestone of achievement in engineering as well. The TFTR D&D (Decommissioning and Decontamination) program provided a rare opportunity to examine machine components that had been exposed to a unique performance environment of greater than 100,000 mechanical and thermal load cycles. In particular, the possible examination of the TFTR toroidal-field (TF) coils, which met, then exceeded, the 5.2 Tesla magnetic field machine specification, could supply the answers to many questions that have been asked and debated since the coils were originally designed and built. A test program conducted in parallel with the D&D effort was the chance to look inside and examine, in detail, the TFTR TF coils for the first time since they were delivered encased to PPPL (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory). The results from such a program would provide data and insight that would not only be nefit PPPL and the fusion community, but the broader scientific community as well.

  16. ${\\bar D}D$ meson pair production in antiproton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Shyam, R

    2016-01-01

    We study the $\\bar D D$ (${\\bar D}^0 D^0$ and $D^-D^+$) charm meson pair production in antiproton (${\\bar p}$) induced reactions on nuclei at beam energies ranging from threshold to several GeV. Our model is based on an effective Lagrangian approach that has only the baryon-meson degrees of freedom and involves the physical hadron masses. The reaction proceeds via the $t$-channel exchanges of $\\Lambda_c^+$, $\\Sigma_c^+$, and $\\Sigma_c^{++}$ baryons in the initial collision of the antiproton with one of the protons of the target nucleus. The medium effects on the exchanged baryons are included by incorporating in the corresponding propagators, the effective charm baryon masses calculated within a quark-meson coupling (QMC) model. The wave functions of the bound proton have been determined within the QMC model as well as in a phenomenological model where they are obtained by solving the Dirac equation with appropriate scalar and vector potentials. The initial- and final-state distortion effects have been approx...

  17. Color suppressed contributions to the decay modes B_{d,s} -> D_{s,d} D_{s,d}, B_{d,s} -> D_{s,d} D^*_{s,d}, and B_{d,s} -> D^*_{s,d} D^*_{s,d}

    OpenAIRE

    Eeg, Jan O.; Fajfer, Svjetlana; Prapotnik, Anita

    2005-01-01

    The amplitudes for decays of the type $B_{d,s} \\to D_{s,d} D_{s,d}$, have no factorizable contributions, while $B_{d,s} \\to D_{s,d} D^*_{s,d}$, and $B_{d,s} \\to D^*_{s,d} D^*_{s,d}$ have relatively small factorizable contributions through the annihilation mechanism. The dominant contributions to the decay amplitudes arise from chiral loop contributions and tree level amplitudes which can be obtained in terms of soft gluon emissions forming a gluon condensate. We predict that the branching rat...

  18. Color suppressed contributions to the decay modes B_{d,s} -> D_{s,d} D_{s,d}, B_{d,s} -> D_{s,d} D^*_{s,d}, and B_{d,s} -> D^*_{s,d} D^*_{s,d}

    OpenAIRE

    Eeg, Jan O.; Fajfer, Svjetlana; Prapotnik, Anita

    2005-01-01

    The amplitudes for decays of the type $B_{d,s} \\to D_{s,d} D_{s,d}$, have no factorizable contributions, while $B_{d,s} \\to D_{s,d} D^*_{s,d}$, and $B_{d,s} \\to D^*_{s,d} D^*_{s,d}$ have relatively small factorizable contributions through the annihilation mechanism. The dominant contributions to the decay amplitudes arise from chiral loop contributions and tree level amplitudes which can be obtained in terms of soft gluon emissions forming a gluon condensate. We predict that the branching rat...

  19. Lewis Acid Catalyzed Benzylic Bromination

    OpenAIRE

    Shibatomi, Kazutaka; Zhang, Yanhua; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2008-01-01

    Lewis acid catalyzed bromination on aromatic side chain was achieved efficiently by using 1,3-dibromo-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DBDMH) as a bromination reagent under mild conditions. Zirconium(IV) chloride showed the highest catalytic activity for the benzylic bromination. It was revealed that the present Lewis acid catalysis proceeds via the radical generation pathway. In contrast to Lewis acid catalysis, Brønsted acid promoted aromatic ring bromination without any benzylic bromination. Monobro...

  20. Gold-catalyzed domino reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelet, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Gold-catalyzed reactions have appeared to be highly attractive tools for chemists to promote novel transformations to prepare elaborated structures from simple starting materials. This chapter presents selected and original examples of domino processes in the presence of gold catalysts, highlighting reports implying hydration, hydroxylation, and hydroamination as key starting point for cascade transformations. Domino processes implying 1,n-enynes, asymmetric domino transformations, and applications of all the presented processes in total synthesis are presented.

  1. Measurement of $CP$ violation in $B^0 \\!\\rightarrow D^+ D^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John

    2016-12-23

    The $C\\!P$ violation observables $S$ and $C$ in the decay channel $B^0 \\!\\rightarrow D^+ D^-$ are determined from a sample of proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of $7$ and $8$ TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3~ {\\text {fb}}^{-1}$. The observable $S$ describes $C\\!P$ violation in the interference between mixing and the decay amplitude, and $C$ parametrizes direct $C\\!P$ violation in the decay. The following values are obtained from a flavour-tagged, decay-time-dependent analysis: \\begin{align*} S &= -0.54 \\, ^{+0.17}_{-0.16} \\, \\text{(stat)} \\pm 0.05 \\, \\text{(syst)}\\,, \\\\ C &= \\phantom{-}0.26 \\, ^{+0.18}_{-0.17} \\, \\text{(stat)} \\pm 0.02 \\, \\text{(syst)}\\,. \\end{align*} These values constrain higher-order Standard Model corrections to be small.

  2. O(d,d) duality transformations in F(R) theories of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gionti, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The argument of Hodge duality symmetry is introduced starting from the electromagnetic field. Introducing bosonic string theory, O(d,d) duality symmetry can be implemented when there exist d-symmetries, which allows one to write Hodge-dual fields. A tree-level effective gravitational action of bosonic string theory coupled with the dilaton field is considered. This theory inherits the Busher's duality of its parent string theory. The dilaton field can be recast into the Weyl's mode of the metric tensor in the Jordan frame. This maps the effective one-loop bosonic string theory of gravity into a Lagrangian of a f(R) function. Constraining this f(R)-Lagrangian on a FLRW metric and using Noether symmetries approach for extended theory of gravity, it is possible to show that the Lagrangian exibits a Gasperini-Veneziano duality symmetry.

  3. Design of an epithermal column for BNCT based on D D fusion neutron facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durisi, E.; Zanini, A.; Manfredotti, C.; Palamara, F.; Sarotto, M.; Visca, L.; Nastasi, U.

    2007-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is currently performed on patients at nuclear reactors. At the same time the international BNCT community is engaged in the development of alternative facilities for in-hospital treatments. This paper investigates the potential of a novel high-output D-D neutron generator, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (CA, USA), for BNCT. The simulation code MCNP-4C is used to realize an accurate study of the epithermal column in view of the treatment of deep tumours. Different materials and Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA) are investigated and an optimized configuration is proposed. The neutron beam quality is defined by the standard free beam parameters, calculated averaging over the collimator aperture. The results are discussed and compared with the performances of other facilities.

  4. Apellidos y sistema Rh (D/d en poblaciones jujeñas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudios previos indican que en las poblaciones jujeñas existiría una estrecha asociación entre la clasificación étnica de los individuos, basada en los apellidos y distintos marcadores genéticos (AB0 y haplotipos holándricos. El propósito de este trabajo fue analizar en estas poblaciones, situadas a diferentes niveles de altura, la relación entre los alelos D/d del sistema Rh y los apellidos clasificados de acuerdo a su origen. El fenotipo Rh de 7178 individuos fue agrupado de acuerdo a su origen geográfico (tierras altas y bajas y de los apellidos (foráneos y autóctonos. Para cada agrupamiento se determinó la frecuencia de los alelos d y D. Las diferencias entre tierras altas y bajas y categorías de apellidos se establecieron con c2. Para el total de la provincia el alelo d fue más frecuente en apellidos foráneos y en las tierras bajas. Se observaron diferencias estadísticamente significativas de las frecuencias de D y d: a entre individuos portadores de apellidos autóctonos y foráneos para las tierras bajas; b entre tierras altas y bajas al considerar los apellidos por separado. Se concluye que en las poblaciones jujeñas el alelo d se asocia preferentemente con los apellidos foráneos, lo que indicaría una concordancia entre la clasificación de los individuos por el origen de sus apellidos y este sistema sanguíneo. La distribución de los alelos D/d guarda relación con la miscegenación diferencial, según un gradiente altitudinal, experimentada por las poblaciones jujeñas, verificada con otros marcadores moleculares.

  5. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  6. $\\bar{B}_{d,s} \\to D^{*}_{d,s} V$ and $\\bar{B}_{d,s}^* \\to D_{d,s} V$ decays with QCD Factorization and Possible Puzzles

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Qin; Zhang, Yun-Yun; Sun, Jun-Feng; Yang, Yue-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the rapid development of heavy-flavor experiments, phenomenological studies of nonleptonic $\\bar{B}_{d,s} \\to D^{*}_{d,s} V$ and $\\bar{B}_{d,s}^* \\to D_{d,s} V$~($V=\\rho\\,,K^*$) decays are performed within the framework of QCD Factorization. Relative to previous works, the QCD corrections to the transverse amplitudes are evaluated at next-to-leading order. The theoretical predictions of the observables are updated. For the measured $\\bar{B}_{d,s} \\to D^{*}_{d,s} V$ decays, two tensions between theoretical results and experimental measurements, {\\it i.e.} "$R_{ds}^{V}$ puzzle" and "$D^{*} V$~(or $R_{V/\\ell\\bar{\

  7. An Improved Nuclear Recoil Calibration in the LUX Detector Using a Pulsed D-D Neutron Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongqing

    2017-01-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 370 kg (250 kg active mass) two-_phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. The first absolute charge (Qy) and light (Ly) measurement performed in situ in the LUX detector with a D-D calibration technique for nuclear recoil spanning 0.7 to 74 keV and 1.1 to 74 keV respectively have been reported in. The D-D calibration has subsequently been further improved by incorporating pulsing technique, i.e. the D-D neutron production is concentrated within narrow pulses (20 us / 250 Hz) with the timing information recorded. This technique allows the suppression of accidental backgrounds in D-D neutron data and also provides increased sensitivity for the lower energy NR calibrations. I will report the improved NR absolute Qy and Ly measurements using the pulsed D-D calibration technique performed in situ in the LUX detector. Brown University, Large Underground Xenon(LUX) Collaboration.

  8. Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, John F.; Pouy, Mark J.

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution has become a valuable method to prepare products from the addition of nucleophiles at the more substituted carbon of an allyl unit. The most active and selective catalysts contain a phosphoramidite ligand possessing at least one arylethyl substituent on the nitrogen atom of the ligand. In these systems, the active catalyst is generated by a base-induced cyclometalation at the methyl group of this substituent to generate an iridium metalacycle bound by the COD ligand of the [Ir(COD)Cl]2 precursor and one additional labile dative ligand. Such complexes catalyze the reactions of linear allylic esters with alkylamines, arylamines, phenols, alcohols, imides, carbamates, ammonia, enolates and enolate equivalents, as well as typical stabilized carbon nucleophiles generated from malonates and cyanoesters. Iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution have also been generated from phosphorus ligands with substituents bound by heteroatoms, and an account of the studies of such systems, along with a description of the development of iridium catalysts is included.

  9. Apellidos y sistema Rh (D/d en poblaciones de alturas jujeñas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales, Jorge

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudios previos indican que en las poblaciones jujeñas existiría una estrecha asociación entre la clasificación étnica de los apellidos y distintos marcadores genéticos (ABO, haplotipos holándricos. El propósito de este trabajo fue analizar la relación entre los alelos D/d y la clasificación, de acuerdo al origen de sus apellidos, de poblaciones situadas a distintos niveles de altura. La información sobre el fenotipo Rh de 7178 individuos fue agrupada en: 1 tierras altas (2500 - 3500 m.s.n.m y bajas (500-1200 m.s.n.m; 2 apellidos foráneos y autóctonos. Para cada agrupamiento se determinó la frecuencia de los alelos D y d. Las diferencias entre regiones y categorías de apellidos se establecieron con x2. Para el total provincial el alelo d fue más frecuente en apellidos foráneos y en las tierras bajas, mientras que en las tierras altas presenta una frecuencia muy baja. Se observaron diferencias estadísticamente significativas (P < 0.05 de las frecuencias de D y d: a entre individuos portadores de apellidos autóctonos y foráneos para el total provincial y las tierras bajas; b entre regiones, al considerar los apellidos por separado. Se concluye que en las poblaciones jujeñas el alelo d se asocia preferentemente con los apellidos foráneos, lo que indicaría una concordancia entre la clasificación étnica de los individuos por el origen de sus apellidos y este sistema sanguíneo. La distribución de los alelos D/d guarda relación con la miscegenación diferencial, según un gradiente altitudinal, experimentada por las poblaciones jujeñas verificada con otros marcadores moleculares.

  10. Time-dependent CP-violation measurements in $B^0 \\to D^+D^–$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Bel, Lennaert

    2016-01-01

    Overconstraining the unitarity triangle is a key goal of LHCb. The excellent time resolution of the detector lends itself to high precision time dependent CP violation measurements. CP observables in $B^0 \\to D^{+}D^{‐}$ decays are of great interest as they have the potential to be sensitive to new physics contributions. There is a long¬‐existing tension between results from BaBar and Belle on $B^0 \\to D^{+}D^{‐}$. We present results on these CP observables with the full Run 1 dataset.

  11. A new 5d description of 6d D-type minimal conformal matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, Hirotaka; Lee, Kimyeong; Taki, Masato; Yagi, Futoshi

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new 5d description of the circle-compactified 6d $(D_{N+4}, D_{N+4})$ minimal conformal matter theory which can be approached by the 6d $\\mathcal{N}=(1,0)$ $Sp(N)$ gauge theory with $N_f=2N+8$ flavors and one tensor multiplet. Compactifying the brane set-up for the 6d theory, we arrive at a 5-brane Tao diagram for 5d $\\mathcal{N}=1$ $SU(N+2)$ theory of the vanishing Chern-Simons level with $2N+8$ flavors. We conjecture that the 6d theory is recovered as the UV fixed point of this 5d theory. We show that the global symmetry of this 5d theory is $SO(4N+16)$ identical to that of the 6d theory by analyzing the 7-brane monodromy. By using the Tao diagram, we also find the instanton fugacity is exactly given by the circle radius. By decoupling flavors in this 5d theory, one can obtain all the 5d $SU(N+2)$ gauge theories of various Chern-Simons levels and corresponding enhanced global symmetries at the 5d UV fixed point.

  12. Nuclear Recoil Calibrations in the LUX Detector Using Direct and Backscattered D-D Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyne, Casey; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. I will discuss the latest calibration of the nuclear recoil (NR) response in liquid xenon (LXe), performed in-situ in the LUX detector using mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced via the Adelphi Technologies, Inc. DD108 D-D neutron generator. The calibration measured the NR charge yield in LXe (Qy) to 0.7 keVnr recoil energy with an absolute determination of deposited energy and the NR light yield in LXe (Ly) to recoil energies of 1.1 keVnr, both of which improve upon all previous measurements. I will then focus in depth on the extension of this calibration using a new technique for generating a beam of sub-300 keV quasi-mono-energetic neutrons via the backscatter of 2.45 MeV neutrons off a deuterium-based reflector. Current simulations work optimizing the technique, its advantages, and its impact on future research will be discussed, including the extension of the NR Qy calibration down to 0.14 keVnr, an independent NR Ly calibration, and an a priori estimate of the expected 8B solar neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering signal in the upcoming LUX-ZEPLIN experiment.

  13. An experimental and theoretical investigation of the C(1D) + D2 reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Hickson, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    In a previous joint experimental and theoretical study of the barrierless chemical reaction C(1D) + H2 at low temperatures (300-50 K) [K. M. Hickson, J.-C. Loison, H. Guo, Y. V. Suleimanov, J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 2015, 6, 4194.], excellent agreement was found between experimental thermal rate constants and theoretical estimates based on ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) over the two lowest singlet potential energy surfaces (PESs). Here, we extend this work to one of its deuterated counterparts, C(1D) + D2, over the same temperature range. Experimental and RPMD results are in very good agreement when contributions from both PESs to this chemical reaction are included in the RPMD simulations. The deviation between experiment and the RPMD calculations does not exceed 25 % and both results exhibit a slight negative temperature dependence. The first excited 1A" PES plays a more important role than the ground 1A' PES as the temperature is decreased, similar to our previous studies of the C(1D) + H2 reaction but...

  14. ORNL Soils Remediation and Slabs Removal The Bridge from D&D to Redevelopment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, M Malinda [ORNL; Schneider, Ken R [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The landscape of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has dramatically changed over the past 2 years with demolition of aging facilities in the Central Campus. Removal of these infrastructure legacies was possible due to an influx of DOE-Environmental Management funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). Facility D&D traditionally removes everything down to the building slab, and the Soils and Sediments Program is responsible for slabs, below-grade footers, abandoned waste utilities, and soils contaminated above certain risk levels that must be removed before the site can be considered for redevelopment. , DOE-EM has used a combination of base and ARRA funding to facilitate the clean-up process in ORNL s 2000 Area. Demolition of 13 buildings in the area was funded by the ARRA. Characterization of the remaining slabs, underground pipelines and soils was funded by DOE-EM base funding. Additional ARRA funding was provided for the removal of the slabs, pipelines and contaminated soils. Removal work is in progress and consists of removing and disposing of approximately 10,000 cubic yards (CY) of concrete, 2,500 CY of debris, and 500 CY of contaminated soil. The completion of this work will allow the site to be available for redevelopment and site reuse efforts at ORNL.

  15. D-D neutron-scatter measurements for a novel explosives-detection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, A.L.; Flaska, M. [Department of NERS, U. Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Kearfott, K.J., E-mail: Kearfott@umich.edu [Department of NERS, U. Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States)

    2012-11-21

    A series of measurements has been completed that provides a benchmark for Monte Carlo simulations related to an algorithm for explosives detection using active neutron interrogation. The original simulations used in algorithm development, based on land-sea cargo container screening, have been adapted to model active neutron interrogation of smaller targets. These smaller-scale measurements are easily accomplished in a laboratory environment. Benchmarking measurements were completed using a D-D neutron generator, two neutron detectors, as well as a variety of scatter media including the explosives surrogate melamine (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}N{sub 6}). Measurements included 90 Degree-Sign , 120 Degree-Sign , or 150 Degree-Sign neutron scatter geometries and variations in source-detector shielding, target presence, and target identity. Comparisons of measured and simulated neutron fluxes were similar, with correlation coefficients greater than 0.7. The simulated detector responses also matched very closely with the measured photon and neutron pulse height distributions, with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.9. The experiments and simulations also provided insight into potential application of the new method to the problem of explosives detection in small objects such as luggage and small packages.

  16. Pair annihilation reaction D+D-->0 in disordered media and conformal invariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, F C; Rittenberg, V

    2007-05-01

    The raise and peel model is a stochastic model of a fluctuating interface separating a substrate covered with clusters of matter of different sizes and a rarefied gas of tiles. The stationary state is obtained when adsorption compensates the desorption of tiles. This model is generalized to an interface with defects (D) . The defects are either adjacent or separated by a cluster. If a tile hits the end of a cluster with a defect nearby, the defect hops at the other end of the cluster, changing its shape. If a tile hits two adjacent defects, the defects annihilate and are replaced by a small cluster. There are no defects in the stationary state. This model can be seen as describing the reaction D+D-->0 , in which the particles (defects) D hop at long distances, changing the medium, and annihilate. Between the hops the medium also changes (tiles hit clusters, changing their shapes). Several properties of this model are presented and some exact results are obtained using the connection of our model with a conformally invariant quantum chain.

  17. d-d excitations in bilayer manganites probed by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.; Rosenkranz, S.; Castellan, J.-P.; Osborn, R.; Mitchell, J. F.; Zheng, H.; Case, D.; Kim, J. H.; Gog, T.

    2010-01-01

    We report a high-resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering investigation of the bilayer manganites La{sub 2-2x}Sr{sub 1+2x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} with x=0.36 and 0.5. The momentum dependence along the crystallographic (110) direction for energy losses 1 eV {le} {Delta}E {le} 15 eV has been measured in detail with the data analysis focusing on the energy-loss region 1 eV {le} {Delta}E {le} 5 eV, which includes a strong peak located at {Delta}E {approx} 2 eV. We observe a clear dispersion of up to 0.5 eV in the measured q range, which is direct evidence of the nonlocal character of this excitation. Further, we found that the intensity in this low-energy region strongly depends on both the reduced wave vector q=(h,h,0), h=0.1-0.5, and temperature, i.e., different ordered phases. Results can be explained via an intersite d-d charge-transfer excitation, proposed for pseudocubic manganites, where the hopping rate is strongly increased (decreased) by ferromagnetic (antiferromagnetic) alignment of neighboring in-plane Mn ion core spins.

  18. ROLE OF AN INTERTEXT IN D. D. SHOSTAKOVICH’S OPERA “GAMBLERS”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovsyankina G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate D. D. Shostakovich's opera “Gamblers” is in the context of an intertext. In this opera, the psychological drama develops; this complex artistic task is solved largely thanks to masterful introduction of a variety of intertextual links. “Gamblers” is an example of recitative opera with an intense, “passionate” vocal style and flexible technique ranging from secco to a gushy accompagnato. The text directs melodic development and intertextual links. The appeal to a method of the intertextual analysis opens interaction between “Gamblers” and their dialogue with musical classics and other Shostakovich’s works. Own creativity and the whole layer of classical works first of all acts as donor texts: operas style bel canto, opera-buffa, D. Verdi’s opera “La traviata”, Russian recitative opera – A. S. Dargomyzhsky, N. A. Rimsky-Korsakov, M. P. Mussorgsky, works by A. P. Borodin, P. I. Tchaikovsky, and of painter and literary texts – P. A. Fedotov, A. S. Pushkin, L. N. Tolstoy, F. M. Dostoevsky. The intertextual artistic methods, enabled by Shostakovich express a complex psychological content

  19. Transition metal-catalyzed functionalization of pyrazines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikishkin, N.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed reactions are generally used for carbon–carbon bond formation on pyrazines and include, but are not limited to, classical palladium-catalyzed reactions like Sonogashira, Heck, Suzuki, and Stille reactions. Also a few examples of carbon–heteroatom bond formation in

  20. Transition metal-catalyzed functionalization of pyrazines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikishkin, Nicolai I.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed reactions are generally used for carbon–carbon bond formation on pyrazines and include, but are not limited to, classical palladium-catalyzed reactions like Sonogashira, Heck, Suzuki, and Stille reactions. Also a few examples of carbon–heteroatom bond formation in pyrazine

  1. Rh-catalyzed linear hydroformylation of styrene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boymans, E.; Janssen, Michèle; Müller, Christian; Lutz, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828971; Vogt, D.

    2012-01-01

    Usually the Rh-catalyzed hydroformylation of styrene predominantly yields the branched, chiral aldehyde. An inversion of regioselectivity can be achieved using strong π-acceptor ligands. Binaphthol-based diphosphite and bis(dipyrrolyl-phosphorodiamidite) ligands were applied in the Rh-catalyzed hydr

  2. bar{B}_{d,s} → D^{*}_{d,s} V and bar{B}_{d,s}^* → D_{d,s} V decays in QCD factorization and possible puzzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qin; Chen, Ling-Xin; Zhang, Yun-Yun; Sun, Jun-Feng; Yang, Yue-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by the rapid development of heavy-flavor experiments, phenomenological studies of nonleptonic bar{B}_{d,s} → D^{*}_{d,s} V and bar{B}_{d,s}^* → D_{d,s} V (V=ρ ,K^*) decays are performed within the framework of QCD factorization. Relative to the previous work, the QCD corrections to the transverse amplitudes are evaluated at next-to-leading order. The theoretical predictions of the observables are updated. For the measured bar{B}_{d,s} → D^{*}_{d,s} V decays, the tensions between theoretical results and experimental measurements, i.e. the "R_{ds}V puzzle" and "D^{*} V (or R_{V/ℓ bar{ν }_ℓ }) puzzle", are presented after detailed analyses. For the bar{B}_{d,s}^* → D_{d,s} V decays, they have relatively large branching fractions of the order ≳ O(10^{-9}) and are in the scope of Belle-II and LHCb experiments. Moreover, they also provide a way to crosscheck the possible puzzles mentioned above through the similar ratios R_{ds}^' V} and R_{V/ℓ bar{ν }_ℓ }^' }. More refined experimental measurements and theoretical efforts are required to confirm or refute such two anomalies.

  3. Gold-catalyzed naphthalene functionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Rivilla

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexes IPrMCl (IPr = 1,3-bis(diisopropylphenylimidazol-2-ylidene, M = Cu, 1a; M = Au, 1b, in the presence of one equiv of NaBAr'4 (Ar' = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethylphenyl, catalyze the transfer of carbene groups: C(RCO2Et (R = H, Me from N2C(RCO2Et to afford products that depend on the nature of the metal center. The copper-based catalyst yields exclusively a cycloheptatriene derivative from the Buchner reaction, whereas the gold analog affords a mixture of products derived either from the formal insertion of the carbene unit into the aromatic C–H bond or from its addition to a double bond. In addition, no byproducts derived from carbene coupling were observed.

  4. Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Charge Asymmetries for B Meson Decays to D(*)D(*), and Implications for the CKM Angle gamma

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côte, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions and charge asymmetries of B decays to all D(*)D(*) modes. Using 232 million BBbar pairs recorded on the Upsilon(4S) resonance by the BaBar detector at the e+e- asymmetric B factory PEP-II at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, we measure the branching fractions BF(B0 -> D*+D*-) = (8.1 +- 0.6 +- 1.0) x 10^-4, BF(B0 -> D*+-D-+) = (5.7 +- 0.7 +- 0.7) x 10^-4, BF(B0 -> D+D-) = (2.8 +- 0.4 +- 0.5) x 10^-4, BF(B+ -> D*+D*0) = (8.1 +- 1.2 +- 1.2) x 10^-4, BF(B+ -> D*+D0) = (3.6 +- 0.5 +- 0.4) x 10^-4, BF(B+ -> D+D*0) = (6.3 +- 1.4 +- 1.0) x 10^-4, and BF(B+ -> D+D0) = (3.8 +- 0.6 +- 0.5) x 10^-4, where in each case the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. We also determine the limits BF(B0 -> D*0D*0) D*0D0) D0D0) D*+-D-+) = 0.03 +- 0.10 +- 0.02, A(B+ -> D*+D*0) = -0.15 +- 0.11 +- 0.02, A(B+ -> D*+D0) = -0.06 +- 0.13 +- 0.02, A(B+ -> D*+D*0) = 0.13 +- 0.18 +- 0.04, and A(B+ -> D+D0) = -0.13 +- 0.14 +- 0.02. Additionally, when we combine ...

  5. Improved QCD sum rule study of $Z_{c}(3900)$ as a $\\bar{D}D^{*}$ molecular state

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jian-Rong

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of QCD sum rules, we present an improved study of our previous work [Phys. Rev. D {\\bf80}, 056004 (2009)] particularly on the $\\bar{D}D^{*}$ molecular state to investigate that the possibility of the newly observed $Z_{c}(3900)$ as a $S$-wave $\\bar{D}D^{*}$ molecular state. To ensure the quality of QCD sum rule analysis, contributions of up to dimension nine are calculated to test the convergence of operator product expansion (OPE). We find that the two-quark condensate $$ is very large and makes the standard OPE convergence (i.e. the perturbative at least larger than each condensate contribution) happen at very large values of Borel parameters. By releasing the rigid OPE convergence criterion, one could find that the OPE convergence is still under control. We arrive at the numerical result $3.86\\pm0.27 {GeV}$ for $\\bar{D}D^{*}$, which agrees with the mass of $Z_{c}(3900)$ and could support the explanation of $Z_{c}(3900)$ in terms of a $S$-wave $\\bar{D}D^{*}$ molecular state.

  6. ASSESSING CHEMICAL HAZARDS AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) FOR PLANNING FUTURE D&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.; MINETT, M.J.

    2007-01-25

    This paper documents the fiscal year (FY) 2006 assessment to evaluate potential chemical and radiological hazards associated with vessels and piping in the former plutonium process areas at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Evaluations by PFP engineers as design authorities for specific systems and other subject-matter experts were conducted to identify the chemical hazards associated with transitioning the process areas for the long-term layup of PFP before its eventual final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities in the main process facilities were suspended in September 2005 for a period of between 5 and 10 years. A previous assessment conducted in FY 2003 found that certain activities to mitigate chemical hazards could be deferred safely until the D and D of PFP, which had been scheduled to result in a slab-on-grade condition by 2009. As a result of necessary planning changes, however, D and D activities at PFP will be delayed until after the 2009 time frame. Given the extended project and plant life, it was determined that a review of the plant chemical hazards should be conducted. This review to determine the extended life impact of chemicals is called the ''Plutonium Finishing Plant Chemical Hazards Assessment, FY 2006''. This FY 2006 assessment addresses potential chemical and radiological hazard areas identified by facility personnel and subject-matter experts who reevaluated all the chemical systems (items) from the FY 2003 assessment. This paper provides the results of the FY 2006 chemical hazards assessment and describes the methodology used to assign a hazard ranking to the items reviewed.

  7. D-D dimer levels in patients with sickle cell disease during bone pain crises and in the steady state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakunle EE

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eyitayo Emmanuel Fakunle,1 Kapoona Iwara Ibiang Eteng,2 Wuraola Adebola Shokunbi21Department of Pathology, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Bermuda; 2Department of Hematology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, NigeriaObjective: To determine the presence of ongoing thrombosis by measuring the D-D dimer levels in bone pain crises (BPCs and in the steady state of patients with sickle cell disease, comparing these levels with those in individuals with normal hemoglobin (HbAA in southwest Nigeria.Study design, patients, and methods: The study design involved 38 patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia (HbSS and 78 adults with the HbAA phenotype, seen at the Hematology Day Care and Accident and Emergency units of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. The TintElize kit was used to quantitatively determine human D-D dimer levels in the plasma with enzyme immunoassay.Results: The mean D-D dimer level measured of the 78 individuals with HbAA was 73.59 ng/mL. The mean D-D dimer level of the patients with HbSS during BPCs was 4002.40 ng/mL, while the mean level in the same patients in the steady state measured 6 weeks after their BPCs, with no other painful crisis episode before the sample was collected, was 1320.00 ng/mL.Conclusion: This study demonstrated a significant increase in the D-D dimer levels of patients with HbSS in the steady state, when compared with those of individuals with HbAA of the same age and sex distribution. There was also an approximate threefold increase in the D-D dimer levels in the same patients with HbSS during BPCs. This confirms the activation of coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in patients with HbSS in the steady state, which is further escalated during BPCs. A multicenter study on the use of anticoagulants in BPCs in patients with sickle cell disease is required.Keywords: anticoagulant, dimer, sickle cell disease, BPC, Nigeria, chronic hemolytic anemia

  8. Advances in lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, Panagiota-Yiolanda; Foukis, Athanasios; Filippou, Michalis; Koukouritaki, Maria; Parapouli, Maria; Theodorou, Leonidas G; Hatziloukas, Efstathios; Afendra, Amalia; Pandey, Ashok; Papamichael, Emmanuel M

    2013-12-01

    Lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions are among the most significant chemical and biochemical processes of industrial relevance. Lipases catalyze hydrolysis as well as esterification reactions. Enzyme-catalyzed esterification has acquired increasing attention in many applications, due to the significance of the derived products. More specifically, the lipase-catalyzed esterification reactions attracted research interest during the past decade, due to an increased use of organic esters in biotechnology and the chemical industry. Lipases, as hydrolyzing agents are active in environments, which contain a minimum of two distinct phases, where all reactants are partitioned between these phases, although their distribution is not fixed and changes as the reaction proceeds. The kinetics of the lipase-catalyzed reactions is governed by a number of factors. This article presents a thorough and descriptive evaluation of the applied trends and perspectives concerning the enzymatic esterification, mainly for biofuel production; an emphasis is given on essential factors, which affect the lipase-catalyzed esterification reaction. Moreover, the art of using bacterial and/or fungal strains for whole cell biocatalysis purposes, as well as carrying out catalysis by various forms of purified lipases from bacterial and fungal sources is also reviewed.

  9. Effect of Fusion Neutron Source Numerical Models on Neutron Wall Loading in a D-D Tokamak Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈义学; 吴宜灿

    2003-01-01

    Effect of various spatial and energy distributions of fusion neutron source on the calculation of neutron wall loading of Tokamak D-D fusion device has been investigated by means of the 3-D Monte Carlo code MCNP. A realistic Monte Carlo source model was developed based on the accurate representation of the spatial distribution and energy spectrum of fusion neutrons to solve the complicated problem of tokamak fusion neutron source modelling. The results show that those simplified source models will introduce significant uncertainties. For accurate estimation of the key nuclear responses of the tokamak design and analyses, the use of the realistic source is recommended. In addition, the accumulation of tritium produced during D-D plasma operation should be carefully considered.

  10. Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the DDbar,D*Dbar, and D*D*bar Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We perform a study of the exclusive production of D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* in initial-state-radiation events, from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium and possible new resonances. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage rings. The D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* mass spectra show clear evidence of several {psi} resonances. However, there is no evidence for Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D} or Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D}*.

  11. Measurement of cross section and astrophysical factor of the d(d,p)t reaction using the Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinollo, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Romano, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Bonomo, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Cherubini, S. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Del Zoppo, A.; Figuera, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Lamia, L.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M.G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Pizzone, R.G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Rolfs, C.; Schuermann, D.; Strieder, F. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy)

    2005-07-25

    Knowledge about reactions involving deuterium is required for a correct understanding of stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis processes, and also in planning fusion reactors for energy production. We have studied the d(d,p)t reaction in the energy range from 1.5 MeV down to astrophysical energies by means of the Trojan Horse Method applied to the three-body {sup 6}Li(d,pt){alpha} reaction, at a beam energy of 14 MeV. Protons and tritons have been detected in coincidence and identified. Quasi-free events have been kinematically selected, in order to extract the cross section and the astrophysical factor, and compare them with the values measured for the direct d(d,p)t process.

  12. $B0 \\to Ds^{(*)}Ds^{(*)}$ and outlook of $B0 \\to D^{(*)}D$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Belloli, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the inclusive branching fraction of $B0s \\to Ds^{(*)+} Ds^{(*)-}$ decay together with its contribution to the determination of $\\Delta \\Gamma{s}/ \\Gamma {s}$ are presented. The branching fraction value is compatible with results from previous experiments, improving the world average. The $B0 \\to D^+D^-$ and $B0 \\to D^*D^{(*)}$ decays are used to measure the parameters associated with $CP$ Violation in those channels; while the analysis associated to the second channel is at an initial stage the first one is almost concluded, the values obtained for the sensitivity on the $CP$ observables show that LHCb can rival the results obtained by previous experiments.

  13. O(d, d)-Symmetry and Ernst Formulation for Einstein-Kalb-Ramond Theory in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, A

    1996-01-01

    The (3+d)-dimensional Einstein-Kalb-Ramond theory reduced to two dimensions is considered. It is shown that the theory allows two different Ernst-like $d Hermitian dualized non-target space ones. The O(d, d) symmetry is written in a SL(2,R) matrix-valued form in both cases. The Kramer-Neugebauer transformation, which algebraically maps the non-dualized Ernst potential into the dualized one, is presented.

  14. Evaluation of D(d,n)3 He reaction neutron source models for BNCT irradiation system design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Ze'en; LUO Peng; Tooru KOBAYASHI; Gerard BENGUA

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical method was developed to calculatc the yield.energy spectrum and angular distribution of neutrons from D(d,n)3 He(D-D)reaction in a thick deuterium-titanium target for incident deuterons in energies lower than 1.0MeV.The data of energy spectrum and angular distribution wefe applied to set up the neutron source model for the beam-shaping-assembly(BSA)design of Boron-Neutron-Capture-Therapy(BNCT)using MCNP-4C code.Three cases of D-D neutron source corresponding to incident deuteron energy of 1000.400 and 150 kaV were investigated.The neutron beam characteristics were compared with the model of a 2.45 MeV mono-energetic and isotropic neutron source using an example BSA designed for BNCT irradiation.The results show significant differences in the neutron beam characteristics,particularly the fast neutron component and fast neutron dose in air,between the non-isotropic neutron source model and the 2.5 MeV mono-energetic and isotropic neutron source model.

  15. Large-scale Demonstration and Deployment Project for D&D of Fuel Storage Canals and Associated Facilities at INEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitmill, Larry Joseph

    2001-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA), sponsored a Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) under management of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The INEEL LSDDP is one of several LSDDPs sponsored by DOE. The LSDDP process integrates field demonstrations into actual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations by comparing new or improved technologies against existing baseline technologies using a side-by-side comparison. The goals are (a) to identify technologies that are cheaper, safer, faster, and cleaner (produce less waste), and (b) to incorporate those technologies into D&D baseline operations. The INEEL LSDDP reviewed more than 300 technologies, screened 141, and demonstrated 17. These 17 technologies have been deployed a total of 70 times at facilities other than those where the technology was demonstrated, and 10 have become baseline at the INEEL. Fifteen INEEL D&D needs have been modified or removed from the Needs Management System as a direct result of using these new technologies. Conservatively, the ten-year projected cost savings at the INEEL resulting from use of the technologies demonstrated in this INEEL LSDDP exceeds $39 million dollars.

  16. Oscillator strength of symmetry-forbidden d-d absorption of octahedral transition metal complex: theoretical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ken; Eishiro, Yoshinori; Nakao, Yoshihide; Sato, Hirofumi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2012-03-01

    The theoretical evaluation of the oscillator strength of a symmetry-forbidden d-d transition is not easy even nowadays. A new approximate method is proposed here and applied to octahedral complexes [Co(NH(3))(6)](3+) and [Rh(NH(3))(6)](3+) as an example. Our method incorporates the effects of geometry distortion induced by molecular vibration and the thermal distribution of such distorted geometries but does not need the Herzberg-Teller approximation. The calculated oscillator strengths of [Co(NH(3))(6)](3+) agree well with the experimental values in both (1)A(1g) → (1)T(1g) and (1)A(1g) → (1)T(2g) transitions. In the Rh analogue, though the calculated oscillator strengths are somewhat smaller than the experimental values, computational results reproduce well the experimental trends that the oscillator strengths of [Rh(NH(3))(6)](3+) are much larger than those of the Co analogue and the oscillator strength of the (1)A(1g) → (1)T(1g) transition is larger than that of the (1)A(1g) → (1)T(2g) transition. It is clearly shown that the oscillator strength is not negligibly small even at 0 K because the distorted geometry (or the uncertainty in geometry) by zero-point vibration contributes to the oscillator strength at 0 K. These results are discussed in terms of frequency of molecular vibration, extent of distortion induced by molecular vibration, and charge-transfer character involved in the d-d transition. The computational results clearly show that our method is useful in evaluating and discussing the oscillator strength of symmetry-forbidden d-d absorption of transition metal complex.

  17. Enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylation of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouy, Mark J; Stanley, Levi M; Hartwig, John F

    2009-08-19

    Highly enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylations of ammonia are reported. These reactions occur with electron-neutral, -rich, and -poor cinnamyl carbonates, alkyl and trityloxy-substituted allylic carbonates, and dienyl carbonates in moderate to good yields and excellent enantioselectivities. This process is enabled by the use of an iridium catalyst that does not require a Lewis acid for activation and that is stable toward a large excess of ammonia. This selective formation of primary allylic amines allows for one-pot syntheses of heterodiallylamines and allylic amides that are not otherwise accessible via iridium-catalyzed allylic amination without the use of blocking groups and protective group manipulations.

  18. Attractor Explosions and Catalyzed Vacuum Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Daniel; Silverstein, Eva; Starr, David

    2006-05-05

    We present a mechanism for catalyzed vacuum bubble production obtained by combining moduli stabilization with a generalized attractor phenomenon in which moduli are sourced by compact objects. This leads straightforwardly to a class of examples in which the Hawking decay process for black holes unveils a bubble of a different vacuum from the ambient one, generalizing the new endpoint for Hawking evaporation discovered recently by Horowitz. Catalyzed vacuum bubble production can occur for both charged and uncharged bodies, including Schwarzschild black holes for which massive particles produced in the Hawking process can trigger vacuum decay. We briefly discuss applications of this process to the population and stability of metastable vacua.

  19. Ground-state phase diagram for a system of interacting, D(D{sub 3}) non-Abelian anyons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, P.E., E-mail: peter.finch@itp.uni-hannover.d [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Frahm, H. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Links, J. [Centre for Mathematical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, 4072 (Australia)

    2011-03-01

    We study an exactly solvable model of D(D{sub 3}) non-Abelian anyons on a one-dimensional lattice with a free coupling parameter in the Hamiltonian. For certain values of the coupling parameter level crossings occur, which divide the ground-state phase diagram into four regions. We obtain explicit expressions for the ground-state energy in each phase, for both closed and open chain boundary conditions. For the closed chain case we show that chiral phases occur which are characterised by non-zero ground-state momentum.

  20. Reorganizacija sistema v skladišču surovin Žito d.d. PC Kruh pecivo

    OpenAIRE

    Jančar, Nives

    2013-01-01

    V tem diplomskem delu smo iskali rešitve za reorganizacijo sistema v skladišču surovin podjetja Žito d.d. PC Kruh pecivo. Najprej smo na kratko opisali teoretične osnove in nato posnetek stanja s kritično analizo. Ugotovili smo, da jim skladiščni informacijski sistem ne prikazuje sledljivega stanja enakega dejanskemu. Prav tako morajo vse potrebne podatke ročno vnašati v informacijski sistem, kar vodi do napak in podaljšuje procese, ki potekajo v skladišču. To predstavlja velik problem p...

  1. Measurement of Branching Fraction and Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry Parameters in B0 -> D*+ D*- Ks Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Dalseno, J; Aihara, H; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Bay, A; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Go, A; Ha, H; Hayasaka, K; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hyun, H J; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Joshi, N J; Kah, D H; Kang, J H; Kapusta, P; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Krizan, P; Krokovnyi, P P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lee, J S; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, S W; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Matsumoto, T; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mitaroff, W A; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Moloney, G R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Seidl, R; Sekiya, A; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stöck, H; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Tsukamoto, T; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Varner, G; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zupanc, A

    2007-01-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters for B0 -> D*+ D*- Ks decays. We also obtain an upper limit on the product branching fraction for the possible two-body decay, B0 -> Ds1+(2536) D*-. These results are obtained from a 414 fb-1 data sample that contains 449e10^6 BBbar pairs collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric e+e- collider.

  2. Measurement of the Branching Fractions of Exclusive anti-B -> D/D*/D(*) pi l- anti-nu_l Decays in Events Tagged by a Fully Reconstructed B Meson

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; Lopez, Spain L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, Italy`G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabé, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schröder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, USAT W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, Italy A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bequilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, e A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, USAJ; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, Italy J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaudoe, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; De La Vaissière, C; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Prendkie, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; CAngelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E; Röthel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle,; Claus, P; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; chwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sun, S; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini,; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-01-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fractions for anti-B -> D/D*/D(*) pi l^- anti-nu_l decays based on 341.1 fb-1 of data collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BaBar detector at the pep-II e^+e^- storage rings. Events are tagged by fully reconstructing one of the B mesons in a hadronic decay mode. We obtain BF (B^- -> D^0 l^- anti-nu_l) = (2.33 +/- 0.09(stat.) +/- 0.09(syst.))%, BF (B^- -> D^*0 l^- anti-nu_l) = (5.83 +/- 0.15(stat.) +/- 0.30(syst.))%, BF (B0bar -> D^+ l^- anti-nu_l) = (2.21 +/- 0.11(stat.) +/- 0.12(syst.))%, BF (B0bar -> D^*+ l^- anti-nu_l) = (5.49 +/- 0.16(stat.) +/- 0.25(syst.))%, BF (B^- -> D^+ pi^- l^- anti-nu_l) = (0.42 +/- 0.06(stat.) +/- 0.03(syst.))%, BF (B^- -> D^*+ pi^- l^- anti-nu_l) = (0.59 +/- 0.05(stat.) +/- 0.04(syst.))%, BF (B0bar -> D^0 pi^+ l^- anti-nu_l) = (0.43 +/- 0.08(stat.) +/- 0.03(syst.))% and BF (B0bar -> D^*0 pi^+ l^- anti-nu_l) = (0.48 +/- 0.08(stat.) +/- 0.04(syst.))%.

  3. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hu, Jianli; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.

    2008-09-16

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  4. Meaurement of CP content and time-dependent CP violation in neutral B meson going to D(+)D(-) decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jacob M.

    This dissertation presents the measurement of the the CP-odd fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters for the B0 → D*+ D*- decay. These results are based on the full BABAR dataset of (467 +/- 5) x 106 BB¯ pairs collected at the PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. An angular analysis finds that the CP-odd fraction of the B0 → D*+D*- decay is R⊥ = 0.158 +/- 0.028 +/- 0.006, where the first uncertainty is statistical, and the second is systematic. A fit to the flavor-tagged, time-dependent, angular decay rate yields C+=0.02+/-0.12+/-0.02 C⊥=0.41+/-0.50+/-0.08 S+=-0.76+/- 0.16+/-0.04 S⊥=-1.81+/- 0.71+/-0.16, for the CP-odd (⊥) and CP-even (+) contributions. Constraining these two contributions to be the same results in C=0.047+/-0.091+/-0.019 S=-0.71+/-0.16+/- 0.03. These measurements are consistent with the Standard Model and with measurements of sin2beta from B0 → (cc¯)K0 decays.

  5. Rhodium-catalyzed restructuring of carbon frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Metal-catalyzed reactions involving an elementary step which cleaves a carbon-carbon bond provide unique organic transformations. Restructuring reactions recently developed in our laboratory, through which the carbon framework of a starting substance is restructured into a totally different carbon framework, are discussed, with the possibility of applying such methods to the synthesis of natural products.

  6. Zeolite 5A Catalyzed Etherification of Diphenylmethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.; Lightbody, Owen C.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for the synthetic undergraduate laboratory is described in which zeolite 5A catalyzes the room temperature dehydration of diphenylmethanol, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOH, producing 1,1,1',1'-tetraphenyldimethyl ether, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOCH(C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]. The…

  7. Lysophosphatidylcholine synthesis by lipase-catalyzed ethanolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guolong; Yang, Ruoxi; Hu, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is amphiphilic substance, and possesses excellent physiological functions. In this study, LPC was prepared through ethanolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in n-hexane or solvent free media catalyzed by Novozym 435 (from Candida antarctica), Lipozyme TLIM (from Thermomcyces lanuginosus) and Lipozyme RMIM (from Rhizomucor miehei). The results showed that three immobilized lipases from Candida Antarctica, Thermomcyces lanuginosus and Rhizomucor miehei could catalyze ethanolysis of PC efficiently. In n-hexane, the LPC conversions of ethanolysis of PC catalyzed by Novozyme 435, Lipozyme TLIM and Lipozyme RMIM could reach to 98.5 ± 1.6%, 94.6 ± 1.4% and 93.7 ± 1.8%, respectively. In solvent free media, the highest LPC conversions of ethanolysis of PC catalyzed by Novozyme 435, Lipozyme TL IM and Lipozyme RM IM were 97.7 ± 1.7%, 93.5 ± 1.2% and 93.8 ± 1.9%, respectively. The catalytic efficiencies of the three lipases were in the order of Novozyme 435 > Lipozyme TLIM > Lipozyme RMIM. Furthermore, their catalytic efficiencies in n-hexane were better than those in solvent free media.

  8. Mechanochemical ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Jean-Louis; Mottillo, Cristina; Tan, Davin; Štrukil, Vjekoslav; Friščić, Tomislav

    2015-02-25

    We describe the development of a mechanochemical approach for Ru-catalyzed olefin metathesis, including cross-metathesis and ring-closing metathesis. The method uses commercially available catalysts to achieve high-yielding, rapid, room-temperature metathesis of solid or liquid olefins on a multigram scale using either no or only a catalytic amount of a liquid.

  9. Pinacol Coupling Reactions Catalyzed by Active Zinc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui ZHAO; Wei DENG; Qing Xiang GUO

    2005-01-01

    Pinacol coupling reactions catalyzed by active zinc revealed high activity and extensive suitability. The efficiency of the reaction was improved apparently owing to decreasing reductive potential of zinc. In addition, the results indicated that the zinc activity has a direct relation to the coupling reactivity compared to untreated zinc or other general active zinc.

  10. Catalyzing curriculum evolution in graduate science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutlerner, Johanna L; Van Vactor, David

    2013-05-09

    Strategies in life science graduate education must evolve in order to train a modern workforce capable of integrative solutions to challenging problems. Our institution has catalyzed such evolution through building a postdoctoral Curriculum Fellows Program that provides a collaborative and scholarly education laboratory for innovation in graduate training.

  11. Biodiesel production by enzyme-catalyzed transesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Olivera S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The principles and kinetics of biodiesel production from vegetable oils using lipase-catalyzed transesterification are reviewed. The most important operating factors affecting the reaction and the yield of alkyl esters, such as: the type and form of lipase, the type of alcohol, the presence of organic solvents, the content of water in the oil, temperature and the presence of glycerol are discussed. In order to estimate the prospects of lipase-catalyzed transesterification for industrial application, the factors which influence the kinetics of chemically-catalysed transesterification are also considered. The advantages of lipase-catalyzed transesterification compared to the chemically-catalysed reaction, are pointed out. The cost of down-processing and ecological problems are significantly reduced by applying lipases. It was also emphasized that lipase-catalysed transesterification should be greatly improved in order to make it commercially applicable. The further optimization of lipase-catalyzed transesterification should include studies on the development of new reactor systems with immobilized biocatalysts and the addition of alcohol in several portions, and the use of extra cellular lipases tolerant to organic solvents, intracellular lipases (i.e. whole microbial cells and genetically-modified microorganisms ("intelligent" yeasts.

  12. Palladium-Catalyzed Intramolecular Aminofluorination of Styrenes%Palladium-Catalyzed Intramolecular Aminofluorination of Styrenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐涛; 邱水发; 刘国生

    2011-01-01

    A novel palladium-catalyzed intramolecular oxidative aminofluorination of styrenes has been developed by using NFSI as fluorinating reagent. This reaction represented an efficient method for the synthesis of 2-aryl-3-fluoropyrrolidine derivatives.

  13. Measurement of B+ -> D+ D0bar branching fraction and charge asymmetry and search for B0 -> D0 D0bar

    CERN Document Server

    Adachi, I; Arinstein, K; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Das, A; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hoedlmoser, H; Hokuue, T; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Joshi, N J; Kaga, M; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kajiwara, S; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumura, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakayama, H; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nishio, Y; Nishizawa, I; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sakamoto, H; Sakaue, H; Sarangi, T R; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sekiya, A; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stypula, J; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taniguchi, N; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, M; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A; Zwahlen, N

    2007-01-01

    We report an improved measurement of the B+ -> D+ D0bar and B0 -> D0 D0bar decays based on 656.7 10^6 BBar events collected with the Belle detector at KEKB. We measure the branching fraction and charge asymmetry for the B+ -> D+ D0bar decay: Br(B+ -> D+ D0bar)= (3.85 +- 0.31 +- 0.38) 10^-4 and A_{CP}(B+ -> D+ D0bar)=0.00 +- 0.08 +- 0.02, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematical. We also set the upper limit for the B0 -> D0 D0bar decay: Br(B0 -> D0 D0bar) < 0.42 10^-4 at 90% CL.

  14. Kinetics of aggregation growth with competition between catalyzed birth and catalyzed death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hai-Feng; Lin Zhen-Quan; Gao Yan

    2008-01-01

    An aggregation growth model of three species A, B and C with the competition between catalyzed birth and catalyzed death is proposed. Irreversible aggregation occurs between any two aggregates of the like species with the constant rate kernels In(n = 1, 2, 3). Meanwhile, a monomer birth of an A species aggregate of size k occurs under the catalysis of a B species aggregate of size j with the catalyzed birth rate kernel K(k,j) = Kkjv, and a monomer death of an A species aggregate of size k occurs under the catalysis of a C species aggregate of size j with the catalyzed death rate kernel L(k, j) = Lkjv, where v is a parameter reflecting the dependence of the catalysis reaction rates of birth and death on the size of catalyst aggregate. The kinetic evolution behaviours of the three species are investigated by the rate equation approach based on the mean-field theory. The form of the aggregate size distribution of A species ak(t) is found to be dependent crucially on the competition between the catalyzed birth and death of A species, as well as the irreversible aggregation processes of the three species: (1) In the v < 0 case, the irreversible aggregation dominates the process, and ak(t) satisfies the conventional scaling form; (2) In the v ≥ 0 case, the competition between the catalyzed birth and death dominates the process. When the catalyzed birth controls the process, ak(t) takes the conventional or generalized scaling form. While the catalyzed death controls the process, the scaling description of the aggregate size distribution breaks down completely.

  15. Cross Section and Tensor Analysing Power of the $\\vec{d}d\\to \\eta\\alpha$ Reaction Near Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Budzanowski, A; Gebel, R; Hawranek, P; Jahn, R; Jha, V; Kilian, K; Kliczewski, S; Kirillov, Da; Kirillov, Di; Kolev, D; Kravcikova, M; Lesiak, M; Lieb, J; Machner, H; Magiera, A; Maier, R; Martinská, G; Nedev, S; Piskunov, N; Prasuhn, D; Protić, D; Ritman, J; Von Rossen, P; Roy, B J; Sitnik, U; Siudak, R; Tsenov, R; Urbán, J; Vankova, G; Wilkin, C

    2008-01-01

    The angular distributions of the unpolarised differential cross section and tensor analysing power $A_{xx}$ of the $\\vec{d}d\\to\\alpha \\eta$ reaction have been measured at an excess energy of 16.6 MeV. The ambiguities in the partial-wave description of these data are made explicit by using the invariant amplitude decomposition. This allows the magnitude of the s-wave amplitude to be extracted and compared with results published at lower energies. In this way, firmer bounds could be obtained on the scattering length of the $\\eta \\alpha$ system. The results do not, however, unambiguously prove the existence of a quasi-bound $\\eta \\alpha$ state.

  16. Stop-Catalyzed Baryogenesis Beyond the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Andrey; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J; Winslow, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Non-minimal supersymmetric models that predict a tree-level Higgs mass above the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) bound are well motivated by naturalness considerations. Indirect constraints on the stop sector parameters of such models are significantly relaxed compared to the MSSM; in particular, both stops can have weak-scale masses. We revisit the stop-catalyzed electroweak baryogenesis (EWB) scenario in this context. We find that the LHC measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates already rule out the possibility of stop-catalyzed EWB. We also introduce a gauge-invariant analysis framework that may generalize to other scenarios in which interactions outside the gauge sector drive the electroweak phase transition.

  17. Palladium-Catalyzed Environmentally Benign Acylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchand, Basuli; Satyanarayana, Gedu

    2016-08-05

    Recent trends in research have gained an orientation toward developing efficient strategies using innocuous reagents. The earlier reported transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylations involved either toxic carbon monoxide (CO) gas as carbonylating agent or functional-group-assisted ortho sp(2) C-H activation (i.e., ortho acylation) or carbonylation by activation of the carbonyl group (i.e., via the formation of enamines). Contradicting these methods, here we describe an environmentally benign process, [Pd]-catalyzed direct carbonylation starting from simple and commercially available iodo arenes and aldehydes, for the synthesis of a wide variety of ketones. Moreover, this method comprises direct coupling of iodoarenes with aldehydes without activation of the carbonyl and also without directing group assistance. Significantly, the strategy was successfully applied to the synthesis n-butylphthalide and pitofenone.

  18. Paucity of V-D-D-J rearrangements and VH replacement events in lupus prone and nonautoimmune TdT-/- and TdT+/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Lisa C; Moffatt-Blue, Chantelle S; McDonald, R Zachary; Kompfner, Elizabeth; Ait-Azzouzene, Djemel; Nemazee, David; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N; Kono, Dwight H; Feeney, Ann J

    2006-07-15

    CDR3 regions containing two D segments, or containing the footprints of V(H) replacement events, have been reported in both mice and humans. However, the 12-23 bp rule for V(D)J recombination predicts that D-D rearrangements, which would occur between 2 recombination signal sequences (RSSs) with 12-bp spacers, should be extremely disfavored, and the cryptic RSS used for V(H) replacement is very inefficient. We have previously shown that newborn mice, which lack TdT due to the late onset of its expression, do not contain any CDR3 with D-D rearrangements. In the present study, we test our hypothesis that most D-D rearrangements are due to fortuitous matching of the second apparent D segment by TdT-introduced N nucleotides. We analyzed 518 sequences from adult MRL/lpr- and C57BL/6 TdT-deficient B cell precursors and found only two examples of CDR3 with D-D rearrangements and one example of a potential V(H) replacement event. We examined rearrangements from pre-B cells, marginal zone B cells, and follicular B cells from mice congenic for the Lbw5 (Sle3/5) lupus susceptibility loci and from other strains of mice and found very few examples of CDR3 with D-D rearrangements. We assayed B progenitor cells, and cells enriched for receptor editing, for DNA breaks at the "cryptic heptamer" but such breaks were rare. We conclude that many examples of apparent D-D rearrangements in the mouse are likely due to N additions that fortuitously match short stretches of D genes and that D-D rearrangements and V(H) replacement are rare occurrences in the mouse.

  19. Glacial to Holocene dynamics of Indonesian precipitation - New insights from plant-wax dD off Northwest Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, E. M.; Mohtadi, M.; Sessions, A. L.; Feakins, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    We used the stable hydrogen and stable carbon isotopic composition (dD and d13C, respectively) of terrestrial plant leaf waxes as a proxy for past rainfall variations over northwestern Indonesia. Our study site lies within the western boundary of the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP), a key evaporative site for the global hydrologic cycle. At present, rainfall intensity in tropical Indonesia is influenced by the Pacific Ocean El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (see Kirono et al., 1999), the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) mode (Saji et al., 1999), and to some extend by the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) (e.g. Koutavas and Lynch-Stieglitz, 2005). Paleoclimate studies show that these systems have varied in the past, however, the impact of these changes on regional paelo-hydrology of Indonesia is yet unknown. We worked on marine sediment core SO189-144KL (1°09,300 N; 98°03,960 E) retrieved at 480 m water depth off Northwest Sumatra from the eastern Indian Ocean. Sediments consist of material from marine and terrestrial sources, and radiocarbon dating indicates an age of ~300 years at the core top and of ~24,000 years at the base. We used d13C and dD values of the n-C30 alkanoic acid as proxies for changes in vegetation composition (C3 vs. C4 plants) and rainfall variability on land, respectively. Values of d13C show only little variation and suggest persistent dominance of tropical trees throughout the past 24,000 years. Values of dD display distinct variability throughout the record, however, mean rainfall intensities during the late Last Glacial compare to those during the Holocene. This is in agreement with rather consistent vegetation at the study site but in sharp contrast with reconstructions of contemporaneous rainfall patterns at the nearby islands Borneo (Partin et al., 2007) and Flores (Griffiths et al., 2009), indicating multiple controls on regional hydrology of Indonesia. In combination with previous studies of late Pleistocene to Holocene

  20. Preliminary results for potential climatic signals in dD of wood lignin methoxyl groups from high-elevation alpine larch trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelmann, Dana F. C.; Greule, Markus; Esper, Jan; Keppler, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Tree-rings of high alpine larch trees (Larix decidua) were investigated using a recently established method that measures dD values of the wood lignin methoxyl groups (Greule et al. 2008). The resulting dD time series were tested for their potential to preserve climatic signals. 37 larch trees were sampled at the tree line near Simplon Village (Southern Switzerland). They were analysed for their tree-ring width (TRW), and from five individuals dD of the wood lignin methoxyl groups (dDmethoxyl) were measured at annual resolution from 1971-2009 and at pentadal resolution from 1781-2009. The inter-series correlation of the five annually resolved dDmethoxyl series is 0.53 (p Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 22(24): 3983-3988.

  1. Production of $Y(4260)$ as a hadronic molecule state of $\\bar{D}D_1 +c.c.$ in $e^+e^-$ annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Wen; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the $Y(4260)$ production in $e^+e^-$ annihilations and probe its structure as the $\\bar{D}D_1+c.c.$ hadronic molecule state. By introducing a compact $c\\bar{c}$ component into the wavefunction in addition to the long-ranged molecular one, we show that the compositeness relation can still provide a reasonable constraint on the wavefunction renormalization parameter. This study confirms the earlier work that the $Y(4260)$ contains predominantly a $\\bar{D}D_1+c.c.$ molecular component, and its decays into the $\\bar{D}D^*\\pi+c.c.$ channel should have a nontrivial lineshape. It provides a natural explanation for the production of $Y(4260)$ in $e^+e^-$ annihilations in the same framework. It also allows us to predict the $Y(4260)$ leptonic decay width of which the upper limit is about 500 eV.

  2. Neutron energy spectra of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, Am-Be source and of the D(d,n) sup 3 He reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sang Tae Park

    2003-01-01

    The neutron energy spectrum of the following sources were measured using a fast neutron spectrometer with the NE-213 liquid scintillator: sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, Am-Be and D(d,n) sup 3 He reaction from a 3 MeV Pelletron accelerator in Tokyo Institute of Technology. The measured proton recoil pulse height data of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, Am-Be and D(d,n) sup 3 He were unfolded using the mathematical program to obtain the neutron energy spectrum. The sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and Am-Be neutron energy spectra were measured and the results obtained showed a good agreement with the spectra usually published in the literature. The neutron energy spectrum from D(d,n) sup 3 He was measured and the results obtained also showed a good agreement with the calculation by time of flight (TOF) methods. (author)

  3. Impaired Protofibril Formation in Fibrinogen γN308K Is Due to Altered D:D and "A:a" Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowley, S.; Okumura, N; Lord, S

    2009-01-01

    'A:a' knob-hole interactions and D:D interfacial interactions are important for fibrin polymerization. Previous studies with recombinant ?N308K fibrinogen, a substitution at the D:D interface, showed impaired polymerization. We examined the molecular basis for this loss of function by solving the crystal structure of ?N308K fragment D. In contrast to previous fragment D crystals, the ?N308K crystals belonged to a tetragonal space group with an unusually long unit cell (a = b = 95 Angstroms, c = 448.3 Angstroms). Alignment of the normal and ?N308K structures showed the global structure of the variant was not changed and the knob 'A' peptide GPRP was bound as usual to hole 'a'. The substitution introduced an elongated positively charged patch in the D:D region. The structure showed novel, symmetric D:D crystal contacts between ?N308K molecules, indicating the normal asymmetric D:D interface in fibrin would be unstable in this variant. We examined GPRP binding to ?N308K in solution by plasmin protection assay. The results showed weaker peptide binding, suggesting that 'A:a' interactions were altered. We examined fibrin network structures by scanning electron microscopy and found the variant fibers were thicker and more heterogeneous than normal fibers. Considered together, our structural and biochemical studies indicate both 'A:a' and D:D interactions are weaker. We conclude that stable protofibrils cannot assemble from ?N308K monomers, leading to impaired polymerization.

  4. D-D Neutron Generator Calibrations and Hardware in the LUX-ZEPLIN Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Will; Lux-Zeplin Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) dark matter search experiment will be a two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber with 7 tonnes of active liquid xenon (LXe) located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. LZ will utilize an in-situ, absolute calibration of nuclear recoils (NR) in LXe using mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced by a D-D neutron generator. This technique was used in the LUX detector to measured the NR charge yield in LXe (Qy) to 0.7 keV recoil energy and the NR light yield in LXe (Ly) to recoil energies of 1.1 keV - both of which were the lowest energy measurements achieved in the field. These absolute, ultra-low energy calibrations of the NR signal yields in LXe provide clear measurements of the detector response used for the WIMP search analysis. The improvements made for LZ will include shorter neutron pulse times, multiple neutron conduit configurations, and lower energy neutrons. The upgrades allow for even lower energy measurements of the nuclear recoil response in LXe and an independent measurement of Ly, as well as providing less uncertainty in energy reconstruction. In addition to discussing the physics of the neutron calibrations, I will describe the hardware systems used to implement them.

  5. ${\\bar p}p$ annihilation into ${\\bar D}D$ meson pair within an effective Lagrangian model

    CERN Document Server

    Shyam, R

    2015-01-01

    We study the charmed meson pair (${\\bar D}^0 D^0$ and $D^- D^+$) production in ${\\bar p}p$ annihilation within an effective Lagrangian model that has only the baryon-meson degrees of freedom and involves the physical hadron masses. The reaction amplitudes include terms corresponding to the t-channel $\\Lambda_c^+$, $\\Sigma_c^+$ and $\\Sigma_c^{++}$ baryon exchanges and the s-channel excitation, propagation and decay of the $\\Psi$(3770) resonance into the charmed mesons. The initial and final state distortion effects have been accounted for by using a simple eikonal approximation-based procedure in the same way as was done in our previous study of the ${\\bar p}p \\to {\\bar \\Lambda}_c^-\\Lambda_c^+$ reaction within a similar model. The ${\\bar D}^0 D^0$ production reaction is dominated by the $\\Lambda_c^+$ baryon exchange process, and the corresponding total cross sections are predicted to be in the range of 0.18 - 0.7 $\\mu$b for antiproton beam momenta varying between threshold and 20 $GeV/c$. The $\\Psi$(3770) reso...

  6. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  7. [Fragment reaction catalyzed by E. coli ribosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotusov, V V; Kukhanova, M K; Sal'nikova, N E; Nikolaeva, L V; Kraevskiĭ, A A

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown that 50S subunits of E. coli MRE-600 ribosomes catalyze the reaction of N-(formyl)-methionyl ester of adenosine 5'-phosphate acting as peptide donor, with Phe-tRNA or CACCA-Phe serving as a peptide acceptor. The reaction is stimulated by cytidine 5'phosphate and inhibited by lincomycin, puromycin and chloramphenicol. The obtained results show that the structure of the donor site of peptidyltransferase is completely assembled on the 50S subunit and 30S subunit is not required for its formation.

  8. Chiral Diamine-catalyzed Asymmetric Aldol Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; XU Da-zhen; WU Lu-lu; WANG Yong-mei

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient catalytic system composed of a simple and commercially available chiral primary diamine (1R,2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine(6) and trifluoroacetic acid(TFA) was employed for asymmetric Aldol reaction in i-PrOH at room temperature.A loading of 10%(molar fraction) catalyst 6 with TFA as a cocatalyst could catalyze the Aldol reactions of various ketones or aldehydes with a series of aromatic aldehydes,furnishing Aldol products in moderate to high yields(up to >99%) with enantioselectivities of up to >99% and diastereoselectivities of up to 99:1.

  9. Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysz, John A.

    1999-07-31

    The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

  10. Biginelli Reaction Catalyzed by Copper Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Manika; Kumar, Ajeet; Saxena, Amit; De, Arnab; Mozumdar, Subho

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported a novel synthesis of copper nanoparticles from copper sulphate utilizing the charge-compensatory effect of ionic liquid [bmim]BF4 and ethylene glycol. The nanoparticles were characterized and found to be stable for one year. Here we hypothesize that the stabilized nanoparticles should be able to catalyze one-pot multicomponent organic reactions. We show that the nanoparticles catalyzed Biginelli reaction at room temperature to give the product 3,4-dihydopyrimidinone (>90% yield in ∼15 minutes) from aldehydes, β-diketoester (ethylacetoacetate) and urea (or thiourea). ). Remarkably, such high yields and rapid kinetics was found to be independent of the electronic density on the reactant aryl-aldehyde. This was probably because even the surface-active particles reacted faster in the presence of ionic liquid as compared to conventional methods. The heterocyclic dihydropyrimidinones (DHPMs) and their derivatives are widely used in natural and synthetic organic chemistry due to their wide spectrum of biological and therapeutic properties (resulting from their antibacterial, antiviral, antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities. Our method has an easy work-up procedure and the nanoparticles could be recycled with minimal loss of efficiency. PMID:22912792

  11. Palladium-Catalyzed Arylation of Fluoroalkylamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusoe, Andrew T.; Hartwig, John F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis of fluorinated anilines by palladium-catalyzed coupling of fluoroalkylamines with aryl bromides and aryl chlorides. The products of these reactions are valuable because anilines typically require the presence of an electron-withdrawing substituent on nitrogen to suppress aerobic or metabolic oxidation, and the fluoroalkyl groups have steric properties and polarity distinct from those of more common electron-withdrawing amide and sulfonamide units. The fluoroalkylaniline products are unstable under typical conditions for C–N coupling reactions (heat and strong base). However, the reactions conducted with the weaker base KOPh, which has rarely been used in cross-coupling to form C–N bonds, occurred in high yield in the presence of a catalyst derived from commercially available AdBippyPhos and [Pd(allyl)Cl]2. Under these conditions, the reactions occur with low catalyst loadings (<0.50 mol % for most substrates) and tolerate the presence of various functional groups that react with the strong bases that are typically used in Pd-catalyzed C–N cross-coupling reactions of aryl halides. The resting state of the catalyst is the phenoxide complex, (BippyPhosPd(Ar)OPh); due to the electron-withdrawing property of the fluoroalkyl substituent, the turnover-limiting step of the reaction is reductive elimination to form the C–N bond. PMID:26065341

  12. Biginelli reaction catalyzed by copper nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manika Dewan

    Full Text Available We recently reported a novel synthesis of copper nanoparticles from copper sulphate utilizing the charge-compensatory effect of ionic liquid [bmim]BF(4 and ethylene glycol. The nanoparticles were characterized and found to be stable for one year. Here we hypothesize that the stabilized nanoparticles should be able to catalyze one-pot multicomponent organic reactions. We show that the nanoparticles catalyzed Biginelli reaction at room temperature to give the product 3,4-dihydopyrimidinone (>90% yield in ~15 minutes from aldehydes, β-diketoester (ethylacetoacetate and urea (or thiourea. . Remarkably, such high yields and rapid kinetics was found to be independent of the electronic density on the reactant aryl-aldehyde. This was probably because even the surface-active particles reacted faster in the presence of ionic liquid as compared to conventional methods. The heterocyclic dihydropyrimidinones (DHPMs and their derivatives are widely used in natural and synthetic organic chemistry due to their wide spectrum of biological and therapeutic properties (resulting from their antibacterial, antiviral, antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities. Our method has an easy work-up procedure and the nanoparticles could be recycled with minimal loss of efficiency.

  13. Manganese Catalyzed C-H Halogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T

    2015-06-16

    The remarkable aliphatic C-H hydroxylations catalyzed by the heme-containing enzyme, cytochrome P450, have attracted sustained attention for more than four decades. The effectiveness of P450 enzymes as highly selective biocatalysts for a wide range of oxygenation reactions of complex substrates has driven chemists to develop synthetic metalloporphyrin model compounds that mimic P450 reactivity. Among various known metalloporphyrins, manganese derivatives have received considerable attention since they have been shown to be versatile and powerful mediators for alkane hydroxylation and olefin epoxidation. Mechanistic studies have shown that the key intermediates of the manganese porphyrin-catalyzed oxygenation reactions include oxo- and dioxomanganese(V) species that transfer an oxygen atom to the substrate through a hydrogen abstraction/oxygen recombination pathway known as the oxygen rebound mechanism. Application of manganese porphyrins has been largely restricted to catalysis of oxygenation reactions until recently, however, due to ultrafast oxygen transfer rates. In this Account, we discuss recently developed carbon-halogen bond formation, including fluorination reactions catalyzed by manganese porphyrins and related salen species. We found that biphasic sodium hypochlorite/manganese porphyrin systems can efficiently and selectively convert even unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds to C-Cl bonds. An understanding of this novel reactivity derived from results obtained for the oxidation of the mechanistically diagnostic substrate and radical clock, norcarane. Significantly, the oxygen rebound rate in Mn-mediated hydroxylation is highly correlated with the nature of the trans-axial ligands bound to the manganese center (L-Mn(V)═O). Based on the ability of fluoride ion to decelerate the oxygen rebound step, we envisaged that a relatively long-lived substrate radical could be trapped by a Mn-F fluorine source, effecting carbon-fluorine bond formation. Indeed, this idea

  14. The isotopic composition of H2 from biomass burning - dependency on combustion efficiency, moisture content and dD of local precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röckmann, Thomas; Gómez Álvarez, Catalina; Walter, Sylvia; Wollny, Adam; Gunthe, Sachin; Helas, Günter; Pöschl, Ulrich; Keppler, Frank; Greule, Markus; Brand, Willi

    2010-05-01

    Differences in isotopic composition between the various sources of H2 are large, but only few measurements have been carried out to constrain them. For biomass burning, the values quoted in the literature are based on few combustion experiments, which were then extrapolated to the global scale based on a number of assumptions. One of these assumptions is that the isotopic composition of H2 should scale with the isotopic composition of the precipitation at the location where the biomass grew. Here we test this hypothesis using 18 wood samples collected from various locations around the globe. The sample locations cover a range in dD of precipitation from below -120 permil in Siberia and Canada to -15 permil in Zimbabwe. The results confirm the predicted linear relation with dD of the precipitation in the sampling region. The water content itself is found to at most slightly affect the results. Furthermore, dD of H2 depends on combustion efficiency. Thus, the isotopic composition of H2 from biomass burning shows a strong variability around the globe, and between different stages of a fire. It is suggested that this variability, rather than a global bulk number, should be incorporated explicitly in global models that attempt to reproduce the spatial and temporal distribution of dD in H2.

  15. 32 CFR 1630.13 - Class 1-D-D: Deferment for certain members of a reserve component or student taking military...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reserve component or student taking military training. 1630.13 Section 1630.13 National Defense Other...: Deferment for certain members of a reserve component or student taking military training. In Class 1-D-D... (entire college level) Army Reserve Officer's Training Corps, or the Air Force Reserve Officer's...

  16. Role of Cu d-d inter-orbital electron correlation on the out-of-plane conduction in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay; Pratap, A.; Joshi, S. K.

    2002-06-01

    In the present paper we study a model which is relevant to an analysis of the effects of the Cu d-d inter-orbital electron correlation on the motion of charge carriers along c-axis in high- Tc cuprates. For this a microscopic model Hamiltonian for the three atom cluster CuO 2 which incorporates the essential features of the basic unit of high- Tc cuprates has been considered. The model Hamiltonian for this three atom cluster includes various in-plane and out-of-plane orbital energies, their intra- and inter-orbital Coulomb interactions relevant for the electrons in the cluster. The out-of-plane correlation which appears when we consider the hopping of a hole from the Cu 3d 3 z2- r2 to apical O 2p z orbitals has been calculated using the Green's function technique. The equation of motion for the relevant Green's function contains higher order Green's functions and we evaluate the correlation parameter relevant to motion for a hole along the c-axis by using suitable decoupling approximations. It has been found through numerical calculations that the out-of-plane correlations depend on the intra- and inter-orbital Coulomb interactions, the out-of-plane orbital energies, hole occupancy and on temperature. Finally, the relevance of the out-of-plane correlation parameter for present three atom CuO 2 cluster model to the c-axis conductivity of the bulk high- Tc cuprate systems has been pointed out.

  17. Oxazolidinone Synthesis through Halohydrin Dehalogenase-Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikleusevic, Ana; Hamersak, Zdenko; Salopek-Sondi, Branka; Tang, Lixia; Janssen, Dick B.; Elenkov, Maja Majeric

    2015-01-01

    An efficient dynamic kinetic resolution protocol using a single enzyme is described. Both the kinetic resolution and substrate racemization are catalyzed by halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 (HheC). The HheC-catalyzed reaction of epibromohydrin and

  18. Synthetic applications of gold-catalyzed ring expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Nevado

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of new methodologies catalyzed by late transition metals involving cycloisomerizations of strained rings can open new venues for the synthesis of structurally complex molecules with interesting biological activities. Herein we summarize, from both a synthetic as well as a mechanistic point of view, the most recent developments in gold-catalyzed ring expansions.

  19. Lipase-catalyzed production of lysophospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mnasri Taha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysophospholipids, such as lysophosphatidic acid or lysophosphatidylcholine, are important bioactive lipids, involved in various normal and pathological cellular processes. They also have industrial and pharmaceutical uses such as emulsifiers or components of drug delivery systems. Lipases, which natural substrates are long chain triacylglycerols, are important biocatalysts for organic synthesis mainly due to their broad substrate specificity and their ability to display high catalytic activity in organic media. This paper describes the various lipase-catalyzed reactions implemented for the production of lysophospholipids. They include hydrolysis or alcoholysis of phospholipids and acylation of the glycerophosphoryl moiety. Special emphasis is made on our work dealing with the production of lysophospholipids rich in dososahexaenoic acid, an important dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid via the hydrolysis of phospholipids extracted from the microalga Isochrysis galbana.

  20. Heterogeneously Catalyzed Oxidation Reactions Using Molecular Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef

    Heterogeneously catalyzed selective oxidation reactions have attracted a lot of attention in recent time. The first part of the present thesis provides an overview over heterogeneous copper and silver catalysts for selective oxidations in the liquid phase and compared the performance and catalytic...... that both copper and silver can function as complementary catalyst materials to gold showing different catalytic properties and being more suitable for hydrocarbon oxidation reactions. Potential opportunities for future research were outlined. In an experimental study, the potential of silver as a catalyst...... revealed that all catalysts were more active in combination with ceria nanoparticles and that under the tested reaction conditions silver was equally or even more efficient than the gold catalysts. Calcination at 900 °C of silver on silica prepared by impregnation afforded a catalyst which was used...

  1. Rhodium-Catalyzed Alkene Difunctionalization with Nitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Jennifer; Dequirez, Geoffroy; Retailleau, Pascal; Gandon, Vincent; Dauban, Philippe

    2016-06-27

    The Rh(II) -catalyzed oxyamination and diamination of alkenes generate 1,2-amino alcohols and 1,2-diamines, respectively, in good to excellent yields and with complete regiocontrol. In the case of diamination, the intramolecular reaction provides an efficient method for the preparation of pyrrolidines, and the intermolecular reaction produces vicinal amines with orthogonal protecting groups. These alkene difunctionalizations proceed by aziridination followed by nucleophilic ring opening induced by an Rh-bound nitrene generated in situ, details of which were uncovered by both experimental and theoretical studies. In particular, DFT calculations show that the nitrogen atom of the putative [Rh]2 =NR metallanitrene intermediate is electrophilic and support an aziridine activation pathway by N⋅⋅⋅N=[Rh]2 bond formation, in addition to the N⋅⋅⋅[Rh]2 =NR coordination mode. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Enzyme-catalyzed degradation of carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene, the nanoscale sp 2 allotropes of carbon, have garnered widespread attention as a result of their remarkable electrical, mechanical, and optical properties and the promise of new technologies that harness these properties. Consequently, these carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been employed for diverse applications such as electronics, sensors, composite materials, energy conversion devices, and nanomedicine. The manufacture and eventual disposal of these products may result in the release of CNMs into the environment and subsequent exposure to humans, animals, and vegetation. Given the possible pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of CNMs, much attention has been focused on the distribution, toxicity, and persistence of CNMs both in living systems and the environment. This dissertation will guide the reader though recent studies aimed at elucidating fundamental insight into the persistence of CNMs such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide). In particular, in-testtube oxidation/degradation of CNMs catalyzed by peroxidase enzymes will be examined, and the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying these processes will be discussed. Finally, an outlook of the current field including in vitro and in vivo biodegradation experiments, which have benefits in terms of human health and environmental safety, and future directions that could have implications for nanomedical applications such as imaging and drug delivery will be presented. Armed with an understanding of how and why CNMs undergo enzyme-catalyzed oxidation/biodegradation, researchers can tailor the structure of CNMs to either promote or inhibit these processes. For example, in nanomedical applications such as drug delivery, the incorporation of carboxylate functional groups could facilitate biodegradation of the nanomaterial after delivery of the cargo. Also, the incorporation of CNMs with defect sites in consumer

  3. Search for new charmonium states in the processes e+ e- --> J/psi D(*) D(*) at sqrt{s} ~ 10.6 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Arinstein, K; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Das, A; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hoedlmoser, H; Hokuue, T; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Joshi, N J; Kaga, M; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kajiwara, S; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumura, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakayama, H; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nishio, Y; Nishizawa, I; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sakaue, H; Sasao, N; Sarangi, T R; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sekiya, A; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stypula, J; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taniguchi, N; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, M; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A; Zwahlen, N

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of the X(3940) state in the process e+e- -> J/psi D* Dbar. The X(3940) mass and width are measured to be (3942 +7 -6 +- 6)MeV/c^2 and Gamma=(37 + 26 - 15 +- 8 MeV. In the process e+e- -> J/psi D* D*bar we have observed another charmonium-like state, which we denote as X(4160), in the spectrum of invariant masses of D*+ D*- combinations. The X(4160) parameters are M= 4156 + 25 - 20 +- 15 MeV/c^2 and Gamma = 139 + 111 -61 +- 21 MeV. The analysis is based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 693 /fb recorded near the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB e+ e- asymmetric-energy collider.

  4. A QCD sum rules calculation of the ηcD*D and ηc Ds* Ds form factors and strong coupling constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, B. Osório; Bracco, M. E.; Zanetti, C. M.

    2017-10-01

    We use the QCD sum rules for the three point correlation functions to compute the strong coupling constants of the meson vertices ηcD* D and ηc Ds* Ds. We consider perturbative and non-perturbative contributions, working up to dimension five on the OPE. The vertices were studied considering that each one of its three mesons are off-shell alternately. The vertex coupling constant is evaluated through the extrapolation of the three different form factors. The results obtained for the coupling constants are gηcD*D =5.23-1.38+1.80 and g ηc Ds* Ds =5.55-1.55+1.29.

  5. Oxygenase-catalyzed ribosome hydroxylation occurs in prokaryotes and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei; Wolf, Alexander; Feng, Tianshu; Ho, Chia-Hua; Sekirnik, Rok; Zayer, Adam; Granatino, Nicolas; Cockman, Matthew E; Loenarz, Christoph; Loik, Nikita D; Hardy, Adam P; Claridge, Timothy D W; Hamed, Refaat B; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Gong, Lingzhi; Robinson, Carol V; Trudgian, David C; Jiang, Miao; Mackeen, Mukram M; Mccullagh, James S; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Thalhammer, Armin; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Yang, Ming; Liu-Yi, Phebee; Zhang, Zhihong; Schmidt-Zachmann, Marion; Kessler, Benedikt M; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Preston, Gail M; Coleman, Mathew L; Schofield, Christopher J

    2012-12-01

    The finding that oxygenase-catalyzed protein hydroxylation regulates animal transcription raises questions as to whether the translation machinery and prokaryotic proteins are analogously modified. Escherichia coli ycfD is a growth-regulating 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase catalyzing arginyl hydroxylation of the ribosomal protein Rpl16. Human ycfD homologs, Myc-induced nuclear antigen (MINA53) and NO66, are also linked to growth and catalyze histidyl hydroxylation of Rpl27a and Rpl8, respectively. This work reveals new therapeutic possibilities via oxygenase inhibition and by targeting modified over unmodified ribosomes.

  6. Analytic, empirical and delta method temperature derivatives of D-D and D-T fusion reactivity formulations, as a means of verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenbrunner, James R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Booker, Jane M. [Booker Scientific, Fredericksburg, TX (United States)

    2017-07-21

    We examine the derivatives with respect to temperature, for various deuterium-tritium (DT) and deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion-reactivity formulations. Langenbrunner and Makaruk [1] had studied this as a means of understanding the time and temperature domain of reaction history measured in dynamic fusion experiments. Presently, we consider the temperature derivative dependence of fusion reactivity as a means of exercising and verifying the consistency of the various reactivity formulations.

  7. Design of a high-temperature first wall/blanket for a d-d compact Reversed-Field-Pinch reactor (CRFPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabiri, A.E.; Glancy, J.E.

    1983-05-01

    A high-temperature first wall/blanket which would take full advantage of the absence of tritium breeding in a d-d reactor was designed. This design which produces steam at p = 7 MPa and T = 538/sup 0/C at the blanket exit eliminates the requirement for a separate steam generator. A steam cycle with steam-to-steam reheat yielding about 37.5 percent efficiency is compatible with this design.

  8. Observation of a Neutral Charmoniumlike State Z(c)(0) in e(+)e(-) -> (D*(D)over-bar*)(0)pi(0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Eren, E. E.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of the process e(+)e(-) -> (D*(D) over bar*)(0)pi(0) using e(+)e(-) collision data samples with integrated luminosities of 1092 pb(-1) at root s = 4.23 GeV and 826 pb(-1) at root s = 4.26 GeV collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring. We observe a new neutral st

  9. New measurement of $\\rm S_{bare}(E)$ factor of the d(d,p)t reaction at astrophysical energies via the Trojan-horse method

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chengbo; Fu, Yuanyong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Shuhua; Meng, Qiuying; Spitaleri, C; Tumino, A; Pizzone, R G; Lamia, L

    2015-01-01

    The study of d(d,p)t reaction is very important for the nucleosynthesis in both standard Big Bang and stellar evolution, as well as for the future fusion reactor planning of energy production. The d(d,p)t bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor has been measured indirectly at energies from about 400 keV down to several keV by means of the Trojan horse method applied to the quasi-free process $\\rm {}^2H({}^6Li,pt){}^4He$ induced at the lithium beam energy of 9.5 MeV, which is closer to the zero quasi-free energy point, in CIAE HI-13 tandem accelerator laboratory. An accurate analysis leads to the determination of the d(d,p)t $\\rm S(E)$ factor $\\rm S_{bare}(0)=56.7 \\pm 2.0 keV*b$ and of the corresponding electron screening potential $\\rm U_e = 13.2 \\pm 4.3 eV$. In addition, this work also gives an updated test for the Trojan horse nucleus invariance comparing with previous indirect investigations using $\\rm {}^3He=(d+p)$ breakup.

  10. Mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardal, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    Nine bacteria were tested for the ability to dehalogenate tetrachloromethane (CT), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) under anaerobic conditions. Three bacteria were able to reductively dehalogenate CT. Dehalogenation ability was not readily linked to a common metabolism or changes in culture redox potential. None of the bacteria tested were able to dehalogenate PCE or TCA. One of the bacteria capable of dehalogenating CT, Shewanella putrefaciens, was chosen as a model organism to study mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation. The effect of a variety of alternate electron acceptors on CT dehalogenation ability by S. putrefaciens was determined. oxygen and nitrogen oxides were inhibitory but Fe (III), trimethylamine oxide, and fumarate were not. A model of the electron transport chain of S. putrefaciens was developed to explain inhibition patterns. A period of microaerobic growth prior to CT exposure increased the ability of S. putrefaciens to dehalogenate CT. A microaerobic growth period also increased cytochrome concentrations. A relationship between cytochrome content and dehalogenation ability was developed from studies in which cytochrome concentrations in S. putrefaciens were manipulated by changing growth conditions. Stoichiometry studies using {sup 14}C-CT suggested that CT was first reduced to form a trichloromethyl radical. Reduction of the radical to produce chloroform and reaction of the radical with cellular biochemicals explained observed product distributions. Carbon dioxide or other fully dehalogenated products were not found.

  11. Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Ourida; Williams, Jonathan M. J.

    This chapter describes the application of iridium complexes to catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions. Transfer hydrogenation reactions provide an alternative to direct hydrogenation for the reduction of a range of substrates. A hydrogen donor, typically an alcohol or formic acid, can be used as the source of hydrogen for the reduction of carbonyl compounds, imines, and alkenes. Heteroaromatic compounds and even carbon dioxide have also been reduced by transfer hydrogenation reactions. In the reverse process, the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds can be achieved by iridium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions, where a ketone or alkene is used as a suitable hydrogen acceptor. The reversible nature of many hydrogen transfer processes has been exploited for the racemization of alcohols, where temporary removal of hydrogen generates an achiral ketone intermediate. In addition, there is a growing body of work where temporary removal of hydrogen provides an opportunity for using alcohols as alkylating agents. In this chemistry, an iridium catalyst "borrows" hydrogen from an alcohol to give an aldehyde or ketone intermediate, which can be transformed into either an imine or alkene under the reaction conditions. Return of the hydrogen from the catalyst provides methodology for the formation of amines or C-C bonds where the only by-product is typically water.

  12. Cyclopalladated Ferrocenylimine Catalyzed Chlorination of 2-Arylbenzoxazoles%Cyclopalladated Ferrocenylimine Catalyzed Chlorination of 2-Arylbenzoxazoles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷瑜婷; 杨帆; 吴养洁; 李克

    2011-01-01

    An efficient and facile protocol for palladacycle-catalyzed chlorination of 2-arylbenzoxazoles was developed. The results represent the first examples involving the palladacycle as the catalyst for such chlorination. This chlori- nation was not a ligand-directed ortho-C--H activation, but an electrophilic substitution process at the para-position of the nitrogen atom in the benzo ring of benzoxazole moiety, the regiochemistry of which had been confirmed by HMBC spectral analysis. The catalytic system could tolerate various halogen atoms, such as F, Cl and Br, affording the corresponding products in moderate to excellent yields.

  13. Platinum-Catalyzed Selective Tin-Carbon Bond Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoonen, Sander Hendrikus Lambertus

    2003-01-01

    In conclusion, two improved methods for the selective synthesis of monoorganotin trihalides were developed. The platinum-catalyzed Kocheshkov redistribution reaction of dialkyltin dichlorides with tin tetrachloride is the most interesting. Contrary to the other two methods described (the direct

  14. Functioned Calix[4]arenes as Artificial Enzymes Catalyze Aldol Condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Aldolase models derived from calix[4]arene were designed and synthesized. The aldol condensation of p-nitrobenzaldehyde with acetone was catalyzed by the synthetic enzymes proceeded under mild conditions to offer chiefly aldol-type product in good yield.

  15. Diastereoselective Pt catalyzed cycloisomerization of polyenes to polycycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Michael J; Gagné, Michel R

    2014-02-26

    Application of a tridentate NHC containing pincer ligand to Pt catalyzed cascade cyclization reactions has allowed for the catalytic, diastereoselective cycloisomerization of biogenic alkene terminated substrates to the their polycyclic counterparts.

  16. Lipase catalyzed synthesis of epoxy-fatty acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN, Qian; LI, Zu-Yi

    2000-01-01

    Lipase catalyzed synthesis of epoxy-fatty acidas from unsaturated carboxylic acids was investigated.Under mild conditions unsaturated arboxylic acids were convcveed to peroxide,then the unsaturated peroxycarboxylic acids epoxidised the C=C bond of themselves

  17. A New Palladium-Catalyzed Phenyl-Alkene Bond Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Roy

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method of palladium-catalyzed phenyl-alkene bond formation is reported. This reaction involves transfer of all three phenyl groups from triphenylantimony onto alkenes containing allylic protons.

  18. Homocoupling of Aryl Bromides Catalyzed by Nickel Chloride in Pyridine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO, Xiao-Chun; ZHOU, Wei; ZHANG, Yue-Ping; DAI, Chun-ya; SHEN, Dong; HUANG, Mei

    2006-01-01

    Pyridine was used as a solvent for homocoupling of aryl bromides catalyzed by nickel chloride/triarylphosphine in the presence of zinc and recycled easily. Triphenylphosphine was the best ligand for nickel in this coupling reaction.

  19. Gold-Catalyzed Regioselective Dimerization of Aliphatic Terminal Alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sheng; Kroll, Julien; Luo, Yingdong; Zhang, Liming

    2012-01-01

    A gold-catalyzed regioselective homodimerization of aliphatic terminal alkynes is described. Bulky and less Lewis acidic tBuXPhosAuNTf(2) is the preferred catalyst, and the additive, anhydrous NaOAc, substantially facilitates the reaction.

  20. THE CREATIVE APPLICATION OF SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & WORK FORCE INNOVATIONS TO THE D&D OF PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) consists of a number of process and support buildings for handling plutonium. Building construction began in the late 1940's to meet national priorities and became operational in 1950 producing refined plutonium salts and metal for the United States nuclear weapons program. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material for fabrication into a nuclear device for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race. PFP has now completed its mission and is fully engaged in deactivation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). At this time the PFP buildings are planned to be reduced to ground level (slab-on-grade) and the site remediated to satisfy national, Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington state requirements. The D&D of a highly contaminated plutonium processing facility presents a plethora of challenges. PFP personnel approached the D&D mission with a can-do attitude. They went into D&D knowing they were facing a lot of challenges and unknowns. There were concerns about the configuration control associated with drawings of these old process facilities. There were unknowns regarding the location of electrical lines and process piping containing chemical residues such as strong acids and caustics. The gloveboxes were highly contaminated with plutonium and chemical residues. Most of the glovebox windows were opaque with splashed process chemicals that coated the windows or etched them, reducing visibility to near zero. Visibility into the glovebox was a serious worker concern. Additionally, all the gloves in the gloveboxes were degraded and unusable. Replacing gloves in gloveboxes was necessary to even begin glovebox cleanout. The sheer volume of breathing air needed was also an issue. These and other challenges and PFP's approach to overcome these

  1. LIPASE-CATALYZED TRANSESTERIFICATION OF PALM KERNEL OIL WITH DIALKYLCARBONATES

    OpenAIRE

    Tjahjono Herawan; M. Rüsch Gen. Klaas

    2014-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed transesterifications-especially in a solvent-free medium-are important for industrial applications because such systems would have an enormous advantage by avoiding the problem of separation, toxicity and flammability of organic solvents. However, the organic solvent-free alcoholysis, especially methanolysis, does not give high conversions. The same problem also occurs when ethyl or methyl acetate are used as acyl acceptors. The main problems of lipase-catalyzed organic solve...

  2. Copper-Catalyzed Aerobic C–H Trifluoromethylation of Phenanthrolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng-Liang; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Yuan, Yong-An

    2016-01-01

    Direct C–H trifluoromethylation of heterocycles is a valuable transformation. In particular, nonprecious metal-catalyzed C–H trifluoromethylation processes, which do not proceed through CF3 radical species, have been less developed. In this cluster report, a new copper-catalyzed aerobic C–H trifluoromethylation of phenanthrolines is described. This transformation affords trifluoromethylated phenanthrolines that have not been synthesized and preliminary mechanistic studies suggest that the CF3 group transfer may occur through cooperative activation. PMID:26855477

  3. Development and industrial application of catalyzer for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis of Claus tail gas

    OpenAIRE

    Honggang Chang; Ronghai Zhu; Zongshe Liu; Jinlong He; Chongrong Wen; Sujuan Zhang; Yang Li

    2015-01-01

    With the implementation of more strict national environmental protection laws, energy conservation, emission reduction and clean production will present higher requirements for sulfur recovery tail gas processing techniques and catalyzers. As for Claus tail gas, conventional hydrogenation catalyzers are gradually being replaced by low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers. This paper concentrates on the development of technologies for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis catalyzers, prepar...

  4. Study on biodistribution of 131 iodine labeled monoclonal antibody D-D3 against pro-gastrin-releasing peptide(31-98) in healthy Kunming mice%抗ProGRP(31-98)单克隆抗体D-D3的131I标记及其体内生物学分布研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈传新; 石怡珍; 杨仪; 唐军; 刘增礼; 徐巧玲

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the 131I labeling methods, stability, and biological distribution pattern of D-D3 antibody against pro-gastrin-releasing peptide 31-98(ProGRP(31-98) ). Methods The radioiodination of D-D3 antibody was performed using the chloramine-T method. The radiochemical purity was determined through thin-layer chromotography. 131I-D-D3 was injected into the healthy Kunming mice via a tail vein, and the % ID/g for various organs was obtained, and then, the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of 131 I-D-D3 antibody in healthy Kunming mice were studied. Results The 131 I-D-D3 labeling rate was (86.56 ± 3.8) %. The radiochemical purity of 131 I-D-D3 was (99.27 ± 0. 6)%. After 48 h incubating in 37 ℃ water bath, the radiochemical purity was (88.38 ± 0.4)%. While being mixed 24 h with healthy human serum, the radiochemical purity was still more than (64.43 ± 0.7)%. The metabolism of 131I-D-D3 in healthy Kunming mice was consistent with a two-compartment model with first-order absorption, T1/2α and T1/2β was 0.25,37.89 h, respectively. Conclusion The labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity of 131 I-D-D-D3 are high and stable. 131I-D-D3 is a promising radioimmunoimaging reagent for small cell lung cancer(SCLC).%目的 探讨抗胃泌素释放肽前体(ProGRP)(31-98)单克隆抗体D-D3的131I标记方法 及其在健康昆明小鼠体内的生物学分布规律与特点.方法 采用氯胺-T法用131I标记单克隆抗体D-D3,利用纸层析法测定其标记率、放化纯度和稳定性.取健康昆明小鼠50只,随机分为10组,每组5只,自昆明小鼠尾静脉注射131I-D-D3 1.48 kBq/100 μL(4 μCi/100 μL),各组小鼠分别于注射后5、15、30 min及1、2、4、8、12、24、48 h处死,取血液、心脏、肝脏、脾脏、肺脏、肾脏、胃、小肠、骨骼(右下肢)、肌肉(右下肢)和脑组织,称质量(g)后测放射性计数(cpm),计算各脏器组织的每克组织百分注射剂量率(%ID

  5. Conservation Kickstart- Catalyzing Conservation Initiatives Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinish, G.

    2014-12-01

    Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation (ASC) is a nonprofit organization that collects environmental data to catalyze conservation initiatives worldwide. Adventure athletes have the skills and motivation to reach the most remote corners of the world. ASC utilizes those skills to provide the scientific community with data while providing the outdoor community with purpose beyond the personal high of reaching a summit or rowing across an ocean. We carefully select projects, choosing partnerships that will maximize the impact of ASC volunteers. Each project must have a clear path to a tangible conservation outcome and demonstrate a clear need for our brand of volunteers. We partner with government agencies, universities, and independant reseachers to kickstart data collection efforts around the world. Last year, through a partnership with the Olympic National Forest, 20 volunteers from the Seattle area set up and monitored camera traps in an effort to survey for costal Pacific marten. Our work led to the species' listing as "critically imperiled" with NatureServe. A partnership with the inaugural Great Pacific Race, engaging trans-Pacific rowing teams, searched for microplastics in the Pacific Ocean as part of our ongoing microplastics campaign. In a multi-year partnership with the American Prairie Reserve (APR), ASC volunteer crews live and work on the Reserve collecting wildlife data year round. The data we obtain directly informs the Reserve's wildlife management decisions. On this project, our crews have safely and effectively navigated temperature extremes from -30 degrees to 100+ degrees while traveling in a remote location. We are currently scouting projects in the Okavango Delta of Botswana and the rainforest of Suriname where we will be able to cover large amounts of area in a short periord of time. ASC is at the crossroads of the adventure and coservation science communities. Our approach of answering specific questions by using highly skilled and

  6. Soft Fusion Energy Path: Isotope Production in Energy Subcritical/Economy Hypercritical D +D Colliding-Beam Mini Fusion Reactor `Exyder'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Tim; Maglich, Bogdan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Bethe1 and Sakharov2 argued for soft fusion energy path via isotope production, substantiated by Manheimer3. - Copious T and 3He production4 , 5 from D(d, p) T and D(d, n) 3He reactions in 725 KeV D +D colliding beams was measured in weak-focusing Self-Collider6 , 7 radius 0.15 m, in B = 3.12 T, non-linearly stabilized by electron cloud oscillations8 to confinement time = 24 s. Simulations6 predict that by switching to strong focusing9, 10 deuterons 0.75 MeV each, generate 1 3He +1T +1p + 1n at total input energy cost 10.72 MeV. Economic value of T and 3He is 65 and 120 MeV/atom, respectively. We obtain economic gain 205MeV/10.72 MeV ~ 2,000% i.e. 3He production funds cost of T. If first wall is made of Thorium n's will breed 233U releasing 200 MeV/fission, at neutron cost 5.36 MeV versus 160 MeV in beam on target, resulting in no cost 3He production, valued 75K/g. 1. Physics Today, May 1979, p.44; 2. Memoirs, Vintage Books, (1992); 3. Phys. Today, May 2012 p. 12; 4. Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 796 (1985); 5. Bull. APS, 57, No. 3 (2012); 6. Part. Acc.1, (1970); 7. ANEUTRONIC FUSION NIM A 271 1-167 (1988); 8. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1818 (1993); 9. Part. Acc. 34, 13 (1990).

  7. MOTIVIRANOST ZAVAROVALNEGA ZASTOPNIKA ZA DELO IN IZOBRAŽEVANJE V ZAVAROVALNIŠKI DRUŽBI ADRIATIC SLOVENICA, D.D.

    OpenAIRE

    Jamnik, Anamarija

    2015-01-01

    Namen magistrskega dela je predstaviti motiviranost zavarovalnega zastopnika za delo in izobraževanje v zavarovalniški družbi AS, d. d. Motivacija usmerja naša dejanja in je eden od glavnih dejavnikov, ki vplivajo na možnost, da zaposleni s približno enakimi sposobnostmi dosegajo približno enake rezultate. Uspešna podjetja in družbe se zavedajo in vedo, da brez ambicioznega in visoko motiviranega kadra, ki je predan družbi, ne bodo dolgo časa uspešna. Uspešno vodstvo in kolektiv sta tista, ki...

  8. Measurement of D^0, D^+, D_s^+ and D^{*+} Production in Fixed Target 920 GeV Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Abt, I; Agari, M; Albrecht, H; Aleksandrov, A; Amaral, V; Amorim, A; Aplin, S J; Aushev, V; Bagaturia, Y; Balagura, V; Bargiotti, M; Barsukova, O; Bastos, J; Batista, J; Bauer, C; Bauer, T S; Belkov, A; Belkov, Ar; Belotelov, I; Bertin, A; Bobchenko, B; Böcker, M; Bogatyrev, A; Böhm, G; Brauer, M; Bruinsma, M; Bruschi, M; Buchholz, P; Buran, T; Carvalho, J; Conde, P; Cruse, C; Dam, M; Danielsen, K M; Danilov, M; De Castro, S; Deppe, H; Dong, X; Dreis, H B; Egorytchev, V; Ehret, K; Eisele, F; Emeliyanov, D; Essenov, S; Fabbri, L; Faccioli, P; Feuerstack-Raible, M; Flammer, J; Fominykh, B; Funcke, M; Garrido, L; Gellrich, A; Giacobbe, B; Glass, J; Goloubkov, D; Golubkov, Y; Golutvin, A; Golutvin, I A; Gorbounov, I; Gorisek, A; Gouchtchine, O; Goulart, D C; Gradl, S; Gradl, W; Grimaldi, F; Groth-Jensen, J; Guilitsky, Yu; Hansen, J D; Hernández, J M; Hofmann, W; Hohlmann, M; Hott, T; Hulsbergen, W; Husemann, U; Igonkina, O; Ispiryan, M; Jagla, T; Jiang, C; Kapitza, H; Karabekyan, S; Karpenko, N; Keller, S; Kessler, J; Khasanov, F; Kiryushin, Yu T; Kisel, I; Klinkby, E; Knöpfle, K T; Kolanoski, H; Korpar, S; Krauss, C; Kreuzer, P; Krizan, P; Krücker, D; Kupper, S; Kvaratskheliia, T; Lanyov, A; Lau, K; Lewendel, B; Lohse, T; Lomonosov, B; Männer, R; Mankel, R; Masciocchi, S; Massa, I; Matchikhilian, I; Medin, G; Medinnis, M; Mevius, M; Michetti, A; Mikhailov, Yu; Mizuk, R; Muresan, R; Zur Nedden, M; Negodaev, M; Nörenberg, M; Nowak, S; Núñez-Pardo de Vera, M T; Ouchrif, M; Ould-Saada, F; Padilla, C; Peralta, D; Pernack, R; Pestotnik, R; Petersen, B AA; Piccinini, M; Pleier, M A; Poli, M; Popov, V; Pose, D; Prystupa, S; Pugatch, V; Pylypchenko, Y; Pyrlik, J; Reeves, K; Ressing, D; Rick, H; Riu, I; Robmann, P; Rostovtseva, I; Rybnikov, V; Sánchez, F; Sbrizzi, A; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schreiner, A; Schröder, H; Schwanke, U; Schwartz, A J; Schwarz, A S; Schwenninger, B; Schwingenheuer, B; Sciacca, F; Semprini-Cesari, N; Shuvalov, S; Silva, L; Skrk, D; Sozuer, L; Solunin, S; Somov, A; Somov, S; Spengler, J; Spighi, R; Spiridonov, A; Stanovnik, A; Staric, M; Stegmann, C; Subramania, H S; Symalla, M; Tikhomirov, I; Titov, M; Tsakov, I; Uwer, U; Van Eldik, C; Vasilev, Yu; Villa, M; Vitale, A; Vukotic, I; Wahlberg, H; Walenta, A H; Walter, M; Wang, J J; Wegener, D; Werthenbach, U; Wolters, H; Wurth, R; Wurz, A; Xella-Hansen, S; Zaitsev, Yu; Zavertyaev, M; Zeuner, T; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Z; Zimmermann, R; Zivko, T; Zoccoli, A

    2007-01-01

    The inclusive production cross sections of the charmed mesons D^0, D^+, D_s^+ and D^{*+} have been measured in interactions of 920 GeV protons on C, Ti, and W targets with the HERA-B detector at the HERA storage ring. Differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and Feynman's x variable are given for the central rapidity region and for transverse momenta up to $\\pT=3.5$ GeV/$c$. The atomic mass number dependence and the leading to non-leading particle production asymmetries are presented as well.

  9. Molecular engineering of D-D-π-A type organic dyes incorporating indoloquinoxaline and phenothiazine for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xing; Wang, Xiaoying; Shao, Li; Li, Hongmei; Yan, Rucai; Hou, Linxi

    2016-09-01

    Four metal-free organic dyes QX05-08 based on indoloquinoxaline and phenothiazine have been successfully designed and synthesized for dye-sensitized solar cells. The D-D-π-A type dyes QX07 and QX08 consist of an indoloquinoxaline donor, a phenothiazine donor, a cyanoacrylic acid acceptor/anchoring group and a thiophene or furan π-bridge. Other simple D-π-A type dyes QX05 and QX06 based on indoloquinoxaline and phenothiazine respectively have also been synthesized for comparison. The D-D-π-A type dyes QX07 and QX08 present good balanced structures and show excellent photoelectric properties. Especially, the dye QX07 with a thiophene unit as the π-bridge exhibits the best photovoltaic performances in solar cells. A high power conversion efficiency up to 8.28% with a Jsc of 15.3 mA cm-2 and a Voc of 757 mV have been achieved by the dye QX07 using an iodine electrolyte under standard conditions.

  10. Study of Nonleptonic $B^{\\ast}_{(s)}\\to M_1 M_2$ $(M=D$, $D_s$, $\\pi$, $K)$ Weak Decays with Factorization Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Qin; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Han, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the experiments of heavy flavor physics at running LHC and upgrading SuperKEKB/Belle-II in the future, the nonleptonic $B^{\\ast}_{(s)}\\to M_1 M_2$ $(M=D$, $D_s$, $\\pi$, $K)$ weak decays are studied in this paper. The amplitudes are calculated with factorization approach, and the transition form factors $A_0^{B^{\\ast}_{(s)}\\to M_1}(0)$ are evaluated within BSW model. With the reasonable approximation $\\Gamma_{tot}(B^*_{(s)})\\simeq \\Gamma(B^*_{(s)}\\to B_{(s)}\\gamma)$, our predictions of branching fractions are presented. Numerically, the CKM-favored tree-dominated $\\bar{B}^{*0} \\to D^+D^-_s$ and $\\bar{B}^{*0}_s \\to D^+_sD^-_s$ decays have the largest branching fractions of the order $\\sim{\\cal O}(10^{-8})$, and hence will be firstly observed by forthcoming Belle-II experiment. However, most of the other decay modes have the branching fractions~$<{\\cal O}(10^{-9})$ and thus are hardly to be observed soon. Besides, for the possible detectable $B^{\\ast}_{(s)}$ decays with branching fractions $\\gtrs...

  11. Comparative Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA): Interplay of discourses (D/D1) as third grade urban and suburban science students engage in hypothesis formulation and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carmen Irene Reyes

    This qualitative research project is a comparative analysis of Discourses (D/D1) while focused upon the science processes of hypothesis generation and observation in an urban versus suburban elementary science classroom. D designates the instructional and formal academic science Discourse and D1 represents the students' informal, social or home language D1iscourses. In particular, this research study is a critical discourse analysis that examines how the science processes of hypothesis formulation and observation are constituted through the interplay of classroom Discourses (D/D1) as two third grade science teachers teach the same kit-based, inquiry science lessons with their respective urban and suburban students. The research also considers ethnicity, social class, language, and the central role science teachers play mediating between children's everyday world and the world of science. Communicative approach and distinctive patterns of interaction between the European American teachers and their respective students are analyzed through a critical lens to examine underlying issues of equity and power embedded in the instructional Discourse of science. Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) provides both the theoretical framework and analytical lens. The research informs development of linguistic-based "best" practices to contribute toward promoting greater science teacher awareness in creating linguistic environments that support all students' learning science Discourse and to serve as a springboard for future educational science researchers' use of CDA.

  12. The Structural Basis of Ribozyme-Catalyzed RNA Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, M.P.; Scott, W.G.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-07-12

    Life originated, according to the RNA World hypothesis, from self-replicating ribozymes that catalyzed ligation of RNA fragments. We have solved the 2.6 angstrom crystal structure of a ligase ribozyme that catalyzes regiospecific formation of a 5' to 3' phosphodiester bond between the 5'-triphosphate and the 3'-hydroxyl termini of two RNA fragments. Invariant residues form tertiary contacts that stabilize a flexible stem of the ribozyme at the ligation site, where an essential magnesium ion coordinates three phosphates. The structure of the active site permits us to suggest how transition-state stabilization and a general base may catalyze the ligation reaction required for prebiotic RNA assembly.

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed Modification of Unprotected Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin H. Shaughnessy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic modification of nucleoside structures provides access to molecules of interest as pharmaceuticals, biochemical probes, and models to study diseases. Covalent modification of the purine and pyrimidine bases is an important strategy for the synthesis of these adducts. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is a powerful method to attach groups to the base heterocycles through the formation of new carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. In this review, approaches to palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides are reviewed. Polar reaction media, such as water or polar aprotic solvents, allow reactions to be performed directly on the hydrophilic nucleosides and nucleotides without the need to use protecting groups. Homogeneous aqueous-phase coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes of water-soluble ligands provide a general approach to the synthesis of modified nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

  14. Highly efficient palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of ethyl ethynyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Ian P; Kwon, Ohyun

    2008-12-08

    The palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of acetylenes is widely exploited in organic synthesis as a means of forming vinyl stannanes for use in palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. Application of this methodology to ethyl ethynyl ether results in an enol ether that is challenging to isolate from the crude reaction mixture because of incompatibility with typical silica gel chromatography. Reported here is a highly efficient procedure for the palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of ethyl ethynyl ether using 0.1% palladium(0) catalyst and 1.0 equiv of tributyltin hydride. The product obtained is a mixture of regioisomers that can be carried forward with exclusive reaction of the beta-isomer. This method is highly reproducible; relative to previously reported procedures, it is more economical and involves a more facile purification procedure.

  15. Microbial-Catalyzed Biotransformation of Multifunctional Triterpenoids Derived from Phytonutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Adnan Ali Shah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial-catalyzed biotransformations have considerable potential for the generation of an enormous variety of structurally diversified organic compounds, especially natural products with complex structures like triterpenoids. They offer efficient and economical ways to produce semi-synthetic analogues and novel lead molecules. Microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi could catalyze chemo-, regio- and stereospecific hydroxylations of diverse triterpenoid substrates that are extremely difficult to produce by chemical routes. During recent years, considerable research has been performed on the microbial transformation of bioactive triterpenoids, in order to obtain biologically active molecules with diverse structures features. This article reviews the microbial modifications of tetranortriterpenoids, tetracyclic triterpenoids and pentacyclic triterpenoids.

  16. New Palladium-Catalyzed Approaches to Heterocycles and Carbocycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinhua [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-12-19

    The tert-butylimines of o-(1-alkynyl)benzaldehydes and analogous pyridinecarbaldehydes have been cyclized under very mild reaction conditions in the presence of I2, ICl, PhSeCl, PhSCl and p-O2NC6H4SCl to give the corresponding halogen-, selenium- and sulfur-containing disubstituted isoquinolines and naphthyridines, respectively. Monosubstituted isoquinolines and naphthyridines have been synthesized by the metal-catalyzed ring closure of these same iminoalkynes. This methodology accommodates a variety of iminoalkynes and affords the anticipated heterocycles in moderate to excellent yields. The Pd(II)-catalyzed cyclization of 2-(1-alkynyl)arylaldimines in the presence of various alkenes provides an efficient way to synthesize a variety of 4-(1-alkenyl)-3-arylisoquinolines in moderate to excellent yields. The introduction of an ortho-methoxy group on the arylaldimine promotes the Pd-catalyzed cyclization and stabilizes the resulting Pd(II) intermediate, improving the yields of the isoquinoline products. Highly substituted naphthalenes have been synthesized by the palladium-catalyzed annulation of a variety of internal alkynes, in which two new carbon-carbon bonds are formed in a single step under relatively mild reaction conditions. This method has also been used to synthesize carbazoles, although a higher reaction temperature is necessary. The process involves arylpalladation of the alkyne, followed by intramolecular Heck olefination and double bond isomerization. This method accommodates a variety of functional groups and affords the anticipated highly substituted naphthalenes and carbazoles in good to excellent yields. Novel palladium migratiodarylation methodology for the synthesis of complex fused polycycles has been developed, in which one or more sequential Pd-catalyzed intramolecular migration processes involving C-H activation are employed. The chemistry works best with electron-rich aromatics, which is in agreement

  17. New Palladium-Catalyzed Approaches to Heterocycles and Carbocycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qinhua Huang

    2004-12-19

    The tert-butylimines of o-(1-alkynyl)benzaldehydes and analogous pyridinecarbaldehydes have been cyclized under very mild reaction conditions in the presence of I{sub 2}, ICl, PhSeCl, PhSCl and p-O{sub 2}NC{sub 6}H{sub 4}SCl to give the corresponding halogen-, selenium- and sulfur-containing disubstituted isoquinolines and naphthyridines, respectively. Monosubstituted isoquinolines and naphthyridines have been synthesized by the metal-catalyzed ring closure of these same iminoalkynes. This methodology accommodates a variety of iminoalkynes and affords the anticipated heterocycles in moderate to excellent yields. The Pd(II)-catalyzed cyclization of 2-(1-alkynyl)arylaldimines in the presence of various alkenes provides an efficient way to synthesize a variety of 4-(1-alkenyl)-3-arylisoquinolines in moderate to excellent yields. The introduction of an ortho-methoxy group on the arylaldimine promotes the Pd-catalyzed cyclization and stabilizes the resulting Pd(II) intermediate, improving the yields of the isoquinoline products. Highly substituted naphthalenes have been synthesized by the palladium-catalyzed annulation of a variety of internal alkynes, in which two new carbon-carbon bonds are formed in a single step under relatively mild reaction conditions. This method has also been used to synthesize carbazoles, although a higher reaction temperature is necessary. The process involves arylpalladation of the alkyne, followed by intramolecular Heck olefination and double bond isomerization. This method accommodates a variety of functional groups and affords the anticipated highly substituted naphthalenes and carbazoles in good to excellent yields. Novel palladium migratiodarylation methodology for the synthesis of complex fused polycycles has been developed, in which one or more sequential Pd-catalyzed intramolecular migration processes involving C-H activation are employed. The chemistry works best with electron-rich aromatics, which is in agreement with the idea that

  18. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengtao Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Copper-catalyzed (or -mediated asymmetric coupling reactions have received significant attention over the past few years. Especially the coupling reactions of aryl or alkyl halides with nucleophiles became a very powerful tool for the formation of C–C, C–N, C–O and other carbon–heteroatom bonds as well as for the construction of heteroatom-containing ring systems. This review summarizes the recent progress in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions for the formation of C–C and carbon–heteroatom bonds.

  19. The mechanism of Fe (Ⅲ)-catalyzed ozonation of phenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    竹湘锋; 徐新华

    2004-01-01

    Fe (Ⅲ)-catalyzed ozonation yielded better degradation rate and extent of COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) or oxalic acid as compared with oxidation by ozone alone. Two parameters with strong effects on the efficiency of ozonation are pH of the solution and the catalyst (Fe3+) dosage. The existence of a critical pH value determining the catalysis of Fe (Ⅲ) in acid conditions was observed in phenol and oxalic acid systems. The best efficiency of catalysis was obtained at a moderate concentration of the catalyst. A reasonable mechanism of Fe (Ⅲ)-catalyzed ozonation of phenol was obtained based on the results and literature.

  20. Esterification of phenolic acids catalyzed by lipases immobilized in organogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoumpanioti, M; Merianou, E; Karandreas, T; Stamatis, H; Xenakis, A

    2010-10-01

    Lipases from Rhizomucor miehei and Candida antarctica B were immobilized in hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose organogels based on surfactant-free microemulsions consisting of n-hexane, 1-propanol and water. Both lipases kept their catalytic activity, catalyzing the esterification reactions of various phenolic acids including cinnamic acid derivatives. High reaction rates and yields (up to 94%) were obtained when lipase from C. antarctica was used. Kinetic studies have been performed and apparent kinetic constants were determined showing that ester synthesis catalyzed by immobilized lipases occurs via the Michaelis-Menten mechanism.

  1. Graphene oxide catalyzed cis-trans isomerization of azobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongha Shin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the fast cis-trans isomerization of an amine-substituted azobenzene catalyzed by graphene oxide (GO, where the amine functionality facilitates the charge transfer from azobenzene to graphene oxide in contrast to non-substituted azobenzene. This catalytic effect was not observed in stilbene analogues, which strongly supports the existence of different isomerization pathways between azobenzene and stilbene. The graphene oxide catalyzed isomerization is expected to be useful as a new photoisomerization based sensing platform complementary to GO-based fluorescence quenching methods.

  2. Cyclodextrin-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Cai Bai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins are well-known macrocyclic oligosaccharides that consist of α-(1,4 linked glucose units and have been widely used as artificial enzymes, chiral separators, chemical sensors, and drug excipients, owing to their hydrophobic and chiral interiors. Due to their remarkable inclusion capabilities with small organic molecules, more recent interests focus on organic reactions catalyzed by cyclodextrins. This contribution outlines the current progress in cyclodextrin-catalyzed organic reactions. Particular emphases are given to the organic reaction mechanisms and their applications. In the end, the future directions of research in this field are proposed.

  3. The D-D Neutron Generator as an Alternative to Am(Li) Isotopic Neutron Source in the Active Well Coincidence Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElroy, Robert Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cleveland, Steven L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The 235U mass assay of bulk uranium items, such as oxide canisters, fuel pellets, and fuel assemblies, is not achievable by traditional gamma-ray assay techniques due to the limited penetration of the item by the characteristic 235U gamma rays. Instead, fast neutron interrogation methods such as active neutron coincidence counting must be used. For international safeguards applications, the most commonly used active neutron systems, the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC), Uranium Neutron Collar (UNCL) and 252Cf Shuffler, rely on fast neutron interrogation using an isotopic neutron source [i.e., 252Cf or Am(Li)] to achieve better measurement accuracies than are possible using gamma-ray techniques for high-mass, high-density items. However, the Am(Li) sources required for the AWCC and UNCL systems are no longer manufactured, and newly produced systems rely on limited supplies of sources salvaged from disused instruments. The 252Cf shuffler systems rely on the use of high-output 252Cf sources, which while still available have become extremely costly for use in routine operations and require replacement every five to seven years. Lack of a suitable alternative neutron interrogation source would leave a potentially significant gap in the safeguarding of uranium processing facilities. In this work, we made use of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Large Volume Active Well Coincidence Counter (LV-AWCC) and a commercially available deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator to examine the potential of the D-D neutron generator as an alternative to the isotopic sources. We present the performance of the LV-AWCC with D-D generator for the assay of 235U based on the results of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulations and measurements of depleted uranium (DU), low enriched uranium (LEU), and highly enriched uranium (HEU) items.

  4. Lipase-Catalyzed Aza-Michael Reaction on Acrylate Derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steunenberg, P.; Sijm, M.; Zuilhof, H.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Scott, E.L.; Franssen, M.C.R.

    2013-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for an efficient and selective lipase-catalyzed aza-Michael reaction of various amines (primary and secondary) with a series of acrylates and alkylacrylates. Reaction parameters were tuned, and under the optimal conditions it was found that Pseudomonas stutzeri lipas

  5. Rh-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of 1,2-Dicyanoalkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meina; Kong, Duanyang; Zi, Guofu; Hou, Guohua

    2017-01-06

    A highly efficient enantioselective hydrogenation of 1,2-dicyanoalkenes catalyzed by the complex of rhodium and f-spiroPhos has been developed. A series of 1,2-dicyanoalkenes were successfully hydrogenated to the corresponding chiral 1,2-dicyanoalkanes under mild conditions with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 98% ee). This methodology provides efficient access to the asymmetric synthesis of chiral diamines.

  6. Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions Catalyzed by Chiral Titanium Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG XiaoMing

    2001-01-01

    @@ Chiral titanium complexes is very importance catalyst to asymmetric catalytic reactions. A series of catalytic systems based on titanium-chiral ligands complexes has been reported. This presentation will discuss some of our recent progress on asymmetric catalytic reactions catalyzed by chiral titanium complexes.

  7. Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions Catalyzed by Chiral Titanium Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG; XiaoMing

    2001-01-01

    Chiral titanium complexes is very importance catalyst to asymmetric catalytic reactions. A series of catalytic systems based on titanium-chiral ligands complexes has been reported. This presentation will discuss some of our recent progress on asymmetric catalytic reactions catalyzed by chiral titanium complexes.  ……

  8. Recent developments in gold-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando López

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last years there have been extraordinary advances in the development of gold-catalyzed cycloaddition processes. In this review we will summarize some of the most remarkable examples, and present the mechanistic rational underlying the transformations.

  9. Palladium-Catalyzed alpha-Arylation of Tetramic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Morten; Dorwald, F. Z.; Peschke, B.;

    2009-01-01

    A mild, racemization-free, palladium-Catalyzed alpha-arylation of tetramic acids (2,4-pyrrolidinediones) has been developed. Various amino acid-derived tetramic acids were cleanly arylated by treatment with 2 mol % of Pd(OAc)(2), 4 mol % of a sterically demanding biaryl phosphine, 2.3 equiv of K2CO...

  10. DNA strand exchange catalyzed by molecular crowding in PEG solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Bobo

    2010-01-01

    DNA strand exchange is catalyzed by molecular crowding and hydrophobic interactions in concentrated aqueous solutions of polyethylene glycol, a discovery of relevance for understanding the function of recombination enzymes and with potential applications to DNA nanotechnology. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. ASYMMETRIC HYDROSILYLATION CATALYZED BY POLYMER—SUPPORTED THIAZOLIDINE RHODIUM CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEIYanohui; LIHong; 等

    1999-01-01

    Asymmetric hydrisilylation catalyzed by polymeric thiazolidine rhodium catalysts was conducted.Almost the same optical yields have been obtained when comb-shaped polymeric ligands and their corresponding monomer complexed rhodium cataltysts were used to asymmetric hydrosilylation of acetophenone.Optical yield of chiral 1-methylbenzyl alcohol reaches as high as 71.5%.Temperature dependence of enantioselective hydrosilylation of acetophenone was discussed.

  12. Palladium-catalyzed silylation of aryl chlorides with hexamethyldisilane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Eric; Barder, Timothy E; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2007-09-13

    A method for the palladium-catalyzed silylation of aryl chlorides has been developed. The method affords desired product in good yield, is tolerant of a variety of functional groups, and provides access to a wide variety of aryltrimethylsilanes from commercially available aryl chlorides. Additionally, a one-pot procedure that converts aryl chlorides into aryl iodides has been developed.

  13. Solvent-free lipase-catalyzed preparation of diacylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nikolaus; Mukherjee, Kumar D

    2004-08-25

    Various methods have been applied for the enzymatic preparation of diacylglycerols that are used as dietary oils for weight reduction in obesity and related disorders. Interesterification of rapeseed oil triacylglycerols with commercial preparations of monoacylglycerols, such as Monomuls 90-O18, Mulgaprime 90, and Nutrisoft 55, catalyzed by immobilized lipase from Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme RM IM) in vacuo at 60 degrees C led to extensive (from 60 to 75%) formation of diacylglycerols. Esterification of rapeseed oil fatty acids with Nutrisoft, catalyzed by Lipozyme RM in vacuo at 60 degrees C, also led to extensive (from 60 to 70%) formation of diacylglycerols. Esterification of rapeseed oil fatty acids with glycerol in vacuo at 60 degrees C, catalyzed by Lipozyme RM and lipases from Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM) and Candida antarctica (lipase B, Novozym 435), also provided diacylglycerols, however, to a lower extent (40-45%). Glycerolysis of rapeseed oil triacylglycerols with glycerol in vacuo at 60 degrees C, catalyzed by Lipozyme TL and Novozym 435, led to diacylglycerols to the extent of

  14. N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed direct carbonylation of dimethylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaonian; Liu, Kun; Xu, Xiaoliang; Ma, Lei; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Dahao; Zhang, Qunfeng; Lu, Chunshan

    2011-07-21

    N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalyzed direct carbonylation of dimethylamine leading to the formation of DMF was successfully accomplished under metal-free conditions. The catalytic efficiency was investigated and the turnover numbers can reach as high as >300. The possible mechanism was also proposed.

  15. Kinetic Resolution of Aryl Alkenylcarbinols Catalyzed by Fc-PIP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡斌; 孟萌; 姜山山; 邓卫平

    2012-01-01

    An effective kinetic resolution of a variety of aryl alkenylcarbinols catalyzed by nonenzymatic acyl transfer catalyst Fe-PIP was developed, affording corresponding unreacted alcohols in good to excellent ee value up to 99% and with selectivity factors up to 24.

  16. Iron-Catalyzed Synthesis of Sulfur-Containing Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosset, Cyril; Lefebvre, Gauthier; Angibaud, Patrick; Stansfield, Ian; Meerpoel, Lieven; Berthelot, Didier; Guérinot, Amandine; Cossy, Janine

    2016-10-13

    An iron-catalyzed synthesis of sulfur- and sulfone-containing heterocycles is reported. The method is based on the cyclization of readily available substrates and proceeded with high efficiency and diastereoselectivity. A variety of sulfur-containing heterocycles bearing moieties suitable for subsequent functionalization are prepared. Illustrative examples of such postcyclization modifications are also presented.

  17. Lipase-Catalyzed Modification of Canola Oil with Caprylic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yingyao; Luan, Xia; Xu, Xuebing

    Lipase-catalyzed acidolysis of canola oil with caprylic acid was performed to produce structured lipids. Six commercial lipases from different sources were screened for their ability to incorporate the caprylic acid into the canola oil. The positional distribution of FA on the glycerol backbone o...

  18. Gal3 Catalyzed Tetrahydropyranylation of Alcohols and Phenols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN, Pei-Pei(孙培培); HU, Zhi-Xin(胡志新)

    2004-01-01

    In dichloromethane, the nucleophilic addition of alcohols or phenols to 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran (DHP) was catalyzed effectively by gallium triiodide which was generated in situ by the reaction of gallium metal and iodine to give the corresponding tetrahydropyranyl acetals in good to excellent yields.

  19. Catalyzing new product adoption at the base of the pyramid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinakis, Y.D.; Walsh, S.T.; Harms, R.

    2016-01-01

    One of the more perplexing of the entrepreneurial issues at the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) is how to catalyze new product adoption by BoP consumers. Because S-shaped adoption dynamics are the result of cultural transmission bias, the question can be rephrased as, how can an entrepreneur overcome conf

  20. Transfer Methane to Fragrant Hydrocarbon by Direct Catalyzed Dehydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Sponsored by NSFC,a research project -"Transfer methane to fragrant hydrocarbon by direct catalyzed dehydrogenation",directed by Prof.Xin Bao from Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of CAS,honored the 2nd class National Science & Technology Award in 2005.

  1. Rh-Catalyzed arylation of fluorinated ketones with arylboronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Luca S; Pattison, Graham

    2016-09-25

    The Rh-catalyzed arylation of fluorinated ketones with boronic acids is reported. This efficient process allows access to fluorinated alcohols in high yields under mild conditions. Competition experiments suggest that difluoromethyl ketones are more reactive than trifluoromethyl ketones in this process, despite their decreased electronic activation, an effect we postulate to be steric in origin.

  2. Rhodium catalyzed arylation of diazo compounds with aryl boronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorai, Jayanta; Anbarasan, Pazhamalai

    2015-04-03

    A general and efficient synthesis of diarylacetate, a diarylmethine derivative, was accomplished through rhodium catalyzed direct arylation of diazo compounds with arylboronic acids. The reaction tolerates various boronic acid derivatives and functional groups. Notably, chemoselective arylation of diazo compounds over other electrophiles were demonstrated. The efficacy of the developed methodology is shown by the expeditious synthesis of the core structure of diclofensine.

  3. Palladium-catalyzed enantioselective conjugate addition of arylboronic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gini, F; Hessen, B; Minnaard, AJ

    2005-01-01

    The first asymmetric palladium-catalyzed conjugate addition of arylboronic acids to alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, ketones, and esters is described. For cyclic substrates, excellent chemo-, regio-, and enantioselectivities are achieved when a Pd(O2CCF3)(2)/DuPHOS catalyst is applied.

  4. Amylase catalyzed synthesis of glycosyl acrylates and their polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Wouter M.J.; Jovanovic, Danijela; Brouwer, Sander; Loos, Katja

    2014-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of novel (di)saccharide acrylates from starch and 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate (2-HEA, 2-HEMA and 4-HBA) catalyzed by various commercially available amylase preparations is demonstrated. Both liquefaction and saccharificatio

  5. Enantioselective N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed synthesis of trifluoromethyldihydropyridinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Ling; Liang, Zhi-Qin; Chen, Kun-Quan; Sun, De-Qun; Ye, Song

    2015-06-05

    The enantioselective N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed [4 + 2] cyclocondensation of α-chloroaldehydes and trifluoromethyl N-Boc azadienes was developed, giving the corresponding 3,4-disubstituted-6-trifluoromethyldihydropyridin-2(1H)-ones in good yields with exclusive cis-selectivities and excellent enantioselectivities.

  6. ReBr(CO)5-Catalyzed Knoevenagel Condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Wei-xiong; HUA Rui-mao; SUN Hong-bin

    2004-01-01

    Knoevenagel condensations are especially important reactions for the synthesis of alkene compounds having electron-withdrawing groups such as COR,CN,COOR,NO2 etc. Recently,transition metal hydride ruthenium1, hydride and polyhydride rhenium2, and polyhydride iridium complexes have been found to be the efficient catalysts for Knoevenagle condensation. However the mentioned-above transition metal hydride complexes are not easily prepared. In addition, all of them are oxygen and H2O-sensitive, unstable compands. Therefor the catalytic reactions are required to be carried out under an inert atmosphere, and using the prepurified reagent.In the paper, We wish to report the development of Knoevenagel condensation catalyzed by ReBr(CO)5 under an air atmosphere in the absence of solvent.All the experiments were carried out under 1atm, without solvent.The resuIts of the representative Knoevenagel condensations are summarized in Table 1.The Knoevenagel reaction with diethyl malonate can be catalyzed by ReBr(CO)5, while the present Knoevenagel reactions catalyzed by transition metal have at least one cyano group in active methylene compouds.A propose mechanism for present catalytic coupling dehydration reactions is also illustrated in the paper.Briefly, this paper reports the ReBr(CO)5-catalyzed Knoevenagel reaction. The reaction is a new method for the Konevenagel condensation.

  7. Phosphine-catalyzed [3+2] annulation of cyanoallenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinderman, S.S.; van Maarseveen, J.H.; Hiemstra, H.

    2011-01-01

    Cyanoallenes were successfully used in organophosphine-catalyzed [3+2]-type annulation to give cyano-substituted dihydropyrroles in good yield. Chiral phosphines were also screened, leading to some initial results in the asymmetric version of cyano­allene-based annulations.

  8. Platinum-catalyzed hydroformylation of terminal and internal octenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duren, R.; van der Vlugt, J.I.; Kooijman, H.; Spek, A.L.; Vogt, D.

    2007-01-01

    A brief historic overview of Pt/Sn-catalyzed hydroformylation as well as recent advances in the hydroformylation of internal alkenes is provided. This serves as background for the results obtained with the [Pt(Sixantphos)Cl2] system, for which the molecular structure and the spectroscopic data are

  9. Synthesis of lactams using enzyme-catalyzed aminolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavila, E.; Loos, K.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of e-caprolactam from 6-aminocaproic acid catalyzed by CALB (N435) is reported. Different lactam ring sizes can be prepared starting from 4-aminobutanoic acid, 5-aminovaleric acid, and 8-aminooctanoic acid. Experiments with mixtures of aminocarboxylic acids have shown that CALB prefers

  10. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  11. Improved Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and the CP-Odd Fraction in the Decay B0->D*+D*-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabé, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schröder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bequilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; De La Vaissière, C; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Röthel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-01-01

    We present an updated measurement of the CP-odd fraction and the time-dependent CP asymmetries in the decay B0->D*+D*-using (383 +/- 4) \\times 10^{6} BB pairs collected with the Babar detector. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be $0.143\\pm0.034\\stat\\pm0.008\\syst$. The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters are determined to be $C_+ = -0.05\\pm 0.14\\stat \\pm 0.02\\syst$ and $S_+ = -0.72 \\pm 0.19\\stat \\pm 0.05\\syst$. The non-zero value of the measured $S_+$ indicates the evidence of CP violation at the $3.7 \\sigma$ confidence level.

  12. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0-->D*+D*-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-10-07

    We present an updated measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0-->D*+D*- using 232x10(6)BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.125+/-0.044(stat)+/-0.007(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters C+ and S+ are determined to be 0.06+/-0.17(stat)+/-0.03(syst) and -0.75+/-0.25(stat)+/-0.03(syst), respectively. The standard model predicts these parameters to be 0 and -sin2beta, respectively, in the absence of penguin amplitude contributions.

  13. TECHNICAL DESIGN NOTE: System for measurement of low yield neutron pulses from D D fusion reactions based upon a 3He proportional counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, José; Birstein, Lipo; Mayer, Roberto E.; Silva, Patricio; Soto, Leopoldo

    2008-08-01

    A conventional neutron detection technique was adapted to measure low neutron yields from D-D fusion pulses. This method uses a 3He proportional counter surrounded by a paraffin moderator. Electric signals generated in the 3He tube are fed into a preamplifier. The output of the preamplifier is directly connected to a digital oscilloscope. The time-integrated signals represent the charge generated in the 3He tube which is proportional to the total neutron yield. The integration time is determined by the preamplifier and moderator characteristics within some hundreds of microseconds. No meaningful neutron background was detected during this time window. The system, previously calibrated, was used to measure the neutron yield (low as 103 neutrons per pulse were measured.

  14. Study of B --> D^(*)D_s(J)^(*) Decays and Measurement of D_s^- and D_sJ(2 460)^- Branching Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, Yu K; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We present branching fraction measurements of twelve B meson decays of the form B --> D^(*)D_s(J)^(*). The results are based on Y(4S) decays in BBbar pairs. One of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and the other decays to two charm mesons, of which one is reconstructed, and the mass and momentum of the other is inferred by kinematics. Combining these results with previous exclusive branching fraction measurements, we determine BR(D_s^- --> phi pi^-) = (4.62 +/- 0.36_stat. +/- 0.51_syst.)%, BR(D_sJ(2460)^- --> D_s^*- pi^0) = (56 +/- 13_stat. +/- 9_syst.)% and BR(D-sJ(2460)^- --> D_s^- gamma) = (16 +/- 4_stat. +/- 3_syst.)%.

  15. Syntheses of dibenzo[d,d']benzo[2,1-b:3,4-b']difuran derivatives and their application to organic field-effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh Anh Truong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ladder-type π-conjugated compounds containing a benzo[2,1-b:3,4-b']difuran skeleton, such as dibenzo[d,d']benzo[2,1-b:3,4-b']difuran (syn-DBBDF and dinaphtho[2,3-d:2',3'-d']benzo[2,1-b:3,4-b']difuran (syn-DNBDF were synthesized. Their photophysical and electrochemical properties were revealed by UV–vis absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs were fabricated with these compounds as organic semiconductors, and their semiconducting properties were evaluated. OFETs with syn-DBBDF and syn-DNBDF showed typical p-type characteristics with hole mobilities of −3 cm2·V−1·s−1 and −1 cm2·V−1·s−1, respectively.

  16. Odpadna embalaža in problem pri odpadni embalaži s pretisnimi omoti v farmacevtskem podjetju Krka d.d.

    OpenAIRE

    Krajnc, Urška

    2015-01-01

    Diplomska naloga obsega problem, ki nastane zaradi čedalje večjega in obsežnejšega nastajanja odpadne embalaže, in konkreten problem, s katerim se srečujejo v farmacevtskem podjetju Krka, d. d., iz Novega mesta. Kot nam je znano, je z odpadki vse več težav. S prostorskega vidika je to kopičenje odpadkov, z okoljskega vidika pa onesnaževanje okolja. Embalaža, ki predstavlja odpadek, ki ga ne potrebujemo več, nam predstavlja predmet, ki ga odvržemo. Pri tem je smiselno premisliti, če je embalaž...

  17. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and the CP-Odd Fraction in the Decay B0->D*+D*-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De, N; De Groot, J G H; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    We present an updated measurement of time-dependent \\CP asymmetries and the \\CP-odd fraction in the decay $B^0 \\to D^{*+}D^{*-}$ using $232 \\times 10^{6} \\BB$ pairs collected by the \\babar detector at the PEP-II $B$ factory. We determine the \\CP-odd fraction to be $0.125 \\pm 0.044\\stat \\pm 0.007\\syst$. The time-dependent \\CP asymmetry parameters $C_+$ and $S_+$ are determined to be $0.06\\pm 0.17\\stat \\pm 0.03\\syst$ and $-0.75 \\pm 0.25\\stat \\pm 0.03\\syst$, respectively. The Standard Model predicts these parameters to be 0 and $-\\stwob$, respectively, in the absence of penguin amplitude contributions.

  18. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and the CP-Odd Fraction in the Decay B0 --> D*+D*-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; Le Clerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmücker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; MacKay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Del, D; Re, M; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljevic, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Forti, A C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graugès-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-01-01

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and an updated determination of the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0 --> D*+D*- using a data sample of 88 x 10^6 BBbar pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.063 +/- 0.055(stat) +/- 0.009(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters $Im(lambda_+)$ and $|lambda_+|$ are determined to be 0.05 +/- 0.29(stat) +/- 0.10(syst) and 0.75 +/- 0.19(stat) +/- 0.02(syst), respectively. The Standard Model predicts these parameters to be -sin2beta and 1, respectively, in the absence of penguin diagram contributions.

  19. Lattice and Magnetic Effects on a d-d Excitation in NiO Using a 25 meV Resolution X-ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Daisuke; Haverkort, Maurits W.; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the behavior of a d-d transition in NiO using a new x-ray spectrometer with 0.025 eV resolution at 15816 eV, and via ab-initio ligand field theory calculations. The transition at ˜1.7 eV energy transfer is measured at temperatures between 20 and 800 K, at a momentum transfer |Q| = 6.52 Å-1. Fine structure is clearly observed at 20 K. As temperature is increased, the excitation shifts to lower energy and broadens. We explain the energy shift as being related to thermal expansion and to magnetism. The broadening is well fit considering thermal fluctuations of the Ni-O bond length, with a scale factor found to be in reasonable agreement with calculation.

  20. Development of high-intensity D-D and D-T neutron sources and neutron filters for medical and industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbeke, Jerome Maurice [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-10

    This thesis consists of three main parts. The first one relates to boron neutron capture therapy. It summarizes the guidelines obtained by numerical simulations for the treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors, as well as the results on the design of beam-shaping assemblies to moderate D-D and D-T neutrons to epithermal energies. The second part is about boron neutron capture synovectomy for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Optimal neutron energy for treatment and beam-shaping assembly designs are summarized in this section. The last part is on the development of the sealed neutron generator, including experimental results on the prototype ion source and the prototype accelerator column.

  1. Design of a high-current low-energy beam transport line for an intense D-T/D-D neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaolong, E-mail: luxl@lzu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Engineering Research Center for Neutron Application, Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Junrun [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Engineering Research Center for Neutron Application, Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Yu; Li, Jianyi; Xia, Li; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Yanyan; Jiang, Bing; Huang, Zhiwu; Ma, Zhanwen; Wei, Zheng [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Qian, Xiangping; Xu, Dapeng; Lan, Changlin [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Engineering Research Center for Neutron Application, Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yao, Zeen, E-mail: zeyao@lzu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Engineering Research Center for Neutron Application, Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-03-01

    An intense D-T/D-D neutron generator is currently being developed at the Lanzhou University. The Cockcroft–Walton accelerator, as a part of the neutron generator, will be used to accelerate and transport the high-current low-energy beam from the duoplasmatron ion source to the rotating target. The design of a high-current low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line and the dynamics simulations of the mixed beam were carried out using the TRACK code. The results illustrate that the designed beam line facilitates smooth transportation of a deuteron beam of 40 mA, and the number of undesired ions can be reduced effectively using two apertures.

  2. Experimental investigation of the confinement of d(3He,p)α and d(d,p)t fusion reaction products in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonheure, Georges; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.

    2012-01-01

    In ITER, magnetic fusion will explore the burning plasma regime. Because such burning plasma is sustained by its own fusion reactions, alpha particles need to be confined (Hazeltine 2010 Fusion Eng. Des. 7–9 85). New experiments using d(3He,p)α and d(d,p)t fusion reaction products were performed...... in JET. Fusion product loss was measured from MHD-quiescent plasmas with a charged particle activation probe installed at a position opposite to the magnetic field ion gradient drift (see figure 1)—1.77 m above mid-plane—in the ceiling of JET tokamak. This new kind of escaping ion detector (Bonheure et...... al 2008 Fusion Sci. Technol. 53 806) provides for absolutely calibrated measurements. Both the mechanism and the magnitude of the loss are dealt with by this research. Careful analysis shows measured loss is in quantitative agreement with predictions from the classical orbit loss model. However...

  3. 26,26,26,27,27,27-Hexadeuterated-1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D-d{sub 6}) As Adjuvant of Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seoane, Samuel; Bermudez, Maria A.; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo [Department of Physiology-CIMUS, Endocrine Oncology Laboratories (P1L3), Avda. Barcelona s/n, Campus Vida-University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain); Abdul-Hadi, Soraya [University of Puerto Rico, Recinto de Rio Piedras, Avda. Barbosa-Ponce de Leon, San Juan 23301 (Puerto Rico); Maestro, Miguel; Mouriño, Antonio [Department of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry, Research Laboratory Ignacio Ribas, Avda. das Ciencias s/n, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain); Perez-Fernandez, Roman, E-mail: roman.perez.fernandez@usc.es [Department of Physiology-CIMUS, Endocrine Oncology Laboratories (P1L3), Avda. Barcelona s/n, Campus Vida-University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)

    2013-12-27

    It has been demonstrated that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) and some of its analogues have antitumor activity. 1,25D labeled with deuterium (26,26,26,27,27,27-hexadeuterated 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}, or 1,25D-d{sub 6}) is commonly used as internal standard for 1,25D liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) quantification. In the present study using human breast cancer cell lines, the biological activity of 1,25D-d{sub 6} administered alone and in combination with two commonly used antineoplastic agents, 5-fluorouracil and etoposide, was evaluated. Using an MTT assay, flow cytometry, and western blots, our data demonstrated that 1,25D-d{sub 6} has effects similar to the natural hormone on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Furthermore, the combination of 1,25D-d{sub 6} and etoposide enhances the antitumoral effects of both compounds. Interestingly, the antitumoral effect is higher in the more aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Our data indicate that 1,25D-d{sub 6} administered alone or in combination with chemotherapy could be a good experimental method for accurately quantifying active 1,25D levels in cultures or in biological fluids, on both in vitro breast cancer cell lines and in vivo animal experimental models.

  4. 26,26,26,27,27,27-Hexadeuterated-1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D-d6 As Adjuvant of Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Seoane

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D and some of its analogues have antitumor activity. 1,25D labeled with deuterium (26,26,26,27,27,27-hexadeuterated 1a,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, or 1,25D-d6 is commonly used as internal standard for 1,25D liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS quantification. In the present study using human breast cancer cell lines, the biological activity of 1,25D-d6 administered alone and in combination with two commonly used antineoplastic agents, 5-fluorouracil and etoposide, was evaluated. Using an MTT assay, flow cytometry, and western blots, our data demonstrated that 1,25D-d6 has effects similar to the natural hormone on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Furthermore, the combination of 1,25D-d6 and etoposide enhances the antitumoral effects of both compounds. Interestingly, the antitumoral effect is higher in the more aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Our data indicate that 1,25D-d6 administered alone or in combination with chemotherapy could be a good experimental method for accurately quantifying active 1,25D levels in cultures or in biological fluids, on both in vitro breast cancer cell lines and in vivo animal experimental models.

  5. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions. Part 3. Hydrolases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert N.; Tewari, Yadu B.

    1994-11-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by the hydrolase class of enzymes have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: The reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement [temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used]; the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it or any calculations for which the data have been used. The data from 145 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers are given for the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participate.

  6. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Part 4. Lyases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert N.; Tewari, Yadu B.

    1995-09-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by the lyase class of enzymes have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: the reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement (temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used); the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it or any calculations for which the data have been used. The data from 106 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers are given for the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participate.

  7. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Part 2. Transferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert N.; Tewari, Yadu B.

    1994-07-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by the transferase class of enzymes have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: the reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement [temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used]; the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it or any calculations for which the data have been used. The data from 285 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers are given for the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participate.

  8. Mechanism of Intramolecular Rhodium- and Palladium-Catalyzed Alkene Alkoxyfunctionalizations

    KAUST Repository

    Vummaleti, Sai V. C.

    2015-11-13

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the reaction mechanism for the [Rh]-catalyzed intramolecular alkoxyacylation ([Rh] = [RhI(dppp)+] (dppp, 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) and [Pd]/BPh3 dual catalytic system assisted intramolecular alkoxycyanation ([Pd] = Pd-Xantphos) using acylated and cyanated 2-allylphenol derivatives as substrates, respectively. Our results substantially confirm the proposed mechanism for both [Rh]- and [Pd]/ BPh3-mediated alkoxyfunctionalizations, offering a detailed geometrical and energetical understanding of all the elementary steps. Furthermore, for the [Rh]-mediated alkoxyacylation, our observations support the hypothesis that the quinoline group of the substrate is crucial to stabilize the acyl metal complex and prevent further decarbonylation. For [Pd]/BPh3-catalyzed alkoxycyanation, our findings clarify how the Lewis acid BPh3 cocatalyst accelerates the only slow step of the reaction, corresponding to the oxidative addition of the cyanate O-CN bond to the Pd center. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  9. Microcalorimetric Study on Tyrosine Oxidation Catalyzed by Tyrosinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Through the method of initial heat release rate, the kinetic property of tyrosine oxidationcatalyzed by tyrosinase from Pseudomonas maltophilia was investigated using a LKB-2107 batchmicrocalorimeter. Tyrosine was catalyzed and oxidized into L-dopa, then into melanin catalyzed bytyrosinase. We found that the tyrosinase reaction obeyed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and at298.15K and pH 7.0, the initial exothermic rate (Ω0) are in the range of0.1567~0.5704 mJ@ s-1, themaximum exothermic rate (Ωmax) are in 0.4152 ~ 0.8143mol @ L-1, and mean value of the Michaelisconstant (Km) is 2.199±0.105×104 mol @ L-1.

  10. Polymerization of phenols catalyzed by peroxidase in nonaqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dordick, J.S.; Marletta, M.A.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Polymers produced by horseradish-peroxidase-catalyzed coupling of phenols have been explored as potential substitutes for phenol-formaldehyde resins. To overcome low substrate solubilities and product molecular weights in water, enzymatic polymerizations in aqueous-organic mixtures have been examined. Peroxidase vigorously polymerizes a number of phenols in mixtures of water with water-miscible solvents such as dioxane, acetone, dimethylformamide, and methyl formate with the solvent content up to 95%. As a result, various phenolic polymers with average molecular weights from 400 to 2.6 x 10/sup 4/ D were obtained depending on the reaction medium composition and the nature of the phenol. Peroxidase-catalyzed copolymerization of different phenols in 85% dioxane was demonstrated. Poly(p-phenylphenol) and poly(p-cresol) were enzymatically prepared on a gram scale. They had much higher melting points, and in addition, poly(p-phenylphenol) was found to have a much higher electrical conductivity than phenol-formaldehyde resins.

  11. Effect of urate on the lactoperoxidase catalyzed oxidation of adrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvstad, Rolf A

    2004-12-01

    Lactoperoxidase is an iron containing enzyme, which is an essential component of the defense system of mammalian secretary fluids. The enzyme readily oxidizes adrenaline and other catecholamines to coloured aminochrome products. A Km-value of 1.21 mM and a catalytic constant (k = Vmax/[Enz]) of 15.5 x 10(3) min(-1) characterized the reaction between lactoperoxidase and adrenaline at pH 7.4. Urate was found to activate the enzyme catalyzed oxidation of adrenaline in a competitive manner, the effect decreasing with increasing adrenaline concentration. Lactoperoxidase was able to catalyze the oxidation of urate. However, urate was a much poorer substrate than adrenaline, and it seems unlikely that urate activates by functioning as a free, redox cycling intermediate between enzyme and adrenaline. The activation mechanism probably involves an urate-lactoperoxidase complex.

  12. Silylation of Dinitrogen Catalyzed by Hydridodinitrogentris(TriphenylphosphineCobalt(I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech I. Dzik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, homogeneous cobalt systems were reported to catalyze the reductive silylation of dinitrogen. In this study the investigations on the silylation of dinitrogen catalyzed by CoH(PPh33N2 are presented. We show that in the presence of the title compound, the reaction of N2 with trimethylsilylchloride and sodium yields, on average, 6.7 equivalents of tris(trimethylsilylamine per Co atom in THF (tetrahydrofuran. The aim was to elucidate whether the active catalyst is: (a the [Co(PPh33N2]− anion formed after two-electron reduction of the title compound; or (b a species formed via decomposition of CoH(PPh33N2 in the presence of the highly reactive substrates. Time profile, and IR and EPR spectroscopic investigations show instability of the pre-catalyst under the applied conditions which suggests that the catalytically active species is formed through in situ modification of the pre-catalyst.

  13. On-site analysis of d13C- and dD-CH4 by laser spectroscopy for the allocation of source processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer, Simon; Tuzson, Béla; Popa, Elena; van der Veen, Carina; Röckmann, Thomas; Brand, Willi A.; Fisher, Rebecca; Lowry, David; Nisbet, Euan G.; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Harris, Eliza; Emmenegger, Lukas; Fischer, Hubertus; Mohn, Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of the most abundant methane isotopologues 12CH4, 13CH4 and 12CH3D can be used to disentangle source/sink processes (Fischer et al. 2008) and to develop target oriented reduction strategies. Isotopic analysis of CH4 is accomplished by isotope-ratio mass-spectrometry (IRMS) and more recently by mid-infrared laser spectroscopy. For high precision measurements in ambient air, however, both techniques rely on preconcentration of the target gas (Eyer et al. 2014). We developed a field-deployable analyser for real-time, on-site analysis of CH4 isotopologues which is based on a dual quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) in combination with an innovative preconcentration technique named trace gas extractor (TREX). The core part of the 19 ″ rack-mounted preconcentration unit is a highly efficient adsorbent trap attached to the cold end of a Stirling cooler. The system achieves preconcentration factors >500. For fast desorption and optimal heat management, the trap is decoupled from the cooler during desorption. The QCLAS has been developed based on a previously described instrument (Tuzson 2010). It comprises two cw-QC laser sources combined and coupled into an astigmatic multipass absorption cell with 76 m optical path. The developed technique reaches an unsurpassed precision of 0.1‰ for d13C-CH4 and system for field applications has been shown in June 2014, where the system has achieved an overall repeatability of 0.19‰ for d13C and 1.7‰ for dD-CH4 for repeated target gas measurements. Compatibility of TREX - QCLAS with flask sampling - IRMS for analysis of ambient CH4 fulfilled the extended WMO/GAW compatibility goals of 0.2‰ for d13C-CH4 and 5‰ for dD-CH4. References: Fischer, H., Behrens, M., Bock, M., Richter, U., Schmitt, J., Loulergue, L., Chappellaz, J., Spahni, R., Blunier, T., Leuenberger, M., Stocker, T. F. (2008) Nature 452: 864-867. Eyer, S., Stadie, N. P., Borgschulte. A., Emmenegger, L., Mohn, J. (2014) Adsorption 20

  14. Cell-surface acceleration of urokinase-catalyzed receptor cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Ploug, M; Behrendt, N;

    1997-01-01

    937 cell lysates, had the same amino termini as uPAR(2+3), generated by uPA in a purified system. In both cases cleavage had occurred at two positions in the hinge region connecting domain 1 and 2, between Arg83-Ala84 and Arg89-Ser90, respectively. The uPA-catalyzed cleavage of uPAR is a new negative...

  15. Copper-catalyzed arylation of alkyl halides with arylaluminum reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijay Shrestha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a Cu-catalyzed coupling between triarylaluminum reagents and alkyl halides to form arylalkanes. The reaction proceeds in the presence of N,N,N’,N’-tetramethyl-o-phenylenediamine (NN-1 as a ligand in combination with CuI as a catalyst. This catalyst system enables the coupling of primary alkyl iodides and bromides with electron-neutral and electron-rich triarylaluminum reagents and affords the cross-coupled products in good to excellent yields.

  16. Pd-catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination of aryl bromides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Geun; Milner, Phillip J; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2014-03-12

    On the basis of mechanism-driven reaction design, a Pd-catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination of aryl bromides and iodides has been developed. The method exhibits a broad substrate scope, especially with respect to nitrogen-containing heteroaryl bromides, and proceeds with minimal formation of the corresponding reduction products. A facilitated ligand modification process was shown to be critical to the success of the reaction.

  17. Gold-catalyzed oxidative cycloadditions to activate a quinoline framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huple, Deepak B; Ghorpade, Satish; Liu, Rai-Shung

    2013-09-23

    Going for gold! Gold-catalyzed reactions of 3,5- and 3,6-dienynes with 8-alkylquinoline oxides results in an oxidative cycloaddition with high stereospecificity (see scheme; EWG = electron-withdrawing group); this process involves a catalytic activation of a quinoline framework. The reaction mechanism involves the intermediacy of α-carbonyl pyridinium ylides (I) in a concerted [3+2]-cycloaddition with a tethered alkene.

  18. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer.

  19. Copper-catalyzed Decarboxylative Hydroboration: Synthesis of Vinyl Boronic Esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irudayanathan, Francis Mariaraj; Raja, Gabriel Charles Edwin; Kim, Han-Sung; Na, Kyungsu; Lee, Sunwoo [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Vinyl boronic esters were synthesized from aryl alkynyl carboxylic acids and bis(pinacolato)diboron using a copper-catalyzed decarboxylative reaction. The reaction was conducted with CuI (10 mol %), bis-[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl]ether(20 mol %), and LiOMe (20 mol %) in DMSO at 50 .deg. C for 16 h. This method provided the desired vinyl boronic esters in good-to-moderate yields and showed good functional group tolerance.

  20. Silver-Catalyzed C(sp(3))-H Chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Jun; Kanai, Motomu

    2017-03-17

    A silver-catalyzed chlorination of benzylic, tertiary, and secondary C(sp(3))-H bonds was developed. The reaction proceeded with as low as 0.2 mol % catalyst loading at room temperature under air atmosphere with synthetically useful functional group compatibility. The regioselectivity and reactivity tendencies suggest that the chlorination proceeded through a radical pathway, but an intermediate alkylsilver species cannot be ruled out.

  1. Comparing Ru and Fe-catalyzed olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poater, Albert; Chaitanya Vummaleti, Sai Vikrama; Pump, Eva; Cavallo, Luigi

    2014-08-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to explore the potential of Fe-based complexes with an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, as olefin metathesis catalysts. Apart from a less endothermic reaction energy profile, a small reduction in the predicted upper energy barriers (≈ 2 kcal mol(-1)) is calculated in the Fe catalyzed profile with respect to the Ru catalysed profile. Overall, this study indicates that Fe-based catalysts have the potential to be very effective olefin metathesis catalysts.

  2. Predictive Modeling of Metal-Catalyzed Polyolefin Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Khare, Neeraj Prasad

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation describes the essential modeling components and techniques for building comprehensive polymer process models for metal-catalyzed polyolefin processes. The significance of this work is that it presents a comprehensive approach to polymer process modeling applied to large-scale commercial processes. Most researchers focus only on polymerization mechanisms and reaction kinetics, and neglect physical properties and phase equilibrium. Both physical properties and phase equilib...

  3. Synthesis of heterocycles through transition-metal-catalyzed isomerization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishoey, Mette; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2014-07-14

    Metal-catalyzed isomerization of N- and O-allylic systems is emerging as an effective method to form synthetically useful iminium and oxocarbenium intermediates. In the presence of tethered nucleophiles, several recent examples illuminate this approach as a powerful strategy for the synthesis of structurally complex and diverse heterocycles. In this Concept article, we attempt to cover this area of research through a selection of recent versatile examples.

  4. Biodiesel by acid-catalyzed transesterification with butanol

    OpenAIRE

    Bynes, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Jatropha oil and Rapeseed oil was transesterified with n-butanol by the use of H2SO4. Before conducting the experiments a review of the effect of alcohol type was preformed. Alcohols from methanol to butanol, branched and straight, were reviewed for the effect on the acid catalyzed transesterification reaction. From the review it was found that propanol and butanol were the best for the acidic transesterification reaction. Variables such as time, temperature, alcohol amount and catalyst c...

  5. Palladium-Catalyzed Synthesis of N-Aryl Carbamates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Park, Nathaniel H.; Fors, Brett P.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient synthesis of aryl carbamates was achieved by introducing alcohols into the reaction of palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling of ArX (X = Cl, OTf) with sodium cyanate. The use of aryl triflates as electrophilic components in this transformation allowed for an expanded substrate scope for direct synthesis of aryl isocyanates. This methodology provides direct access to major carbamate protecting groups, S-thiocarbamates, and diisocyanate precursors to polyurethane materials. PMID:23441814

  6. Cobalt-catalyzed formation of symmetrical biaryls and its mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncomble, Aurélien; Le Floch, Pascal; Gosmini, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    Effective devotion: An efficient cobalt-catalyzed method devoted to the formation of symmetrical biaryls is described avoiding the preparation of organometallic reagents. Various aromatic halides functionalized by a variety of reactive group reagents are employed. Preliminary DFT calculations have shown that the involvement of a Co(I)/Co(III) couple is realistic at least in the case of 1,3-diazadienes as ligands (FG = functional group).

  7. Lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of carcinogenic aromatic and heterocyclic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlewska-Roberts, Katarzyna M; Teitel, Candee H; Lay, Jackson O; Roberts, Dean W; Kadlubar, Fred F

    2004-12-01

    Lactoperoxidase, an enzyme secreted from the human mammary gland, plays a host defensive role through antimicrobial activity. It has been implicated in mutagenic and carcinogenic activation in the human mammary gland. The potential role of heterocyclic and aromatic amines in the etiology of breast cancer led us to examination of the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of the most commonly studied arylamine carcinogens: 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]-pyridine (PhIP), benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx). In vitro activation was performed with lactoperoxidase (partially purified from bovine milk or human milk) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and calf thymus DNA. Products formed during enzymatic activation were monitored by HPLC with ultraviolet and radiometric detection. Two of these products were characterized as hydrazo and azo derivatives by means of mass spectrometry. The DNA binding level of 3H- and 14C-radiolabeled amines after peroxidase-catalyzed activation was dependent on the hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the highest levels of carcinogen binding to DNA were observed at 100 microM H2O2. Carcinogen activation and the level of binding to DNA were in the order of benzidine > ABP > IQ > MeIQx > PhIP. One of the ABP adducts was identified, and the level at which it is formed was estimated to be six adducts/10(5) nucleotides. The susceptibility of aromatic and heterocyclic amines for lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation and the binding levels of activated products to DNA suggest a potential role of lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of carcinogens in the etiology of breast cancer.

  8. Asymmetric Aldol Reaction Catalyzed by Modularly Designed Organocatalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sinha, Debarshi; Mandal, Tanmay; Gogoi, Sanjib; Goldman, Joshua J.; 赵从贵

    2012-01-01

    The self-assembly of the precatalyst modules, which are amino acids and cinchona alkaloid derivatives, leads to the direct formation of the desired organocatalysts without any synthesis. These modularly designed organocatalysts (MDOs) may be used for catalyzed asymmetric aldol reaction the corresponding aldol products may be obtained in mediocre diastereoselectivities (up to 79 : 21 dr). Depending on structure of the aldehyde substrates, to excellent ee values (up to 92% ee) with moderate

  9. Asymmetric Stetter reactions catalyzed by thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparyan, Elena; Richter, Michael; Dresen, Carola; Walter, Lydia S; Fuchs, Georg; Leeper, Finian J; Wacker, Tobias; Andrade, Susana L A; Kolter, Geraldine; Pohl, Martina; Müller, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The intermolecular asymmetric Stetter reaction is an almost unexplored transformation for biocatalysts. Previously reported thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent PigD from Serratia marcescens is the first enzyme identified to catalyze the Stetter reaction of α,β-unsaturated ketones (Michael acceptor substrates) and α-keto acids. PigD is involved in the biosynthesis of the potent cytotoxic agent prodigiosin. Here, we describe the investigation of two new ThDP-dependent enzymes, SeAAS from Saccharopolyspora erythraea and HapD from Hahella chejuensis. Both show a high degree of homology to the amino acid sequence of PigD (39 and 51 %, respectively). The new enzymes were heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli, and the yield of soluble protein was enhanced by co-expression of the chaperone genes groEL/ES. SeAAS and HapD catalyze intermolecular Stetter reactions in vitro with high enantioselectivity. The enzymes possess a characteristic substrate range with respect to Michael acceptor substrates. This provides support for a new type of ThDP-dependent enzymatic activity, which is abundant in various species and not restricted to prodigiosin biosynthesis in different strains. Moreover, PigD, SeAAS, and HapD are also able to catalyze asymmetric carbon-carbon bond formation reactions of aldehydes and α-keto acids, resulting in 2-hydroxy ketones.

  10. Anisotropic Morphological Changes in Goethite during Fe(2+)-Catalyzed Recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prachi; Gorski, Christopher A

    2016-07-19

    When goethite is exposed to aqueous Fe(2+), rapid and extensive Fe atom exchange can occur between solid-phase Fe(3+) and aqueous Fe(2+) in a process referred to as Fe(2+)-catalyzed recrystallization. This process can lead to the structural incorporation or release of trace elements, which has important implications for contaminant remediation and nutrient biogeochemical cycling. Prior work found that the process did not cause major changes to the goethite structure or morphology. Here, we further investigated if and how goethite morphology and aggregation behavior changed temporally during Fe(2+)-catalyzed recrystallization. On the basis of existing literature, we hypothesized that Fe(2+)-catalyzed recrystallization of goethite would not result in changes to individual particle morphology or interparticle interactions. To test this, we reacted nanoparticulate goethite with aqueous Fe(2+) at pH 7.5 over 30 days and used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cryogenic TEM, and (55)Fe as an isotope tracer to observe changes in particle dimensions, aggregation, and isotopic composition over time. Over the course of 30 days, the goethite particles substantially recrystallized, and the particle dimensions changed anisotropically, resulting in a preferential increase in the mean particle width. The temporal changes in goethite morphology could not be completely explained by a single mineral-transformation mechanism but rather indicated that multiple transformation mechanisms occurred concurrently. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the morphology of goethite nanoparticles does change during recrystallization, which is an important step toward identifying the driving force(s) of recrystallization.

  11. Enzyme-catalyzed biocathode in a photoelectrochemical biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Hu, Donghua; Zhang, Xiaohuan; Wang, Kunqi; Wang, Bin; Sun, Bo; Qiu, Zhidong

    2014-12-01

    A novel double-enzyme photoelectrochemical biofuel cell (PEBFC) has been developed by taking glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as the enzyme of the photoanode and biocathode to catalyze the oxidation of glucose and the reduction of oxygen. A H2-mesoporphyrin IX is used as a dye for a TiO2 film electrode to fabricate a photoanode. The horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is immobilized on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode to construct a biocathode which is used to catalyze the reduction of oxygen in the PEBFC for the first time. The biocathode exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity in the presence of O2. The performances of the PEBFC are obtained by current-voltage and power-voltage curves. The short-circuit current density (Isc), the open-circuit voltage (Voc), maximum power density (Pmax), fill factor (FF) and energy conversion efficiency (η) are 439 μA cm-2, 678 mV, 79 μW cm-2, 0.39 and 0.016%, respectively, and the incident photon-to-collected electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) is 32% at 350 nm. The Isc is higher than that of the PEBFC with Pt cathode, and the Voc is higher than that of the dye-sensitized solar cell or the enzyme-catalyzed biofuel cell operating individually, which demonstrates that the HRP is an efficient catalyst for the biocathode in the PEBFC.

  12. Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires: Growth methods, properties, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainey, Mel F.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-12-01

    Metal-mediated vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth is a promising approach for the fabrication of silicon nanowires, although residual metal incorporation into the nanowires during growth can adversely impact electronic properties particularly when metals such as gold and copper are utilized. Aluminum, which acts as a shallow acceptor in silicon, is therefore of significant interest for the growth of p-type silicon nanowires but has presented challenges due to its propensity for oxidation. This paper summarizes the key aspects of aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth along with wire properties and device results. In the first section, aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth is discussed with a specific emphasis on methods to mitigate aluminum oxide formation. Next, the influence of growth parameters such as growth temperature, precursor partial pressure, and hydrogen partial pressure on nanowire morphology is discussed, followed by a brief review of the growth of templated and patterned arrays of nanowires. Aluminum incorporation into the nanowires is then discussed in detail, including measurements of the aluminum concentration within wires using atom probe tomography and assessment of electrical properties by four point resistance measurements. Finally, the use of aluminum-catalyzed VLS growth for device fabrication is reviewed including results on single-wire radial p-n junction solar cells and planar solar cells fabricated with nanowire/nanopyramid texturing.

  13. Protection of wood from microorganisms by laccase-catalyzed iodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, M; Engel, J; Thöny-Meyer, L; Schwarze, F W M R; Ihssen, J

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, Norway spruce wood (Picea abies L.) was reacted with a commercial Trametes versicolor laccase in the presence of potassium iodide salt or the phenolic compounds thymol and isoeugenol to impart an antimicrobial property to the wood surface. In order to assess the efficacy of the wood treatment, a leaching of the iodinated and polymerized wood and two biotests including bacteria, a yeast, blue stain fungi, and wood decay fungi were performed. After laccase-catalyzed oxidation of the phenols, the antimicrobial effect was significantly reduced. In contrast, the enzymatic oxidation of iodide (I(-)) to iodine (I(2)) in the presence of wood led to an enhanced resistance of the wood surface against all microorganisms, even after exposure to leaching. The efficiency of the enzymatic wood iodination was comparable to that of a chemical wood preservative, VP 7/260a. The modification of the lignocellulose by the laccase-catalyzed iodination was assessed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) technique. The intensities of the selected lignin-associated bands and carbohydrate reference bands were analyzed, and the results indicated a structural change in the lignin matrix. The results suggest that the laccase-catalyzed iodination of the wood surface presents an efficient and ecofriendly method for wood protection.

  14. Reduction of nitrobenzene by the catalyzed Fe/Cu process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wenying; LI Ping; FAN Jinhong

    2008-01-01

    The polarization behavior of the couple Fe/Cu in 100 mg/L nitrobenzene aqueous solution was studied using Evans coupling diagrams. The results indicated that the iron corrosion was limited by both anodic and cathodic half-cell reactions under the neutral conditions and cathodically controlled under the alkaline conditions. Batch experiments were performed to study the effect of solution pH, reaction duration, concentration, type of electrolyte and dissolved oxygen (DO) on the reduction of nitrobenzene by the catalyzed Fe/Cu process. This process proved effective in the pH range of 3 to 11. The conversion efficiency of nitrobenzene at pH ≈ 10.1 was almost the same as that under highly acid conditions (pH ≈ 3). The degradation of nitrobenzene fell into two phases: adsorption and surface reduction, and the influence of adsorption and mass transfer became more extensive with solution concentration. The reduction rate decreased in the presence of DO in the solution, indicating that a need for aeration was eliminated in the catalyzed Fe/Cu process. Accordingly, spending on energy consumption would be reduced. Economic analysis indicated that merely 0.05 kg was required for the treatment of a ton of nitrobenzene-containing water with pH from 3 to 11. The catalyzed Fe/Cu process is cost-effective and of practical value.

  15. Acid-Catalyzed Preparation of Biodiesel from Waste Vegetable Oil: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladt, Don; Murray, Steve; Gitch, Brittany; Trout, Haylee; Liberko, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This undergraduate organic laboratory exercise involves the sulfuric acid-catalyzed conversion of waste vegetable oil into biodiesel. The acid-catalyzed method, although inherently slower than the base-catalyzed methods, does not suffer from the loss of product or the creation of emulsion producing soap that plagues the base-catalyzed methods when…

  16. Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of D Mesons and e^+ e^- --> D D-bar Cross Sections at the psi(3770)

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, S; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; López, A; Mehrabyan, S; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Zweber, P

    2007-01-01

    Using 281 /pb of e^+ e^- collisions recorded at the psi(3770)resonance with the CLEO-c detector at CESR, we determine absolute hadronic branching fractions of charged and neutral D mesons using a double tag technique. Among measurements for three D0 and six D^+ modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D0 --> K^-pi^+) = (3.891 +- 0.035 +- 0.059 +- 0.035)% and B(D^+ --> K^-pi^+pi^+) = (9.15 +- 0.10 +- 0.16 +- 0.07)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is all systematic errors other than final state radiation (FSR), and the third is the systematic uncertainty due to FSR. We include FSR in these branching fractions by allowing for additional unobserved photons in the final state. Using an independent determination of the integrated luminosity, we also extract the cross sections sigma(e+e- --> D0 D0-bar) = (3.66+- 0.03 +- 0.06) nb and sigma(e+e- --> D^+ D^-) = (2.91+- 0.03 +- 0.05) nb at a center of mass energy, E_cm = 3774 +- 1 MeV.

  17. Syntheses of dibenzo[d,d']benzo[2,1-b:3,4-b']difuran derivatives and their application to organic field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Minh Anh

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ladder-type π-conjugated compounds containing a benzo[2,1-b:3,4-b']difuran skeleton, such as dibenzo[d,d']benzo[2,1-b:3,4-b']difuran (syn-DBBDF) and dinaphtho[2,3-d:2',3'-d']benzo[2,1-b:3,4-b']difuran (syn-DNBDF) were synthesized. Their photophysical and electrochemical properties were revealed by UV–vis absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) were fabricated with these compounds as organic semiconductors, and their semiconducting properties were evaluated. OFETs with syn-DBBDF and syn-DNBDF showed typical p-type characteristics with hole mobilities of <1.5 × 10−3 cm2·V−1·s−1 and <1.0 × 10−1 cm2·V−1·s−1, respectively. PMID:27340471

  18. Optimization of the beam shaping assembly in the D-D neutron generators-based BNCT using the response matrix method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasesaz, Y; Khalafi, H; Rahmani, F

    2013-12-01

    Optimization of the Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) has been performed using the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code to shape the 2.45 MeV neutrons that are produced in the D-D neutron generator. Optimal design of the BSA has been chosen by considering in-air figures of merit (FOM) which consists of 70 cm Fluental as a moderator, 30 cm Pb as a reflector, 2mm (6)Li as a thermal neutron filter and 2mm Pb as a gamma filter. The neutron beam can be evaluated by in-phantom parameters, from which therapeutic gain can be derived. Direct evaluation of both set of FOMs (in-air and in-phantom) is very time consuming. In this paper a Response Matrix (RM) method has been suggested to reduce the computing time. This method is based on considering the neutron spectrum at the beam exit and calculating contribution of various dose components in phantom to calculate the Response Matrix. Results show good agreement between direct calculation and the RM method.

  19. Low-energy (0.7-74 keV) nuclear recoil calibration of the LUX dark matter experiment using D-D neutron scattering kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Araújo, H M; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Beltrame, P; Bernard, E P; Bernstein, A; Biesiadzinski, T P; Boulton, E M; Bradley, A; Bramante, R; Brás, P; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chapman, J J; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Currie, A; Cutter, J E; Davison, T J R; de Viveiros, L; Dobi, A; Dobson, J E Y; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B N; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C R; Hanhardt, M; Haselschwardt, S J; Hertel, S A; Hogan, D P; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ignarra, C M; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Ji, W; Kamdin, K; Kazkaz, K; Khaitan, D; Knoche, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Lenardo, B G; Lesko, K T; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Malling, D C; Manalaysay, A; Mannino, R L; Marzioni, M F; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J A; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H N; Neves, F; O'Sullivan, K; Oliver-Mallory, K C; Palladino, K J; Pangilinan, M; Pease, E K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Rhyne, C A; Shaw, S; Shutt, T A; Silva, C; Solmaz, M; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; Stephenson, S; Sumner, T J; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D J; Taylor, W C; Tennyson, B P; Terman, P A; Tiedt, D R; To, W H; Tripathi, M; Tvrznikova, L; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Webb, R C; White, J T; Whitis, T J; Witherell, M S; Wolfs, F L H; Xu, J; Yazdani, K; Young, S K; Zhang, C

    2016-01-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is a dual-phase liquid xenon time projection chamber (TPC) operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. A calibration of nuclear recoils in liquid xenon was performed $\\textit{in situ}$ in the LUX detector using a collimated beam of mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced by a deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion source. The nuclear recoil energy from the first neutron scatter in the TPC was reconstructed using the measured scattering angle defined by double-scatter neutron events within the active xenon volume. We measured the absolute charge ($Q_{y}$) and light ($L_{y}$) yields at an average electric field of 180 V/cm for nuclear recoil energies spanning 0.7 to 74 keV and 1.1 to 74 keV, respectively. This calibration of the nuclear recoil signal yields will permit the further refinement of liquid xenon nuclear recoil signal models and, importantly for dark matter searches, clearly demonstrates measured ionization and scintillation s...

  20. Quantitative Predictions for B semileptonic decays into $D,D^*$ and the orbitally excited $D^{**}$ in quark models à la Bakamjian-Thomas

    CERN Document Server

    Morénas, V; Oliver, L; Pène, O; Raynal, J C

    1997-01-01

    Once chosen the dynamics in one frame, the rest frame in this paper, the Bakamjian and Thomas method allows to define relativistic quark models in any frame. These models have been shown to provide, in the infinite quark mass limit, fully covariant current form factors as matrix elements of the quark current operator. In this paper we use the rest frame dynamics fitted from the meson spectrum by various authors, already shown to provide a reasonable value for $\\rho^2$. From the general formulae for the scaling invariant form factors quantitavely the $B$ semileptonic branching ratios to the ground state and orbitally excited charmed mesons $D, D^\\ast$ and $D^{\\ast\\ast}$. We check Bjorken's sum rule and discuss the respective contributions to it. We find function is Coulomb-like. We also find $\\tau_{3/2}\\simeq 0.5 (2/(1+w))^3$ and orbitally excited $D$'s results. The overall agreement with experiment is rather good within the present accuracy which is poor for the orbitally excited charmed mesons. We predict a ...

  1. System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boris, G.

    2008-02-21

    The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer{reg_sign} H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the associated equipment to convey electrical power, air, and foam component material to the unit. This high-pressure, plural-component polyurethane foam pouring system will be used to fill process gas and non-process equipment/piping (PGE/P) within the K-25/K-27 Buildings with polyurethane foam to immobilize contaminants prior to removal. The system creates foam by mixing isocyanate and polyol resin (Resin) component materials. Currently, the project plans to utilize up to six foaming units simultaneously during peak foaming activities. Also included in this system description are the foam component material storage containers that will be used for storage of the component material drums in a staging area outside of the K-25/K-27 Buildings. The Foam Delivery System and foam component material storage enclosures (i.e., Foaming Component Protective Enclosures) used to store polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (PMDI) component material are identified as Safety Significant (SS) Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) in the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the project, Documented Safety Analysis for the K-25 and K-27 Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DSA-ET-K-25/K-27-0001.

  2. Measurement of the $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D_s^-D_s^+$ and $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^-D_s^+$ effective lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves Jr, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R.B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Garcia, L.Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G.A.; Craik, D.C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P.N.Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; de Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Farber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V.V.; Gobel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L.A.; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grunberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T.W.; Haines, S.C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S.T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R.F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I.V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Marki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Martynov, A.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Minard, M.N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M.J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Muller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A.D.; Nguyen, T.D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J.M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B.K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C.J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G.D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J.H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M.S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M.M.; dos Reis, A.C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D.A.; Rodrigues, A.B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A.Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P.Ruiz; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J.J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R.Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N.A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V.K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M.T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M.Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J.J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J.A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D.R.; Warrington, N.; Watson, N.K.; Webber, A.D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F.F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S.A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-01-01

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the $\\bar{B}_s^0$ meson in the decay $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D_s^-D_s^+$ is reported using a proton-proton collision dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D_s^-D_s^+$ effective lifetime is $1.379\\pm0.026\\pm0.017$ ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light $\\bar{B}_s^0$ mass eigenstate of $\\Gamma_L = 0.725 \\pm 0.014 \\pm 0.009$ ps$^{-1}$. The $\\bar{B}_s^0$ lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^-D_s^+$ decay to be $1.52\\pm 0.15 \\pm 0.01~{\\rm ps}$.

  3. Synthesis, structures, and fluorescence properties of two d-d heterometallic cluster-based complexes constructed by N-(phosphonomethyl) iminodiacetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sa-Ying

    2016-12-01

    Two novel d-d heterometallic cluster-based complexes constructed by N-(Phosphonomethyl)imino-diacetic acid (H4PMIDA) multifunctional ligand, [Cu2Zn2(PMIDA)2(H2O)3]·3H2O(1), [ZnNi14(PMIDA)6(H2O)18]·(NO3)6·15H2O(2), have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal analyses, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex 1 is one-dimensional heteronuclear molecular chain, which is further extends into a 3D supramolecular network through very extensive Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The compound 2 is a rare novel zero-dimensional heteronuclear molecular cluster, which is further extends into a 3D supramolecular network through very extensive Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the solid-state fluorescence properties of the two complexes have also been investigated at room temperature.

  4. System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boris, G.

    2008-02-21

    The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer{reg_sign} H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the associated equipment to convey electrical power, air, and foam component material to the unit. This high-pressure, plural-component polyurethane foam pouring system will be used to fill process gas and non-process equipment/piping (PGE/P) within the K-25/K-27 Buildings with polyurethane foam to immobilize contaminants prior to removal. The system creates foam by mixing isocyanate and polyol resin (Resin) component materials. Currently, the project plans to utilize up to six foaming units simultaneously during peak foaming activities. Also included in this system description are the foam component material storage containers that will be used for storage of the component material drums in a staging area outside of the K-25/K-27 Buildings. The Foam Delivery System and foam component material storage enclosures (i.e., Foaming Component Protective Enclosures) used to store polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (PMDI) component material are identified as Safety Significant (SS) Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) in the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the project, Documented Safety Analysis for the K-25 and K-27 Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DSA-ET-K-25/K-27-0001.

  5. Measurements of $B\\rightarrow \\bar{D} D_{s0} ^{*+}(2317)$ decay rates and a search for isospin partners of the $D_{s0}^{*+} (2317)$

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, S -K; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Cervenkov, D; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dolezal, Z; Drasal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Horiguchi, T; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Inguglia, G; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kawasaki, T; Kim, B H; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kodys, P; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lange, J S; Lee, I S; Lewis, P; Li, H; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mori, T; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pesantez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petric, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribezl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Staric, M; Steder, M; Tamponi, U; Tanaka, S; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Trusov, V; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yashchenko, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report improved measurements of the product branching fractions ${\\mathcal B}(B^+\\rightarrow\\bar{D}^0 D_{s0}^{*+} (2317))\\times{\\mathcal B}( D_{s0} ^{*+}(2317)\\rightarrow D_s^{+}\\pi^0) =(8.0^{+1.3}_{-1.2} \\pm 1.1 \\pm 0.4)\\times 10^{-4}$ and ${\\mathcal B}(B^0\\rightarrow D^- D_{s0} ^{*+}(2317))\\times{\\mathcal B}(D_{s0}^{*+}(2317)\\rightarrow D_s^{+}\\pi^0) =(10.2^{+1.3}_{-1.2} \\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.4)\\times 10^{-4}$, where the first errors are statistical, the second are systematic and the third are from $D$ and $D_s$ branching fractions. In addition, we report negative results from a search for hypothesized neutral ($Z^0$) and doubly charged ($Z^{++}$) isospin partners of the $D_{s0}^{*+}(2317)$ and provide upper limits on the product branching fractions ${\\mathcal B}(B^0 \\rightarrow D^0 z^0)\\times{\\mathcal B}(z^0\\rightarrow D_s^{+}\\pi^-)$ and ${\\mathcal B}(B^+\\rightarrow D^0 z^{++})\\times{\\mathcal B}(z^{++}\\rightarrow D_s^{+}\\pi^+)$ that are more than an order of magnitude smaller than theoretical expectations for t...

  6. First observation of CP violation and improved measurement of the branching fraction and polarization of B0→D*+D*- decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenbitter, B.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Barrett, Matthew; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Brovchenko, O.; Browder, Thomas E.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I- S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Esen, Sevda; Fast, James E.; Feindt, M.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Goh, Y. M.; Haba, J.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, Masaya; Iwasaki, Y.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Koblitz, S.; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, S. H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Louvot, R.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohapatra, Debabrata; Moll, A.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Neubauer, S.; Ng, C.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Onuki, Y.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Prim, M.; Ritter, M.; Rohrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Sakai, Yoshihide; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, Alan J.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, Anatoly; Solovieva, E.; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, Eun Il; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Zander, D.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-10-18

    We report the measurement of the branching fraction, the polarization, and the parameters of the time-dependent CP violation in B0→D*+D*- decays using a data sample of 772×106BB pairs, collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We obtain a branching fraction of B=(7.82±0.38±0.63)×10-4, a CP-odd fraction of R⊥=0.138±0.024±0.006 and, additionally, a fraction of the longitudinal component in the transversity base of R0=0.624±0.029±0.011. The measured values of the parameters of the CP violation are SD*+D*-=-0.79±0.13±0.03 and AD*+D*-=0.15±0.08±0.04.

  7. Synthetic Study of Dragmacidin E: Construction of the Core Structure Using Pd-Catalyzed Cascade Cyclization and Rh-Catalyzed Aminoacetoxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Naoya; Nakano, Shun-Ichi; Harada, Shingo; Hamada, Yasumasa; Nemoto, Tetsuhiro

    2017-03-03

    We developed a novel synthetic method of the core structure of dragmacidin E bearing a 7-membered ring-fused bis(indolyl)pyrazinone skeleton. Formation of the 7-membered ring-fused tricyclic indole skeleton was accomplished using a palladium-catalyzed Heck insertion-allylic amination cascade. Vicinal difunctionalization of the 7-membered ring was realized via a rhodium-catalyzed aminoacetoxylation.

  8. Ammonia and hydrazine. Transition-metal-catalyzed hydroamination and metal-free catalyzed functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, Guy [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-06-29

    high temperatures and long reaction times. To address this issue, we have developed several new families of carbon- and boron-based ligands, which are even better donors. The corresponding metal complexes (particularly gold, rhodium, iridium, and ruthenium) of all these species will be tested in the Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov hydroamination of alkynes, allenes, and also alkenes with ammonia and hydrazine. We will also develop metal-free catalytic processes for the functionalization of ammonia and hydrazine. By possessing both a lone pair of electrons and an accessible vacant orbital, singlet carbenes resemble and can mimic the chemical behavior of transition metals. Our preliminary results demonstrate that specially designed carbenes can split the N–H bond of ammonia by an initial nucleophilic activation that prevents the formation of Lewis acid-base adducts, which is the major hurdle for the transition metal catalyzed functionalization of NH3. The use of purely organic compounds as catalysts will eliminate the major drawbacks of transition-metal-catalysis technology, which are the excessive cost of metal complexes (metal + ligands) and in many cases the toxicity of the metal.

  9. Development and industrial application of catalyzer for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis of Claus tail gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honggang Chang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of more strict national environmental protection laws, energy conservation, emission reduction and clean production will present higher requirements for sulfur recovery tail gas processing techniques and catalyzers. As for Claus tail gas, conventional hydrogenation catalyzers are gradually being replaced by low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers. This paper concentrates on the development of technologies for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis catalyzers, preparation of such catalyzers and their industrial application. In view of the specific features of SO2 hydrogenation and organic sulfur hydrolysis during low-temperature hydrogenation, a new technical process involving joint application of hydrogenation catalyzers and hydrolysis catalyzers was proposed. In addition, low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers and low-temperature hydrolysis catalyzers suitable for low-temperature conditions were developed. Joint application of these two kinds of catalyzers may reduce the inlet temperatures in the conventional hydrogenation reactors from 280 °C to 220 °C, at the same time, hydrogenation conversion rates of SO2 can be enhanced to over 99%. To further accelerate the hydrolysis rate of organic sulfur, the catalyzers for hydrolysis of low-temperature organic sulfur were developed. In lab tests, the volume ratio of the total sulfur content in tail gas can be as low as 131 × 10−6 when these two kinds of catalyzers were used in a proportion of 5:5 in volumes. Industrial application of these catalyzers was implemented in 17 sulfur recovery tail gas processing facilities of 15 companies. As a result, Sinopec Jinling Petrochemical Company had outstanding application performances with a tail gas discharging rate lower than 77.9 mg/m3 and a total sulfur recovery of 99.97%.

  10. Assessment of TD-DFT and LF-DFT for study of d - d transitions in first row transition metal hexaaqua complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahović, Filip; Perić, Marko; Gruden-Pavlović, Maja; Zlatar, Matija

    2015-06-07

    Herein, we present the systematic, comparative computational study of the d - d transitions in a series of first row transition metal hexaaqua complexes, [M(H2O)6](n+) (M(2+/3+) = V (2+/3+), Cr(2+/3+), Mn(2+/3+), Fe(2+/3+), Co(2+/3+), Ni(2+)) by the means of Time-dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) and Ligand Field Density Functional Theory (LF-DFT). Influence of various exchange-correlation (XC) approximations have been studied, and results have been compared to the experimental transition energies, as well as, to the previous high-level ab initio calculations. TD-DFT gives satisfactory results in the cases of d(2), d(4), and low-spin d(6) complexes, but fails in the cases when transitions depend only on the ligand field splitting, and for states with strong character of double excitation. LF-DFT, as a non-empirical approach to the ligand field theory, takes into account in a balanced way both dynamic and non-dynamic correlation effects and hence accurately describes the multiplets of transition metal complexes, even in difficult cases such as sextet-quartet splitting in d(5) complexes. Use of the XC functionals designed for the accurate description of the spin-state splitting, e.g., OPBE, OPBE0, or SSB-D, is found to be crucial for proper prediction of the spin-forbidden excitations by LF-DFT. It is shown that LF-DFT is a valuable alternative to both TD-DFT and ab initio methods.

  11. An optical study of the D-D neutron irradiation-induced defects in Co-and Cu-doped ZnO wafers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yun-Bo; Li Gong-Ping; Xu Nan-Nan; Pan Xiao-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Room-temperature photoluminescence and optical transmittance spectroscopy of Co-doped (1 × 1014,5 × 1016,and 1 × 1017 cm-2) and Cu-doped (5 × 1016 cm-2) ZnO wafers irradiated by D-D neutrons (fluence of 2.9 x 1010 cm-2) have been investigated.After irradiation,the Co or Cu metal and oxide clusters in doped ZnO wafers are dissolved,and the würtzite structure of ZnO substrate for each sample remains unchanged and keeps in high c-axis preferential orientation.The degree of irradiation-induced crystal disorder reflected from the absorption band tail parameter (E0) is far greater for doped ZnO than the undoped one.Under the same doping concentration,the Cu-doped ZnO wafer has much higher irradiation-induced disorder than the Co-doped one.Photoluminescence measurements indicate that the introduction rate of both the zinc vacancy and the zinc interstitial is much higher for the doped ZnO wafer with a high doping level than the undoped one.In addition,both crystal lattice distortion and defect complexes are suggested to be formed in doped ZnO wafers.Consequently,the Co-or Cu-doped ZnO wafer (especially with a high doping level) exhibits very low radiation hardness compared with the undoped one,and the Cu-doped ZnO wafer is much less radiation-hard than the Co-doped one.

  12. A SABATH Methyltransferase from the moss Physcomitrella patens catalyzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Nan [ORNL; Ferrer, Jean-Luc [Universite Joseph Fourier, France; Moon, Hong S [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee; Kapteyn, Jeremy [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University; Zhuang, Xiaofeng [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu [Laboratory of Evolutionary Biology, National Institute for Biology, 38 Nishigounaka; Stewart, Neal C. [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee; Gang, David R. [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University; Chen, Feng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01

    Known SABATH methyltransferases, all of which were identified from seed plants, catalyze methylation of either the carboxyl group of a variety of low molecular weight metabolites or the nitrogen moiety of precursors of caffeine. In this study, the SABATH family from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens was identified and characterized. Four SABATH-like sequences (PpSABATH1, PpSABATH2, PpSABATH3, and PpSABATH4) were identified from the P. patens genome. Only PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 showed expression in the leafy gametophyte of P. patens. Full-length cDNAs of PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were cloned and expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were tested for methyltransferase activity with a total of 75 compounds. While showing no activity with carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing compounds, PpSABATH1 displayed methyltransferase activity with a number of thiols. PpSABATH2 did not show activity with any of the compounds tested. Among the thiols analyzed, PpSABATH1 showed the highest level of activity with thiobenzoic acid with an apparent Km value of 95.5 lM, which is comparable to those of known SABATHs. Using thiobenzoic acid as substrate, GC MS analysis indicated that the methylation catalyzed by PpSABATH1 is on the sulfur atom. The mechanism for S-methylation of thiols catalyzed by PpSABATH1 was partially revealed by homology-based structural modeling. The expression of PpSABATH1 was induced by the treatment of thiobenzoic acid. Further transgenic studies showed that tobacco plants overexpressing PpSABATH1 exhibited enhanced tolerance to thiobenzoic acid, suggesting that PpSABATH1 have a role in the detoxification of xenobiotic thiols.

  13. Physio-pathological roles of transglutaminase-catalyzed reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariangela; Ricotta; Maura; Iannuzzi; Giulia; De; Vivo; Vittorio; Gentile

    2010-01-01

    Transglutaminases(TGs) are a large family of related and ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins.The main activity of these enzymes is the cross-linking of a glutaminyl residue of a protein/peptide substrate to a lysyl residue of a protein/peptide co-substrate.In addition to lysyl residues,other second nucleophilic co-substrates may include monoamines or polyamines(to form mono-or bi-substituted/crosslinked adducts) or-OH groups(to form ester linkages) .In the absence of co-substrates,the nucleophile may be water,resulting in the net deamidation of the glutaminyl residue.The TG enzymes are also capable of catalyzing other reactions important for cell viability.The distribution and the physiological roles of TG enzymes have been widely studied in numerous cell types and tissues and their roles in several diseases have begun to be identified."Tissue" TG(TG2) ,a member of the TG family of enzymes,has definitely been shown to be involved in the molecular mechanisms responsible for a very widespread human pathology:i.e.celiac disease(CD) .TG activity has alsobeen hypothesized to be directly involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for several other human diseases,including neurodegenerative diseases,which are often associated with CD.Neurodegenerative diseases,such as Alzheimer’s disease,Parkinson’s disease,supranuclear palsy,Huntington’s disease and other recently identified polyglutamine diseases,are characterized,in part,by aberrant cerebral TG activity and by increased cross-linked proteins in affected brains.In this review,we discuss the physio-pathological role of TG-catalyzed reactions,with particular interest in the molecular mechanisms that could involve these enzymes in the physio-pathological processes responsible for human neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Energy harvesting by implantable abiotically catalyzed glucose fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerzenmacher, S.; von Stetten, F. [Laboratory for MEMS Applications, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 106, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Ducree, J. [HSG-IMIT, Wilhelm-Schickard-Str. 10, D-78052 Villingen-Schwenningen (Germany); Zengerle, R. [Laboratory for MEMS Applications, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 106, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); HSG-IMIT, Wilhelm-Schickard-Str. 10, D-78052 Villingen-Schwenningen (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Implantable glucose fuel cells are a promising approach to realize an autonomous energy supply for medical implants that solely relies on the electrochemical reaction of oxygen and glucose. Key advantage over conventional batteries is the abundant availability of both reactants in body fluids, rendering the need for regular replacement or external recharging mechanisms obsolete. Implantable glucose fuel cells, based on abiotic catalysts such as noble metals and activated carbon, have already been developed as power supply for cardiac pacemakers in the late-1960s. Whereas, in vitro and preliminary in vivo studies demonstrated their long-term stability, the performance of these fuel cells is limited to the {mu}W-range. Consequently, no further developments have been reported since high-capacity lithium iodine batteries for cardiac pacemakers became available in the mid-1970s. In recent years research has been focused on enzymatically catalyzed glucose fuel cells. They offer higher power densities than their abiotically catalyzed counterparts, but the limited enzyme stability impedes long-term application. In this context, the trend towards increasingly energy-efficient low power MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) implants has revived the interest in abiotic catalysts as a long-term stable alternative. This review covers the state-of-the-art in implantable abiotically catalyzed glucose fuel cells and their development since the 1960s. Different embodiment concepts are presented and the historical achievements of academic and industrial research groups are critically reviewed. Special regard is given to the applicability of the concept as sustainable micro-power generator for implantable devices. (author)

  15. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  16. Theoretical Study of the Effects of Di-Muonic Molecules on Muon-Catalyzed Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    MOLECULES ON MUON -CATALYZED FUSION DISSERTATION Eugene V. Sheely, Lieutenant Colonel, USA DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY...THEORETICAL STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF DI-MUONIC MOLECULES ON MUON -CATALYZED FUSION DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty...potential of enhancing the muon -catalyzed fusion reaction rate. In order to study these di-muonic molecules a method of non-adiabatic quantum mechanics

  17. Pd-catalyzed decarboxylative cross coupling of potassium polyfluorobenzoates with aryl bromides, chlorides, and triflates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Rui; Xu, Qing; Jiang, Yuan-Ye; Wang, Yan; Liu, Lei

    2010-03-05

    Pd-catalyzed decarboxylative cross coupling of potassium polyfluorobenzoates with aryl bromides, chlorides, and triflates is achieved by using diglyme as the solvent. The reaction is useful for synthesis of polyfluorobiaryls from readily accessible and nonvolatile polyfluorobenzoate salts. Unlike the Cu-catalyzed decarboxylation cross coupling where oxidative addition is the rate-limiting step, in the Pd-catalyzed version decarboxylation is the rate-limiting step.

  18. Lipase-catalyzed enantioselective esterification of flurbiprofen with n-butanol

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The influences of water activity and solvent hydrophobicity on the kinetics of the lipase-catalyzed enantioselective esterification of flurbiprofen with n-butanol were investigated. The solvent effect was not similar for lipases from Candida rugosa (Crl), Mucor javanicus (Mjl), and porcine pancreas (Ppl). The lipase-catalyzed reaction rates in different solvents across a wide range of water activities revealed that the Ppl-catalyzed reaction exhibited no enantioselectivity and no substantial ...

  19. Facile Rh(III)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Fluorinated Pyridines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuming; Bergman, Robert G.; Ellman, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    A Rh(III)-catalyzed C–H functionalization approach was developed for the preparation of multi-substituted 3-fluoropyridines from α-fluoro-α,β-unsaturated oximes and alkynes. Oximes substituted with aryl, heteroaryl and alkyl β-substituents were effective coupling partners, as were symmetrical and unsymmetrical alkynes with aryl and alkyl substituents. The first examples of coupling α,β-unsaturated oximes with terminal alkynes was also demonstrated and proceeded with uniformly high regioselectivity to provide single 3-fluoropyridine regioisomers. Reactions were also conveniently set up in air on the bench top. PMID:25992591

  20. Rhodium(NHC)-catalyzed O-arylation of aryl bromides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Min; Chang, Sukbok

    2011-05-06

    The first example of the rhodium-catalyzed O-arylation of aryl bromides is reported. While the right combination of rhodium species and N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) offered an effective catalytic system enabling the arylation to proceed, the choice of NHC was determined to be most important. The developed O-arylation protocol has a wide range of substrate scope, high functional group tolerance, and flexibility allowing a complementary route to either N- or O-arylation depending on the choice of NHC.

  1. Triphenylphosphine-Catalyzed Michael Addition of Alcohols to Acrylic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU, Hai-Ling; JIANG, Huan-Feng; WANG, Yu-Gang

    2007-01-01

    A facile triphenylphosphine-catalyzed Michael addition of alcohols to acrylic compounds was described. The reaction was carried out in open air at refluxing temperature in the presence of 10 mol% PPh3. Michael addition of saturated and unsaturated alcohols to acrylonitrile or acrylates has been examined. The reaction gaveβ-alkoxy derivatives with isolated yields of 5%-79%. PPh3 is cheaper and more stable than those trialkylphosphines previously used for the similar reactions, and the products can be easily separated from the reaction mixture via distillation.

  2. Synthesis of Dihydrobenzofurans via Palladium-Catalyzed Heteroannulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman Vladimirovich Rozhkov

    2004-12-19

    Palladium-catalyzed heteroannulation of 1,3-dienes with 3-iodo-2-alkenols, and 2-iodo-2-alkenols, as well as their amino analogs, affords the corresponding cyclic ethers and amines respectively. The presence of a {beta}-hydrogen in the vinylic halide results in {beta}-hydride elimination giving the corresponding alkyne. The presence of a bulky group in the {alpha}-position of the vinylic halide results in failure or reduced amounts of annulation products. A chloride source, pyridine base and electron-rich phosphine are essential for this reaction.

  3. FBH1 Catalyzes Regression of Stalled Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, Kasper; Mistrik, Martin; Neelsen, Kai J

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication fork perturbation is a major challenge to the maintenance of genome integrity. It has been suggested that processing of stalled forks might involve fork regression, in which the fork reverses and the two nascent DNA strands anneal. Here, we show that FBH1 catalyzes regression...... a model whereby FBH1 promotes early checkpoint signaling by remodeling of stalled DNA replication forks....... of a model replication fork in vitro and promotes fork regression in vivo in response to replication perturbation. Cells respond to fork stalling by activating checkpoint responses requiring signaling through stress-activated protein kinases. Importantly, we show that FBH1, through its helicase activity...

  4. Production of Chemoenzymatic Catalyzed Monoepoxide Biolubricant: Optimization and Physicochemical Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Jumat Salimon; Nadia Salih; Bashar Mudhaffar Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is converted to per-carboxylic acid catalyzed by an immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435). This per-carboxylic acid is only intermediate and epoxidized itself in good yields and almost without consecutive reactions. Monoepoxide linoleic acid 9(12)-10(13)-monoepoxy 12(9)-octadecanoic acid (MEOA) was optimized using D-optimal design. At optimum conditions, higher yield% (82.14) and medium oxirane oxygen content (OOC) (4.91%) of MEOA were predicted at 15 μL ...

  5. Synthesis of Dihydrobenzofurans via Palladium-Catalyzed Heteroannulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhkov, Roman Vladimirovich [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed heteroannulation of 1,3-dienes with 3-iodo-2-alkenols, and 2-iodo-2-alkenols, as well as their amino analogs, affords the corresponding cyclic ethers and amines respectively. The presence of a β-hydrogen in the vinylic halide results in β-hydride elimination giving the corresponding alkyne. The presence of a bulky group in the α-position of the vinylic halide results in failure or reduced amounts of annulation products. A chloride source, pyridine base and electron-rich phosphine are essential for this reaction.

  6. Urea- and Thiourea-Catalyzed Aminolysis of Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Marine; Yau, Honman; Jean-Gérard, Ludivine; Auvergne, Rémi; Benazet, Dominique; Schreiner, Peter R; Caillol, Sylvain; Andrioletti, Bruno

    2016-08-23

    The aminolysis of (poly)carbonates by (poly)amines provides access to non-isocyanate polyurethanes (NIPUs) that are toxic-reagent-free analogues of polyurethanes (PUs). Owing to their low reactivity, the ring opening of cyclic carbonates requires the use of a catalyst. Herein, we report that the more available and cheaper ureas could advantageously be used for catalyzing the formation of NIPUs at the expense of the thiourea analogues. In addition, we demonstrate a medium-range pKa of the (thio)urea and an unqeual substitution pattern is critical for controlling the efficiency of the carbonate opening.

  7. Synthesis of heterocycles through transition-metal-catalyzed isomerization reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishøy, Mette; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland

    2014-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed isomerization of N- and O-allylic systems is emerging as an effective method to form synthetically useful iminium and oxocarbenium intermediates. In the presence of tethered nucleophiles, several recent examples illuminate this approach as a powerful strategy for the synthesis...... versatile method to form iminium and oxocarbenium ions. Given the number of reactions involving these highly electrophilic intermediates, this concept provides a sea of opportunities for heterocycle synthesis, (see scheme; Nu=nucleophile). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim....

  8. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of monoacylglycerol in a homogeneous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Julieta B; Nascimento, Maria G; Ninow, Jorge L

    2003-04-01

    The 1,3-regiospecifique lipase, Lipozyme IM, catalyzed the esterification of lauric acid and glycerol in a homogeneous system. To overcome the drawback of the insolubility of glycerol in hexane, which is extensively used in enzymatic synthesis, a mixture of n-hexane/tert-butanol (1:1, v/v) was used leading to a monophasic system. The conversion of lauric acid into monolaurin was 65% in 8 h, when a molar ratio of glycerol to fatty acid (5:1) was used with the fatty acid at 0.1 M, and the phenomenon of acyl migration was minimized.

  9. Iodine - catalyzed prins cyclization of aliphatic and aromatic ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, K.R.; Reddy, K.; Silva Junior, Luiz F., E-mail: luizfsjr@iq.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQ/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Fundamental

    2013-09-15

    Iodine-catalyzed Prins cyclization of homoallylic alcohols and ketones was investigated. Anhydrous conditions and inert atmosphere are not required in this metal-free protocol. The reaction of 2-(3,4-dihydronaphthalene-1-yl)propan-1-ol with six aliphatic symmetric ketones gave the desired products in 67-77% yield. Cyclization was performed with four aliphatic unsymmetric ketones, leading to corresponding pyrans in 66-76% yield. Prins cyclization was also accomplished with four aromatic ketones in 37-66% yield. Finally, Prins cyclization of the monoterpene isopulegol and acetone was successfully achieved. (author)

  10. Comparing Ru and Fe-catalyzed olefin metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to explore the potential of Fe-based complexes with an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, as olefin metathesis catalysts. Apart from a less endothermic reaction energy profile, a small reduction in the predicted upper energy barriers (≈ 2 kcal mol -1) is calculated in the Fe catalyzed profile with respect to the Ru catalysed profile. Overall, this study indicates that Fe-based catalysts have the potential to be very effective olefin metathesis catalysts. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  11. Catalyzing new product adoption at the base of the pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    Marinakis, Y.D.; Walsh, S. T.; Harms, R.

    2016-01-01

    One of the more perplexing of the entrepreneurial issues at the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) is how to catalyze new product adoption by BoP consumers. Because S-shaped adoption dynamics are the result of cultural transmission bias, the question can be rephrased as, how can an entrepreneur overcome conformity bias. We modified the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to include conformity bias. We then qualitatively applied the model to three examples from the literature, namely fuel stoves in Darfu...

  12. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases: two enzyme families catalyze the same reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Piskur, Jure

    2005-01-01

    Mammals have four deoxyribonucleoside kinases, the cytoplasmic (TK1) and mitochondrial (TK2) thymidine kinases, and the deoxycytidine (dCK) and deoxyguanosine (dGK) kinases, which salvage the precursors for nucleic acids synthesis. In addition to the native deoxyribonucleoside substrates, the kin......, the kinases can phosphorylate and thereby activate a variety of anti-cancer and antiviral prodrugs. Recently, the crystal structure of human TK1 has been solved and has revealed that enzymes with fundamentally different origins and folds catalyze similar, crucial cellular reactions....

  13. Kinetics of acid-catalyzed cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, M E; Gonzales, N O; Zimmerman, L W; Yang, J

    2006-03-17

    The cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide, in the presence of sulfuric acid, to form phenol and acetone has been examined by adiabatic calorimetry. As expected, acid can catalyze cumene hydroperoxide reaction at temperatures below that of thermally-induced decomposition. At elevated acid concentrations, reactivity is also observed at or below room temperature. The exhibited reactivity behavior is complex and is significantly affected by the presence of other species (including the products). Several reaction models have been explored to explain the behavior and these are discussed.

  14. Rhodium catalyzed asymmetric Pauson-Khand reaction using SDP ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The activity and enantiocontrol ability of the chiral catalysts prepared from spiro diphosphine ligands, SDP, and rhodium precursor were investigated in the asymmetric catalytic Pauson-Khand reaction. The results showed that SDP ligands were very effective in Rh-catalyzed Pauson-Khand reaction, and their complexes with rhodium could convert a variety of 1,6-enyne compounds into bicyclopentone derivatives under CO atmosphere in high yields with good enantioselectivities. The SbF6- was found to be a suitable counter anion of the catalyst, and 1,2-dichloroethane was the best choice of the solvent for Pauson-Khand reaction.

  15. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases: two enzyme families catalyze the same reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Piskur, Jure

    2005-01-01

    Mammals have four deoxyribonucleoside kinases, the cytoplasmic (TK1) and mitochondrial (TK2) thymidine kinases, and the deoxycytidine (dCK) and deoxyguanosine (dGK) kinases, which salvage the precursors for nucleic acids synthesis. In addition to the native deoxyribonucleoside substrates, the kin......, the kinases can phosphorylate and thereby activate a variety of anti-cancer and antiviral prodrugs. Recently, the crystal structure of human TK1 has been solved and has revealed that enzymes with fundamentally different origins and folds catalyze similar, crucial cellular reactions....

  16. Optimization of Alkali Catalyzed Transesterification of Safflower Oil for Production of Biodiesel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Math, M. C; Chandrashekhara, K. N

    2016-01-01

      The Central Composite Design is used for the optimization of alkaline catalyzed transesterification parameters such as methanol quantity, catalytic concentration, and rotational speed by keeping...

  17. Organizational innovation: a comprehensive model for catalyzing organizational development and change in a rapidly changing world

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steiber, Annika; Alänge, Sverker

    2015-01-01

    ..., especially the processes through which organizational innovations are created, diffused, and sustained. There is thus a need for a more comprehensive understanding of mechanisms catalyzing organizational development...

  18. Solution-solid-solid mechanism: superionic conductors catalyze nanowire growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junli; Chen, Kangmin; Gong, Ming; Xu, Bin; Yang, Qing

    2013-09-11

    The catalytic mechanism offers an efficient tool to produce crystalline semiconductor nanowires, in which the choice, state, and structure of catalysts are active research issues of much interest. Here we report a novel solution-solid-solid (SSS) mechanism for nanowire growth catalyzed by solid-phase superionic conductor nanocrystals in low-temperature solution. The preparation of Ag2Se-catalyzed ZnSe nanowires at 100-210 °C is exampled to elucidate the SSS model, which can be extendable to grow other II-VI semiconductor (e.g., CdSe, ZnS, and CdS) nanowires by the catalysis of nanoscale superionic-phase silver or copper(I) chalcogenides (Ag2Se, Ag2S, and Cu2S). The exceptional catalytic ability of these superionic conductors originates from their structure characteristics, known for high-density vacancies and fast mobility of silver or copper(I) cations in the rigid sublattice of Se(2-) or S(2-) ions. Insights into the SSS mechanism are provided based on the formation of solid solution and the solid-state ion diffusion/transport at solid-solid interface between catalyst and nanowire.

  19. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Part 1. Oxidoreductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert N.; Tewari, Yadu B.; Bell, Donna; Fazio, Kari; Anderson, Ellen

    1993-03-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: the reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement (temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used); the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it. The thermodynamic conventions pertinent to the tabulation of equilibrium data are discussed. A distinction is made between those thermodynamic quantities which pertain to the overall biochemical reaction and those which pertain to a reference reaction that involves specific species. The data from 205 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service Registry Numbers have been assigned to the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participated.

  20. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen catalyzed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournet, Amandine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France)] [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Berge, Mathieu; Roques, Christine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France); Bergel, Alain [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Delia, Marie-Line, E-mail: marieline.delia@ensiacet.f [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has already been shown to catalyze oxidation processes in the anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell. The present study focuses on the reverse capacity of the bacterium, i.e. reduction catalysis. Here we show that P. aeruginosa is able to catalyze the electrochemical reduction of oxygen. The use of cyclic voltammetry showed that, for a given range of potential values, the current generated in the presence of bacteria could reach up to four times the current obtained without bacteria. The adhesion of bacteria to the working electrode was necessary for the catalysis to be observed but was not sufficient. The electron transfer between the working electrode and the bacteria did not involve mediator metabolites like phenazines. The transfer was by direct contact. The catalysis required a certain contact duration between electrodes and live bacteria but after this delay, the metabolic activity of cells was no longer necessary. Membrane-bound proteins, like catalase, may be involved. Various strains of P. aeruginosa, including clinical isolates, were tested and all of them, even catalase-defective mutants, presented the same catalytic property. P. aeruginosa offers a new model for the analysis of reduction catalysis and the protocol designed here may provide a basis for developing an interesting tool in the field of bacterial adhesion.

  1. Ozonation of Indigo Carmine Catalyzed with Fe-Pillared Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Bernal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ozonation catalyzed by iron-pillared clays was studied. The degradation of dye indigo carmine (IC was elected as test reaction. Fe-pillared clays were synthesized by employing hydrolyzed FeCl3 solutions and bentonite. The pillared structure was verified by XRD and by XPS the oxidation state of iron in the synthesized material was established to be +2. By atomic absorption the weight percentage of iron was determined to be 16. The reaction was conducted in a laboratory scale up-flow bubble column reactor. From the studied variables the best results were obtained with a particle size of 60 microns, pH=3, ozone flow of 0.045 L/min, and catalyst concentration of 100 mg/L. IC was completely degraded and degradation rate was found to be double when using Fe-PILCS than with ozone alone. DQO reduction was also significantly higher with catalyzed than with noncatalyzed ozonation.

  2. Lipase-catalyzed polyester synthesis--a green polymer chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shiro

    2010-01-01

    This article is a short comprehensive review describing in vitro polyester synthesis catalyzed by a hydrolysis enzyme of lipase, most of which has been developed for these two decades. Polyesters are prepared by repeated ester bond-formation reactions; they include two major modes, ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of cyclic monomers such as cyclic esters (lactones) and condensation polymerization via the reaction between a carboxylic acid or its ester group and an alcohol group. Polyester synthesis is, therefore, a reaction in reverse way of in vivo lipase catalysis of ester bond-cleavage with hydrolysis. The lipase-catalyzed polymerizations show very high chemo-, regio-, and enantio-selectivities and involve various advantageous characteristics. Lipase is robust and compatible with other chemical catalysts, which allows novel chemoenzymatic processes. New syntheses of a variety of functional polyesters and a plausible reaction mechanism of lipase catalysis are mentioned. The polymerization characteristics are of green nature currently demanded for sustainable society, and hence, desirable for conducting 'green polymer chemistry'.

  3. Catalyzed Synthesis of Zinc Clays by Prebiotic Central Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruixin; Basu, Kaustuv; Hartman, Hyman; Matocha, Christopher J; Sears, S Kelly; Vali, Hojatollah; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2017-04-03

    How primordial metabolic networks such as the reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and clay mineral catalysts coevolved remains a mystery in the puzzle to understand the origin of life. While prebiotic reactions from the rTCA cycle were accomplished via photochemistry on semiconductor minerals, the synthesis of clays was demonstrated at low temperature and ambient pressure catalyzed by oxalate. Herein, the crystallization of clay minerals is catalyzed by succinate, an example of a photoproduced intermediate from central metabolism. The experiments connect the synthesis of sauconite, a model for clay minerals, to prebiotic photochemistry. We report the temperature, pH, and concentration dependence on succinate for the synthesis of sauconite identifying new mechanisms of clay formation in surface environments of rocky planets. The work demonstrates that seeding induces nucleation at low temperatures accelerating the crystallization process. Cryogenic and conventional transmission electron microscopies, X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and measurements of total surface area are used to build a three-dimensional representation of the clay. These results suggest the coevolution of clay minerals and early metabolites in our planet could have been facilitated by sunlight photochemistry, which played a significant role in the complex interplay between rocks and life over geological time.

  4. Acid-Catalyzed Hydration of anti-Sesquinorbornene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slebocka-Tilk, H.; Brown, R. S.

    1996-11-15

    The acid-catalyzed hydration of anti-sesquinorbornene (1) has been studied at 25 degrees C in 20% DME/H(2)O from 0.001 M kinetic isotope effect for hydration of 1 is 2.7, and a plot of the observed second-order rate constant for the hydration in a mixed solvent system of H(2)O/D(2)O against the atom fraction of deuterium (n) is bowed upward. The reaction also shows marked buffer catalysis by formic, chloroacetic, and dichloroacetic acids, the Brønsted alpha being 1 for these three carboxylic acids: H(3)O(+) does not fit on this Brønsted line. A mechanism for the reaction is presented which is consistent with the generally accepted one for acid-catalyzed hydration of an alkene in which the rate-limiting step involves proton transfer from H(3)O(+) to the double bond. Whether attack of a second water on the developing carbocation occurs simultaneously with protonation cannot be ascertained from the data for 1, but if so, the extent of its C-OH(2) bond formation must be small enough that there is little change in the bonding of these O-H bonds.

  5. Acid base catalyzed transesterification kinetics of waste cooking oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M.P.; Rajvanshi, Shalini [Alternate Hydro Energy Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2011-01-15

    The present study reports the results of kinetics study of acid base catalyzed two step transesterification process of waste cooking oil, carried out at pre-determined optimum temperature of 65 C and 50 C for esterification and transesterification process respectively under the optimum condition of methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1%(w/w) for H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH and 400 rpm of stirring. The optimum temperature was determined based on the yield of ME at different temperature. Simply, the optimum concentration of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH was determined with respect to ME Yield. The results indicated that both esterification and transesterification reaction are of first order rate reaction with reaction rate constant of 0.0031 min{sup -1} and 0.0078 min{sup -1} respectively showing that the former is a slower process than the later. The maximum yield of 21.50% of ME during esterification and 90.6% from transesterification of pretreated WCO has been obtained. This is the first study of its kind which deals with simplified kinetics of two step acid-base catalyzed transesterification process carried under the above optimum conditions and took about 6 h for complete conversion of TG to ME with least amount of activation energy. Also various parameters related to experiments are optimized with respect to ME yield. (author)

  6. Study of microwave effects on the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chen; Reddy, P Muralidhar; Devi, C Shobha; Chang, Po-Chi; Ho, Yen-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microwave heating on lipase-catalyzed reaction remains controversial. It is not clear whether the reaction rate enhancements are purely due to thermal/heating effects or to non-thermal effects. Therefore, quantitative mass spectrometry was used to conduct accurate kinetic analysis of lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of triolein by microwave and conventional heating. Commercial lipases from Candida rugosa (CRL), Porcine Pancreas (PPL), and Burkholderia cepacia (BCL) were used. Hydrolysis reactions were performed at various temperatures and pH levels, along with various amounts of buffer and enzymes. Hydrolysis product yields at each time point using an internal-standard method showed no significant difference between microwave and conventional heating conditions when the reaction was carried out at the same temperature. CRL showed optimum catalytic activity at 37 °C, while PPL and BCL had better activities at 50 °C. The phosphate buffer was found to give a better hydrolysis yield than the Tris-HCl buffer. Overall results prove that a non-thermal effect does not exist in microwave-assisted lipase hydrolysis of triolein. Therefore, conventional heating at high temperatures (e.g., 50 °C) can be also used to accelerate hydrolysis reactions.

  7. Lipase-catalyzed polyester synthesis – A green polymer chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shiro

    2010-01-01

    This article is a short comprehensive review describing in vitro polyester synthesis catalyzed by a hydrolysis enzyme of lipase, most of which has been developed for these two decades. Polyesters are prepared by repeated ester bond-formation reactions; they include two major modes, ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of cyclic monomers such as cyclic esters (lactones) and condensation polymerization via the reaction between a carboxylic acid or its ester group and an alcohol group. Polyester synthesis is, therefore, a reaction in reverse way of in vivo lipase catalysis of ester bond-cleavage with hydrolysis. The lipase-catalyzed polymerizations show very high chemo-, regio-, and enantio-selectivities and involve various advantageous characteristics. Lipase is robust and compatible with other chemical catalysts, which allows novel chemo-enzymatic processes. New syntheses of a variety of functional polyesters and a plausible reaction mechanism of lipase catalysis are mentioned. The polymerization characteristics are of green nature currently demanded for sustainable society, and hence, desirable for conducting ‘green polymer chemistry’. PMID:20431260

  8. Metalloporphyrin solubility: a trigger for catalyzing reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Ishai; Schlautman, Mark A

    2004-02-01

    Metalloporphyrins are well known for their electron-transfer roles in many natural redox systems. In addition, several metalloporphyrins and related tetrapyrrole macrocycles complexed with various core metals have been shown to catalyze the reductive dechlorination of certain organic compounds, thus demonstrating the potential for using naturally occurring metalloporphyrins to attenuate toxic and persistent chlorinated organic pollutants in the environment. However, despite the great interest in reductive dechlorination reactions and the wide variety of natural and synthetic porphyrins currently available, only soluble porphyrins, which comprise a small fraction of this particular family of organic macrocycles, have been used as electron-transfer shuttles in these reactions. Results from the present study clearly demonstrate that metalloporphyrin solubility is a key factor in their ability to catalyze the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene and its daughter compounds. Additionally, we show that certain insoluble and nonreactive metalloporphyrins can be activated as catalysts merely by changing solution conditions to bring about their dissolution. Furthermore, once a metalloporphyrin is fully dissolved and activated, tetrachloroethylene transformation proceeds rapidly, giving nonchlorinated and less toxic alkenes as the major reaction products. Results from the present study suggest that if the right environmental conditions exist or can be created, specific metalloporphyrins may provide a solution for cleaning up sites that are contaminated with chlorinated organic pollutants.

  9. IRC analysis of methanol carbonylation reaction catalyzed by rhodium complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Maorong; FENG Wenlin; JI Yongqiang; LEI Ming

    2004-01-01

    In the reaction cycle for methanol carbonylation catalyzed by Rh complex, the structure geometries of the reactant, intermediates, transition states and product of each elemental reaction have been studied by using the energy gradient method at HF/LANL2DZ level, and the changes of their potential profiles have also been calculated. Through IRC analyses of the transition states for each elemental reaction, it is confirmed that the various structure geometries obtained are stationary points on the cycle reaction pathway of methanol carbonylation catalyzed by Rh complex, and the changes are given in energies and structure geometries of the reactant molecules along the reaction pathway of lowest energy. It has been proposed that the geometrical conversions of intermediates play an important role during the cycle reaction. Through analyses of structure geometries, it has been suggested that, in addition to cis- and trans- structure exchange linkage of catalysis reactive species, the two pathways, cis- and trans-cata- lyzed cycle reactions, can also be linked through geometrical conversion of intermediates, of which the activation energy is 49.79 kJ/mol. Moreover, the reductive elimination elemental reaction may be neither cis-cycle nor trans- one, showing that the cycle reaction can be achieved through various pathways. However different the pathway, the oxidative addition elemental reaction of CH3I is the rate-controlling step.

  10. Enzyme catalyzed electricity-driven water softening system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arugula, Mary A; Brastad, Kristen S; Minteer, Shelley D; He, Zhen

    2012-12-10

    Hardness in water, which is caused by divalent cations such as calcium and magnesium ions, presents a major water quality problem. Because hard water must be softened before use in residential applications, there is great interest in the saltless water softening process because, unlike ion exchange softeners, it does not introduce additional ions into water. In this study, a saltless hardness removal driven by bioelectrochemical energy produced through enzymatic oxidation of glucose was proposed and investigated. Glucose dehydrogenase was coated on a carbon electrode to catalyze glucose oxidation in the presence of NAD⁺ as a cofactor/mediator and methylene green as an electrocatalyst. The results showed that electricity generation stimulated hardness removal compared with non-electricity conditions. The enzymatic water softener worked upon a 6h batch operation per day for eight days, and achieved an average hardness removal of 46% at a high initial concentration of 800 mg/L as CaCO₃. More hardness was removed at a lower initial concentration. For instance, at 200mg/L as CaCO₃ the enzymatic water softener removed 76.4±4.6% of total hardness. The presence of magnesium ions decreased hardness removal because of its larger hydrated radius than calcium ions. The enzymatic water softener removed 70-80% of total hardness from three actual hard water samples. These results demonstrated a proof-of-concept that enzyme catalyzed electricity generation can be used to soften hard water.

  11. Cu-Catalyzed Click Reaction in Carbohydrate Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vinod K; Mishra, Bhuwan B; Mishra, Kunj B; Mishra, Nidhi; Singh, Anoop S; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-09

    Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC), popularly known as the "click reaction", serves as the most potent and highly dependable tool for facile construction of simple to complex architectures at the molecular level. Click-knitted threads of two exclusively different molecular entities have created some really interesting structures for more than 15 years with a broad spectrum of applicability, including in the fascinating fields of synthetic chemistry, medicinal science, biochemistry, pharmacology, material science, and catalysis. The unique properties of the carbohydrate moiety and the advantages of highly chemo- and regioselective click chemistry, such as mild reaction conditions, efficient performance with a wide range of solvents, and compatibility with different functionalities, together produce miraculous neoglycoconjugates and neoglycopolymers with various synthetic, biological, and pharmaceutical applications. In this review we highlight the successful advancement of Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry in glycoscience and its applications as well as future scope in different streams of applied sciences.

  12. A novel fast-neutron tomography system based on a plastic scintillator array and a compact D-D neutron generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert; Zboray, Robert; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Very few experimental imaging studies using a compact neutron generator have been published, and to the knowledge of the authors none have included tomography results using multiple projection angles. Radiography results with a neutron generator, scintillator screen, and camera can be seen in Bogolubov et al. (2005), Cremer et al. (2012), and Li et al. (2014). Comparable results with a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube can be seen in Popov et al. (2011). One study using an array of individual fast neutron detectors in the context of cargo scanning for security purposes is detailed in Eberhardt et al. (2005). In that case, however, the emphasis was on very large objects with a resolution on the order of 1cm, whereas this study focuses on less massive objects and a finer spatial resolution. In Andersson et al. (2014) three fast neutron counters and a D-T generator were used to perform attenuation measurements of test phantoms. Based on the axisymmetry of the test phantoms, the single-projection information was used to calculate radial attenuation distributions of the object, which was compared with the known geometry. In this paper a fast-neutron tomography system based on an array of individual detectors and a purpose-designed compact D-D neutron generator is presented. Each of the 88 detectors consists of a plastic scintillator read out by two Silicon photomultipliers and a dedicated pulse-processing board. Data acquisition for all channels was handled by four single-board microcontrollers. Details of the individual detector design and testing are elaborated upon. Using the complete array, several fast-neutron images of test phantoms were reconstructed, one of which was compared with results using a Co-60 gamma source. The system was shown to be capable of 2mm resolution, with exposure times on the order of several hours per reconstructed tomogram. Details about these measurements and the analysis of the reconstructed images are given, along with a discussion

  13. Immobilization of Chiral Ferrocenyl Ligands on Silica Gel and their Testing in Pd-catalyzed Allylic Substitution and Rh-catalyzed Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan J. Macquarrie

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Five different silica gels containing two chiral ferrocenyl ligands were prepared by various synthetic routes and tested in an enantioselective Pd(0-catalyzed allylic substitution and Rh-catalyzed hydrogenation. All the prepared anchored ligands were characterized by porosimetry data, DRIFTS spectra, thermal data and AAS. The aim of the work was to compare the influence of the carrier, surface properties and immobilization strategy on the performance of the catalyst.

  14. ROLE OF COPPER,ZINC-SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE IN CATALYZING NITROTYROSINE FORMATION IN MURINE LIVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The solely known function of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is to catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anion into hydrogen peroxide. Our objective was to determine if SOD1 catalyzed murine liver protein nitration induced by acetaminophen (APAP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Liver and plasma ...

  15. Copper-catalyzed cascade reactions of α,β-unsaturated esters with keto esters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengning Li; Chongnian Wang; Zengchang Li

    2015-01-01

    A copper-catalyzed cascade reaction of α,β-unsaturated esters with keto esters is reported. It features a copper-catalyzed reductive aldolization followed by a lactonization. This method provides a facile approach to prepare γ-carboxymethyl-γ-lactones and δ-carboxymethyl-δ-lactones under mild reaction conditions.

  16. Kinetic study on the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to levulinic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girisuta, B.; Janssen, L. P. B. M.; Heeres, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    A variety of interesting bulk chemicals is accessible by the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose. An interesting example is levulinic acid, a versatile precursor for fuel additives, polymers, and resins. A detailed kinetic study on the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to levulinic acid is

  17. Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative synthesis of aryl nitriles from benzylic alcohols and aqueous ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chuanzhou; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Youmin; Liu, Weiwei; Cao, Zhiling

    2013-05-28

    Copper-catalyzed direct conversion of benzylic alcohols to aryl nitriles was realized using NH3(aq.) as the nitrogen source, O2 as the oxidant and TEMPO as the co-catalyst. Furthermore, copper-catalyzed one-pot synthesis of primary aryl amides from alcohols was also achieved.

  18. Oxygenase-Catalyzed Desymmetrization of N,N-Dialkyl-piperidine-4-carboxylic Acids**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzik, Anna M; Leung, Ivanhoe K H; Kochan, Grazyna T; McDonough, Michael A; Claridge, Timothy D W; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    γ-Butyrobetaine hydroxylase (BBOX) is a 2-oxoglutarate dependent oxygenase that catalyzes the final hydroxylation step in the biosynthesis of carnitine. BBOX was shown to catalyze the oxidative desymmetrization of achiral N,N-dialkyl piperidine-4-carboxylates to give products with two or three stereogenic centers. PMID:25164544

  19. Aminoacyl-coenzyme A synthesis catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, Martijn J.; Jekel, Peter A.; Wijma, Hein J.; Bovenberg, Roel A. L.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2011-01-01

    Coenzyme A ligases play an important role in metabolism by catalyzing the activation of carboxylic acids. In this study we describe the synthesis of aminoacyl-coenzyme As (CoAs) catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum. The enzyme accepted medium-chain length fatty acids as the best

  20. LIPASE-CATALYZED TRANSESTERIFICATION OF PALM KERNEL OIL WITH DIALKYLCARBONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjahjono Herawan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipase-catalyzed transesterifications-especially in a solvent-free medium-are important for industrial applications because such systems would have an enormous advantage by avoiding the problem of separation, toxicity and flammability of organic solvents. However, the organic solvent-free alcoholysis, especially methanolysis, does not give high conversions. The same problem also occurs when ethyl or methyl acetate are used as acyl acceptors. The main problems of lipase-catalyzed organic solvent-free alcoholysis are first, the solubility of the plant oil in the substrate or solvent and second, the fact that transesterification is an equilibrium reaction. Dialkyl carbonates, versatile compounds due to their chemical reactivity and physical properties, may provide an alternative to solve both problems. Using dialkyl carbonates transesterification is not an equilibrium reaction, because the intermediate compound immediately decomposes to carbon dioxide and an alcohol. Moreover, dialkyl carbonates (especially dimethyl carbonate are cheap and widely available. For single step lipase-catalyzed transesterification of palm kernel oil, diakyl carbonates (in this case dimethyl and diethyl carbonate gave better yields compared to those of short chain alcohols. The rate of ester formation with dialkyl carbonates as substrate was about 6-7 times higher than that obtained with short chain alcohols. The formation of esters was gradually increased by a higher enzyme amount from 5-20% (w/w of oil for 8 h reaction time. However from the economic point of view, an enzyme amount of 10% on the weight base of oil was proposed for further reaction. Generally, the highest ester formation was observed when a temperature of 60°C was used. However, in the case of dimethyl carbonate little difference was observed at reaction temperatures of 60 and 70oC and the reactions proceeded nearly identically. The esters formation increased drastically up to more than 70% when water

  1. Degradation and transformation of atrazine under catalyzed ozonation process with TiO2 as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yixin; Cao, Hongbin; Peng, Pai; Bo, Hongmiao

    2014-08-30

    Degradation of atrazine by heterogeneously catalyzed ozonation was carried out with TiO2 in the form of rutile as the catalyst. Some experimental factors such as catalyst dose, ozone dose and initial concentration of atrazine were investigated for their influence on catalyzed ozonation process. Although atrazine was effectively removed from aqueous solution by catalyzed ozonation process, the mineralization degree only reached 56% at the experimental conditions. Five transformation products were identified by GC/MS analysis. The degradation of atrazine involved de-alkylation, de-chlorination and de-amination. Diaminotriazine and 5-azauracil were the de-chlorinated and de-aminated products, respectively. The evolution of concentration of transformation products during catalyzed ozonation process was compared with uncatalyzed ozonation to show the degradation pathway. Toxicity tests based on the inhibition of the luminescence emitted by Vibrio fisheri indicated the detoxification of atrazine by catalyzed ozonation.

  2. An improved model electronic Hamiltonian for potential energy surfaces and spin-orbit couplings of low-lying d-d states of [Fe(bpy)3]2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, Satoru; Koga, Nobuaki

    2014-01-14

    With the aim of exploring excited state dynamics, a model electronic Hamiltonian for several low-lying d-d states of [Fe(bpy)3](2+) complex [S. Iuchi, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064519 (2012)] is refined using density-functional theory calculations of singlet, triplet, and quintet states as benchmarks. Spin-orbit coupling elements are also evaluated within the framework of the model Hamiltonian. The accuracy of the developed model Hamiltonian is determined by examining potential energies and spin-orbit couplings at surface crossing regions between different spin states. Insights into the potential energy surfaces around surface crossing regions are also provided through molecular dynamics simulations. The results demonstrate that the constructed model Hamiltonian can be used for studies on the d-d excited state dynamics of [Fe(bpy)3](2+).

  3. CRYSTAL DEFECTS IN PLASMA NITRIDED LAYER CATALYZED BY RARE EARTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.S. Chen; Y.X. Liu; D.K. Liang; L.M. Xiao

    2002-01-01

    The microstructure of plasma nitrided layer catalyzed by rare-earth elements has beenstudied with TEM. The results show that the grains of γ'-Fe4N phase are refinedby rare-earth elements and the plane defects in boundary are increased by rare-earthelements. The addition of rare-earth element increases the bombardment effect andthe number of crystal defects such as vacancies, dislocation loops, twins and stackingfaults in γ'-Fe4N phase and can produce the high-density dislocations in the ferrite ofdiffusion layer at a distance 0. 08mm from the surface. The production of a numberof crystal defects is one of important reasons why rare-earth element accelerates thediffusion of nitrogen atoms during plasma-nitridiug.

  4. Rh(II)-catalyzed Reactions of Diazoesters with Organozinc Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panish, Robert; Selvaraj, Ramajeyam; Fox, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Rh(II)-catalyzed reactions of diazoesters with organozinc reagents are described. Diorganozinc reagents participate in reactions with diazo compounds by two distinct, catalyst-dependent mechanisms. With bulky diisopropylethylacetate ligands, the reaction mechanism is proposed to involve initial formation of a Rh-carbene and subsequent carbozincation to give a zinc enolate. With Rh2(OAc)4, it is proposed that initial formation of an azine precedes 1,2-addition by an organozinc reagent. This straightforward route to the hydrazone products provides a useful method for preparing chiral quaternary α-aminoesters or pyrazoles via the Paul-Knorr condensation with 1,3-diketones. Crossover and deuterium labeling experiments provide evidence for the mechanisms proposed. PMID:26241081

  5. Towards a methanol economy: Zeolite catalyzed production of synthetic fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie

    chapter is a literature study of Mobil’s “methanol to hydrocarbons” (MTH) process, giving an overview of the history of the process, the nature of the employed catalysts, and the reaction mechanism. In the third chapter, a series of experiments concerning co conversion of ethane and methanol over......, the conversion capacities for all four alcohols are markedly lower than for H-ZSM-5, and H Beta has higher conversion capacity for methanol than the other alcohols. Furthermore, conventional and mesoporous H Ga MFI was employed in the conversion of methanol and 2 propanol. These catalysts showed a lower...... selectivity towards aromatics than H-ZSM-5 and the mesoporous H-Ga-MFI deactivated extremely slowly during the conversion of 2-propanol and only very small amounts of coke were deposited on the gallium based zeolites compared to H-ZSM-5. In the fifth chapter the direct zeolite catalyzed production...

  6. Cobalt catalyzed hydroesterification of a wide range of olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rensburg, H.; Hanton, M.; Tooze, R.P.; Foster, D.F. [Sasol Technology UK, St Andrews (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    Petrochemical raw materials are an essential raw material for the production of detergents with a substantial portion of synthetic fatty alcohols being produced via hydroformylation of oil or coal derived olefins. Carbonylation processes other than hydroformylation have to date not been commercially employed for the production of fatty esters or alcohols. In this document we highlight the opportunities of converting olefins to esters using cobalt catalyzed alkoxycarbonylation. This process is highly versatile and applicable to a wide range of olefins, linear or branched, alpha or internal in combination with virtually any chain length primary or secondary alcohol allowing the synthesis of a diverse array of compounds such as ester ethoxylated surfactants, methyl branched detergents, lubricants and alkyl propanoates. Furthermore, alkoxycarbonylation of a broad olefin/paraffin hydrocarbon range could be used to produce the corresponding broad cut detergent alcohols. (orig.)

  7. FBH1 Catalyzes Regression of Stalled Replication Forks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Fugger

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication fork perturbation is a major challenge to the maintenance of genome integrity. It has been suggested that processing of stalled forks might involve fork regression, in which the fork reverses and the two nascent DNA strands anneal. Here, we show that FBH1 catalyzes regression of a model replication fork in vitro and promotes fork regression in vivo in response to replication perturbation. Cells respond to fork stalling by activating checkpoint responses requiring signaling through stress-activated protein kinases. Importantly, we show that FBH1, through its helicase activity, is required for early phosphorylation of ATM substrates such as CHK2 and CtIP as well as hyperphosphorylation of RPA. These phosphorylations occur prior to apparent DNA double-strand break formation. Furthermore, FBH1-dependent signaling promotes checkpoint control and preserves genome integrity. We propose a model whereby FBH1 promotes early checkpoint signaling by remodeling of stalled DNA replication forks.

  8. Lactam hydrolysis catalyzed by mononuclear metallo-ß-bactamases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars; Antony, J; Ryde, U

    2003-01-01

    . For most studied systems, the tetrahedral structure is a stable intermediate. Moreover, the C-N bond in the lactam ring is intact in this intermediate, as well as in the following transition state-its cleavage is induced by proton transfer to the nitrogen atom in the lactam ring. However, for the model...... with Asp as a proton shuttle, attack of the zinc-bond hydroxide ion seems to be concerted with the proton transfer. We have also studied the effect of replacing one of the histidine ligands by an asparagine or glutamine residue, giving a zinc site representative of other subclasses of metallo......Two central steps in the hydrolysis of lactam antibiotics catalyzed by mononuclear metallo-beta-lactamases, formation of the tetrahedral intermediate and its breakdown by proton transfer, are studied for model systems using the density functional B3LYP method. Metallo-beta-lactamases have two metal...

  9. Recent developments in lipase-catalyzed synthesis of polyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shiro

    2009-02-18

    Polyester synthesis by lipase catalyst involves two major polymerization modes: i) ring-opening polymerization of lactones, and, ii) polycondensation. Ring-opening polymerization includes the finding of lipase catalyst; scope of reactions; polymerization mechanism; ring-opening polymerization reactivity of lactones; enantio-, chemo- and regio-selective polymerizations; and, chemoenzymatic polymerizations. Polycondensation includes polymerizations involving condensation reactions between carboxylic acid and alcohol functional groups to form an ester bond. In most cases, a carboxylic acid group is activated as an ester form, such as a vinyl ester. Many recently developed polymerizations demonstrate lipase catalysis specific to enzymatic polymerization and appear very useful. Also, since lipase-catalyzed polyester synthesis provides a good opportunity for conducting "green polymer chemistry", the importance of this is described.

  10. Calcium-catalyzed pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Paige A; Truong, Chi; Wheeler, M Clayton; DeSisto, William J

    2015-09-01

    The present study examines the effect of calcium pretreatment on pyrolysis of individual lignocellulosic compounds. Previous work has demonstrated that the incorporation of calcium compounds with the feedstock prior to pyrolysis has a significant effect on the oxygen content and stability of the resulting oil. The aim of this work was to further explore the chemistry of calcium-catalyzed pyrolysis. Bench-scale pyrolysis of biomass constituents, including lignin, cellulose and xylan is performed and compared to the oils produced from pyrolysis of the same components after calcium pretreatment. The resulting oils were analyzed by quantitative GC-MS and SEC. These analyses, together with data collected from previous work provide evidence which was used to develop proposed reaction pathways for pyrolysis of calcium-pretreatment biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis of Rosin Acid Starch Catalyzed by Lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihui Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosin, an abundant raw material from pine trees, was used as a starting material directly for the synthesis of rosin acid starch. The esterification reaction was catalyzed by lipase (Novozym 435 under mild conditions. Based on single factor experimentation, the optimal esterification conditions were obtained as follows: rosin acid/anhydrous glucose unit in the molar ratio 2 : 1, reaction time 4 h at 45°C, and 15% of lipase dosage. The degree of substitution (DS reaches 0.098. Product from esterification of cassava starch with rosin acid was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and iodine coloration analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the morphology and crystallinity of the cassava starch were largely destroyed. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that thermal stability of rosin acid starch decreased compared with native starch.

  12. Silica nanospheres formation induced by peroxidase-catalyzed phenol polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To examine whether lignin-like compound is correlated with silica precipitation in grass, a series of simulated chemical experiments were carried out at ambient temperature and pressure, close to cell wall pH, with phenol polymerization catalyzed by peroxidase in silicon solution. The experiments showed that phenol polymer (a kind of lignin-like substance) caused silica nanosphere precipitation similar to those caused by protein in diatom cell wall previously reported by other authors. The sphere diameter varied with different kinds of phenol and the concentrations of phenol and silicon. Silicon precipitation had phenol and silicon saturation effect, meaning that when the concentration ratio of soluble silicon to phenol exceeded a certain value, the amount of silicon precipitation would decrease.

  13. Chemical and genomic evolution of enzyme-catalyzed reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehisa, Minoru

    2013-09-02

    There is a tendency that a unit of enzyme genes in an operon-like structure in the prokaryotic genome encodes enzymes that catalyze a series of consecutive reactions in a metabolic pathway. Our recent analysis shows that this and other genomic units correspond to chemical units reflecting chemical logic of organic reactions. From all known metabolic pathways in the KEGG database we identified chemical units, called reaction modules, as the conserved sequences of chemical structure transformation patterns of small molecules. The extracted patterns suggest co-evolution of genomic units and chemical units. While the core of the metabolic network may have evolved with mechanisms involving individual enzymes and reactions, its extension may have been driven by modular units of enzymes and reactions.

  14. Chemo- and Enantioselective Intramolecular Silver-Catalyzed Aziridinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Minsoo; Weatherly, Cale D; Guzei, Ilia A; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2017-08-07

    Asymmetric nitrene-transfer reactions are a powerful tool for the preparation of enantioenriched amine building blocks. Reported herein are chemo- and enantioselective silver-catalyzed aminations which transform di- and trisubstituted homoallylic carbamates into [4.1.0]-carbamate-tethered aziridines in good yields and with ee values of up to 92 %. The effects of the substrate, silver counteranion, ligand, solvent, and temperature on both the chemoselectivity and ee value were explored. Stereochemical models were proposed to rationalize the observed absolute stereochemistry of the aziridines, which undergo nucleophilic ring opening to yield enantioenriched amines with no erosion in stereochemical integrity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Mg-catalyzed autoclave synthesis of aligned silicon carbide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Guangcheng; Liu, Yankuan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xiaoqing; Qian, Yitai

    2006-07-27

    In this article, a novel magnesium-catalyzed co-reduction route was developed for the large-scale synthesis of aligned beta-SiC one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures at relative lower temperature (600 degrees C). By carefully controlling the reagent concentrations, we could synthesize beta-SiC rodlike and needlelike nanostructures. The possible growth mechanism of the as-synthesized beta-SiC 1D nanostructures has been investigated. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized beta-SiC nanostructures are characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared absorption, and scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Raman and photoluminescence properties are also investigated at room temperature. The as-synthesized beta-SiC nanostructures exhibit strong shape-dependent field emission properties. Corresponding to their shapes, the as-synthesized nanorods and nanoneedles display the turn-on fields of 12, 8.4, and 1.8 V/microm, respectively.

  16. Metal-catalyzed protein tyrosine nitration in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolo, Nicolás; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael

    2014-11-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is an oxidative postranslational modification that can affect protein structure and function. It is mediated in vivo by the production of nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and nitrogen dioxide ((•)NO₂). Redox-active transition metals such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and manganese (Mn) can actively participate in the processes of tyrosine nitration in biological systems, as they catalyze the production of both reactive oxygen species and RNS, enhance nitration yields and provide site-specificity to this process. Early after the discovery that protein tyrosine nitration can occur under biologically relevant conditions, it was shown that some low molecular weight transition-metal centers and metalloproteins could promote peroxynitrite-dependent nitration. Later studies showed that nitration could be achieved by peroxynitrite-independent routes as well, depending on the transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of nitrite (NO₂(-)) to (•)NO₂ in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Processes like these can be achieved either by hemeperoxidase-dependent reactions or by ferrous and cuprous ions through Fenton-type chemistry. Besides the in vitro evidence, there are now several in vivo studies that support the close relationship between transition metal levels and protein tyrosine nitration. So, the contribution of transition metals to the levels of tyrosine nitrated proteins observed under basal conditions and, specially, in disease states related with high levels of these metal ions, seems to be quite clear. Altogether, current evidence unambiguously supports a central role of transition metals in determining the extent and selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration mediated both by peroxynitrite-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  17. Cyclic peptide formation catalyzed by an antibody ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrud, David B.; Benkovic, Patricia A.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Roberts, Victoria; Liu, Josephine; Neagu, Irina; Iwama, Seiji; Phillips, Barton W.; Smith, Amos B.; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2000-01-01

    Cyclic hexapeptides represent a class of compounds with important, diverse biological activities. We report herein that the antibody 16G3 catalyzes the cyclization of d-Trp-Gly-Pal-Pro-Gly-Phe⋅p-nitrophenyl ester (8a) to give c-(d-Trp-Gly-Pal-Pro-Gly-l-Phe) (11a). The antibody does not, however, catalyze either epimerization or hydrolysis. The resulting rate enhancement of the cyclization by 16G3 (22-fold) was sufficient to form the desired product in greater than 90% yield. In absolute rate terms, the turnover of 16G3 is estimated to be 2 min−1. The background rate of epimerization of 8a was reduced from 10 to 1% and hydrolysis from 50 to 4% in the presence of 16G3. As expected, the catalytic effects of 16G3 were blocked by the addition of an amount of the hapten equal to twice the antibody concentration. We also synthesized three diastereomers of 8a: the d-Trp1-d-Phe6 (8b), l-Trp1-l-Phe6 (8c), and l-Trp1-d-Phe6 (8d) hexapeptides as well as d-Trp′-l-Trp6 (12) and d-Phe′-l-Phe6 (13). As expected, the rate enhancement by 16G3 was greatest for 8a, because the stereochemistry of Trp1 and Phe6 matches that of the corresponding residues on the hapten used to induce the biosynthesis of 16G3. A model of the variable domain of 16G3 was generated from the primary sequence using the antibody structural database to guide the model construction. The resulting model provided support for some previously proposed interpretations of the kinetic data, while providing valuable new insights for others. PMID:10688882

  18. The general base in the thymidylate synthase catalyzed proton abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ananda K; Islam, Zahidul; Krueger, Jonathan; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-12-14

    The enzyme thymidylate synthase (TSase), an important chemotherapeutic drug target, catalyzes the formation of 2'-deoxythymidine-5'-monophosphate (dTMP), a precursor of one of the DNA building blocks. TSase catalyzes a multi-step mechanism that includes the abstraction of a proton from the C5 of the substrate 2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate (dUMP). Previous studies on ecTSase proposed that an active-site residue, Y94 serves the role of the general base abstracting this proton. However, since Y94 is neither very basic, nor connected to basic residues, nor located close enough to the pyrimidine proton to be abstracted, the actual identity of this base remains enigmatic. Based on crystal structures, an alternative hypothesis is that the nearest potential proton-acceptor of C5 of dUMP is a water molecule that is part of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) network comprised of several water molecules and several protein residues including H147, E58, N177, and Y94. Here, we examine the role of the residue Y94 in the proton abstraction step by removing its hydroxyl group (Y94F mutant). We investigated the effect of the mutation on the temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and found that these KIEs are more temperature dependent than those of the wild-type enzyme (WT). These results suggest that the phenolic -OH of Y94 is a component of the transition state for the proton abstraction step. The findings further support the hypothesis that no single functional group is the general base, but a network of bases and hydroxyls (from water molecules and tyrosine) sharing H-bonds across the active site can serve the role of the general base to remove the pyrimidine proton.

  19. Analysis of the vertexes $D^*D_sK$, $D^*_sDK$, $D_0D_sK$ and $D_{s0}DK$ with the light-cone QCD sum rules

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Z G

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the vertexes $D^*D_sK$, $D^*_sDK$, $D_0D_sK$ and $D_{s0}DK$ within the framework of the light-cone QCD sum rules approach in an unified way. The strong coupling constants $G_{D^*D_sK}$ and $G_{D^*_sDK}$ are important parameters in evaluating the charmonium absorption cross sections in searching for the quark-gluon plasmas, our numerical values for the $G_{D^*D_sK}$ and $G_{D^*_sDK}$ are compatible with the existing estimations although somewhat smaller, the SU(4) symmetry breaking effects are very large, about 60%. For the charmed scalar mesons $D_0$ and $D_{s0}$, we take the point of view that they are the conventional $c\\bar{u}$ and $c\\bar{s}$ mesons respectively, and calculate the strong coupling constants $G_{D_0 D_s K}$ and $G_{D_{s0} D K}$ with the vector interpolating currents. The numerical values for the scalar-$D_sK$ and -$DK$ coupling constants $G_{D_0 D_s K}$ and $G_{D_{s0} D K}$ are compatible with the existing estimations, the large values support the hadronic dressin...

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron porosity logging using D-D neutron generator%D-D中子源孔隙度测井的蒙特卡洛模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严岩; 李炳营; 郑世平; 闫永宏; 杨尧; 姚泽恩; 刘炯

    2012-01-01

    The D-D neutron source model was developed according to the neutron energy spectrum and angular distribution of D-D reaction and the standard calibration well model was developed too. The D-D neutron transports in the well model were simulated using the MCNP code. The distributions of relative thermal neutron flux in axis and the relative porosity sensitivity for different source spacing were presented. The results show that the location of zero porosity sensitivity was about 17 cm, and the detector should be located at 25~60 cm space. According to the neutron energy spectrum and angular distribution data, the models of D-T and Am-Be neutron source were also developed. The near-to-far count ratio R and the porosity sensitivities S of the compensated neutron porosity logging were investigated respectively for D-T, D-D and Am-Be neutron sources using the MCNP code, and the results show that the D-D neutron source exhibited a higher sensitivity and higher neutron efficiency in contrast with D-T and Am-Be neutron sources.%根据D-D反应中子的能谱和角分布数据,建立了D-D中子源模型.根据标准刻度井数据,建立了井模型.采用MCNP程序模拟了D-D中子在井中的输运,给出了热中子相对通量沿轴线的分布和孔隙度探测灵敏度随源距的变化,结果显示对D-D中子源,孔隙度测量零灵敏约在17 cm附近,探测器的适宜布置区间为25~60 cm.根据D-T反应中子和Am-Be中子源的能谱及角分布数据,建立了其中子源模型,通过MCNP模拟,研究了补偿法孔隙度测井时近远探测器中的热中子计数比值R及测量灵敏度S随孔隙度的变化,并与D-D中子源的模拟结果进行了比较,结果显示D-D源有更高的测量灵敏度和更高的中子利用率.

  1. Lipase catalyzed ester synthesis for food processing industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravindan Rajendran

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Lipases are one of the most important industrial biocatalyst which catalyzes the hydrolysis of lipids. It can also reverse the reaction at minimum water activity. Because of this pliable nature, it is widely exploited to catalyze the diverse bioconversion reactions, such as hydrolysis, esterification, interesterification, alcoholysis, acidolysis and aminolysis. The property to synthesize the esters from the fatty acids and glycerol promotes its use in various ester synthesis. The esters synthesized by lipase finds applications in numerous fields such as biodiesel production, resolution of the recemic drugs, fat and lipid modification, flavour synthesis, synthesis of enantiopure pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals. It plays a crucial role in the food processing industries since the process is unaffected by the unwanted side products. Lipase modifications such as the surfactant coating, molecular imprinting to suit for the non-aqueous ester synthesis have also been reported. This review deals with lipase catalyzed ester synthesis, esterification strategies, optimum conditions and their applications in food processing industries.Lipases são catalizadores industriais dos mais importantes, os quais catalizam a hidrólise de lipídeos. Também podem reverter a reação a um mínimo de atividade de água. Devido sua natureza flexível, é amplamente explorada para catalizar uma diversidade de reações de bioconversão como hidrólise, esterificação, interesterificação, alcoólise, acidólise e aminólise. A propriedade de síntese de esteres a partir de ácidos graxos e glicerol promoveu seu uso em várias sínteses de esteres. Os esteres sintetizados por lipases encontram aplicação em numerosos campos como a produção de biodiesel, resolução de drogas racêmicas, modificação de gorduras e lipídios, sintese de aromas, síntese de produtos farmacêuticos enantiopuro e nutracêuticos. As lipases possuem um papel crucial nas indústrias de

  2. Recent advances in osmium-catalyzed hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelucci, Giorgio; Baldino, Salvatore; Baratta, Walter

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: A current issue in metal-catalyzed reactions is the search for highly efficient transition-metal complexes affording high productivity and selectivity in a variety of processes. Moreover, there is also a great interest in multitasking catalysts that are able to efficiently promote different organic transformations by careful switching of the reaction parameters, such as temperature, solvent, and cocatalyst. In this context, osmium complexes have shown the ability to catalyze efficiently different types of reactions involving hydrogen, proving at the same time high thermal stability and simple synthesis. In the catalytic reduction of C═X (X = O, N) bonds by both hydrogenation (HY) and transfer hydrogenation (TH) reactions, the most interest has been focused on homogeneous systems based on rhodium, iridium, and in particular ruthenium catalysts, which have proved to catalyze chemo- and stereoselective hydrogenations with remarkable efficiency. By contrast, osmium catalysts have received much less attention because they are considered less active on account of their slower ligand exchange kinetics. Thus, this area remained almost neglected until recent studies refuted these prejudices. The aim of this Account is to highlight the impressive developments achieved over the past few years by our and other groups on the design of new classes of osmium complexes and their applications in homogeneous catalytic reactions involving the hydrogenation of carbon-oxygen and carbon-nitrogen bonds by both HY and TH reactions as well as in alcohol deydrogenation (DHY) reactions. The work described in this Account demonstrates that osmium complexes are emerging as powerful catalysts for asymmetric and non-asymmetric syntheses, showing a remarkably high catalytic activity in HY and TH reactions of ketones, aldehydes, imines, and esters as well in DHY reactions of alcohols. Thus, for instance, the introduction of ligands with an NH function, possibly in combination with a

  3. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  4. Construction of cyclic enones via gold-catalyzed oxygen transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald B. Hammond

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, gold-catalyzed reactions have become a tour de force in organic synthesis. Recently, the gold-, Brønsted acid- or Lewis acid-catalyzed oxygen transfer from carbonyl to carbon–carbon triple bond, the so-called alkyne–carbonyl metathesis, has attracted much attention because this atom economical transformation generates α,β-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives which are of great interest in synthetic organic chemistry. This mini-review focuses on the most recent achievements on gold-catalyzed oxygen transfer reactions of tethered alkynones, diynes or alkynyl epoxides to cyclic enones. The corresponding mechanisms for the transformations are also discussed.

  5. DFT Study of the Molybdenum-Catalyzed Deoxydehydration of Vicinal Diols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lupp, Daniel; Christensen, Niels Johan; Dethlefsen, Johannes Rytter

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of the molybdenum-catalyzed deoxydehydration (DODH) of vicinal diols has been investigated using density functional theory. The proposed catalytic cycle involves condensation of the diol with an MoVI oxo complex, oxidative cleavage of the diol resulting in an MoIV complex......, and extrusion of the alkene. We have compared the proposed pathway with several alternatives, and the results have been corroborated by comparison with the molybdenum- catalyzed sulfoxide reduction recently published by Sanz et al. and with experimental observations for the DODH itself. Improved understanding...... of the mechanism should expedite future optimization of molybdenum-catalyzed biomass transformations....

  6. Isotopic study of ceria-catalyzed soot oxidation in the presence of NOx

    OpenAIRE

    Guillén Hurtado, Noelia; García García, Avelina; Bueno López, Agustín

    2013-01-01

    The ceria-catalyzed soot oxidation mechanism has been studied by a pulse technique with labeled O2 in the absence and presence of NO, using ceria–soot mixtures prepared in the loose contact mode. In the absence of soot, the ceria-catalyzed oxidation of NO to NO2 takes place with ceria oxygen and not with gas-phase O2. However, the oxygen exchange process between gas-phase O2 and ceria oxygen (to yield back O2, but with oxygen atoms coming from ceria) prevailed with regard to the ceria-catalyz...

  7. Exploring chain length selectivity in HIC-catalyzed polycondensation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, David; Gross, Richard A

    2010-03-08

    Polyester synthesis activity of immobilized Humicola insolens (HiC) was systematically studied with three-series of substrates varying in (i) omega-hydroxyalkanoic acid (omegaHA), (ii) alpha,omega-n-alkane diol, and (iii) alpha,omega-n-alkane diacid chain length. Covalent immobilization of HiC on Amberzyme oxirane (AO) resin (i.e., AO-HiC) was prepared. HiC-AO's activity for omegaHA substrates with 6, 10, 12, and 16 carbons was C16 > C12, where C10-omegaHA and C6-omegaHA were not polymerized. In contrast, N435's activity for omegaHA substrates was C16 = C12 > C10, where C6-omegaHA was not polymerized. HiC-AO activity for copolymerization of sebacic acid (C10-diacid) with alpha,omega-n-alkane diols with 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, and 8-carbon chain lengths was C8 > C6, where C3, C4, and C5 diols were not polymerized. N435's relative activity for diol substrates was C8 = C6 = C5 > C4 > C3. HiC-AO activity for copolymerizations of 1,8-octanediol with alpha,omega-n-alkane diacids with 6-, 8-, 9-, 10-, and 13-carbon chain lengths was C13 = C10, where HiC showed little activity for C6, C8, and C9 diacid copolymerization. N435 displayed similar activity for all these diacid chain lengths. Thus, N435 has a broader substrate promiscuity than HiC-AO. This is most apparent for shorter chain length omegaHA, diol, and diacid monomers. These trends were similarly observed for a series of small molecule esterification reactions. Comparison of HiC-AO- and N435-catalyzed C16-HA homopolymerization at 8 h gave polymers with M(n) 40.4 and 25.5 kg/mol, respectively. Furthermore, HiC-AO- and N435-catalyzed copolymerization of 1,8-octanediol/C13-diacid polymerizations at 8 h gave polymers with M(n) of 11.0 and 9.6 kg/mol, respectively.

  8. Enzyme-Catalyzed Regioselective Modification of Starch Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Soma [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States). National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing of Macromolecules, Othmer Dept. of Chemical and Biological Science and Engineering; Sahoo, Bishwabhusan [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States). National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing of Macromolecules, Othmer Dept. of Chemical and Biological Science and Engineering; Teraoka, Iwao [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States). National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing of Macromolecules, Othmer Dept. of Chemical and Biological Science and Engineering; Miller, Lisa M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); Gross, Richard A. [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States). National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing of Macromolecules, Othmer Dept. of Chemical and Biological Science and Engineering

    2004-12-13

    The selective esterification of starch nanoparticles was performed using as catalyst Candida antartica Lipase B (CAL-B) in its immobilized (Novozym 435) and free (SP-525) forms. The starch nanoparticles were made accessible for acylation reactions by formation of Aerosol-OT (AOT, bis(2-ethylhexyl)sodium sulfosuccinate) stabilized microemulsions. Starch nanoparticles in microemulsions were reacted with vinyl stearate, ε-caprolactone, and maleic anhydride at 40 °C for 48 h to give starch esters with degrees of substitution (DS) of 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4, respectively. Substitution occurred regioselectively at the C-6 position of the glucose repeat units. Infrared microspectroscopy (IRMS) revealed that AOT-coated starch nanoparticles diffuse into the outer 50 μm shell of catalyst beads. Thus, even though CAL-B is immobilized within a macroporous resin, CAL-B is sufficiently accessible to the starch nanoparticles. When free CAL-B was incorporated along with starch within AOT-coated reversed micelles, CAL-B was also active and catalyzed the acylation with vinyl stearate (24 h, 40 °C) to give DS = 0.5. After removal of surfactant from the modified starch nanoparticles, they were dispersed in DMSO or water and were shown to retain their nanodimensions.

  9. Lipase catalyzed esterification of glycidol in organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J F; Da Ponte, M N; Barreiros, S

    1993-08-05

    We studied the resolution of racemic glycidol through esterification with butyric acid catalyzed by porcine pancreatic lipase in organic media. A screening of seven solvents (log P values between 0.49 and 3.0, P being the n-octanol-water partition coefficient of the solvent) showed that neither log P nor the logarithm of the molar solubility of water in the solvent provides good correlations between enantioselectivity and the properties of the organic media. Chloroform was one of the best solvents as regards the enantiomeric purity (e. p.) of the ester produced. In this solvent, the optimum temperature for the reaction was determined to be 35 degrees C. The enzyme exhibited maximum activity at a water content of 13 +/- 2% (w/w). The enantiomeric purity obtained was 83 +/- 2% of (S)-glycidyl butyrate and did not depend on the alcohol concentration or the enzyme water content for values of these parameters up to 200 mM and 25% (w/w), respectively. The reaction was found to follow a BiBi mechanism.

  10. Hydrogen cycling of niobium and vanadium catalyzed nanostructured magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, H Gijs; Huot, Jacques; Chapon, Laurent C; Tichelaar, Frans D; Mulder, Fokko M

    2005-10-19

    The reaction of hydrogen gas with magnesium metal, which is important for hydrogen storage purposes, is enhanced significantly by the addition of catalysts such as Nb and V and by using nanostructured powders. In situ neutron diffraction on MgNb(0.05) and MgV(0.05) powders give a detailed insight on the magnesium and catalyst phases that exist during the various stages of hydrogen cycling. During the early stage of hydriding (and deuteriding), a MgH(1hydrogen diffusion coefficient, partly explaining the enhanced kinetics of nanostructured magnesium. It is shown that under relevant experimental conditions, the niobium catalyst is present as NbH(1). Second, a hitherto unknown Mg-Nb perovskite phase could be identified that has to result from mechanical alloying of Nb and the MgO layer of the particles. Vanadium is not visible in the diffraction patterns, but electron micrographs show that the V particle size becomes very small, 2-20 nm. Nanostructuring and catalyzing the Mg enhance the adsorption speed that much that now temperature variations effectively limit the absorption speed and not, as for bulk, the slow kinetics through bulk MgH(2) layers.

  11. On Transition Metal Catalyzed Reduction of N-nitrosodimethlamine

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jun; Tian, Junhua; Zhao, Zhun

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a critical review on "Metal-Catalyzed Reduction of N-Nitrosodimethylamine with Hydrogen in Water", by Davie et al. N-nitrosodimethlamine (NDMA) is a contaminant in drinking and ground water which is difficult to remove by conventional physical methods, such as air stripping. Based on the reported robust capability of metal based powder shaped catalysts in hydrogen reduction, several monometallic and bimetallic catalyst are studied in this paper on the reduction of NDMA with hydrogen. Two kinds of kinetics, metal weight normalized and surface area normalized, are compared between each catalyst in terms of pseudo-first order reaction rate. Palladium, copper enhanced palladium and nickel are found to be very efficient in NDMA reduction, with half-lives on the order of hours per 10 mg/l catalyst metal. Preliminary LC-MS data and carbon balance showed no intermediates. Finally, a simple hydrogen and NMDA surface activated reaction mechanism is proposed by the author for palladium and nickel.

  12. Production of chemoenzymatic catalyzed monoepoxide biolubricant: optimization and physicochemical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimon, Jumat; Salih, Nadia; Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar

    2012-01-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is converted to per-carboxylic acid catalyzed by an immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435). This per-carboxylic acid is only intermediate and epoxidized itself in good yields and almost without consecutive reactions. Monoepoxide linoleic acid 9(12)-10(13)-monoepoxy 12(9)-octadecanoic acid (MEOA) was optimized using D-optimal design. At optimum conditions, higher yield% (82.14) and medium oxirane oxygen content (OOC) (4.91%) of MEOA were predicted at 15 μL of H(2)O(2), 120 mg of Novozym 435, and 7 h of reaction time. In order to develop better-quality biolubricants, pour point (PP), flash point (FP), viscosity index (VI), and oxidative stability (OT) were determined for LA and MEOA. The results showed that MEOA exhibited good low-temperature behavior with PP of -41(°)C. FP of MEOA increased to 128(°)C comparing with 115(°)C of LA. In a similar fashion, VI for LA was 224 generally several hundred centistokes (cSt) more viscous than MEOA 130.8. The ability of a substance to resist oxidative degradation is another important property for biolubricants. Therefore, LA and MEOA were screened to measure their OT which was observed at 189 and 168(°)C, respectively.

  13. Production of Chemoenzymatic Catalyzed Monoepoxide Biolubricant: Optimization and Physicochemical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumat Salimon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Linoleic acid (LA is converted to per-carboxylic acid catalyzed by an immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435. This per-carboxylic acid is only intermediate and epoxidized itself in good yields and almost without consecutive reactions. Monoepoxide linoleic acid 9(12-10(13-monoepoxy 12(9-octadecanoic acid (MEOA was optimized using D-optimal design. At optimum conditions, higher yield% (82.14 and medium oxirane oxygen content (OOC (4.91% of MEOA were predicted at 15 μL of H2O2, 120 mg of Novozym 435, and 7 h of reaction time. In order to develop better-quality biolubricants, pour point (PP, flash point (FP, viscosity index (VI, and oxidative stability (OT were determined for LA and MEOA. The results showed that MEOA exhibited good low-temperature behavior with PP of −41°C. FP of MEOA increased to 128°C comparing with 115°C of LA. In a similar fashion, VI for LA was 224 generally several hundred centistokes (cSt more viscous than MEOA 130.8. The ability of a substance to resist oxidative degradation is another important property for biolubricants. Therefore, LA and MEOA were screened to measure their OT which was observed at 189 and 168°C, respectively.

  14. Palladium Catalyzed Allylic C-H Alkylation: A Mechanistic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper Junker Engelin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The atom-efficiency of one of the most widely used catalytic reactions for forging C-C bonds, the Tsuji-Trost reaction, is limited by the need of preoxidized reagents. This limitation can be overcome by utilization of the recently discovered palladium-catalyzed C-H activation, the allylic C-H alkylation reaction which is the topic of the current review. Particular emphasis is put on current mechanistic proposals for the three reaction types comprising the overall transformation: C-H activation, nucleophillic addition, and re-oxidation of the active catalyst. Recent advances in C-H bond activation are highlighted with emphasis on those leading to C-C bond formation, but where it was deemed necessary for the general understanding of the process closely related C-H oxidations and aminations are also included. It is found that C-H cleavage is most likely achieved by ligand participation which could involve an acetate ion coordinated to Pd. Several of the reported systems rely on benzoquinone for re-oxidation of the active catalyst. The scope for nucleophilic addition in allylic C-H alkylation is currently limited, due to demands on pKa of the nucleophile. This limitation could be due to the pH dependence of the benzoquinone/hydroquinone redox couple. Alternative methods for re-oxidation that does not rely on benzoquinone could be able to alleviate this limitation.

  15. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  16. Deoxycholic acid transformations catalyzed by selected filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollerov, V V; Lobastova, T G; Monti, D; Deshcherevskaya, N O; Ferrandi, E E; Fronza, G; Riva, S; Donova, M V

    2016-03-01

    More than 100 filamentous fungi strains, mostly ascomycetes and zygomycetes from different phyla, were screened for the ability to convert deoxycholic acid (DCA) to valuable bile acid derivatives. Along with 11 molds which fully degraded DCA, several strains were revealed capable of producing cholic acid, ursocholic acid, 12-keto-lithocholic acid (12-keto-LCA), 3-keto-DCA, 15β-hydroxy-DCA and 15β-hydroxy-12-oxo-LCA as major products from DCA. The last metabolite was found to be a new compound. The ability to catalyze the introduction of a hydroxyl group at the 7(α/β)-positions of the DCA molecule was shown for 32 strains with the highest 7β-hydroxylase activity level for Fusarium merismoides VKM F-2310. Curvularia lunata VKM F-644 exhibited 12α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity and formed 12-keto-LCA from DCA. Acremonium rutilum VKM F-2853 and Neurospora crassa VKM F-875 produced 15β-hydroxy-DCA and 15β-hydroxy-12-oxo-LCA, respectively, as major products from DCA, as confirmed by MS and NMR analyses. For most of the positive strains, the described DCA-transforming activity was unreported to date. The presented results expand the knowledge on bile acid metabolism by filamentous fungi, and might be suitable for preparative-scale exploitation aimed at the production of marketed bile acids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Kinetics of acid base catalyzed transesterification of Jatropha curcas oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M P

    2010-10-01

    Out of various non-edible oil resources, Jatropha curcas oil (JCO) is considered as future feedstock for biodiesel production in India. Limited work is reported on the kinetics of transesterification of high free fatty acids containing oil. The present study reports the results of kinetic study of two-step acid base catalyzed transesterification process carried out at an optimum temperature of 65 °C and 50 °C for esterification and transesterification respectively under the optimum methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1% (w/w) for H₂SO₄ and NaOH. The yield of methyl ester (ME) has been used to study the effect of different parameters. The results indicate that both esterification and transesterification reaction are of first order with reaction rate constant of 0.0031 min⁻¹ and 0.008 min⁻¹ respectively. The maximum yield of 21.2% of ME during esterification and 90.1% from transesterification of pretreated JCO has been obtained.

  18. Acid-catalyzed production of biodiesel from waste frying oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, S.; Dube, M.A.; McLean, D.D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Kates, M. [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-15

    The reaction kinetics of acid-catalyzed transesterification of waste frying oil in excess methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), for possible use as biodiesel, was studied. Rate of mixing, feed composition (molar ratio oil:methanol:acid) and temperature were independent variables. There was no significant difference in the yield of FAME when the rate of mixing was in the turbulent range 100 to 600rpm. The oil:methanol:acid molar ratios and the temperature were the most significant factors affecting the yield of FAME. At 70{sup o}C with oil:methanol:acid molar ratios of 1:245:3.8, and at 80{sup o}C with oil:methanol:acid molar ratios in the range 1:74:1.9-1:245:3.8, the transesterification was essentially a pseudo-first-order reaction as a result of the large excess of methanol which drove the reaction to completion (99+/-1% at 4h). In the presence of the large excess of methanol, free fatty acids present in the waste oil were very rapidly converted to methyl esters in the first few minutes under the above conditions. Little or no monoglycerides were detected during the course of the reaction, and diglycerides present in the initial waste oil were rapidly converted to FAME. (author)

  19. Enzymatically catalyzed HES conjugation using microbial transglutaminase: Proof of feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besheer, Ahmed; Hertel, Thomas C; Kressler, Jörg; Mäder, Karsten; Pietzsch, Markus

    2009-11-01

    Polymer-drug and polymer-protein conjugates are promising candidates for the delivery of therapeutic agents. PEGylation, using poly(ethylene glycol) for the conjugation, is now the gold standard in this field, and some PEGylated proteins have successfully reached the market. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is a water-soluble, biodegradable derivative of starch that is currently being investigated as a substitute for PEG. So far, only chemical methods have been suggested for HES conjugation; however, these may have detrimental effects on proteins. Here, we report an enzymatic method for HES conjugation using a recombinant microbial transglutaminase (rMTG). The latter catalyzes the acyl transfer between the gamma-carboxamide group of a glutaminyl residue (acyl donors) and a variety of primary amines (acyl acceptors), including the amino group of lysine. HES was modified with N-carbobenzyloxy glutaminyl glycine (Z-QG) and hexamethylene diamine (HMDA) to act as acyl donor and acyl acceptor, respectively. Using (1)H NMR, the degree of modification with Z-QG and HMDA was found to be 4.6 and 3.9 mol%, respectively. Using SDS-PAGE, it was possible to show that the modified HES successfully coupled to test compounds, proving that it is accepted as a substrate by rMTG. Finally, the process described in this study is a simple, mild approach to produce fully biodegradable polymer-drug and polymer-protein conjugates. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  20. Cobalt-Catalyzed Vinylation of Organozinc Reagents with Aldehydes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; JinXian

    2001-01-01

    Transtion metal catalyzed vinylation of organic halides are known to be a very convenient method for forming carbon-carbon bonds at unsubstituted vinylic position. The versatility of stilbenes is well known because of its various biological active components, the variety of its reactions in organic syntheses, and its ability to function as a bonding partner for metals in complexes.  Many methods have been described for the synthesis of stilbenes. The reduction, dehydrogenation, and elimination reactions leading to stilbenes without formation of new carbon-carbon bonds are known to be a very convenient methods. Synthetically more important are the dimerization reactions: oxidative or eleminative dimerization of a suitable methylarene often constitutes the method of choice for the preparation of a symmetric stilbene. Meerwein arylation and Heck reaction are prominent examples for the synthesis of stilbenes from arenes and styrenes. Moreover, condensation reactions of a nucleophilic with an electrophilic arylmethyl compound include Knoevenagel type reactions and the very general Wittig and Wittig-Horner reactions are also known methods.  ……

  1. Isothermal Kinetics of Catalyzed Air Oxidation of Diesel Soot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To comply with the stringent emission regulations on soot, diesel vehicles manufacturers more and more commonly use diesel particulate filters (DPF. These systems need to be regenerated periodically by burning soot that has been accumulated during the loading of the DPF. Design of the DPF requires rate of soot oxidation. This paper describes the kinetics of catalytic oxidation of diesel soot with air under isothermal conditions. Kinetics data were collected in a specially designed mini-semi-batch reactor. Under the high air flow rate assuming pseudo first order reaction the activation energy of soot oxidation was found to be, Ea = 160 kJ/ mol. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 14th June 2010, Revised: 18th July 2010, Accepted: 9th August 2010[How to Cite: R. Prasad, V.R. Bella. (2010. Isothermal Kinetics of Catalyzed Air Oxidation of Diesel Soot. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5(2: 95-101. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.796.95-101][DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.796.95-101 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/796]Cited by in: ACS 1 |

  2. Base-catalyzed depolymerization of lignin : separation of monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneault, A. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Johnson, D.K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Chornet, E. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Biofuels produced from residual lignocellulosic biomass range from ethanol to biodiesel. The use of lignin for the production of alternate biofuels and green chemicals has been studied with particular emphasis on the structure of lignin and its oxyaromatic nature. In an effort to fractionate lignocellulosic biomass and valorize specific constitutive fractions, the authors developed a strategy for the separation of 12 added value monomers produced during the hydrolytic base catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of a Steam Exploded Aspen Lignin. The separation strategy was similar to vanillin purification to obtain pure monomers, but combining more steps after the lignin depolymerization such as acidification, batch liquid-liquid-extraction (LLE), followed by vacuum distillation, liquid chromatography (LC) and crystallization. The purpose was to develop basic data for an industrial size process flow diagram, and to evaluate both the monomer losses during the separation and the energy requirements. Experimentally testing of LLE, vacuum distillation and flash LC in the laboratory showed that batch vacuum distillation produced up to 4 fractions. Process simulation revealed that a series of 4 vacuum distillation columns could produce 5 distinct monomer streams, of which 3 require further chromatography and crystallization operations for purification. 22 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  3. Enzyme-catalyzed Sequential Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Formaldehyde☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenfang Liu; Yanhui Hou; Benxiang Hou; Zhiping Zhao

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that enzymatic-catalyzed reduction of CO2 is feasible. Most of literature focuses on the con-version of CO2 to methanol. Herein we put emphasis on the sequential conversion of CO2 to formaldehyde and its single reactions. It appears that CO2 pressure plays a critical role and higher pressure is greatly helpful to form more HCOOH as well as HCHO. The reverse reaction became severe in the reduction of CO2 to formaldehyde after 10 h, decreasing HCHO production. Increasing the mass ratio of formate dehydrogenase to formaldehyde dehydrogenase could promote the sequential reaction. At concentrations of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide lower than 100 mmol·L−1, the reduction of CO2 was accelerated by increasing cofactor concentration. The opti-mum pH value and concentration of phosphate buffer were determined as 6.0 and 0.05 mol·L−1, respectively, for the overall reaction. It seems that thermodynamic factor such as pH is restrictive to the sequential reaction due to distinct divergence in appropriate pH range between its single reactions.

  4. Alkylation of Benzene with Propylene Catalyzed by Ionic Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Xuewen; Zhao Suoqi

    2006-01-01

    The alkylation of benzene with propylene catalyzed by ionic liquids to obtain cumene was investigated. Propylene conversion and cumene selectivity under mild reaction conditions were improved greatly after the ionic liquid was modified with HCl. Under the conditions of 20 oC, 0.1MPa, 5 min of reaction time, and a molar ratio of benzene to propylene of 10:1, propylene conversion increased from 83.6% to 100%, and cumene selectivity increased from 90.86% to 98.47%. In addition, it was found that the reaction could be carried out in two different stages so as to obtain a better result. At the first stage, the key reaction was alkylation and a higher propylene conversion was obtained at a lower temperature;At the second stage, the key reaction was transalkylation and a higher temperature was used to improve cumene selectivity. The reaction temperature, pressure and the amount of catalyst used in this work were lower than those used in traditional alkylation processes.

  5. Broadening the scope of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed sugar nucleotide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Richard W; Peltier-Pain, Pauline; Singh, Shanteri; Zhou, Maoquan; Thorson, Jon S

    2013-05-07

    We described the integration of the general reversibility of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions, artificial glycosyl donors, and a high throughput colorimetric screen to enable the engineering of glycosyltransferases for combinatorial sugar nucleotide synthesis. The best engineered catalyst from this study, the OleD Loki variant, contained the mutations P67T/I112P/T113M/S132F/A242I compared with the OleD wild-type sequence. Evaluated against the parental sequence OleD TDP16 variant used for screening, the OleD Loki variant displayed maximum improvements in k(cat)/K(m) of >400-fold and >15-fold for formation of NDP-glucoses and UDP-sugars, respectively. This OleD Loki variant also demonstrated efficient turnover with five variant NDP acceptors and six variant 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl glycoside donors to produce 30 distinct NDP-sugars. This study highlights a convenient strategy to rapidly optimize glycosyltransferase catalysts for the synthesis of complex sugar nucleotides and the practical synthesis of a unique set of sugar nucleotides.

  6. Kinetics of phenolic polymerization catalyzed by peroxidase in organic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.P.; Huang, G.L; Yu, Y.T. [Nankai Univ., Tianjin (China). Inst. for Molecular Biology

    1995-07-05

    Phenolic polymerization was carried out by enzymatic catalysis in organic media, and its kinetics was studied by using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Phenols and aromatic amines with electron-withdrawing groups could hardly be polymerized by HRP catalysis, but phenols and aromatic amines with electron-donating groups could easily by polymerized. The reaction rate of either the para-substituted substrate or meta-substituted substrate was higher than that of ortho-substituted substrate. When ortho-position of hydroxy group of phenols was occupied by an electron-donating group and if another electron-donating group occupied para-position of hydroxy group, the reaction rate increased. Horseradish peroxidase and lactoperoxidase could easily catalyze the polymerization, but chloroperoxidase and laccase failed to yield polymers. Metallic ions such as Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 3+}, and Cu{sup 2+} could poison horseradish peroxidase to various extents, but ions such as Co{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and K{sup +} were not found to inhibit the reaction.

  7. Transamidation of carboxamides catalyzed by Fe(III) and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Figueroa, Liliana; Ojeda-Porras, Andrea; Gamba-Sánchez, Diego

    2014-05-16

    The highly efficient transamidation of several primary, secondary, and tertiary amides with aliphatic and aromatic amines (primary and secondary) is described. The reaction is performed in the presence of a 5 mol % concentration of different hydrated salts of Fe(III), and the results show that the presence of water is crucial. The methodology was also applied to urea and phthalimide to demonstrate its versatility and wide substrate scope. An example of its use is an intramolecular application in the synthesis of 2,3-dihydro-5H-benzo[b]-1,4-thiazepin-4-one, which is the bicyclic core of diltiazem and structurally related drugs (Budriesi, R.; Cosimelli, B.; Ioan, P.; Carosati, E.; Ugenti, M. P.; Spisani, R. Curr. Med. Chem. 2007, 14, 279-287). A plausible mechanism that explains the role of water is proposed on the basis of experimental observations and previous mechanistic suggestions for transamidation reactions catalyzed by transition metals such as copper and aluminum. This methodology represents a significant improvement over other existing methods; it can be performed in air and with wet or technical grade solvents.

  8. Regiospecific Addition of Uracil to Acrylates Catalyzed by Alkaline Protease from Bacillus subtilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying CAI; Jian Yi WU; Na WANG; Xiao Feng SUN; Xian Fu LIN

    2004-01-01

    Michael addition reactions of uracil to acrylates were catalyzed by an alkaline protease from Bacillus subtilis in dimethyl sulfoxide at 55 ℃ for 72 h. The adducts were determined by TLC, IR and 1H NMR.

  9. NOx-Catalyzed Gas-Phase Activation of Methane:the Formation of Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaoxian Xiao; Zhen Yan; Yuan Kou

    2003-01-01

    NOx-catalyzed oxidation of methane without a solid catalyst was investigated, and a hydrogen selectivity of 27% was obtained with an overall methane conversion of 34% and a free O2 concentration of 1.7% at 700 ℃.

  10. Iridium-catalyzed annulation of salicylimines with 1,3-dienes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebe, Yusuke; Nishimura, Takahiro

    2014-07-01

    Iridium-catalyzed annulation of salicylimines with 1,3-dienes gave high yields of the corresponding 4-aminochromanes with high stereoselectivity. The use of a chiral diene ligand enabled the asymmetric reaction to give 4-aminochromanes with high enantioselectivity.

  11. From the molecule to the mole: improving heterogeneous copper catalyzed click chemistry using single molecule spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bowen; Durantini, Javier; Decan, Matthew R; Nie, Jun; Lanterna, Anabel E; Scaiano, Juan C

    2016-12-22

    Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) inspired the optimization of a heterogeneous 'click' catalyst leading to enhanced yields of the Cu-catalyzed reaction of azides with terminal alkynes. Changes in SMS data after optimization confirm the improvements in catalyst performance.

  12. Rhodium-Catalyzed Transannulation of 1,2,3-Triazoles with Nitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneff, Tony; Chuprakov, Stepan; Chernyak, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    Stable and readily available 1-sulfonyl triazoles are converted to the corresponding imidazoles in good to excellent yields via a rhodium(II)-catalyzed reaction with nitriles. Rhodium iminocarbenoids are proposed intermediates. PMID:18855475

  13. Self-catalyzed Effect and Cracking Risk in Mass Concrete Containing Micro-slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The main results obtained from the experimental and engineering investigation on the heat evolution and cracking risk of a furnace concrete block were presented. The heat evolution of experimental mortars containing micro-slag under different environmental temperatures was instrumented in order to investigate the self-catalyzed effect, which was discovered in engineering. Moreover, the thermal stress of the furnace concrete due to heat temperature rise was calculated to evaluate the cracking risk of mass concrete containing micro-slag due to self-catalyzed effect. The experimental results illustrate that with the development of hydration and initial temperature of mixture, the hydration can be also accelerated and temperature of concrete will be continued to rise, which was the self-catalyzed effect. And the thermal stress due to self-catalyzed effect could not result in the cracking of furnace concrete.

  14. The applications of Schiff bases in Ti-catalyzed asymmetric alkynylation of aldehydes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Jia; Lu Yin; Xuan Zhao; Xing Shu Li

    2007-01-01

    Sciff bases 1 and 2, which were derived from chiral aminoalcohols, were used as ligands in Ti-catalyzed asymmetric alkynylation of aldehydes. Good enantioselectivities (up to 88% ee) and high chemical yields (80-90 %) were obtained.

  15. Solid Nanoparticles That Catalyze Biofuel Upgrade Reactions at the Water/Oil Interface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steven Crossley; Jimmy Faria; Min Shen; Daniel E. Resasco

    2010-01-01

    ... of crude products greatly complicates purification procedures. Here, we report a family of solid catalysts that can stabilize water-oil emulsions and catalyze reactions at the liquid/liquid interface...

  16. Palladium-catalyzed Cascade Cyclization-Coupling Reaction of Benzyl Halides with N,N-Diallylbenzoylamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Min HU; Yu ZHANG; Jian Lin HAN; Cheng Jian ZHU; Yi PAN

    2003-01-01

    A novel type of palladium-catalyzed cascade cyclization-coupling reaction has been found. Reaction of N, N-diallylbenzoylamide 1 with benzyl halides 2 afforded the corresponding dihydropyrroles 3 in moderate to excellent yields.

  17. Hydrolysis of Toxic Natural Glucosides Catalyzed by Cyclodextrin Dicyanohydrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Nielsen, Erik Holm; Bols, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    The hydrolysis of toxic 7-hydroxycoumarin glucosides and other aryl and alkyl glucosides, catalyzed by modified a- and ß-cyclodextrin dicyanohydrins, was investigated using different UV, redox, or HPAEC detection assays. The catalyzed reactions all followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and an impre......The hydrolysis of toxic 7-hydroxycoumarin glucosides and other aryl and alkyl glucosides, catalyzed by modified a- and ß-cyclodextrin dicyanohydrins, was investigated using different UV, redox, or HPAEC detection assays. The catalyzed reactions all followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics......, and an impressive rate increase of up to 7569 (kcat/kuncat) was found for the hydroxycoumarin glucoside substrate 4-MUGP. Good and moderate degrees of catalysis (kcat/kuncat) of up to 1259 were found for the natural glucosides phloridzin and skimmin. By using a newly developed catechol detection UV-assay, a weak...

  18. Organizational innovation: verifying a comprehensive model for catalyzing organizational development and change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steiber, Annika; Alänge, Sverker

    2015-01-01

    .... Previous research has identified a need for a more comprehensive framework that will aid in better understanding of the mechanisms catalyzing organizational development and change. Steiber and Alänge (Triple Helix 2(9):1–25, 2015...

  19. PALLADIUM-CATALYZED OXIDATION OF STYRENE AND ALKENES IN PRESENCE OF IONIC LIQUIDS (WACKER REACTION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of ionic liquids in various synthetic transformations is gaining significance due to the enhanced reaction rates, potential for recycling and compatibility with various organic compounds and organometallic catalysts. Palladium-catalyzed oxidation of styrene and other alk...

  20. Highly Efficient Synthesis of Bis(indolyl)methanes Catalyzed by Sodium Tetrafluoroborate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KAMBLE,Vinod Tribhuvannathji; BANDGAR,Babasaheb Pandurang; BAVIKAR,Sudhir Narayanrao

    2007-01-01

    Sodium tetrafluoroborate (NaBF4) was found to catalyze the electrophilic substitution reactions of indoles with aldehydes and ketones under solvent-free conditions to afford the corresponding bis(indolyl)methanes in high yields.

  1. Highly enantioselective [4 + 2] cyclization of chloroaldehydes and 1-azadienes catalyzed by N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Teng-Yue; Sun, Li-Hui; Ye, Song

    2012-11-14

    Highly functionalized dihydropyridinones were synthesized via the N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed enantioselective [4 + 2] annulation of α-chloroaldehydes and azadienes. Hydrogenation of the resulted dihydropyridinones afforded the corresponding piperidinones with high enantiopurity.

  2. Three-component synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols catalyzed by bismuth(Ⅲ) nitrate pentahydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Yan Liang; Ting Ting Zhang; Jing Jing Gao

    2012-01-01

    Bismuth(Ⅲ) nitrate pentahydrate catalyzed the three-component condensation of β-naphthol,aldehydes and amines/urea under solvent-free conditions to afford the corresponding amidoalkyl naphthols in excellent yields.

  3. Regioselective Palladium-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions of 2,4,7-Trichloroquinazoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipf, Peter; George, Kara M

    2010-03-01

    The regioselective palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of 2,4,7-trichloroquinazoline with various aryl- and heteroarylboronic acids are reported. An efficient, sequential strategy was developed that provides access to novel, functionalized heterocycles.

  4. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Alternative Solvent Systems Generated by PARIS IIMichael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas M. Becker, and Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26...

  5. Hydroaminomethylation of 1-Dodecene Catalyzed by Water-soluble Rhodium Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Yong WANG; Mei Ming LUO; Yao Zhong LI; Hua CHEN; Xian Jun LI

    2004-01-01

    The hydroaminomethylation of 1-dodecene catalyzed by water soluble rhodium complex RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)2 in the presence of surfactant CTAB was investigated. High reactivity and selectivity for tertiary amine were achieved under relatively mild conditions.

  6. Influence of the Terminal Electron Donor in D-D-π-A Organic Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole versus Bis(amine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Panpan; Yang, Lin; Liang, Mao; Dong, Huanhuan; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Chunyao; Sun, Zhe; Xue, Song

    2015-10-14

    With respect to the electron-withdrawing acceptors of D-A-π-A organic dyes, reports on the second electron-donating donors for D-D-π-A organic dyes are very limited. Both of the dyes have attracted significant attention in the field of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). In this work, four new D-D-π-A organic dyes with dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole (DTP) or bis(amine) donor have been designed and synthesized for a investigation of the influence of the terminal electron donor in D-D-π-A organic dye-sensitized solar cells. It is found that DTP is a promising building block as the terminal electron donor when introduced in the dithiophenepyrrole direction, but not just a good bridge, which exhibits several characteristics: (i) efficiently increasing the maximum molar absorption coefficient and extending the absorption bands; (ii) showing stronger charge transfer interaction as compared with the pyrrole direction; (iii) beneficial to photocurrent generation of DSCs employing cobalt electrolytes. DSCs based on M45 with the Co-phen electrolyte exhibit good light-to-electric energy conversion efficiencies as high as 9.02%, with a short circuit current density (JSC) of 15.3 mA cm(-2), open circuit voltage (VOC) of 867 mV and fill factor (FF) of 0.68 under AM 1.5 illumination (100 mW cm(-2)). The results demonstrate that N,S-heterocycles such as DTP unit could be promising candidates for application in highly efficient DSCs employing cobalt electrolyte.

  7. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed free radical cannot free move in reaction solution

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Mechanism of Horseradish Peroxidase -catalyzed phenol compound oxidizing reaction is a radical polymerization. Many polymer preparation are also carry on through the radical polymerization mechanism We deduce if free radical produced by peroxidasecatalyzed phenol polymerization could apply on polymer preparation? Could the phenol–oxygen free radical leave off the peroxidase and catalyze other compounds polymerization? The free radical in phenol oxidation process was investigated in homo...

  8. Ready Access to the Echinopines Skeleton via Gold(I)-Catalyzed Alkoxycyclizations of Enynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The [3,5,5,7] tetracyclic skeleton of echinopines has been stereoselectively accessed through a gold(I)-catalyzed alkoxycyclization of cyclopropyl-tethered 1,6-enynes. The key bicyclo[4.2.1]nonane core of the enyne precursors was readily assembled by means of a Co-catalyzed [6 + 2] cycloaddition. Furthermore, the attempted alkoxycyclization of 1,5-enyne substrates revealed an uncovered cyclopropyl rearrangement that gives rise to [3,6,5,7] tetracyclic structures. PMID:27529429

  9. Palladium-catalyzed carbonylative Sonogashira coupling of aryl bromides via tert-butyl isocyanide insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ting; Fei, Xiang-Dong; Ge, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Ming; Ji, Shun-Jun

    2013-04-05

    A simple and efficient palladium-catalyzed carbonylative Sonogashira coupling via tert-butyl isocyanide insertion has been developed, which demonstrates the utility of isocyanides in intermolecular C-C bond construction. This methodology provides a novel pathway for the synthesis of alkynyl imines which can undergo simple silica gel catalyzed hydrolysis to afford alkynones. The approach is tolerant of a wide range of substrates and applicable to library synthesis.

  10. Multidirectional Synthesis of Substituted Indazoles via Iridium-Catalyzed C-H Borylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Scott A; Hones, Andrew C; Roberts, Bryan; Blakemore, David; Marder, Todd B; Steel, Patrick G

    2015-05-15

    In the absence of a steric directing group, iridium-catalyzed C-H borylation of N-protected indazoles occurs rapidly and selectively at C-3 and the resulting boronate esters can be utilized in a range of downstream conversions. The functional group tolerance of the iridium-catalyzed C-H borylation reaction enables simple and efficient multidirectional syntheses of substituted indazoles to be realized.

  11. Palladium-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Substitution of Alcohols : Mechanistic Studies and Synthetic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sawadjoon, Supaporn

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the palladium-catalyzed nucleophilic substitution of π-activated alcohols in which the C–O bond of a non-manipulated hydroxyl group is cleaved. The thesis is divided in two chapters describing two different catalytic systems. Chapter 2 describes a heterogeneous palladium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenolysis of primary, secondary, and tertiary benzylic alcohols to generate the corresponding aromatic hydrocarbons using formic acid as the hydrogen donor. A detailed mechanisti...

  12. Modeling Lipase-Catalyzed Biodiesel Production in [BMIM][PF6

    OpenAIRE

    JianJun Yang; MingYan Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production models in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) reaction medium available in the literature are valid especially for mixing intensity. In this paper, a preliminary model is established in order to try to describe the lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production process in RTILs in a stirring type bioreactor. Mixing intensity and time delay were inspected for the reaction model in [BMIM][PF6] medium. As a result, this model is a good explanation for these actual...

  13. Biodiesel Production from Spent Fish Frying Oil Through Acid-Base Catalyzed Transesterification

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalrahman B. Fadhil; Mohammed M. Dheyab; Kareem M. Ahmed; Marwa H. Yahya

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel fuels were prepared from a special type of frying oil namely spent fish frying oil through two step transesterification viz. acid-base catalyzed transesterification. Hydrochloric acid and potassium hydroxide with methanol were used for this purpose. The oil was pre-treated with (1.0 wt% HCl) and methanol to reduce free fatty acids content of the oil. Then, conditions of the base catalyzed step such as base concentration, reaction temperature, methanol to oil molar ratio and reaction...

  14. Ready Access to the Echinopines Skeleton via Gold(I)-Catalyzed Alkoxycyclizations of Enynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorel, Ruth; Echavarren, Antonio M

    2016-09-16

    The [3,5,5,7] tetracyclic skeleton of echinopines has been stereoselectively accessed through a gold(I)-catalyzed alkoxycyclization of cyclopropyl-tethered 1,6-enynes. The key bicyclo[4.2.1]nonane core of the enyne precursors was readily assembled by means of a Co-catalyzed [6 + 2] cycloaddition. Furthermore, the attempted alkoxycyclization of 1,5-enyne substrates revealed an uncovered cyclopropyl rearrangement that gives rise to [3,6,5,7] tetracyclic structures.

  15. Mo-catalyzed asymmetric olefin metathesis in target-oriented synthesis: Enantioselective synthesis of (+)-africanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherhead, Gabriel S.; Cortez, G. A.; Schrock, Richard R.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2004-01-01

    Catalytic asymmetric ring-opening metathesis (AROM) provides an efficient method for the synthesis of a variety of optically enriched small organic molecules that cannot be easily prepared by alternative methods. The development of Mo-catalyzed AROM transformations that occur in tandem with ring-closing metathesis are described. The utility of the Mo-catalyzed AROM/ring-closing metathesis is demonstrated through an enantioselective approach to the synthesis of (+)-africanol. PMID:15056762

  16. Cyclization strategies to polyenes using Pd(II)-catalyzed couplings of pinacol vinylboronates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iafe, Robert G; Chan, Daniel G; Kuo, Jonathan L; Boon, Byron A; Faizi, Darius J; Saga, Tomomi; Turner, Jonathan W; Merlic, Craig A

    2012-08-17

    As a complement to Pd(0)-catalyzed cyclizations, seven Pd(II)-catalyzed cyclization strategies are reported. α,ω-Diynes are selectively hydroborated to bis(boronate esters), which cyclize under Pd(II)-catalysis producing a diverse array of small, medium, and macrocyclic polyenes with controlled E,E, Z,Z, or E,Z stereochemistry. Various functional groups are tolerated including aryl bromides, and applications are illustrated.

  17. Silver-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Addition/Cyclization of Activated Alkenes with Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Su-Li; Chen, Chao; Wang, Haijun; Liang, Yong-Min

    2016-02-05

    A silver-catalyzed decarboxylative addition/aryl migration/desulfonylation of N-phenyl-N-(phenylsulfonyl)methacrylamide with primary, secondary, and tertiary carboxylic acids was described. The protocol provides an efficient approach for the synthesis of α-all-carbon quaternary stereocenters amides and isoquinolinediones. It was proposed that the radical generated from the silver-catalyzed decarboxylation was involved in the sequence reaction.

  18. Use of a palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative kinetic resolution in synthetic efforts toward bielschowskysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael E; Phillips, John H; Ferreira, Eric M; Stoltz, Brian M

    2013-09-09

    Progress toward the cyclobutane core of bielshowskysin is reported. The core was thought to arise from a cyclopropane intermediate via a furan-mediated cyclopropane fragmentation, followed by a 1,4-Michael addition. The synthesis of the cyclopropane intermediate utilizes a Suzuki coupling reaction, an esterification with 2-diazoacetoacetic acid, and a copper catalyzed cyclopropanation. An alcohol intermediate within the synthetic route was obtained in high enantiopurity via a highly selective palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative kinetic resolution (OKR).

  19. NMR spectroscopic investigations on copper-catalyzed reactions and zintl anions

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Carina

    2016-01-01

    The copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugated 1,4-addition reaction of organozinc reagents to a,b-unsaturated compounds is a very effective and widely used method for the enantioselective carbon-carbon bond formation. By the use of phosphoramidite ligands it is possible to reach ee-values and conversion up to > 99 %. Furthermore, this outstanding reaction provides lower costs in comparison to other transition-metal catalyzed reactions and compatibility to many functional groups. Despite the grea...

  20. Direct Evidence of a Dinuclear Copper Intermediate in Cu(I)-Catalyzed Azide–Alkyne Cycloadditions

    OpenAIRE

    Worrell, B. T.; Malik, J.A.; FOKIN, V.V.

    2013-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has become a commonly employed method for the synthesis of complex molecular architectures under challenging conditions. Despite the widespread use of copper-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions, the mechanism of these processes has remained difficult to establish due to the involvement of multiple equilibria between several reactive intermediates. Real-time monitoring of a representative cycloaddition process via heat flow reaction calo...

  1. The mechanism for iron-catalyzed alkene isomerization in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Karma R.; Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Cahoon, James F.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-05-27

    Here we report nano- through microsecond time-resolved IR experiments of iron-catalyzed alkene isomerization in room-temperature solution. We have monitored the photochemistry of a model system, Fe(CO){sub 4}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene), in neat 1-hexene solution. UV-photolysis of the starting material leads to the dissociation of a single CO to form Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene), in a singlet spin state. This CO loss complex shows a dramatic selectivity to form an allyl hydride, HFe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}), via an internal C-H bond-cleavage reaction in 5-25 ns. We find no evidence for the coordination of an alkene molecule from the bath to the CO loss complex, but do observe coordination to the allyl hydride, indicating that it is the key intermediate in the isomerization mechanism. Coordination of the alkene ligand to the allyl hydride leads to the formation of the bis-alkene isomers, Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene)({eta}{sup 2}-2-hexene) and Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene){sub 2}. Because of the thermodynamic stability of Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene)({eta}{sup 2}-2-hexene) over Fe(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 2}-1-hexene){sub 2} (ca. 12 kcal/mol), nearly 100% of the alkene population will be 2-alkene. The results presented herein provide the first direct evidence for this mechanism in solution and suggest modifications to the currently accepted mechanism.

  2. Trinucleotide repeat expansions catalyzed by human cell-free extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer R Stevens; Elaine E Lahue; Guo-Min Li; Robert S Lahue

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions cause 17 heritable human neurological disorders.In some diseases,somatic expansions occur in non-proliferating tissues such as brain where DNA replication is limited.This finding stimulated significant interest in replication-independent expansion mechanisms.Aberrant DNA repair is a likely source,based in part on mouse studies showing that somatic expansions are provoked by the DNA repair protein MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3complex).Biochemical studies to date used cell-free extracts or purified DNA repair proteins to yield partial reactions at triplet repeats.The findings included expansions on one strand but not the other,or processing of DNA hairpin structures thought to be important intermediates in the expansion process.However,it has been difficult to recapitulate complete expansions in vitro,and the biochemical role of MutSβ remains controversial.Here,we use a novel in vitro assay to show that human cell-free extracts catalyze expansions and contractions of trinucleotide repeats without the requirement for DNA replication.The extract promotes a size range of expansions that is similar to certain diseases,and triplet repeat length and sequence govern expansions in vitro as in vivo.MutSβ stimulates expansions in the extract,consistent with aberrant repair of endogenous DNA damage as a source of expansions.Overall,this biochemical system retains the key characteristics of somatic expansions in humans and mice,suggesting that this important mutagenic process can be restored in the test tube.

  3. A review on biodiesel production using catalyzed transesterification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Dennis Y.C.; Wu, Xuan; Leung, M.K.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China)

    2010-04-15

    Biodiesel is a low-emissions diesel substitute fuel made from renewable resources and waste lipid. The most common way to produce biodiesel is through transesterification, especially alkali-catalyzed transesterification. When the raw materials (oils or fats) have a high percentage of free fatty acids or water, the alkali catalyst will react with the free fatty acids to form soaps. The water can hydrolyze the triglycerides into diglycerides and form more free fatty acids. Both of the above reactions are undesirable and reduce the yield of the biodiesel product. In this situation, the acidic materials should be pre-treated to inhibit the saponification reaction. This paper reviews the different approaches of reducing free fatty acids in the raw oil and refinement of crude biodiesel that are adopted in the industry. The main factors affecting the yield of biodiesel, i.e. alcohol quantity, reaction time, reaction temperature and catalyst concentration, are discussed. This paper also described other new processes of biodiesel production. For instance, the Biox co-solvent process converts triglycerides to esters through the selection of inert co-solvents that generates a one-phase oil-rich system. The non-catalytic supercritical methanol process is advantageous in terms of shorter reaction time and lesser purification steps but requires high temperature and pressure. For the in situ biodiesel process, the oilseeds are treated directly with methanol in which the catalyst has been preciously dissolved at ambient temperatures and pressure to perform the transesterification of oils in the oilseeds. This process, however, cannot handle waste cooking oils and animal fats. (author)

  4. Electrochemically Protected Copper(I)-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Vu; Udit, Andrew K.; Evans, Richard A.; Finn, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has found broad application in myriad fields. For the most demanding applications requiring high yields at low substrate concentrations, highly active but air-sensitive copper complexes must be used. We describe here the use of an electrochemical potential to maintain catalysts in the active Cu(I) oxidation state in the presence of air. The simple procedure efficiently achieves excellent yields of CuAAC products involving both small molecule and protein substrates without the use of potentially damaging chemical reducing agents. A new water-soluble carboxylated version of the popular tris(benzyltriazolylmethyl)amine (TBTA) ligand is described. Cyclic voltammetry revealed reversible or quasi-reversible electrochemical redox behavior of copper complexes of the TBTA derivative (2; E1/2 = 60 mV vs. Ag/AgCl), sulfonated bathophenanthroline (3; E1/2 = -60 mV), and sulfonated tris(benzimidazoylmethyl)amine (4; E1/2 ~ -70 mV), and showed catalytic turnover to be rapid relative to the voltammetry time scale. Under the influence of a -200 mV potential established using a reticulated vitreous carbon working electrode, CuSO4 and 3 formed a superior catalyst. Electrochemically-protected bioconjugations in air were performed using bacteriophage Qβ derivatized with azide moieties at surface lysine residues. The complete addressing of more than 600 reactive sites per particle was demonstrated within 12 hours of electrolysis with sub-stoichiometric quantities of Cu•3. PMID:18504727

  5. Electrochemically protected copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Vu; Udit, Andrew K; Evans, Richard A; Finn, M G

    2008-06-16

    The copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has found broad application in myriad fields. For the most demanding applications that require high yields at low substrate concentrations, highly active but air-sensitive copper complexes must be used. We describe here the use of an electrochemical potential to maintain catalysts in the active Cu(I) oxidation state in the presence of air. This simple procedure efficiently achieves excellent yields of CuAAC products from both small-molecule and protein substrates without the use of potentially damaging chemical reducing agents. A new water-soluble carboxylated version of the popular tris(benzyltriazolylmethyl)amine (TBTA) ligand is also described. Cyclic voltammetry revealed reversible or quasi-reversible electrochemical redox behavior of copper complexes of the TBTA derivative (2; E(1/2)=60 mV vs. Ag/AgCl), sulfonated bathophenanthroline (3; E(1/2)=-60 mV), and sulfonated tris(benzimidazoylmethyl)amine (4; E(1/2) approximately -70 mV), and showed catalytic turnover to be rapid relative to the voltammetry time scale. Under the influence of a -200 mV potential that was established by using a reticulated vitreous carbon working electrode, CuSO4 and 3 formed a superior catalyst. Electrochemically protected bioconjugations in air were performed by using bacteriophage Qbeta that was derivatized with azide moieties at surface lysine residues. Complete derivatization of more than 600 reactive sites per particle was demonstrated within 12 h of electrolysis with substoichiometric quantities of Cu3.

  6. Myeloperoxidase-catalyzed chlorination: the quest for the active species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Daniel R; García, M Victoria; Canle L, Moisés; Santaballa, J Arturo; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a dominating enzyme of circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophils that catalyzes the two-electron oxidation of chloride, thereby producing the strong halogenating agent hypochlorous acid (ClO(-)/HOCl). In absence of MPO the tripeptide Pro-Gly-Gly reacts with HOCl faster than the amino acid taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid, Tau), while the MPO-mediated chlorination shows reverse order. A comparative study of the enzymatic oxidation of both substrates at pH 4.0-6.0, varying H2O2 concentration is presented. Initial and equilibrium rates studies have been carried on, reaction rates in the latter being slower due to the chemical equilibrium between MPO-I and MPO-II-HO2. A maximum of chlorination rate is observed for Pro-Gly-Gly and Tau when [H2O2] approximately 0.3-0.7 mM and pH approximately 4.5-5.0. Several mechanistic possibilities are considered, the proposed one implies that chlorination takes place via two pathways. One, for bulkier substrates, involves chlorination by free HOCl outside the heme cavity; ClO(-) is released from the active center, diffuses away the heme cavity, and undergoes protonation to HOCl. The other implies the existence of compound I-Cl(-) complex (MPO-I-Cl), capable of chlorinating smaller substrates in the heme pocket. Electronic structure calculations show the size of Pro-Gly-Gly comparable to the available gap in the substrate channel, this tripeptide being unable to reach the active site, and its chlorination is only possible by free HOCl outside the enzyme.

  7. Copper-Catalyzed Click Reaction on/in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siheng; Wang, Lin; Yu, Fei; Zhu, Zhiling; Shobaki, Dema; Chen, Haoqing; Wang, Mu; Wang, Jun; Qin, Guoting; Erasquin, Uriel J; Ren, Li; Wang, Yingjun; Cai, Chengzhi

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrated that copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction could be performed inside live mammalian cells without using a chelating azide. Under optimized conditions, the reaction was performed in human ovary cancer cell line OVCAR5 in which newly synthesized proteins were metabolically modified with homopropargylglycine (HPG). This model system allowed us to estimate the efficiency of the reaction on the cell membranes and in the cytosol using mass spectrometry. We found that the reaction was greatly promoted by a tris(triazolylmethyl)amine Cu(I) ligand tethering a cell-penetrating peptide. Uptake of the ligand, copper, and a biotin-tagged azide in the cells was determined to be 69 ± 2, 163 ± 3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 µM, respectively. After 10 minutes of reaction, the product yields on the membrane and cytosolic proteins were higher than 18% and 0.8%, respectively, while 75% cells remained viable. By reducing the biothiols in the system by scraping or treatment with N-ethylmalemide, the reaction yield on the cytosolic proteins was greatly improved to ~9% and ~14%, respectively, while the yield on the membrane proteins remained unchanged. The results indicate that out of many possibilities, deactivation of the current copper catalysts by biothiols is the major reason for the low yield of CuAAC reaction in the cytosol. Overall, we have improved the efficiency for CuAAC reaction on live cells by 3-fold. Despite the low yielding inside live cells, the products that strongly bind to the intracellular targets can be detected by mass spectrometry. Hence, the in situ CuAAC reaction can be potentially used for screening of cell-specific enzyme inhibitors or biomarkers containing 1,4-substituted 1,2,3-triazoles.

  8. Copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Abeer Ahmed

    The click reaction concept, introduced in 2001, has since spurred the rapid development and reexamination of efficient, high yield reactions which proceed rapidly under mild conditions. Prior to the discovery of facile copper catalysis in 2002, the thermally activated azide-alkyne or Huisgen cycloaddition reaction was largely ignored following its discovery in large part due to its slow kinetics, requirement for elevated temperature and limited selectivity. Now, arguably, the most prolific and capable of the click reactions, the copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction is extremely efficient and affords exquisite control of the reaction. The orthogonally and chemoselectivity of this reaction enable its wide utility across varied scientific fields. Despite numerous inherent advantages and widespread use for small molecule synthesis and solution-based polymer chemistry, it has only recently and rarely been utilized to form polymer networks. This work focuses on the synthesis, mechanisms, and unique attributes of the CuAAC reaction for the fabrication of functional polymer networks. The photo-reduction of a series of copper(II)/amine complexes via ligand metal charge transfer was examined to determine their relative efficiency and selectivity in catalyzing the CuAAC reaction. The aliphatic amine ligands were used as an electron transfer species to reduce Cu(II) upon irradiation with 365 nm light while also functioning as an accelerating agent and as protecting ligands for the Cu(I) that was formed. Among the aliphatic amines studied, tertiary amines such as triethylamine (TEA), tetramethyldiamine (TMDA), N,N,N',N",N"-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDTA), and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTETA) were found to be the most effective. The reaction kinetics were accelerated by increasing the PMDETA : Cu(II) ratio with a ratio of ligand to Cu(II) of 4:1 yielding the maximum conversion in the shortest time. The sequential and orthogonal nature of the photo

  9. The mechanism of the NHC catalyzed aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction: insights into a new substrate-catalyzed bimolecular pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pritha; Verma, Pragya; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-04-14

    The first mechanistic study on the NHC-catalyzed aza-MBH reaction between cyclopentenone and N-mesylbenzaldimine using density functional theory reveals that a bimolecular mechanism, involving two molecules of benzaldimine in the proton transfer, is energetically more preferred over the conventional direct proton transfer.

  10. Effect of Molecular Guest Binding on the d-d Transitions of Ni(2+) of CPO-27-Ni: A Combined UV-Vis, Resonant-Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy, and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Erik; Gorelov, Evgeny; Guda, Alexander A; Bugaev, Aram L; Bonino, Francesca; Borfecchia, Elisa; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Gianolio, Diego; Chavan, Sachin; Lamberti, Carlo

    2017-10-04

    We used Ni K-edge resonant-valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (RVtC-XES, also referred to as direct RIXS), an element-selective bulk-sensitive synchrotron-based technique, to investigate the electronic structure of the CPO-27-Ni metal-organic framework (MOF) upon molecular adsorption of significant molecular probes: H2O, CO, H2S, and NO. We compare RVtC-XES with UV-vis spectroscopy, and we show that the element selectivity of RVtC-XES is of strategic significance to observe the full set of d-d excitations in Ni(2+), which are partially overshadowed by the low-energy π-π* transitions of the Ni ligands in standard diffuse-reflectance UV-vis experiments. Our combined RVtC-XES/UV-vis approach provides access to the whole set of d-d excitations, allowing us a complete discussion of the changes undergone by the electronic configuration of the Ni(2+) sites hosted within the MOF upon molecular adsorption. The experimental data have been interpreted by multiplet ligand-field theory calculations based on Wannier orbitals. This study represents a step further in understanding the ability of the CPO-27-Ni MOFs in molecular sorption and separation applications.

  11. High-dynamic-range neutron time-of-flight detector used to infer the D(t,n){sup 4}He and D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction yield and ion temperature on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, C. J., E-mail: cforrest@lle.rochester.edu; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Upgraded microchannel-plate–based photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMT’s) with increased stability to signal-shape linearity have been implemented on the 13.4-m neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector at the Omega Laser Facility. This diagnostic uses oxygenated xylene doped with diphenyloxazole C{sub 15}H{sub 11}NO + p-bis-(o-methylstyryl)-benzene (PPO + bis-MSB) wavelength shifting dyes and is coupled through four viewing ports to fast-gating MCP-PMT’s, each with a different gain to allow one to measure the light output over a dynamic range of 1 × 10{sup 6}. With these enhancements, the 13.4-m nTOF can measure the D(t,n){sup 4}He and D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction yields and average ion temperatures in a single line of sight. Once calibrated for absolute neutron sensitivity, the nTOF detectors can be used to measure the neutron yield from 1 × 10{sup 9} to 1 × 10{sup 14} and the ion temperature with an accuracy approaching 5% for both the D(t,n){sup 4}He and D(d,n){sup 3}He reactions.

  12. High-dynamic-range neutron time-of-flight detector used to infer the D(t,n)(4)He and D(d,n)(3)He reaction yield and ion temperature on OMEGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, C J; Glebov, V Yu; Goncharov, V N; Knauer, J P; Radha, P B; Regan, S P; Romanofsky, M H; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C

    2016-11-01

    Upgraded microchannel-plate-based photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMT's) with increased stability to signal-shape linearity have been implemented on the 13.4-m neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector at the Omega Laser Facility. This diagnostic uses oxygenated xylene doped with diphenyloxazole C15H11NO + p-bis-(o-methylstyryl)-benzene (PPO + bis-MSB) wavelength shifting dyes and is coupled through four viewing ports to fast-gating MCP-PMT's, each with a different gain to allow one to measure the light output over a dynamic range of 1 × 10(6). With these enhancements, the 13.4-m nTOF can measure the D(t,n)(4)He and D(d,n)(3)He reaction yields and average ion temperatures in a single line of sight. Once calibrated for absolute neutron sensitivity, the nTOF detectors can be used to measure the neutron yield from 1 × 10(9) to 1 × 10(14) and the ion temperature with an accuracy approaching 5% for both the D(t,n)(4)He and D(d,n)(3)He reactions.

  13. High-dynamic-range neutron time-of-flight detector used to infer the D(t,n)4He and D(d,n)3He reaction yield and ion temperature on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-11-01

    Upgraded microchannel-plate-based photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMT's) with increased stability to signal-shape linearity have been implemented on the 13.4-m neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector at the Omega Laser Facility. This diagnostic uses oxygenated xylene doped with diphenyloxazole C15H11NO + p-bis-(o-methylstyryl)-benzene (PPO + bis-MSB) wavelength shifting dyes and is coupled through four viewing ports to fast-gating MCP-PMT's, each with a different gain to allow one to measure the light output over a dynamic range of 1 × 106. With these enhancements, the 13.4-m nTOF can measure the D(t,n)4He and D(d,n)3He reaction yields and average ion temperatures in a single line of sight. Once calibrated for absolute neutron sensitivity, the nTOF detectors can be used to measure the neutron yield from 1 × 109 to 1 × 1014 and the ion temperature with an accuracy approaching 5% for both the D(t,n)4He and D(d,n)3He reactions.

  14. Growth and characterization of gold catalyzed SiGe nanowires and alternative metal-catalyzed Si nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gentile Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growth of semiconductor (SC nanowires (NW by CVD using Au-catalyzed VLS process has been widely studied over the past few years. Among others SC, it is possible to grow pure Si or SiGe NW thanks to these techniques. Nevertheless, Au could deteriorate the electric properties of SC and the use of other metal catalysts will be mandatory if NW are to be designed for innovating electronic. First, this article's focus will be on SiGe NW's growth using Au catalyst. The authors managed to grow SiGe NW between 350 and 400°C. Ge concentration (x in Si1- x Ge x NW has been successfully varied by modifying the gas flow ratio: R = GeH4/(SiH4 + GeH4. Characterization (by Raman spectroscopy and XRD revealed concentrations varying from 0.2 to 0.46 on NW grown at 375°C, with R varying from 0.05 to 0.15. Second, the results of Si NW growths by CVD using alternatives catalysts such as platinum-, palladium- and nickel-silicides are presented. This study, carried out on a LPCVD furnace, aimed at defining Si NW growth conditions when using such catalysts. Since the growth temperatures investigated are lower than the eutectic temperatures of these Si-metal alloys, VSS growth is expected and observed. Different temperatures and HCl flow rates have been tested with the aim of minimizing 2D growth which induces an important tapering of the NW. Finally, mechanical characterization of single NW has been carried out using an AFM method developed at the LTM. It consists in measuring the deflection of an AFM tip while performing approach-retract curves at various positions along the length of a cantilevered NW. This approach allows the measurement of as-grown single NW's Young modulus and spring constant, and alleviates uncertainties inherent in single point measurement.

  15. Polymer multilayer films obtained by electrochemically catalyzed click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzek, Gaulthier; Thomann, Jean-Sébastien; Ben Ameur, Nejla; Jierry, Loïc; Mésini, Philippe; Ponche, Arnaud; Contal, Christophe; El Haitami, Alae E; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Senger, Bernard; Schaaf, Pierre; Frisch, Benoît; Boulmedais, Fouzia

    2010-02-16

    We report the covalent layer-by-layer construction of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films by using an efficient electrochemically triggered Sharpless click reaction. The click reaction is catalyzed by Cu(I) which is generated in situ from Cu(II) (originating from the dissolution of CuSO(4)) at the electrode constituting the substrate of the film. The film buildup can be controlled by the application of a mild potential inducing the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) in the absence of any reducing agent or any ligand. The experiments were carried out in an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance cell which allows both to apply a controlled potential on a gold electrode and to follow the mass deposited on the electrode through the quartz crystal microbalance. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) modified with either alkyne (PAA(Alk)) or azide (PAA(Az)) functions grafted onto the PAA backbone through ethylene glycol arms were used to build the PEM films. Construction takes place on gold electrodes whose potentials are more negative than a critical value, which lies between -70 and -150 mV vs Ag/AgCl (KCl sat.) reference electrode. The film thickness increment per bilayer appears independent of the applied voltage as long as it is more negative than the critical potential, but it depends upon Cu(II) and polyelectrolyte concentrations in solution and upon the reduction time of Cu(II) during each deposition step. An increase of any of these latter parameters leads to an increase of the mass deposited per layer. For given buildup conditions, the construction levels off after a given number of deposition steps which increases with the Cu(II) concentration and/or the Cu(II) reduction time. A model based on the diffusion of Cu(II) and Cu(I) ions through the film and the dynamics of the polyelectrolyte anchoring on the film, during the reduction period of Cu(II), is proposed to explain the major buildup features.

  16. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation: Mechanism and Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingyue; Kam, Lisa; Trerise, Ryan; Williams, Travis J

    2017-01-17

    One of the greatest challenges in using H2 as a fuel source is finding a safe, efficient, and inexpensive method for its storage. Ammonia borane (AB) is a solid hydrogen storage material that has garnered attention for its high hydrogen weight density (19.6 wt %) and ease of handling and transport. Hydrogen release from ammonia borane is mediated by either hydrolysis, thus giving borate products that are difficult to rereduce, or direct dehydrogenation. Catalytic AB dehydrogenation has thus been a popular topic in recent years, motivated both by applications in hydrogen storage and main group synthetic chemistry. This Account is a complete description of work from our laboratory in ruthenium-catalyzed ammonia borane dehydrogenation over the last 6 years, beginning with the Shvo catalyst and resulting ultimately in the development of optimized, leading catalysts for efficient hydrogen release. We have studied AB dehydrogenation with Shvo's catalyst extensively and generated a detailed understanding of the role that borazine, a dehydrogenation product, plays in the reaction: it is a poison for both Shvo's catalyst and PEM fuel cells. Through independent syntheses of Shvo derivatives, we found a protective mechanism wherein catalyst deactivation by borazine is prevented by coordination of a ligand that might otherwise be a catalytic poison. These studies showed how a bidentate N-N ligand can transform the Shvo into a more reactive species for AB dehydrogenation that minimizes accumulation of borazine. Simultaneously, we designed novel ruthenium catalysts that contain a Lewis acidic boron to replace the Shvo -OH proton, thus offering more flexibility to optimize hydrogen release and take on more general problems in hydride abstraction. Our scorpionate-ligated ruthenium species (12) is a best-of-class catalyst for homogeneous dehydrogenation of ammonia borane in terms of its extent of hydrogen release (4.6 wt %), air tolerance, and reusability. Moreover, a synthetically

  17. Captan impairs CYP-catalyzed drug metabolism in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, M; Barillari, J; Trespidi, S; Valgimigli, L; Pedulli, G F; Cantelli-Forti, G

    1999-11-30

    To investigate whether the fungicide captan impairs CYP-catalyzed drug metabolism in murine liver, kidney and lung, the modulation of the regio- and stereo-selective hydroxylation of testosterone, including 6beta-(CYP3A), 6alpha-(CYP2A1 and CYP2B1) and 16alpha-(CYP2B9) oxidations was studied. Specific substrates as probes for different CYP isoforms such as p-nitrophenol (CYP2E1), pentoxyresorufin (CYP2B1), ethoxyresorufin (CYP1A1), aminopyrine (CYP3A), phenacetin and methoxyresorufin (CYP1A2), and ethoxycoumarin (mixed) were also considered. Daily doses of captan (7.5 or 15 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) were administered to different groups of Swiss Albino CD1 mice of both sexes for 1 or 3 consecutive days. While a single dose of this fungicide did not affect CYP-machinery, repeated treatment significantly impaired the microsomal metabolism; in the liver, for example, a general inactivating effect was observed, with the sole exception of testosterone 2alpha-hydroxylase activity which was induced up to 8.6-fold in males. In vitro studies showed that the mechanism-based inhibition was related to captan metabolites rather than the parental compound. In the kidney, both CYP3A- and CYP1A2-linked monooxygenases were significantly induced (2-fold) by this pesticide. Accelerated phenacetin and methoxyresorufin metabolism (CYP1A2) was also observed in the lung. Data on CYP3A (kidney) and CYP1A2 (kidney and lung) induction were corroborated by Western immunoblotting using rabbit polyclonal anti-CYP3A1/2 and CYP1A1/2 antibodies. By means of electron spin resonance (EPR) spectrometry coupled to a spin-trapping technique, it was found that the recorded induction generates a large amounts of the anion radical superoxide (O*2-) either in kidney or lung microsomes. These findings suggest that alterations in CYP-associated activities by captan exposure may result in impaired (endogenous) metabolism as well as of coadministered drugs with significant implications for their disposition. The

  18. Ru(ii)-Catalyzed C-H activation and annulation of salicylaldehydes with monosubstituted and disubstituted alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Swagata; Kaishap, Partha Pratim; Gogoi, Sanjib

    2016-10-27

    The Ru(ii)-catalyzed C-H activation and annulation reaction of salicylaldehydes and disubstituted alkynes affords chromones in high yields. This reaction also works with terminal alkynes and tolerates a wide range of sensitive functional groups. The selectivity pattern of this Ru(ii)-catalyzed annulation reaction is different from the known Au(i), Rh(iii)-catalyzed annulation reactions of salicylaldehydes and terminal alkynes.

  19. Enzyme-catalyzed reaction of voltammetric enzyme-linked immunoassay system based on OAP as substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张书圣; 陈洪渊; 焦奎

    1999-01-01

    The o-aminophenol (OAP)-H2O2-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) voltammetric enzyme-linked immunoassay new system has extremely high sensitivity. HRP can be measured with a detection limit of 6.0×10-(10) g/L and a linear range of 1.0×10-9—4.0×10-6 g/L. The pure product of H2O2 oxidizing OAP catalyzed by HRP was prepared with chemical method. The enzyme-catalyzed reaction has been investigated with electroanalytical chemistry, UV/Vis spectrum, IR spectrum, 13C NMR, 1H NMR, mass spectrum, elemental analysis, etc. Under the selected enzyme-catalyzed reaction conditions, the oxidation product of OAP with H2O2 catalyzed by HRP is 2-aminophe-noxazine-3-one. The processes of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction and the electroreduction of the product of the enzymecatalyzed reaction have been described.

  20. [Degradation of nitrobenzene in aqueous solution by modified ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Zhong; Zhao, Lei; Ma, Jun

    2005-11-01

    Comparative experiments of modified ceramic honeycomb, ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation and ozonation alone were conducted with nitrobenzene as the model organic pollutant. It was found that the processes of modified ceramic honeycomb and ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation could increase the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene by 38.35% and 15.46%, respectively, compared with that achieved by ozonation alone. Under the conditions of this experiment, the degradation rate of modified ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation increased by 30.55% with the increase of amount of catalyst to 5 blocks. The degradation rate of three process all increased greatly with the increase of temperature and value of pH in the solution. But when raising the pH value of the solution to 10.00, the advantage of modified ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation processes lost. The experimental results indicate that in modified ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation, nitrobenzene is primarily oxidized by *OH free radical in aqueous solution. The adsorption of nitrobenzene is too limited to have any influence on the degradation efficiency of nitrobenzene. With the same total dosage of applied ozone, the multiple steps addition of ozone showed a much higher removal efficiency than that obtained by one step in three processes. Modified ceramic honeycomb had a relative longer lifetime.

  1. Nanostructured Ti-catalyzed MgH2 for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, H.; Felderhoff, M.; Schüth, F.; Weidenthaler, C.

    2011-06-01

    Nanocrystalline Ti-catalyzed MgH2 can be prepared by a homogeneously catalyzed synthesis method. Comprehensive characterization of this sample and measurements of hydrogen storage properties are discussed and compared to a commercial MgH2 sample. The catalyzed MgH2 nanocrystalline sample consists of two MgH2 phases—a tetrahedral β-MgH2 phase and an orthorhombic high-pressure modification γ-MgH2. Transmission electron microscopy was used for the observation of the morphology of the samples and to confirm the nanostructure. N2 adsorption measurement shows a BET surface area of 108 m2 g - 1 of the nanostructured material. This sample exhibits a hydrogen desorption temperature more than 130 °C lower compared to commercial MgH2. After desorption, the catalyzed nanocrystalline sample absorbs hydrogen 40 times faster than commercial MgH2 at 300 °C. Both the Ti catalyst and the nanocrystalline structure with correspondingly high surface area are thought to play important roles in the improvement of hydrogen storage properties. The desorption enthalpy and entropy values of the catalyzed MgH2 nanocrystalline sample are 77.7 kJ mol - 1 H2 and 138.3 J K - 1 mol - 1 H2, respectively. Thermodynamic properties do not change with the nanostructure.

  2. Removal of SU-8 resists using hydrogen radicals generated by tungsten hot-wire catalyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiko; Arai, Yu; Goto, Yousuke; Horibe, Hideo

    2012-03-01

    We investigated removal of chemically amplified negative-tone i-line resist SU-8 using hydrogen radicals, which was generated by the catalytic decomposition of H2/N2 mixed gas (H2:N2 = 10:90vol.%) using tungsten hot-wire catalyzer. SU-8 with exposure dose from 7 (Dg100×0.5) to 280mJ/cm2 (Dg100×20) were removed by hydrogen radicals without a residual layer. When the distance between the catalyzer and the substrate was 100mm, the catalyzer temperature was 2400°C, and the initial substrate temperature was 50°C, removal rate of SU-8 was 0.17μm/min independent of exposure dose to the SU-8. Finally, we obtained high removal rate for SU-8 (exposure dose = 14mJ/cm2 (Dg100)) of approximately 4μm/min when the distance between the catalyzer and the substrate was 20mm, the catalyzer temperature was 2400°C, and the initial substrate temperature was 165°C.

  3. Nanostructured Ti-catalyzed MgH2 for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, H; Felderhoff, M; Schüth, F; Weidenthaler, C

    2011-06-10

    Nanocrystalline Ti-catalyzed MgH(2) can be prepared by a homogeneously catalyzed synthesis method. Comprehensive characterization of this sample and measurements of hydrogen storage properties are discussed and compared to a commercial MgH(2) sample. The catalyzed MgH(2) nanocrystalline sample consists of two MgH(2) phases-a tetrahedral β-MgH(2) phase and an orthorhombic high-pressure modification γ-MgH(2). Transmission electron microscopy was used for the observation of the morphology of the samples and to confirm the nanostructure. N(2) adsorption measurement shows a BET surface area of 108 m(2) g(-1) of the nanostructured material. This sample exhibits a hydrogen desorption temperature more than 130 °C lower compared to commercial MgH(2). After desorption, the catalyzed nanocrystalline sample absorbs hydrogen 40 times faster than commercial MgH(2) at 300 °C. Both the Ti catalyst and the nanocrystalline structure with correspondingly high surface area are thought to play important roles in the improvement of hydrogen storage properties. The desorption enthalpy and entropy values of the catalyzed MgH(2) nanocrystalline sample are 77.7 kJ mol(-1) H(2) and 138.3 J K(-1) mol(-1) H(2), respectively. Thermodynamic properties do not change with the nanostructure.

  4. 妊娠高血压综合征患者血浆D-D与FDP水平变化%Change of D-D and FDP in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐桂莲

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨妊娠高血压综合征患者血浆D-D与FDP检测的临床意义。方法选择妊娠25~30周孕妇118例为研究对象,合并妊娠高血压综合征的孕妇53例,妊娠高血压组,65例健康孕妇为健康孕妇组。另选择健康体检的育龄女性50例为健康对照组。比较三组血浆D-D与FDP水平。结果妊娠高血压组患者D-D(5.3±1.0)μg/mL,FDP(19.6±3.1)μg/mL,均显著高于健康孕妇组和健康对照组(P<0.05)。结论对妊娠高血压综合征患者检测血浆中D-D水平以及FDP水平能够了解患者的病情发展、判断疗效、判断预后。%Objective To discuss significance of detection of D-D and FDP in pregnancy-induced hypertension. Methods118 cases of 25-30 weeks of pregnancy were selected,among 53 cases with pregnancy-induced hypertension as pregnancy-induced hypertension group,and 65 cases of healthy pregnancy as healthy pregnancy group.50 cases of healthy women of childbearing age were selected as control group.ResultsD-D of pregnancy-induced hypertension group was (5.3±1.0)μg/mL,and FDP was(19.6±3.1)μg/mL,which higher than healthy pregnancy group and control group(P<0.05).Conclusion Detection of D-D levels and FDP levels in plasma in pregnancy-induced hypertension syndrome can understand the progression of the patient's condition, determine the efficacy and prognosis.

  5. Iridium and ruthenium catalyzed syntheses, hydroborations, and metathesis reactions of alkenyl-decaboranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Shahana; Carroll, Patrick J; Sneddon, Larry G

    2013-08-05

    The selective syntheses of new classes of 6,9-dialkenyl- and 6-alkenyl-decaboranes and 6-alkyl-9-alkenyl-decaboranes have been achieved via iridium and ruthenium catalyzed decaborane and 6-alkyl-decaborane alkyne-hydroborations. Reactions employing [Cp*IrCl2]2 and [RuCl2(p-cymene)]2 precatalysts gave β-E-alkenyl-decaboranes, while the corresponding reactions with [RuI2(p-cymene)]2 gave the α-alkenyl-decaborane isomers, with the differences in product selectivity suggesting quite different mechanistic steps for the catalysts. The alkenyl-decaboranes were easily converted to other useful derivatives, including coupled-cage and functionally substituted compounds, via iridium-catalyzed hydroborations and ruthenium-catalyzed homo and cross olefin-metathesis reactions.

  6. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed free radical cannot free move in reaction solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Xialing

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanism of Horseradish Peroxidase -catalyzed phenol compound oxidizing reaction is a radical polymerization. Many polymer preparation are also carry on through the radical polymerization mechanism We deduce if free radical produced by peroxidasecatalyzed phenol polymerization could apply on polymer preparation? Could the phenol–oxygen free radical leave off the peroxidase and catalyze other compounds polymerization? The free radical in phenol oxidation process was investigated in homogeneous reaction and in immobilized HRP catalyzed reaction. The results showed the free radical produced by peroxidase only move on the surface of enzyme, can’t free move in solution in both experiment. Evidence showed the phenol polymerization is enzyme reaction process, different from general chemistry free radical chain reaction.Keywords: Horseradish Peroxidase, free radical polymerization, mechanismReceived: 17 March 2008 / Received in revised form: 5 February 2009, Accepted: 31 April 2009 Published online: 14 May 2009

  7. Polymerization of o-Phenylenediamine Catalyzed by Hemeproteins Encapsulated in Reversed Micelle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yong; MAO Lu-yuan; LI Liu-zhu; LIU Xiao-guang; SHI Jun; CAO Shao-kui

    2004-01-01

    Hemeproteins encapsulated in reversed micelle formulated with di-2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate (AOT)was found to catalyze the polymerization of o-phenylenediamine (o-PDA) with hydrogen peroxide, whereas o-PDA catalyzed by hemeproteins dissolved in water could only form its trimers. As the nanostructural environment in reversed micelle acts as a certain orientation surrounding medium, it offers a strong electrostatic field that alters the reductive potential of Fe3+/Fe2+ (Em7) in the heme of hemeproteins and thus increases the catalytic activity of peroxidase accordingly. According to the results of UV-Vis, 1H NMR and FTIR, the polymer catalyzed by hemoglobin(Hb) in reversed micelle was presumed to be constructed of lines and trapeziforms alternatively.

  8. First Novozym 435 lipase-catalyzed Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction in the presence of amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xuemei; Zhang, Suoqin; Zheng, Liangyu

    2016-03-01

    The first Novozym 435 lipase-catalyzed Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction with amides as co-catalyst was realized. Results showed that neither Novozym 435 nor amide can independently catalyze the reaction. This co-catalytic system that used a catalytic amount of Novozym 435 with a corresponding amount of amide was established and optimized. The MBH reaction strongly depended on the structure of aldehyde substrate, amide co-catalyst, and reaction additives. The optimized reaction yield (43.4%) was achieved in the Novozym 435-catalyzed MBH reaction of 2, 4-dinitrobenzaldehyde and cyclohexenone with isonicotinamide as co-catalyst and β-cyclodextrin as additive only in 2 days. Although enantioselectivity of Novozym 435 was not found, the results were still significant because an MBH reaction using lipase as biocatalyst was realized for the first time.

  9. Brønsted Acid-Catalyzed Direct Substitution of 2-Ethoxytetrahydrofuran with Trifluoroborate Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla M. Fisher

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal-free transformations of organotrifluoroborates are advantageous since they avoid the use of frequently expensive and sensitive transition metals. Lewis acid-catalyzed reactions involving potassium trifluoroborate salts have emerged as an alternative to metal-catalyzed protocols. However, the drawbacks to these methods are that they rely on the generation of unstable boron dihalide species, thereby resulting in low functional group tolerance. Recently, we discovered that in the presence of a Brønsted acid, trifluoroborate salts react rapidly with in situ generated oxocarbenium ions. Here, we report Brønsted acid-catalyzed direct substitution of 2-ethoxytetrahydrofuran using potassium trifluoroborate salts. The reaction occurs when tetrafluoroboric acid is used as a catalyst to afford functionalized furans in moderate to excellent yields. A variety of alkenyl- and alkynyltrifluoroborate salts readily participate in this transformation.

  10. Theoretical Studies on the Iodine-catalyzed Nucleophilic Addition of Acetone with Five-membered Heterocycles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-hua; LI Li; CHEN Xue-song

    2008-01-01

    The iodine-catalyzed nucleophilic addition reactions of pyrrole,furan,or thiophene with acetone were studied in gas and solvent by the density functional theory at the level of Lan12DZ*,It was seen that the halogen bond between iodine and carbonyl oxygen appeared to have an important catalytic effect on such reactions,and the first iodine molecule maximally diminished the barrier height by 41 kJ/mol,while the second iodine molecule could not improve such reactions largely,It was concluded that the C2-addition was generally more favorable than the C3-addition for the three heterocycles;however,iodine considerably more effectively catalyzed the C3-addition than the C2-addition for pyrrole,It was also revealed by PCM calculation that the iodine-catalyzed nucleophilic additions occurred more easily in solvent than in gas,which explained the experiment performed by Bandgar et al..

  11. Heterogeneous oxidation of cyclohexanone catalyzed by TS-1:Combined experimental and DFT studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changjiu Xia; Xingtian Shu; Long Ju; Yi Zhao; Hongyi Xu; Bin Zhu; Feifei Gao; Min Lin; Zhenyu Dai; Xiaodong Zou

    2015-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of the oxidation of cyclohexanone catalyzed by titanium silicate zeolite TS-1 using aqueous H2O2 as the oxidant was investigated by combining density function theory (DFT) calculations with experimental studies. DFT calculations showed that H2O2 was adsorbed and activated at the tetrahedral Ti sites. By taking into account the adsorption energy, molecular size, steric hindrance and structural information, a reaction mechanism of Baeyer-Villiger oxidation catalyzed by TS-1 that involves the activation of H2O2 was proposed. Experimental studies showed that the major products of cyclohexanone oxidation by H2O2 catalyzed by a hollow TS-1 zeolite wereε-carprolactone, 6-hydroxyhexanoic acid, and adipic acid. These products were analyzed by GC-MS and were in good agreement with the proposed mechanism. Our studies showed that the reaction mechanism on TS-1 zeolite was different from that on Sn-beta zeolite.

  12. Investigation of the effect of organic solvents on kinetic parameters in metal catalyzed reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORDANA A. MILOVANOVIC

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of acetone and acetonitrile on the kinetic parameters of azorubin S oxidation by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by manganese(II, pyrocatechol violet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by copper(II, and carminic acid oxidation by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by copper(II and activated by bifenox, were examined. It was established that the examined solvents exhibit various effects on the kinetic parameters of the above said reactions. In a11 instances a change in the solvent concentration effects both the anthalpy and the entropy contributions to the free activation energy during the transition of the system into the active state, as well as the constant of the active complex formed at this point.

  13. Catalyzing Transdisciplinarity: A Systems Ethnography of Cancer-Obesity Comorbidity and Risk Coincidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S Scott; Harley, Amy; Kessler, Molly M; Roberts, Laura; DeVasto, Dannielle; Card, Daniel J; Neuner, Joan M; Kim, Sang-Yeon

    2017-05-01

    Effectively addressing wicked health problems, that is, those arising from complex multifactorial biological and socio-economic causes, requires transdisciplinary action. However, a significant body of research points toward substantial difficulties in cultivating transdisciplinary collaboration. Accordingly, this article presents the results of a study that adapts Systems Ethnography and Qualitative Modeling (SEQM) in response to wicked health problems. SEQM protocols were designed to catalyze transdisciplinary responses to national defense concerns. We adapted these protocols to address cancer-obesity comorbidity and risk coincidence. In so doing, we conducted participant-observations and interviews with a diverse range of health care providers, community health educators, and health advocacy professionals who target either cancer or obesity. We then convened a transdisciplinary conference designed to catalyze a coordinated response. The findings offer productive insights into effective ways of catalyzing transdisciplinarity in addressing wicked health problems action and demonstrate the promise of SEQM for continued use in health care contexts.

  14. Iron-Catalyzed C-C Cross-Couplings Using Organometallics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérinot, Amandine; Cossy, Janine

    2016-08-01

    Over the last decades, iron-catalyzed cross-couplings have emerged as an important tool for the formation of C-C bonds. A wide variety of alkenyl, aryl, and alkyl (pseudo)halides have been coupled to organometallic reagents, the most currently used being Grignard reagents. Particular attention has been devoted to the development of iron catalysts for the functionalization of alkyl halides that are generally challenging substrates in classical cross-couplings. The high functional group tolerance of iron-catalyzed cross-couplings has encouraged organic chemists to use them in the synthesis of bioactive compounds. Even if some points remain obscure, numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the mechanism of iron-catalyzed cross-coupling and several hypotheses have been proposed.

  15. Constitutive modeling of the viscoelastic and viscoplastic responses of metallocene catalyzed polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville; Sanporean, Catalina-Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to perform experimental investigation and constitutive modeling of the viscoelastic and viscoplastic behavior of metallocene catalyzed polypropylene (mPP) with application to lifetime assessment under conditions of creep rupture. Design/methodology/approach ...... in long-term creep tests. Keywords Metallocene catalyzed polypropylene, Viscoelasticity, Viscoplasticity, Creep rupture, Constitutive modeling, Elastoplastic analysis, Viscosity, Creep, Physical properties of materials Paper type Research paper....../methodology/approach – Three series of experiments are conducted where the mechanical response of mPP is analyzed in tensile tests with various strain rates, relaxation tests with various strains, and creep tests with various stresses at room temperature. A constitutive model is derived for semicrystalline polymers under......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to perform experimental investigation and constitutive modeling of the viscoelastic and viscoplastic behavior of metallocene catalyzed polypropylene (mPP) with application to lifetime assessment under conditions of creep rupture. Design...

  16. Enzyme catalyzed oxidative cross-linking of feruloylated pectic polysaccharides from sugar beet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz

    -linking and consequently the properties of the gels formed. The kinetics of oxidative gelation of SBP, taking place via enzyme catalyzed cross-linking of FA, was evaluated by small angle oscillatory measurements. The result indicates a significant difference between the SBP gels produced from the catalysis of HRP...... and laccase, that is, laccase catalysis produced stronger SBP gels albeit slower rates of gelation than the HRP catalysis. Statistically design experiment has been constructed to investigate the effect of several reaction factors which might influence the rates of gelation of SBP catalyzed by HRP or laccase......, particularly the pectin level, temperature, enzyme dosage, pH and, for HRP, the H2O2 concentration. The result reveals that these reaction factors could be tuned in order to adjust the enzyme catalyzed gelation and the properties of the gels produced. Moreover, positive correlation between the rates...

  17. Using simple donors to drive the equilibria of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Richard W; Peltier-Pain, Pauline; Cournoyer, William J; Thorson, Jon S

    2011-08-21

    We report that simple glycoside donors can drastically shift the equilibria of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions, transforming NDP-sugar formation from an endothermic to an exothermic process. To demonstrate the utility of this thermodynamic adaptability, we highlight the glycosyltransferase-catalyzed synthesis of 22 sugar nucleotides from simple aromatic sugar donors, as well as the corresponding in situ formation of sugar nucleotides as a driving force in the context of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions for small-molecule glycodiversification. These simple aromatic donors also enabled a general colorimetric assay for glycosyltransfer, applicable to drug discovery, protein engineering and other fundamental sugar nucleotide-dependent investigations. This study directly challenges the general notion that NDP-sugars are 'high-energy' sugar donors when taken out of their traditional biological context.

  18. Rhodium-catalyzed acyloxy migration of propargylic esters in cycloadditions, inspiration from the recent "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xing-Zhong; Shu, Dongxu; Schienebeck, Casi M; Tang, Weiping

    2012-12-07

    Transition metal-catalyzed acyloxy migration of propargylic esters offers versatile entries to allene and vinyl carbene intermediates for various fascinating subsequent transformations. Most π-acidic metals (e.g. gold and platinum) are capable of facilitating these acyloxy migration events. However, very few of these processes involve redox chemistry, which are well-known for most other transition metals such as rhodium. The coupling of acyloxy migration of propargylic esters with oxidative addition, migratory insertion, and reductive elimination may lead to ample new opportunities for the design of new reactions. This tutorial review summarizes recent developments in Rh-catalyzed 1,3- and 1,2-acyloxy migration of propargylic esters in a number of cycloaddition reactions. Related Au- and Pt-catalyzed cycloadditions involving acyloxy migration are also discussed.

  19. Carbon dioxide reduction to methane and coupling with acetylene to form propylene catalyzed by remodeled nitrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Yong; Moure, Vivian R; Dean, Dennis R; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2012-11-27

    A doubly substituted form of the nitrogenase MoFe protein (α-70(Val)(→Ala), α-195(His→Gln)) has the capacity to catalyze the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) to yield methane (CH(4)). Under optimized conditions, 1 nmol of the substituted MoFe protein catalyzes the formation of 21 nmol of CH(4) within 20 min. The catalytic rate depends on the partial pressure of CO(2) (or concentration of HCO(3)(-)) and the electron flux through nitrogenase. The doubly substituted MoFe protein also has the capacity to catalyze the unprecedented formation of propylene (H(2)C = CH-CH(3)) through the reductive coupling of CO(2) and acetylene (HC≡CH). In light of these observations, we suggest that an emerging understanding of the mechanistic features of nitrogenase could be relevant to the design of synthetic catalysts for CO(2) sequestration and formation of olefins.

  20. Time-dependent wave-packet quantum dynamics study of the Ne + D2(+) (v0 = 0-2, j0 = 0) → NeD(+) + D reaction: including the coriolis coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cui-Xia; Zhang, Pei-Yu

    2014-07-10

    The dynamics of the Ne + D2(+) (v0 = 0-2, j0 = 0) → NeD(+) + D reaction has been investigated in detail by using an accurate time-dependent wave-packet method on the ground 1(2)A' potential energy surface. Comparisons between the Coriolis coupling results and the centrifugal-sudden ones reveal that Coriolis coupling effect can influence reaction dynamics of the NeD2(+) system. Integral cross sections have been evaluated for the Ne + D2(+) reaction and its isotopic variant Ne + H2(+), and a considerable intermolecular isotopic effect has been found. Also obvious is the great enhancement of the reactivity due to the reagent vibrational excitation. Besides, a comparison with previous theoretical results is also presented and discussed.

  1. Free energy of mixing of an Fe-Co liquid alloy taking into account nondiagonal d-d-electron coupling in the framework of the Willis-Harrison model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, N. E.; Vatolin, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Within the framework of the Willis-Harrison model, the effect of taking into account d-d-electron couplings nondiagonal in the magnetic quantum number between the neighboring atoms in a transition metal on the partial pair potentials and the free energy of mixing of an Fe-Co liquid alloy near the melting temperature is investigated. It is found that an increase in the fraction of nondiagonal couplings results in a decrease in the depth of the first minimum of the partial pair potentials and in the displacement of its position towards larger r. It is shown that taking this factor into account considerably improves the agreement with experimental data of the concentration dependence of the free energy of mixing of the system under consideration.

  2. Study of {sup nat}Mg(d,d{sub 0}) reaction at detector angles between 90° and 170°, for the energy range E{sub d,lab}=1660–1990 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patronis, N., E-mail: npatronis@uoi.gr [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Aslanoglou, X. [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Axiotis, M. [Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Georgiadou, A. [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kokkoris, M. [Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens (Greece); Lagoyannis, A. [Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Misaelides, P. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Paneta, V. [Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens (Greece)

    2014-10-15

    In the present work, the study of the {sup nat}Mg(d,d{sub 0}) is presented for the energy range E{sub d,lab} = 1660–1990 keV (in steps of 5 keV), for detector angles between 90° and 170°. Elastic scattering data for two forward angles (55° and 70°) were also obtained. In order to validate the obtained experimental results a thick Mg sample with Au evaporated on top was fabricated and benchmarking measurements were performed at various deuteron beam energies. The results of the present work are complementary to the recently published {sup 24}Mg(d,p{sub 0,1,2}) reaction cross section data, thus facilitating the simultaneous depth profiling study of magnesium by both the d-NRA and EBS techniques.

  3. Measurement of Cross Sections for $D^0 {\\bar D}^0$ and $D^+D^-$ Production in $e^+e^-$ Annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}=3.773$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ban, Y; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Fu, L P; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Harris, F A; He, J; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, L; Huang, X P; Ji, X B; Jia, Q Y; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R B; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, X S; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Liu, H M; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, G R; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Song, L W; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Zhe Wang; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xu, Y; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yan, W B; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, S D; Yang, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Yue, Q; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J M; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L S; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang Xiao Min; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y J; Zhang, Y Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zou, B S

    2004-01-01

    The cross sections for $D^0 {\\bar D}^0$ and $D^+D^-$ production at 3.773 GeV have been measured with BES-II detector at BEPC. These measurements are made by analyzing a data sample of about 17.3 $\\rm pb^{-1}$ collected at the center-of-mass energy of 3.773 GeV. Observed cross sections for the charm pair production are radiatively corrected to obtain the tree level cross section for $D\\bar D$ production. A measurement of the total tree level hadronic cross section is obtained from the tree level $D \\bar D$ cross section and an extrapolation of the $R_{uds}$ below the open charm threshold.

  4. D$^0$, D$^+$, D$^{*+}$ and D$_s^+$ azimuthal anisotropy in mid-central Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; The ALICE collaboration; Adolfsson, Jonatan; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Bazo Alba, Jose Luis; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altenkamper, Lucas; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andreou, Dimitra; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Bratrud, Lars; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chandra, Sinjini; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Chowdhury, Tasnuva; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Van Doremalen, Lennart Vincent; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Esumi, Shinichi; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Jhuma; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Gruber, Lukas; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Haque, Md Rihan; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hassan, Hadi; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hills, Christopher; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hohlweger, Bernhard; Horak, David; Hornung, Sebastian; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Isakov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jaelani, Syaefudin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karczmarczyk, Przemyslaw; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khabanova, Zhanna; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Byungchul; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lai, Yue Shi; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lazaridis, Lazaros; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lim, Bong-hwi; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lindsay, Scott William; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Luhder, Jens Robert; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Masson, Erwann; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Myrcha, Julian Wojciech; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Narayan, Amrendra; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nobuhiro, Akihide; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Pathak, Surya Prakash; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pliquett, Fabian; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Dominguez Rosas, Edgar; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Vazquez Rueda, Omar; Rui, Rinaldo; Rumyantsev, Boris; Rustamov, Anar; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Scheid, Horst Sebastian; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schmidt, Nicolas Vincent; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shaikh, Wadut; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Stocco, Diego; Storetvedt, Maksim Melnik; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thakur, Sanchari; Thomas, Deepa; Thoresen, Freja; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Tropp, Lukas; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Trzeciak, Barbara Antonina; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wenzel, Sandro Christian; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Willsher, Emily; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yamakawa, Kosei; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann; Zou, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    The azimuthal anisotropy coefficient $v_2$ of prompt D$^0$, D$^+$, D$^{*+}$ and D$_s^+$ mesons was measured in mid-central (30-50% centrality class) Pb-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV, with the ALICE detector at the LHC. The D mesons were reconstructed via their hadronic decays at mid-rapidity, $|y|<0.8$, in the transverse momentum interval $1

  5. Dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by the catalyzed Fe-Cu process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wen-ying; GAO Ting-yao

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction characteristics of carbon tetrachloride (CT) were investigated using cyclic voltammetry in this study. In addition, the difference in reduction mechanisms of CT between Master Builders' iron and the catalyzed Fe-Cu process was discussed. The results showed that CT was reduced directly on the surface of copper rather than by atomic hydrogen produced at the cathode in the catalyzed Fe-Cu process. The reduction was realized largely by atomic hydrogen in Master Builders' iron. The entire CT in 350 ml aqueous solution with 320 mg/L was reduced to trichloromethane and dichloromethane in 2.25 h when 100 g of scrap iron with Fe/Cu ratio of 10:1 (w/w) were used. Moreover, the reduction rate slowed with time. CT could be reduced at acidic, neutral and alkaline pH from solution by Fe-Cu bimetallic media, but the mechanisms were different. The degradation rate was not significantly influenced by pH in the catalyzed Fe-Cu process; in Master Builders' iron it clearly increased with decreasing pH. The kinetics of the reductions followed pseudo-first order in both cases. Furthermore, the reductions under acidic conditions proceeded faster than that under the neutral and alkaline conditions. The catalyzed Fe-Cu process was superior to Master Builders' iron in treating CT-containing water and this advantage was particularly noticeable under alkaline conditions. The reduction was investigated in the cathode (Cu) and anode (Fe) compartments respectively, the results showed that the direct reduction pathway played an important role in the reduction by the catalyzed Fe-Cu process. The catalyzed Fe-Cu process is of practical value.

  6. Kinetic Behavior of Aggregation-Exchange Growth Process with Catalyzed-Birth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN An-Jia; CHEN Yu; LIN Zhen-Quan; KE Jian-Hong

    2007-01-01

    We propose an aggregation model of a two-species system to mimic the growth of cities' population and assets,in which irreversible coagulation reactions and exchange reactions occur between any two aggregates of the same species,and the monomer-birth reactions of one species occur by the catalysis of the other species.In the case with population-catalyzed birth of assets,the rate kernel of an asset aggregate Bκ of size k grows to become an aggregate Bκ+ 1through a monomer-birth catalyzed by a population aggregate Aj of size j is J(k,j) = Jkjλ.And in mutually catalyzed birth model,the birth rate kernels of population and assets are H(k,j) = Hkjη and J(k,j) = Jkjλ,respectively.The kinetics of the system is investigated based on the mean-field theory.In the model of population-catalyzed birth of assets,the long-time asymptotic behavior of the assets aggregate size distribution obeys the conventional or modified scaling form.In mutually catalyzed birth system,the asymptotic behaviors of population and assets obey the conventional scaling form in the case ofη =λ= 0,and they obey the modified scalingform in the case of η = 0,λ= 1.In the case of η = λ = 1,the total mass of population aggregates and that of asset aggregates both grow much faster than those in population-catalyzed birth of assets model,and they approaches to infinite values in finite time.

  7. Biofuel-Promoted Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxin/furan Formation in an Iron-Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Norbert V; Rey, Maria Dolores; Zennegg, Markus; Haag, Regula; Wichser, Adrian; Schmid, Peter; Seiler, Cornelia; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Mohn, Joachim; Bürki, Samuel; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-08-04

    Iron-catalyzed diesel particle filters (DPFs) are widely used for particle abatement. Active catalyst particles, so-called fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs), are formed in situ, in the engine, when combusting precursors, which were premixed with the fuel. The obtained iron oxide particles catalyze soot oxidation in filters. Iron-catalyzed DPFs are considered as safe with respect to their potential to form polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). We reported that a bimetallic potassium/iron FBC supported an intense PCDD/F formation in a DPF. Here, we discuss the impact of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biofuel on PCDD/F emissions. The iron-catalyzed DPF indeed supported a PCDD/F formation with biofuel but remained inactive with petroleum-derived diesel fuel. PCDD/F emissions (I-TEQ) increased 23-fold when comparing biofuel and diesel data. Emissions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the most toxic congener [toxicity equivalence factor (TEF) = 1.0], increased 90-fold, and those of 2,3,7,8-TCDF (TEF = 0.1) increased 170-fold. Congener patterns also changed, indicating a preferential formation of tetra- and penta-chlorodibenzofurans. Thus, an inactive iron-catalyzed DPF becomes active, supporting a PCDD/F formation, when operated with biofuel containing impurities of potassium. Alkali metals are inherent constituents of biofuels. According to the current European Union (EU) legislation, levels of 5 μg/g are accepted. We conclude that risks for a secondary PCDD/F formation in iron-catalyzed DPFs increase when combusting potassium-containing biofuels.

  8. Synthesis of Fused Dibenzofuran Derivatives via Palladium-Catalyzed Domino C-C Bond Formation and Iron-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization/Aromatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Kartick; Jalal, Swapnadeep; Kundal, Sandip; Jana, Umasish

    2016-02-05

    A range of tetracyclic dibenzofuran derivatives bearing a variety of functional groups was readily synthesized via a two-stage domino strategy starting from propargyl ethers of 2-halo phenol derivatives. The first stage in the strategy involves Pd(0)-catalyzed domino intramolecular carbopalladation/Suzuki coupling via 5-exo-dig cyclization onto the alkyne, leading to 3-methylene-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran derivatives. In the second stage of the domino strategy, an iron(III)-catalyzed cycloisomerization and aromatization reaction produces tetracyclic benzofuran derivatives. This two-step sequence provides efficient access to diversely substituted polycyclic dibenzofuran derivatives in high yields and in an atom-efficient and environmentally friendly manner. Moreover, this strategy was also successfully used for the synthesis of a naturally occurring tetracyclic dibenzofuran, β-brazan.

  9. Acid-catalyzed hydrogenation of olefins. A theoretical study of the HF- and H/sub 3/O/sup +/-catalyzed hydrogenation of ethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siria, J.C.; Duran, M.; Lledos, A.; Bertran, J.

    1987-12-09

    The HF- and H/sub 3/O/sup +/-catalyzed hydrogenation of ethylene and the direct addition of molecular hydrogen to ethylene have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio MO calculations using different levels of theory. The main results are that catalysis by HF lowers the potential energy barrier to a large extent, while catalysis by H/sub 3/O/sup +/ diminishes dramatically the barrier for the reaction. Entropic contributions leave these results unchanged. The mechanisms of the two acid-catalyzed hydrogenations are somewhat different. While catalysis by HF exhibits bifunctional characteristics, catalysis by H/sub 3/O/sup +/ proceeds via an initial formation of a carbocation. It is shown that catalysis by strong acids may be an alternate way for olefin hydrogenation.

  10. Metal-catalyzed decaborane-alkyne hydroboration reactions: efficient routes to alkenyldecaboranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Shahana; Carroll, Patrick J; Sneddon, Larry G

    2010-04-05

    Transition-metal-catalyzed decaborane-alkyne hydroboration reactions have been developed that provide high-yield routes to the previously unknown di- and monoalkenyldecaboranes. These alkenyl derivatives should be easily modified starting materials for many biomedical and/or materials applications. Unusual catalyst product selectivity was observed that suggests quite different mechanistic steps, with the reactions catalyzed by the [RuCl(2)(p-cymene)](2) and [Cp*IrCl(2)](2) complexes giving the beta-E alkenyldecaboranes and the corresponding reactions with the [RuI(2)(p-cymene)](2) complex giving the alpha-alkenyldecaborane isomers.

  11. Rh(III)-Catalyzed meta-C-H Olefination Directed by a Nitrile Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua-Jin; Lu, Yi; Farmer, Marcus E; Wang, Huai-Wei; Zhao, Dan; Kang, Yan-Shang; Sun, Wei-Yin; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2017-02-15

    A range of Rh(III)-catalyzed ortho-C-H functionalizations have been developed; however, extension of this reactivity to remote C-H functionalizations through large-ring rhodacyclic intermediates has yet to be demonstrated. Herein we report the first example of the use of a U-shaped nitrile template to direct Rh(III)-catalyzed remote meta-C-H activation via a postulated 12-membered macrocyclic intermediate. Because the ligands used for Rh(III) catalysts are significantly different from those of Pd(II) catalysts, this offers new opportunities for future development of ligand-promoted meta-C-H activation reactions.

  12. Cu-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of aryl iodides with trifluoromethylzinc reagent prepared in situ from trifluoromethyl iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzo Nakamura

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The trifluoromethylation of aryl iodides catalyzed by copper(I salt with trifluoromethylzinc reagent prepared in situ from trifluoromethyl iodide and Zn dust was accomplished. The catalytic reactions proceeded under mild reaction conditions, providing the corresponding aromatic trifluoromethylated products in moderate to high yields. The advantage of this method is that additives such as metal fluoride (MF, which are indispensable to activate silyl groups for transmetallation in the corresponding reactions catalyzed by copper salt by using the Ruppert–Prakash reagents (CF3SiR3, are not required.

  13. Lipase-catalyzed process for biodiesel production: protein engineering and lipase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyun Tae; Qi, Feng; Yuan, Chongli; Zhao, Xuebing; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Liu, Dehua; Varma, Arvind

    2014-04-01

    Biodiesel is an environment-friendly and renewable fuel produced by transesterification of various feedstocks. Although the lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production has many advantages over the conventional alkali catalyzed process, its industrial applications have been limited by high-cost and low-stability of lipase enzymes. This review provides a general overview of the recent advances in lipase engineering, including both protein modification and production. Recent advances in biotechnology such as in protein engineering, recombinant methods and metabolic engineering have been employed but are yet to impact lipase engineering for cost-effective production of biodiesel. A summary of the current challenges and perspectives for potential solutions are also provided.

  14. The mechanism of Fe (Ⅲ)-catalyzed ozonation of phenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    竹湘锋; 徐新华

    2004-01-01

    Fe (Ⅲ)-catalyzed ozonation yielded better degradation rate and extent of COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) or oxalic acid as compared with oxidation by ozone alone. Two parameters with strong effects on the efficiency of ozonation are pH of the solution and the catalyst (Fe3+) dosage. The existence of a critical pH value determining the catalysis ofFe (Ⅲ) in acid conditions was observed in phenol and oxalic acid systems. The best efficiency of catalysis was obtained at a moderate concentration of the catalyst. A reasonable mechanism of Fe (Ⅲ)-catalyzed ozonation of phenol was obtained based on the results and literature.

  15. Glycerol Dehydration to Acrolein Catalyzed by ZSM‐5 Zeolite in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Ren, Shoujie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC‐CO2) has been used for the first time as a reaction medium for the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein catalyzed by a solid acid. Unprecedented catalyst stability over 528 hours of time‐on‐stream was achieved and the rate of coke deposition on the zeolite catalyst was the lowest among extensive previous studies, showing potential for industrial application. Coking pathways in SC‐CO2 were also elucidated for future development. The results have potential implications for other dehydration reactions catalyzed by solid acids. PMID:27796088

  16. Additive-Free Pd-Catalyzed α-Allylation of Imine-Containing Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kljajic, Marko; Puschnig, Johannes G; Weber, Hansjörg; Breinbauer, Rolf

    2017-01-06

    An additive-free Pd-catalyzed α-allylation of different imino-group-ontaining heterocycles is reported. The activation of α-CH pronucleophiles (pKa (DMSO) > 25) occurs without the addition of strong bases or Lewis acids using only the Pd/Xantphos catalyst system. The reaction scope has been studied for various 5- and 6-membered nitrogen-containing heterocycles (yields up to 96%). Mechanistic investigations suggest an initial allylation of the imine-N followed by a Pd-catalyzed formal aza-Claisen rearrangement.

  17. FeCl3 -Catalyzed Ring-Closing Carbonyl-Olefin Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lina; Li, Wenjuan; Xi, Hui; Bai, Xiaohui; Ma, Enlu; Yan, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhiping

    2016-08-22

    Exploiting catalytic carbonyl-olefin metathesis is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Reported herein is an FeCl3 -catalyzed ring-closing carbonyl-olefin metathesis. The protocol allows access to a range of carbo-/heterocyclic alkenes with good efficiency and excellent trans diastereoselectivity. The methodology presents one of the rare examples of catalytic ring-closing carbonyl-olefin metathesis. This process is proposed to take place by FeCl3 -catalyzed oxetane formation followed by retro-ring-opening to deliver metathesis products.

  18. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Iron-catalyzed intermolecular [2+2] cycloadditions of unactivated alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Jordan M; Schmidt, Valerie A; Tondreau, Aaron M; Chirik, Paul J

    2015-08-28

    Cycloadditions, such as the [4+2] Diels-Alder reaction to form six-membered rings, are among the most powerful and widely used methods in synthetic chemistry. The analogous [2+2] alkene cycloaddition to synthesize cyclobutanes is kinetically accessible by photochemical methods, but the substrate scope and functional group tolerance are limited. Here, we report iron-catalyzed intermolecular [2+2] cycloaddition of unactivated alkenes and cross cycloaddition of alkenes and dienes as regio- and stereoselective routes to cyclobutanes. Through rational ligand design, development of this base metal-catalyzed method expands the chemical space accessible from abundant hydrocarbon feedstocks.

  19. An alternative approach to aldol reactions: gold-catalyzed formation of boron enolates from alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Cindy; Starkov, Pavel; Sheppard, Tom D

    2010-05-05

    A new method for enolate generation via the gold-catalyzed addition of boronic acids to alkynes is reported. The formation of boron enolates from readily accessible ortho-alkynylbenzeneboronic acids proceeds rapidly with 2 mol % PPh(3)AuNTf(2) at ambient temperature. The enolates undergo aldol reaction with an aldehyde present in the reaction mixture to give cyclic boronate esters, which can be subsequently transformed into phenols, biaryls, or dihydrobenzofurans via oxidation, Suzuki-Miyaura, or intramolecular Chan-Lam coupling, respectively. A combined gold/boronic acid catalyzed aldol condensation reaction of an alkynyl aldehyde was also successfully achieved.

  20. Kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed cross-linking of feruloylated arabinan from sugar beet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Arnous, Anis; Holck, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    the kinetics of HRP catalyzed cross-linking of FA esterified to α-(1,5)-linked arabinans are affected by the length of the arabinan chains carrying the feruloyl substitutions. The kinetics of the HRP-catalyzed cross-linking of four sets of arabinan samples from sugar beet pulp, having different molecular...... weights and hence different degrees of polymerization, were monitored by the disappearance of FA absorbance at 316 nm. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis confirmed that the sugar beet arabinans were feruloyl-substituted, and HPLC analysis verified that the amounts of diFAs increased when FA levels decreased...

  1. Modeling Lipase-Catalyzed Biodiesel Production in [BMIM][PF6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianJun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production models in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs reaction medium available in the literature are valid especially for mixing intensity. In this paper, a preliminary model is established in order to try to describe the lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production process in RTILs in a stirring type bioreactor. Mixing intensity and time delay were inspected for the reaction model in [BMIM][PF6] medium. As a result, this model is a good explanation for these actual reaction conditions in RTILs. The model prediction curves well describe the experimental data indicating this bioenzymatic reaction model is effective and reliable in certain conditions.

  2. Synthesis of Fluoroalkoxy Substituted Arylboronic Esters by Iridium-Catalyzed Aromatic C–H Borylation

    KAUST Repository

    Batool, Farhat

    2015-08-17

    The preparation of fluoroalkoxy arylboronic esters by iridium-catalyzed aromatic C–H borylation is described. The fluoroalkoxy groups employed include trifluoromethoxy, difluoromethoxy, 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethoxy, and 2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxole. The borylation reactions were carried out neat without the use of a glovebox or Schlenk line. The regioselectivities available through the iridium-catalyzed C–H borylation are complementary to those obtained by the electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions of fluoroalkoxy arenes. Fluoroalkoxy arylboronic esters can serve as versatile building blocks.

  3. Monitoring lipase-catalyzed butterfat interesterification with rapesee oil by Fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hong; Mu, Huiling; Xu, Xuebing

    2006-01-01

    This work demonstrates the application of FT-NIR spectroscopy to monitor the enzymatic interesterification process for butterfat modification. The reactions were catalyzed by Lipozyme TL IM at 70 C for the blend of butterfat/rapeseed oil (70/30, w/w) in a packed-bed reactor. The blend and intere......This work demonstrates the application of FT-NIR spectroscopy to monitor the enzymatic interesterification process for butterfat modification. The reactions were catalyzed by Lipozyme TL IM at 70 C for the blend of butterfat/rapeseed oil (70/30, w/w) in a packed-bed reactor. The blend...

  4. Reactivity and Chemoselectivity of Allenes in Rh(I)-Catalyzed Intermolecular (5 + 2) Cycloadditions with Vinylcyclopropanes: Allene-Mediated Rhodacycle Formation Can Poison Rh(I)-Catalyzed Cycloadditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Allenes are important 2π building blocks in organic synthesis and engage as 2-carbon components in many metal-catalyzed reactions. Wender and co-workers discovered that methyl substituents on the terminal allene double bond counterintuitively change the reactivities of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs). More sterically encumbered allenes afford higher cycloadduct yields, and such effects are also observed in other Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular cycloadditions. Through density functional theory calculations (B3LYP and M06) and experiment, we explored this enigmatic reactivity and selectivity of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with VCPs. The apparent low reactivity of terminally unsubstituted allenes is associated with a competing allene dimerization that irreversibly sequesters rhodium. With terminally substituted allenes, steric repulsion between the terminal substituents significantly increases the barrier of allene dimerization while the barrier of the (5 + 2) cycloaddition is not affected, and thus the cycloaddition prevails. Computation has also revealed the origin of chemoselectivity in (5 + 2) cycloadditions with allene-ynes. Although simple allene and acetylene have similar reaction barriers, intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions of allene-ynes occur exclusively at the terminal allene double bond. The terminal double bond is more reactive due to the enhanced d−π* backdonation. At the same time, insertion of the internal double bond of an allene-yne has a higher barrier as it would break π conjugation. Substituted alkynes are more difficult to insert compared with acetylene, because of the steric repulsion from the additional substituents. This leads to the greater reactivity of the allene double bond relative to the alkynyl group in allene-ynes. PMID:25379606

  5. Measurement of the Relative Branching Fractions for B^- to D/D^{*}/D^{**}(D^{(*)}\\pi) \\ell^- \\bar{\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B

    2006-09-26

    We present a study of B semileptonic decays into charm final states based on 211.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Using a novel technique based on the simultaneous fit of a set of variables reconstructed on the recoil of a B tagged in an hadronic decay mode, we measure the relative branching fractions {Lambda}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = 0.611 {+-} 0.022 (stat.) {+-} 0.027 (syst.) and {Lambda}(B{sup -} {yields} D**{sup 0})(D{sup (*)}{pi}){ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}/{Lambda}(B{sup -} {yields} DX{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = 0.173 {+-} 0.017 (stat.) {+-} 0.021 (syst.).

  6. A 11-Steps Total Synthesis of Magellanine through a Gold(I)-Catalyzed Dehydro Diels-Alder Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Philippe; Bétournay, Geneviève; Barabé, Francis; Barriault, Louis

    2017-01-12

    We have developed an innovative strategy for the formation of angular carbocycles via a gold(I)-catalyzed dehydro Diels-Alder reaction. This transformation provides rapid access to a variety of complex angular cores in excellent diastereoselectivities and high yields. The usefulness of this Au(I) -catalyzed cycloaddition was further demonstrated by accomplishing a 11-steps total synthesis of (±)-magellanine.

  7. Development of melamine modified urea formaldehyde resins based o nstrong acidic pH catalyzed urea formaldehyde polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    To upgrade the performance of urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin bonded particleboards, melamine modified urea-formaldehyde (MUF) resins based on strong acidic pH catalyzed UF polymers were investigated. The study was conducted in a series of two experiments: 1) formulation of MUF resins based on a UF polymer catalyzed with strong acidic pH and 2) determination of the...

  8. Large acceleration of α-chymotrypsin-catalyzed dipeptide formation by 18-crown-6 in organic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unen, van Dirk-Jan; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of 18-crown-6 on the synthesis of peptides catalyzed by α-chymotrypsin are reported. Lyophilization of the enzyme in the presence of 50 equivalents of 18-crown-6 results in a 425-fold enhanced activity when the reaction between the 2-chloroethylester of N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine and L-phe

  9. Metal-ion catalyzed polymerization in the eutectic phase in water-ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Szostak, Jack W.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of an RNA world requires among other processes the non-enzymatic, template-directed replication of genetic polymers such as RNA or related nucleic acids, possibly catalyzed by metal ions. The absence of uridilate derivative polymerization on adenine containing templates has been the...

  10. Asymmetric hydrogenation of quinolines catalyzed by iridium complexes of monodentate BINOL-derived phosphoramidites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mrsic, Natasa; Lefort, Laurent; Boogers, Jeroen A. F.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.; de Vries, Johannes G.; Mršić, Nataša

    The monodentate BINOL-derived phosphoramidite PipPhos is used as ligand for the iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of 2- and 2,6-substituted quinolines. If tri-ortho-tolylphosphine and/or chloride salts are used as additives enantioselectivities are strongly enhanced up to 89%. NMR indicates

  11. Redox-Neutral Rh(III)-Catalyzed Olefination of Carboxamides with Trifluoromethyl Allylic Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihye; Han, Sangil; Jeon, Mijin; Mishra, Neeraj Kumar; Lee, Seok-Yong; Lee, Jong Suk; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Um, Sung Hee; Kim, In Su

    2016-11-18

    The rhodium(III)-catalyzed olefination of various carboxamides with α-CF3-substituted allylic carbonate is described. This reaction provides direct access to linear CF3-allyl frameworks with complete trans-selectivity. In particular, a rhodium catalyst provided Heck-type γ-CF3-allylation products via the β-O-elimination of rhodacycle intermediate and subsequent olefin migration process.

  12. Rh(III-catalyzed directed C–H bond amidation of ferrocenes with isocyanates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takebayashi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [RhCp*(OAc2(H2O] [Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl] catalyzed the C–H bond amidation of ferrocenes possessing directing groups with isocyanates in the presence of 2 equiv/Rh of HBF4·OEt2. A variety of disubstituted ferrocenes were prepared in high yields, or excellent diastereoselectivities.

  13. Synthesis of 2-substituted tetraphenylenes via transition-metal-catalyzed derivatization of tetraphenylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shulei; Jiang, Hang; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Dushen

    2016-01-01

    Summary A new strategy for the synthesis of 2-substituted tetraphenylenes through a transition-metal-catalyzed derivatization has been developed. Three types of functionalities, including OAc, X (Cl, Br, I) and carbonyl, were introduced onto tetraphenylene, which allows the easy access to a variety of monosubstituted tetraphenylenes. These reactions could accelerate research on the properties and application of tetraphenylene derivatives. PMID:27559378

  14. Enantioselective addition of diphenyl phosphonate to ketimines derived from isatins catalyzed by binaphthyl-modified organocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hee Seung; Kim, Yubin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chiral binaphthyl-modified squaramide-catalyzed enantioselective addition of diphenyl phosphonate to ketimines derived from isatins has been achieved. This method affords practical and efficient access to chiral 3-amino-3-phosphonyl-substituted oxindole derivatives in high yields with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 99% ee). PMID:27559405

  15. Synthesis of a novel chemotype via sequential metal-catalyzed cycloisomerizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Leng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sequential cycloisomerizations of diynyl o-benzaldehyde substrates to access novel polycyclic cyclopropanes are reported. The reaction sequence involves initial Cu(I-mediated cycloisomerization/nucleophilic addition to an isochromene followed by diastereoselective Pt(II-catalyzed enyne cycloisomerization.

  16. Practical and General Palladium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Ketones from Internal Olefins

    KAUST Repository

    Morandi, Bill

    2013-01-16

    Make it simple! A convenient and general palladium-catalyzed oxidation of internal olefins to ketones is reported. The transformation occurs at room temperature and shows wide substrate scope. Applications to the oxidation of seed-oil derivatives and a bioactive natural product (see scheme) are described, as well as intriguing mechanistic features.

  17. Memory effects in palladium-catalyzed allylic Alkylations of 2-cyclohexen-1-yl acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensen, Nina; Fristrup, Peter; Tanner, David Ackland

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the enantiospecificity of the allylic alkylation of enantioenriched 2-cyclohexen-1-yl acetate with the enolate ion of dimethyl malonate catalyzed by unsymmetrical palladium catalysts. The precatalysts employed were (eta(3)-allyl)PdLCl, where L...

  18. Enantioselective Evans-Tishchenko Reduction of b-Hydroxyketone Catalyzed by Lithium Binaphtholate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Nakajima

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lithium diphenylbinaphtholate catalyzed the enantioselective Evans-Tishchenko reduction of achiral b-hydroxyketones to afford monoacyl-protected 1,3-diols with high stereoselectivities. In the reaction of racemic b-hydroxyketones, kinetic optical resolution occurred in a highly stereoselective manner.

  19. Palladium-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions of Perfluoro Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Ohashi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarize our recent development of palladium(0-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of perfluoro organic compounds with organometallic reagents. The oxidative addition of a C–F bond of tetrafluoroethylene (TFE to palladium(0 was promoted by the addition of lithium iodide, affording a trifluorovinyl palladium(II iodide. Based on this finding, the first palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of TFE with diarylzinc was developed in the presence of lithium iodide, affording α,β,β-trifluorostyrene derivatives in excellent yield. This coupling reaction was expanded to the novel Pd(0/PR3-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of TFE with arylboronates. In this reaction, the trifluorovinyl palladium(II fluoride was a key reaction intermediate that required neither an extraneous base to enhance the reactivity of organoboronates nor a Lewis acid additive to promote the oxidative addition of a C–F bond. In addition, our strategy utilizing the synergetic effect of Pd(0 and lithium iodide could be applied to the C–F bond cleavage of unreactive hexafluorobenzene (C6F6, leading to the first Pd(0-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of C6F6 with diarylzinc compounds.

  20. Highly selective formation of imines catalyzed by silver nanoparticles supported on alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Poreddy, Raju; Engelbrekt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of alcohols to aldehydes catalyzed by Ag nanoparticles supported on Al2O3 was studied. The catalyst promoted the direct formation of imines by tandem oxidative dehydrogenation and condensation of alcohols and amines. The reactions were performed under mild conditions...

  1. Aminofluorination of 2-alkynylanilines: a Au-catalyzed entry to fluorinated indoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Arcadi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The scope and limitations of gold-catalyzed tandem cycloisomerization/fluorination reactions of unprotected 2-alkynylanilines to have access to 3,3-difluoro-2-aryl-3H-indoles and 3-fluoro-2-arylindoles are described. An unprecedented aminoauration/oxidation/fluorination cascade reaction of 2-alkynylanilines bearing a linear alkyl group on the terminal triple bond is reported.

  2. Surprisingly Mild Enolate-Counterion-Free Pd(0)-Catalyzed Intramolecular Allylic Alkylations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madec, David; Prestat, Guillaume; Martini, Elisabetta;

    2005-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed intramolecular allylic alkylations of unsaturated EWG-activated amides can take place under phase-transfer conditions or in the presence of a crown ether. These new reaction conditions are milder and higher yielding than those previously reported. A rationalization for such an...

  3. The Extension Storyteller: Using Stories to Enhance Meaning and Catalyze Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Many cultures share and pass on norms through storytelling. Extension as a culture also creates and shares stories to pass on history, provide information about Extension work and experiences, and develop the organization. However, Extension as a culture less frequently uses storytelling to enhance meaning and catalyze related change. This article…

  4. Optimizing the Acid Catalyzed Synthesis of Hyperbranched Poly(Glycerol-diacids) Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligomeric pre-polymers were synthesized by the acid-catalyzed condensation of glycerol with succinic acid, glutaric acid and azelaic acid in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or dimethylformamide (DMF). The prepolymers were obtained, on average in 84% yield, and were characterized by proton NMR, MALDI-TOF ...

  5. Direct 2-acetoxylation of quinoline N-oxides via copper catalyzed C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuan; Zhu, Chongwei; Cui, Xiuling; Wu, Yangjie

    2013-08-07

    An efficient and direct 2-acetoxylation of quinoline N-oxides via copper(I) catalyzed C-H bond activation has been developed. This transformation was achieved using TBHP as an oxidant in the cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) reaction of quinoline N-oxides with aldehydes, and provided a practical pathway to 2-acyloxyl quinolines.

  6. Copper(II)-catalyzed electrophilic amination of quinoline N-oxides with O-benzoyl hydroxylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Jia, Chunqi; Sun, Kai; Lv, Yunhe; Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Kexiao; Wu, Hankui

    2015-03-21

    Copper acetate-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization amination of quinoline N-oxides was achieved using O-benzoyl hydroxylamine as an electrophilic amination reagent, thereby affording the desired products in moderate to excellent yields. Electrophilic amination can also be performed in good yield on a gram scale.

  7. Palladium-catalyzed conversion of aryl and vinyl triflates to bromides and chlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoqiang; Hyde, Alan M; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2010-10-13

    The palladium-catalyzed conversion of aryl and vinyl triflates to aryl and vinyl halides (bromides and chlorides) has been developed using dialkylbiaryl phosphine ligands. A variety of aryl, heteroaryl, and vinyl halides can be prepared via this method in good to excellent yields.

  8. Palladium-catalyzed carbonylation reaction of aryl bromides with 2-hydroxyacetophenones to form flavones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Feng; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Flavone of the month: a general and efficient method for the palladium-catalyzed carbonylative synthesis of flavones has been developed. Starting from aryl bromides and 2-hydroxyacetophenones, the corresponding flavones have been isolated in good yields. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Palladium-catalyzed amination of unprotected five-membered heterocyclic bromides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mingjuan; Hoshiya, Naoyuki; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2014-02-07

    An efficient method for the palladium-catalyzed amination of unprotected bromoimidazoles and bromopyrazoles is presented. The transformation is facilitated by the use of our newly developed Pd precatalyst based on the bulky biarylphosphine ligand tBuBrettPhos (L4). The mild reaction conditions employed allow for the preparation of a broad scope of aminoimidazoles and aminopyrazoles in moderate to excellent yields.

  10. An improved palladium-catalyzed conversion of aryl and vinyl triflates to bromides and chlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jun; Wang, Xinyan; Zhang, Yong; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2011-09-16

    A facile Pd-catalyzed conversion of aryl and vinyl triflates to aryl and vinyl halides (bromides and chlorides) is described. This method allows convenient access to a variety of aryl, heteroaryl, and vinyl halides in good to excellent yields and with greatly simplified conditions relative to our previous report. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Efficient palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions of aryl bromides and chlorides with phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tongjie; Schulz, Thomas; Torborg, Christian; Chen, Xiaorong; Wang, Jun; Beller, Matthias; Huang, Jun

    2009-12-21

    A convenient and general palladium-catalyzed coupling reaction of aryl bromides and chlorides with phenols was developed. Various functional groups such as nitriles, aldehydes, ketones and esters are well tolerated and the corresponding products are obtained in good to excellent yield.

  12. Highly efficient synthesis of phenols by copper-catalyzed hydroxylation of aryl iodides, bromides, and chlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Li, Zheng; Wang, Zhaoyang; Yao, Zhiyi; Jiang, Sheng

    2011-08-19

    8-Hydroxyquinolin-N-oxide was found to be a very efficient ligand for the copper-catalyzed hydroxylation of aryl iodides, aryl bromides, or aryl chlorides under mild reaction conditions. This methodology provides a direct transformation of aryl halides to phenols and to alkyl aryl ethers. The inexpensive catalytic system showed great functional group tolerance and excellent selectivity. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Palladium-catalyzed carbonylative sonogashira coupling of aryl bromides using near stoichiometric carbon monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Karoline T.; Laursen, Simon R.; Lindhardt, Anders T.

    2014-01-01

    A general procedure for the palladium-catalyzed carbonylative Sonogashira coupling of aryl bromides is reported, using near stoichiometric amounts of carbon monoxide. The method allows a broad substrate scope in moderate to excellent yields. The formed alkynone motive serves as a platform...

  14. NHC-Catalyzed/Titanium(IV);#8722;Mediated Highly Diastereo- and Enantioselective Dimerization of Enals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Daniel T.; Cardinal-David, Benoit; Roberts, John M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Scheidt, Karl A. (NWU)

    2012-05-09

    An NHC-catalyzed, diastereo- and enantioselective dimerization of enals has been developed. The use of Ti(Oi-Pr){sub 4} is a key element for the reactivity and selectivity of this process. The cyclopentenes are obtained with high levels of diastereo- and enantioselectivity and their synthetic utility is demonstrated by functionalization of the product alkene.

  15. A Palladium-Catalyzed Vinylcyclopropane (3 + 2) Cycloaddition Approach to the Melodinus Alkaloids

    KAUST Repository

    Goldberg, Alexander F. G.

    2011-08-19

    A palladium-catalyzed (3+2) cycloaddition of a vinylcyclopropane and a β-nitrostyrene is employed to rapidly assemble the cyclopentane core of the Melodinus alkaloids. The ABCD ring system of the natural product family is prepared in six steps from commercially available materials.

  16. Asymmetric Cyclization of N-Sulfonyl Alkenyl Amides Catalyzed by Iridium/Chiral Diene Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamoto, Midori; Yanagi, Tomoyuki; Nishimura, Takahiro; Yorimitsu, Hideki

    2016-09-16

    Iridium/chiral diene complexes efficiently catalyzed the asymmetric cyclization of N-sulfonyl alkenyl amides to give the corresponding 2-pyrrolidone derivatives with high enantioselectivity. A mechanistic study revealed that the reaction proceeds via nucleophilic attack of the amide on the alkene moiety.

  17. Cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to alcohols: unexpected reactivity trend indicates ester enolate intermediacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Arup; Goldberg, Alexander F G; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Shimon, Linda J W; Ben David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    The atom-efficient and environmentally benign catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic acid esters to alcohols has been accomplished in recent years mainly with precious-metal-based catalysts, with few exceptions. Presented here is the first cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to the corresponding alcohols. Unexpectedly, the evidence indicates the unprecedented involvement of ester enolate intermediates.

  18. Heteroaromatic sulfonates and phosphates as electrophiles in iron-catalyzed cross-couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gøgsig, Thomas M; Lindhardt, Anders T; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2009-11-01

    Employment of heteroaromatic tosylates and phosphates as suitable electrophiles in iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions with alkyl Grignard reagents is reported. These reactions are performed at low temperature allowing good functional group tolerance and full conversion is achieved within minutes. In addition, an aryl-aryl cross-coupling utilizing a heteroaryl sulfamate electrophile is reported.

  19. Palladium-Catalyzed Polyfluorophenylation of Porphyrins with Bis(polyfluorophenylzinc Reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikatsu Takanami

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A facile and efficient method for the synthesis of pentafluorophenyl- and related polyfluorophenyl-substituted porphyrins has been achieved via palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of brominated porphyrins with bis(polyfluorophenylzinc reagents. The reaction is applicable to a variety of free-base bromoporphyrins, their metal complexes, and a number of bis(polyfluorophenylzinc reagents.

  20. Copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of arylsulfinate salts using an electrophilic trifluoromethylation reagent

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Xiaoxi

    2013-03-01

    A copper-catalyzed method for the trifluoromethylation of arylsulfinates with Togni\\'s reagent has been developed, affording aryltrifluoromethylsulfones in moderate to good yields. A wide range of functional groups in arylsulfinates are compatible with the reaction conditions. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.