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Sample records for locally recurrent head

  1. Pemetrexed disodium in recurrent locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    OpenAIRE

    Pivot, X; Raymond, E; Laguerre, B.; Degardin, M; Cals, L; Armand, J P; Lefebvre, J L; Gedouin, D; Ripoche, V; Kayitalire, L; Niyikiza, C; Johnson, R.; Latz, J.; Schneider, M.

    2001-01-01

    This phase II study determined response rate of patients with locally advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer treated with pemetrexed disodium, a new multitargeted antifolate that inhibits thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. 35 patients with local or metastatic relapse of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (31 male, 4 female; median age 53 years) were treated with pemetrexed 500 mg m2 administered as a 10-minute infusi...

  2. Salvage Stereotactic Reirradiation With or Without Cetuximab for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comet, Benedicte [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Kramar, Andrew [Department of Statistical Analysis, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Faivre-Pierret, Mathieu [Department of Radiology, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Dewas, Sylvain; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Degardin, Marian; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Lacornerie, Thomas [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Lartigau, Eric F., E-mail: e-lartigau@o-lambret.fr [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Normal tissues tolerance limits the use of reirradiation for recurrent head-and-neck cancers (HNC). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could offer precise irradiation while sparing healthy tissues. Results of a feasibility study using SBRT with or without cetuximab are reported for reirradiation of recurrent primary HNC. Methods and Materials: Patients with inoperable recurrent, or new primary tumor, in a previously irradiated area were included. Reirradiation dose was 36 Gy in six fractions of 6 Gy to the 85% isodose line covering 95% of the planning target volume. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma received concomitant cetuximab. Results: Between June 2007 and January 2010, 40 patients were prospectively treated for 43 lesions. Median age was 60 and median tumor size was 29 mm. Fifteen patients received concomitant cetuximab and 1 received concomitant cisplatin. Median follow-up was 25.6 months with 34 patients evaluable for tumor response. Median overall survival was 13.6 months and response rate was 79.4% (15 complete and 12 partial responses). Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 4 patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that short SBRT with or without cetuximab is an effective salvage treatment with good response rate in this poor prognosis population with previously irradiated HNC. Treatment is feasible and, with appropriate care to limiting critical structure, acute toxicities are acceptable. A prospective multicenter Phase II trial of SRT and concomitant cetuximab in recurrent HNC squamous cell carcinoma is ongoing.

  3. Guidelines of the French Society of Otorhinolaryngology (SFORL), short version. Diagnosis of local recurrence and metachronous locations in head and neck oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, C; Barry, B; De Raucourt, D; Choussy, O; Dessard-Diana, B; Hans, S; Lafarge, D

    2015-11-01

    Surveillance is fundamental to the management of head and neck cancer. The present guidelines of the French ENT society (SFORL) were drawn up by a group of experts in the field, and are intended to specify the modalities of management, based on a review of the literature and, where data are lacking, to provide expert opinion. The present paper deals with guidelines for the diagnosis of local and regional recurrence and metachronous head and neck locations. Locoregional recurrence usually occurs within 3 years of primary treatment and is mainly related to the characteristics of the primary tumor and the treatment measures taken. Laryngeal location, safe primary resection margins, low level of lymph node invasion, unimodal primary treatment and early diagnosis of recurrence are factors of good prognosis. Systematic imaging surveillance may be considered for patients for whom a curative technique exists and when surveillance is difficult. The role of PET-scanning remains to be determined. Metachronous locations are frequent, even in the late course; prolonged surveillance is appropriate. The best preventive measure is cessation of alcohol abuse and smoking. Patient education is primordial.

  4. SBRT for recurrent head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, M.; Kabarriti, R.; Baliga, S.; Guha, C.; Tome, W.; Kalnicki, S.

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancers is complex. Concerns over toxicity with re-irradiation have limited its use in the clinical setting. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a highly conformal and precise type of radiotherapy and has the advantage of sparing normal tissue. Although SBRT is an attractive treatment modality, its use in the clinic is limited, given the technically challenging nature of the procedure. In this review, we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of re-irradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancers, with particular attention to the advent of SBRT and its use with systemic therapies such as cetuximab.

  5. Continuous-Course Reirradiation With Concurrent Carboplatin and Paclitaxel for Locally Recurrent, Nonmetastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head-and-Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharofa, Jordan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Choong, Nicholas [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Wang, Dian; Firat, Selim; Schultz, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Sadasiwan, Chitra [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Wong, Stuart, E-mail: Swong@mcw.edu [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy and toxicity of continuous-course, conformal reirradiation with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin for the treatment of locally recurrent, nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) in a previously irradiated field. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with continuous course-reirradiation with concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel at the Medical College of Wisconsin and the Clement J. Zablocki VA from 2001 through 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included in the analysis had prior radiation at the site of recurrence of at least 45 Gy. The analysis included patients who received either intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) or three-dimensional conformal RT techniques. All patients received weekly concurrent carboplatin (AUC2) and paclitaxel (30-50 mg/m{sup 2}). Results: Thirty-eight patients with nonmetastatic SCCHN met the entry criteria for analysis. The primary sites at initial diagnosis were oropharyngeal or laryngeal in most patients (66%). Median reirradiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 54-70 Gy). Acute toxicity included Grade 2 neutropenia (5%), Grade 3 neutropenia (15%), and Grade 1/2 thrombocytopenia (8%). No deaths occurred from hematologic toxicity. Chemotherapy doses held (50%) was more prevalent than radiation treatment break (8%). Sixty-eight percent of patients required a gastrostomy tube in follow-up. Significant late toxicity was experienced in 6 patients (16%): 1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 pharyngocutaneous fistula, 3 with osteoradionecrosis, and 1 patient with a lingual artery bleed. Patients treated with three-dimensional conformal RT had more frequent significant late toxicites than patients treated with intensity-modulated RT (44% and 7% respectively, p < 0.05). The median time to progression was 7 months and progression-free rates at 1, 2, and 5 years was 44%, 34%, and 29% respectively. The median overall survival was 16 months. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 54

  6. Re-irradiation combined with capecitabine in locally recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A prospective phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormittag, L.; Kornek, G. [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Div. of Clinical Oncology; Lemaire, C.; Radonjic, D.; Selzer, E. [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. for Radiotherapy and Radiobiology

    2012-03-15

    We performed a prospective phase II trial to investigate the safety and efficacy of radiotherapy combined with capecitabine in patients suffering from a recurrence of a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) within a previously irradiated field. A total of 31 evaluable patients with recurrent SCCHN received re-irradiation with a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions over 5 weeks) up to a maximum of 60 Gy combined with 900 mg/m{sup 2}/day capecitabine given on the days of radiotherapy. The median time to relapse after the first course of radiotherapy was 15 months. The overall response rate in our study was 68% including 6 patients with a complete response. The median overall survival was 8.4 months. Grade 3 or 4 mucositis occurred in 4 patients and 1 patient, respectively. No grade 4 hematological toxicities were observed; 1 patient had grade 3 anemia. The cumulative median lifetime dose was 116 Gy. Capecitabine combined with re-irradiation is a well-tolerated treatment in patients with recurrent SCCHN. In light of its good tolerability, it appears to be a potential option for patients with a reduced performance status and may also serve as a basis for novel treatment concepts, such as in combination with targeted therapies.

  7. Evaluation of suspected local recurrence in head and neck cancer: A comparison between PET and PET/CT for biopsy proven lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, Benjamin S. [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Center/Nuclear Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095-6948 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Division of Musculo-Skeletal and Head and Neck Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna 1090 Waehringer Guertel 18-20 (Austria)]. E-mail: benjamin.halpern@meduniwien.ac.at; Yeom, Kristen [Department of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1721 (United States); Fueger, Barbara J. [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Center/Nuclear Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095-6948 (United States); Lufkin, Robert B. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1721 (United States); Czernin, Johannes [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Center/Nuclear Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095-6948 (United States); Allen-Auerbach, Martin [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Center/Nuclear Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095-6948 (United States)]. E-mail: mauerbach@mednet.ucla.edu

    2007-05-15

    Background: {sup 18}F-FDG PET has a high accuracy for re-staging of head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the diagnostic accuracy can be further improved with integrated PET/CT. Materials and methods: Forty-nine patients with a mean age of 59 {+-} 18 years were studied retrospectively. Histo-pathological verification was available either from complete tumor resection with or without lymph node dissection (n = 27) or direct endoscopic biopsy (n = 16) or ultrasound guided biopsy (n = 6). Two reviewers blinded to the pathological findings read all PET images in consensus. An experienced radiologist was added for the interpretation of the PET/CT images. Results: Tissue verification was available for 110 lesions in 49 patients. Sixty-seven lesions (61%) were biopsy positive and 43 (39%) were negative for malignant disease. PET and PET/CT showed an overall accuracy for cancer detection of 84 and 88% (p = 0.06), respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for PET were 78 and 93% versus 84 (p = NS) and 95% (p = NS) with PET/CT. A patient-by-patient analysis yielded a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for PET of 80, 56 and 76%, compared to 88% (p = NS), 78% (p = NS) and 86% (p = 0.06) for PET/CT. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that PET/CT does not significantly improve the detection of recurrence of head and neck cancer. However, a trend towards improved accuracy was observed (p = 0.06)

  8. Sunitinib, Cetuximab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  9. Bortezomib With or Without Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  10. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  11. [Local recurrence of paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabii, R; Moufid, K; Fekak, H; Dassouli, B; Joual, A; Bennani, S; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2002-10-01

    We report an uncommon case of scrotal recurrence of embryonal paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma in 19 year old man after 3 years later. The diagnosis was suspected clinically and confirmed by histopathology study after resection of the scrotal tumor. About this case, the authors discuss the diagnosis and the management of this tumor.

  12. Surgery for local recurrence of rectal carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Wiggers (Theo); M.R. de Vries (Mark); B. Veeze-Kuypers (Bernadette)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: This study was designed to evaluate results, especially mortality and morbidity, of surgical resection with curative intent for patients with a local recurrence of rectal cancer, in combination with radiotherapy. METHODS: Consecutive medical records of 163 patients with local re

  13. Palliative treatment of patients with inoperable locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer, using a low-dose and personalized chemotherapeutic regimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Rohit; Bennett, Jeffery; Reisman, David N.

    2017-01-01

    Inoperable or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is known to be associated with a poor patient prognosis. First line therapies include a Taxol, platinum-based antineoplastic and fluorouracil (FU) treatment regimen (TPF) or a platinum-based antineoplastic, FU and EGFR inhibitor treatment regimen (PFE). The toxicity of these regimens is one of the major limiting factors, particularly for palliative treatment. The present study is a retrospective study of 15 patients with HNSCC, where the treatment goal was palliative. Of the 15 patients, 8 received a TPF, while 7 received a PFE. A total of 129 treatment cycles were administered with a median of 9 cycles (range, 3–14). Chemotherapy began with low doses and was subsequently titrated up based on tolerance and response. Positive responses were noted with the lower doses compared with the conventional doses, and maximal doses were not required. The median dose of cisplatin, paclitaxel and 5-FU administered was 40 mg/m2, 80 mg/m2 and 360 mg/m2/day for 5 days, respectively. Cetuximab was used at a standard dose. At the initial follow-up (mean, 64 days; 3 cycles), a 100% disease control rate (DCR) and 80% overall response rate (ORR) was achieved. A positive response, 60% DCR and 60% ORR, was maintained until the late stages of the study (mean, 217 days; 9 cycles). Following termination of chemotherapy after >9 cycles, 4 patients remained disease free for ~1 year. A total of 3 patients exhibited a pathologic complete response despite radiologically exhibiting residual disease. The median progression-free survival time was 10.03 months and the overall survival time was 15.77 months. The only grade 3 hematologic toxicity noted was neutropenia in 3 (20%) patients. Grade 3 vomiting was noted in 1 (6.67%) patient and grade 3 stomatitis was noted in 1 (6.67%) patient. Due to low toxicity patients exhibited improved tolerance to this approach, particularly in terms of palliative care. Furthermore, these results

  14. Design of a phase I clinical trial to evaluate intratumoral delivery of ErbB-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cells in locally advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, May C I; Papa, Sophie E; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Guerrero Urbano, Teresa; Spicer, James F; Maher, John

    2013-09-01

    Despite several advances, 5-year survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains unchanged at only 50%. The commonest cause of death is locally advanced/recurrent disease. Consequently, there is an unmet need for new approaches to improve local control in HNSCC. T4 immunotherapy is an autologous cell therapy in which peripheral blood T-cells are genetically engineered using a retroviral vector to coexpress two chimeric receptors: (i) T1E28z is a chimeric antigen receptor that engages multiple ErbB dimers that are commonly upregulated in HNSCC; (ii) 4αβ is a chimeric cytokine receptor that converts the weak mitogenic stimulus provided by interleukin (IL)-4 into a strong and selective growth signal, allowing preferential expansion and enrichment of T4(+) T-cells ex vivo. T4 immunotherapy exerts antitumor activity against HNSCC cell lines and tumors in vivo, without significant toxicity. Human T4(+) T-cells also engage mouse ErbB receptors, permitting safety testing in SCID Beige mice. Severe toxicity caused by cytokine release syndrome ensues when human T4(+) T-cells are administered at high doses to mice, particularly with advanced tumor burdens. However, such toxicity is not required for efficacy and is never seen if T-cells are administered by the intratumoral route. To exploit this, we have designed a first-in-man clinical trial in which T4(+) T-cells are administered to patients with locally advanced/recurrent HNSCC. Cells will be administered at a single sitting to multiple sites around the viable tumor circumference. A 3+3 dose escalation design will be used, starting at 10(7) cells (cohort 1), escalating to 10(9) cells (cohort 5). If maximum tolerated dose remains undefined, cohorts 6/7 will receive either low- or high-dose cyclophosphamide before 10(9) T4(+) T-cells. A panel of routine/in-house assays and imaging techniques will be used to monitor safety, efficacy, perturbation of endogenous antitumor immunity

  15. Current management of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Laurberg, Søren; Holm, Thorbjörn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the surgical management of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Embase, Web...

  16. Hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, Jakub; Knybel, Lukas; Skacelikova, Eva; Otahal, Bretislav; Molenda, Lukas; Feltl, David [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Oncology, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Stransky, Jiri; Res, Oldrich [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Maxilofacial Surgery, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Matousek, Petr; Zelenik, Karol [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Otolaryngology, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-01-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation (re-RT) as a treatment for inoperable, recurrent, or second primary head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) that is not suitable for systemic treatment. Forty patients with recurrent or second primary HNSCC were included in this study. The patients had a median gross tumor volume of 76 ml (range 14-193 ml) and a previous radiotherapy dose greater than 60 Gy. Treatment was designed to cover 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV, defined as gross tumor volume [GTV] + 3 mm to account for microscopic spreading, with no additional set-up margin) with the prescribed dose (48 Gy in 16 fractions b.i.d.). Treatment was administered twice daily with a minimum 6 h gap. Uninvolved lymph nodes were not irradiated. Treatment was completed as planned for all patients (with median duration of 11 days, range 9-14 days). Acute toxicity was evaluated using the RTOG/EORTC scale. A 37 % incidence of grade 3 mucositis was observed, with recovery time of ≤ 4 weeks for all of these patients. Acute skin toxicity was never observed to be higher than grade 2. Late toxicity was also evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. Mandible radionecrosis was seen in 4 cases (10 %); however, neither carotid blowout syndrome nor other grade 4 late toxicity occurred. One-year overall survival (OS) and local progression-free survival (L-PFS) were found to be 33 and 44 %, respectively. Performance status and GTV proved to be significant prognostic factors regarding local control and survival. Hyperfractionated stereotactic re-RT is a reasonable treatment option for patients with recurrent/second primary HNSCC who were previously exposed to high-dose irradiation and who are not candidates for systemic treatment or hypofractionation. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war es, die Effektivitaet und Toxizitaet der hyperfraktionierten akzelerierten stereotaktischen Wiederbestrahlung (re

  17. Effectiveness of BNCT for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Itsuro E-mail: katoitsu@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ono, Koji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ohmae, Masatoshi; Maruhashi, Akira; Imahori, Yoshio; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Nakazawa, Mitsuhiro; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2004-11-01

    Recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM) are often radio-/chemo-resistant and show extensive growth, necessitating a wide resection including surrounding tissues. To avoid severe impairment of oro-facial structures and functions, it is necessary to explore new treatments for HNM. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy that has significant superiority over conventional radiotherapies in principle. We report here, first in the world, six patients with a recurrent HNM who have been treated with BNCT. The BNCT in combination with boronophenylalanine (BPA) and borocaptate sodium (BSH) was performed using the epithermal neutrons with Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The results of BNCT were as follows: (1) {sup 10}B concentration of tumor/normal tissue ratios (T/N ratio) of PET studies were SCC:1.8-4.4, sarcoma:3.1-4.0, parotid tumor:3.5. (2) Relative volume (%) of each tumor to the prior were 6-46%. (3) Remarkable reduction (46-100%) of huge tumor such as 40-675 cm{sup 3} (average: 315 cm{sup 3}), improvement of QOL and very mild side effects were recognized in all cases. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach even for a huge or far advanced HNM.

  18. Re-irradiation for recurrent and second primary cancers of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Maria A; Veruttipong, Darlene; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Chin, Robert; Beron, Philip; Abemayor, Elliot; St John, Maie; Chen, Allen M

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate a single-institutional experience with the use of re-irradiation for recurrent and new primary cancers of the head and neck. The medical charts of 80 consecutive patients who underwent re-irradiation for local-regionally recurrent or second primary head and neck cancer between November 1998 and December 2015 were analyzed. Multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard and logistic regression to determine predictors of clinical outcomes. Seventy-six of the 80 patients were evaluable. The median age was 57.5 (range 26.6-84.9); Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was used in 71 (93.4%) patients with a median dose of 60Gy. Thirty-one patients (40.8%) underwent salvage surgery before re-irradiation and 47 (61.8%) received concurrent systemic therapy. The median time interval between radiation courses was 25.3months (range 2-322months). The 2-year estimates of overall survival, progression free survival, locoregional control, and distant control were 51.0%, 31.3%, 36.8% and 68.3%, respectively. Patients who underwent salvage surgery prior to re-irradiation had significantly improved locoregional control, progression free survival, and overall survival (p<0.05, for all). On multivariate analysis, gross tumor volume (GTV) at re-irradiation and interval between radiation courses were associated with improved overall survival. Severe (grade⩾3) late complications were observed in 25 patients (32.8%). Re-irradiation for recurrent or second primary head and neck cancer is feasible and effective in select patients with head and neck cancer. The high observed rate of treatment-related morbidity highlights the continue challenges that accompany this approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sentinel Lymph Node Dissection in Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Charlotte Caspara; Christensen, Mette Haulund; Oldenbourg, Mette Holmqvist

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the use of sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) in the treatment of patients with locally recurrent breast cancer. METHODS: A total of 147 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer were included from five different breast surgery departments...

  20. Risk of Local Recurrence of Benign and Borderline Phyllodes Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borhani-Khomani, Kaveh; Talman, Maj-Lis Møller; Kroman, Niels

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the recurrence rate of benign and borderline phyllodes tumors (PTs) of the breast, the association between the size of resection margin and risk of recurrence and the risk of progression of histological grading at recurrence. METHODS: Nationwide retrospective study on Danish...... in histological grading was found. The results do not justify wide excision margins of nonmalignant phyllodes tumors of the breast....... women aged 18 years or older, operated from 1999 to 2014, with resected benign or borderline PTs. Information on age, size of primary tumor and recurrence, histological grade, surgical treatment, margin size, and local recurrence were collected from the national Danish Pathology Register. RESULTS...

  1. The significance of local recurrence of carcinoma of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toonkel, L.M.; Fix, I.; Jacobson, L.H.; Wallach, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    One hundred twenty-one patients with local or regional recurrence of carcinoma of the breast without evidence of distant metastases were treated with megavoltage radiation therapy. All patients had radical or modified radical mastectomy as their initial treatment. The 10 year survival probability of this group of patients is 26%, with a local control probability of 46%. Within this group of patients with recurrent disease, factors found to be associated with a poorer prognosis include peripheral nodal recurrence, advanced initial disease stage and short disease free interval. Contarary to expection, patients with recurrence within the mastectomy scar (as opposed to chest wall recurrence wide of the scar) or a history of previous radiotherapy had poorer local control rates (although not statistically significant), without effect upon overall survival. Comprehensive radiation therapy (peripheral lymphatic plus chest wall) enhanced the local control rate for the entire group and the survival probability for patients with isolated chest wall recurrence compared with limited radiation therapy fields. (Five year survival probability: chest wall irradiation only = 27%; chest wall and peripheral lymphatic = 54%). Patients given systemic therapy at the time of local recurrence showed no survival benefit. Aggressive, comprehensive radiation therapy is indicated for locally recurrent breast cancer. More effective systemic therapy is needed, especially for higher risk patients.

  2. Localization without recurrence and pseudo-Bloch oscillations in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical localization, i.e. the absence of secular spreading of a quantum or classical wave packet, is usually associated to Hamiltonians with purely point spectrum, i.e. with a normalizable and complete set of eigenstates, which show quasi-periodic dynamics (recurrence). Here we show rather counter-intuitively that dynamical localization can be observed in Hamiltonians with absolutely continuous spectrum, where recurrence effects are forbidden. An optical realization of such an Hamiltonian is proposed based on beam propagation in a self-imaging optical resonator with a phase grating. Localization without recurrence in this system is explained in terms of pseudo-Bloch optical oscillations.

  3. Localization without recurrence and pseudo-Bloch oscillations in optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2015-10-15

    Dynamical localization, i.e., the absence of secular spreading of a quantum or classical wave packet, is usually associated with Hamiltonians by the pure point spectrum, i.e., with a normalizable and complete set of eigenstates. Such systems always show quasi-periodic dynamics (recurrence). Here, we show, rather counter-intuitively, that dynamical localization can be observed in Hamiltonians with an absolutely continuous spectrum, where recurrence effects are forbidden. An optical realization of such a Hamiltonian is proposed based on beam propagation in a self-imaging optical resonator with a phase grating. Localization without recurrence in this system is explained in terms of pseudo-Bloch optical oscillations.

  4. SYMPTOMATOLOGY, LOCALIZATION AND TREATMENT OF RECURRENT CERVICAL-CARCINOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TINGA, DJ; BOUMA, J; AALDERS, JG; Boonstra, J.

    1992-01-01

    In a group of 367 women treated for invasive carcinoma of the cervix tumor recurrence was discovered at an asymptomatic stage in 16 (23%) patients. The tumor recurrence was localized to the pelvis in 29 (41%) cases, in the vaginal wall in 3 (4%) cases, and 39 (55%) patients had distant metastases

  5. SYMPTOMATOLOGY, LOCALIZATION AND TREATMENT OF RECURRENT CERVICAL-CARCINOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TINGA, DJ; BOUMA, J; AALDERS, JG; Boonstra, J.

    1992-01-01

    In a group of 367 women treated for invasive carcinoma of the cervix tumor recurrence was discovered at an asymptomatic stage in 16 (23%) patients. The tumor recurrence was localized to the pelvis in 29 (41%) cases, in the vaginal wall in 3 (4%) cases, and 39 (55%) patients had distant metastases (w

  6. SYMPTOMATOLOGY, LOCALIZATION AND TREATMENT OF RECURRENT CERVICAL-CARCINOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TINGA, DJ; BOUMA, J; AALDERS, JG; Boonstra, J.

    1992-01-01

    In a group of 367 women treated for invasive carcinoma of the cervix tumor recurrence was discovered at an asymptomatic stage in 16 (23%) patients. The tumor recurrence was localized to the pelvis in 29 (41%) cases, in the vaginal wall in 3 (4%) cases, and 39 (55%) patients had distant metastases (w

  7. Caspase-3 activity predicts local recurrence in rectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heer, P. de; Bruin, E.C. de; Klein-Kranenbarg, E.; Aalbers, R.I.; Marijnen, C.A.M.; Putter, H.; Bont, H.J. de; Nagelkerke, J.F.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Verspaget, H.W.; Velde, C.J. van de; Kuppen, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Radiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision surgery has been shown to significantly reduce local recurrence rates in rectal cancer patients. Radiotherapy, however, is associated with considerable morbidity. The present study evaluated the use of biochemical detection of enzymatic

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy outcomes for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Kato, Ituro; Aihara, Teruhito; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Niimi, Miyuki; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Haginomori, Shin-ichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Fukushima, Masanori; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively review outcomes of applying boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to unresectable advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. Patients who were treated with BNCT for either local recurrent or newly diagnosed unresectable head or neck cancers between December 2001 and September 2007 were included. Clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrieved from hospital records. Either a combination of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine (BPA) or BPA alone were used as boron compounds. In all the treatment cases, the dose constraint was set to deliver a dose <10–12 Gy-eq to the skin or oral mucosa. There was a patient cohort of 62, with a median follow-up of 18.7 months (range, 0.7–40.8). A total of 87 BNCT procedures were performed. The overall response rate was 58% within 6 months after BNCT. The median survival time was 10.1 months from the time of BNCT. The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 43.1% and 24.2%, respectively. The major acute Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were hyperamylasemia (38.6%), fatigue (6.5%), mucositis/stomatitis (9.7%) and pain (9.7%), all of which were manageable. Three patients died of treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced carotid artery hemorrhage, two of whom had coexistent infection of the carotid artery. This study confirmed the feasibility of our dose-estimation method and that controlled trials are warranted. PMID:23955053

  9. Imaging of prostate cancer local recurrences: why and how?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis [Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Medecine Lyon Nord (France); Service d' Imagerie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); INSERM U 556, Lyon (France); Vitry, Thierry [Service d' Imagerie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France)

    2010-05-15

    Because prostate cancer local recurrences can be efficiently treated by salvage therapies, it becomes critical to detect them early. The first alert is the rise of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level after the post-treatment nadir, which can correspond to a distant recurrence, a local recurrence or both. This so-called biochemical failure (BF) is defined as PSA level >0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy (RP) and PSA level > nadir+2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. There is no consensual definition of BF after cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation or brachytherapy. Local recurrences after RP are treated by radiotherapy, those after radiotherapy by RP, cryotherapy, brachytherapy or HIFU ablation. Recurrences after cryotherapy or HIFU ablation can be treated by a second session or radiotherapy. Recurrences after brachytherapy are difficult to treat. In patients with BF, MRI can detect local recurrences, whatever the initial treatment was. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI seems particularly accurate. The role of spectroscopy remains controversial. Ultrasound-based techniques are less accurate, but this may change with the advent of ultrasonic contrast media. These recent advances in imaging may improve the outcome of salvage therapies (by improving patient selection and treatment targeting) and should open the way to focal salvage treatments in the near future. (orig.)

  10. IMRT reirradiation with concurrent cetuximab immunotherapy in recurrent head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicker, Felix; Roeder, Falk; Thieke, Christian; Timke, Carmen; Huber, Peter E. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Muenter, Marc W.; Debus, Juergen [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: In this retrospective investigation, the outcome and toxicity after reirradiation with concurrent cetuximab immunotherapy of recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) in patients who had contraindications to platinum-based chemotherapy were analyzed. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with locally advanced recurrent HNC were retrospectively evaluated. In 9 cases, histology was squamous cell carcinoma, in one case adenoid cystic carcinoma. External beam radiotherapy was part of the initial treatment in all cases. Reirradiation was carried out using step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Cetuximab was applied as loading dose (400 mg/m{sup 2}) 1 week prior to reirradiation and then weekly concurrently with radiotherapy (250 mg/m{sup 2}). Results: The median overall survival time after initiation of reirradiation was 7 months; the 1-year overall survival (OS) rate was 40%. Local failure was found in 3 patients, resulting in a 1-year local control (LC) rate of 61%. The 1-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 44%, while the 1-year distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was 75%. Acute hematological toxicity was not observed in the group. Severe acute toxicity included one fatal infield arterial bleeding and one flap necrosis. Severe late toxicities were noted in 2 patients: fibrosis of the temporomandibular joint in 1 patient and stenosis of the cervical esophagus in another. Conclusions: IMRT reirradiation with concurrent cetuximab immunotherapy in recurrent HNC is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity. Further investigations are necessary to determine the clinical role of this therapy concept. (orig.)

  11. Effectiveness of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Itsuro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, II Osaka University, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: katoitsu@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Fujita, Yusei [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, II Osaka University, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan); Maruhashi, Akira [Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Research Reactor Institut, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Kumada, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Research and Development Center, Ibaraki (Japan); Ohmae, Masatoshi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Izimisano Municipal Hospital, Rinku General Hospital, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); Kirihata, Mitsunori [Graduate School of Environment and Life Science, Osaka prefectural University, Osaka (Japan); Imahori, Yoshio [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University, Kyoto (Japan); CEO of Cancer Intelligence Care Systems, Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Minoru [Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Research Reactor Institut, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Sakrai, Yoshinori [Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Sumi, Tetsuro; Iwai, Soichi; Nakazawa, Mitsuhiro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, II Osaka University, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan); Murata, Isao; Miyamaru, Hiroyuki [Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Ono, Koji [Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Research Reactor Institut, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    It is necessary to explore new treatments for recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM) to avoid severe impairment of oro-facial structures and functions. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy that has significant superiority over conventional radiotherapies in principle. We have treated with BNCT 42 times for 26 patients (19 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 4 salivary gland carcinomas and 3 sarcomas) with a recurrent and far advanced HNM since 2001. Results of (1) {sup 10}B concentration of tumor/normal tissue ratios (T/N ratio) of FBPA-PET studies were SCC: 1.8-5.7, sarcoma: 2.5-4.0, parotid tumor: 2.5-3.7. (2) Therapeutic effects were CR: 12 cases, PR: 10 cases, PD: 3 cases NE (not evaluated): 1 case. Response rate was 85%. (3) Improvement of QOL such as a relief of severe pain, bleeding, and exudates at the local lesion, improvement of PS, disappearance of ulceration, covered with normal skin and preserved oral and maxillofacial functions and tissues. (4) Survival periods after BNCT were 1-72 months (mean: 13.6 months). Six-year survival rate was 24% by Kaplan-Meier analysis. (5) Adverse-events were transient mucositis and alopecia in most of the cases; three osteomyelitis and one brain necrosis were recognized. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach for advanced HNM.

  12. Women and transformation: A recurrent theme in Head and Ngugi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cloete

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates, within the context of the increasingly important position assigned to African literature in general (and the novel in particular, the dominant roles played by Bessie Head and Ngugi through a focus on the significant contributions of these two writers concerning the theme of women and transformation. Although both authors put a high premium on wotnanism, showing themselves as champions of especially sexual and racial freedom for all women, their novels indicate different trends in their portrayal of this theme. Head, for instance, becomes increasingly autobiographical in her articulation of her female protagonists ’ struggle for freedom from oppression, while Ngugi tends to become increasingly politically biased in expressing his Marxist social, political and economic doctrines. This article furthermore examines the ways in which Ngugi and Head highlight different aspects of the discourse of female liberation, while also studying the dialogue of transformation and a sense of belonging. Finally, it remarks on Head's and Ngugi's aesthetic approaches to the discourse of women and transformation.

  13. Partial humeral head resurfacing and Latarjet coracoid transfer for treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moros, Chris; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2009-08-01

    Bone deficiencies of either the humeral head or glenoid fossa may cause recurrent shoulder instability following soft tissue stabilization procedures. The engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, a major risk factor for instability, has been identified in a majority of patients with recurrent anterior instability. Guidance for surgical management of large humeral head deficiency presents few available options, with even fewer clinical data to support any one technique. Anteroinferior glenoid deficiency has also been a well-documented source of recurrent instability. The Latarjet coracoid transfer procedure corrects the glenoid defect by restoring the architecture of the inferior rim. Although coracoid transfer addresses containment on the glenoid, a concomitant large humeral head defect is at risk for engagement on the corrected glenoid. This article describes a case of a 50-year-old man presenting with recurrent right shoulder dislocations status post-open stabilization procedure 10 years prior. Radiologic evaluation demonstrated a large Hill-Sachs lesion with adjacent chondral derangement and a nonunion bony Bankart lesion. The Arthrosurface HemiCap humeral head resurfacing prosthesis (Arthrosurface Inc, Franklin, Massachusetts) was used to address the Hill-Sachs lesion with a Latarjet coracoid transfer procedure. We were unable to identify examples in the literature of the HemiCap used in the correction of a Hill-Sachs lesion for recurrent anterior instability. The HemiCap prosthesis has the benefit of correcting the Hill-Sachs lesion and adjacent chondral defect while preserving uninvolved articular surface. The combination of surgical interventions produced a successful result.

  14. Recurrence and survival after neck dissections in cutaneous head and neck melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Stemann; Chakera, Annette Hougaard; Thamsborg, Andreas Key Milan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An important prognostic factor in head and neck melanoma is the status of the regional lymph nodes since the presence of metastatic disease in the nodes greatly aggravates the prognosis. There is no consensus on the surgical treatment algorithm for this group. Our aim was to study...... if there is a difference in nodal recurrence and survival after radical, modified or selective neck dissection. METHODS: A total of 57 patients treated for regional meta-stases of head and neck melanoma were analysed retrospectively with respect to type of neck dissection, use of sentinel node biopsy, nodal recurrence...

  15. Management of locally advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.W. de Wilt (Johannes); M. Vermaas (Maarten); F.T.J. Ferenschild (Floris); C. Verhoef (Kees)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTreatment for patients with locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer differs significantly from patients with rectal cancer restricted to the mesorectum. Adequate preoperative imaging of the pelvis is therefore important to identify those patients who are candidates for multimodality

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging guided reirradiation of recurrent and second primary head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen M. Chen, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Our preliminary findings show that reirradiation with MRI guided radiation therapy results in effective disease control with relatively low morbidity for patients with recurrent and second primary cancers of the head and neck. The superior soft tissue resolution of the MRI scans that were used for planning and delivery has the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio.

  17. On-line learning algorithms for locally recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolucci, P; Uncini, A; Piazza, F; Rao, B D

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on on-line learning procedures for locally recurrent neural networks with emphasis on multilayer perceptron (MLP) with infinite impulse response (IIR) synapses and its variations which include generalized output and activation feedback multilayer networks (MLN's). We propose a new gradient-based procedure called recursive backpropagation (RBP) whose on-line version, causal recursive backpropagation (CRBP), presents some advantages with respect to the other on-line training methods. The new CRBP algorithm includes as particular cases backpropagation (BP), temporal backpropagation (TBP), backpropagation for sequences (BPS), Back-Tsoi algorithm among others, thereby providing a unifying view on gradient calculation techniques for recurrent networks with local feedback. The only learning method that has been proposed for locally recurrent networks with no architectural restriction is the one by Back and Tsoi. The proposed algorithm has better stability and higher speed of convergence with respect to the Back-Tsoi algorithm, which is supported by the theoretical development and confirmed by simulations. The computational complexity of the CRBP is comparable with that of the Back-Tsoi algorithm, e.g., less that a factor of 1.5 for usual architectures and parameter settings. The superior performance of the new algorithm, however, easily justifies this small increase in computational burden. In addition, the general paradigms of truncated BPTT and RTRL are applied to networks with local feedback and compared with the new CRBP method. The simulations show that CRBP exhibits similar performances and the detailed analysis of complexity reveals that CRBP is much simpler and easier to implement, e.g., CRBP is local in space and in time while RTRL is not local in space.

  18. Surgical Management of Local Recurrences of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Acar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection either in the form of radical nephrectomy or in the form of partial nephrectomy represents the mainstay options in the treatment of kidney cancer. In most instances, resecting the tumor bearing kidney or the tumor itself provides durable cancer specific survival rates. However, recurrences may rarely develop in the renal fossa or remnant kidney. Despite its rarity, locally recurrent RCC is a challenging condition in terms of the possible management options and relatively poor prognosis. If technically feasible, wide surgical excision and ensuring negative surgical margins are the most effective treatment options. Repeat surgeries (completion nephrectomy, excision of locally recurrent tumor, or repeat partial nephrectomy may often be complicated, and perioperative morbidity is a major concern. Open approach has been extensively applied in this context and 5-year cancer specific survival rates have been reported to be around 50%. The roles of minimally invasive surgical options (laparoscopic and robotic approach and nonsurgical alternatives (cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation have yet to be described. In selected patients, surgical resection may have to be complemented with (neoadjuvant radiotherapy or medical treatment.

  19. Head rotation and sound image localization in the median plane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO Dan; XIE Bosun

    2005-01-01

    The effect of head rotation on median plane sound source (or image) localization is studied. It is suggested that, at low frequency, the change of interaural time difference (ITD) caused by head rotation supplies information for determining sound source direction in the median plane. Based on the suggestion, the summed sound image localization equations for multiple loudspeakers arranged in the median plane are derived. Especially, for a pair of loudspeakers arranged front-back symmetrically in the median plane, the localization equations are similar to that of stereophonic sound in horizontal plane. A sound image localization experiment was carried out to prove the theoretical analysis. The results of this paper are not only available to virtual spatial auditory, but also supply a quantitative validation of the hypothesis that head rotation is a cue for sound source localization in the median plane at low frequency.

  20. Positron Emission Tomography and head and neck cancers: Recurrence and post-treatment surveillance; TEP au {sup 18}-FDG et cancers ORL: recidive et surveillance post-therapeutique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colavolpe, C.; Guedj, E.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [CHU La Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France); Fakhry, N.; Zanaret, M. [CHU La Timone, Service d' ORL et de Chirurgie Cervicofaciale, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2008-08-15

    Recurrence of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas occurs early and currently, with poor prognosis. Post-therapeutic surveillance aims to diagnose a recurrence as early as possible in order to perform curative salvage therapy. The risk of recurrence is highest in locally advanced cancers. Morphological imaging, including Computed Tomography (CT Scan) and magnetic resonance imaging, can be limited by the anatomic changes following surgery and radiotherapy, and sometimes cannot provide early diagnosis of recurrence. Histology presents some risk of morbidity, especially in irradiated tissues, and sampling error. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F.D.G.) is superior to conventional imaging for the diagnosis and staging of recurrence, especially when it is performed three months after the end of treatments. F.D.G.-PET has high sensitivity and negative predictive value for recurrence, so that further morphological and invasive investigations should not be performed in case of negative examination. On the other hand, because of its limited specificity and positive predictive value, any positive PET finding should be documented, in order to avoid false positives findings. The diagnosis of recurrence is the field of application in which F.D.G.-PET has the greatest impact on head and neck cancer management: it is considered as a standard. However, the interest of F.D.G.-PET during systematic follow-up has not yet been confirmed. PET should only be performed in difficult cases and within evaluation protocols. (authors)

  1. Comparison of Local Recurrence Rate of Three Treatment Modalities for Kimura Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Peng; Wei, Tai; Yu, Guang-Yan; Wu, Li-Ling; Peng, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic hyperplastic lymphogranuloma, also known as Kimura disease, is a benign and chronic inflammatory condition, predominantly involving the head and neck region. Surgical excision, radiotherapy (RA), surgical resection combined with low-dose postoperative radiotherapy and oral corticosteroids are 4 treatment modalities reported to control this disease effectively. Local recurrence, however, is common and the optimum treatment for Kimura disease is controversial. Thus, the present meta-analysis was performed to identify the treatment modality associated with the lowest local recurrence. Electronic databases (Cochrane Library, Wiley Online Library, PubMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang Data) were searched. Data were also obtained from other sources such as related references and communication with the relevant authors. Two reviewers screened the literature according to preselected criteria. All studies involving different treatments for Kimura disease were collected. After data extraction and research quality assessment, the meta-analysis of 22 studies involving 570 patients was conducted using STATA 12.1 software. Meta-analysis revealed that administration of RA or surgical excision alone were inferior in controlling local recurrence compared with surgical resection combined with postoperative RA (risk ratio (RR) = 2.72; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.47-5.04 and RR = 4.72; 95% CI, 2.53-8.82). Surgical excision alone did not show significant advantage in controlling local recurrence compared with RA alone (RR = 2.13; 95% CI, 0.88-5.17). Surgical resection combined with postoperative RA is superior to either surgery or RA alone in treating Kimura disease. More large scale prospective randomized controlled trials, however, should be conducted to assess the long-term effects and safety issues.

  2. Head-to-head comparison between {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography in clinically recurrent head and neck paragangliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimburger, Celine; Hubele, Fabrice; Namer, Izzie Jacques [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Strasbourg (France); CNRS/University of Strasbourg, ICube, UMR 7357, Strasbourg (France); University of Strasbourg, FMTS, Faculty of Medicine, Strasbourg (France); Veillon, Francis; Riehm, Sophie; Cavalcanti, Marcela [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology, Strasbourg (France); Taieb, David [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone University Hospital, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, European Center for Research in Medical Imaging, Marseille (France); Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Inserm UMR1068 Marseille Cancerology Research Center, Marseille (France); Goichot, Bernard; Chabrier, Gerard [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Internal Medicine, Strasbourg (France); Petit-Thomas, Julie; Charpiot, Anne [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Otolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Strasbourg (France); Averous, Gerlinde [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Pathology, Strasbourg (France); Imperiale, Alessio [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Strasbourg (France); CNRS/University of Strasbourg, ICube, UMR 7357, Strasbourg (France); University of Strasbourg, FMTS, Faculty of Medicine, Strasbourg (France); Hautepierre University Hospital, Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2017-06-15

    Head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) can relapse after primary treatment. Optimal imaging protocols have not yet been established for posttreatment evaluation. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography (MRA/CTA) in HNPGL patients with clinical relapse during their follow-up. Sixteen consecutive patients presenting with local pain, tinnitus, dysphagia, hoarse voice, cranial nerve involvement, deafness, or retrotympanic mass appearing during follow-up after the initial treatment of HNPGLs were retrospectively evaluated. Patients underwent both {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA (15 patents) or CTA (1 patent). Both methods were first assessed under blinded conditions and afterwards correlated. Head and neck imaging abnormalities without histological confirmation were considered true-positive results based on a consensus between radiologists and nuclear physicians and on further {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and/or MRA. {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA were concordant in 14 patients and in disagreement in 2 patients. {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA identified, respectively, 12 and 10 presumed recurrent HNPGLs in 12 patients. The two lesions diagnosed by PET/CT only were confirmed during follow-up by otoscopic examination and MRA performed 29 and 17 months later. {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT images were only slightly influenced by the posttreatment sequelae, showing a better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA. Finally, in 2 of the 16 studied patients, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT detected two additional synchronous primary HNPGLs. {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT is highly sensitive in posttreatment evaluation of patients with HNPGLs, and also offers better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA and whole-body examination. We therefore suggest that {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT is performed as the first diagnostic imaging modality in symptomatic patients with suspicion of HNPGL relapse after primary treatment when {sup 68

  3. Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  4. The avian head induces cues for sound localization in elevation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans A Schnyder

    Full Text Available Accurate sound source localization in three-dimensional space is essential for an animal's orientation and survival. While the horizontal position can be determined by interaural time and intensity differences, localization in elevation was thought to require external structures that modify sound before it reaches the tympanum. Here we show that in birds even without external structures like pinnae or feather ruffs, the simple shape of their head induces sound modifications that depend on the elevation of the source. Based on a model of localization errors, we show that these cues are sufficient to locate sounds in the vertical plane. These results suggest that the head of all birds induces acoustic cues for sound localization in the vertical plane, even in the absence of external ears.

  5. The avian head induces cues for sound localization in elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Hans A; Vanderelst, Dieter; Bartenstein, Sophia; Firzlaff, Uwe; Luksch, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Accurate sound source localization in three-dimensional space is essential for an animal's orientation and survival. While the horizontal position can be determined by interaural time and intensity differences, localization in elevation was thought to require external structures that modify sound before it reaches the tympanum. Here we show that in birds even without external structures like pinnae or feather ruffs, the simple shape of their head induces sound modifications that depend on the elevation of the source. Based on a model of localization errors, we show that these cues are sufficient to locate sounds in the vertical plane. These results suggest that the head of all birds induces acoustic cues for sound localization in the vertical plane, even in the absence of external ears.

  6. Thermochemoradiotherapy for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer. Analysis of clinical results and background variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshina, Hideyuki; Takagi, Ritsuo; Nagashima, Katsuhiro; Fujita, Hajime; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Sohma, Yoh; Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Imai, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Masaki [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    2001-03-01

    Eighteen patients with 25 unresectable advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers (squamous cell carcinomas) received thermochemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy. The total radiation dose ranged from 50 to 82 Gy (mean, 65.6 Gy). Patients received thermochemotherapy twice a week, for a total number of 8.8 sessions, on average. The temperature in the tumor, as a result of the hyperthermia, was over 42 deg C in 185 (84.5%) of the 219 treatments. Three kinds of heating systems were used: a 13.56-MHz radiofrequency system, a 2450-MHz microwave system, and a radiofrequency interstitial system. The total amount of administered CDDP ranged from 40 to 300 mg (mean, 110 mg), combined with PEP and/or 5FU. Background factors (tumor factors and treatment factors) were investigated in detail, and the clinical results (tumor response and the 5-year cumulative focal control rate) were evaluated. The relationship between these two results was then analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistics. The clinical results of patients with a WHO histological classification of grade 3 were poor compared with patients with a classification of grade 1 or 2. The difference between these two results was significant when analyzed using univariate statistics, but not significant when analyzed using multivariate statistics. The clinical results of patients with primary lesions surrounded by bony tissues were slightly poor compared with those of patients whose lesions were surrounded by soft tissues, but the difference between these two results was not significant. Successful treatment of refractory recurrent tumors, large tumor masses, and diffuse invasive carcinomas was not affected by the treatment factors (heating systems, heating sessions, radiation dose, and CDDP dose and drug combination). These results suggest that refractory recurrence, proximity to bony tissues, tumor size, and histological malignancy might not be prognostic variables for thermochemoradiotherapy strategy

  7. Combined cetuximab and reirradiation for locoregional recurrent and inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Hambek, Markus [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Dept. of Oral Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to investigate the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of external-beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods: seven patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were treated between August and December 2008 with Re-RT (1.8 Gy/fraction to 50.4 Gy) and cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} initial dose in the 1st week, and then 250 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly). Recurrence had to be located at least {>=} 50% in the preirradiated field. Long term toxicity from previous treatment was recorded before Re-RT as a baseline value. Acute and late toxicity derived from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT, and then every 3 months. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after end of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter (Tables 1 and 2). Results: only mild localized mucositis occurred in all patients. Two patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. After treatment one patient developed a grade 2 trismus, another showed grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation with severe pain requiring opioid medication. Two patients achieved a complete response after 7 months, one remained stable, three progressed, and one died from pneumonia without having restaging magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: A second course of RT combined with cetuximab in patients with inoperable, recurrent HNSCC proved to be feasible with mild or moderate toxicity and encouraging response to treatment. (orig.)

  8. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONFORMAL RADIATION THERAPY FOR LOCALLY RECURRENT NASOPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Xiao-kang

    2001-01-01

    [1]Carlos AP, Luther WB. Carcinoma of the nasopharynx. In: Principles and Practice of Radiation Oncology [M]. 3th ed. Philadelphial: JB Lippincott, 1997; 930.[2]Yang TS, Ng KT, Wang HM, et al. Prognostic factors of locoregionally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma ? a retrospective review of 182 cases [J]. Am J Clin Oncol 1996; 19:337.[3]Lee AW, Law SC, Foo W, et al. Retrospective analysis of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated during 1976-1985: survival after local recurrence [J]. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1993; 26:773.[4]Lee AW, Poon YF, Foo W, et al. Retrospective analysis of 5037 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated during 1976-1985: overall survival and patterns of failure [J]. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1992; 23:261.[5]Sanguineti G, Geara FB, Garden AS. Carcinoma of nasopharynx treated by radiotherapy alone: determinants of local and regional control [J]. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1997; 37:973.[6]Lee AW, Foo W, Law SC, et al. Reirradiation for recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma: factors affecting the therapeutic ratio and ways for improvement [J]. Int J Radioat Oncol Biol Phys 1997; 38:43.[7]Chua DT, Sham JS, Kwong DL, et al. Locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma: treatment result for patients with computed tomography assessment [J]. Int J Radioat Oncol Biol Phys 1998; 41:379.[8]Teo PM, Kwan WH, Chan AT, et al. How successful is high-dose (>or = 60 Gy) reirradiation using mainly external beams in salvaging local failures of nasopharyngeal carcinoma [J]? Int J Radioat Oncol Biol Phys 1998; 40:897.[9]Pryzant RM, Wendt CD, Delclos L, et al. Retreatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in 53 patients [J]. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1992; 22:94l.[10]Bajada C, Selch M, De SA, et al. Application of stereotactic radiosurgery to the head and neck region [J]. Acta Neurochir Suppl Wien 1994; 62:114.[11]Mitsuhashi N, Sakurai H, Katano S, et al. Stereotactic radiotherapy for locally recurrent

  9. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally unresectable head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohno, Naoyuki; Kitahara, Satoshi; Tamura, Etuyo; Tanabe, Tetuya; Nakanoboh, Manabu; Itoh, Yasuo; Murata, Yasuhiro; Furukawa, Taichi [National Defense Medical Coll., Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    In patients with locally unresectable head and neck cancer with large nodal involvement, the expected five-year survival is as low as 1-2%. To improve the prognosis of these patients, we studied the usefulness of concurrent chemoradiotherapy in a phase 11 trial. Between September 1996 and May 1999, thirty-five patients with locally unresectable head and neck cancer were administered concurrent chemoradiotherapy consisting of low-dose and long-term treatment with cisplatin (CDDP) plus 5-fluorouracil (5FU), or (L-CF); the L-CF regimen consisted of CDDP, 3 mg/m{sup 2} on 5 days of the week and 5FU, 150 mg/m{sup 2} as a 24-hour infunsion on 5 days of the week. Concurrently, conventional radiotherapy was given up to total dose of around 60 Gy. In the 33 patients evaluable for response, 17 complete and 9 partial responses were noted, with an overall response rate of 79%. Oral mucositis and myelosuppression were the major side effects and mucositis was a dose limiting toxicity. This study demonstrates increase in survival among the responders (complete+partial) in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy setting. However 8 local relapses were eventually noted in the 17 complete responders. We concluded that this treatment strategy was beneficial in patients with locally unresectable head and neck cancer. (author)

  10. Treatment of locally advanced/locally recurrent breast cancer and inflammatory breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Masao [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    This paper summarizes the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, and locally recurrent breast cancer. A multidisciplinary approach considering subclinical distant metastases is needed to treat these types of breast cancer. Subclinical distant metastasis is observed in about 80% of case of locally advanced cancer, and treatment of subclinical distant metastases, e.g., by endocrinotherapy and chemotherapy, is therefore essential to improving the prognosis. The standard therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer consists of induction chemotherapy with anthracyclines and local treatment with mastectomy or irradiation. Previous reports have stated that induction chemotherapy was effective in 60-80% of the primary lesions or lymph node metastasis, and the CR rates were in the 10-20% range. Combination therapy with induction chemotherapy clearly improved the outcome over local treatment alone. The usual irradiation dose is 50 to 60 Gy/5 to 7 weeks to the whole breast or the thoracic wall. Boost irradiation at a dose of 10 to 25 Gy is performed in unresectable cases. The boost irradiation dose to the lymph node area is usually 45 to 50 Gy/5 to 6 weeks in cases without gross lesions and 10 to 15 Gy in cases with gross lesions. Combination therapy consisting of conservative pectoral mastectomy and postoperative adjuvant chemo- endocrino-therapy (i.e., adjuvant therapy) has become the standard regimen for treating resectable locally advanced breast cancer, because it significantly improves the recurrence rate and survival rate compared to local treatment alone. Some clinical have studies indicated that neoadjuvant therapy (i.e., induction chemotherapy + surgery/radiation therapy) is comparable or superior to adjuvant therapy in terms of improving the prognosis. However, the efficacy and most appropriate method of breast-conserving therapy after induction chemotherapy are still unclear. More clinical trials are needed. It has been

  11. Clinical outcomes of chemoradiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Jae Hwan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the clinical outcome of chemoradiotherapy with or without surgery for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC and to find useful and significant prognostic factors for a clinical situation. Methods Between January 2001 and February 2009, 67 LRRC patients, who entered into concurrent chemoradiotherapy with or without surgery, were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 67 patients, 45 were treated with chemoradiotherapy plus surgery, and the remaining 22 were treated with chemoradiotherapy alone. The mean radiation doses (biologically equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions were 54.6 Gy and 66.5 Gy for the chemoradiotherapy with and without surgery groups, respectively. Results The median survival duration of all patients was 59 months. Five-year overall (OS, relapse-free (RFS, locoregional relapse-free (LRFS, and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS were 48.9%, 31.6%, 66.4%, and 40.6%, respectively. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of symptoms was an independent prognostic factor influencing OS, RFS, LRFS, and DMFS. No statistically significant difference was found in OS (p = 0.181, RFS (p = 0.113, LRFS (p = 0.379, or DMFS (p = 0.335 when comparing clinical outcomes between the chemoradiotherapy with and without surgery groups. Conclusions Chemoradiotherapy with or without surgery could be a potential option for an LRRC cure, and the symptoms related to LRRC were a significant prognostic factor predicting poor clinical outcome. The chemoradiotherapy scheme for LRRC patients should be adjusted to the possibility of resectability and risk of local failure to focus on local control.

  12. IL-6 Inhibition With MEDI5117 Decreases The Fraction of Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells and Prevents Tumor Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey A. Finkel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC exhibit a small population of uniquely tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSC endowed with self-renewal and multipotency. We have recently shown that IL-6 enhances the survival and tumorigenic potential of head and neck cancer stem cells (i.e. ALDHhighCD44high cells. Here, we characterized the effect of therapeutic inhibition of IL-6 with a novel humanized anti-IL-6 antibody (MEDI5117 using three low-passage patient-derived xenograft (PDX models of HNSCC. We observed that single agent MEDI5117 inhibited the growth of PDX-SCC-M1 tumors (P < .05. This PDX model was generated from a previously untreated HNSCC. In contrast, MEDI5117 was not effective at reducing overall tumor volume for PDX models representing resistant disease (PDX-SCC-M0, PDX-SCC-M11. Low dose MEDI5117 (3 mg/kg consistently decreased the fraction of cancer stem cells in PDX models of HNSCC when compared to IgG-treated controls, as follows: PDX-SCC-M0 (P < .001, PDX-SCC-M1 (P < .001, PDX-SCC-M11 (P = .04. Interestingly, high dose MEDI5117 (30 mg/kg decreased the CSC fraction in the PDX-SCC-M11 model (P = .002, but not in PDX-SCC-M0 and PDX-SCC-M1. MEDI5117 mediated a dose-dependent decrease in the number of orospheres generated by ALDHhighCD44high cells cultured in ultra-low attachment plates (P < .05, supporting an inhibitory effect on head and neck cancer stem cells. Notably, single agent MEDI5117 reduced the overall recurrence rate of PDX-SCC-M0, a PDX generated from the local recurrence of human HNSCC. Collectively, these data demonstrate that therapeutic inhibition of IL-6 with low-dose MEDI5117 decreases the fraction of cancer stem cells, and that adjuvant MEDI5117 inhibits recurrence in preclinical models of HNSCC.

  13. [Post-recurrence survival after surgical resection of non-small cell lung cancer with local recurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokouchi, Hideoki; Miyazaki, Masaki; Miyamoto, Takeaki; Tsuji, Fumio; Ebisui, Chikara; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the clinical outcomes of 192 consecutive patients with local recurrence after complete resection of non-small cell lung cancer NSCLC). The initial local recurrent site was the resection stump in 5 patients the chest wall in 3 patients, mediastinum in 1 patient, and diaphragm in 1 patient), and the hilar and/or mediastinal lymph node (HMLN) in 17 patients. The sites of distant metastasis were the lungs in 10 patients, pleura in 4 patients, brain in 7 patients, liver in 5 patients, bone in 4 patients, and other sites in 4 patients. Treatments after initial recurrence included surgery in 2 patients, radiotherapy in 5 patients, chemotherapy in 9 patients, and chemo-radiotherapy in 5 patients. Only 1 patient received supportive care. The response to radiotherapy was a complete response (R) in 1 patient, partial response (PR) in 5 patients, stable disease (SD )in 3 patients, and progressive disease (PD )in 1 patient. The best response of all lines of chemotherapy was CR in 3 patients, PR in 4 patients, SD in 3 patients, and PD in 4 patients. The median post-recurrence survival (PRS) time with local recurrence was better than that with distant metastasis (23 vs 14 months); however, the best PRS was obtained in patients with recurrence in the lungs (29 months). A CR for more than 2 years was obtained in 1 patient after surgery, in 1 patient after radiotherapy, and in 2 patients after chemotherapy. Although local recurrence of resected NSCLC can be potentially controlled by using local treatments - such as surgery and radiotherapy - or systemic chemotherapy, curative aggressive treatment should be considered when required.

  14. Mini-Invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy for resistant or recurrent neuropathic plantar metatarsal head ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Eran; Finestone, Aharon S; Avisar, Erez; Agar, Gabriel

    2016-07-11

    Patients with peripheral neuropathy and pressure under a relatively plantar deviated metatarsal head frequently develop plantar foot ulcers. When conservative management with orthotics and shoes does not cure the ulcer, surgical metatarsal osteotomy may be indicated to relieve the pressure and enable the ulcer to heal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of a mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy in treating recalcitrant ulcers or recurrent ulcers plantar to the metatarsal heads in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) related neuropathy. Computerized medical files of patients with diabetic neuropathy treated with an osteotomy during 2013 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 20 osteotomies performed on 17 patients (mean age 58 years). The patients had a diagnosis of DM for a mean of 17 years. All ulcers were University of Texas grade 1A; mean ulcer age was 19 months. After 17/20 operations, the ulcer completely resolved after 6 weeks and did not recur after a mean follow-up of 11.5 months. One patient developed an early post-operative infection with osteomyelitis at the osteotomy site (proximal shaft of the fifth metatarsal) that needed debridement and IV antibiotics. In the other 19 cases, the surgical wound healed within 1 week. Asymptomatic radiological non-union developed in six cases (30 %). Mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy can cure resistant and recurrent University of Texas grade 1A ulcerations plantar to the metatarsal heads in neuropathic patients.

  15. Increased survival rate by local release of diclofenac in a murine model of recurrent oral carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will OM

    2016-10-01

    determination of tumor recurrence. At the end of 7 weeks following tumor resection, 33% of mice with diclofenac-loaded scaffolds had a recurrent tumor, in comparison to 90%–100% of the mice in the other three groups. At this time point, mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds showed 89% survival rate, while the other groups showed survival rates of 10%–25%. Immunohistochemical staining of recurrent tumors revealed a near 10-fold decrease in the proliferation marker Ki-67 in the tumors derived from mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds. In summary, the local application of diclofenac in an orthotopic mouse tumor resection model of oral cancer reduced tumor recurrence with significant improvement in survival over a 7-week study period following tumor resection. Local drug release of anti-inflammatory agents should be investigated as a therapeutic option in the prevention of tumor recurrence in oral squamous carcinoma. Keywords: tumor recurrence, oral squamous cell carcinoma, head and neck cancer, NSAIDs, drug releasing polymers, mouse model 

  16. Local recurrence following lung cancer surgery: incidence, risk factors, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, David; Johnson, W Rainey; Singhal, Sunil

    2013-09-01

    To date, few large-scale original studies have focused specifically on local recurrence following curative lung cancer surgery. This review seeks to consolidate and analyze data from these studies regarding local recurrence incidence, risk factors, salvage treatments, and outcomes to increase awareness in the Oncology community and to spark new research in this area. PubMed literature was searched for large-scale cohort studies involving recurrence following lung cancer surgery. Studies with a primary focus on local recurrence and studies that examined overall recurrence but provided relevant numerical data on local recurrence were included. Each chosen study's methods were critically analyzed to reconcile as best as possible large differences in reported results across the studies. Up to 24% of patients recur locally following lung cancer surgery. Risk of local recurrence increases with the stage of the primary cancer, but even stage I patients experience local recurrence up to 19% of the time. Overall survival time following local recurrence varies widely across studies, from 7 to 26 months, and may be related to frequency of follow-up visits. Salvage therapy appears to increase survival time. However, estimates of this increase vary widely, and measurements of benefits of the various salvage options are confounded by lack of control of subjects' condition at the time of salvage therapy administration. Local recurrence following lung cancer surgery is a significant problem warranting additional research. At present, data on this topic is scarce. We recommend initiation of additional large-scale studies to clearly define the parameters of local recurrence in order to provide useful guidance to clinicians. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Primary malignant melanoma of the vagina with repeated local recurrences and brain metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Te Lin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma of the vagina, a very rare malignancy, has a notoriously aggressive behavior associated with a high risk of local recurrence and distant metastasis. At present, there are various treatment options for this disease but no standard guideline. We describe a case of a 54-year-old woman with a locally advanced melanoma of the vagina, who underwent radical surgery, biochemotherapy with interferon-α-2b, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and repeat excision of local recurrent lesions and brain metastasis. In conclusion, malignant melanoma of the vagina has a high risk for local recurrence. Repeated local excision followed by biochemotherapy is a tolerable treatment.

  18. Ezrin expression in rectal cancer predicts time to development of local recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jörgren, Fredrik; Nilbert, Mef; Rambech, Eva

    2012-01-01

    : Immunohistochemical expression of ezrin was analysed in 104 primary rectal cancers from patients who developed local recurrences despite being treated with R0 major abdominal surgery. Time to local recurrence and distant metastasis as well as 5-year overall and cancer-specific survival were used as end points...

  19. Clinical review: surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Courtney, D

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent and locally advanced colorectal cancers frequently require en bloc resection of involved organs to achieve negative margins. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most current literature related to the surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  20. Retrospective analysis of prognostic factors for sixty osteosarcoma patients with local recurrence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjing Sha; Weixiang Qi; Haiyan Hu; Yuanjue Sun; Zan Shen; Yang Yao

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors and imply the appropriate management for lo-cal recurrent osteosarcoma. Methods: The clinical records of 60 patients with local recurrence osteosarcoma were reviewed between January 2002 and December 2010. The mean followed-up time for these patients was 49.1 months (range 13 to 143 months). The factors of age, gender, tumor site, tumor size, surgical procedure, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, frequency of primary postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, lung metastasis, metastasis of other sites (except for lung) and treatment after local recurrence were selected as the measurements for this analysis. Kaplan-Meier method was used to measure the overall survival and post-recurrence survival. The univariate analysis was used to determine the prognostic factors related with survival by Log-rank test. The COX proportional-hazard regression model was used to analyze the correlation between the prognostic factor and the survival. Results: The median post-recurrence survival and overall survival of 60 patients were 32 months (95% confidence interval: 16.2-47.8) and 55 months (95% confidence interval: 39.3–70.7) respectively. The 2- and 3-year cumulative survival rates were 81.7% and 55.4%, respectively. The Log-rank univariate analysis showed that age, gender, tumor size, metastasis of other sites (except for lung) and treatment after local recurrence were associated with the prognosis of osteosarcoma with local recurrence (P 0.05). Conclusion: The independent prognostic factors for local recurrent osteosarcoma were the metastasis of other site (except for lung) and the treatment after local recurrence. The aggressive surgical treatment for local recurrence and distant metastasis could effectively improve the survival of local recurrent osteosarcoma.

  1. Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: Head-to-head comparison with CT and bone scintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke

    Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: Head-to-head comparison with CT and bone scintigraphy  Kirsten Falch, Christina Baun, Oke Gerke, , Ziba A. Farahani, Poul F. Høilund-Carlsen, Lisbet B. Larsen*, Marianne Ewertz**, Katrine Søe*** and Malene G. Hildebrandt...... Departments of Nuclear Medicine, *Radiology, **Oncolocy, and ***Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Purpose: Breast cancer (BC) is the most common type of cancer among women in Denmark and about 1/3 of the affected women experience recurrence. The prognosis is good if loco regional recurrence...... FDG PET/CT, routine bone scintigraphy and CT of the chest and upper abdomen within 2 weeks. Patients with other malignancies, pregnant or lactating women, patients younger than 18 years and patients with confirmed metastatic disease were not eligible FDG PET/CT. All patients fasted for a minimum...

  2. Prognostic value of continued smoking on survival and recurrence rates in patients with head and neck cancer : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Imhoff, Lieke C R; Kranenburg, Gabriëlle G J; Macco, Sven; Nijman, Nicoline L; van Overbeeke, Elisabeth J; Wegner, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Pothen, Ajit J

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the prognostic value of continued smoking after diagnosis on survival and recurrence rates in head and neck cancer. METHODS: A systematic search was performed and predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to screen and

  3. Postoperative elective nodal irradiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck : outcome and prognostic factors for regional recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, M. R.; Doornaert, P. A. H.; de Bree, R.; Leemans, C. R.; Slotman, B. J.; Langendijk, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study describes the results of elective irradiation in the N0 neck and tries to identify prognostic factors for regional recurrence. Materials and methods: Between 1985 and 2000, 785 cN0 or pN0 necks were treated with elective nodal irradiation in 619 head and neck squamous cell

  4. Treatments and costs for recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Naomi; Buter, Jan; Pescott, Chris P.; Lalisang, Roy I.; de Boer, Jan Paul; de Graeff, Alexander; van Herpen, Carla M L; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A.

    2016-01-01

    For patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN), chemotherapy can prolong life and alleviate symptoms. However, expected gains may be small, not necessarily outweighing considerable toxicity and high costs. Treatment choice is to a large extent

  5. Treatments and costs for recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Linden (Naomi); J. Buter (Jan); C.P. Pescott; R.I. Lalisang (Roy I.); J.P. De Boer (Jan Paul); A. de Graeff (A.); C.M.L. Herpen, C.M.L. (Carla); R.J. Baatenburg de Jong (Robert Jan); C.A. Uyl-de Groot (Carin)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ For patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN), chemotherapy can prolong life and alleviate symptoms. However, expected gains may be small, not necessarily outweighing considerable toxicity and high costs. Treatmen

  6. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancers using charged particle or photon radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hideya [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Soseikai General Hospital, CyberKnife Center, Shimotoba Fushimi-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Demizu, Yusuke; Okimoto, Tomoaki [Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Ogita, Mikio [Fujimoto Hayasuzu Hospital, Radiotherapy Department, Miyakonojo, Miyazaki (Japan); Himei, Kengo [Japanese Red Cross Okayama Hospital, Department of Radiology, Okayama, Okayama (Japan); Nakamura, Satoaki; Suzuki, Gen [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Yoshida, Ken; Kotsuma, Tadayuki [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Oh, Ryoongjin [Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Osaka (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    To examine the outcomes of reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancers using different modalities. This retrospective study included 26 patients who received charged particle radiotherapy (CP) and 150 who received photon radiotherapy (117 CyberKnife radiotherapy [CK] and 36 intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) involving propensity scores was used to reduce background selection bias. Higher prescribed doses were used in CP than photon radiotherapy. The 1-year overall survival (OS) rates were 67.9% for CP and 54.1% for photon radiotherapy (p = 0.15; 55% for CK and 51% for IMRT). In multivariate Cox regression, the significant prognostic factors for better survival were nasopharyngeal cancer, higher prescribed dose, and lower tumor volume. IPTW showed a statistically significant difference between CP and photon radiotherapy (p = 0.04). The local control rates for patients treated with CP and photon radiotherapy at 1 year were 66.9% (range 46.3-87.5%) and 67.1% (range 58.3-75.9%), respectively. A total of 48 patients (27%) experienced toxicity grade ≥3 (24% in the photon radiotherapy group and 46% in the CP group), including 17 patients with grade 5 toxicity. Multivariate analysis revealed that younger age and a larger planning target volume (PTV) were significant risk factors for grade 3 or worse toxicity. CP provided superior survival outcome compared to photon radiotherapy. Tumor volume, primary site (nasopharyngeal), and prescribed dose were identified as survival factors. Younger patients with a larger PTV experienced toxicity grade ≥3. (orig.) [German] Bestimmung der Ergebnisse einer Rebestrahlung von wiederkehrenden Kopf-Hals-Tumoren mittels verschiedener Modalitaeten. Die retrospektive Studie umfasst 26 Patienten, die mit der Ionenstrahlentherapie (CP), und 150 Patienten, die mit der Photonenstrahlentherapie (117 Stereotaxien [CK] und 36 intensitaetsmodulierte Strahlentherapien [IMRT]) behandelt

  7. [Predictive factors for locally recurrent rectal cancer after primary curative surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haoji; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Ren

    2015-11-01

    Local recurrence is a major clinical challenge after primary rectal cancer surgery. Although there is a possibility that R0 resection can be achieved, the outcome is still not favorable due to the low R0 resection rate and complexity of the surgery. Therefore prevention has a higher priority over treatment afterwards. As TME principle is accepted worldwide, the local recurrence rate has been reduced dramatically. And there are other factors associated with local recurrence including CRM, operation type, staging and PNI. Proper chemoradiotherapy may reduce the risk, however benefit always comes with side effect, therefore risk stratification is important.

  8. MRI guided needle localization in a patient with recurrence pleomorphic sarcoma and post-operative scarring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ching-Di [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung (China); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Wei, Jesse; Wu, Jim S. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Goldsmith, Jeffrey D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Gebhardt, Mark C. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-07-15

    MRI-guided wire localization is commonly used for surgical localization of breast lesions. Here we introduce an alternative use of this technique to help with surgical resection of a recurrent pleomorphic sarcoma embedded in extensive post-treatment scar tissue. We describe a case of recurrent pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma in the thigh after treatment with neoadjuvant therapy, surgery, and radiation. Due to the distortion of the normal tissue architecture and formation of extensive scar tissue from prior treatment, wire localization under MRI was successfully used to assist the surgeon in identifying the recurrent tumor for removal. (orig.)

  9. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National Yonsei University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yea, Ji Woon [Dongguk University Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  10. Effects on functional outcome after IORT-containing multimodality treatment for locally advanced primary and locally recurrent rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannaerts, GHH; Rutten, HJT; Martijn, H; Hanssens, PEJ; Wiggers, T

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: In the treatment of patients with locally advanced primary or locally recurrent rectal cancer, much attention is focused on. the oncologic outcome. Little is known about the functional outcome. In this study, the functional outcome after a multimodality treatment for locally advanced primar

  11. FXYD-3 expression in relation to local recurrence of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loftas, Per; Arbman, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao Feng; Hallbook, Olof [Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoping University, Norrkoping (Sweden); Edler, David [Dept. of Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Syk, Erik [Dept. of Surgery, Ersta Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    In a previous study, the transmembrane protein FXYD-3 was suggested as a biomarker for a lower survival rate and reduced radiosensitivity in rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy. The purpose of preoperative irradiation in rectal cancer is to reduce local recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of FXYD-3 as a biomarker for increased risk for local recurrence of rectal cancer. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in surgical specimens from a cohort of patients with rectal cancer who developed local recurrence (n = 48). The cohort was compared to a matched control group without recurrence (n = 81). Weak FXYD-3 expression was found in 106/129 (82%) of the rectal tumors and strong expression in 23/129 (18%). There was no difference in the expression of FXYD-3 between the patients with local recurrence and the control group. Furthermore there was no difference in FXYD-3 expression and time to diagnosis of local recurrence between patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and those without. Previous findings indicated that FXYD-3 expression may be used as a marker of decreased sensitivity to radiotherapy or even overall survival. We were unable to confirm this in a cohort of rectal cancer patients who developed local recurrence.

  12. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF BIOCHEMICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR LOCALIZED AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Chernyaev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To reveal prognostic factors of PSA-failure following radical prostatectomy in patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer.Materials and methods. Medical data of 386 consecutive patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1997 to 2011 were analyzed. Median age was 61.0 years. Median PSA before surgery – 10.3 ng/ml. Plasma levels of VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1, CD105, IL-6 were measured using Enzyme Linked-Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA before radical prostatectomy in 77 patients. Postoperatively the tumours were categorized as pT2 in 288 (59.1 %, pT3 – in 144 (37.3 %, pT4 – in 14 (3.6; pN+ – in 34 (8.8 % cases. Gleason score < 7 was present in 254 (65.8 %,  7 – in 132 (34.2 % specimens. Perineural invasion was identified in 188 (48.7 %, angiolymphatic invasion – in 126 (32.6 cases.Results. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 64 (16.6 % out of 386 patients at a median follow-up of 30.5 (12−164 months. Independent predictors of biochemical recurrence were PSA (HR 0.161 (95% CI:0.058−0.449; р = 0.001, Gleason sum in surgical specimens (HR 0.496 (95 % CI:0.268−0.917; p = 0.025, pN (HR 0.415 (95 % CI:0.181−0.955; p = 0.039. The patients were divided into 3 prognostic groups: good (0 factor, intermediate (1 factor, poor (2 factors and very poor (3 factors (AUC – 0.720 (95% CI: 0.656−0.784. High preoperative levels VEGF ( 67 pg/ml (р = 0.005, VEGFR2 ( 3149 pg/ml (р = 0.036, VEGFR3 ( 2268 pg/ml (р = 0.001, TGF-β1 ( 14473 pg/ml (р = 0.052 were identified as unfavorable prognostic factors for survival without PSA-failure. Conclusion. Independent prognostic factors of biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy were PSA, Gleason sum and pN. Joint effect of the factors allows to predict PSA-relapse with accuracy 0.720. Preoperative serum levels VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1 potentially are perspective markers for PSA-failure after

  13. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF BIOCHEMICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR LOCALIZED AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Chernyaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To reveal prognostic factors of PSA-failure following radical prostatectomy in patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer.Materials and methods. Medical data of 386 consecutive patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1997 to 2011 were analyzed. Median age was 61.0 years. Median PSA before surgery – 10.3 ng/ml. Plasma levels of VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1, CD105, IL-6 were measured using Enzyme Linked-Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA before radical prostatectomy in 77 patients. Postoperatively the tumours were categorized as pT2 in 288 (59.1 %, pT3 – in 144 (37.3 %, pT4 – in 14 (3.6; pN+ – in 34 (8.8 % cases. Gleason score < 7 was present in 254 (65.8 %,  7 – in 132 (34.2 % specimens. Perineural invasion was identified in 188 (48.7 %, angiolymphatic invasion – in 126 (32.6 cases.Results. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 64 (16.6 % out of 386 patients at a median follow-up of 30.5 (12−164 months. Independent predictors of biochemical recurrence were PSA (HR 0.161 (95% CI:0.058−0.449; р = 0.001, Gleason sum in surgical specimens (HR 0.496 (95 % CI:0.268−0.917; p = 0.025, pN (HR 0.415 (95 % CI:0.181−0.955; p = 0.039. The patients were divided into 3 prognostic groups: good (0 factor, intermediate (1 factor, poor (2 factors and very poor (3 factors (AUC – 0.720 (95% CI: 0.656−0.784. High preoperative levels VEGF ( 67 pg/ml (р = 0.005, VEGFR2 ( 3149 pg/ml (р = 0.036, VEGFR3 ( 2268 pg/ml (р = 0.001, TGF-β1 ( 14473 pg/ml (р = 0.052 were identified as unfavorable prognostic factors for survival without PSA-failure. Conclusion. Independent prognostic factors of biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy were PSA, Gleason sum and pN. Joint effect of the factors allows to predict PSA-relapse with accuracy 0.720. Preoperative serum levels VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1 potentially are perspective markers for PSA-failure after

  14. CD44 expression predicts local recurrence after radiotherapy in larynx cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C.J. de; Pramana, J.; Wal, J.E. van der; Lacko, M.; Peutz-Kootstra, C.J.; Jong, J.M. de; Takes, R.P.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Laan, B.F.A.M. van der; Wachters, J.; Jansen, J.C.; Rasch, C.R.; Velthuysen, M.L. van; Grenman, R.; Hoebers, F.J.; Schuuring, E.; Brekel, M.W. van den; Begg, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To find molecular markers from expression profiling data to predict recurrence of laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We generated gene expression data on pre-treatment biopsies from 52 larynx cancer patients. Patients developing a local recurrence were matched for T-s

  15. CD44 Expression Predicts Local Recurrence after Radiotherapy in Larynx Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Monique C.; Pramana, Jimmy; van der Wal, Jacqueline E.; Lacko, Martin; Peutz-Kootstra, Carine J.; Takes, Robert P.; Kaanders, Johannes H.; van der Laan, Bernard F.; Wachters, Jasper; Jansen, Jeroen C.; Rasch, Coen R.; van Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F.; Grenman, Reidar; Hoebers, Frank J.; Schuuring, Ed; van den Brekel, Michiel W.; Begg, Adrian C.; de Jong, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To find molecular markers from expression profiling data to predict recurrence of laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy. Experimental Design: We generated gene expression data on pre-treatment biopsies from 52 larynx cancer patients. Patients developing a local recurrence were matched for T-s

  16. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy improves loco-regional recurrence of head and neck mucosal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wushou, Alimujiang; Hou, Jing; Zhao, Ya-Jun; Miao, Xin-chao

    2015-05-01

    Primary head and neck mucosal melanoma (HNMM) is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Controversy remains as to whether postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (PORT) achieves a significant benefit in HNMM treatment. Because of the lack of available conclusive prospective data, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all relevant available studies to clarify the benefits of PORT. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases was conducted to collect relevant studies until April 30, 2014. Studies published in the English language comparing surgery alone and surgery plus PORT for HNMM were included, with more than 15 study populations. All statistical analyses were performed using STATA version 12.0. A total of 423 patients were available from eight studies and the median sample size was 53 cases. The median follow-up time was 38.2 months (range 18.3-65.2 months). There was a positive association between PORT and loco-regional recurrence of HNMM (odds ratio [OR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.22-0.60, P = 0.000). No associations were found between the PORT and 3-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.94-2.09, P = 0.093 and OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.70-1.61, P = 0.161, respectively). PORT had no impact on 3-year and 5-year OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.80-1.61, P = 0.472 and HR = 1.34, 95% CI = 0.97-1.85, P = 0.227, respectively). PORT improved loco-regional recurrence of HNMM independent of OS.

  17. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  18. Prognostic value of continued smoking on survival and recurrence rates in patients with head and neck cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Imhoff, Lieke C R; Kranenburg, Gabriëlle G J; Macco, Sven; Nijman, Nicoline L; van Overbeeke, Elisabeth J; Wegner, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Pothen, Ajit J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the prognostic value of continued smoking after diagnosis on survival and recurrence rates in head and neck cancer. A systematic search was performed and predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to screen and select the articles. The remaining articles were critically appraised. Six articles were used for data extraction. The survival rate of patients who continued to smoke was 21% to 35% lower compared with patients who quit smoking. The recurrence rate for continued smoking was 23% and 30% higher. In 1 study, there was no difference between continuation and cessation of smoking, and 1 study showed a higher recurrence rate for patients who continued to smoke, which was not statistically significant. There is consistent evidence that survival rates are lower and recurrence rates are higher for patients who continue to smoke after being diagnosed with head and neck cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2214-E2220, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Do surgical margin and local recurrence influence survival in soft tissue sarcomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais, Eduardo N; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Alderete, Joseph; Larson, Melissa C; Rose, Peter S; Sim, Franklin H

    2010-11-01

    Established prognostic factors influencing survival in soft tissue sarcomas include tumor stage, histopathologic grade, size, depth, and anatomic site. The presence of tumor near or at the margin of resection increases the risk of local recurrence but whether a positive surgical margin or local recurrence affect overall survival is controversial. We explored the impact of microscopic margin on local recurrence, metastasis, and overall survival in patients with intermediate- to high-grade soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities. We then determined whether local recurrence decreases overall survival. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 248 patients who had soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities treated surgically from 1995 to 2008. We estimated survival, local recurrence, and distant metastasis and examined factors potentially influencing these outcomes. The minimum followup was 0.4 years (median, 4.4 years; range, 0.4-13 years). The 5-year cumulative incidence of local recurrence was 4.1%. Patients who presented with positive margins or a margin of 2 mm or less had a worse survival than patients who had margins of greater than 2 mm and wide margins (5-year survival, 47% versus 70% and 72%). In addition to surgical margin, developing metastasis, tumor response of less than 90% necrosis, high histopathologic grade, high AJCC stage (Stage III), increasing age, and male gender were associated with decreased overall survival. Local recurrence independently predicted decreased overall survival. Microscopic surgical margin and local recurrence after surgical treatment should be included as risk factors predicting decreased overall survival for intermediate- to high-grade soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities.

  20. Local treatment in young breast cancer patients : Recurrence, toxicity and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joppe, Enje Jacoba

    2015-01-01

    Local treatment options for early stage breast cancer include mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy (BCT), the latter consisting of local excision followed by radiotherapy. For all age groups, the risk of local recurrence after BCT is higher than after mastectomy, with similar survival rates.

  1. Stage IE Primary Bone Lymphoma:Limb Salvage for Local Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodamorad Jamshidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Primary bone lymphoma or non-Hodgkin lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There are only a few case series of stage IE of this condition in medical literature. The aim of this study is to determine the rate of survival   for stage IE after combined modality treatment, the rate of local recurrence, and the results of limb salvage in cases   of local recurrence.     Methods:   We collected data from 61 patients with histologically confirmed PBL treated at the Musculoskeletal   Oncology Department of our hospital from 2000 to 2010. Retrospective evaluation included demographics, symptoms, tumor locations, outcomes of surgical treatment for local recurrence and survival rates. Results:   All patients received Combined Modality Therapy. Overall,five year survival was 89% and five year disease free survival rate was 78%. Local recurrence occurred in 6 patients during follow up period, which was treated surgically     by wide excision and reconstruction. The mean follow-up for the local recurrence group was 36(24-54 months and mortality rate in this group was 17%. Conclusions:   Combined Modality Therapy for stage IE primary bone lymphomaresults in good survival rate. In case   of local recurrence, wide excision and reconstruction improves the outcomes.

  2. Stage IE Primary Bone Lymphoma:Limb Salvage for Local Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodamorad Jamshidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Primary bone lymphoma or non-Hodgkin lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There are only a few case series of stage IE of this condition in medical literature. The aim of this study is to determine the rate of survival   for stage IE after combined modality treatment, the rate of local recurrence, and the results of limb salvage in cases   of local recurrence.     Methods:   We collected data from 61 patients with histologically confirmed PBL treated at the Musculoskeletal   Oncology Department of our hospital from 2000 to 2010. Retrospective evaluation included demographics, symptoms, tumor locations, outcomes of surgical treatment for local recurrence and survival rates. Results:   All patients received Combined Modality Therapy. Overall,five year survival was 89% and five year disease free survival rate was 78%. Local recurrence occurred in 6 patients during follow up period, which was treated surgically     by wide excision and reconstruction. The mean follow-up for the local recurrence group was 36(24-54 months and mortality rate in this group was 17%. Conclusions:   Combined Modality Therapy for stage IE primary bone lymphomaresults in good survival rate. In case   of local recurrence, wide excision and reconstruction improves the outcomes.

  3. Local recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after radiofrequency ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A 51-year-old Chinese male with a 20-year history of hepatitis B was diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma in the right anterior portion of the liver, sized 3.5 cm × 3.2 cm, and was treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on December 18, 2001. The patient did not receive antiviral therapy for hepatitis B virus after RFA. The treated lesion reduced gradually and reached its minimum size of 1.7 cm × 1.5 cm seven years later on November 18, 2008. However computed tomography findings revealed that a recurr...

  4. Early localization of recurrent prostate cancer after prostatectomy by endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Brian J; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A; Tollefson, Matthew K; Karnes, Jeffrey; Davis, Brian J; Rangel, Laureano J; King, Bernard F; Mynderse, Lance A

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the ability of endorectal coil (e-coil) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify early prostatic fossa recurrence after radical prostatectomy. We identified 187 patients from 2005-2011 who underwent e-coil MRI with dynamic gadolinium-contrast enhancement followed by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostatic fossa biopsy for possible local prostate cancer recurrence. For analysis, local recurrence was defined as a negative evaluation for distant metastatic disease with a positive prostatic fossa biopsy, decreased prostate-specific antigen (PSA) following salvage radiation therapy, or increased lesion size on serial imaging. Local recurrence was identified in 132 patients, with 124 (94%) detected on e-coil MRI. The median PSA was 0.59 ng/mL (range coil MRI was 86%. When a lesion was identified on MRI, the positive biopsy rate was 65% and lesion size was a significant predictor of positive biopsies. The positive biopsy rates were 51%, 74%, and 88% when the lesion was 2 cm, respectively (p = 0.0006). E-coil MRI has a high level of sensitivity in identifying local recurrence of prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy, even at low PSA levels. E-coil MRI should be considered as the first imaging evaluation for biochemical recurrence for identifying patients suitable for localized salvage therapy.

  5. Prognostic Factors for Local, Loco-regional and Systemic Recurrence in Early-stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, A; Kümmel, S; Barinoff, J; Heitz, F; Holtschmidt, J; Weikel, W; Lorenz-Salehi, F; du Bois, A; Harter, P; Traut, A; Blohmer, J U; Ataseven, B

    2015-07-01

    Aim: The risk of recurrence in breast cancer depends on factors such as treatment but also on the intrinsic subtype. We analyzed the risk factors for local, loco-regional and systemic recurrence, evaluated the differences and analyzed the risk of recurrence for different molecular subtypes. Material and Methods: A total of 3054 breast cancer patients who underwent surgery followed by adjuvant treatment at HSK hospital or Essen Mitte Hospital between 1998 and 2011 were analyzed. Based on immunohistochemical parameters, cancers were divided into the following subgroups: luminal A, luminal B (HER2-), luminal B (HER2+), HER2+ and TNBC (triple negative breast cancer). Results: 67 % of tumors were classified as luminal A, 13 % as luminal B (HER2-), 6 % as luminal B (HER2+), 3 % as HER2+ and 11 % as TNBC. After a median follow-up time of 6.6 years there were 100 local (3.3 %), 32 loco-regional (1 %) and 248 distant recurrences (8 %). Five-year recurrence-free survival for the overall patient collective was 92 %. On multivariate analysis, positive nodal status, TNBC subtype and absence of radiation therapy were found to be independent risk factors for all forms of recurrence. Age loco-regional recurrence was low. In addition to nodal status, subgroup classification was found to be an important factor affecting the risk of recurrence.

  6. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer with salvage interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, Vratislav; Lotter, Michael; Kreppner, Stephan; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    To assess the long-term results of protocol-based interstitial pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy as reirradiation combined with simultaneous chemotherapy and interstitial hyperthermia in selected patients with recurrent head and neck tumors. A total of 104 patients with biopsy-proven recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with interstitial PDR brachytherapy. Salvage surgery had also been undergone by 53/104 (51 %) patients (R1 or R2 resection in > 80 % of patients). Salvage brachytherapy alone was administered in 81 patients (78 %), with a median total dose of 56.7 Gy. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was performed in 23/104 patients (32 %), using a median total dose of D{sub REF} = 24 Gy. Simultaneously to PDR brachytherapy, concomitant chemotherapy was administered in 58/104 (55.8 %) patients. A single session of interstitial hyperthermia was also used to treat 33/104 (31.7 %) patients. The analysis was performed after a median follow-up of 60 months. Calculated according to Kaplan-Meier, local tumor control rates after 2, 5, and 10 years were 92.5, 82.4, and 58.9 %, respectively. Comparing results of salvage PDR brachytherapy with or without simultaneous chemotherapy, the 10-year local control rates were 76 vs. 39 % (p= 0014), respectively. No other patient- or treatment-related parameters had a significant influence on treatment results. Soft tissue necrosis or bone necrosis developed in 18/104 (17.3 %) and 11/104 (9.6 %) patients, respectively, but only 3 % of patients required surgical treatment. PDR interstitial brachytherapy with simultaneous chemotherapy is a very effective and, in experienced hands, also a safe treatment modality in selected patients with head and neck cancer in previously irradiated areas. (orig.) [German] Es erfolgte die Analyse der Langzeitergebnisse einer protokollbasierten interstitiellen Brachytherapie (Re-Bestrahlung) mit simultaner Chemotherapie und interstitieller Hyperthermie

  7. Local and global approaches to the problem of Poincaré recurrences. Applications in nonlinear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anishchenko, V.S., E-mail: wadim@info.sgu.ru; Boev, Ya.I., E-mail: boev.yaroslav@gmail.com; Semenova, N.I., E-mail: harbour2006@mail.ru; Strelkova, G.I., E-mail: strelkovagi@info.sgu.ru

    2015-07-26

    We review rigorous and numerical results on the statistics of Poincaré recurrences which are related to the modern development of the Poincaré recurrence problem. We analyze and describe the rigorous results which are achieved both in the classical (local) approach and in the recently developed global approach. These results are illustrated by numerical simulation data for simple chaotic and ergodic systems. It is shown that the basic theoretical laws can be applied to noisy systems if the probability measure is ergodic and stationary. Poincaré recurrences are studied numerically in nonautonomous systems. Statistical characteristics of recurrences are analyzed in the framework of the global approach for the cases of positive and zero topological entropy. We show that for the positive entropy, there is a relationship between the Afraimovich–Pesin dimension, Lyapunov exponents and the Kolmogorov–Sinai entropy either without and in the presence of external noise. The case of zero topological entropy is exemplified by numerical results for the Poincare recurrence statistics in the circle map. We show and prove that the dependence of minimal recurrence times on the return region size demonstrates universal properties for the golden and the silver ratio. The behavior of Poincaré recurrences is analyzed at the critical point of Feigenbaum attractor birth. We explore Poincaré recurrences for an ergodic set which is generated in the stroboscopic section of a nonautonomous oscillator and is similar to a circle shift. Based on the obtained results we show how the Poincaré recurrence statistics can be applied for solving a number of nonlinear dynamics issues. We propose and illustrate alternative methods for diagnosing effects of external and mutual synchronization of chaotic systems in the context of the local and global approaches. The properties of the recurrence time probability density can be used to detect the stochastic resonance phenomenon. We also discuss

  8. Local melanoma recurrences in the scar after limited surgery for primary tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drzewiecki, K T; Andersson, A P

    1995-01-01

    The clinical and histologic records of 46 consecutive patients were reviewed who during the period 1980-1993 had recurrence from melanoma in the scar after limited surgery for a skin tumor. They constituted about 50% of all patients admitted with local recurrence from melanoma during this period....... At reexamination of the primary tumors, 16 were found to be malignant melanomas and 9 were nevi (four atypical and five benign). Twenty-one were missing, 11 of which had never been set for histologic examination. The median thickness of nine measurable melanomas was 0.66 mm. The recurrences in scar consisted of 34...... recurrences in the form of a new primary in a scar following limited surgery supports the theory of limited field change around a primary melanoma. Furthermore, limited procedures for primary melanoma, if followed by a recurrence in the scar, worsen the prognosis....

  9. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally-Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Mann Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of malignant skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally-advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC, progression-free survival rate (PFS, overall survival rate (OS and toxicities were reported.Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6-67.2 months. The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4-205 cm3. All patients received prior EBRT with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24-75.6 Gy delivered in 12 to 42 fractions. 20 patients had surgeries prior to SABR. 19 patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, 8 patients received concurrent cetuximab (ErbituxTM with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP was 3.3 months (range: 0-16.9 months. For the 29 patients (93.5% who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5-41.4 months. The estimated 1-year overall survival (OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities.Conclusions: SABR has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally-advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base.

  10. Methods for estimating the site of origin of locoregional recurrence in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Due, A.K.; Vogelius, I.R.; Berthelsen, A.K.; Kristensen, C.A.; Specht, L. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Aznar, M.C. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Niels Bohr Institute; Bentzen, S.M. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Wisconsin Univ., MD (United States). Depts. of Human Oncology and Medical Physics; Korreman, S.S. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Niels Bohr Institute; Roskilde Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Science, Systems, and Models

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Methods to estimate the likely origin of recurrences after radiation therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma are compared. Methods and materials: A total of 25 patients meeting the following inclusion criteria were randomly selected: curatively intended intensity-modulated radiotherapy planned on a positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) scan during the period 2005-2009; squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity, pharynx or larynx; complete clinical response followed by locoregional recurrence; and a CT scan at recurrence before any salvage therapy. Exclusion criteria were previous cancer in the area, surgery prior to radiotherapy, or a synchronous cancer. Three methods of estimating focal points of recurrence origin and two volume overlap methods assigning the recurrences to the most central target volumes encompassing at least 50% or 95% of the recurrence volumes were tested. Treatment planning and recurrence scans were rigid and deformable co-registered in order to transfer focal points to the treatment planning scan. Double determinations of all volumes, points, and co-registrations were made. Results: The volume overlap methods assigned the recurrences to significantly more peripheral target volumes than focal methods (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons of 95% overlap vs. focal methods, p < 0.028 for all comparisons of 50% overlap vs. focal methods). Repeated registrations of the same point had higher reproducibility with deformable registration than with rigid registration (median distance 0.31 vs. 0.35 cm, p = 0.015). No significant differences were observed among the focal methods. Conclusion: Significant differences between methods were found which may affect strategies to improve radiotherapy based on pattern of failure analyses. (orig.)

  11. Impact of Margin Status on Local Recurrence After Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Duggan, Margaret M. [Department of Surgery, Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Golshan, Mehra [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pochebit, Stephen [Department of Pathology, Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bellon, Jennifer R., E-mail: jbellon@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the rate of local recurrence according to the margin status for patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated by mastectomy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-five consecutive women who underwent mastectomy with or without radiation therapy for DCIS from 1998 to 2005 were included in this retrospective analysis. Only patients with pure DCIS were eligible; patients with microinvasion were excluded. The primary endpoint was local recurrence, defined as recurrence on the chest wall; regional and distant recurrences were secondary endpoints. Outcomes were analyzed according to margin status (positive, close (≤2 mm), or negative), location of the closest margin (superficial, deep, or both), nuclear grade, necrosis, receptor status, type of mastectomy, and receipt of hormonal therapy. Results: The primary cohort consisted of 142 patients who did not receive postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). For those patients, the median follow-up time was 7.6 years (range, 0.6-13.0 years). Twenty-one patients (15%) had a positive margin, and 23 patients (16%) had a close (≤2 mm) margin. The deep margin was close in 14 patients and positive in 6 patients. The superficial margin was close in 13 patients and positive in 19 patients. One patient experienced an isolated invasive chest wall recurrence, and 1 patient had simultaneous chest wall, regional nodal, and distant metastases. The crude rates of chest wall recurrence were 2/142 (1.4%) for all patients, 1/21 (4.8%) for those with positive margins, 1/23 (4.3%) for those with close margins, and 0/98 for patients with negative margins. PMRT was given as part of the initial treatment to 3 patients, 1 of whom had an isolated chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: Mastectomy for pure DCIS resulted in a low rate of local or distant recurrences. Even with positive or close mastectomy margins, the rates of chest wall recurrences were so low that PMRT is likely not warranted.

  12. Fear of recurrence among head and neck cancer survivors: longitudinal trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Naseem; Cadwallader, Ella; Lowe, Derek; Humphris, Gerry; Ozakinci, Gozde; Rogers, Simon N

    2013-04-01

    Fear of recurrence (FoR) following head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment is a major patient concern but is infrequently discussed in outpatient settings and may cause significant detrimental effect on patient psychological well-being. The aim of this paper is to determine longitudinal trends and predictors of significant FoR. Prospective data collection was obtained in 189 post-treatment HNC patients with 456 clinic attendances from October 2008 to January 2011. All patients completed Patient Concerns Inventory (PCI), University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire version 4 and the FoR questionnaires using a combination of paper and touch-screen technology. The prevalence of significant FoR was 35%, which was stable longitudinally. Logistic regression-delineated predictors of significant FoR were young age (<65 years), anxiety/mood and patient-reported FoR. Conventional prognostic factors including standard clinicopathological factors, treatment modality and length of follow-up did not predict significant FoR. Over time, 20% of patients reported significant FoR intermittently, whereas 30% experienced it consistently. The remaining 50% did not experience significant FoR. Patient-related characteristics were more important than clinicopathological prognostic factors in predicting significant FoR, potentially creating a mismatch between the doctors' perception of patient's experience of FoR with what patients may experience. In the long term, FoR is expressed across a spectrum extending from 'normal' FoR to persistent significant FoR with an intermediate category of intermittent significant FoR. Those patients experiencing intermittent and consistent levels of significant FoR may benefit from psychological support. This study confirmed that self-reported screening FoR using the PCI is a valuable tool in identifying significant FoR. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Mechanisms driving local breast cancer recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Myles J

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify mechanisms driving local recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Breast cancer recurrence after BCS remains a clinically significant, but poorly understood problem. We have previously reported that recurrent colorectal tumours demonstrate altered growth dynamics, increased metastatic burden and resistance to apoptosis, mediated by upregulation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase\\/Akt (PI3K\\/Akt). We investigated whether similar characteristics were evident in a model of locally recurrent breast cancer. METHODS: Tumours were generated by orthotopic inoculation of 4T1 cells in two groups of female Balb\\/c mice and cytoreductive surgery performed when mean tumour size was above 150 mm(3). Local recurrence was observed and gene expression was examined using Affymetrix GeneChips in primary and recurrent tumours. Differential expression was confirmed with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Phosphorylation of Akt was assessed using Western immunoblotting. An ex vivo heat shock protein (HSP)-loaded dendritic cell vaccine was administered in the perioperative period. RESULTS: We observed a significant difference in the recurrent 4T1 tumour volume and growth rate (p < 0.05). Gene expression studies suggested roles for the PI3K\\/Akt system and local immunosuppression driving the altered growth kinetics. We demonstrated that perioperative vaccination with an ex vivo HSP-loaded dendritic cell vaccine abrogated recurrent tumour growth in vivo (p = 0.003 at day 15). CONCLUSION: Investigating therapies which target tumour survival pathways such as PI3K\\/Akt and boost immune surveillance in the perioperative period may be useful adjuncts to contemporary breast cancer treatment.

  14. Whither surgical quality assurance of breast cancer surgery (surgical margins and local recurrence) after paterson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundred, N J; Thomas, J; Dixon, J M J

    2017-07-05

    The Kennedy report into the actions of the disgraced Breast Surgeon, Paterson focussed on issues of informed consent for mastectomy, management of surgical margins and raised concerns about local recurrence rates and the increasing emphasis on cosmesis after mastectomy for breast cancer. This article assesses whether Kennedy's recommendations apply to the UK as a whole and how to address these issues. New GMC advice on consent and newer nonevidenced innovations in immediate reconstruction have altered the level of informed consent required. Patients deserve a better understanding of the issues of oncological versus cosmetic outcomes on which to base their decisions. Involvement of the whole multidisciplinary team including Oncologists is necessary in surgical planning. Failure to obtain clear microscopic margins at mastectomy leads to an increased local recurrence, yet has received little attention in the UK. Whereas, other countries have used surgical quality assurance audits to reduce local recurrence; local recurrence rates are not available and the extent of variation across the UK in margin involvement after surgery, its management and relationship to local recurrence needs auditing prospectively to reduce unnecessary morbidity. To reassure public, patients and the NHS management, an accreditation system with more rigour than NHSBSP QA and peer review is now required. Resource and efforts to support its introduction will be necessary from the Royal College of Surgeons and the Association of Breast Surgeons. New innovations require careful evaluation before their backdoor introduction to the NHS. Private Hospitals need to have the same standards imposed.

  15. Intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in locally advanced or recurrent penile squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ye Liu; Yong-Hong Li; Zhuo-Wei Liu; Zhi-Ling Zhang; Yun-Lin Ye; Kai Yao; Hui Han; Zi-Ke Qin; Fang-Jian Zhou

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of locally advanced or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis after conventional treatment is dismal. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin on local y advanced or recurrent SCC of the penis. Between April 1999 and May 2011, we treated 5 patients with locally advanced penile SCC and 7 patients with recurrent disease with intraarterial chemotherapy. The response rate and toxicity data were analyzed, and survival rates were calculated. After 2 to 6 cycles of intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin, 1 patients with locoregional y advanced disease achieved a complete response, and 4 achieved partial response. Of the 7 patients with recurrent disease, 2 achieved complete response, 3 achieved partial response, 3 had stable disease, and 1 developed progressive disease. An objective tumor response was therefore achieved in 10 of the 12 patients. The median overal survival for the patients was 24 months (range, 10-50 months). Three out of 10 patients who responded were long-term survivors after intraarterial chemotherapy. Intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin may be effective and potential y curative in locoregional y advanced or recurrent penile SCC. The contribution of this therapy in the primary management of advanced or recurrent penile SCC should be prospectively investigated.

  16. Vaginal delivery of carboplatin-loaded thermosensitive hydrogel to prevent local cervical cancer recurrence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Jin; Wu, Wenbin; Li, Hongjun

    2016-11-01

    Local tumor recurrence after cervical cancer surgery remains a clinical problem. Vaginal delivery of thermosensitive hydrogel may be suited to reduce tumor relapse rate with more efficacy and safety. A pilot study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of carboplatin-loaded poloxamer hydrogel to prevent local recurrence of cervical cancer after surgery. In vivo vaginal retention evaluation of 27% poloxamer hydrogel in mice was proven to be a suitable vaginal drug delivery formulation due to its low gelation temperature. A mimic orthotopic cervical/vaginal cancer recurrence model after surgery was established by injecting murine cervical cancer cell line U14 into the vaginal submucosa to simulate the residual tumor cells infiltrated in the surgical site, followed by drug administration 24 h later to interfere with the formation/recurrence of the tumor. By infusing fluorescein sodium-loaded hydrogel into the vagina of mice, a maximized accumulation of fluorescein sodium (Flu) in the vagina was achieved and few signals were observed in other organs. When used in the prevention of the cervical cancer formation/recurrence in mice, the carboplatin-loaded poloxamer hydrogel exhibited great efficacy and systemic safety. In conclusion, thermosensitive hydrogel presents a simple, practical approach for the local drug delivery via vagina against cervical cancer recurrence.

  17. The Pattern of Failure after Re-Irradiation of Recurrent Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Defining the Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovtzer, Aron; Gluck, Iris; Chepeha, Douglas B; Teknos, Theodoros N; Moyer, Jeffrey S; Prince, Mark E; Bradford, Carol R; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Re-irradiation (re-RT) of recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) may achieve long term disease control in some patients, at the expense of high rates of late sequelae. Limiting the re-RT targets to the recurrent gross tumor volume (rGTV) would reduce the volumes of re-irradiated tissues, however, its effect on tumor recurrence pattern is unknown. Methods Retrospective review of 66 patients who underwent curative-intent re-RT for non-resectable recurrent or second primary mucosal squamous cell HNC. Treatment was delivered with 3-dimensional conformal (3D) RT or intensity modulated RT (IMRT). The targets in all patients consisted of the rGTVs with tight (0.5 cm) margins, with no intent to treat prophylactically lymph nodes or sub-clinical disease in the vicinity of the rGTVs. The sites of local-regional failures (LRFs) were determined using imaging at the time of failure, and were compared to the rGTVs. Results Median re-RT dose was 68 Gy. 47 patients (71%) received concomitant chemotherapy and 31 (47%) received hyperfractionated, accelerated RT. At a median follow up 42 month, 16 (23%) are alive and free of disease. Fifty patients (77%) had a third recurrence or persistent disease, including 47 LRFs. All LRFs occurred within the rGTVs except for two (4%) (95% C.I. 0; 11 %). Nineteen patients (29%) had grade ≥3 late complications, mostly dysphagia (12 patients). Conclusion Almost all LRFs occurred within the re-irradiated rGTVs despite avoiding prophylactic RT of tissue at risk of subclinical disease. These results support confining the re-RT targets to the rGTVs to reduce re-irradiated tissue volumes. PMID:19135312

  18. Osteosarcoma of the spine: prognostic variables for local recurrence and overall survival, a multicenter ambispective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekutoski, Mark B; Clarke, Michelle J; Rose, Peter; Luzzati, Alessandro; Rhines, Laurence D; Varga, Peter P; Fisher, Charles G; Chou, Dean; Fehlings, Michael G; Reynolds, Jeremy J; Williams, Richard; Quraishi, Nasir A; Germscheid, Niccole M; Sciubba, Daniel M; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Boriani, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Primary spinal osteosarcomas are rare and aggressive neoplasms. Poor outcomes can occur, as obtaining marginal margins is technically demanding; further Enneking-appropriate en bloc resection can have significant morbidity. The goal of this study is to identify prognostic variables for local recurrence and mortality in surgically treated patients diagnosed with a primary osteosarcoma of the spine. METHODS A multicenter ambispective database of surgically treated patients with primary spine osteosarcomas was developed by AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor. Patient demographic, diagnosis, treatment, perioperative morbidity, local recurrence, and cross-sectional survival data were collected. Tumors were classified in 2 cohorts: Enneking appropriate (EA) and Enneking inappropriate (EI), as defined by pathology margin matching Enneking-recommended surgical margins. Prognostic variables were analyzed in reference to local recurrence and survival. RESULTS Between 1987 and 2012, 58 patients (32 female patients) underwent surgical treatment for primary spinal osteosarcoma. Patients were followed for a mean period of 3.5 ± 3.5 years (range 0.5 days to 14.3 years). The median survival for the entire cohort was 6.7 years postoperative. Twenty-four (41%) patients died, and 17 (30%) patients suffered a local recurrence, 10 (59%) of whom died. Twenty-nine (53%) patients underwent EA resection while 26 (47%) patients underwent EI resection with a postoperative median survival of 6.8 and 3.7 years, respectively (p = 0.048). EI patients had a higher rate of local recurrence than EA patients (p = 0.001). Patient age, previous surgery, biopsy type, tumor size, spine level, and chemotherapy timing did not significantly influence recurrence and survival. CONCLUSIONS Osteosarcoma of the spine presents a significant challenge, and most patients die in spite of aggressive surgery. There is a significant decrease in recurrence and an increase in survival with en bloc resection (EA

  19. Evidence-Based Treatment Options in Recurrent and/or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanassios Argiris

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The major development of the past decade in the first-line treatment of recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN was the introduction of cetuximab in combination with platinum plus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (CT, followed by maintenance cetuximab (the “EXTREME” regimen. This regimen is supported by a phase 3 randomized trial and subsequent observational studies, and it confers well-documented survival benefits, with median survival ranging between approximately 10 and 14 months, overall response rates between 36 and 44%, and disease control rates of over 80%. Furthermore, as indicated by patient-reported outcome measures, the addition of cetuximab to platinum-based CT leads to a significant reduction in pain and problems with social eating and speech. Conversely, until very recently, there has been a lack of evidence-based second-line treatment options, and the therapies that have been available have shown low response rates and poor survival outcomes. Presently, a promising new treatment option in R/M SCCHN has emerged: immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs, which have demonstrated favorable results in second-line clinical trials. Nivolumab and pembrolizumab are the first two ICIs that were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. We note that the trials that showed benefit with ICIs included not only patients who previously received ≥1 platinum-based regimens for R/M SCCHN but also patients who experienced recurrence within 6 months after combined modality therapy with a platinum agent for locally advanced disease. In this review, we outline the available clinical and observational evidence for the EXTREME regimen and the initial results from clinical trials for ICIs in patients with R/M SCCHN. We propose that these treatment options can be integrated into a new continuum of care paradigm, with first-line EXTREME regimen followed by second-line ICIs. A number of ongoing clinical trials

  20. Patterns and prognosis of locally recurrent rectal cancer following multidisciplinary treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhao; Chang-Zheng Du; Ying-Shi Sun; Jin Gu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the patterns and decisive prognostic factors for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with a multidisciplinary team (MDT) modality.METHODS:Ninety patients with local recurrence were studied,out of 1079 consecutive rectal cancer patients who underwent curative surgery from 1999 to 2007.For each patient,the recurrence pattern was assessed by specialist radiologists from the MDT using imaging,and the treatment strategy was decided after discussion by the MDT.The associations between clinicopathological factors and long-term outcomes were evaluated using both univariate and multivariate analysis.RESULTS:The recurrence pattern was classified as follows:Twenty-seven (30%) recurrent tumors were evaluated as axial type,21 (23.3%) were anterior type,8 (8.9%) were posterior type,and 13 (25.6%) were lateral type.Forty-one patients had tumors that were evaluated as resectable by the MDT and ultimately received surgery,and R0 resection was achieved in 36 (87.8%) of these patients.The recurrence pattern was closely associated with resectability and R0 resection rate (P < 0.001).The recurrence pattern,interval to recurrence,and RO resection were significantly associated with 5-year survival rate in univariate analysis.Multivariate analysis showed that the R0 resection was the unique independent factor affecting long-term survival.CONCLUSION:The MDT modality improves patient selection for surgery by enabling accurate classification of the recurrence pattern; RO resection is the most significant factor affecting long-term survival.

  1. Massive Multinodular Head and Neck Recurrence of Parotid Gland Pleomorphic Adenoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Philouze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The optimal initial management of parotid pleomorphic adenomas reduces the risk of recurrence and malignant transformation. Surgery of recurrence can be difficult in multinodular disseminated forms. Case Report. A 67-years-old patient was referred for management of a large multifocal recurrence of a pleomorphic adenoma operated on 23 years ago. The clinical and radiological assessment found parapharyngeal, infratemporal, and prestyloid invasion, with nodules in the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Excision by transmandibular approach was performed. The pathologist found a multinodular recurrent pleomorphic adenoma without criteria of malignancy. Postoperative radiotherapy was performed. Discussion. Multinodular forms and incomplete resections are the most important factors that are thought to predispose to recurrence. A precise analysis of the extension by preoperative MRI is essential. Adjuvant radiotherapy can be given in these recurrent multifocal forms.

  2. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  3. Robustifying eye center localization by head pose cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valenti, R.; Yücel, Z.; Gevers, T.

    2009-01-01

    Head pose and eye location estimation are two closely related issues which refer to similar application areas. In recent years, these problems have been studied individually in numerous works in the literature. Previous research shows that cylindrical head models and isophote based schemes provide

  4. Concurrent radiochemotherapy of locally recurrent or advanced sarcomas of the uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortmann, B.; Klautke, G.; Fietkau, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Rostock (Germany); Reimer, T.; Gerber, B. [Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Univ. of Rostock, Suedstadt Hospital (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Background: uterine sarcomas are rare tumors. Until now, no data on the treatment of recurrent or advanced uterine sarcomas using concurrent radiochemotherapy (RCT) has been available. Patients and methods: from 01/1997 to 03/2004, seven patients with locally recurrent (n = 6) or locally advanced uterine sarcomas (n = 1) received concurrent RCT after tumor surgery (R1/2 resection in 3/7 patients). A total radiation dose of 45 Gy was applied in single doses of 1.8 Gy using an external-beam technique; in addition, three to four intracavitary doses of 5 Gy were applied. Concurrent chemotherapy was generally administered as follows: 1.2 g/m{sup 2} ifosfamide on days 1-5 and 29-33 in combination with 50 or 40 mg/m{sup 2} adriamycin on days 2 and 30. 3/7 patients received further cycles of chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 35 months. Results: all recurrences (before RCT) were localized either in the vagina or in or directly proximal to the vaginal stump. The main side effects of RCT were hemotoxicity (grade 3: n = 3/7; grade 4: n = 4/7; neutropenic fever n = 1/7) and diarrhea (grade 3: n = 5/7). At the median follow-up (35 months), 4/7 patients had recurrences (one local recurrence; one lymph node recurrence outside the irradiated field, two distant metastases). Local control in the irradiated field was 80% {+-} 18% after 3 years. Disease-free survival calculated according to Kaplan-Meier was 57% {+-} 19% after 3 years. Presently, 5/7 patients are still alive, corresponding to a 3-year survival rate of 83% {+-} 15%. Conclusion: concurrent RCT shows good local effectiveness with a good long-term survival. Further evaluation in phase II studies is recommended. (orig.)

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Sufang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Lin Shaojun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Tham, Ivan W.K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Pan Jianji; Lu Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Lu, Jiade J., E-mail: mdcljj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3-4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50-77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  6. High-intensity focused ultrasound: noninvasive treatment for local unresectable recurrence of osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenxi; Tang, Lina; Lin, Feng; Yao, Yang; Shen, Zan; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2015-03-01

    Local unresectable recurrence of osteosarcoma is one of the most challenging tumors to treat. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a new, noninvasive technique with potential to ablate and inactivate tumors. Treatment of solid tumors with HIFU has been reported. In this study, we assessed safety and efficacy of HIFU in treating local unresectable recurrence of osteosarcoma. We performed a retrospective analysis of 27 patients who had local unresectable recurrence of osteosarcoma from 2006 to 2010. Changes of biochemical markers and pain rating, response rate, disease control rate, local disease progression-free survival, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were used to evaluate efficacy of HIFU treatment. HIFU resulted in a significant change in alkaline phosphatase and lactic acid dehydrogenase and a remarkably relief in pain rating, without severe side effects. According to MRI examination 4-6 weeks after HIFU treatment, 2 (7.4%) patients had complete response (CR), 12 (44.4%) had partial response (PR), 9 (33.3%) had stable disease (SD) and 4 (14.8%) had progression disease (PD). The response rate was 51.8% and the local disease control rate was 85.2%. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local disease control rates were 59.2%, 40.7% and 33.1%, respectively. The median local disease progression-free time was 14 months, the median progression-free time was 13 months and the median over-all survival time was 21 months. Patients without pulmonary metastasis had a better local disease control rate at 1-,2-,3-year and a longer local disease progression-free time, progression-free time, over-all survival time than patients with pulmonary metastasis. HIFU is a safe and noninvasive treatment for local unresectable recurrence of osteosarcoma, with good local control and without severe complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A rare presentation of locally re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Andrew; Babikir, Osman Mahdi; Abboud, Amer; Theodorakis, Spyridon

    2014-10-29

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the USA. While locally advanced rectal cancer involving bone has been described extensively, colon cancer locally involving bone has only been described, to our knowledge, in a single case report. In this case report, we describe the presentation and treatment of locally advanced re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone. We also discuss the available literature on treatment for recurrent and re-recurrent colorectal cancer.

  8. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-17

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  9. S0420, Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  10. Primary Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Skin with Multiple Local Recurrences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Dimitrov Tonev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary adenoid cystic carcinoma (PACC of the skin is a rare tumor with fewer than 70 cases studied in detail in the English literature. This type of tumor shows a prolonged course and a growth pattern usually manifested by multiple local recurrences and has a low potential for distant metastases. The most important modality for primary treatment is surgical resection followed by radiotherapy. We report a woman aged 43 years at the time of diagnosis, who presented with a slow-growing nodule in the right axilla without lymph node enlargement. A wide local excision was performed, and the histology revealed an adenoid cystic carcinoma. During the next 24 years, another four local recurrences were excised (the last one in 2015 and confirmed histologically to be adenoid cystic carcinoma. The patient was given 44 Gy of radiotherapy after the second surgery in 1996. PACC of the skin is a rare tumor with insufficient data concerning the efficacy of the surgical technique and chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment, even more so in the case of multiple recurrences. After the last recurrence, the patient was offered an active follow-up based on the long tumor-free intervals in the past and because the site of the primary tumor allowed further surgical excisions in future recurrences.

  11. Surgery for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: Tips, Tricks, and Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Satish K; Heriot, Alexander G; Lynch, Andrew Craig

    2016-06-01

    Rectal cancer can recur locally in up to 10% of the patients who undergo definitive resection for their primary cancer. Surgical salvage is considered appropriate in the curative setting as well as select cases with palliative intent. Disease-free survival following salvage resection is dependent upon achieving an R0 resection margin. A clear understanding of applied surgical anatomy, appropriate preoperative planning, and a multidisciplinary approach to aggressive soft tissue, bony, and vascular resection with appropriate reconstruction is necessary. Technical tips, tricks, and pitfalls that may assist in managing these cancers are discussed and the roles of additional boost radiation and intraoperative radiation therapy in the management of such cancers are also discussed.

  12. Experience in qualitative and quantitative FDG PET in follow-up of patients with suspected recurrence from head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapela, M; Eigtved, A; Jyrkkiö, S

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated positron emission tomography (PET) with 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in the detection of recurrent head and neck cancer, and compared visual and quantitative interpretation of PET images for their accuracy in the identification of tumour recurrence. Sixty-two FDG PET...... studies were performed in 56 patients having a total of 81 lesions, which were clinically suspected for recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck. The PET images were interpreted visually, and tracer uptake was quantitated as the standardised uptake value adjusted to body weight (SUV). Sensitivity...

  13. [A case of locally recurrent breast cancer difficult to differentiate from nodular fasciitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Masaki; Nakata, Takuya; Imaizumi, Ken; Hirano, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Youhei; Chikatani, Kenichi; Hoshino, Mayumi; Matsuyama, Takatoshi; Motoyama, Kazuo; Goto, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Tetsunori; Koshiishi, Haruya; Tsuruta, Kouji

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery was performed on a 78-year-old woman for left breast cancer 5 years previously (invasive ductal carcinoma, T1cN2M0, stage IIIA, ER[+], PR[-], HER2[-]). Chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy were administered. A left subclavian tumor was detected, and an excisional biopsy was performed. Histological examination showed spindle cells, different from primary breast cancer histology, and nodular fasciitis was diagnosed negative cytokeratin and vimentin immunostaining results. After 12 months, a mass had developed in the same region, and reoperation was performed for resection. Similar spindle cells were observed, but they tested positive for cytokeratin. Carcinoma was diagnosed and thought to be locally recurrent breast cancer. Despite postoperative chemotherapy, the patient experienced bone and lung metastasis and a third local recurrence. She died 13 months following the last surgery. Recurrent breast cancer sometimes displays different histology from the initial cancer, and mimics stromal tumors in certain cases.

  14. Computationally efficient locally-recurrent neural networks for online signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, A; Shim, I

    1999-01-01

    A general class of computationally efficient locally recurrent networks (CERN) is described for real-time adaptive signal processing. The structure of the CERN is based on linear-in-the- parameters single-hidden-layered feedforward neural networks such as the radial basis function (RBF) network, the Volterra neural network (VNN) and the functionally expanded neural network (FENN), adapted to employ local output feedback. The corresponding learning algorithms are derived and key structural and computational complexity comparisons are made between the CERN and conventional recurrent neural networks. Two case studies are performed involving the real- time adaptive nonlinear prediction of real-world chaotic, highly non- stationary laser time series and an actual speech signal, which show that a recurrent FENN based adaptive CERN predictor can significantly outperform the corresponding feedforward FENN and conventionally employed linear adaptive filtering models. (13 refs).

  15. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  16. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  17. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-02

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of

  18. Correlation Between MRS and Serum PSA in the Diagnosis of Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghafuri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multifocality, multicentricity and extension beyond the prostate capsule are all characteristics of prostatic adenocarcinoma that may escape diagnosis by conventional CT scanning or MRI. This study was designed to assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS in prostatic carcinoma and its compatibility with prostatic specific antigen (PSA as the conventional method.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we recruited 139 patients with previous radical prostatectomy referring to Radiology department of Hazrate-e-Rasul Hospital during the first half of 2011 for the evaluation of local recurrence. Traditionally, local recurrence is defined as serum PSA concentration >0.2 ng/dl. We used 1.5-tesla Siemens Avanto MRI unit with endorectal coil and measured creatine, choline and citrate levels before calculating choline-creatine/citrate ratio. Correlation between MRS findings with PSA concentration was evaluated in regards to the multiple levels of the previously mentioned ratio.Results: Local recurrence was found in 107 (77% patients based on PSA levels. The mean values for serum PSA levels and creatine-choline/citrate ratio were significantly different in patients with and without local recurrence. Creatine-choline/citrate ratios greater than 50, 100 and 150 (as different cut-off points of recurrence were respectively seen in 104, 102 and 97 patients and agreement ratio between MRS and PSA in these levels were 94.1%, 94.4% and 85.1%, respectively. Correlation coefficient between these two methods was 0.481.Conclusion: MRS is a valuable tool for evaluating recurrence inpatients with prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy and it is in good agreement with serum PSA levels.

  19. Focal salvage therapy for local prostate cancer recurrences after primary radiotherapy : a comprehensive review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijzentkunst, D A Smit; Peters, M; van der Voort van Zyp, J R N; Moerland, M A; van Vulpen, M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary radiotherapy can be eligible for salvage treatment. Whole-gland salvage techniques carry a high risk of toxicity. A focal salvage approach might reduce the risk of adverse events while maintaining cancer control in careful

  20. Tumor Wide Horizontal Invasion Predicts Local Recurrence for Scrotal Extramammary Paget’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lujia; Feng, Chenchen; Zhou, Minwei; Zhou, Zhongwen; Ding, Guanxiong; Gao, Peng; Ding, Qiang; Wu, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Extramammary Paget’s disease (EMPD) is a rare malignancy, and little was known about its prognostic factors and optimal treatment. In the current study, we aimed to discuss clinical and pathological features of scrotal EMPD and determine the prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival and local recurrence. A total of 206 patients with scrotal EMPD lesions surgically treated at our institute were studied. All clinical and pathological data were reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining of TP53 and Ki67 was examined as well. At the last follow-up, 175 patients (84.95%) were alive. Twelve patients (5.83%) had died of the disease due to distant metastases. Fifteen patients (7.28%) developed local recurrences of scrotal EMPD. Ki67 expression was significantly elevated in patients with wide horizontal invasion (P = 0.003). In univariate analysis, high invasion level, presence of nodule, presence of lymphovascular invasion, adnexa invasion, lymph node metastasis and high p53 expression were significant factors for poor cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, high p53 expression was significantly correlated with poor cancer-specific survival. Wide horizontal invasion was independently correlated with local recurrence-free survival of scrotal EMPD. In conclusion, wide horizontal invasion is an independent risk factor for local recurrence-free survival in the patients with scrotal EMPD. PMID:28322288

  1. Prevalence of local recurrence of colorectal cancer at the Iranian Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omranipour, Ramesh; Mahmoodzadeh, Habibollah; Safavi, Farinaz

    2014-01-01

    Although a great deal of progress has been made in the management of colorectal cancer in terms of neoadjuvant modalities, surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies, the recurrence of tumors remains an enigmatic complication in patients. A better understanding of colorectal cancer and of factors that lead to recurrence of disease can provide helpful information for designing more effective screening and surveillance methods. To investigate the factors that may lead to local recurrence of colorectal cancers. The current retrospective case study evaluated 617 patients admitted to the Iranian Cancer Institute (the largest referral cancer center in the country) from 1995 to 2009 with confirmed colorectal cancer. Patients with distant metastasis, or with pathology other than adenocarcinoma and no follow-up, were excluded (175 patients). The remainder (442) included 294 (66.5%) with rectal cancer and 148 (33.5%) with colon cancer. The median duration of follow-up was 26 months. The total rate of recurrence was 17.4%, comprising 19.6% and 16.3% recurrence rates in colon and rectal cancer, respectively. Recurrence of colorectal cancer was significantly correlated to tumor grade (p<0.008).

  2. Advanced Imaging for the Early Diagnosis of Local Recurrence Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Panebianco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa after radical prostatectomy (RT is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  3. Advanced imaging for the early diagnosis of local recurrence prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Musio, Daniela; De Felice, Francesca; Proietti, Camilla; Indino, Elena Lucia; Megna, Valentina; Schillaci, Orazio; Catalano, Carlo; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa) after radical prostatectomy (RT) is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  4. EGFR, CD10 and proliferation marker Ki67 expression in ameloblastoma: possible role in local recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aziz Azza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic neoplasm characterized by local invasiveness and tendency towards recurrence. Aims Studying the role played by EGFR, CD10 and Ki67 in the recurrence of ameloblastoma. Methods This study was carried out on 22 retrospective cases of mandibular ameloblastoma from the period from Jan 2002 to Jan 2008 with follow up period until Jan 2011 (3 to 8 years follow up peroid. Archival materials were obtained from pathology department, Mansoura university. Paraffin sections of tumor tissue from all cases were submitted for routine H&E stains and immunohistochemistry using EGFR, CD10 and Ki67 monoclonal antibodies. Statistical analysis using of clinical data for all patients, tumor type, EGFR, CD10 and Ki67 expression in relation to recurrence were evaluated. Results Among the 22 cases, 10 cases were males and 12 were females with sex ratio 1:1.2. Age ranged from 34 to 59 years old with a mean age 44.18 year. Five cases showed local recurrence within studied period and proved by biopsy. No statistically significant relation was found between local recurrence and patient age, tumor size, tumor type, EGFR expression. There was a significant relation between CD10 expression as well as Ki67 labelling index and recurrence (P value = 0.003, 0.000 respectively. Conclusion Evaluation of CD10 and Ki67 status together with conventional histological evaluation can help in providing more information about the biologic behavior of the tumor, while EGFR could be a target of an expanding class of anticancer therapies. Since ameloblastomas are EGFR-positive tumors, anti-EGFR agents could be considered to reduce the size of large tumors and to treat unresectable tumors that are in close proximity to vital structures. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1902106905645651

  5. Re-irradiation with cetuximab or cisplatin-based chemotherapy for recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornoff, Nicolas; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Franz [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Ghanaati, Shahram [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Atefeh, Nateghian; Roedel, Claus; Balermpas, Panagiotis [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site: Frankfurt, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Locoregional recurrence remains the main pattern of failure after primary combined modality treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We compared the efficacy and toxicity of either cisplatin or cetuximab in combination with re-irradiation (ReRT) for recurrent unresectable SCCHN. Various clinicopathological factors were investigated to establish a prognostic score. Between 2007 and 2014, 66 patients with recurrent SCCHN originating in a previously irradiated area received cetuximab (n = 33) or cisplatin-based chemotherapy (n = 33) concomitant with ReRT. Toxicity was evaluated weekly and at every follow-up visit. Physical examination, endoscopy, CT or MRI scans were used to evaluate response and disease control. With a mean follow-up of 18.3 months, the 1-year overall survival (OS) rates for Re-RT with cetuximab and cisplatin-based chemotherapy were 44.4 and 45.5 % (p = 0.352), respectively. At 1 year, local control rates (LCR) were 46.4 and 54.2 % (p = 0.625), freedom from metastases (FFM) rates 73.6 and 81 % (p = 0.842), respectively. Haematological toxicity ≥ grade 3 occurred more often in the cisplatin group (p < 0.001), pain ≥ grade 3 was increased in the cetuximab group (p = 0.034). A physiological haemoglobin level and a longer interval between primary RT and ReRT, proved to be significant prognostic factors for OS (multivariate: p = 0.003, p = 0.002, respectively). Site of the recurrence and gross target volume (GTV) did not show a significant impact on OS in multivariate analysis (p = 0.160, p = 0.167, respectively). A prognostic-score (1-4 points) based on these four variables identified significantly different subgroups: 1-year OS for 0/1/2/3/4 prognostic points: 10, 38, 76, 80 and 100 %, respectively (p < 0.001). Both cetuximab- and cisplatin-based ReRT of SCCHN recurrences are feasible and effective treatment options with comparable results in terms of tumour control and survival. Acute adverse events may differ slightly

  6. Preliminary Testing of a Patient-Reported Outcome Measure for Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Leanne K; Deng, Jie; Ridner, Sheila H; Gilbert, Jill; Dietrich, Mary S; Murphy, Barbara A

    2016-05-01

    We describe development and preliminary testing of Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey-Recurrent/Metastatic (VHNSS-RM) to assess residual symptoms, tumor-related symptoms, and side effects from therapy. Items were identified through patient and provider interviews. Card sort selected high-yield and high-impact items. The VHNSS-RM was administered to 50 patients with recurrent/metastatic head and neck cancer (RMHNC). The VHNSS-RM includes 12 unique symptoms (diet change, tongue movement affecting speech/swallowing, face/neck swelling, neck/jaw cramping, bad breath, drooling, wound drainage/pain/odor, nasal congestion/drainage, eyes watering, face/tongue/ear/scalp numbness, headaches, and confusion) and 7 unique psychosocial issues (burden to family/friends, lost independence, fear, embarrassment, mood swings, stress, and boredom). The VHNSS-RM contains 35 physical and 12 psychosocial issues. The VHNSS-RM is feasible and not overly burdensome. Nineteen unique items may improve palliation to patients with RMHNC. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Training Manual for Local Head Start Staff. Part IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Carol; And Others

    This manual is the fourth in a set of training manuals for Head Start staff. It contains descriptions of workshop modules on the topics of (1) language development in children, (2) creativity in children, (3) the Individualized Education Program (IEP), (4) building self-esteem in families, (5) family development, (6) effective communication, and…

  8. Desmoid-type fibromatosis-associated Gardner fibromas: prevalence and impact on local recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Justin M M; Stricker, Thomas P; Sturgeon, Duveen; Coffin, Cheryl M

    2014-10-28

    Although Gardner fibroma is a precursor lesion of desmoid tumor, the prevalence and prognostic importance of Gardner fibroma associated with desmoid tumors has not been systematically studied in adults. From 129 patients with desmoid-type fibromatosis, 170 specimens were re-examined for the presence of an associated Gardner fibroma. Clinicopathologic features of Gardner fibroma-associated desmoid-type fibromatosis were compared to desmoid tumors without associated Gardner fibroma. Recurrence-free survival was compared using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression to account for known confounding factors. Of 104 evaluable primary desmoid tumor resections, 25 (24%) had an associated Gardner fibroma. When previous incisional biopsies and resection specimens of locally recurrent desmoid tumors were also examined, the overall prevalence of associated Gardner fibroma was 37%. Desmoid tumors arising in high risk anatomic sites (extremities or deep soft tissues of the back and chest wall) were more often associated with Gardner fibroma than tumors at other sites. Median recurrence-free survival for patients with Gardner fibroma-associated desmoid-type fibromatosis was 3.2 years, whereas median survival for patients without associated Gardner fibroma was >25 years (hazard ratio 2.8; P = 0.001). Although the presence of Gardner fibroma had no impact on the recurrence rate of desmoid tumors arising at high risk anatomic sites, associated Gardner fibroma increased the risk of recurrence 4-fold for desmoid tumors at low risk anatomic sites. Associated Gardner fibroma is under-recognized in desmoid-type fibromatosis and increases the risk of local recurrence for a subgroup of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hyperglycemia and prostate cancer recurrence in men treated for localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jonathan L; Plymate, Stephen R.; Porter, Michael P; Gore, John L; Lin, Dan W; Hu, Elaine; Zeliadt, Steven B

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is consistently linked with prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence and mortality although the mechanism is unknown. Impaired glucose regulation, which is common among obese individuals, has been hypothesized as a potential mechanism for PCa tumor growth. In this study we explore the relationship between serum glucose at time of treatment and risk of PCa recurrence following initial therapy. Methods The study group was comprised of 1,734 men treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiation therapy (RT) for localized PCa between 2001–2010. Serum glucose levels closest to date of diagnosis were determined. PCa recurrence was determined based on PSA progression (nadir PSA + 2 for RT; PSA ≥ 0.2 for RP) or secondary therapy. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to determine whether glucose level was associated with BCR after adjusting for age, race, BMI, comorbidity, diagnosis of diabetes, Gleason Sum, PSA, treatment, and treatment year. Results Recurrence was identified in 16% of men over a mean follow-up period 41 months (range 1 – 121 months). Those with elevated glucose (≥ 100 mg/dL) had a 50% increased risk of recurrence (HR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1–2.0) compared to those with a normal glucose level (< 100 mg/dL). This effect was seen in both those undergoing RP (HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0–3.6) and those treated with RT (HR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0–2.0). Conclusion Glucose levels at the time of PCa diagnosis are an independent predictor of PCa recurrence for men undergoing treatment for localized disease. PMID:23459096

  10. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Cancer Risk, Tumor Recurrence, or Survival of Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Cederblad, Lena; Andersson, Bengt-Åke; Olin, Mattias; Nilsson, Mats; Rutqvist, Lars Erik; Lundgren, Jan; Engström, Mats; Tytor, Wieslaw; Löfgren, Sture; Lewin, Freddi

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at studying the influence of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on cancer risk, tumor recurrence, and survival in head and neck (H&N) cancer patients. A total of 45 SNPs in 41 genes were investigated. A total of 174 Caucasian H&N cancer patients and 245 healthy blood donors were enrolled in the study. Ten SNPs were associated with H&N cancer risk, but the identified SNPs differed among males and females. Some of the SNPs were related to immune response genes. The immune response gene SNPs were also related to survival. In particular, we noted that the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) rs1800629 could have an influence on cancer risk, tumor recurrence as well as survival. Genetic variation of the TNFα rs1800629 might be useful as a biomarker in clinical decision-making since it was found to be related to cancer risk, tumor recurrence, and survival of H&N cancer patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  12. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation and Carboplatin Followed By Chemoradiation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-22

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging for localization of prostate cancer in the setting of biochemical recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Colarieti, Anna; Salvo, Vincenzo; Cardone, Gianpiero; Catalano, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    The clinical suspicion of local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical treatment is based on the onset of biochemical failure. The use of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer has increased over recent years, mainly for detection, staging, and active surveillance. However, suspicion of recurrence in the set of biochemical failure is becoming a significant reason for clinicians to request multiparametric MRI. Radiologists should be able to recognize the normal posttreatment MRI findings. Fibrosis and atrophic remnant seminal vesicles (SV) after radical prostatectomy are often found and must be differentiated from local relapse. Moreover, brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, and focal therapies tend to diffusely decrease the signal intensity of the peripheral zone on T2-weighted images due to the loss of water content, consequently mimicking tumor and hemorrhage. The combination of T2-weighted images and functional studies like diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging improves the identification of local relapse. Tumor recurrence tends to restrict on diffusion images and avidly enhances after contrast administration. The authors provide a review of the normal findings and the signs of local tumor relapse after radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy and focal therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Photodynamic therapy trials with lutetium texaphyrin (Lu-Tex) in patients with locally recurrent breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Yuen, Alan R.; Panella, Timothy J.; Wieman, Thomas J.; Dougherty, Shona; Esserman, Laura; Panjehpour, Masoud; Taber, Scott W.; Fingar, Victor H.; Lowe, Elizabeth; Engel, Julie S.; Lum, Bert; Woodburn, Kathryn W.; Cheong, Wai-Fung; Miller, Richard A.

    1998-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of locally recurrent breast cancer has been limited to treatment of small lesions because of non- selective necrosis of adjacent normal tissues in the treatment field. Lutetium Texaphyrin (PCI-0123, Lu-Tex) is a photosensitizer with improved tumor localization that is activated by 732 nm light, which can penetrate through larger tumors. We have evaluated Lu-Tex in a Phase I trial and in an ongoing Phase II trial in women with locally recurrent breast cancer with large tumors who have failed radiation therapy. Patients received Lu-Tex intravenously by rapid infusion 3 hours before illumination of cutaneous or subcutaneous lesions. In Phase I, Lu-Tex doses were escalated from 0.6 to 7.2 mg/kg in 7 cohorts. Sixteen patients with locally recurrent breast cancer lesions were treated. Dose limiting toxicities above 5.5 mg/kg were pain in the treatment field during therapy, and dysesthesias in light exposed areas. No necrosis of normal tissues in the treated field was noticed. Responses were observed in 60% of evaluable patients [n equals 15, 27% complete remission (CR), 33% partial remission (PR)], with 63% of lesions responding (n equals 73: 45% CR, 18% PR). In Phase II, 25 patients have been studied to date, receiving two treatments ranging from 1.0 to 3.0 mg/kg at a 21 day interval. Treatment fields up to 480 cm2 in size were treated successfully and activity has been observed. Patients have experienced pain at the treatment site but no tissue necrosis. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of Lu-Tex PDT to large chest wall areas in women who have failed radiation therapy for the treatment of locally recurrent breast cancer. Treatment conditions are currently being optimized in the ongoing Phase II trials.

  15. Local treatment of oligometastatic recurrence in patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Tokujiro; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Haro, Akira; Fukuyama, Seiichi; Yoshida, Tsukihisa; Kohno, Mikihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-12-01

    We previously reported a retrospective study indicating the prognostic impact of the local treatment of oligometastatic recurrence after a complete resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present study, we prospectively observed postoperative oligometastatic patients and investigated the effects of local treatment on progression-free survival (PFS). Using a prospectively maintained database of patients with completely resected NSCLC treated between October 2007 and December 2011, we identified 52 consecutive patients with postoperative recurrence, excluding second primary lung cancer. Of these patients, 31 suffering from distant metastases alone without primary site recurrence were included in this study. According to the definition of 'oligometastases' as a limited number of distant metastases ranging from one to three, 17 patients had oligometastatic disease. Of those 17 patients, four patients with only brain metastasis were excluded from the analysis. The oligometastatic sites included the lungs in five patients, bone in four patients, the lungs and brain in two patients, the adrenal glands in one patient and soft tissue in one patient. Eleven of the 13 patients first received local treatment. Three patients (lung, adrenal gland, soft tissue) underwent surgical resection, and the remaining eight patients received radiotherapy. The median PFS was 20 months in the oligometastatic patients who received local treatment. There were five patients with a PFS of longer than two years. The metastatic sites in these patients varied, and one patient had three lesions. On the other hand, the two remaining patients first received a systemic chemotherapy of their own selection. The PFS of these two patients was five and 15 months, respectively. Local therapy is a choice for first-line treatment in patients with postoperative oligometastatic recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Locally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer after complete surgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, E G; Brindle, J S; Creagan, E T; Foote, R L; Trastek, V F; Buskirk, S J

    1992-12-01

    Between Jan. 1, 1976, and Dec. 31, 1985, at our institution, 37 patients who had undergone prior complete surgical resection of non-small-cell lung cancer received definitive thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) for locally recurrent disease. Of the 37 recurrences, 33 were in the pulmonary parenchyma or the hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular lymph nodes; the other 4 were in the chest wall. The initial stage of disease was I in 43%, II in 35%, and IIIA in 19%, whereas at the time of local recurrence, the stage was I in 8%, II in 11%, IIIA in 57%, IIIB in 22%, and IV in 3% (this patient had multiple pulmonary nodules encompassible within a single TRT field). The locally recurrent lesions were squamous cell carcinoma in 30%, adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma in 46%, mixed types in 5%, and unknown type in 19%. All patients received megavoltage TRT, most often 4,000 cGy in 10 fractions administered in a split-course schedule. In addition, 15 patients received multiagent chemotherapy, usually a combination of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cisplatin or a regimen that included these drugs. The 2-year and 5-year survivals were 30% and 4%, respectively, and the median duration of survival was 13.7 months. Survival was not improved by the addition of chemotherapy. Approximately half of the patients had radiographic and symptomatic responses after TRT. Of 33 patients assessable for post-TRT patterns of failure, 46% had local failure only, 18% had local plus systemic failure, and 32% had systemic failure only. Two-thirds of the patients died as a direct consequence of progressive chest disease, despite receiving TRT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. FOXP3 Subcellular Localization Predicts Recurrence in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Donald T.; Walker, Gail; De La Fuente, Adriana C.; Nazarian, Ronen; Vella, Jennifer L.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen R.; Serafini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) expression in tumor infiltrating CD4+T cells is generally associated with an intrinsic capacity to suppress tumor immunity. Based on this notion, different studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this maker in cancer but contradictory results have been found. Indeed, even within the same cancer population, the presence of CD4+FOXP3+T cells has been associated,with either a poor or a good prognosis, or no correlation has beenfound. Here, we demonstrate,in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), that what really represents a prognostic parameter is not the overall expression of FOXP3 but its intracellular localization.While overallFOXP3 expression in tumor infiltrating CD4+T cells does not correlate with tumor recurrence, its intracellular localization within the CD4 cells does: nuclear FOXP3 (nFOXP3) is associated with tumor recurrence within 3 years, while cytoplasmicFOXP3 (cFOXP3) is associated with a lower likelihood of recurrence. Thus, we propose elevated levels of the cFOXP3/nFOXP3 ratio within tumor infiltrating CD4+ T cells as a predictor of OSCC recurrence. PMID:23977174

  18. Prediction of margin involvement and local recurrence after skin-sparing and simple mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Himdani, S; Timbrell, S; Tan, K T; Morris, J; Bundred, N J

    2016-07-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) facilitates immediate breast reconstruction. We investigated locoregional recurrence rates after SSM compared with simple mastectomy and the factors predicting oncological failure. Patients with early breast cancer that underwent mastectomy between 2000 and 2005 at a single institution were studied to ascertain local and systemic recurrence rates between groups. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank test were used to evaluate disease-free survival. Patients (n = 577) underwent simple mastectomy (80%) or SSM (20%). Median follow up was 80 months. Patients undergoing SSM were of younger average age, less often had involved lymph nodes (22% vs 44%, p mastectomy respectively (p = 0.35). Predictors of locoregional recurrence were lymph node involvement (HR 8.0, for >4 nodes, p mastectomy radiotherapy. Re-excision of involved margins is essential to prevent local recurrence after mastectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ the Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  19. Loss of TIMP-1 immune expression and tumor recurrence in localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Thalita dos Reis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Overexpression of MMPs has been related to biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. TIMP1 and TIMP2 are controllers of MMPs and the aim of this study is to evaluate the expression levels of MMPs and their regulators using immunohistochemistry in tissue microarray of localized prostate cancer (PC. Materials and Methods: Immune-expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, TIMP1, TIMP-2, MMP-14 and IL8, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in radical prostatectomy specimens of 40 patients with localized PC who underwent surgery between September 1997 and February 2000. Protein expression was considered as categorical variables, negative or positive. The results of the immune-expression were correlated to Gleason score (GS, pathological stage (TNM, pre-operatory PSA serum levels and biochemical recurrence in a mean follow up period of 92.5 months. Results: The loss of TIMP1 immune-expression was related to biochemical recurrence. When TIMP1 was negative, 56.3% patients recurred versus 22.2% of those whose TIMP1 was positive (p=0.042. MMP-9, MMP-2, IL8 and MMP-14 were positive in the majority of PC. TIMP-2 was negative in all cases. Conclusion: Negative immune-expression of TIMP1 is correlated with biochemical recurrence in patients with PC possibly by failing to control MMP-9, an important MMP related to cancer progression.

  20. Do recurrent seizure-related head injuries affect seizures in people with epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, David E.; Chiang, Sharon; Tobias, Ronnie S.

    2015-01-01

    Seizure-related head injuries (SRHIs) are among the most commonly encountered injuries in people with epilepsy (PWE). Whether head injury has an effect on preexisting epilepsy is not known. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess for any possible effects of SRHIs on seizure frequency and seizure semiology over a 2-year period. We identified 204 patients who have been followed at the Baylor Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from 2008 to 2010. SRHI occurred in 18.1% of the cohort. Most injuries (91%) were classified as mild. Though seizure frequency varied following head injury, overall seizure frequency was not significantly impacted by presence or absence of SRHI over the 2-year study period. Changes in seizure semiology were not observed in those with SRHIs. Although mild SRHI is common among PWE, it does not appear to have an effect on seizure characteristics over a relatively short period. PMID:22227592

  1. Toward four-dimensional image-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally recurrent endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokdal, Lars; Ørtoft, Gitte; Hansen, Estrid S; Røhl, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate clinical outcome and feasibility of a four-dimensional image-guided adaptive brachytherapy concept in patients with locally recurrent endometrial cancer. Forty-three patients with locally recurrent endometrial cancer were included. Treatment consisted of conformal external beam radiotherapy followed by a boost using pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (BT). Large tumors were treated with MRI-guided interstitial BT. Small tumors were treated with CT-guided intracavitary BT. The planning aim (total external beam radiotherapy and BT) for high-risk clinical target volume was D90 > 80 Gy, whereas constraints for organs at risk were D2cc ≤ 90 Gy for bladder and D2cc ≤ 70 Gy for rectum, sigmoid, and bowel in terms of equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions. Median high-risk clinical target volume was 18 cm(3) (range, 0-91). D90 was 82 Gy (range, 77-88). D2cc to bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 67 Gy (range, 50-81), 67 Gy (range, 51-77), and 55 Gy (range, 44-68), respectively. Median followup was 30 months (6-88). Two-year local control rate was 92% (standard error [SE], 5). Disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate was 59% (SE, 8) and 78% (SE, 7), respectively. Patients with low- to intermediate-risk for recurrence had a 2-year disease-free survival rate of 72% (SE, 9) compared with 42% (SE, 12) in patients with high risk for recurrence (p = 0.04). Late morbidity Grade 3 was recorded in 5 (12%) patients. Four-dimensional image-guided adaptive brachytherapy is feasible in locally recurrent endometrial cancer. Local control rate is good. Systemic control remains a problem in patients with high risk for recurrence. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Injectable bulking agents for urinary incontinence after radical prostaectomy, mimicking local recurrence: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Je Hong; Ahn, Sung Eun; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Park, Seong Jin; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Sun Ju [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Periurethral bulking agent injection (or transurethral submucosal injection) is a comparatively less invasive procedure for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in patients who develop incontinence after radical prostatectomy, and who are more frequently being treated with transurethral submucosal injection. However, as the radiologic findings of bulking agents are not very well known, they can be mistaken for local recurrence in prostate cancer patients who have undergone prostatectomy. Unlike some of the literatures, in which the radiologic features of collagen injections have been reported, the radiologic findings of silicone injections are yet to be determined. Thus, it is our intention to report this case along with the literature review as the authors have experienced an actual case of a silicone injection mistaken as local recurrence.

  3. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  4. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikaya, V. V., E-mail: viktoria.v.v@inbox.ru; Startseva, Zh. A., E-mail: zhanna.alex@rambler.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Musabaeva, L. I., E-mail: musabaevaLI@oncology.tomsk.ru; Lisin, V. A., E-mail: Lisin@oncology.tomsk.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  5. Reirradiation With Cetuximab in Locoregional Recurrent and Inoperable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Feasibility and First Efficacy Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Keller, Christian [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hambek, Markus; Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Department of Oral Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Roedel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Weiss, Christian, E-mail: christian.weiss@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with a prospective protocol of external beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable, recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: Between August 2008 and June 2010, 18 patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were enrolled. Acute and late toxicity from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT and every 3 months thereafter. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after completion of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 9.4 (range: 3.85-31.7) months and for patients alive 30.4 (range: 15.7-31.7) months. Acute toxicity was generally mild or moderate. Five patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. Late toxicity occurred as grade 3 trismus in five and as grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation in one patient, respectively. Overall response rate was 47%. Median overall and progression-free survival for all patients was 8.38 months and 7.33 months, respectively. The overall survival rate was 44% at 1 year, with a 1 year local control rate of 33%. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of our preliminary data Re-RT combined with cetuximab for recurrent and inoperable SCCHN is feasible and the integration of newer targeted agents seems to be less toxic compared to conventional chemotherapy with encouraging response rates at least for a subset of patients.

  6. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis, E-mail: acapellizzon@hcancer.org.br [A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia

    2016-05-15

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. (author)

  7. Intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with local recurrence, lung metastases and death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendi, Tuba Karaguelle [Integra MR Imaging Center, Tahran Cad., No. 38, Kavaklidere, Ankara (Turkey); Center for MR Research, University of Minnesota, 2021 6th Street SE, MN 55455, Minneapolis (United States); Erakar, Aziz; Yildiz, H.Yusuf [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ankara University School of Medicine, 06100, Ankara (Turkey); Saglik, Yener; Erekul, Selim [Department of Pathology, Ankara University School of Medicine, 06100, Ankara (Turkey)

    2004-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is almost always seen in soft tissue. Skeletal involvement by MPNST is uncommon and usually results from secondary invasion. Primary MPNSTs are exceptionally rare. We report a surgically proven case of intraosseous MPNST, with local recurrence and lung metastasis during follow-up. The imaging and histological features of the case are described and the literature on the subject briefly reviewed. (orig.)

  8. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  9. Non-Minimum Phase Nonlinear System Predictive Control Based on Local Recurrent Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张燕; 陈增强; 袁著祉

    2003-01-01

    After a recursive multi-step-ahead predictor for nonlinear systems based on local recurrent neural networks is introduced, an intelligent PID controller is adopted to correct the errors including identified model errors and accumulated errors produced in the recursive process. Characterized by predictive control, this method can achieve a good control accuracy and has good robustness. A simulation study shows that this control algorithm is very effective.

  10. Effects of Preoperative Biopsies on Recurrence in Head and Neck Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Eun Jung; Dong Kyun Rah; Yong Oock Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background Skin cancer is the most common malignant tumor in humans. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the two most common types of skin cancers. When skin cancer is clinically suspected, preoperative biopsies are recommended for a definite diagnosis. However, despite a concern over potential increased risk of metastasis associated with mechanical manipulation, there have been few investigations into whether a preoperative biopsy affected the recurrence of BCC a...

  11. Evaluation of contrast-enhanced computed tomographic colonography in detection of local recurrent colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yau-Tong You; Chung-Rong Chang Chien; Jeng-Yi Wang; Koon-Kwan Ng; Jinn-Shiun Chen; Reiping Tang; Jy-Ming Chiang; Chien-Yuh Yeh; Pao-Shiu Hsieh

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity,specificity of contrast-enhanced computed tomographic colonography in detecting local recurrence of colorectal cancer.METHODS: From January 2000 to December 2004,434 patients after potentially curative resection for invasive colorectal cancer were followed up for a period ranging from 20 to 55 mo. Eighty of the four hundred and thirty-four patients showing strong clinical evidence for recurring colorectal cancer during the last followup were enrolled in this study. Each patient underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic colonography and colonoscopy on the same day. Any lesions, biopsies,identified during the colonoscopic examination, immediate complications and the duration of the procedure were recorded. The results of contrast-enhanced computed tomographic colonography were evaluated by comparing to those of colonoscopy, surgical finding, and clinical follow-up.RESULTS: Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic colonography had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 83% and an overall accuracy of 94% in detecting local recurrent colorectal cancer.CONCLUSION: Conventional colonoscopy and contrastenhanced tomographic colonography can complement each other in detecting local recurrence of colorectal cancer.

  12. Prognostic significance of local recurrence in breast cancer after postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunst, J.; Steil, B.; Furch, S.; Fach, A.; Diestelhorst, A.; Richter, C. [Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Lautenschlaeger, C. [Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany). Dept. of Biometry; Lampe, D.; Koelbl, H. [Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany). Dept. of Gynecology

    2001-10-01

    Purpose: We have retrospectively analyzed the impact of local recurrence in patients with adjuvant radiation therapy after mastectomy for breast cancer. Patients and Methods: From January 1985 through December 1993, 959 patients were irradiated after mastectomy for breast cancer. The age ranged from 34 to 79 years, the median follow-up was 3.1 years (range; 0.3-12.2 years). 368 (38%) were pre- and 591 (62%) postmenopausal. 35% had T3-4 tumors, 62% had axillary lymph node involvement, and 66% received additional systemic hormonal and/or cytotoxic therapy. Postmastectomy radiotherapy was administered in case of positive axillary nodes and in high-risk pN0-patients. The chest wall and lymphatics (axilla, parasternal and supraclavicular nodes) were irradiated with an anterior photon field with 50 Gy and the chest wall with an electron field with 44 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Results: The overall survival was 70.5% after 5 and 59.8% after 10 years. 53 patients (5.5%) developed a locoregional recurrence 2-96 months after treatment (median 26 months). The local control rate was 92.7% after 5 and 86.4% after 10 years. Axillary lymph node involvement was the most important and (in a multivariate analysis the only) risk factor for local recurrence (p=0.0001). Patients with local control had a significantly better 10-year distant-disease-free survival and overall survival as compared to patients with local recurrence (44.5% vs 15.4%, p=0.002 and 62.1% vs 34.8%, p=0.004). Local recurrence increased the risk of death by a factor of 1.7 and in a Cox regression model, axillary lymph node status, T-category and local recurrence were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. In patients with local recurrence, the initial axillary lymph node status was the most important prognostic factor for survival after local recurrence. The 3-year survival after local relapse was 86% for patients with pN0 status vs 27% in with positive axillary nodes (p=0.025). Conclusions: Local

  13. Sound localization with head movement: implications for 3-d audio displays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ian McAnally

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the accuracy of sound localization is improved if listeners are allowed to move their heads during signal presentation. This study describes the function relating localization accuracy to the extent of head movement in azimuth. Sounds that are difficult to localize were presented in the free field from sources at a wide range of azimuths and elevations. Sounds remained active until the participants’ heads had rotated through windows ranging in width of 2°, 4°, 8°, 16°, 32°, or 64° of azimuth. Error in determining sound-source elevation and the rate of front/back confusion were found to decrease with increases in azimuth window width. Error in determining sound-source lateral angle was not found to vary with azimuth window width. Implications for 3-d audio displays: The utility of a 3-d audio display for imparting spatial information is likely to be improved if operators are able to move their heads during signal presentation. Head movement may compensate in part for a paucity of spectral cues to sound-source location resulting from limitations in either the audio signals presented or the directional filters (i.e., head-related transfer functions used to generate a display. However, head movements of a moderate size (i.e., through around 32° of azimuth may be required to ensure that spatial information is conveyed with high accuracy.

  14. Effects of resection margins on local recurrence of osteosarcoma in extremity and pelvis: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fangzhou; Zhang, Weibin; Shen, Yuhui; Yu, Pei; Bao, Qiyuan; Wen, Junxiang; Hu, Chuanzhen; Qiu, Shijing

    2016-12-01

    There are conflicting findings about the effect of resection margins on local recurrence in osteosarcoma after surgery. In this meta-analysis, we examined the association between local recurrence and resection margins for osteosarcoma in extremity and pelvis. EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane CENTRAL were searched from January 1980 to July 2016. The quality of included studies was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of local recurrence were estimated, respectively, for inadequate vs adequate margins and marginal vs wide margins using a random-effect model. Chi-square test was performed to comparing the local recurrence rate between extremity and pelvic osteosarcomas with an identical surgical margin. Thirteen articles involving 1559 patients (175 with and 1384 without local recurrence) were included in this study. The meta-analysis showed that the osteosarcoma resected with inadequate and marginal margins, whether in extremity or in pelvis, were associated with a significantly higher local recurrence rate than the osteosarcoma resected with adequate and wide margins, respectively. Chi-square test showed that, when pelvic and extremity osteosarcomas were removed with an identical resection margin, the local recurrence was significantly more frequent in pelvis osteosarcoma than in extremity osteosarcoma. This study provides level IIa evidence to support that the surgery with adequate or wide resection margin has positive effect on reducing the risk of local recurrence in osteosarcoma. In addition, the factors independent of resection margin are more likely to increase the risk of local recurrence in pelvic osteosarcoma. Level IIa, Therapeutic study. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of Local Cancer Recurrence After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Physician Performance Versus Radiomic Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A; Palma, David A; Johnson, Carol; Louie, Alexander V; Landis, Mark; Rodrigues, George; Chan, Ian; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Yeung, Timothy P C; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D

    2016-04-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is a guideline-specified treatment option for early-stage lung cancer. However, significant posttreatment fibrosis can occur and obfuscate the detection of local recurrence. The goal of this study was to assess physician ability to detect timely local recurrence and to compare physician performance with a radiomics tool. Posttreatment computed tomography (CT) scans (n=182) from 45 patients treated with SABR (15 with local recurrence matched to 30 with no local recurrence) were used to measure physician and radiomic performance in assessing response. Scans were individually scored by 3 thoracic radiation oncologists and 3 thoracic radiologists, all of whom were blinded to clinical outcomes. Radiomic features were extracted from the same images. Performances of the physician assessors and the radiomics signature were compared. When taking into account all CT scans during the whole follow-up period, median sensitivity for physician assessment of local recurrence was 83% (range, 67%-100%), and specificity was 75% (range, 67%-87%), with only moderate interobserver agreement (κ = 0.54) and a median time to detection of recurrence of 15.5 months. When determining the early prediction of recurrence within recurrence, with a mean error of 35%, false positive rate (FPR) of 1%, and false negative rate (FNR) of 99%. At the same time point, a radiomic signature consisting of 5 image-appearance features demonstrated excellent discrimination, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.85, classification error of 24%, FPR of 24%, and FNR of 23%. These results suggest that radiomics can detect early changes associated with local recurrence that are not typically considered by physicians. This decision support system could potentially allow for early salvage therapy of patients with local recurrence after SABR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in the Management of Locally Recurrent Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Tinkle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the efficacy and morbidity of limb-sparing surgery with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT for patients with locally recurrent extremity soft tissue sarcoma (ESTS. Methods and Materials. Twenty-six consecutively treated patients were identified in a single institution retrospective analysis of patients with locally recurrent ESTS treated with IORT following salvage limb-sparing resection from May 2000 to July 2011. Fifteen (58% patients received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT prior to recurrence (median dose 63 Gy, while 11 (42% patients received EBRT following IORT (median dose 52 Gy. The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was used to estimate disease control and survival and subsets were compared using a log rank statistic, Cox’s regression model was used to determine independent predictors of disease outcome, and toxicity was reported according to CTCAE v4.0 guidelines. Results. With a median duration of follow-up from surgery and IORT of 34.9 months (range: 4 to 139 mos., 10 patients developed a local recurrence with 4 subsequently undergoing amputation. The 5-year estimate for local control (LC was 58% (95% CI: 36–75%, for amputation-free was 81% (95% CI: 57–93%, for metastasis-free control (MFC was 56% (95% CI: 31–75%, for disease-free survival (DFS was 35% (95% CI: 17–54%, and for overall survival (OS was 50% (95% CI: 24–71%. Prior EBRT did not appear to influence disease control (LC, p=0.74; MFC, p=0.66 or survival (DFS, p=0.16; OS, p=0.58. Grade 3 or higher acute and late toxicities were reported for 6 (23% and 8 (31% patients, respectively. The frequency of both acute and late grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred equally between patients who received EBRT prior to or after IORT. Conclusions. IORT in combination with oncologic resection of recurrent ESTS yields good rates of local control and limb-salvage with acceptable morbidity. Within the limitations of small subsets, these data suggest

  17. CPAFFC President Li Xiaolin Heads Chinese Local Government Delegation to Kenya and Senegal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Qian; Tang; Ruimin

    2013-01-01

    <正>A Chinese local government delegation headed by CPAFFC President Li Xiaolin paid a friendly visit to Kenya and Senegal from November 29 to December 7,2012,at the invitation of the Kenya Local Government Association and the President of the Republic of Senegal.The

  18. Characterization of local complex structures in a recurrence plot to improve nonlinear dynamic discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Structures in recurrence plots (RPs), preserving the rich information of nonlinear invariants and trajectory characteristics, have been increasingly analyzed in dynamic discrimination studies. The conventional analysis of RPs is mainly focused on quantifying the overall diagonal and vertical line structures through a method, called recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). This study extensively explores the information in RPs by quantifying local complex RP structures. To do this, an approach was developed to analyze the combination of three major RQA variables: determinism, laminarity, and recurrence rate (DLR) in a metawindow moving over a RP. It was then evaluated in two experiments discriminating (1) ideal nonlinear dynamic series emulated from the Lorenz system with different control parameters and (2) data sets of human heart rate regulations with normal sinus rhythms (n = 18) and congestive heart failure (n = 29). Finally, the DLR was compared with seven major RQA variables in terms of discriminatory power, measured by standardized mean difference (DSMD). In the two experiments, DLR resulted in the highest discriminatory power with DSMD = 2.53 and 0.98, respectively, which were 7.41 and 2.09 times the best performance from RQA. The study also revealed that the optimal RP structures for the discriminations were neither typical diagonal structures nor vertical structures. These findings indicate that local complex RP structures contain some rich information unexploited by RQA. Therefore, future research to extensively analyze complex RP structures would potentially improve the effectiveness of the RP analysis in dynamic discrimination studies.

  19. Characterization of local complex structures in a recurrence plot to improve nonlinear dynamic discriminant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Structures in recurrence plots (RPs), preserving the rich information of nonlinear invariants and trajectory characteristics, have been increasingly analyzed in dynamic discrimination studies. The conventional analysis of RPs is mainly focused on quantifying the overall diagonal and vertical line structures through a method, called recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). This study extensively explores the information in RPs by quantifying local complex RP structures. To do this, an approach was developed to analyze the combination of three major RQA variables: determinism, laminarity, and recurrence rate (DLR) in a metawindow moving over a RP. It was then evaluated in two experiments discriminating (1) ideal nonlinear dynamic series emulated from the Lorenz system with different control parameters and (2) data sets of human heart rate regulations with normal sinus rhythms (n = 18) and congestive heart failure (n = 29). Finally, the DLR was compared with seven major RQA variables in terms of discriminatory power, measured by standardized mean difference (DSMD). In the two experiments, DLR resulted in the highest discriminatory power with DSMD = 2.53 and 0.98, respectively, which were 7.41 and 2.09 times the best performance from RQA. The study also revealed that the optimal RP structures for the discriminations were neither typical diagonal structures nor vertical structures. These findings indicate that local complex RP structures contain some rich information unexploited by RQA. Therefore, future research to extensively analyze complex RP structures would potentially improve the effectiveness of the RP analysis in dynamic discrimination studies.

  20. Role of blood tumor markers in predicting metastasis and local recurrence after curative resection of colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yifan; Zhai, Zhiwei; Li, Zhongmin; Wang, Lin; Gu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the prognostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA199, CA724 and CA242 in peripheral blood and local draining venous blood in colon cancer patients after curative resection. Methods: 92 colon cancer patients who received curative resection were retrospectively analyzed. The CEA, CA199, CA724 and CA242 were detected in peripheral blood and local draining venous blood. Results: Metastasis or local recurrence was found in 29 (29/92, 31.5%) patients during follow-up period. 92 patients were divided into two groups: metastasis/local recurrence group (n = 29) and non-metastasis/local recurrence group (n = 63). Peripheral venous CEA, CA199, CA724 and CA242 (p-CEA, p-CA199, p-CA724 and p-CA242) were comparable between two groups (P > 0.05). The median draining venous CEA (d-CEA) in metastases/local recurrence group (23.7 ± 6.9 ng/ml) was significantly higher than that in non-metastases/local recurrence group (18.1 ± 6.3 ng/ml; P 0.05). The optimal cut-off value of d-CEA was 2.76 ng/ml, with the sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 40% in the prediction of metastasis or local recurrence, respectively. d-CEA correlated with tumor differentiation, T stage, TNM stage, metastasis and local recurrence. Subgroup analysis showed that, of 41 patients with stage II colon cancer, the optimal cut-off value of d-CEA was 8.78 ng/mL, and the sensitivity and specificity were 87.5% and 69.7% in the prediction of metastasis or local recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: d-CEA may be a prognostic factor for stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:25785084

  1. Open source deformable image registration system for treatment planning and recurrence CT scans : Validation in the head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Brink, Carsten; Hansen, Christian Rønn; Bertelsen, Anders; Johansen, Jørgen; Grau, Cai; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2016-08-01

    Clinical application of deformable registration (DIR) of medical images remains limited due to sparse validation of DIR methods in specific situations, e. g. in case of cancer recurrences. In this study the accuracy of DIR for registration of planning CT (pCT) and recurrence CT (rCT) images of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients was evaluated. Twenty patients treated with definitive IMRT for HNSCC in 2010-2012 were included. For each patient, a pCT and an rCT scan were used. Median interval between the scans was 8.5 months. One observer manually contoured eight anatomical regions-of-interest (ROI) twice on pCT and once on rCT. pCT and rCT images were deformably registered using the open source software elastix. Mean surface distance (MSD) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between contours were used for validation of DIR. A measure for delineation uncertainty was estimated by assessing MSD from the re-delineations of the same ROI on pCT. DIR and manual contouring uncertainties were correlated with tissue volume and rigidity. MSD varied 1-3 mm for different ROIs for DIR and 1-1.5 mm for re-delineated ROIs performed on pCT. DSC for DIR varied between 0.58 and 0.79 for soft tissues and was 0.79 or higher for bony structures, and correlated with the volumes of ROIs (r = 0.5, p elastix in HNSCC on planning and recurrence CT scans is feasible; an uncertainty of the method is close to the voxel size length of the planning CT images.

  2. Long-term outcomes of ethanol injection therapy for locally recurrent papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Seok-Mo; Chang, Hojin; Kim, Bup-Woo; Lim, Chi Young; Lee, Yong Sang; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo

    2017-06-29

    The standard treatment regimen for locally recurrent lesions is total thyroidectomy, or complete removal of the recurrent thyroid lesion within the thyroid bed. However, reoperation increases the risk of complications and patients have to undergo general anesthesia. Percutaneous ethanol injection therapy represents a far less invasive procedure without general anesthesia and with lower risk of complications. Thirty-four patients who received PEIT at Yonsei University Medical Center between October 2002 and August 2009 for recurrent cervical nodal metastases of differentiated papillary thyroid cancer were included in this retrospective study. During a minimum follow-up of 60 months, treatment outcomes were determined by measuring the lesion size prior to the first injection and 3 months after the last injection. A total of 46 recurrent lesions were detected in 34 patients. Five patients underwent surgery and PEIT was administered to the remaining 19 and 22 lesions in the central compartment and lateral neck lymph nodes, respectively. Size increases were observed in seven (17.1%) lesions, whereas no changes in size and decreases were detected in 10 (24.4%) and 24 (58.5%) lesions. Patients with increased lymph nodes were significantly older (65.3 ± 14.4 vs. 48.2 ± 16.3 years; p = 0.02) and had smaller sizes (9.3 ± 1.0 vs. 12.3 ± 6.4 mm; p = 0.012). Although reoperation remains the first-line treatment for recurrent thyroid cancer, PEIT may be considered as a treatment option in selected patients with lesions larger than 1 cm who are ineligible for surgery or have refused reoperation.

  3. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rebueno, Neal C. [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin A. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Amini, Behrang [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tannir, Nizar M. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D. [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, USC Norris Cancer Hospital, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ghia, Amol J., E-mail: ajghia@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  4. Local recurrence in patients treated for rectal cancer using total mesorectal excision or transection of mesorectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojković Bobana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Rectal cancer is a major health problem throughout the world, despite the great progress in the treatment and control of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of mesorectal excision type on local recurrence in patients operated on for rectal cancer within a 3- year period. Methods. The clinical retrospective study was conducted at the Clinic for General Surgery at the Clinical Center in Niš, Serbia, and included 225 patients with rectal cancer. Postoperatively, the patients were observed 36 months. Total mesorectal excision (TME method was used in 129 (57.33% patients, and partial mesorectal excision (PME in 96 (42.66%. There were 145 (64.44% man and 80 (35.55% women, average age 66.8 years. Results. In 58 (25.77% of the patients cancer was localized in the proximal third of the rectum, in 99 (44% in the medium third, in 68 (30.22% it was 8 cm of the anocutaneous line. In 167 (74.22% patients rectal cancer was in T3 stadium. TME was performed in all the patients with cancer in the distal third of the rectum and in 61.61% of the patients with cancer in the medium third of the rectum. PME was performed in all the patients with localized cancer in the proximal third and in 38.38% of the patients with cancer in the medium third of the rectum. Local recurrence occurred in 20 (8.88% patients, 12 (9.30% in the TME group and 8 (8.33% in the PME group, which was not a statistically significant difference. In 75% of the cases, relapse occurred in the patients in T3 stage. Relapse occurred in 55% of the cases in the second year after the surgery. The median survival of all the patients amounted to 35 months. The total mortality of all respondents in a 3-year period amounted to 5.3%. Conclusion. There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of local recurrence and survival among patients who underwent TME and those underwent PME. The type of mesorectal excision does not affect the incidence of

  5. Radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as the initial treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Hachiya, Kae; Okada, Sunaho; Kitahara, Masashi; Matsuyama, Katsuya; Matsuo, Masayuki [Gifu University, Gifu (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Although the technical developments of radiotherapy have been remarkable, there are currently few reports on the treatment results of radiotherapy for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as initial treatment in this three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy era. Thus, we retrospectively evaluated the treatment results of radiotherapy for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as the initial treatment. Thirty-two patients who underwent radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. The dose per fraction was 2.0–3.5 Gy. Because the treatment schedule was variable, the biological effective dose (BED) was calculated. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rates from the completion of radiotherapy were calculated. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year LC rates were 51.5%, 24.5%, 19.6%, 19.6%, and 13.1%, respectively. LC rates were significantly higher for the high BED group (≥75 Gy10) than for the lower BED group (<75 Gy10). All patients who reported pain achieved pain relief. The duration of pain relief was significantly higher for the high BED group than for the lower BED group. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year OS rates were 82.6%, 56.5%, 45.2%, 38.7%, and 23.2%, respectively. There was a trend toward higher OS rates in with higher BED group compared to lower BED group. For patients with unresectable locally recurrent rectal cancer treated with surgery alone, radiotherapy is effective treatment. The prescribed BED should be more than 75 Gy10, if the dose to the organ at risk is within acceptable levels.

  6. Can titanium mesh influence local recurrence management after implant-based breast reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Egidio; Chifu, Camelia; Martelli, Gabriele; Ferraris, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    TiLOOP(®) Bra is a permanent titanium-coated polypropylene mesh currently used in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction with implants. This mesh is generally presented as inducing low-grade inflammatory reactions, but only few reports focused on its possible side effects. In the case described here, the use of the mesh led to minor clinical problems that needed to be clinically and surgically managed at the same time as a local relapse. A patient with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ underwent primary surgery (nipple-sparing mastectomy and one-stage reconstruction using the TiLOOP(®) Bra mesh) and was subsequently referred for radiological and clinical investigation when various nodules became apparent during a follow-up physical examination. Prior to the histopathological proof, the diagnosis of local recurrence was complicated by the occurrence of an extensive granulomatous reaction in the fixation areas along with mild inflammatory changes scattered on the surface of the mesh. This case illustrates a side effect of titanium-coated permanent mesh in immediate implant-based reconstruction, i.e. the formation of granulomas in the inframammary fold, probably in the area where the mesh had been folded or fixed. We propose a safer technical approach to avoid the problem and a clinical management strategy for patients at high risk of local recurrence who develop granuloma-like nodules. A surgical technique is suggested to prevent granuloma formation. If, however, subcutaneous nodules that may be local recurrences do appear, they should not be interpreted by default as a granulomatous reaction, but should be fully investigated and possibly excised.

  7. Radiomics versus physician assessment for the early prediction of local cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Johnson, Carol; Palma, David A.; Rodrigues, George; Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Yeung, Timothy P. C.; Ward, Aaron D.

    2016-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has recently become a standard treatment option for patients with early-stage lung cancer, which achieves local control rates similar to surgery. Local recurrence following SABR typically presents after one year post-treatment. However, benign radiological changes mimicking local recurrence can appear on CT imaging following SABR, complicating the assessment of response. We hypothesize that subtle changes on early post- SABR CT images are important in predicting the eventual incidence of local recurrence and would be extremely valuable to support timely salvage interventions. The objective of this study was to extract radiomic image features on post-SABR follow-up images for 45 patients (15 with local recurrence and 30 without) to aid in the early prediction of local recurrence. Three blinded thoracic radiation oncologists were also asked to score follow-up images as benign injury or local recurrence. A radiomic signature consisting of five image features demonstrated a classification error of 24%, false positive rate (FPR) of 24%, false negative rate (FNR) of 23%, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.85 at 2-5 months post-SABR. At the same time point, three physicians assessed the majority of images as benign injury for overall errors of 34-37%, FPRs of 0-4%, and FNRs of 100%. These results suggest that radiomics can detect early changes associated with local recurrence which are not typically considered by physicians. We aim to develop a decision support system which could potentially allow for early salvage therapy of patients with local recurrence following SABR.

  8. Phase II study of docetaxel and cisplatin in patients with recurrent or disseminated squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L; Larsen, S K; Hansen, H S

    2000-01-01

    Results with docetaxel as single drug in squamous-cell head and neck cancer have been encouraging. The purpose of the present phase II study is to evaluate the antitumour efficacy and toxicity of the combination of docetaxel and cisplatin in patients with recurrent or disseminated squamous...

  9. Predictive Factors for Local Recurrence and Incomplete Resection of Early Gastric Cancer Treated by Endoscopic Resection: A Western Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Yuji Hondo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early gastric cancer (EGC is defined as adenocarcinoma limited to the mucosa or submucosa regardless of lymph node involvement. Local EGC recurrence rates have been described in up to 6% of cases.

  10. SU-E-T-620: Planning and Dosimetry for Pulsed Low Dose Rate RT for Recurrent Lung, Spine, GYN and Head and Neck Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, X; Luo, F; Liu, Y; Zhang, W; Xu, Q; Zhang, T; Li, J [3rd Affiliated Hospital of Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar (China); Chen, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Extensive in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that pulsed low dose rate (PLDR) radiotherapy has potential to provide significant local tumor control and to reduce normal tissue toxicities. This work investigated the planning and dosimetry of PLDR re-irradiation for recurrent cancers. Methods: We analyzed the treatment plans and dosimetry for 13 recurrent patients who were treated with the PLDR technique in this study. All cases were planned with the 3DCRT technique with optimal beam angle selection. The treatment was performed on a Siemens accelerator using 6MV beams. The target volume ranged between 161 and 703cc. The previous RT dose was 40–60Gy while the re-irradiation dose was 16–60Gy. The interval between previous RT and re-irradiation was 13–336 months, and the follow-up time was up to 27months. The total prescription dose was administered in 2Gy/day fractions with the daily dose delivered in 10 sub-fractions (pulses) of 20cGy with a 3min interval between the pulses to achieve an effective dose rate of 6.7cGy/min. Results: The clinical outcome was analyzed based on the treatment plans. All pulses were kept with Dmax<40cGy. The PLDR treatments were effective (CR: 3 patients, PR: 10 patients). The acute and late toxicities were all acceptable (generally grade II or under). Two patients died three months after the PLDR re-irradiation, one due to massive cerebral infarction and the other due to acute cardiac failure. All others survived more than 8 months. Five patients showed good conditions at the last follow-up. Among them two recurrent lung cancer patients had survived 23 months and one nasopharyngeal cancer patient had survived 27 months. Conclusion: The PLDR technique was effective for the palliative treatment of head and neck, lung, spine and GYN cancers. Further phase II and III studies are warranted to quantify the efficacy of PLDR for recurrent cancers.

  11. Varying recurrence rates and risk factors associated with different definitions of local recurrence in patients with surgically resected, stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlotto, John M; Recht, Abram; Flickinger, John C; Medford-Davis, Laura N; Dyer, Anne-Marie; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2010-05-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of different definitions of local recurrence on the reported patterns of failure and associated risk factors in patients who undergo potentially curative resection for stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 306 consecutive patients who were treated from 2000 to 2005 without radiotherapy. Local recurrence was defined either as 'radiation' (r-LR) (according to previously defined postoperative radiotherapy fields), including the bronchial stump, staple line, ipsilateral hilum, and ipsilateral mediastinum; or as 'comprehensive' (c-LR), including the same sites plus the ipsilateral lung and contralateral mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. All recurrences that were not classified as "local" were considered to be distal. The median follow-up was 33 months. The proportions of c-LR and r-LR at 2 years, 3 years, and 5 years were 14%, 21%, and 29%, respectively, and 7%, 12%, and 16%, respectively. Significant risk factors for c-LR on multivariate analysis were diabetes, lymphatic vascular invasion, and tumor size; and significant factors for r-LR were resection of less than a lobe and lymphatic vascular invasion. The proportions of distant (non-local) recurrence using these definitions at 2 years, 3 years, and 5 years were 10%, 12%, and 18%, respectively, and 14%, 19%, and 29%, respectively. Significant risk factors for distant failure were histology when using the c-LR definition and tumor size when using the r-LR definition. Local recurrence increased nearly 2-fold when a broad definition was used instead of a narrow definition. The definition also affected which factors were associated significantly with both local and distant failure on multivariate analysis. Comparable definitions must be used when analyzing different series. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  12. Theranostic 3-Dimensional nano brain-implant for prolonged and localized treatment of recurrent glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Ranjith; Junnuthula, Vijayabhaskar Reddy; Gowd, G. Siddaramana; Ashokan, Anusha; Thomas, John; Peethambaran, Reshmi; Thomas, Anoop; Unni, Ayalur Kodakara Kochugovindan; Panikar, Dilip; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2017-03-01

    Localized and controlled delivery of chemotherapeutics directly in brain-tumor for prolonged periods may radically improve the prognosis of recurrent glioblastoma. Here, we report a unique method of nanofiber by fiber controlled delivery of anti-cancer drug, Temozolomide, in orthotopic brain-tumor for one month using flexible polymeric nano-implant. A library of drug loaded (20 wt%) electrospun nanofiber of PLGA-PLA-PCL blends with distinct in vivo brain-release kinetics (hours to months) were numerically selected and a single nano-implant was formed by co-electrospinning of nano-fiber such that different set of fibres releases the drug for a specific periods from days to months by fiber-by-fiber switching. Orthotopic rat glioma implanted wafers showed constant drug release (116.6 μg/day) with negligible leakage into the peripheral blood (4 month) survival of 85.7% animals whereas 07 day releasing implant showed tumor recurrence in 54.6% animals, rendering a median survival of only 74 days. In effect, we show that highly controlled drug delivery is possible for prolonged periods in orthotopic brain-tumor using combinatorial nanofibre libraries of bulk-eroding polymers, thereby controlling glioma recurrence.

  13. Salvage surgery for local recurrence after carbon ion radiotherapy for patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Nakajima, Mio; Baba, Masayuki; Miyoshi, Kentaro; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Watanabe, Syun-Ichi; Katoh, Ryoichi; Kohno, Tadasu; Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Nishio, Wataru; Kamada, Tadashi; Fujisawa, Takehiko; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) has been expected to be an alternative for surgery for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and adopted as the second-best choice even in operable patients although local recurrence after CIRT is sometimes experienced. The purpose of this study was to investigate the demographic data, perioperative courses and therapeutic outcomes of patients who underwent salvage resection for local recurrence after CIRT. From November 1994 to February 2012, CIRT was applied for 602 c-T1/T2/T3N0M0 NSCLC lesions of 599 patients at the National Institute of Radiological Science. A total of 95 (16%) patients were diagnosed as having local recurrence, of whom 12 underwent salvage surgeries. The medical records were retrospectively reviewed. There were 7 men and 5 women (mean age, 63 ± 7.4 years). The clinical stages upon initial presentation with NSCLC were as follows: 4 IA, 7 IB and 1 IIB. All the patients were operable, but refused surgery and underwent CIRT. The median progression-free survival time after CIRT was 20 months (range, 7.1-77 months), and salvage surgery was performed at a median of 24 months (range, 9-78 months) after CIRT. All surgeries were successfully performed without any significant CIRT-related adhesions during the surgery, resulting in no mortality or Clavien-Dindo grade 3-4 postoperative complications. However, the distribution of pathological stages was as follows: 4 IA, 3 IB, 2 IIB, 2 IIIA and 1 IV, which included 6 upstages from the clinical stages before CIRT. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival after the salvage surgery showed that the 3-year survival rate was 82%. The dose intensity of CIRT spared the hilum of the lungs and parietal pleura, none of the patients developed adhesions outside of the radiation field, such that the salvage surgeries for local recurrence after CIRT were safe and feasible. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio

  14. Current status of boron neutron capture therapy of high grade gliomas and recurrent head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Rolf F; Vicente, M Graca H; Harling, Otto K; Kiger, W S; Riley, Kent J; Binns, Peter J; Wagner, Franz M; Suzuki, Minoru; Aihara, Teruhito; Kato, Itsuro; Kawabata, Shinji

    2012-08-29

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Clinical interest in BNCT has focused primarily on the treatment of high grade gliomas, recurrent cancers of the head and neck region and either primary or metastatic melanoma. Neutron sources for BNCT currently have been limited to specially modified nuclear reactors, which are or until the recent Japanese natural disaster, were available in Japan, United States, Finland and several other European countries, Argentina and Taiwan. Accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams also could be used for BNCT and these are being developed in several countries. It is anticipated that the first Japanese accelerator will be available for therapeutic use in 2013. The major hurdle for the design and synthesis of boron delivery agents has been the requirement for selective tumor targeting to achieve boron concentrations in the range of 20 μg/g. This would be sufficient to deliver therapeutic doses of radiation with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Two boron drugs have been used clinically, a dihydroxyboryl derivative of phenylalanine, referred to as boronophenylalanine or "BPA", and sodium borocaptate or "BSH" (Na2B12H11SH). In this report we will provide an overview of other boron delivery agents that currently are under evaluation, neutron sources in use or under development for BNCT, clinical dosimetry, treatment planning, and finally a summary of previous and on-going clinical studies for high grade gliomas and recurrent tumors of the head and neck region. Promising results have been obtained with both groups of patients but these outcomes must be more rigorously evaluated in larger, possibly randomized clinical trials

  15. Current status of boron neutron capture therapy of high grade gliomas and recurrent head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Rolf F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Clinical interest in BNCT has focused primarily on the treatment of high grade gliomas, recurrent cancers of the head and neck region and either primary or metastatic melanoma. Neutron sources for BNCT currently have been limited to specially modified nuclear reactors, which are or until the recent Japanese natural disaster, were available in Japan, United States, Finland and several other European countries, Argentina and Taiwan. Accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams also could be used for BNCT and these are being developed in several countries. It is anticipated that the first Japanese accelerator will be available for therapeutic use in 2013. The major hurdle for the design and synthesis of boron delivery agents has been the requirement for selective tumor targeting to achieve boron concentrations in the range of 20 μg/g. This would be sufficient to deliver therapeutic doses of radiation with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Two boron drugs have been used clinically, a dihydroxyboryl derivative of phenylalanine, referred to as boronophenylalanine or “BPA”, and sodium borocaptate or “BSH” (Na2B12H11SH. In this report we will provide an overview of other boron delivery agents that currently are under evaluation, neutron sources in use or under development for BNCT, clinical dosimetry, treatment planning, and finally a summary of previous and on-going clinical studies for high grade gliomas and recurrent tumors of the head and neck region. Promising results have been obtained with both groups of patients but these outcomes must be more rigorously evaluated in larger

  16. Current status of boron neutron capture therapy of high grade gliomas and recurrent head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Clinical interest in BNCT has focused primarily on the treatment of high grade gliomas, recurrent cancers of the head and neck region and either primary or metastatic melanoma. Neutron sources for BNCT currently have been limited to specially modified nuclear reactors, which are or until the recent Japanese natural disaster, were available in Japan, the United States, Finland and several other European countries, Argentina and Taiwan. Accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams also could be used for BNCT and these are being developed in several countries. It is anticipated that the first Japanese accelerator will be available for therapeutic use in 2013. The major hurdle for the design and synthesis of boron delivery agents has been the requirement for selective tumor targeting to achieve boron concentrations in the range of 20 μg/g. This would be sufficient to deliver therapeutic doses of radiation with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Two boron drugs have been used clinically, a dihydroxyboryl derivative of phenylalanine, referred to as boronophenylalanine or “BPA”, and sodium borocaptate or “BSH” (Na2B12H11SH). In this report we will provide an overview of other boron delivery agents that currently are under evaluation, neutron sources in use or under development for BNCT, clinical dosimetry, treatment planning, and finally a summary of previous and on-going clinical studies for high grade gliomas and recurrent tumors of the head and neck region. Promising results have been obtained with both groups of patients but these outcomes must be more rigorously evaluated in larger, possibly randomized

  17. Immunostimulatory sutures that treat local disease recurrence following primary tumor resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intra, Janjira; Zhang Xueqing; Salem, Aliasger K [Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Williams, Robin L; Zhu Xiaoyan [Department of Surgery, Roy J and Lucille Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Sandler, Anthony D, E-mail: aliasger-salem@uiowa.edu [Department of Surgery and Center for Cancer and Immunology Research, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Neuroblastoma is a common childhood cancer that often results in progressive minimal residual disease after primary tumor resection. Cytosine-phosphorothioate-guanine oligonucleotides (CpG ODN) have been reported to induce potent anti-tumor immune responses. In this communication, we report on the development of a CpG ODN-loaded suture that can close up the wound following tumor excision and provide sustained localized delivery of CpG ODN to treat local disease recurrence. The suture was prepared by melt extruding a mixture of polylactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA 75:25 0.47 dL g{sup -1}) pellets and CpG ODN 1826. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the sutures were free of defects and cracks. UV spectrophotometry measurements at 260 nm showed that sutures provide sustained release of CpG ODN over 35 days. Syngeneic female A/J mice were inoculated subcutaneously with 1 x 10{sup 6} Neuro-2a murine neuroblastoma wild-type cells and tumors were grown between 5 to 10 mm before the tumors were excised. Wounds from the tumor resection were closed using CpG ODN-loaded sutures and/or polyglycolic acid Vicryl suture. Suppression of neuroblastoma recurrence and mouse survival were significantly higher in mice where wounds were closed using the CpG ODN-loaded sutures relative to all other groups. (communication)

  18. [Transrectal echography in the assessment of anastomosis and local recurrence after prior resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannicelli, E; Fusaro, P L; Manganaro, L; Conforti, G; Di Nardo, R; Drudi, F M; Passariello, R

    1993-05-01

    The value of rectal endosonography was investigated in the follow-up of the patients submitted to anterior resection for rectal cancer. Rectal endosonography was performed on 42 patients who had been operated on two months to five years before; all patients were monitored according to a carefully planned follow-up schedule including clinical and instrumental examinations and laboratory tests. Sixteen patients had altered clinical and laboratory data; 26 were completely asymptomatic. In the latter group, no signs of local recurrences were found, while in 4 cases the rectal wall appeared homogeneously thickened and hypoechoic: this pattern was due to postoperative or post-irradiation hyperemic-edematous phenomena. In 14 of 16 symptomatic patients, a mass was detected--in 9 of them inhomogeneous and hypoechoic and developing mainly in the perirectal perianastomotic tissue and in 5 limited to the rectal wall, in the anastomotic area. In the last 2 cases, no lesions were found. Both the manual and the stapler anastomoses were always demonstrated, which exhibited different US patterns. US findings were compared with histologic results or were clinically checked in the subsequent follow-up. To conclude, rectal endosonography proved to be useful in the postoperative follow-up of this kind of patients even though it did not allow the differential diagnosis between fibrosis and local recurrence.

  19. Secondary external-beam radiotherapy and hyperthermia for local recurrence after 125-iodine implantation in adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, I.; Kapp, D.S.; Bagshaw, M.A. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA))

    1991-03-01

    At Standford, six patients underwent a course of external radiotherapy after local recurrence following 125-iodine implantation. Four of the six patients also received concomitant hyperthermia. Four patients were initially managed with hormonal manipulation at time of local relapse and subsequently received external beam radiotherapy with or without hyperthermia. The hyperthermia was non-invasively induced using an annular phased array radiative electromagnetic system. Treatment was well tolerated, and none of the patients experienced severe rectal or bladder complications. Three patients are free from disease; one patient experience local-regional recurrence based on biopsy; one recurred in the bladder, was treated with cystoprostatectomy and subsequently succumbed to metastatic disease; and one patient died of presumed metastatic disease. External-beam irradiation with concurrent hyperthermia can be safely delivered to treat locally recurrent prostatic carcinoma after 125-iodine implantation.

  20. [Radical prostatectomy: local recurrence and persistence of disease. Is it possible to hypothesize any responsibility of the surgeon?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattoni, Filiberto; Gigli, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) represents the most frequently chosen therapeutic option for treating newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer. Cancer recurrence after surgery is linked to biologic variables. But are these the only ones that must be considered to give an explanation of a possible local or distal recurrence, or can it also admit the possibility that an incorrectly conducted surgery has a negative role in the unfavorable evolution after PR? Prostate cancer recurrence, as a matter of fact, is related also to surgical technique. The PR, by definition is a surgical, potentially complicated act. Surgery outcomes depend on a whole series of factors: the surgeon's ability, and the way the surgical procedure is conducted, play an essential role. Here we evaluate the role of biological and surgical factors on biochemical recurrence.

  1. Long-term prognosis of patients with local recurrence after conservative surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Voogd (Adri); F.J. van Oost (F.); E.J.T. Rutgers (Emiel); S. Elkhuizen (Sylvia); A.N. van Geel (Albert); L.J.E.E. Scheijmans (L. J E E); M.J.C. van der Sangen (Maurice); G. Botke (G.); C.J.M. Hoekstra (C. J M); J.J. Jobsen (Jan); C.J.H. van de Velde (Cornelis); M.F. von Meyenfeldt (Maarten); J.M. Tabak (J.); J.L. Peterse (J.); M.J. Vijver (Marc ); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); G. van Tienhoven (Geertjan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe have studied the long-term prognosis of 266 patients considered to have isolated local recurrence in the breast following conservative surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer. The median follow-up of the patients still alive after diagnosis of local relapse was 11.2 years. At

  2. The 10-Year Local Recurrence and Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhizhen Wang; Ruiying Li

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the local recurrence and the role of whole breast radiotherapy for early breast cancer treated by conservative surgery.METHODS From April 1990 to December 2000, 49 patients with early primary breast cancer were treated by conservative surgery in our hospital. The cases were comprised of Stage 0, 1; Stage Ⅰ, 31; and Stage Ⅱa,17. Forty cases underwent quadrantectomy plus axillary lymph node dissection, and the other 9 cases had lumpectomy alone. Irradiation, which was received by 39 patients, was administered by using low tangential half fields with 6 MV X-ray to decrease the pulmonary irradiative volume.The dose to the whole breast was 45 Gy/22~23f/4.5W, then a 15 Gy boost dose was delivered to the tumor bed by an electron beam. The other patients underwent an irradiated regional field according to postoperative pathology.RESULTS All patients were followed-up for 10 years or more. The 10year local recurrence rates, distant metastasis rates and survival rates were 6.1%, 4.1% and 98.0% respectively. All of the 3 patients who had a local recurrence had infiltrative carcinomas and negative lymph nodes.The 10-year local recurrence rate was higher (2.6% vs. 20.0%) with nonpostoperative whole breast radiotherapy, but the statistical difference was not marked because of the low number of cases. All of the recurrent lesions localized within 3 cm of the primary lesion.CONCLUSION Original recurrence of the tumor was the main type of local recurrence. Radiotherapy after conservative surgery is very essential.After conservative surgery it is feasible that irradiation can be delivered alone to the neighboring region of the tumor bed. Partial breast radiotherapy can substitute for whole breast radiotherapy.

  3. Pathological Predictors for Site of Local Recurrence After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, Supriya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Toi, Ants [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Taback, Nathan [Division of Biostatistics, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Evans, Andrew [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto (Canada); Milosevic, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Morton, Gerard; Vesprini, Danny [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto (Canada); Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Menard, Cynthia, E-mail: Cynthia.Menard@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Rational design of targeted radiotherapy (RT) in prostate cancer (Pca) hinges on a better understanding of spatial patterns of recurrence. We sought to identify pathological factors predictive for site of local recurrence (LR) after external beam RT. Methods and Materials: Prospective databases were reviewed to identify men with LR after RT from 1997 through 2009. Patients with biochemical failure and biopsy-confirmed Pca more than 2 years after RT were evaluated. Prediction for site of recurrence based on the following pretreatment factors was determined on independent and cluster-sextant basis: presence of malignancy, dominant vs. nondominant percentage core length (PCL) involvement, PCL {>=} or <40%, and Gleason score. Sites of dominant PCL were defined as sextants with peak PCL involvement minus 10%, and >5% for each patient. Results: Forty-one patients with low-intermediate risk Pca constituted the study cohort. Median time to biopsy after RT was 51 months (range, 24-145). Of 246 sextants, 74 were involved with tumor at baseline. When sextants are treated as independent observations the presence of malignancy (77% vs. 22%, p = 0.0001), dominant PCL (90% vs. 46%, p = 0.0001), and PCL {>=}40% (89% vs. 68 %, p = 0.04) were found to be significant predictors for LR, although PCL {>=}40% did not retain statistical significance if sextants were considered correlated. The vast majority of patients (95%) recurred at the original site of dominant PCL or PCL {>=}40%, and 44% also recurred in regions of nondominant PCL <40% (n = 8) and/or benign sampling (n = 14) at baseline. Conclusions: LR after RT predominantly occurs in regions bearing higher histological tumor burden but are not isolated to these sites. Our data highlights the value of spatially resolved baseline pathological sampling and may assist in the design of clinical trials tailoring RT dose prescriptions to subregions of the prostate gland.

  4. Patterns of local recurrence in rectal cancer after a multidisciplinary approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose M Enríquez-Navascués; Nerea Borda; Aintzane Lizerazu; Carlos Placer; Jose L Elosegui; Juan P Ciria; Adelaida Lacasta; Luis Bujanda

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in surgery and the application of combined approaches to fight rectal cancer have succeeded in reducing the local recurrence (LR) rate and whenthere is LR it tends to appear later and less often in isolation. Moreover, a subtle change in the distribution of LRs with respect to the pelvis has been observed.In general terms, prior to total mesorectal excision the most common LRs were central types (perianastomotic and anterior) while lateral and posterior forms (presacral)have become more common since the growth in the use of combined treatments. No differences have been reported in the current pattern of LRs as a function of the type of approach used, that is, neo-adjuvanttherapies (short-term or long-course radiotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy versus extended lymphadenectomy,though there is a trend towards posterior or presacral LR in patients in the Western world and lateral LR in Asia. Nevertheless, both may arise from the samemechanism. Moreover, as well as the mode of treatment,the type of LR is related to the height of the initial tumor. Nowadays most LRs are related to theadvanced nature of the disease. Involvement of the circumferential radial margin and spillage of residual tumor cells from lymphatic leakage in the pelvic side wallare two plausible mechanisms for the genesis of LR.The patterns of pelvic recurrence itself (pelvic subsites)also have important implications for prognosis and are related to the potential success of salvage curative approach. The re-operability for cure and prognosis are generally better for anastomotic and anterior types than for presacral and lateral recurrences. Overall survival after LR diagnosis is lower with radio or chemoradiotherapy plus optimal surgery approaches, compared to optimal surgery alone.

  5. Recurrent or residual pelvic bowel cancer: Accuracy of MRI local extent before salvage surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Philip; Carrington, Bernadette M.; Swindell, Ric; Shanks, Johnathan H.; O' Dwyer, Sarah T

    2002-06-01

    PURPOSE: To determine pre-operative MRI accuracy in assessing local disease extent in recurrent/residual pelvic bowel cancer by comparing MRI assessment and staging examination under anaesthesia (EUA), with laparotomy/histopathological findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with recurrent (n = 21) or residual (n = 6) pelvic bowel cancer (13 of the rectum, eleven of the anus and three of the colon) underwent EUA and pelvic MRI (1T) using a phased array pelvic coil. Retrospective analysis of eight specific anatomical regions for tumour involvement on MRI was performed. Findings at EUA and biopsy were recorded. The MRI and EUA findings were correlated with findings at surgery and histopathology. Statistical comparison between MRI and EUA results was performed using the chi-squared test . RESULTS: Overall MRI accuracy in determining tumour invasion for all sites assessed was 452/499 (91%), sensitivity was 95/109 (87%), specificity was 357/390 (92%), positive predictive value (PPV) was 95/128 (74%) and negative predictive value (NPV) was 357/371 (96%). PPV and NPV for specific areas were 21/38 (55%) and 134/136 (99%) for genitourinary tract, 4/6 (67%) and 61/65 (94%) for pelvic side wall, 21/26 (81%) and 40/41 (98%) for pelvic floor, 1/6 (17%) and 40/43 (93%) for the posterior pelvis pre-sacrum/sacrum. For those anatomical sites evaluated by both EUA and MRI, MRI was superior to EUA, with an accuracy of 89% vs 73%(P < 0.05) . CONCLUSION: MRI is an accurate technique for assessing disease extent in recurrent/residual pelvic bowel cancer. Robinson, P. et al. (2002)

  6. Salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia for local recurrence after radiation therapy failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukielka, A.M.; Hetnal, M.; Dabrowski, T.; Walasek, T.; Brandys, P.; Reinfuss, M. [Centre of Oncology, M. Sklodowska - Curie Institute, Krakow Branch, Department of Radiotherapy, Krakow (Poland); Nahajowski, D.; Kudzia, R.; Dybek, D. [Centre of Oncology, M. Sklodowska - Curie Institute, Krakow Branch, Department of Medical Physics, Department of Radiotherapy, Krakow (Poland)

    2014-02-15

    The aim of the present retrospective study is to evaluate toxicity and early clinical outcomes of interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) combined with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage treatment in patients with biopsy-confirmed local recurrence of prostate cancer after previous external beam radiotherapy. Between September 2008 and March 2013, 25 patients with local recurrence of previously irradiated prostate cancer were treated. The main eligibility criteria for salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia were biopsy confirmed local recurrence and absence of nodal and distant metastases. All patients were treated with a dose of 30 Gy in 3 fractions at 21-day intervals. We performed 62 hyperthermia procedures out of 75 planned (83 %). The aim of the hyperthermia treatment was to heat the prostate to 41-43 C for 60 min. Toxicity for the organs of the genitourinary system and rectum was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, v. 4.03). Determination of subsequent biochemical failure was based on the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/ml). The median age was 71 years (range 62-83 years), the median initial PSA level was 16.3 ng/ml (range 6.37-64 ng/ml), and the median salvage PSA level was 2.8 ng/ml (1.044-25.346 ng/ml). The median follow-up was 13 months (range 4-48 months). The combination of HDR brachytherapy and IHT was well tolerated. The most frequent complications were nocturia, weak urine stream, urinary frequency, hematuria, and urgency. Grade 2 rectal hemorrhage was observed in 1 patient. No grade 3 or higher complications were observed. The 2-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of biochemical control after salvage treatment was 74 %. The PSA in 20 patients decreased below the presalvage level, while 11 patients achieved a PSA nadir < 0.5 ng/ml. All patients are still alive. Of the 7 patients who experienced biochemical failure, bone metastases were found in 2 patients. IHT in combination

  7. A model of Mira's cometary head/tail entering the Local Bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A; Canto, J; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A; Lopez-Camara, D; Velazquez, P F; De Colle, F

    2010-01-01

    We model the cometary structure around Mira as the interaction of an AGB wind from Mira A, and a streaming environment. Our simulations introduce the following new element: we assume that after 200 kyr of evolution in a dense environment Mira entered the Local Bubble (low density coronal gas). As Mira enters the bubble, the head of the comet expands quite rapidly, while the tail remains well collimated for a 100 kyr timescale. The result is a broad-head/narrow-tail structure that resembles the observed morphology of Mira's comet. The simulations were carried out with our new adaptive grid code WALICXE, which is described in detail.

  8. Impact of head modeling and sensor types in localizing human gamma-band oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideksa, K G; Hoogenboom, N; Hellriegel, H; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2014-01-01

    An effective mechanism in neuronal communication is oscillatory neuronal synchronization. The neuronal gamma-band (30-100 Hz) synchronization is associated with attention which is induced by a certain visual stimuli. Numerous studies have shown that the gamma-band activity is observed in the visual cortex. However, impact of different head modeling techniques and sensor types to localize gamma-band activity have not yet been reported. To do this, the brain activity was recorded using 306 magnetoencephalography (MEG) sensors, consisting of 102 magnetometers and 102 pairs of planar gradiometers (one measuring the derivative of the magnetic field along the latitude and the other along the longitude), and the data were analyzed with respect to time, frequency, and location of the strongest response. The spherical head models with a single-shell and overlapping spheres (local sphere) have been used as a forward model for calculating the external magnetic fields generated from the gamma-band activity. For each sensor type, the subject-specific frequency range of the gamma-band activity was obtained from the spectral analysis. The identified frequency range of interest with the highest gamma-band activity is then localized using a spatial-filtering technique known as dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS). The source analysis for all the subjects revealed that the gradiometer sensors which measure the derivative along the longitude, showed sources close to the visual cortex (cuneus) as compared to the other gradiometer sensors which measure the derivative along the latitude. However, using the magnetometer sensors, it was not possible to localize the sources in the region of interest. When comparing the two head models, the local-sphere model helps in localizing the source more focally as compared to the single-shell head model.

  9. Cicatricial Fibromatosis Diagnosis after Suspected Local Recurrence at the Bronchial Stump Following Lobectomy for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wan Jin; Lee, Yeiwon; Jung, Soo Young; Yeh, Daewook; Park, Soon Hyo; Yoon, Yoo Sang

    2016-04-01

    A mass excision surrounding the bronchial stump was performed to exclude malignancy in a 42-year-old man who had undergone a right lower lobectomy for lung cancer. The mass was identified as a cicatricial fibroma. Cicatricial fibromatosis, which is desmoid fibromatosis that arises in a surgical scar, is a well-known clinical condition. It consists of histologically benign neoplasms. Their occurrence after thoracic surgery is extremely rare. Biopsy or excision of suspicious lesions is very important for diagnosis. R0 resection remains the principal outcome for intra-thoracic desmoid fibromatosis. We report that a cicatricial fibromatosis in the subcarinal space was removed after suspicion of local recurrence at the bronchial stump follwing lobectomy for lung cancer.

  10. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of thyroid gland with local recurrence: ultrasonographic and computed tomographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ja Yoon; Kwon, Kye Won; Kim, Sang Wook [Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Youn, In Young [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland (PSCCT) is a rare malignancy that presents with advanced disease and poor prognosis. It is difficult to diagnose PSCCT in its early stage because of its rarity and lack of typical imaging findings. We experienced an elderly woman with PSCCT confirmed by surgery. Although preoperative fine-needle aspiration revealed no malignancy, surgical resection was performed because the ultrasonogram showed diffuse microcalcifications, which suggested malignancy, and clinically, the mass grew rapidly to compress the trachea. Local tumor recurrence was noted at 3 months after surgery. Surgical resection or repeat biopsy should be considered if a cytologically benign thyroid mass shows imaging or clinical features of malignancy.

  11. LOCAL RECURRENCE OF TUBULOCYSTIC CARCINOMA 4 YEARS AFTER RENAL RESECTION (A CLINICAL OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Peters

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of a local recurrence of tubulocystic carcinoma (TCC in a 46-year-old man, a relatively good course (the relapse occurred after 4 years, who has been successfully operated on and is being followed up. This disease is a rare renal malignancy and, until recently, it has been referred to as collecting tubular carcinoma. However, this disease has come to be regarded as an independent nosological entity, by taking into account its certain morphological, immunohistohemical, and cytogenetic characteristics, as well as the nature of its course. About 80 TCC cases have been described to date. Further study of this disease and other rare renal malignancies will allow the more accurate elaboration of management tactics for such patients in terms of certain prognostic factors, which calls for a larger number of cases of this disease.

  12. Can local Erythropoietin administration enhance bone regeneration in osteonecrosis of femoral head?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Hooman; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Parvizi, Javad

    2012-08-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a challenging disease. Regardless of underlying causes, the ultimate result in all cases is disruption of femoral head blood supply. Once the disease starts, it is progressive in 80% of cases. Since the majority of the affected individuals are young, every effort should be focused on preserving the patients own femoral head. These years, the role of angiogenic growth factors has been investigated with promising results in animal models of ONFH. Erythropoietin (EPO) is a well known hormone that has been used in treatment of chronic anemia for many years with few side effects. Considering the angiogenic properties of EPO, we hypothesize that local delivery of recombinant human EPO during core decompression will enhance bone regeneration in ONFH. In this way we also can avoid systemic side effects of EPO.

  13. Image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer remains a challenge because of the head and neck complex anatomy and the tumor invasion to the adjacent organs and/or metastases to the cervical nodes. Postoperative irradiation or concurrent chemoradiation may lead to damage of radiosensitive structures such as the salivary glands, mandible, cochlea, larynx, and pharyngeal muscles. Xerostomia, osteoradionecrosis, deafness, hoarseness of the voice, dysphagia, and aspiration remain serious complications of head and neck irradiation and impair patient quality of life. Intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy by virtue of steep dose gradient and daily imaging may allow for decreased radiation of the organs at risk for complication while preserving loco-regional control.

  14. Loss of PTEN expression is associated with increased risk of recurrence after prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Alcides; Peskoe, Sarah B; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Schultz, Luciana; Albadine, Roula; Hicks, Jessica; De Marzo, Angelo M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Netto, George J

    2012-11-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) is one of the most frequently lost tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and it has been described in more than two-thirds of patients with advanced/aggressive prostate cancer. Previous studies suggest that, in prostate cancer, genomic PTEN loss is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. Thus, we evaluated whether immunohistochemical PTEN expression in prostate cancer glands was associated with higher risk of recurrence, using a nested case-control study that included 451 men who recurred and 451 men who did not recur with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy. Recurrence was defined as biochemical recurrence (serum prostate-specific antigen >0.2 ng/ml) or clinical recurrence (local recurrence, systemic metastases, or prostate cancer-related death). Cases and controls were matched on pathological T stage, Gleason score, race/ethnicity, and age at surgery. Odds ratios of recurrence and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression to account for the matching factors and to adjust for year of surgery, preoperative prostate-specific antigen concentrations, and status of surgical margins. Men who recurred had a higher proportion of PTEN negative expression (16 vs 11%, P=0.05) and PTEN loss (40 vs 31%, P=0.02) than controls. Men with markedly decreased PTEN staining had a higher risk of recurrence (odds ratio=1.67; 95% confidence intervals 1.09, 2.57; P=0.02) when compared with all other men. In summary, in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by prostatectomy, decreased PTEN expression was associated with an increased risk of recurrence, independent of known clinicopathological factors.

  15. Influence of head models on neuromagnetic fields and inverse source localizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schimpf Paul H

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The magnetoencephalograms (MEGs are mainly due to the source currents. However, there is a significant contribution to MEGs from the volume currents. The structure of the anatomical surfaces, e.g., gray and white matter, could severely influence the flow of volume currents in a head model. This, in turn, will also influence the MEGs and the inverse source localizations. This was examined in detail with three different human head models. Methods Three finite element head models constructed from segmented MR images of an adult male subject were used for this study. These models were: (1 Model 1: full model with eleven tissues that included detailed structure of the scalp, hard and soft skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter and other prominent tissues, (2 the Model 2 was derived from the Model 1 in which the conductivity of gray matter was set equal to the white matter, i.e., a ten tissuetype model, (3 the Model 3 consisted of scalp, hard skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter, i.e., a five tissue-type model. The lead fields and MEGs due to dipolar sources in the motor cortex were computed for all three models. The dipolar sources were oriented normal to the cortical surface and had a dipole moment of 100 μA meter. The inverse source localizations were performed with an exhaustive search pattern in the motor cortex area. A set of 100 trial inverse runs was made covering the 3 cm cube motor cortex area in a random fashion. The Model 1 was used as a reference model. Results The reference model (Model 1, as expected, performed best in localizing the sources in the motor cortex area. The Model 3 performed the worst. The mean source localization errors (MLEs of the Model 3 were larger than the Model 1 or 2. The contour plots of the magnetic fields on top of the head were also different for all three models. The magnetic fields due to source currents were larger in magnitude as compared to the magnetic fields of volume currents

  16. SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR VERY HIGH-RISK LOCALLY RECURRENT PROSTATE CANCER AFTER RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMY: A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliyev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Locally recurrent prostate cancer (PC in the bladder neck can substantially worsen quality of life in patients and hinder further treatment when castration-resistant PC develops. The paper describes a clinical case of very high-risk PC in a 55-year-old patient in whom radical cystectomy (RCE with removal of metastases in the bladder neck and the Bricker ileal conduit were performed for a local recurrence after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE. It gives the data of preoperative examination, the technical features of the primary operation RPE, the data of postoperative observation, the technical aspects and outcomes of еру surgery for a local recurrence, as well as the results of a 1.5-year follow-up after RCE. 

  17. Are Biopsy Tracts a Concern for Seeding and Local Recurrence in Sarcomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos-Ruiz, Irene; Ortiz-Cruz, Eduardo José; Serrano-Montilla, José; Bernabeu-Taboada, Daniel; Pozo-Kreilinger, Jose Juan

    2017-02-01

    A biopsy is the final step in the diagnosis of sarcomas. Complete resection of the biopsy tract traditionally has been recommended in musculoskeletal oncology guidelines, as that tract is considered potentially seeded with tumor cells. However, to our knowledge, the frequency and implications of contamination of the biopsy tract-specifically with respect to the likelihood of local recurrence-and the factors that affect cell seeding are not well described. We asked: (1) How often are biopsy tracts contaminated with pathologically detectable tumor cells at the time of tumor resection? (2) What factors, in particular biopsy type (open versus percutaneous), are associated with tumoral seeding? (3) Is biopsy tract contamination associated with local recurrence? This is a retrospective study of a database with patient data collected from a single center between 2000 and 2013. We treated 221 patients with sarcomas. A total of 27 patients (12%) were excluded and 14 (6%) were lost to followup. One hundred eighty patients finally were included in the analysis who either had biopsies at our center (112) or biopsies at outside institutions (68). Of those performed at our center, 15 (13%) were open and 97 (87%) were percutaneous; of those at outside centers, those numbers were 47 (69%) and 21 (31%) respectively. Median followup was 40 months (range, 24-152 months). During the study period, we generally performed percutaneous biopsies as a standard practice for the diagnosis of bone and soft tissue sarcomas and open biopsies were done when the percutaneous procedure failed to provide a histologic characterization. The mean age of the population was 48 years (range, 7-87 years); 60% were male; 42% had bone sarcomas. Nineteen patients had preoperative radiotherapy and 56 had postoperative radiotherapy. Fifty-seven patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 73 had adjuvant chemotherapy. We determined what proportion of biopsy tracts were contaminated by pathologic analysis of

  18. Evaluation of multiple-sphere head models for MEG source localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalancette, M; Cheyne, D [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Ave., Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8 (Canada); Quraan, M, E-mail: marc.lalancette@sickkids.ca, E-mail: douglas.cheyne@utoronto.ca [Krembil Neuroscience Centre, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8 (Canada)

    2011-09-07

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) source analysis has largely relied on spherical conductor models of the head to simplify forward calculations of the brain's magnetic field. Multiple- (or overlapping, local) sphere models, where an optimal sphere is selected for each sensor, are considered an improvement over single-sphere models and are computationally simpler than realistic models. However, there is limited information available regarding the different methods used to generate these models and their relative accuracy. We describe a variety of single- and multiple-sphere fitting approaches, including a novel method that attempts to minimize the field error. An accurate boundary element method simulation was used to evaluate the relative field measurement error (12% on average) and dipole fit localization bias (3.5 mm) of each model over the entire brain. All spherical models can contribute in the order of 1 cm to the localization bias in regions of the head that depart significantly from a sphere (inferior frontal and temporal). These spherical approximation errors can give rise to larger localization differences when all modeling effects are taken into account and with more complex source configurations or other inverse techniques, as shown with a beamformer example. Results differed noticeably depending on the source location, making it difficult to recommend a fitting method that performs best in general. Given these limitations, it may be advisable to expand the use of realistic head models.

  19. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with daily low dose CDDP/5FU for locally unresectable head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohno, Naoyuki; Kitahara, Satoshi; Tamura, Etsuyo; Tanabe, Tetsuya [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Murata, Yasuhiro [National Defence Medical Coll., Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    To improve the local control rate and the prognosis of locally unresectable head and neck cancer patients, we studied the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Between September 1996 and September 2000, thirty-eight patients with locally unresectable head and neck cancer were administered concurrent chemoradiotherapy consisting of low-dose and long-term treatment with cisplatin (CDDP) plus 5-fluorouracil (5FU), or (L-CF); the L-CF regimen consisted of CDDP, 3 mg/m{sup 2} on 5 days of the week and 5FU, 150 mg/m{sup 2} as a 24-hour infusion on 5 days of the week. Concurrently, conventional radiotherapy was given up to total dose of around 60 Gy. In the 36 patients evaluable for response, 19 complete and 10 partial responses were noted, with an overall response rate of 81%. Oral mucositis and myelosuppression were the major side effects and dose limiting toxicity. This study demonstrates increase in survival among the responders (complete+partial) in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy setting. We concluded that this treatment strategy was beneficial. Further studies for patients with locally unresectable head and neck cancer are warranted. (author)

  20. Evaluation of multiple-sphere head models for MEG source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalancette, M; Quraan, M; Cheyne, D

    2011-09-07

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) source analysis has largely relied on spherical conductor models of the head to simplify forward calculations of the brain's magnetic field. Multiple- (or overlapping, local) sphere models, where an optimal sphere is selected for each sensor, are considered an improvement over single-sphere models and are computationally simpler than realistic models. However, there is limited information available regarding the different methods used to generate these models and their relative accuracy. We describe a variety of single- and multiple-sphere fitting approaches, including a novel method that attempts to minimize the field error. An accurate boundary element method simulation was used to evaluate the relative field measurement error (12% on average) and dipole fit localization bias (3.5 mm) of each model over the entire brain. All spherical models can contribute in the order of 1 cm to the localization bias in regions of the head that depart significantly from a sphere (inferior frontal and temporal). These spherical approximation errors can give rise to larger localization differences when all modeling effects are taken into account and with more complex source configurations or other inverse techniques, as shown with a beamformer example. Results differed noticeably depending on the source location, making it difficult to recommend a fitting method that performs best in general. Given these limitations, it may be advisable to expand the use of realistic head models.

  1. {sup 125}I brachytherapy alone for recurrent or locally advanced adenoid cystic carcinoma of the oral and maxillofacial region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, M.W.; Zheng, L.; Liu, S.M.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Yu, G.Y.; Zhang, J.G. [Peking Univ. School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2013-06-15

    Background and purpose: This retrospective study was to evaluate the local control and survival of {sup 125}I brachytherapy for recurrent and/or locally advanced adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the oral and maxillofacial region. Patients and methods: A total of 38 patients with recurrent and/or locally advanced ACC of the oral and maxillofacial region received {sup 125}I brachytherapy alone from 2001-2010. Twenty-nine were recurrent cases following previous surgery and radiation therapy. The other 9 cases involved primary tumors. Overall, 12 tumors were located in the major salivary glands, 12 in the minor salivary glands, and 14 in the paranasal region, the nasal cavity or the skull base. The prescribed dose was 100-160 Gy. Results: Patients were followed for 12-122 months (median 51 months). The 2-, 5-, and 10-year local tumor control rates were 86.3, 59, and 31.5 %, respectively. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year overall survival rates were 92.1, 65 and 34.1 %, respectively. Tumors > 6 cm had significantly lower local control and survival rates. No severe complications were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: {sup 125}I brachytherapy is a feasible and effective modality for the treatment of locally advanced unresectable or recurrent ACC. (orig.)

  2. Post-treatment PET/CT and p16 status for predicting treatment outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer after definitive radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awan, Musaddiq J.; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min [Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lavertu, Pierre; Zender, Chad; Rezaee, Rod; Fowler, Nicole [University Hospitals, Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States); Karapetyan, Lilit; Gibson, Michael [University Hospitals, Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wasman, Jay [University Hospitals, Department of Pathology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Faulhaber, Peter [University Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To retrospectively review post-treatment (post-tx) FDG-PET/CT scans in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and known p16 status, treated with definitive (chemo)radiation (RT). A total of 108 eligible patients had N2A or greater HNSCC treated with chemoRT from August 1, 2008, to February 28, 2015, with post-tx PET/CT within 6 months after RT. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank statistics, and Cox proportional hazards regression were used for statistical analysis. Median follow-up was 2.38 years. Sixty-eight (63.0%) patients had p16+ and 40 (37.0%) had p16- status. Two-year overall survival and recurrence-free survival were 93.4% and 77.8%, respectively. The negative predictive value (NPV) of PET/CT for local recurrence (LR) was 100%. The NPV for regional recurrence (RR) was 96.5% for all patients, 100% for p16+ patients, and 88.5% for p16- patients. The positive predictive value (PPV) of PET/CT for recurrence was 77.3% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+, and 78.6% for p16-. The PPV for LR was 72.7% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+ patients, and 72.7% for p16- patients. The PPV for RR was 50.0% for all patients, 33% for p16+, and 66.6% for p16-. Post-tx PET/CT and p16 status were independent predictors of recurrence-free survival (p < 0.01). Post-tx PET/CT predicts treatment outcomes in both p16 + and p16- patients, and does so independently of p16 status. P16- patients with negative PET have a 10% risk of nodal recurrence, and closer follow-up in these patients is warranted. (orig.)

  3. Intra-operative perforation is an important predictor of local recurrence and impaired survival after abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, S; Christensen, I J; Iversen, L H

    2011-01-01

    on the Danish National Colorectal Cancer Database and included patients treated with abdominoperineal resection between 1 May 2001 and 31 December 2006. Follow up in the departments was supplemented with vital status in the Civil Registration System. The analysis included actuarial local and distant recurrence...... was reported in 108 (10%) patients. The cumulative 5-year local recurrence rate was 11% [95% confidence interval (CI), 7-13)], overall survival was 56% (95% CI, 53-60) and cancer-specific survival was 68% (95% CI, 65-71). Multivariate analysis showed that perforation, tumour stage and nonradical surgery were...

  4. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  5. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-28

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  6. Twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, Kumiko; Kojima, Nahoko; Himei, Kengo; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kita, Midori; Okawa, Tomohiko; Ishii, Tetsuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    Twenty-nine patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were treated with twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy (TDFR) for a total dose of 72 Gy to 82 Gy combined with Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) of CDDP+5FU and concurrent chemotherapy of low dose CBDCA between 1994 and 1997. Twenty-one cases (72%) had complete response and sixteen cases recurred. The relapse-free rate at 2 years was 23.4% and the actual 2-year survival rate was 42.0%. No severe toxicity has been observed. Based on this investigation, it was concluded that TDFR with chemotherapy is a promising modality for locally advanced head and neck cancer and toxicity is acceptable. (author)

  7. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Cetuximab, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-11

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  8. Results of chest wall resection for recurrent or locally advanced breast malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Giulia; Scanagatta, Paolo; Goldhirsch, Aron; Rietjens, Mario; Colleoni, Marco; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2007-06-01

    Between 1998 and 2003 we observed 15 women who underwent full thickness chest wall resection (FTCWR) followed by plastic reconstruction for locally recurrent or primary breast cancer. Preoperative symptoms were: pain (5 patients), malodorous ulceration (3 patients), presence of tumour mass (4 patients) and thoracic deformity (2 patients). One patient was asymptomatic. Surgery was partial sternectomy with rib resection in 9 patients, rib resection alone in 5, and total sternectomy in one. No perioperative mortality or major morbidity occurred; minor complications occurred in 3 patients (20%). Five of the six surviving patients reported a positive overall outcome in a telephonic interview. Median overall and disease-free survival were 23.4 and 17.5 months, respectively. In conclusion, FTCWR is a safe procedure with low morbidity and mortality that can provide good symptoms palliation in patients with locally advanced breast malignancies, so it should be considered more often by interdisciplinary care providers in those patients who fail to respond to classic multimodality treatment.

  9. [A Case of Local Recurrence and Lung Metastasis from a Rectal Cancer Treated with Systemic Chemotherapy and Cyberknife].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Tairin; Mishima, Hideyuki; Osawa, Takaaki; Matsumura, Tatsuki; Komaya, Kenichi; Kimura, Kengo; Ando, Keiichi; Saito, Takuya; Ishiguro, Seiji; Ohashi, Norifumi; Arikawa, Takashi; Komatsu, Shunichiro; Miyachi, Masahiko; Mizumatsu, Shinichiro; Sano, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent abdominoperineal resection for a rectal cancer. He developed a hip pain 3 years and 6 months after the surgery. A CT scan revealed a local recurrence in the perineum and multiple lung metastases in the bilateral lung. He received systemic chemotherapy consisting of XELOX with bevacizumab. Thereafter, the hip pain was slightly relieved. The hip pain worsened 1 year and 6 months after the recurrence. The border between the perineal tumor and skin was very narrow, and conventional radiation therapy could cause a perineal skin necrosis and subsequent poor wound healing. Therefore, we selected a Cyberknife treatment. The hip pain was relieved and a CT scan showed a reduction of the perineal tumor's size after the Cyberknife treatment. A Cyberknife treatment may be effective and promising as palliation for patients with local recurrence of rectal cancer.

  10. Centrally necrotizing breast carcinoma: a rare histological subtype, which was cause of misdiagnosis in an evident clinical local recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernanz Fernando

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Centrally necrotizing carcinoma is a rare subtype of breast carcinoma, which is characterized by an extensive central necrotic zone accounting for at least 70% of the cross-sectional area of the neoplasm. This central necrotic zone, in turn, is surrounded by a narrow rim of proliferative viable tumor cells. We report an unusual clinical situation in which a patient whose evident breast mass suggested an ipsilateral local recurrence and for which numerous attempts to confirm the histological diagnosis had failed. The patient was treated with a radical mastectomy based on clinical suspicion of breast cancer recurrence after an undesirable delay. In this case, the narrow rim of viable malignant tissue had a thickness of 0.5 to 8 mm, and the centrally necrotizing carcinoma had a central zone with a predominance of fibrosis. The special features of this case led to a misdiagnosis and to an evident clinical local recurrence.

  11. Salvage surgery in recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Oncologic outcome and predictors of disease free survival

    OpenAIRE

    Hamoir, Marc; Holvoet, Emma; Ambroise, Jérôme; Lengelé, Benoît; Schmitz, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Objective Salvage surgery in recurrent SCCHN is associated with poor outcomes. This study aimed to better identify suitable surgical candidates and those at high risk of new recurrence. Materials and methods Single-center retrospective analysis of 109 patients undergoing salvage surgery for recurrent SCCHN. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify prognostic factors affecting disease-free survival (DFS). Results The following factors showed a significant impact on DFS: Disea...

  12. Soy Isoflavones in Preventing Head and Neck Cancer Recurrence in Patients With Stage I-IV Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage I Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage II Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  13. Mapping Patterns of Local Recurrence After Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A New Approach to Adjuvant Radiation Field Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Kumar, Rachit [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Raman, Siva P. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Moore, Joseph A.; Ellsworth, Susannah; McNutt, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Laheru, Daniel A.; Jaffee, Elizabeth [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Cameron, John L. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hobbs, Robert F. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wolfgang, Christopher L. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To generate a map of local recurrences after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and to model an adjuvant radiation therapy planning treatment volume (PTV) that encompasses a majority of local recurrences. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with resectable PDA undergoing PD and 1 or more computed tomography (CT) scans more than 60 days after PD at our institution were reviewed. Patients were divided into 3 groups: no adjuvant treatment (NA), chemotherapy alone (CTA), or chemoradiation (CRT). Cross-sectional scans were centrally reviewed, and local recurrences were plotted to scale with respect to the celiac axis (CA), superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and renal veins on 1 CT scan of a template post-PD patient. An adjuvant clinical treatment volume comprising 90% of local failures based on standard expansions of the CA and SMA was created and simulated on 3 post-PD CT scans to assess the feasibility of this planning approach. Results: Of the 202 patients in the study, 40 (20%), 34 (17%), and 128 (63%) received NA, CTA, and CRT adjuvant therapy, respectively. The rate of margin-positive resections was greater in CRT patients than in CTA patients (28% vs 9%, P=.023). Local recurrence occurred in 90 of the 202 patients overall (45%) and in 19 (48%), 22 (65%), and 49 (38%) in the NA, CTA, and CRT groups, respectively. Ninety percent of recurrences were within a 3.0-cm right-lateral, 2.0-cm left-lateral, 1.5-cm anterior, 1.0-cm posterior, 1.0-cm superior, and 2.0-cm inferior expansion of the combined CA and SMA contours. Three simulated radiation treatment plans using these expansions with adjustments to avoid nearby structures were created to demonstrate the use of this treatment volume. Conclusions: Modified PTVs targeting high-risk areas may improve local control while minimizing toxicities, allowing dose escalation with intensity-modulated or stereotactic body radiation therapy.

  14. Comparison of intraoperative radiation therapy-containing multimodality treatment with historical treatment modalities for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannaerts, GHH; Rutten, HJT; Martijn, H; Hanssens, PEJ; Wiggers, T

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Treatment protocols for patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer have changed in the last two decades. Subsequently, treatment goals shifted from palliation to possible cure. In this retrospective study, we explored the treatment variables that may have contributed to the improvement i

  15. PSMA, EpCAM, VEGF and GRPR as Imaging Targets in Locally Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rybalov, Maxim; Ananias, Hildo J. K.; Hoving, Hilde D.; van der Poel, Henk G.; Rosati, Stefano; de Jong, Igle J.

    2014-01-01

    In this retrospective pilot study, the expression of the prostate- specific membrane antigen (PSMA), the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the gastrin- releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) in locally recurrent prostate cancer after brachytherap

  16. Local recurrence following mastectomy and autologous breast reconstruction: incidence, risk factors, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Siyu Wu,1,2 Miao Mo,3 Yujie Wang,1,2 Na Zhang,1,2 Jianwei Li,1,2 Genhong Di,1,2 Zhimin Shao,1,2 Jiong Wu,1,2 Guangyu Liu1,2 1Department of Breast Surgery, Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer in Shanghai, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 3Clinical Statistics Center, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Breast reconstruction (BR, including autologous breast reconstruction (ABR after mastectomy (MST, has been gaining popularity all around the world, especially in the People’s Republic of China during the past decade. However, there is a small proportion, but a significant number, of patients who develop local recurrence (LR of breast cancer postoperatively. The purpose of this study is to examine the incidence of LR, discuss risk factors associated with LR, and management of LR following MST and ABR. Methods: A total of 397 patients who underwent MST and ABR after diagnosis of breast cancer were included in this retrospective study. Data were analyzed by the Kaplan–Meier method, the log-rank statistical test, and Cox proportional hazards model. Results: From January 1999 to December 2011, 400 ABRs were performed in 397 patients in Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. The median follow-up time in the study was 3.6 years. LR occurred in 11 of 397 patients, with a median time to LR of 2.9 years. In univariate and multivariate analyses, tumor stage, hormonal therapy (yes or no, and tumor type (multifocal or nonmultifocal were significantly associated with LR after ABR following MST. Conclusion: ABR is an oncologically safe surgical procedure with an acceptable LR rate of 2.8%. Risk factors associated with high rate of LR were higher tumor stage, absence of hormonal therapy, and multifocal tumor type. Keywords: local recurrence, autologous breast reconstruction, incidence, risk factors, management

  17. Prognosis of patients with local recurrence after mastectomy or conservative surgery for early-stage invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, J; Major, T; Polgár, C; Orosz, Z; Sulyok, Z; Kásler, M

    2008-06-01

    Between 1983 and 1987, 1309 women with stage I or II breast cancer underwent mastectomy (n=894) or conservative surgery (CS, n=415). Of these patients, 124 developed an isolated local recurrence (ILR): chest wall, 56 and in-breast, 68. The 10-year actuarial rate of cause-specific survival after treatment for ILR was 52%. On multivariate analysis three independent prognostic factors for the risk of death after ILR were identified: operability of recurrence (operable vs. inoperable, relative risk [RR]: 5.9), age at initial diagnosis (>40 vs. 24 vs. mastectomy) and recurrent tumor grade (1-2 vs. 3) were not independent predictors of survival. In the mastectomy group, single surgical scar recurrence with initial node negative stage predicted good prognosis, and the 10-year survival was 85%. In the CS group, the 10-year survival rate was 88% with new primary tumor and 54% with true recurrence (p=0.01), and the type of salvage surgery (mastectomy vs. repeat complete excision) had no significant impact on survival (p=0.2). The majority (n=44) of CS patients developed mastectomy (n=16). The identified unfavorable prognostic factors are pointers of the forthcoming systemic progression. Patients with < or = 2 cm in-breast recurrence might receive a second CS.

  18. Cisplatin With or Without WEE1 Inhibitor MK-1775 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  19. Clinical and radiologic features of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma including initial presentation, local recurrence, and metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Neena

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical and imaging features of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC including initial presentation, recurrence, and metastases.

  20. Local, regional, and systemic recurrence rates in patients undergoing skin-sparing mastectomy compared with conventional mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Min; Kronowitz, Steven J; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Feig, Barry W; Symmans, W Fraser; Lucci, Anthony; Ross, Merrick I; Babiera, Gildy V; Kuerer, Henry M; Hunt, Kelly K

    2011-03-01

    Although the use of SSM is becoming more common, there are few data on long-term, local-regional, and distant recurrence rates after treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the rates of local, regional, and systemic recurrence, and survival in breast cancer patients who underwent skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) or conventional mastectomy (CM) at our institution. Patients with stage 0 to III unilateral breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy at our center from 2000 to 2005 were included in this study. Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated, and the log-rank test was used to evaluate the differences between overall and disease-free survival rates in the 2 groups. Of 1810 patients, 799 (44.1%) underwent SSM and 1011 (55.9%) underwent CM. Patients who underwent CM were older (58.3 vs 49.3 years, P<.0001) and were more likely to have stage IIB or III disease (53.0% vs 31.8%, P<.0001). Significantly more patients in the CM group received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (P<.0001). At a median follow-up of 53 months, 119 patients (6.6%) had local, regional, or systemic recurrences. The local, regional, and systemic recurrence rates did not differ significantly between the SSM and CM groups. After adjusting for clinical TNM stage and age, disease-free survival rates between the SSM and CM groups did not differ significantly. SSM is an acceptable treatment option for patients who are candidates for immediate breast reconstruction. Local-regional recurrence rates are similar to those of patients undergoing CM. Cancer 2011. © 2010 American Cancer Society. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  1. PI3K Inhibitor BKM120 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-22

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  2. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  3. [Supracricoid partial laryngectomy with CHP and CHEP for local recurrence following irradiation of vocal cord carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietek, Eugeniusz; Firlit, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The cases of CHEP and CHP following supracricoid partial laryngectomy in the treatment of the local recurrence after irradiation of vocal cord carcinoma were reported. In both cases the wound was healed by first intention. The cannula was not removed in the patient after CHEP, although the wide of neolarynx and spirometry parameters showed such a possibility. That patient with a huge obesity developed progressive coronary disease after surgery. Sometimes he needs to open the plugged cannula. The spirometry parameters confirmed that the patient after CHP could be decannulationed in the third month after surgery. Because of his psychological resistance that was delayed to the sixth month. The deglutition is efficient in both patients. The oesophagus tube was removed in sixth and seventh weeks after the operation. The patient after CHEP was carried out the objective evaluation of deglutition in the videoroentgenokinematography which showed a small aspiration. In spite of that he didn't develop any pulmonary complication during 2.5 years after surgery. A few cases and short time of observation doesn't allowed us to draw the objective conclusions to the presented question.

  4. Recurrent use of evolutionary importance for functional annotation of proteins based on local structural similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, David M; Chen, Brian Y; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y; Ward, R Matthew; Lisewski, Andreas Martin; Kimmel, Marek; Kavraki, Lydia E; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2006-06-01

    The annotation of protein function has not kept pace with the exponential growth of raw sequence and structure data. An emerging solution to this problem is to identify 3D motifs or templates in protein structures that are necessary and sufficient determinants of function. Here, we demonstrate the recurrent use of evolutionary trace information to construct such 3D templates for enzymes, search for them in other structures, and distinguish true from spurious matches. Serine protease templates built from evolutionarily important residues distinguish between proteases and other proteins nearly as well as the classic Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad. In 53 enzymes spanning 33 distinct functions, an automated pipeline identifies functionally related proteins with an average positive predictive power of 62%, including correct matches to proteins with the same function but with low sequence identity (the average identity for some templates is only 17%). Although these template building, searching, and match classification strategies are not yet optimized, their sequential implementation demonstrates a functional annotation pipeline which does not require experimental information, but only local molecular mimicry among a small number of evolutionarily important residues.

  5. Margin Proximity Correlates with Local Recurrence After Mastectomy for Patients Not Receiving Adjuvant Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorioso, Jaime M; Gonzalez Juarrero, Alexandra B; Rodysill, Brian R; Harmsen, William S; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Carter, Jodi M; Mutter, Robert W; Degnim, Amy C; Jakub, James W

    2017-07-05

    Although considerable evidence exists regarding margin status and reexcision for patients undergoing breast conservation therapy, few data address the impact of a close margin for patients undergoing mastectomy without postmastectomy radiotherapy. This retrospective review identified 1147 patients who underwent 1206 mastectomies with negative final margins for breast cancer from 2006 to 2010. Margin distance was analyzed as a continuous variable and dichotomized variable ((≤2 vs >2 mm). Patients undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy were excluded from the study. Uni- and multivariable analyses were used to assess the association of reexcision, proximity of the final margin, adjuvant therapy, and other clinical and pathologic factors with local recurrence (LR). In 158 mastectomies (13.1%), a reexcision was performed for a close (n = 90) or positive (n = 68) margin. All but one were identified intraoperatively using frozen section analysis. The reexcision rates for skin- and nipple-sparing mastectomy (SSM/NSM) were higher than for simple mastectomy (SM) (19.8 vs 9.3%; p mastectomy for breast cancer, a wider final margin correlated with a reduced risk for LR. The rates for LR were similar between SSM/NSM and SM despite higher rates of intraoperative reexcision for SSM/NSM.

  6. LOCAL APPLICATION OF RECOMBINANT INTERFERON-ALFA2 FOR TREATMENT OF RECURRENT RESPIRATORY PAPILLOMATOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plouzhnikov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP is the most frequently occurring tumour of the upper airways associated with a human papilloma virus (HPV. The aim of this study was to reveal some features of systemic and local immunity in RRP, to investigate clinical and immunological efficiency of local treatment with recombinant interferon-α (rIFNα, and to determine clinical and laboratory indications to it’s administration. The study included forty-one patients with confirmed RRP. Their examination included histological examination of papillomas, detection of HPV DNA in papilloma tissues using PCR technique, phenotyping of circulating lymphocytes (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD25+, HLA-DR+ by means of flow cytometry. The levels of IFNγ, TNFα, GM-CSF, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13 in laryngeal secretions were quantified by a multiplex immunoassay. In all cases, we revealed an initially decreased functional activity of Т-lymphocytes, as well as low contents of Т-killer and NK-cells. In laryngeal secretions, increased values of Th1-type-specific cytokines (IFNγ and TNFα were found. Besides that, high levels of local IL-4 were detected thus being typical to alternative Th2-type response. Single inhalations 1000 000 ME of «Interal» or «Roferon» preparations were administered daily (a total of 10-15 millions ME per therapeutic course. Thirteen patients received the treatment after surgery, as an adjuvant therapy, and eleven patients underwent monotherapy. Complete tumor regression of tumors following this monotherapy was observed in 45,5% of the patients, whereas partial regression was registered in 45%. The effect was mostly expressed in frequently recurring juvenile papillomatosis with aggressive course and histological pattern of actively proliferating papilloma. In the patients with complete tumor regression, high initial levels of TNFα and IL-4/IFNг ratios were revealed initially in laryngeal secretions. When rIFNб was

  7. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  8. Phase II study of capecitabine as palliative treatment for patients with recurrent and metastatic squamous head and neck cancer after previous platinum-based treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Trufero, J; Isla, D; Adansa, J C; Irigoyen, A; Hitt, R; Gil-Arnaiz, I; Lambea, J; Lecumberri, M J; Cruz, J J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Platinum-based therapy (PBT) is the standard therapy for recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer (HNC), but the incidence of recurrence remains high. This study evaluates the efficacy and tolerability of capecitabine as palliative monotherapy for recurrent HNC previously treated with PBT. Methods: Patients aged 18–75 years, with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0–2, squamous HNC with locoregional and/or metastatic recurrence previously treated with PBT and adequate organ functions, were included. Capecitabine (1.250 mg m−2 BID) was administered on days 1–14 every 21 days for at least two cycles. Results: A total of 40 male patients with a median age of 58 years were analysed. All patients received a median number of four cycles of capecitabine (range: 1–9) and the median relative dose intensity was 91%. Seven patients were not evaluable for response. Overall response rate was 24.2%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 4.8 and 7.3 months, respectively. Haematological adverse events (AEs) grade 3/4 were reported in six patients. Most common grade 3/4 non-haematological AEs were asthenia (12.5%), palmar-plantar eritrodisestesia (10%), mucositis (10%), dysphagia (10%) and diarrhoea (7.5%). Conclusions: Capecitabine seems to be an active, feasible and well-tolerated mode of palliative treatment for advanced HNC patients who have previously received PBT schedules. PMID:20485287

  9. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-11

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  10. Brain metastases as site of first and isolated recurrence of breast cancer: the role of systemic therapy after local treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwińska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The role of systemic treatment was assessed after local therapy for breast cancer patients who developed central nervous system (CNS) metastases as a first and isolated recurrence. Subjects were 128 breast cancer patients with brain metastases as the first and isolated site of recurrence that were selected from 673 consecutive breast cancer patients with brain metastases treated at the same institution. Median survival from brain metastases in patients with and without systemic treatment after local therapy was respectively 15 and 4 months (p systemic treatment after local therapy, was respectively 22 and 7 months (p = 0.003). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that good performance status, solitary brain metastasis and systemic therapy undertaken after local treatment were factors which prolonged survival. However patient survival was adversely affected by those having leptomeningeal metastasis associated with brain parenchymal lesions. Systemic therapy, undertaken after local treatment improved survival in those patients with breast cancer and brain metastases as the site of first and isolated recurrence. Further study is required in order to fully establish the role of systemic treatment for this patient group.

  11. What is the role of postoperative re-irradiation in recurrent and second primary squamous cell cancer of head and neck? A literature review according to PICO criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlotti, Anna; Mazzola, Rosario; Alterio, Daniela; Alongi, Filippo; Bacigalupo, Almalina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Maddalo, Marta; Russi, Elvio Grazioso; Orlandi, Ester

    2017-03-01

    Re-irradiation has been increasingly offered as a potential effective treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) loco-regional recurrence as well as second primary tumor in previously irradiated area. This review focused on the role of postoperative re-irradiation (POreRT) in terms of feasibility, toxicity and long-term outcomes in HNSCC patients. The key issue for the research was formulated in two questions according to the PICO (population, intervention, control, and outcomes) criteria. A total of 16 publications met the inclusion criteria for a total of 919 patients; in 522 patients POreRT was performed. POreRT in recurrent and second primary HNSCC seems to be feasible in highly selected patients with the intent to guarantee an acceptable LC compared to surgery alone. The optimal RT schedule remains unclear due to the heterogeneity of literature data.

  12. A Prospective Phase 2 Trial of Reirradiation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Plus Cetuximab in Patients With Previously Irradiated Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ferris, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ohr, James [Division Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Clump, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Davis, Kara S.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bauman, Julie E.; Gibson, Michael K. [Division Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Branstetter, Barton F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Heron, Dwight E., E-mail: herond2@umpc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Salvage options for unresectable locally recurrent, previously irradiated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (rSCCHN) are limited. Although the addition of reirradiation may improve outcomes compared to chemotherapy alone, significant toxicities limit salvage reirradiation strategies, leading to suboptimal outcomes. We therefore designed a phase 2 protocol to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plus cetuximab for rSCCHN. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to March 2013, 50 patients >18 years of age with inoperable locoregionally confined rSCCHN within a previously irradiated field receiving ≥60 Gy, with a Zubrod performance status of 0 to 2, and normal hepatic and renal function were enrolled. Patients received concurrent cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} on day −7 and then 250 mg/m{sup 2} on days 0 and +8) plus SBRT (40-44 Gy in 5 fractions on alternating days over 1-2 weeks). Primary endpoints were 1-year locoregional progression-free survival and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 graded toxicity. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 18 months (range: 10-70). The 1-year local PFS rate was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44%-75%), locoregional PFS was 37% (95% CI: 23%-53%), distant PFS was 71% (95% CI: 54%-85%), and PFS was 33% (95% CI: 20%-49%). The median overall survival was 10 months (95% CI: 7-16), with a 1-year overall survival of 40% (95% CI: 26%-54%). At last follow-up, 69% died of disease, 4% died with disease, 15% died without progression, 10% were alive without progression, and 2% were alive with progression. Acute and late grade 3 toxicity was observed in 6% of patients respectively. Conclusions: SBRT with concurrent cetuximab appears to be a safe salvage treatment for rSCCHN of short overall treatment time.

  13. Salvage Total Pelvic Exenteration with Bilateral V-Y Advancement Flap Reconstruction for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Tashiro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Total pelvic exenteration for locally recurrent rectal cancer typically requires extensive excision of the pelvic floor with perineal skin. Due to the extensiveness of the procedure and its non-curative nature, it is controversial as purely palliative therapy. A 66-year-old male patient who had undergone abdominoperineal resection at another hospital 8 years prior was admitted to our hospital. During radiation and chemotherapy for 2 years, he complained of perineal pain, discharge, cacosmia and bleeding from a recurrent tumor. The 10 × 8 cm recurrent tumor was exposed on the perineum and the patient suffered from serious discomfort in his daily life during walking or sitting. We performed total pelvic exenteration with partial sacrectomy, after which the large perineal defect was reconstructed with a bilateral V-Y gluteus maximus advancement flap in approximately 120 min. The patient's postoperative course was satisfactory and his quality of life markedly improved.

  14. Taxane-containing induction chemotherapy followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy. Outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

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    Broemme, J.O.; Schmuecking, M.; Leiser, D.; Geretschlaeger, A.; Ghadjar, P.; Aebersold, D.M. [Bern Univ. Hospital and Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Arnold, A.; Giger, R. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Head and Neck Surgery; Rauch, D. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Medical Oncology; Plasswilm, L. [Kantonsspital, St. Gallen (Switzerland). Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Background: Induction chemotherapy followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy is an intensified treatment approach for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) that might be associated with high rates of toxicity. Materials and methods: The data of 40 consecutive patients who underwent induction chemotherapy with docetaxel-containing regimens followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concomitant systemic therapy for unresectable locally advanced HNSCC were retrospectively analyzed. Primary objectives were RT-related acute and late toxicity. Secondary objectives were response to induction chemotherapy, locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), overall survival (OS), and influencing factors for LRRFS and OS. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 21 months (range, 2-53 months). Patients received a median of three cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT to 72 Gy. Three patients died during induction chemotherapy and one during chemoradiotherapy. Acute RT-related toxicity was of grade 3 and 4 in 72 and 3 % of patients, respectively, mainly dysphagia and dermatitis. Late RT-related toxicity was mainly xerostomia and bone/cartilage necrosis and was of grade 3 and 4 in 15 % of patients. One- and 2-year LRRFS and OS were 72 and 49 % and 77 and 71 %, respectively. Conclusion: Induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy using IMRT was associated with a high rate of severe acute and late RT-related toxicities in this selected patient cohort. Four patients were lost because of fatal complications. Induction chemotherapy did not compromise the delivery of full-dose RT; however, the use of three cycles of concomitant cisplatin was impaired. (orig.)

  15. Experience in qualitative and quantitative FDG PET in follow-up of patients with suspected recurrence from head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapela, M; Eigtved, A; Jyrkkiö, S;

    2000-01-01

    studies were performed in 56 patients having a total of 81 lesions, which were clinically suspected for recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck. The PET images were interpreted visually, and tracer uptake was quantitated as the standardised uptake value adjusted to body weight (SUV). Sensitivity...... of visual interpretation of the PET images for the presence of malignancy ranged from 84 to 95%, and specificity from 84 to 93%, respectively, depending on the selected scheme for grading of the lesions. Malignant lesions accumulated significantly more FDG than the benign ones (the median SUVs were 6...

  16. Localization using nonindividualized head-related transfer functions. [for auditory interfaces in virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Arruda, Marianne; Kistler, Doris J.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    1993-01-01

    The paper investigates the accuracy of localization by inexperienced listeners of the direction (azimuth and elevation) of wideband noisebursts presented in the free-field or over headphones, with headphone stimuli being synthesized using head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) from a representative subject of Wightman and Kistler (1989). Many subjects showed high rates of front-back and up-down confusions that increased significantly for virtual sources compared to the free-field stimuli. When confusions were resolved, localization of virtual sources was quite accurate and comparable to the free-field sources for 12 out of 16 subjects. The results of this study suggest that, while the interaural cues to horizontal location are robust, the spectral cues considered important for resolving location along a particular cone-of-confusion are distorted by a synthesis process that uses nonindividualized HRTFs.

  17. Risk Factors for Local and Distant Recurrence After Surgical Treatment in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Dariusz Adam; Rudzinski, Piotr; Langfort, Renata; Orlowski, Tadeusz

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify independent perioperative and pathologic variables associated with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) recurrence after complete surgical resection. A retrospective examination was performed of a prospectively maintained database of patients who underwent resection for NSCLC from January 2009 to January 2014 at a multi-institution. Clinicopathologic variables were evaluated for their influence on frequency of recurrence. Cox proportional regression hazard model analysis examined the association of recurrence in NSCLC. Of these patients, 2816 (19.3%) experienced recurrence of primary cancer. Local or distant recurrence was found in 20.5% and 79.5% of patients, respectively. Median follow-up was 27.9 months (range, 11.4-66.0 months). The analysis indicated independent effects of the following risk factors on the risk of recurrence: age 64-90 years (hazard ratio [HR], 1.136; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.024-1.261), histologic type adenocarcinoma (HR, 1.117; 95% CI 1.005-1.24), blood vessel invasion (HR, 1.236; 95% CI, 1.124-1.359), lymphatic vessel invasion (HR, 1.287; 95% CI, 1.176-1.409), visceral pleural invasion (HR, 1.641; 95% CI, 1.215-2.218), N1 disease (HR, 1.142; 95% CI, 0.99-1.316), N2 disease (HR, 1.596; 95% CI, 1.271-1.649), tumor size of 20-30 mm (HR, 1.235; 95% CI, 1.081-1.41), 30-50 mm (HR, 1.544; 95% CI, 1.33-1.792), 50-70 mm (HR, 1.521; 95% CI, 1.275-1.815), and 70-100 mm (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.385-2.11), pneumonectomy (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.97-1.203), and sublobar resection (HR, 1.762; 95% CI, 1.537-2.019). In the largest series reported to date on postresection recurrence of NSCLC, increasing pathologic stage, advanced age, pneumonectomy, sublobar resection, lymphatic and blood vessel invasion, and visceral pleural invasion were independently associated with local and distant recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Early PET imaging with [68]Ga-PSMA-11 increases the detection rate of local recurrence in prostate cancer patients with biochemical recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Fritz, Josef; Decristoforo, Clemens; Kendler, Dorota; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Nilica, Bernhard; Maffey-Steffan, Johanna; di Santo, Gianpaolo; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2017-09-01

    PET/CT using (68)Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen PSMA-11 (HBEDD-CC) has emerged as a promising imaging method in the diagnostic evaluation of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical recurrence. However, assessment of local recurrence (LR) may be limited by intense physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole-body scans, normally conducted 60 min post-tracer injection (p.i.). It could be shown on early dynamic imaging studies that (68)Ga-PSMA-11 uptake in PC lesions occurs earlier than tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. This study aims to investigate whether early static PET acquisition increases detection rate of local recurrence on (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in comparison to PET imaging 60 min p.i.. 203 consecutive PC patients with biochemical failure referred to (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT were analysed retrospectively (median prostate specific antigen (PSA) value: 1.44 ng/ml). In addition to whole-body PET/CT scans 60 min p.i., early static imaging of the pelvis was performed, starting at a median time of 283 s p.i. (range: 243-491 s). Assessment was based on visual analysis and calculation of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of pathologic lesions present in the pelvic area found on early PET imaging and on 60 min-PET scans. 26 patients (12.8%) were judged positive for LR on PET scans 60 min p.i. (median SUVmax: 10.8; range: 4.7-40.9), whereas 50 patients (24.6%) revealed a lesion suggestive of LR on early PET imaging (median SUVmax: 5.9; range: 2.9-17.6), resulting in a significant rise in detection rate (p PET scans 60 min p.i. decreased significantly with the help of early imaging (15.8% vs. 4.5% of patients; p PET scans (31.0%). However, acquisition starting time of early PET scans differed significantly in the patient groups with and without urinary bladder activity (median starting time of 321 vs. 275 s p.i.; range: 281-491 vs. 243-311 s p.i.; p PET/CT in addition to whole-body scans 60 min p

  19. UNDIFFERENTIATED PLEOMORPHIC CARDIAC SARCOMA: THE ADVANTAGES OF PET/CT IN DETECTION OF LOCAL RECURRENCE AND DISTANT METASTASES (CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Ryzhkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a case of a 52-year-old female patient with pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma/ undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma of the left atrium. One year after surgical resection of the primary tumor, microsurgical removal of the right parietal lobe metastatic tumor was performed. PET/CT with 11C-methionine and 18F-FDG performed 2 months after surgical resection of brain metastasis revealed local recurrence of sarcoma in the left atrium and left lateral ventricle metastases. This clinical case demonstrates high diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT with 18F-FDG and 11C-methionine in detecting local recurrence of cardiac undifferentiated sarcoma, however, PET/CT with 11C-methionine appears to be superior to PET/CT with18F-FDG in detecting brain metastasis.

  20. Local triple-combination therapy results in tumour regression and prevents recurrence in a colon cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, João; Oliva, Nuria; Zhang, Yi; Artzi, Natalie

    2016-10-01

    Conventional cancer therapies involve the systemic delivery of anticancer agents that neither discriminate between cancer and normal cells nor eliminate the risk of cancer recurrence. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of gene, drug and phototherapy delivered through a prophylactic hydrogel patch leads, in a colon cancer mouse model, to complete tumour remission when applied to non-resected tumours and to the absence of tumour recurrence when applied following tumour resection. The adhesive hydrogel patch enhanced the stability and provided local delivery of embedded nanoparticles. Spherical gold nanoparticles were used as a first wave of treatment to deliver siRNAs against Kras, a key oncogene driver, and rod-shaped gold nanoparticles mediated the conversion of near-infrared radiation into heat, causing the release of a chemotherapeutic as well as thermally induced cell damage. This local, triple-combination therapy can be adapted to other cancer cell types and to molecular targets associated with disease progression.

  1. Cryotherapy with concurrent CpG oligonucleotide treatment controls local tumor recurrence and modulates Her2/neu immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Jesse J.; Gibson, Heather M.; Littrup, Peter J.; Reyes, Joyce D.; Cher, Michael L.; Takashima, Akira; Wei, Wei-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous cryoablation is a minimally invasive procedure for tumor destruction, which can potentially initiate or amplify antitumor immunity through the release of tumor-associated antigens. However, clinically efficacious immunity is lacking and regional recurrences are a limiting factor relative to surgical excision. To understand the mechanism of immune activation by cryoablation, comprehensive analyses of innate immunity and Her2/neu humoral and cellular immunity following cryoablation with or without peritumoral CpG injection was conducted using two Her2/neu+ tumor systems in wild type, neu-tolerant, and SCID mice. Cryoablation of neu+ TUBO tumor in BALB/c mice resulted in systemic immune priming, but not in neu-tolerant BALB NeuT mice. Cryoablation of human Her2+ D2F2/E2 tumor enabled the functionality of tumor-induced immunity but secondary tumors were refractory to anti-tumor immunity if rechallenge occurred during the resolution phase of the cryoablated tumor. A step-wise increase in local recurrence was observed in wild type, neu-tolerant, and SCID mice indicating a role of adaptive immunity in controlling residual tumor foci. Importantly, local recurrences were eliminated or greatly reduced in wild type, neu tolerant and SCID mice when CpG was incorporated in the cryoablation regimen, showing significant local control by innate immunity. For long-term protection, however, adaptive immunity was required because most SCID mice eventually succumbed to local tumor recurrence even with combined cryoablation and CpG treatment. This improved understanding of the mechanisms by which cryoablation affects innate and adaptive immunity will help guide appropriate combination of therapeutic interventions to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25092895

  2. Evaluation of 1p Losses in Primary Carcinomas, Local Recurrences and Peripheral Metastases from Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Thorstensen

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas have shown that loss of the distal part of chromosome arm 1p is common, particularly in tumors of the left colon. Because the importance of 1p loss in colorectal cancer metastases is unknown, we compared the frequency, exact site and extent of ip deletions in primary carcinomas (n=28, local recurrences (n=19 and metastases (n=33 from 67 colorectal cancer patients using 14 markers in an allelic imbalance study. Loss of 1p was found in 50% of the primary carcinomas, 33% of the local recurrences, and 64% of the metastases, revealing a significant difference between the local recurrences and the metastases (P=.04. The smallest region of 1p deletion overlap (SRO defined separately for each group of lesions had the region between markers Di S2647 and D1 S2644, at 1 p35-36, in common. The genes PLA2G2A (1p35.1-36 and TP73 (1p36.3 were shown to lie outside this consistently lost region, suggesting that neither of them are targets for the 1p loss. In the second part of the study, microdissected primary carcinomas and distant metastases from the same colorectal cancer patients (n=18 were analyzed, and the same 1p genotype was found in the majority of patients (12/18, 67%. The finding that primary carcinoma cells with metastatic ability usually contain 1p deletions, and that some cases lacking 1p alterations in the primary tumor acquire such changes during growth of a metastatic lesion, supports the notion that 1p loss may be important both early and late in colorectal carcinogenesis, with the apparent exception of local recurrences.

  3. Advantages and pitfalls of {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography in detecting locally residual or recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma: comparison with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Taipei Chang Gung Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Taipei Chang Gung Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Yen-Chao [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Taipei Chang Gung Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Wang, Hung-Ming [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Department of Haematology/Oncology, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Taipei Chang Gung Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Taipei Chang Gung Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (Taiwan)

    2006-09-15

    This prospective study was designed to elucidate the advantages and pitfalls of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in detecting locally residual/recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in comparison with MRI. We recruited NPC patients from two ongoing prospective trials. One is being performed to evaluate suspected local recurrence (group A) and the other to assess local treatment response 3 months after therapy (group B). Both groups received {sup 18}F-FDG PET and head and neck MRI. The gold standard was histopathology or clinical/imaging follow-up. An optimal cut-off standardised uptake value (SUV) was retrospectively determined. From January 2002 to August 2004, 146 patients were eligible. Thirty-four were from group A and 112 from group B. In all, 26 had locally recurrent/residual tumours. Differences in detection rate between {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRI were not statistically significant in either group. However, {sup 18}F-FDG PET showed significantly higher specificity than MRI in detecting residual tumours among patients with initial T4 disease (p=0.04). In contrast, the specificity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET for patients with an initial T1-2 tumour treated with intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) was significantly lower than that for patients not treated by ICBT (72.2% vs 98.1%, p=0.003). At an SUV cut-off of 4.2, PET showed an equal and a higher accuracy compared with MRI in groups A and B, respectively. {sup 18}F-FDG PET is superior to MRI in identifying locally residual NPC among patients with initial T4 disease but demonstrates limitations in assessing treatment response in patients with initial T1-2 disease after ICBT. A cut-off SUV is a useful index for aiding in the visual detection of locally residual/recurrent NPC. (orig.)

  4. PSMA, EpCAM, VEGF and GRPR as Imaging Targets in Locally Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Rybalov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this retrospective pilot study, the expression of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA, the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR in locally recurrent prostate cancer after brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT was investigated, and their adequacy for targeted imaging was analyzed. Prostate cancer specimens were collected of 17 patients who underwent salvage prostatectomy because of locally recurrent prostate cancer after brachytherapy or EBRT. Immunohistochemistry was performed. A pathologist scored the immunoreactivity in prostate cancer and stroma. Staining for PSMA was seen in 100% (17/17, EpCAM in 82.3% (14/17, VEGF in 82.3% (14/17 and GRPR in 100% (17/17 of prostate cancer specimens. Staining for PSMA, EpCAM and VEGF was seen in 0% (0/17 and for GRPR in 100% (17/17 of the specimens’ stromal compartments. In 11.8% (2/17 of cases, the GRPR staining intensity of prostate cancer was higher than stroma, while in 88.2% (15/17, the staining was equal. Based on the absence of stromal staining, PSMA, EpCAM and VEGF show high tumor distinctiveness. Therefore, PSMA, EpCAM and VEGF can be used as targets for the bioimaging of recurrent prostate cancer after EBRT to exclude metastatic disease and/or to plan local salvage therapy.

  5. Co-occurring gland angularity in localized subgraphs: predicting biochemical recurrence in intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George; Sparks, Rachel; Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Shih, Natalie N C; Feldman, Michael D; Spangler, Elaine; Rebbeck, Timothy; Tomaszewski, John E; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative histomorphometry (QH) refers to the application of advanced computational image analysis to reproducibly describe disease appearance on digitized histopathology images. QH thus could serve as an important complementary tool for pathologists in interrogating and interpreting cancer morphology and malignancy. In the US, annually, over 60,000 prostate cancer patients undergo radical prostatectomy treatment. Around 10,000 of these men experience biochemical recurrence within 5 years of surgery, a marker for local or distant disease recurrence. The ability to predict the risk of biochemical recurrence soon after surgery could allow for adjuvant therapies to be prescribed as necessary to improve long term treatment outcomes. The underlying hypothesis with our approach, co-occurring gland angularity (CGA), is that in benign or less aggressive prostate cancer, gland orientations within local neighborhoods are similar to each other but are more chaotically arranged in aggressive disease. By modeling the extent of the disorder, we can differentiate surgically removed prostate tissue sections from (a) benign and malignant regions and (b) more and less aggressive prostate cancer. For a cohort of 40 intermediate-risk (mostly Gleason sum 7) surgically cured prostate cancer patients where half suffered biochemical recurrence, the CGA features were able to predict biochemical recurrence with 73% accuracy. Additionally, for 80 regions of interest chosen from the 40 studies, corresponding to both normal and cancerous cases, the CGA features yielded a 99% accuracy. CGAs were shown to be statistically signicantly ([Formula: see text]) better at predicting BCR compared to state-of-the-art QH methods and postoperative prostate cancer nomograms.

  6. Regional hyperthermia in conjunction with definitive radiotherapy against recurrent or locally advanced prostate cancer T3pNoMo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilly, W.; Gellermann, J.; Graf, R.; Felix, R.; Wust, P. [Dept. of Radiation Medicine, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hildebrandt, B. [Dept. of Internal Medicine - Hematology and Oncology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Weissbach, L. [Dept. of Urology, Urban Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Budach, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: since long-term results of the standard treatment of locally advanced or recurrent prostatic carcinoma are unsatisfactory, the role for additional regional hyperthermia was evaluated in a phase I/II study. Patients and methods: from 08/1996 to 03/2000, 22 patients were treated by a standard irradiation regimen (68.4 Gy) in combination with regional hyperthermia (weekly, five to six times), and five of 22 patients received short-term (neoadjuvant) hormonal treatment. Of these, 15 patients had primary prostatic carcinoma T3 pNO MO and seven a histologically confirmed local recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Feasibility of hyperthermia, and acute/late toxicity as well as long-term follow-up (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] control, overall survival) were analyzed. Clinical endpoints were correlated with thermal parameters. Results: mean maximum temperatures along the urethra of 41.4 C (41.0 C for the recurrences), and mean T{sub 90} values of 40.7 C could be achieved. Severe acute toxicity of grade 3 occurred at the rectum in three, at the urethra in four, at the intestine in one, and a burn induced by hyperthermia in one of 22 patients. Late toxicity was only observed rectally in one patient (grade 3) and at the urethra in two patients (grade 2). There was no correlation between thermal parameters and any toxicity. The survival curves showed a PSA control for primary prostatic carcinoma > 50% after 6 years, but no long-term PSA control for the recurrences. Overall survival after 6 years was 95% for primary carcinoma, and 60% for the recurrences. There was a clear correlation between higher temperatures or thermal doses with long-term PSA control. Conclusion: regional hyperthermia might be a low-toxicity approach to increase PSA control of common treatment schedules. Further evaluation, in particular employing improved hyperthermia technology, is worthwhile. (orig.)

  7. Pancreatectomy with venous resection for pT3 head adenocarcinoma: Perioperative outcomes, recurrence pattern and prognostic implications of histologically confirmed vascular infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malleo, Giuseppe; Maggino, Laura; Marchegiani, Giovanni; Feriani, Giovanni; Esposito, Alessandro; Landoni, Luca; Casetti, Luca; Paiella, Salvatore; Baggio, Elda; Lipari, Giovanni; Capelli, Paola; Scarpa, Aldo; Bassi, Claudio; Salvia, Roberto

    The outcomes of pancreatectomy with superior mesenteric vein (SMV) or portal vein (PV) resection have been mixed. This study investigated the morbidity and mortality profile after SMV-PV resection in comparison with standard pancreatectomy. Furthermore, we assessed whether tumors with histologically proven SMV-PV infiltration differ from other pT3 neoplasms in terms of recurrence pattern and survival. All patients with a pT3 head adenocarcinoma resected from 2000 to 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. In the SMV-PV resection group, information on venous wall status was obtained through pathologic reports. Standard statistical methods were used for data analysis. The study population consisted of 651 patients, of whom 81 (12.4%) underwent synchronous SMV-PV resection. Venous resection was not associated with a higher rate of postoperative complications (60.5% versus 50.2%) and mortality (1.2% versus 1.1%) in comparison with standard pancreatectomy. Vascular infiltration was confirmed pathologically in 56/81 patients (69.1%). The median disease-specific survival of the entire population was 27 months (95% CI 24.6-29.3), with a 5-year survival rate of 20.5%. The median recurrence-free survival was 18 months (95% CI 15.0-20.9). On multivariate analysis, ASA score, preoperative pain, Ca 19-9 levels, tumor grade, R-status, lymph-vascular invasion, N-status, and adjuvant therapy resulted to be survival predictors. Similarly, Ca 19.9 levels, R-status, and N-status were predictors of recurrence. SMV-PV infiltration was not a significant prognostic factor. Morbidity and mortality rates of pancreatectomy with SMV-PV resection are comparable with standard pancreatectomy. Pancreatic head adenocarcinoma with histologically confirmed SMV-PV infiltration does not segregate prognostically from other pT3 tumors. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Braquiterapia intersticial de alta tasa de rescate en cáncer cabeza cuello previamente radiado High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy in previously irradiated recurrent head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Gutiérrez-Bayard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de los avances en el tratamiento de cáncer de cabeza y cuello (CCC, el 15-50% de los pacientes presentan recurrencia locorregional. Para los pacientes que presentan enfermedad localmente recurrente o un segundo tumor primario en un campo previamente irradiado, las opciones terapéuticas de rescate son limitadas, siendo la resección quirúrgica con intención curativa la opción de elección para los pacientes con enfermedad limitada. Reirradiación con o sin la adición de quimioterapia puede ser una buena opción, obteniendo en pacientes seleccionados supervivencia a largo plazo. La braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis (HDRBT puede jugar un papel importante en el tratamiento de rescate en tumores de cabeza y cuello recurrentes. Presentamos un paciente de 56 años diagnosticado de cáncer de lengua sometido a cirugía y radioterapia externa adyuvante, y recurrencia metastásica ganglionar cervical contralateral a los 18 meses. Recibió tratamiento multidisciplinar con quimioterapia, cirugía y braquiterapia intersticial.Despite advances in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC, 15-50% of patients present locoregional disease recurrence. The therapeutic options are limited for patients who present locally recurrent disease or a second primary tumor in a previously irradiated field. Surgical salvage with curative intent is the preferred option for patients with limited-volume disease. Re-irradiation with or without the addition of chemotherapy may hold promise for long-term survival for selected patients. High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy can play an important role in the salvage treatment of previously irradiated recurrent head and neck cancer. The case reported was a 56-year old man diagnosed of tongue cancer who presented recurrent metastatic contralateral cervical node 1.5 years after radical treatment with surgery and adjuvant external radiotherapy. He received multidisciplinary treatment with chemotherapy, surgery and HDR

  9. Surgical Margins and the Risk of Local-Regional Recurrence After Mastectomy Without Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen Yuhui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Duggan, Margaret M. [Department of Surgery, Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Golshan, Mehra [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pochebit, Stephen [Department of Pathology, Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wong, Julia S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bellon, Jennifer R., E-mail: jbellon@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Although positive surgical margins are generally associated with a higher risk of local-regional recurrence (LRR) for most solid tumors, their significance after mastectomy remains unclear. We sought to clarify the influence of the mastectomy margin on the risk of LRR. Methods and Materials: The retrospective cohort consisted of 397 women who underwent mastectomy and no radiation for newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer from 1998-2005. Time to isolated LRR and time to distant metastasis (DM) were evaluated by use of cumulative-incidence analysis and competing-risks regression analysis. DM was considered a competing event for analysis of isolated LRR. Results: The median follow-up was 6.7 years (range, 0.5-12.8 years). The superficial margin was positive in 41 patients (10%) and close ({<=}2 mm) in 56 (14%). The deep margin was positive in 23 patients (6%) and close in 34 (9%). The 5-year LRR and DM rates for all patients were 2.4% (95% confidence interval, 0.9-4.0) and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 1.6-5.3) respectively. Fourteen patients had an LRR. Margin status was significantly associated with time to isolated LRR (P=.04); patients with positive margins had a 5-year LRR of 6.2%, whereas patients with close margins and negative margins had 5-year LRRs of 1.5% and 1.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, positive margins, positive nodes, lymphovascular invasion, grade 3 histology, and triple-negative subtype were associated with significantly higher rates of LRR. When these factors were included in a multivariate analysis, only positive margins and triple-negative subtype were associated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Patients with positive mastectomy margins had a significantly higher rate of LRR than those with a close or negative margin. However, the absolute risk of LRR in patients with a positive surgical margin in this series was low, and therefore the benefit of postmastectomy radiation in this population with otherwise favorable

  10. Subtalar distraction arthrodesis using fresh-frozen allogeneic femoral head augmented with local autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chao-Ching; Tzeng, Yun-Hsuan; Lin, Chien-Fu Jeff; Huang, Ching-Kuei; Chen, Wei-Ming; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2013-04-01

    Tricortical autograft has been commonly used in subtalar distraction arthrodesis (SDA) for severe calcaneal malunion. Structural allograft enriched with orthobiological agents is an alternative. This study was performed to evaluate the results of SDA using fresh-frozen allogeneic femoral head without the addition of orthobiological agents. We retrospectively reviewed 15 consecutive SDA procedures (13 patients) with allogeneic femoral head augmented with local autograft for the treatment of severe calcaneal malunion. Clinical outcome was evaluated with the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score, visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, Short Form-12 (SF-12), range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint, and patient satisfaction rate. Radiographic assessment included the talar declination angle (TDA), calcaneal inclination angle (CIA), lateral talocalcaneal angle (LTCA), heel height, calcaneal length, and union time. At a median follow-up of 36.0 months (range, 24-47 months), all 15 feet (100%) achieved union, at a median of 13.0 weeks (range, 12-18 weeks). The AOFAS score and VAS pain score improved significantly, with a satisfaction rate of 93.3%. The TDA, CIA, LTCA, and heel height improved significantly. The median increase in heel height was 8.6 mm (range, 1.9-20.1 mm). There was a significant reduction in calcaneal length. Complications included 1 varus malalignment, 1 complex regional pain syndrome, 1 hardware irritation, and 1 sural neuralgia. This study found that SDA using fresh-frozen femoral head allograft without an orthobiological agent was cost-effective and may have outcomes comparable to those using autograft or allograft enriched with orthobiological agents.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of adding cetuximab to platinum-based chemotherapy for first-line treatment of recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek B Hannouf

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the cost effectiveness of adding cetuximab to platinum-based chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC from the perspective of the Canadian public healthcare system. METHODS: We developed a Markov state transition model to project the lifetime clinical and economic consequences of recurrent or metastatic HNSCC. Transition probabilities were derived from a phase III trial of cetuximab in patients with recurrent or metastatic HNSCC. Cost estimates were obtained from London Health Sciences Centre and the Ontario Case Costing Initiative, and expressed in 2011 CAD. A three year time horizon was used. Future costs and health benefits were discounted at 5%. RESULTS: In the base case, cetuximab plus platinum-based chemotherapy compared to platinum-based chemotherapy alone led to an increase of 0.093 QALY and an increase in cost of $36,000 per person, resulting in an incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER of $386,000 per QALY gained. The cost effectiveness ratio was most sensitive to the cost per mg of cetuximab and the absolute risk of progression among patients receiving cetuximab. CONCLUSION: The addition of cetuximab to standard platinum-based chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with recurrent or metastatic HNSCC has an ICER that exceeds $100,000 per QALY gained. Cetuximab can only be economically attractive in this patient population if the cost of cetuximab is substantially reduced or if future research can identify predictive markers to select patients most likely to benefit from the addition of cetuximab to chemotherapy.

  12. High b-Value Diffusion MRI to Differentiate Recurrent Tumors from Posttreatment Changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Single Center Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Acampora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently DW-MR Imaging has shown promising results in distinguishing between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSSC. Aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performances of DWI at high b-value (b = 2000 s/mm2 compared to standard b-value (b = 1000 s/mm2 and ADCratio values (ADCratio=ADC2000/ADC1000×100 to differentiate recurrent tumors from posttreatment changes after treatment of HSNCC. 20 patients (16 M, 4 F underwent MR Imaging between 2 and 16 months (mean 7 after treatment. Besides morphological sequences, we performed single-shot echo-planar DWI at b = 1000 s/mm2 and b = 2000 s/mm2, and corresponding ADC maps were generated (ADC1000 and ADC2000, resp.. By considering contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as references, ROIs were drawn in order to evaluate mean ADC1000, ADC2000, and ADCratio. The mean ADC1000 and ADC2000 in recurrent tumors were significantly lower than those in posttreatment changes (P=0.001 and P=0.016, resp.. Moreover, the mean ADCratio between the two groups showed a statistically significant difference (P=0.002. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of ADCratio were 82.0%, 100%, and 90%, respectively, by considering an optimal cutoff value of 65.5%. ADCratio is a promising value to differentiate between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in HNSCC and may be more useful than ADC1000 and ADC2000.

  13. High b-Value Diffusion MRI to Differentiate Recurrent Tumors from Posttreatment Changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Single Center Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acampora, Angela; Manzo, Gaetana; Fenza, Giacomo; Busto, Giuseppina; Serino, Antonietta; Manto, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Recently DW-MR Imaging has shown promising results in distinguishing between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSSC). Aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performances of DWI at high b-value (b = 2000 s/mm(2)) compared to standard b-value (b = 1000 s/mm(2)) and ADCratio values (ADCratio = ADC2000/ADC1000 × 100) to differentiate recurrent tumors from posttreatment changes after treatment of HSNCC. 20 patients (16 M, 4 F) underwent MR Imaging between 2 and 16 months (mean 7) after treatment. Besides morphological sequences, we performed single-shot echo-planar DWI at b = 1000 s/mm(2) and b = 2000 s/mm(2), and corresponding ADC maps were generated (ADC1000 and ADC2000, resp.). By considering contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as references, ROIs were drawn in order to evaluate mean ADC1000, ADC2000, and ADCratio. The mean ADC1000 and ADC2000 in recurrent tumors were significantly lower than those in posttreatment changes (P = 0.001 and P = 0.016, resp.). Moreover, the mean ADCratio between the two groups showed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.002). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of ADCratio were 82.0%, 100%, and 90%, respectively, by considering an optimal cutoff value of 65.5%. ADCratio is a promising value to differentiate between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in HNSCC and may be more useful than ADC1000 and ADC2000.

  14. Re-irradiation of unresectable recurrent head and neck cancer: using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Songmi; Yoo, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Yoon; Han, Chi Wha; Kim, Ki Jun; Kay, Chul Seung [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Re-irradiation (re-RT) is considered a treatment option for inoperable locoregionally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) after prior radiotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in recurrent HNC. Patients diagnosed with recurrent HNC and received re-RT were retrospectively reviewed. Primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) and secondary endpoints were locoregional control and toxicities. The median follow-up period of total 9 patients was 18.7 months (range, 4.1 to 76 months) and that of 3 alive patients was 49 months (range, 47 to 76 months). Median dose of first radiotherapy and re-RT was 64.8 and 47.5 Gy10. Median cumulative dose of the two courses of radiotherapy was 116.3 Gy10 (range, 91.8 to 128.9 Gy10) while the median interval between the two courses of radiation was 25 months (range, 4 to 137 months). The response rate after re-RT of the evaluated 8 patients was 75% (complete response, 4; partial response, 2). Median locoregional relapse-free survival after re-RT was 11.9 months (range, 3.4 to 75.1 months) and 5 patients eventually presented with treatment failure (in-field failure, 2; in- and out-field failure, 2; out-field failure, 1). Median OS of the 8 patients was 20.3 months (range, 4.1 to 75.1 months). One- and two-year OS rates were 62.5% and 50%, respectively. Grade 3 leucopenia developed in one patient as acute toxicity, and grade 2 osteonecrosis and trismus as chronic toxicity in another patient. Re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy for previously irradiated patients with unresectable locoregionally recurrent HNC may be a feasible treatment option with long-term survival and acceptable toxicities.

  15. [Effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy for a patient with local recurrence of advanced gastric cancer followed by curable gastrectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Soichiro; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Yajima, Kazuhito; Yuu, Ken; Oohinata, Ryouki; Ishiyama, Satoshi; Takahashi, Keiichi; Maeda, Yoshiharu

    2014-11-01

    We report here the effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy for a patient with local recurrence followed by curable gastrectomy. A 57-year-old man presented with a history of total gastrectomy with distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, D2 lymphadenectomy, and Roux-en-Y reconstruction for advanced gastric cancer arising from the cardia. Esophageal intramural metastasis and lymph node metastasis around the right recurrent nerve were detected by chest-abdominal computed tomography and gastrointestinal endoscopy 27 months after the initial gastrectomy. Stable disease was achieved following 7 courses of chemotherapy using S-1 plus CDDP. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy including administration of S-1 and radiation of total 50 Gy (2 Gy/25 Fr) was selected for local tumor control. The patient was not able to eat solid food because of esophageal stenosis from regrowth of intramural metastasis of the esophagus 60 months after the chemotherapy. A WallFlex™ Duodenal Stent was placed to improve the dysphagia 67 months after chemotherapy. The patient died from recurrence of gastric cancer 69 months after completion of the initial chemotherapy and 2 months after the stent insertion.

  16. Eight-choice sound localization by manatees: performance abilities and head related transfer functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert-Luke, Debborah E; Gaspard, Joseph C; Reep, Roger L; Bauer, Gordon B; Dziuk, Kimberly; Cardwell, Adrienne; Mann, David A

    2015-02-01

    Two experiments investigated the ability and means by which two male Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) may determine the direction of a sound source. An eight-choice discrimination paradigm was used to determine the subjects' sound localization abilities of five signal conditions covering a range of frequencies, durations, and levels. Subjects performed above the 12.5% chance level for all broadband frequencies and were able to localize sounds over a large level range. Errors were typically located to either side of the signal source location when presented in the front 180° but were more dispersed when presented from locations behind the subject. Front-to-back confusions were few and accuracy was greater when signals originated from the front 180°. Head-related transfer functions were measured to determine if frequencies were filtered by the manatee body to create frequency-specific interaural level differences (ILDs). ILDs were found for all frequencies as a function of source location, although they were largest with frequencies above 18 kHz and when signals originated to either side of the subjects. Larger ILDs were found when the signals originated behind the subjects. A shadowing-effect produced by the body may explain the relatively low occurrence of front-back confusions in the localization study.

  17. Efficient Approximation of Head-Related Transfer Functions in Subbands for Accurate Sound Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Damián; Baumgartner, Robert; Majdak, Piotr

    2015-07-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) describe the acoustic filtering of incoming sounds by the human morphology and are essential for listeners to localize sound sources in virtual auditory displays. Since rendering complex virtual scenes is computationally demanding, we propose four algorithms for efficiently representing HRTFs in subbands, i.e., as an analysis filterbank (FB) followed by a transfer matrix and a synthesis FB. All four algorithms use sparse approximation procedures to minimize the computational complexity while maintaining perceptually relevant HRTF properties. The first two algorithms separately optimize the complexity of the transfer matrix associated to each HRTF for fixed FBs. The other two algorithms jointly optimize the FBs and transfer matrices for complete HRTF sets by two variants. The first variant aims at minimizing the complexity of the transfer matrices, while the second one does it for the FBs. Numerical experiments investigate the latency-complexity trade-off and show that the proposed methods offer significant computational savings when compared with other available approaches. Psychoacoustic localization experiments were modeled and conducted to find a reasonable approximation tolerance so that no significant localization performance degradation was introduced by the subband representation.

  18. Treatment of recurrent chronic bacterial prostatitis by local injection of thiamphenicol into prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, T.A.; Baert, L.; Maes, R.A.

    Twenty-nine patients were treated for recurrent chronic bacterial prostatitis by an injection of 2 Gm. thiamphenicol glycinate via the perineal route directly into the prostate. Escherichia coli was identified as the pathogen responsible for this infection in 83 per cent of the cases. Using this

  19. Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy as salvage treatment of locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P T; Roed, H; Engelholm, S A

    1998-01-01

    . There was no difference in survival probability when stratifying the patients by primary diagnosis (recurrent vs. primary advanced), relapse locations (central vs. central + pelvic wall mass) or treatment volume. Seventeen chronic grade III complications were observed in 10 patients. Large treatment volumes significantly...

  20. Local recurrence of pheochromocytoma in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Tramunt, Blandine; Buffet, Alexandre; Grunenwald, Solange; Vezzosi, Delphine; Bennet, Antoine; Huyghe, Eric; Zerdoud, Slimane; Caron, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message In a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), an inverted physiological ratio between urinary normetanephrines and metanephrines is an early marker of recurrence in epinephrine?secreting pheochromocytoma, and 131I MIBG treatment appears to be a useful therapeutic option in order to avoid multiple invasive surgical procedures in pheochromocytomatosis.

  1. Local recurrence of pheochromocytoma in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramunt, Blandine; Buffet, Alexandre; Grunenwald, Solange; Vezzosi, Delphine; Bennet, Antoine; Huyghe, Eric; Zerdoud, Slimane; Caron, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    In a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), an inverted physiological ratio between urinary normetanephrines and metanephrines is an early marker of recurrence in epinephrine-secreting pheochromocytoma, and 131I MIBG treatment appears to be a useful therapeutic option in order to avoid multiple invasive surgical procedures in pheochromocytomatosis.

  2. Treatment of recurrent chronic bacterial prostatitis by local injection of thiamphenicol into prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, T.A.; Baert, L.; Maes, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients were treated for recurrent chronic bacterial prostatitis by an injection of 2 Gm. thiamphenicol glycinate via the perineal route directly into the prostate. Escherichia coli was identified as the pathogen responsible for this infection in 83 per cent of the cases. Using this med

  3. Comparison of Local Recurrence After Simple and Skin-Sparing Mastectomy Performed in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbrell, Simon; Al-Himdani, Sarah; Shaw, Oliver; Tan, Kian; Morris, Julie; Bundred, Nigel

    2017-04-01

    The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is increasing with the use of screening mammography, and approximately 30% of all women diagnosed with DCIS are treated by mastectomy. There is increasing use of a skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) approach to surgically excise DCIS as this facilitates immediate breast reconstruction. The rates of locoregional recurrence (LRR) after simple mastectomy performed for pure DCIS are historically reported as 1%; however, international data suggest that LRR after SSM may be higher. To determine our rates of LRR and compare the effect of the type of mastectomy performed, we undertook a retrospective review of all patients who underwent a mastectomy for pure DCIS at our institution between 2000 and 2010. In total, 199 patients underwent a mastectomy for pure DCIS (with eight local recurrences), all of which were invasive ductal carcinoma. The recurrences all occurred after SSM, which was associated with a higher 5-year LRR of 5.9% (5/102) compared with 0% in the simple mastectomy group (0/97; p = 0.012), log-rank. Univariate analysis showed the two factors that predicted the risk of recurrence were a young age at mastectomy and close or involved margins. These data highlight the importance of achieving clear margins, especially in young women with estrogen receptor-negative DCIS who have a higher risk of invasive recurrence. Women undergoing a mastectomy for DCIS should be counseled as to the importance of achieving clear margins and the potential increased need for further excision, post-mastectomy radiotherapy and post-reconstruction mammography in order to prevent LRR after SSM.

  4. Objective and subjective image quality of primary and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma on head and neck low-tube-voltage 80-kVp computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Kaup, Moritz; Kraft, Johannes; Noeske, Eva-Maria; Schulz, Boris; Burck, Iris; Kerl, J.M.; Bauer, Ralf W.; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wichmann, Julian L. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Scheerer, Friedrich [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-03-26

    To investigate low-tube-voltage 80-kVp computed tomography (CT) of head and neck primary and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) regarding objective and subjective image quality. We retrospectively evaluated 65 patients (47 male, 18 female; mean age: 62.1 years) who underwent head and neck dual-energy CT (DECT) due to biopsy-proven primary (n = 50) or recurrent (n = 15) SCC. Eighty peak kilovoltage and standard blended 120-kVp images were compared. Attenuation and noise of malignancy and various soft tissue structures were measured. Tumor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Subjective image quality was rated by three reviewers using 5-point grading scales regarding overall image quality, lesion delineation, image sharpness, and image noise. Radiation dose was assessed as CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}). Interobserver agreement was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Mean tumor attenuation (153.8 Hounsfield unit (HU) vs. 97.1 HU), SNR (10.7 vs. 8.3), CNR (8.1 vs. 4.8), and subjective tumor delineation (score, 4.46 vs. 4.13) were significantly increased (all P < 0.001) with 80-kVp acquisition compared to standard blended 120-kVp images. Noise of all measured structures was increased in 80-kVp acquisition (P < 0.001). Overall interobserver agreement was good (ICC, 0.86; 95 % confidence intervals: 0.82-0.89). CTDI{sub vol} was reduced by 48.7 % with 80-kVp acquisition compared to standard DECT (4.85 ± 0.51 vs. 9.94 ± 0.81 mGy cm, P < 0.001). Head and neck CT with low-tube-voltage 80-kVp acquisition provides increased tumor delineation, SNR, and CNR for CT imaging of primary and recurrent SCC compared to standard 120-kVp acquisition with an accompanying significant reduction of radiation exposure. (orig.)

  5. Modeling the dynamics of the lead bismuth eutectic experimental accelerator driven system by an infinite impulse response locally recurrent neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zio, Enrico; Pedroni, Nicola; Broggi, Matteo; Golea, Lucia Roxana [Polytechnic of Milan, Milan (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, an infinite impulse response locally recurrent neural network (IIR-LRNN) is employed for modelling the dynamics of the Lead Bismuth Eutectic eXperimental Accelerator Driven System (LBE-XADS). The network is trained by recursive back-propagation (RBP) and its ability in estimating transients is tested under various conditions. The results demonstrate the robustness of the locally recurrent scheme in the reconstruction of complex nonlinear dynamic relationships

  6. Phase II study of docetaxel and cisplatin in patients with recurrent or disseminated squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L; Larsen, S K; Hansen, H S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results with docetaxel as single drug in squamous-cell head and neck cancer have been encouraging. The purpose of the present phase II study is to evaluate the antitumour efficacy and toxicity of the combination of docetaxel and cisplatin in patients with recurrent or disseminated......; no previous systemic chemotherapy (prior radiotherapy and/or surgery were allowed), no other previous or concurrent malignancy; no peripheral neuropathy. Treatment consisted of docetaxel 75 mg/m2 in a one-hour infusion after pre-treatment with prednisolone, followed by cisplatin 75 mg/m2 in a half...... but one patient. Grade 3 neuropathy occurred in one patient, none had grade 4. Grade 3 oral mucositis occurred in three patients, none had grade 4. Grade 2-3 hypomagnesaemia occurred in 10 patients requiring magnesium infusion. CONCLUSIONS: Docetaxel and cisplatin is an active combination in patients...

  7. Heparanase Localization and Expression by Head and Neck Cancer: Correlation with Tumor Progression and Patient Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Doweck

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that specifically cleaves heparan sulfate (HS side chains of HS proteoglycans, the major proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix and cell surfaces. Traditionally, heparanase activity was implicated in cellular invasion associated with angiogenesis, inflammation, and cancer metastasis. More recently, heparanase upregulation was documented in an increasing number of primary human tumors, correlating with reduced postoperative survival rate and enhanced tumor angiogenesis. In the present study, we examined the expression of heparanase in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck by means of immunostaining, and we correlated expression levels with patient outcome. The intensity and extent of heparanase staining correlated with tumor stage (P = .049 and P = .027, respectively, and the extent of staining further correlated with tumor grade (P = .047. Moreover, heparanase expression inversely correlated with patient status at the end of the study (P = .012. Notably, heparanase localization was found to be an important parameter for patient status. Thus, 63% of patients with nuclear staining, compared to 19% of patients with cytoplasmic staining (P=.0043, were alive, indicating that nuclear localization of the enzyme predicts a favorable outcome.

  8. Local recurrence following hepatic radiofrequency ablation: diagnosis and treatment; Diagnostik und Therapie von Lokalrezidiven nach Radiofrequenzablation an der Leber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisele, R.M.; Schumacher, G.; Neuhaus, P. [Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Background: radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an established treatment in irresectable malignant liver disease. The most severe constraint is re-occurrence at site of ablation. Whereas factors influencing local recurrence rates have been determined, little is known about the timespan within local recurrence (LR) is to be expected, and further treatment options. Patients and methods: in the presented trial, RFA was performed using two different types of monopolar devices. All procedures were conducted under general anesthesia. Follow-up examinations took part after 3, 6, 12 months and annually. Results: 149 RFAs in 125 patients were enrolled. Percutaneous access was chosen in 74 cases (50%), laparoscopic in 15 (10%) and open surgical in 60 cases (40%). Indications were primary liver tumors in 99 (67%) and metastases in 50 cases (33%). Overall LR rate was 29.5% on a per-patient- and 19.7% on a per-tumor-basis. The majority of LRs (71%) occurred within 9 months after the RFA despite observations beyond 2 years following the treatment (Figure 1). 75% of LR could be treated by targeted interventions (RFA, n = 18, 53%, laser-induced thermo therapy (LITT), n = 2.6%, brachytherapy, n = 2.6% or transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE), n = 2.6%) or resection (n = 6.18%); 4 patients underwent liver transplantation (12%) (Figure 2). Conclusion: local recurrence can be considered rather common after RFA. It is observed during the first 3 years of the follow-up period, and schedules have to be designed according to this finding. Follow-on treatment is feasible in approximately 75% of LR. Factors influencing the secondary success of repeated procedures have yet to be determined. (orig.)

  9. Follow-up of recurrences of limb soft tissue sarcomas in patients with localized disease: performance of ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto [University of Genoa, Institute of Anatomy, Department of Experimental Medicine (DIMES), Genoa (Italy); IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); University of Genoa, Department of Experimental Medicine -DIMES, Genoa (Italy); Truini, Mauro; Spina, Bruno [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientitifico Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino-Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro (IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST), Department of Pathology, Genova (Italy); Cambiaso, Paolo; Zaottini, Federico [School of Medicine, Genova (Italy); Bignotti, Bianca; Derchi, Lorenzo E.; Martinoli, Carlo [University of Genoa, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), Genoa (Italy); Calabrese, Massimo [IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate diagnostic performance of ultrasound in the detection of local recurrences in patients with localized soft tissue sarcomas of the limb. An analysis of patients treated for soft tissue sarcomas between 2005 and April 2014 was performed. Sixty-eight patients (men/women, 36:32; age range, 18-84 years) were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), positive predictive value (PPV), pre-test probability (the prevalence), negative predictive value (NPV), likelihood ratio for positive results (LH+), accuracy and post-test probability (post-P) of ultrasound were reported on a per patient basis using surgical findings and clinical follow-up as reference standard. Effects of independent variables (US equipment, age and sex, body mass index, radiologist) were considered. Comparison with MR was also performed. The overall sensitivity and specificity were 0.88 (0.60-0.94) and 0.94 (0.86-0.98). PPV, pre-test probability, NPV, LH+, accuracy and post-P: 0.83/0.25/0.96/14.9/0.92/0.83. There were two false negative cases both graded as G3 and deeply located and three false positive US cases. Diagnostic accuracy was not dependent by US machine (p = 0.08), age and sex (p = 0.16), body mass index (p = 0.07) and radiologists (p = 0.07). Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound was relatively high. Negative US results excluded the presence of a local recurrence with acceptable accuracy. (orig.)

  10. True Local Recurrences after Breast Conserving Surgery have Poor Prognosis in Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Serkan; Ordu, Cetin; Alco, Gul; Bozdogan, Atilla; Elbuken, Filiz; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Agacayak, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Eralp, Yesim; Dincer, Maktav

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed at investigating clinical and histopathologic features of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and their effects on survival after breast conservation therapy. Methods: 1,400 patients who were treated between 1998 and 2007 and had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for early breast cancer (cT1-2/N0-1/M0) were evaluated. Demographic and pathologic parameters, radiologic data, treatment, and follow-up related features of the patients were recorded. Results: 53 patients (3.8%) had IBTR after BCS within a median follow-up of 70 months. The mean age was 45.7 years (range, 27-87 years), and 22 patients (41.5%) were younger than 40 years. 33 patients (62.3%) had true recurrence (TR) and 20 were classified as new primary (NP). The median time to recurrence was shorter in TR group than in NP group (37.0 (6-216) and 47.5 (11-192) months respectively; p = 0.338). Progesterone receptor positivity was significantly higher in the NP group (p = 0.005). The overall 5-year survival rate in the NP group (95.0%) was significantly higher than that of the TR group (74.7%, p 20 mm), high grade tumor and triple-negative molecular phenotype along with developing TR negatively affected overall survival (hazard ratios were 4.2 (CI 0.98-22.76), 4.6 (CI 1.07-13.03), 4.0 (CI 0.68-46.10), 6.5 (CI 0.03-0.68), and 6.5 (CI 0.02- 0.80) respectively, p 2 cm), high grade, triple negative phenotype, and having true recurrence were identified as independent prognostic factors with a negative impact on overall survival in this dataset of patients with recurrent breast cancer. In conjunction with a more intensive follow-up program, the role of adjuvant therapy strategies should be explored further in young patients with large and high-risk tumors to reduce the risk of TR. PMID:27158571

  11. Intraoperative perforation is an important predictor of local recurrence and impaired survival after abdominoperineal excision for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, S; Christensen, Ij; Iversen, Lh

    2010-01-01

    National Colorectal Cancer Database and included patients operated with APR from 1.5.2001-31.12.2006. A follow up in the departments was supplemented with vital status in the Civil Registration System. The analysis included actuarial local and distant recurrence and overall and cancer specific survival......%). The cumulative 5-year LR rate was 11% (95% CI 7-13), OS was 56% (95% CI 53-60), and CS was 68% (95% CI 65-71). Multivariate analysis showed that perforation, tumour stage and non-radical surgery were independent risk factors for LR; tumour fixation, perforation and tumour stage were independent risk factors...

  12. MiR-422a promotes loco-regional recurrence by targeting NT5E/CD73 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnin, Nathalie; Armandy, Emma; Carras, Julien; Ferrandon, Sylvain; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Aubry, Marc; Guihard, Sébastien; Meyronet, David; Foy, Jean-Philippe; Saintigny, Pierre; Ledrappier, Sonia; Jung, Alain; Rimokh, Ruth; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Poncet, Delphine

    2016-07-12

    At the time of diagnosis, 60% of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) present tumors in an advanced stage (III-IV) of disease and 80% will relapse within the first two years post-treatment, due to their frequent radio(chemo)resistance. To identify new molecular targets and companion biomarkers, we have investigated the miRNome of 75 stage III-IV oropharynx tumors without relapse (R) or with loco-regional relapse (non-responder, NR) within two years post-treatment. Interestingly, miR-422a was significantly downregulated in NR tumors, in agreement with the increase in cell proliferation and adhesion induced by miR-422a inhibition in vitro. Furthermore, we identified CD73/NT5E oncogene as target of miR-422a. Indeed, modulation of the endogenous level of miR-422a inversely influences the expression and the enzymatic activity of CD73. Moreover, knocking down CD73 mimics the effects of miR-422a upregulation. Importantly, in tumors, miR-422a and CD73 expression levels are inversely correlated, and both are predictive of relapse free survival - especially considering loco(regional) recurrence - in vitro two independent cohorts of advanced oropharynx or HNSCC (N=255) tumors. In all, we reported, for the first time, that MiR-422a and its target CD73 are involved in early loco(regional) recurrence of HNSCC tumors and are new targets for personalized medicine.

  13. Targeted local simultaneous iontophoresis of chemotherapeutics for topical therapy of head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratieri, Taís; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2014-01-02

    The objective was to investigate the feasibility of using buccal iontophoresis for the simultaneous delivery of chemotherapeutic agents with a view to developing a new approach to treat head and neck cancers. Short duration cathodal iontophoresis of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 20mM) and leucovorin (LV; 10 mM) at 1 mA/cm(2) for 10 or 20 min from aqueous solution and a 2% hydroxyethyl cellulose gel at pH 7.6 was evaluated using bovine mucosa in vitro. Iontophoresis resulted in a statistically significant increase in the mucosal deposition of both drugs as compared to passive diffusion (Student's t-test, α=0.05); in each case, drug delivery was selective for deposition with no permeation being observed. After 20 min of iontophoresis, there was an ~ 8-fold enhancement for 5-FU (1.46 ± 0.86 and 11.93 ± 3.81 μg/cm(2), respectively) and a 3-fold increase for LV (8.31 ± 2.44 and 25.08 ± 6.89 μg/cm(2), respectively) when using aqueous solutions. The same trend was observed when the gel was applied for 10 min; passive delivery of 5-FU from the gel resulted in non-detectable levels in the mucosa, while 4.62 ± 1.76 μg/cm(2) were deposited in the mucosa following iontophoresis. Similarly, iontophoretic delivery of LV from the gel resulted in ~ 3-fold higher deposition as compared to passive diffusion (6.71 ± 1.36 and 21.12 ± 9.94 μg/cm(2), respectively). No drug permeation was observed in either case. In conclusion, iontophoresis can be used for targeted topical delivery of chemotherapeutics to the buccal mucosa and may enable less invasive local therapy of head and neck cancers.

  14. Use of somatostatin analogue scintigraphy in the localization of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, L.; Catafau, A.; Mari, C.; Flotats, A.; Martin, J.C.; Estorch, M.; Carrio, I. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Chico, A.; Mato, E. [Department of Endocrinology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Matias-Guiu, X. [Department of Pathology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Alonso, C. [Department of Oncology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Mora, J.; Rodriguez-Espinosa, J. [Department of Biochemistry, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Mauricio, D. [Department of Endocrinology, Hospital Parc Tauli, Sabadell (Spain)

    1998-11-01

    Detection of recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) remains a diagnostic problem. Increased serum tumour marker levels frequently indicate recurrence while conventional imaging techniques (CIT) are non-diagnostic. In this study, we performed indium-111 octreotide scintigraphy and CIT in a series of 20 patients with MTC presenting with elevated serum tumour markers after surgery. {sup 111}In-octreotide whole-body studies detected 15 pathological uptake foci in 11 of the 20 patients studied and CIT detected 17 lesions in 11 of the 20 patients. Ten patients underwent reoperation, five of them with positive {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy and CIT and two with positive isotopic exploration and negative CIT. Surgical findings demonstrated that the results of isotopic study and CIT had been false-positive for MTC in one case (sarcoidosis). The six patients with true-positive {sup 111}In-octreotide studies had significantly higher basal calcitonin (CT) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels than the patients with negative isotopic studies. The expression of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) subtypes by PC-PCR could be investigated in four cases with a positive isotopic study. Among the three cases with a true-positive study, SSTR2, the SSTR subtype that preferentially binds to the somatostatin analogue octreotide, was detected in two, SSTR5 was demonstrated in the three, and SSTR3 was detected in one. No subtype of SSTR was detected in the case with a final diagnosis of sarcoidosis. We conclude that {sup 111}In-octreotide has limited sensitivity in detecting recurrence in patients with MTC, although its sensitivity may improve with high serum CT levels. This radionuclide imaging technique should be employed when conventional imaging techniques are negative or inconclusive or when the presence of somatostatin receptors may provide the basis for treatment with somatostatin analogues. (orig.) With 4 figs., 3 tabs., 29 refs.

  15. Preliminary experience with external hemipelvectomy for locally advanced and recurrent pelvic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Rasmussen, Peter Chr.; Keller, Johnny Østergaard;

    2012-01-01

    was found. With agreement by the multidisciplinary team, surgery was performed by a colorectal surgeon and an orthopaedic sarcoma surgeon and, if needed, by an urologist and vascular surgeon. Patients were reconstructed with either a femoral or a gluteal musculocutaneous flap. Results Of the eight women...... have died, one from postoperative complications at 5 months and two from recurrence at 5 and 52.8 months. Phantom-limb was experienced in six patients. Four patients received a prosthesis, one is considering this and one does not want a prosthesis. Conclusion Hemipelvectomy may be considered...

  16. Phase II clinical study of valproic acid plus cisplatin and cetuximab in recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of Head and Neck-V-CHANCE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caponigro, Francesco; Di Gennaro, Elena; Ionna, Franco; Longo, Francesco; Aversa, Corrado; Pavone, Ettore; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Di Marzo, Massimiliano; Muto, Paolo; Cavalcanti, Ernesta; Petrillo, Antonella; Sandomenico, Fabio; Maiolino, Piera; D'Aniello, Roberta; Botti, Gerardo; De Cecio, Rossella; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Scala, Stefania; Trotta, Annamaria; Zotti, Andrea Ilaria; Bruzzese, Francesca; Daponte, Antonio; Calogero, Ester; Montano, Massimo; Pontone, Monica; De Feo, Gianfranco; Perri, Francesco; Budillon, Alfredo

    2016-11-25

    Recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) has a poor prognosis and the combination of cisplatin and cetuximab, with or without 5-fluorouracil, is the gold standard treatment in this stage. Thus, the concomitant use of novel compounds represents a critical strategy to improve treatment results. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) enhance the activity of several anticancer drugs including cisplatin and anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (anti-EGFR) compounds. Preclinical studies in models have shown that vorinostat is able to down regulate Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) expression and to revert epithelial to mesenchimal transition (EMT). Due to its histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibiting activity and its safe use as a chronic therapy for epileptic disorders, valproic acid (VPA) has been considered a good candidate for anticancer therapy. A reasonable option may be to employ the combination of cisplatin, cetuximab and VPA in recurrent/metastatic SCCHN taking advantage of the possible positive interaction between histone deacetylase inhibitors, cisplatin and/or anti-EGFR. V-CHANCE is a phase 2 clinical trial evaluating, in patients with recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck never treated with first-line chemotherapy, the concomitant standard administration of cisplatin (on day 1, every 3 weeks) and cetuximab (on day 1, weekly), in combination with oral VPA given daily from day -14 with a titration strategy in each patient (target serum level of 50-100 μg/ml). Primary end point is the objective response rate measured according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Sample size, calculated according to Simon 2 stage minimax design will include 21 patients in the first stage with upper limit for rejection being 8 responses, and 39 patients in the second stage, with upper limit for rejection being 18 responses. Secondary endpoints are time to progression, duration of response

  17. Pemetrexed in combination with cisplatin versus cisplatin monotherapy in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer: Final results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urba, S.; Herpen, C.M. van; Sahoo, T.P.; Shin, D.M.; Licitra, L.; Mezei, K.; Reuter, C.; Hitt, R.; Russo, F.; Chang, S.C.; Hossain, A.M.; Frimodt-Moller, B.; Koustenis, A.; Hong, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is associated with poor survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy is often a first-line treatment. Pemetrexed has shown single-agent activity in SCCHN and in combination with cisplatin for other tumors. This trial e

  18. Local recurrence of sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma with eosinophilia in the upper lip: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Satoh, Koji; Aizawa, Takako; Urano, Makoto; Kuroda, Makoto; Mizutani, Hideki

    2015-02-24

    Sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma with eosinophilia is a rare morphological variant of thyroid carcinoma associated with Hashimoto's disease. To date, only three such tumors have been reported in the minor salivary glands. We describe the first case, to the best of our knowledge, of recurrent sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma with eosinophilia in the minor salivary glands of the upper lip. A 61-year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital with a mass in his median upper lip of four years' duration. An examination of his median upper lip revealed a well-defined tumor measuring 9 × 12 mm in diameter, which was subsequently resected. Three years after the first surgery, the tumor recurred and was resected. Both tumors were confirmed by histopathology to be sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma with eosinophilia. Neither recurrence nor metastasis was observed in three and a half years of follow-up after the second surgery. Our findings indicate that sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma with eosinophilia can originate in the minor salivary glands and may be clinically or pathologically misdiagnosed as other conditions.

  19. Chebyshev polynomial functions based locally recurrent neuro-fuzzy information system for prediction of financial and energy market data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Parida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper Chebyshev polynomial functions based locally recurrent neuro-fuzzy information system is presented for the prediction and analysis of financial and electrical energy market data. The normally used TSK-type feedforward fuzzy neural network is unable to take the full advantage of the use of the linear fuzzy rule base in accurate input–output mapping and hence the consequent part of the rule base is made nonlinear using polynomial or arithmetic basis functions. Further the Chebyshev polynomial functions provide an expanded nonlinear transformation to the input space thereby increasing its dimension for capturing the nonlinearities and chaotic variations in financial or energy market data streams. Also the locally recurrent neuro-fuzzy information system (LRNFIS includes feedback loops both at the firing strength layer and the output layer to allow signal flow both in forward and backward directions, thereby making the LRNFIS mimic a dynamic system that provides fast convergence and accuracy in predicting time series fluctuations. Instead of using forward and backward least mean square (FBLMS learning algorithm, an improved Firefly-Harmony search (IFFHS learning algorithm is used to estimate the parameters of the consequent part and feedback loop parameters for better stability and convergence. Several real world financial and energy market time series databases are used for performance validation of the proposed LRNFIS model.

  20. An adaptive PID like controller using mix locally recurrent neural network for robotic manipulator with variable payload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Kumar, Vikas; Gaur, Prerna; Mittal, A P

    2016-05-01

    Being complex, non-linear and coupled system, the robotic manipulator cannot be effectively controlled using classical proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. To enhance the effectiveness of the conventional PID controller for the nonlinear and uncertain systems, gains of the PID controller should be conservatively tuned and should adapt to the process parameter variations. In this work, a mix locally recurrent neural network (MLRNN) architecture is investigated to mimic a conventional PID controller which consists of at most three hidden nodes which act as proportional, integral and derivative node. The gains of the mix locally recurrent neural network based PID (MLRNNPID) controller scheme are initialized with a newly developed cuckoo search algorithm (CSA) based optimization method rather than assuming randomly. A sequential learning based least square algorithm is then investigated for the on-line adaptation of the gains of MLRNNPID controller. The performance of the proposed controller scheme is tested against the plant parameters uncertainties and external disturbances for both links of the two link robotic manipulator with variable payload (TL-RMWVP). The stability of the proposed controller is analyzed using Lyapunov stability criteria. A performance comparison is carried out among MLRNNPID controller, CSA optimized NNPID (OPTNNPID) controller and CSA optimized conventional PID (OPTPID) controller in order to establish the effectiveness of the MLRNNPID controller.

  1. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: vismodegib for recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, Michael; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hong; Kufrin, Dubravka; Palmby, Todd; Dong, Zedong; Russell, Anne Marie; Miksinski, Sarah; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The data and regulatory considerations leading to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) January 30, 2012 approval of Erivedge (vismodegib) capsules for the treatment of patients with recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are described. The FDA's approval decision was based primarily on the results observed in a single-arm, parallel cohort, international trial of vismodegib, administered orally at 150 mg daily until disease progression, in patients with pathologically confirmed, recurrent, locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (mBCC). An independent review committee confirmed an overall response rate (ORR) of 30.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 15.6-48.2] in 33 patients with mBCC and an ORR of 42.9% (95% CI: 30.5-56.0) in 63 patients with laBCC; median response durations were 7.6 months and 7.6 months for patients with mBCC and laBCC, respectively. The most common adverse reactions were muscle spasms, alopecia, dysgeusia, weight loss, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, decreased appetite, constipation, cough, arthralgias, vomiting, headache, ageusia, insomnia, and upper respiratory tract infection. Animal toxicology studies confirmed that vismodegib is a potent teratogenic agent. Approval was based on durable objective tumor responses supported by knowledge of the pathologic role of Hedgehog signaling in BCC and acceptable toxicity in a population without effective alternative therapies.

  2. Intelligent non-linear modelling of an industrial winding process using recurrent local linear neuro-fuzzy networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasan ABBASI NOZARI; Hamed DEHGHAN BANADAKI; Mohammad MOKHTARE; Somaveh HEKMATI VAHED

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with the neuro-fuzzy (NF) modelling of a real industrial winding process in which the acquired NF model can be exploited to improve control performance and achieve a robust fault-tolerant system.A new simulator model is proposed for a winding process using non-linear identification based on a recurrent local linear neuro-fuzzy (RLLNF) network trained by local linear model tree (LOLIMOT),which is an incremental tree-based learning algorithm.The proposed NF models are compared with other known intelligent identifiers,namely multilayer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF).Comparison of our proposed non-linear models and associated models obtained through the least square error (LSE) technique (the optimal modelling method for linear systems) confirms that the winding process is a non-linear system.Experimental results show the effectiveness of our proposed NF modelling approach.

  3. Personalized therapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Escribano R

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients (LAHNSCC represents a truly heterogeneous population with differences in comorbidities, primary tumor location and etiology. These are key factors in optimal treatment selection. Material and methods: An extensive literature review was made in order to identify the most relevant factor in the therapeutic decision, with special interest in induction chemotherapy as the latest and most debatable option. Results: In the therapeutic decision we have to take into account factors related to the patient, age and performance status are the most important, and others related to the tumor as stage, site of origin and etiology, between this ones l, viral subtypes (EBV and HPV are becoming relevant in the later decades. Chemoradiotherapy is considered the gold standard treatment, supported by several randomized trials and metaanalysis. Induction chemotherapy is one of the later options appeared in the therapeutic arena, improving results in organ preservation and survival. Although a substantial increase in toxicities and lack of prospective comparisons with the standard concurrent chemoradioterapy, warrants a cautious use. Conclusions: Therapeutic choice in the LAHNSCC patient is a complex and multidimensional process, that should be carried in a specialized and multidisciplinary team that can assure the highest efficiency and security for the patient

  4. Preliminary results of phase I trial of oral uracil/tegafur (UFT, leucovorin plus irinotecan and radiation therapy for patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukunaga Mutsumi

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical attempts for locally recurrent rectal cancer often fail due to local re-recurrence and distant metastasis. Preoperative chemoradiation may enhance better local control and survival. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of oral uracil and tegafur (UFT plus leucovorin (LV, and irinotecan combined with radiation and determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD and dose limiting toxicity (DLT of the triple drug regimen. Patients and methods Patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer received escalating doses of irinotecan on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 (starting at 30 mg/m2, with 10 mg increments between consecutive cohorts and fixed doses of UFT (300 mg/m2 plus LV (75 mg/day on days 3 to 7, 10 to 14, 17 to 21, and 24 to 28. Radiation was given 5 days per week totaling 40 to 50 Gy (2Gy/day. Results Six patients were treated at the starting dose, and 2 received the full scheduled chemoradiotherapy. The other 4 patients had grade 3 diarrhea and diarrhea was the DLT. One patient had partial response and he had subsequently radical surgical resection. Median progression free survival for local recurrence was 320 days. Conclusion Irinotecan plus UFT/LV with concomitant radiotherapy in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer was not feasible due to diarrhea in this setting. Modification of the treatment is needed.

  5. TU-AB-BRA-10: Prognostic Value of Intra-Radiation Treatment FDG-PET and CT Imaging Features in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J; Pollom, E; Durkee, B; Aggarwal, S; Bui, T; Le, Q; Loo, B; Hara, W [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Cui, Y [Hokkaido University, Global Institute for Collaborative Research and Educat, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Li, R [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Hokkaido University, Global Institute for Collaborative Research and Educat, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To predict response to radiation treatment using computational FDG-PET and CT images in locally advanced head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods: 68 patients with State III-IVB HNC treated with chemoradiation were included in this retrospective study. For each patient, we analyzed primary tumor and lymph nodes on PET and CT scans acquired both prior to and during radiation treatment, which led to 8 combinations of image datasets. From each image set, we extracted high-throughput, radiomic features of the following types: statistical, morphological, textural, histogram, and wavelet, resulting in a total of 437 features. We then performed unsupervised redundancy removal and stability test on these features. To avoid over-fitting, we trained a logistic regression model with simultaneous feature selection based on least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). To objectively evaluate the prediction ability, we performed 5-fold cross validation (CV) with 50 random repeats of stratified bootstrapping. Feature selection and model training was solely conducted on the training set and independently validated on the holdout test set. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the pooled Result and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated as figure of merit. Results: For predicting local-regional recurrence, our model built on pre-treatment PET of lymph nodes achieved the best performance (AUC=0.762) on 5-fold CV, which compared favorably with node volume and SUVmax (AUC=0.704 and 0.449, p<0.001). Wavelet coefficients turned out to be the most predictive features. Prediction of distant recurrence showed a similar trend, in which pre-treatment PET features of lymph nodes had the highest AUC of 0.705. Conclusion: The radiomics approach identified novel imaging features that are predictive to radiation treatment response. If prospectively validated in larger cohorts, they could aid in risk-adaptive treatment of HNC.

  6. Re-irradiation of the chest wall for local breast cancer recurrence. Results of salvage brachytherapy with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auoragh, A. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Fuerth, Department of Radiation Oncology, Fuerth (Germany); Strnad, V.; Ott, O.J.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, M.W. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Following mastectomy and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer, the incidence of local or locoregional recurrence is approximately 9 % (2-20 %). Alongside the often limited possibilities of surgical treatment, radiation therapy combined with superficial hyperthermia is the most effective local therapy. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of salvage brachytherapy combined with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is presented. Between 2004 and 2011, 18 patients with a total of 23 target volumes resulting from chest wall recurrences after previously mastectomy and external beam radiation therapy (median 56 Gy, range 50-68 Gy) were treated with superficial brachytherapy as salvage treatment: 8 patients (44 %) had macroscopic tumor, 3 (17 %) had microscopic tumor (R1), and 7 (39 %) had undergone R0 resection and were treated due to risk factors. A dose of 50 Gy was given (high-dose rate [HDR] and pulsed-dose rate [PDR] procedures). In all, 5 of 23 patients (22 %) received additional concurrent chemotherapy, and in 20 of 23 (87 %) target volumes additional superficial hyperthermia was carried out twice weekly. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 56 %, the disease-free survival was 28 %, and a 5-year overall survival was 22 %. Late side effects Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 3 were reported in 17 % of the patients: 2 of 18 (11 %) had CTC grade 3 fibrosis, and 1 of 18 (6 %) had a chronic wound healing disorder. Re-irradiation as salvage brachytherapy with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is a feasible and safe treatment with good local control results and acceptable late side effects. (orig.) [German] Nach einer Mastektomie und adjuvanter Strahlentherapie bei Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom kommt es bei 9 % (2-20 %) zum lokalen bzw. lokoregionaeren Rezidiv. Neben den oft limitierten operativen Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten ist die Strahlentherapie mit Oberflaechenhyperthermie die

  7. Expression of IL-4 and IL-13 predicts recurrence and survival in localized clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan; Xu, Le; An, Huimin; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Lian; Lin, Zongming; Xu, Jiejie

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13 are anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines that can influence cancer-directed immunosurveillance. However, they are not evaluated as biomarkers for ccRCC outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of tumor-derived IL-4 and IL-13 in patients with localized ccRCC after surgery. Our study comprised 194 consecutive patients with localized ccRCC undergoing nephrectomy in a single center. Clinical characteristics, recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were recorded. We assessed IL-4 and IL-13 expression as continuous variables and dichotomized as low versus high by immunohistochemistry. For associations with RFS and OS, we used the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression models. Concordance index was calculated for predictive accuracy. We found that high expression levels of IL-4 and IL-13 were associated with increased recurrence (P IL-13 expression (IL-4/IL-13 signature) was an independent prognostic factor for RFS and OS (P = 0.009 and P = 0.016, respectively). When applied to UISS score, IL-4/IL-13 signature improved the predictive accuracy. Notably, this improvement in prediction was mainly observed in patients with low-risk disease. To conclude, IL-4/IL-13 signature is an independent predictor of outcomes in patients with localized ccRCC, and the prognostic value is more prominent among patients with low-risk disease. Evaluation of IL-4 and IL-13 expression provides the opportunity to optimize postsurgical management and develop novel targeted therapies for ccRCC patients.

  8. Usefulness of increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake for detecting local recurrence in patients with extremity osteosarcoma treated with surgical resection and endoprosthetic replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kyoung Jin; Lim, Ilhan; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Nowon Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Chang-Bae; Cho, Wan Hyeong; Jeon, Dae-Geun; Lee, Soo-Yong [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Orthopedic Surgery, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Nowon Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-29

    To investigate the changes of increased F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake around the prosthesis and its ability to differentiate local recurrence from postsurgical change after endoprosthetic replacement in extremity osteosarcoma. A total of 355 positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans in 109 extremity osteosarcoma patients were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were followed up with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for more than 3 years after tumor resection. For semiquantitative assessment, we drew a volume of interest around the entire prosthesis of the extremity and measured the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Independent samples t test was used to compare SUVmax at each follow-up time. SUVmax at 3 months (SUV1) and SUVmax at the time of local recurrence in patients with recurrence or at the last follow-up in others (SUV2) were compared using the Mann-Whitney test. Diagnostic performances of PET parameters were assessed using ROC curve analyses. Nine patients (8 %) showed a local recurrence. Mean SUVmax at 3, 12, 24, and 36 months was 3.1 ± 1.5, 3.8 ± 1.9, 3.6 ± 1.9, and 3.7 ± 1.5 respectively. In ROC curve analysis, the combination of SUV2 >4.6 and ΔSUV >75.0 was a more useful parameter for predicting local recurrence than SUV2 or ΔSUV alone. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for identifying local recurrence were 89, 76, 77 % for SUV2; 78, 81, 81 % for ΔSUV; and 78, 94, 93 % for the combined criterion respectively. The combination of SUV2 and ΔSUV was more useful than the SUV2 or ΔSUV used alone for the prediction of local recurrence. (orig.)

  9. Erlotinib and bevacizumab in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a phase I/II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ezra E W; Davis, Darren W; Karrison, Theodore G; Seiwert, Tanguy Y; Wong, Stuart J; Nattam, Sreenivasa; Kozloff, Mark F; Clark, Joseph I; Yan, Duen-Hwa; Liu, Wen; Pierce, Carolyn; Dancey, Janet E; Stenson, Kerstin; Blair, Elizabeth; Dekker, Allison; Vokes, Everett E

    2009-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a validated target in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck, but in patients with recurrent or metastatic disease, EGFR targeting agents have displayed modest efficacy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenesis has been implicated as a mechanism of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. In this multi-institutional phase I/II study we combined an EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib, with an anti-VEGF antibody, bevacizumab. Between April 15, 2003, and Jan 27, 2005, patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck were enrolled from seven centres in the USA and were given erlotinib (150 mg daily) and bevacizumab in escalating dose cohorts. The primary objectives in the phase I and II sections, respectively, were to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of bevacizumab when administered with erlotinib and to establish the proportion of objective responses and time to disease progression. Pretreatment serum and tissues were collected and analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence quantitative laser analysis, respectively. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00055913. In the phase I section of the trial, ten patients were enrolled in three successive cohorts with no dose-limiting toxic effects noted. 46 patients were enrolled in the phase II section of the trial (including three patients from the phase I section) on the highest dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg every 3 weeks). Two additional patients were accrued beyond the protocol-stipulated 46, leaving a total of 48 patients for the phase II assessment. The most common toxic effects of any grade were rash and diarrhoea (41 and 16 of 48 patients, respectively). Three patients had serious bleeding events of grade 3 or higher. Seven patients had a response, with four showing a complete response allowing rejection of the null hypothesis. Median time of overall

  10. Local Tumor Control and Normal Tissue Toxicity of Pulsed Low-Dose Rate Radiotherapy for Recurrent Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigates (1 local tumor control and (2 normal tissue toxicity of pulsed low-dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR for recurrent lung cancer. Methods: For study 1, nude mice were implanted with A549 tumors and divided into the following 3 groups: (1 control (n = 10, (2 conventional radiotherapy (RT; n = 10, and (3 PLDR (n = 10. Tumor-bearing mice received 2 Gy daily dose for 2 consecutive days. Weekly magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumor growth monitoring. For study 2, 20 mice received 8 Gy total body irradiation either continuously (n = 10 or 40 × 0.2 Gy pulses with 3-minute intervals (n = 10. Results: For study 1, both conventional RT and PLDR significantly inhibited the growth of A549 xenografts compared with the control group (>35% difference in the mean tumor volume; P .05. For study 2, the average weight was 20.94 ± 1.68 g and 25.69 ± 1.27 g and the survival time was 8 days and 12 days for mice treated with conventional RT and PLDR (P < .05, respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that PLDR could control A549 tumors as effectively as conventional RT, and PLDR induced much less normal tissue toxicity than conventional RT. Thus, PLDR would be a good modality for recurrent lung cancers. Advances in Knowledge: This article reports our results of an in vivo animal investigation of PLDR for the treatment of recurrent cancers, which may not be eligible for treatment because of the dose limitations on nearby healthy organs that have been irradiated in previous treatments. This was the first in vivo study to quantify the tumor control and normal tissue toxicities of PLDR using mice with implanted tumors, and our findings provided evidence to support the clinical trials that employ PLDR treatment techniques.

  11. Rectal cancer : when is the local recurrence risk low enough to refrain from the aim to prevent it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautter-Bihl, M L; Hohenberger, W; Fietkau, R; Rödel, C; Schmidberger, H; Sauer, R

    2013-02-01

    Recently, preliminary results of the OCUM study (optimized surgery and MRI-based multimodal therapy of rectal cancer) were published and raised concern in the scientific community. In this observational study, the circumferential resection margin status assessed in preoperative MRI (mrCRM) was used to decide for either total mesorectal excision (TME) alone or neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (nRCT). In contrast to current guidelines, neither T3 stage (with negative CRM) nor clinically positive lymph nodes were an indication for nRCT. Pathologically node-positive patients received chemotherapy (ChT). Overall, 230 patients were included, of whom 96 CRM-positive patients received nRCT. The CRM was accurately predicted in MRI, the rate of mesorectal plane resection was high. Recurrence rates have not yet been reported, but an impressive rate of down-staging for both T and N stage after nRCT was observed, while acute side effects were minimal. Nonetheless, the authors conclude that a substantial number of patients could be "spared severe radiation toxicity" and propagate their concept for prospectively replacing current guidelines. This is based on the hypothesis that CRM is a valid surrogate parameter for the risk of local recurrence and in case of a negative CRM, nRCT becomes dispensable. Moreover, it is assumed that lymph node status is no more relevant. Both assumptions are a contradiction to recent data from randomized studies as specified below. As 5-year locoregional recurrence rate (LRR) of only of 5-8% and study design inacceptable. Unless a publication explicitly specifies 5-year LRR, results are not exploitable for clinical decisions.

  12. Prostate cancer transrectal HIFU ablation: detection of local recurrences using T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France); Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Girouin, Nicolas; Glas, Ludivine; Ben Cheikh, Alexandre [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France); Gelet, Albert [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Mege-Lechevallier, Florence [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, Lyon (France); Rabilloud, Muriel [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Biostatistics, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, UMR CNRS, Laboratoire Biostatistiques-Sante, Pierre-Benite (France); Chapelon, Jean-Yves [Inserm, U556, Lyon (France)

    2010-01-15

    The objective was to evaluate T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in detecting local cancer recurrences after prostate high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Fifty-nine patients with biochemical recurrence after prostate HIFU ablation underwent T2-weighted and DCE MRI before transrectal biopsy. For each patient, biopsies were performed by two operators: operator 1 (blinded to MR results) performed random and colour Doppler-guided biopsies (''routine biopsies''); operator 2 obtained up to three cores per suspicious lesion on MRI (''targeted biopsies''). Seventy-seven suspicious lesions were detected on DCE images (n=52), T2w images (n=2) or both (n=23). Forty patients and 41 MR lesions were positive at biopsy. Of the 36 remaining MR lesions, 20 contained viable benign glands. Targeted biopsy detected more cancers than routine biopsy (36 versus 27 patients, p=0.0523). The mean percentages of positive cores per patient and of tumour invasion of the cores were significantly higher for targeted biopsies (p<0.0001). The odds ratios of the probability of finding viable cancer and viable prostate tissue (benign or malignant) at targeted versus routine biopsy were respectively 3.35 (95% CI 3.05-3.64) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.13-1.63). MRI combining T2-weighted and DCE images is a promising method for guiding post-HIFU biopsy towards areas containing recurrent cancer and viable prostate tissue. (orig.)

  13. Successful Re-resection for Locally Recurrent Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma at Four Years After Ex Vivo Tumor Resection and Autotransplantation of the Liver: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T; Miura, K; Ishikawa, H; Soma, D; Zhang, Z; Yuza, K; Hirose, Y; Takizawa, K; Nagahashi, M; Sakata, J; Kameyama, H; Kosugi, S; Wakai, T

    2016-05-01

    Surgical resection should be considered for isolated locally recurrent retroperitoneal liposarcomas. We experienced a case of successful re-resection for locally recurrent retroperitoneal liposarcomas 4 years after ex vivo tumor resection and autotransplantation of the liver. A 75-year-old man was admitted to our hospital. His diagnosis was local recurrence of liposarcomas. He had previously undergone ex vivo tumor resection and autologous orthotopic liver transplantation for a retroperitoneal tumor 4 years earlier. The resected tumor size was 23.5 × 15.5 × 12.5 cm. The tumor was revealed by means of histopathologic study to be a myxoid liposarcoma. Follow-up computerized tomography showed 2 recurrent tumors in the retropancreatic and para-aortic lesions. Although adhesion was severe within the operative field, we successfully performed complete en bloc re-resection of each recurrent tumor. The operative time was 250 minutes, and blood loss was 300 mL. The resected tumor sizes were 3.9 × 3.2 × 1.5 cm and 4.5 × 3.3 × 3.0 cm. The tumors were revealed by means of histopathologic study to be dedifferentiated liposarcomas. Postoperative complications included intestinal obstruction and colocutaneous fistula formation, both of which were treated surgically. The patient was discharged in an ambulatory state at 80 days after re-resection of the recurrent tumors. At the time of writing, he was alive with no evidence of recurrence, 14 months after re-resection and 62 months after primary ex vivo tumor resection. This is the first case of successful surgical re-resection for locally recurrent liposarcoma after ex vivo tumor resection and autotransplantation of the liver.

  14. Clinical, histological and demographic predictors for recurrence and second primary tumours of head and neck basal cell carcinoma. A 1062 patient-cohort study from a tertiary cancer referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrgidis, Athanassios; Vahtsevanos, Konstantinos; Tzellos, Thrasivoulos George; Xirou, Persa; Kitikidou, Kyriaki; Antoniades, Konstantinos; Zouboulis, Christos C; Triaridis, Stefanos

    2010-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for nearly 25% of all cancers in the human body and for almost 75% of skin malignancies; approximately 85% of basal cell carcinomas develop in the head and neck region. Limited demographic, clinical and histological predictors for second primary and/or recurrent BCC have been identified to date. Our objective was to identify predictors of recurrence and second primary tumour development of BCC in the head and neck region. We included 1062 patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of BCC. Multivariate and Cox regression analysis were used to access demographic, clinical and histological predictors. Study follow up included 4,302 patient-years, each patient was followed-up for an average 4.0 +/- 1.8 years (range 1-12). Overall recurrence rate was 4%. High-risk histology type was associated with an increased risk for recurrence (odds ratio (OR) = 3.47, 95%CI: 1.07-11.25). We calculated a 4-fold increased risk for recurrence with positive excision margins (OR = 4.31, 95%CI: 1.82-10.22), a 21% increased risk for recurrence (OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.06-1.37) and a 25% increased risk for second primary BCC development (OR = 1.25, 95%CI: 1.17-1.34) per year of follow-up. The median time free of second primary tumour was 7 years, while the median time free of recurrence was 12 years. The strongest predictors for recurrence are positive excision margins and high-risk histology type, indicating the need for additional patient care in such cases.

  15. What is the most accurate whole-body imaging modality for assessment of local and distant recurrent disease in colorectal cancer? A meta-analysis. Imaging for recurrent colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Monique; Lambregts, Doenja M.J. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rutten, Iris J.G.; Cappendijk, Vincent C.; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Nelemans, Patty J. [Maastricht University, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET), PET/CT, CT and MRI as whole-body imaging modalities for the detection of local and/or distant recurrent disease in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who have a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease, based on clinical findings or rise in carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). A meta-analysis was undertaken. PubMed and Embase were searched for studies on the accuracy of whole-body imaging for patients with suspected local and/or distant recurrence of their CRC. Additionally, studies had to have included at least 20 patients with CRC and 2 x 2 contingency tables had to be provided or derivable. Articles evaluating only local recurrence or liver metastasis were excluded. Summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed from the data on sensitivity and specificity of individual studies and pooled estimates of diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) and areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) were calculated. To test for heterogeneity the Cochran Q test was used. Fourteen observational studies were included which evaluated PET, PET/CT, CT and/or MRI. Study results were available in 12 studies for PET, in 5 studies for CT, in 5 studies for PET/CT and in 1 study for MRI. AUCs for PET, PET/CT and CT were 0.94 (0.90-0.97), 0.94 (0.87-0.98) and 0.83 (0.72-0.90), respectively. In patient based analyses PET/CT had a higher diagnostic performance than PET with an AUC of 0.95 (0.89-0.97) for PET/CT vs 0.92 (0.86-0.96) for PET. Both whole-body PET and PET/CT are very accurate for the detection of local and/or distant recurrent disease in CRC patients with a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease. CT has the lowest diagnostic performance. This difference is probably mainly due to the lower accuracy of CT for detection of extrahepatic metastases (including local recurrence). For clinical practice PET/CT might be the modality of choice when evaluating patients with a (high

  16. Local community detection as pattern restoration by attractor dynamics of recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Densely connected parts in networks are referred to as "communities". Community structure is a hallmark of a variety of real-world networks. Individual communities in networks form functional modules of complex systems described by networks. Therefore, finding communities in networks is essential to approaching and understanding complex systems described by networks. In fact, network science has made a great deal of effort to develop effective and efficient methods for detecting communities in networks. Here we put forward a type of community detection, which has been little examined so far but will be practically useful. Suppose that we are given a set of source nodes that includes some (but not all) of "true" members of a particular community; suppose also that the set includes some nodes that are not the members of this community (i.e., "false" members of the community). We propose to detect the community from this "imperfect" and "inaccurate" set of source nodes using attractor dynamics of recurrent neural networks. Community detection by the proposed method can be viewed as restoration of the original pattern from a deteriorated pattern, which is analogous to cue-triggered recall of short-term memory in the brain. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method using synthetic networks and real social networks for which correct communities are known.

  17. Mitomycin C, 5-fluorouracil and radiation in advanced, locally recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, W

    1992-02-01

    15 patients with inoperable presacral recurrent rectal cancer following surgery were treated with combined radiation and chemotherapy. Treatment consisted of split-course radiotherapy with 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks and, after 4 weeks, an additional 20 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. At the start of treatment and following the split course, chemotherapy was administered. Mitomycin C was given on Day 1 (dose: 15 mg/m2 i.v. bolus) and 5-fluorouracil from Day 1 to Day 5 (dose: 750 mg/m2/24 h, continuous i.v. infusion). Owing to considerable, predominantly haematological and gastrointestinal toxicity, only six out of 15 patients received treatment according to the protocol. The symptomatic relief of symptoms was good. Pain was controlled in seven of eight symptomatic patients. Seven of the patients showed response according to computed tomography, but in none of these cases was a complete remission seen. After a follow-up of at least 30 months, only three patients are alive. The 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates are 9/15, 6/15 and 3/12, respectively. The median survival is 14 months (range 4-60+ months). In comparison with historical data from the same institution, combined radio-chemotherapy did not show any prolongation of survival or increased response rate, but increased toxicity excessively, when compared with radiation alone.

  18. In vitro pediculicidal activity of herbal shampoo base on Thai local plants against head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassami, Watcharawit; Soonwera, Mayura

    2013-04-01

    Head lice infestation, a worldwide head infestation caused Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer, is an important public health problem in Thailand. Several chemical pediculicides have lost in efficacy due to increasing resistance of lice against insecticide. Therefore, non-toxic alternative products, such as natural products from plants, e.g. plant extract pediculicides, are needed for head lice control. The aims of this study were to evaluate the potential of pediculicidal activity of herbal shampoo base on three species of Thai local plants (Accacia concinna (Willd.) DC, Averrhoa bilimbi Linn. and Tamarindus indica Linn.) against head lice and to compare them with carbaryl shampoo (Hafif shampoo®; 0.6% w/v carbaryl) and non-treatment control in order to assess their in vitro. Doses of 0.12 and 0.25 ml/cm2 of each herbal shampoo were applied to filter paper, and ten head lice were place on the filter paper. The mortalities of head lice on the filter paper were recorded at 1, 5, 10, 30 and 60 min by sterio-microscope. All herbal shampoos at 0.25 ml/cm2 were more effective pediculicide than carbaryl shampoo with 100% mortality at 5 min. The median lethal time (LT50) of all herbal shampoos at 0.25 ml/cm2 showed no significant differences over at 0.12 ml/cm2 (Pshampoo, followed by Av. bilimbi extract shampoo and Ac. concinna extract shampoo, with LT50 valuesshampoos have high potential of pediculicide to head lice treatments for schoolchildren.

  19. Computed tomographic features predictive of local recurrence in patients with early stage lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpenny, Darragh; Ridge, Carole A; Hayes, Sara; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Rimner, Andreas; Ginsberg, Michelle S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify computed tomography (CT) features of local recurrence (LR) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Two hundred eighteen patients underwent SBRT for lung cancer from January 1st, 2006 to March 1st, 2011. Signs of LR recorded: opacity with new bulging margin, opacification of air bronchograms, enlarging pleural effusion, new or enlarging mass, and increased lung density at the treatment site. A new bulging margin at the treatment site was the only feature significantly associated with LR (P<.005). Most CT features classically associated with LR following conventional radiation therapy are unreliable for predicting LR following SBRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Immune Adjuvant Activity of Pre-Resectional Radiofrequency Ablation Protects against Local and Systemic Recurrence in Aggressive Murine Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumito Ito

    Full Text Available While surgical resection is a cornerstone of cancer treatment, local and distant recurrences continue to adversely affect outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Evidence that an alternative debulking strategy involving radiofrequency ablation (RFA induces antitumor immunity prompted the current investigation of the efficacy of performing RFA prior to surgical resection (pre-resectional RFA in a preclinical mouse model.Therapeutic efficacy and systemic immune responses were assessed following pre-resectional RFA treatment of murine CT26 colon adenocarcinoma.Treatment with pre-resectional RFA significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival compared to sham surgery, RFA, or resection alone. Mice in the pre-resectional RFA group that achieved a complete response demonstrated durable antitumor immunity upon tumor re-challenge. Failure to achieve a therapeutic benefit in immunodeficient mice confirmed that tumor control by pre-resectional RFA depends on an intact adaptive immune response rather than changes in physical parameters that make ablated tumors more amenable to a complete surgical excision. RFA causes a marked increase in intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration, thus substantially enhancing the ratio of CD8+ effector T cells: FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Importantly, pre-resectional RFA significantly increases the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment and tumor-draining lymph node but had no impact on infiltration by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, M1 macrophages or M2 macrophages at tumor sites or in peripheral lymphoid organs (i.e., spleen. Finally, pre-resectional RFA of primary tumors delayed growth of distant tumors through a mechanism that depends on systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity.Improved survival and antitumor systemic immunity elicited by pre-resectional RFA support the translational potential of this neoadjuvant treatment for cancer patients with

  1. Multi-Parametric MRI-Directed Focal Salvage Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Locally Recurrent Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: A Novel Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, T; Avital, I; Stojadinovic, A; Brücher, B L D M; Cote, E; Yu, J

    2013-01-01

    Even with the technological advances of dose-escalated IMRT with the addition of the latest image guidance technologies, local failures still occur. The combination of MRI-based imaging techniques can yield quantitative information that reflects on the biological properties of prostatic tissues. These techniques provide unique information that can be used for tumor detection in the treated gland. With the advent of these improved imaging modalities, it has become possible to more effectively image local recurrences within the prostate gland. With better imaging, these focal recurrences can be differentially targeted with salvage brachytherapy minimizing rectal and bladder toxicity. Here we report a novel use of MRI-directed focal brachytherapy after local recurrence. This technique offers a unique opportunity to safely and successfully treat recurrent prostate cancer, previously treated with definitive radiation therapy. The use of multi-parametric MRI-directed focal salvage permanent interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a promising strategy to avoid more aggressive and expensive treatments that are associated with increased morbidity, potentially improving survival at potentially lower costs.

  2. The potential value of power Doppler ultrasound imaging compared with grey-scale ultrasound findings in the diagnosis of local recurrence after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamsel, S. [Department of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Killi, R. [Department of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Apaydin, E. [Department of Urology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Hekimgil, M. [Department of Pathology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Demirpolat, G. [Department of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2006-04-15

    AIM: To determine the value of power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) imaging during transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) in detecting local recurrence after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients were evaluated in whom local recurrence of prostate cancer was suspected on the basis of elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels (above 0.4 ng/ml) after RRP with no evidence of metastatic disease. Grey-scale TRUS and PDUS-guided biopsies of the vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA) and perianastomotic soft tissues were obtained after TRUS examinations of the prostatic fossa. The ability to detect locally recurrent prostate cancer using grey-scale TRUS alone was compared with TRUS combined with PDUS. RESULTS: Fifteen of the 18 patients (83%) had positive biopsies for local recurrent tumour at histological examination. TRUS alone detected grey-scale abnormalities in 15 of 18 patients (83%), of whom 14 (77%) had positive TRUS-guided biopsies. PDUS during TRUS showed hypervascularity in 14 of 18 patients (77%). Biopsies of these hypervascular regions were positive in all patients (100%). The sensitivity and specificity of TRUS alone in detecting recurrent tumour were 93 and 67%, respectively, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 93% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 67%. TRUS combined with PDUS had a sensitivity and specificity of 93 and 100%, respectively, with a PPV and a NPV of 100 and 75%, respectively.

  3. Local recurrence after surgery for non-small cell lung cancer: a recursive partitioning analysis of multi-institutional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Chris R; Higgins, Kristin A; Peterson, Bercedis L; Chino, Junzo P; Marks, Lawrence B; D'Amico, Thomas A; Varlotto, John M

    2013-10-01

    To define subgroups at high risk of local recurrence (LR) after surgery for non-small cell lung cancer using a recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). This Institutional Review Board-approved study included patients who underwent upfront surgery for I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer at Duke Cancer Institute (primary set) or at other participating institutions (validation set). The 2 data sets were analyzed separately and identically. Disease recurrence at the surgical margin, ipsilateral hilum, and/or mediastinum was considered an LR. Recursive partitioning was used to build regression trees for the prediction of local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) from standard clinical and pathological factors. LRFS distributions were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. The 1411 patients in the primary set had a 5-year LRFS rate of 77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.74-0.81), and the 889 patients in the validation set had a 5-year LRFS rate of 76% (95% CI, 0.72-0.80). The RPA of the primary data set identified 3 terminal nodes based on stage and histology. These nodes and their 5-year LRFS rates were as follows: (1) stage I/adenocarcinoma, 87% (95% CI, 0.83-0.90); (2) stage I/squamous or large cell, 72% (95% CI, 0.65-0.79); and (3) stage II-IIIA, 62% (95% CI, 0.55-0.69). The validation RPA identified 3 terminal nodes based on lymphovascular invasion (LVI) and stage: (1) no LVI/stage IA, 82% (95% CI, 0.76-0.88); (2) no LVI/stage IB-IIIA, 73% (95% CI, 0.69-0.80); and (3) LVI, 58% (95% CI, 0.47-0.69). The risk of LR was similar in the primary and validation patient data sets. There was discordance between the 2 data sets regarding the clinical factors that best segregate patients into risk groups. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The New York Head-A precise standardized volume conductor model for EEG source localization and tES targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Parra, Lucas C; Haufe, Stefan

    2016-10-15

    In source localization of electroencephalograpic (EEG) signals, as well as in targeted transcranial electric current stimulation (tES), a volume conductor model is required to describe the flow of electric currents in the head. Boundary element models (BEM) can be readily computed to represent major tissue compartments, but cannot encode detailed anatomical information within compartments. Finite element models (FEM) can capture more tissue types and intricate anatomical structures, but with the higher precision also comes the need for semi-automated segmentation, and a higher computational cost. In either case, adjusting to the individual human anatomy requires costly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus head modeling is often based on the anatomy of an 'arbitrary' individual (e.g. Colin27). Additionally, existing reference models for the human head often do not include the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), and their field of view excludes portions of the head and neck-two factors that demonstrably affect current-flow patterns. Here we present a highly detailed FEM, which we call ICBM-NY, or "New York Head". It is based on the ICBM152 anatomical template (a non-linear average of the MRI of 152 adult human brains) defined in MNI coordinates, for which we extended the field of view to the neck and performed a detailed segmentation of six tissue types (scalp, skull, CSF, gray matter, white matter, air cavities) at 0.5mm(3) resolution. The model was solved for 231 electrode locations. To evaluate its performance, additional FEMs and BEMs were constructed for four individual subjects. Each of the four individual FEMs (regarded as the 'ground truth') is compared to its BEM counterpart, the ICBM-NY, a BEM of the ICBM anatomy, an 'individualized' BEM of the ICBM anatomy warped to the individual head surface, and FEMs of the other individuals. Performance is measured in terms of EEG source localization and tES targeting errors. Results show that the ICBM-NY outperforms

  5. Docetaxel plus cetuximab biweekly is an active regimen for the first-line treatment of patients with recurrent/metastatic head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Doris; Fuchs, Hannah; Kornek, Gabriela; Grah, Anja; Pammer, Johannes; Aretin, Marie-Bernadette; Fuereder, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    For patients with recurrent/metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCCHN) limited therapeutic options exist. Only a subset of patients is suitable for combination chemotherapy regimens. Biweekly docetaxel plus cetuximab might be an alternative option. Thus, we performed this retrospective analysis in unselected patients in order to investigate the efficacy and safety of this regimen. Thirty-one patients receiving off protocol docetaxel (50 mg/m2) plus cetuximab (500 mg/m2) biweekly were included. Data collection included baseline demographic, response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS) as well as toxicity. OS and PFS were 8.3 months (95% CI 4.8-11.8) and 4.0 months (95% CI 1.0-7.0), respectively. Three (9.7%) patients achieved a complete response and one patient (3.2%) a partial response. The DCR was 41.9% and we observed an ORR of 12.9%. The one-year survival rate was 25.8%. The therapy was well tolerated and the most common grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (19.4%), hypomagnesaemia (12.9%) and acne-like rash (9.7%). Biweekly cetuximab/docetaxel is an effective regimen and well tolerated in R/M SCCHN patients not suitable for platinum doublet treatment. Further evaluation of this regimen in prospective clinical trials is warranted.

  6. Effect of time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy on local recurrence-free survival in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The concentration of capecitabine peaks at 1–2 hours after administration. We therefore assumed that proper timing of capecitabine administration and radiotherapy would maximize radiosensitization and influence survival among patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 223 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiation, followed by surgery from January 2002 to May 2006. All patients underwent pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) and received capecitabine twice daily at 12-hour intervals (1,650 mg/m2/day). Patients were divided into two groups according to the time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy. Patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy were classified as Group A (n = 109); all others were classified as Group B (n = 114). The median follow-up period was 72 months (range, 7 to 149 months). Although Group A had a significantly higher rate of good responses (44% vs. 25%; p = 0.005), the 5-year local recurrence-free survival rates of 93% in Group A and 97% in Group B did not differ significantly (p = 0.519). The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were also comparable between the groups. Despite the better pathological response in Group A, the time interval between capecitabine and radiotherapy administration did not have a significant effect on survivals. Further evaluations are needed to clarify the interaction of these treatment modalities.

  7. Whisking kinematics enables object localization in head-centered coordinates based on tactile information from a single vibrissa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne En-Tzu Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During active tactile exploration with their whiskers (vibrissae, rodents can rapidly orient to an object even though there are very few proprioceptors in the whisker muscles. Thus a long-standing question in the study of the vibrissal system is how the rat can localize an object in head-centered coordinates without muscle-based proprioception. We used a three-dimensional model of whisker bending to simulate whisking motions against a peg to investigate the possibility that the 3D mechanics of contact from a single whisker are sufficient for localization in head-centered coordinates. Results show that, for nearly all whiskers in the array, purely tactile signals at the whisker base – as would be measured by mechanoreceptors, in whisker-centered coordinates – could be used to determine the location of a vertical peg in head-centered coordinates. Both the roll and the elevation components of whisking kinematics contribute to the uniqueness and resolution of the localization. These results offer an explanation for a behavioral study showing that rats can more accurately determine the horizontal angle of an object if one column, rather than one row, of whiskers is spared.

  8. Whisking Kinematics Enables Object Localization in Head-Centered Coordinates Based on Tactile Information from a Single Vibrissa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Anne E. T.; Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    During active tactile exploration with their whiskers (vibrissae), rodents can rapidly orient to an object even though there are very few proprioceptors in the whisker muscles. Thus a long-standing question in the study of the vibrissal system is how the rat can localize an object in head-centered coordinates without muscle-based proprioception. We used a three-dimensional model of whisker bending to simulate whisking motions against a peg to investigate the possibility that the 3D mechanics of contact from a single whisker are sufficient for localization in head-centered coordinates. Results show that for nearly all whiskers in the array, purely tactile signals at the whisker base – as would be measured by mechanoreceptors, in whisker-centered coordinates – could be used to determine the location of a vertical peg in head-centered coordinates. Both the “roll” and the “elevation” components of whisking kinematics contribute to the uniqueness and resolution of the localization. These results offer an explanation for a behavioral study showing that rats can more accurately determine the horizontal angle of an object if one column, rather than one row, of whiskers is spared. PMID:27486390

  9. Whisking Kinematics Enables Object Localization in Head-Centered Coordinates Based on Tactile Information from a Single Vibrissa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Anne E T; Hartmann, Mitra J Z

    2016-01-01

    During active tactile exploration with their whiskers (vibrissae), rodents can rapidly orient to an object even though there are very few proprioceptors in the whisker muscles. Thus a long-standing question in the study of the vibrissal system is how the rat can localize an object in head-centered coordinates without muscle-based proprioception. We used a three-dimensional model of whisker bending to simulate whisking motions against a peg to investigate the possibility that the 3D mechanics of contact from a single whisker are sufficient for localization in head-centered coordinates. Results show that for nearly all whiskers in the array, purely tactile signals at the whisker base - as would be measured by mechanoreceptors, in whisker-centered coordinates - could be used to determine the location of a vertical peg in head-centered coordinates. Both the "roll" and the "elevation" components of whisking kinematics contribute to the uniqueness and resolution of the localization. These results offer an explanation for a behavioral study showing that rats can more accurately determine the horizontal angle of an object if one column, rather than one row, of whiskers is spared.

  10. The role of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in differentiation of local recurrence and residual soft-tissue tumor versus post-treatment changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehotska, V; Tothova, L; Valkovic, L

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the diagnosis of local recurrence of malignant soft-tissue tumors after receiving treatment. From March 2002 till December 2009 we performed dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in 95 patients with soft-tissue tumor after receiving treatment (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy). Patients were classified according to five types of TIC. The recurrent disease was suspected in 47 patients and the biopsy was recommended. In 8 cases (TIC II), the biopsy was performed due to long-term post-treatment changes. Histological results proved STT recurrence in 45 patients; in 10 patients (8 with TIC II), biopsy revealed hypervascular granulation tissue, florid inflammation and reactive changes. The sensitivity for dynamic contrast-enhanced MR examination was 100 %, specificity 80 %, positive predictive value (PPV) 95.7 % and negative predictive value (NPV) 100 %. Our results indicate that TICs III, IV and V raise high suspicion of local tumor recurrence and require percutaneous imaging-guided biopsy. TIC of type II usually represents a pseudomass and the biopsy should be performed only in selected cases with increased risk of recurrent disease based on multidisciplinary approach. On the basis of literature review as well as our experiences we created a reliable algorithm proposed for diagnosing the residual or recurrent soft-tissue tumors (Tab. 2, Fig. 6, Ref. 20).

  11. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume Measured by {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated by Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyu Ho; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Han, Eun Ji; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Gi Wom; Na, Sea Jung; Sun, Dong Il; Jung, So Lyung; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Min Sik; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Sung Hoon [The Cathholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    We assessed the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured using {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) inpatients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients (51 men, five women; mean age 56.0{+-}8.8 years) who had locally advanced HNSCC and underwent FDG PET/CT for initial evaluation. All patients had surgical resection and radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. The peak standardized uptake (SUV{sup peak)} and MTV of the target lesion, including primary HNSCC and metastatic cervical lymph nodes, were measured SUV{sup peak,} MTV, and clinico pathologic variables such as age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, pN stage, pT stage, TNM stage, histologic grade and treatment modality to disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). On the initial FDG PET/CT scans, the median SUV{sup peakw}as 7.8 (range, 1.8-19.0) and MTV was 17.0cm{sup 3(}range, 0.1-131.0cm{sup 3)}. The estimated 2 year DFS and OS rates were 67.2% and 81.8%. The cutoff points of SUV{sup peak6}.2 and MTV 20.7cm{sup 3w}ere the best discriminative values for predicting clinical outcome. MTV and ECOG performance status were significantly related to DFS and OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (P=0.05). The MTV obtained from initial FDG PET/CT scan is a significant prognostic factor for disease recurrence and mortality in locally advanced HNSCC treated with surgery and radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

  12. Phase II trial of isoflavone in prostate-specific antigen recurrent prostate cancer after previous local therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Wei

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Data exist that demonstrate isoflavones' potent antiproliferative effects on prostate cancer cells. We evaluated the efficacy of isoflavone in patients with PSA recurrent prostate cancer after prior therapy. We postulated that isoflavone therapy would slow the rate of rise of serum PSA. Methods- Twenty patients with rising PSA after prior local therapy were enrolled in this open-labeled, Phase II, nonrandomized trial (Trial registration # NCT00596895. Patients were treated with soy milk containing 47 mg of isoflavonoid per 8 oz serving three times per day for 12 months. Serum PSA, testosterone, lipids, isoflavone levels (genistein, daidzein, and equol, and quality of life (QOL were measured at various time points from 0 to 12 months. PSA outcome was evaluated. Results- Within the mixed regression model, it was estimated that PSA had increased 56% per year before study entry and only increased 20% per year for the 12-month study period (p = 0.05. Specifically, the slope of PSA after study entry was significantly lower than that before study entry in 6 patients and the slope of PSA after study entry was significantly higher than before study entry in 2 patients. For the remaining 12 patients, the change in slope was statistically insignificant. Nearly two thirds of the patients were noted to have significant levels of free equol in their serum while on therapy. Conclusion- Dietary intervention with isoflavone supplementation may have biologic activity in men with biochemical recurrent prostate cancer as shown by a decline in the slope of PSA. This study may lend support to the literature that nutritional supplements have biologic activity in prostate cancer and therefore, further studies with these agents in randomized clinical trials should be encouraged.

  13. Histopathological predictors for local recurrence in patients with T3 and T4 rectal cancers without preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Yoshito; Hisaka, Toru; Mizobe, Tomoaki; Kinugasa, Tetsushi; Ogata, Yutaka; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2014-11-01

    Identification of suitable predictors of local recurrence (LR) in patients with rectal cancer would be of clinical benefit. The aim of this study was to identify histopathological factors that could predict LR. A total of 796 stage II/III patients with pT3 and pT4 rectal cancer who did not undergo preoperative chemoradiation were enrolled. LR was defined as intra-pelvic recurrence only. Histopathological factors related to LR were investigated. LR was found in 25 patients (6.1%) with stage II and 54 patients (13.9%) with stage IIIB/IIIC. In patients with stage II, distance of mesorectal extension (DME) >4 mm (P = 0.011) and positive venous invasion (P = 0.035) were independent factors that predicted LR. In patients with stage IIIB/IIIC, circumferential resection margin (CRM) ≤1 mm (P = 0.003) and positive lymphatic invasion (P = 0.006) were independent factors. The cumulative 5-year LR rate was higher (11.9%) in patients with a combination of DME > 4 mm and/or positive venous invasion for stage II (P CRM≤1 mm and/or positive lymphatic invasion for stage IIIB and IIIC (22.2%; P < 0.002, and 34.3%; P < 0.006, respectively). Important histopathological predictors for LR in patients with pT3 and pT4 rectal cancer were different at each stage. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Impact of age, intrinsic subtype and local treatment on long-term local-regional recurrence and breast cancer mortality among low-risk breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Tinne; Alsner, Jan; Tramm, Trine

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term prognostic impact of age, local treatment and intrinsic subtypes on the risk of local-regional recurrence (LRR) and breast cancer mortality among low-risk patients.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cohort study with prospectively collected data, balanced five-year age groups...... no prognostic impact on the 20-year LRR risk, regardless of age. A distinct 20-year mortality pattern was observed among the younger patients: 11% of patients with LumB tumor died of breast cancer within the first five years after primary surgery, 23% of patients with Lum-HER2+ tumor died within a 5-10-year...... period, whereas patients with LumA tumor died with a constant low rate throughout the 20-year period. After 20 years of follow-up, patients with LumA tumor had breast cancer mortality comparable to that of patients with LumB tumor (20%) and lower than Lum-HER2+ tumor (39%). Among the older patients...

  15. Recurrences after intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma more likely to originate from regions with high baseline [18F]-FDG uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Anne Kirkebjerg; Vogelius, Ivan Richter; Aznar, Marianne;

    2014-01-01

    received radiotherapy for HNSCC from 2005 to 2009. Among 100 patients achieving complete clinical response and a later recurrence, 39 patients with 48 loco-regional failures had a recurrence CT scan before any salvage therapy. The estimated point of origin of each recurrence was transferred to the planning...

  16. Detection of local, regional, and distant recurrence in patients with psa relapse after external-beam radiotherapy using (11)C-choline positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; Pruim, Jan; van den Bergh, Alphons C. M.; Leliveld, Anna M.; Njman, Rien J. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; de Jong, Idle J.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: An elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level cannot distinguish between local-regional recurrences and the presence of distant metastases after treatment with curative intent for prostate cancer. With the advent of salvage treatment such as cryotherapy, it has become important to

  17. Association between irrigation fluids, washout volumes and risk of local recurrence of anterior resection for rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of 427 cases and 492 controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rectal washout can prevent local recurrence after anterior resection of rectal cancer. Few studies have focused particularly on the association between irrigation fluids volume or agents and the risk of local recurrence after anterior resection of rectal cancer. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between irrigation fluids types, volumes of rectal washout and risk of local recurrence after anterior resection for cancer. DATA SOURCES: Relevant studies were identified by a search of Medline, Embase, Wiley Online Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Cochrane Oral Health Group Specialized Register, Wanfang databases and Google Website from their inception until October 18,2013. STUDY SELECTION: Studies reporting the association between rectal washout types and volumes and risk of local recurrence after anterior resection for cancer were included. INTERVENTIONS: Eligible studies used rectal washout. Control groups were defined as no washout. STUDY APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS METHODS: Random-effects model were used to obtain summary estimates of RR and 95% CI, with Stata version 11 and RevMan 5.2.5 softwares used. The quality of report was appraised in reference to the MINORS item. RESULTS: Of the 919 rectal cancer patients in 8 included studies, a total of 61(6.64% cases of local recurrence were reported, with a pooled RR 0.51 (95%CI = 0.28-0.92, P = 0.03. The RRs 0.37 and 0.39 in normal saline and washout volume (≥ 1500 ml normal saline subgroup, respectively, indicated that rectal washout with normal saline, or ≥ 1500 ml in volume could significantly reduce local recurrence (LR rate (95% CI = 0.17-0.79, P = 0.01; 95% CI = 0.18-0.87, P = 0.02 after anterior resection for cancer. LIMITATION: The included studies were non-randomized observational studies, with diversity of study designs. CONCLUSION: Rectal washout with normal saline alone can reduce the risk of local recurrence in patients with resectable rectal cancer, and

  18. The predictive value of preoperative {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET for postoperative recurrence in patients with localized primary gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Kanae Kawai; Nakamoto, Yuji; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mikami, Yoshiki [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Kyoto (Japan); Kumamoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Kumamoto (Japan); Tanaka, Shiro [Kyoto University, Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Public Health, Kyoto (Japan); Higashi, Tatsuya [Shiga Medical Center Research Institute, Shiga (Japan); Tadamura, Eiji [Sakazaki Clinic, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Saga, Tsuneo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Dianostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Minami, Shunsuke [Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Department of Radiology, Shiga (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    To assess the potential value of preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET to predict postoperative recurrence of solitary localized primary gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) after radical resection. A total of 46 patients with primary GIST who received preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET and underwent complete resection without neoadjuvant therapy were retrospectively studied. PET findings, including ring-shaped uptake and intense uptake, were compared with Joensuu risk grades using Fisher's exact test. The prognostic value of the preoperative clinico-imaging variables - age ≥60 years, male, ring-shaped uptake, intense uptake, tumour size >5 cm, heterogeneous CT attenuation and lower gastrointestinal origin - and Joensuu high risk for recurrence-free survival was evaluated using log-rank test and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Ring-shaped uptake and intense uptake were significantly associated with Joensuu high risk. Univariate analysis showed that ring-shaped uptake, intense uptake, size >5 cm and Joensuu high risk were significantly associated with inferior recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analysis showed that ring-shaped uptake (P = 0.004) and Joensuu high risk (P = 0.021) were independent adverse prognostic factors of postoperative recurrence. Ring-shaped uptake on preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET may be a potential predictor of postoperative tumour recurrence of localized primary GISTs. (orig.)

  19. Nivolumab or Expectant Observation Following Ipilimumab, Nivolumab, and Surgery in Treating Patients With High Risk Localized, Locoregionally Advanced, or Recurrent Mucosal Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-04

    Cervical Carcinoma; Esophageal Carcinoma; Mucosal Melanoma; Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Oral Cavity Mucosal Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Oral Cavity Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Vaginal Carcinoma

  20. Fibromatosis in vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap imitating tumor recurrence after surgery for locally advanced rectal cancer: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Hole, Knut Håkon; Tønne, Elin; Ryder, Truls; Grøholt, Krystyna Kotanska; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2016-03-03

    Abdominoperineal excision is performed in patients with locally advanced, low rectal carcinoma. Reconstruction of the dorsal vagina and perineum using the vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap following extensive surgery results in favorable surgical outcome and quality of life. However, the rectus abdominis muscle, as part of the anterior abdominal wall, may develop fibrous lesions also as a transplant. A 39-year-old female patient with low rectal cancer and extensive colorectal polyposis was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by colectomy and abdominoperineal excision with resection of the dorsal vaginal wall and subsequent reconstruction of the perineum using the vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. At the 6-month follow-up, a suspected 2 × 2 cm tumor recurrence was detected in the transposed tissue and was subsequently surgically removed. Histologic examination concluded with fibromatosis. Genetic testing revealed a known disease-causing mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene, confirming the diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis. Fibromatosis may affect the anterior abdominal wall, that is the rectus abdominis muscle, at the primary site or may develop in the muscle after its transposition into the perineum at pelvic reconstruction. Fibromatosis in the muscle flap after pelvic reconstruction may present a difficult diagnostic challenge for the multidisciplinary team.

  1. Tumor-related markers in histologically normal margins correlate with locally recurrent oral squamous cell carcinoma: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhong; Chen, Si; Chen, Xinming; Zhang, Cuicui; Liang, Xueyi

    2016-02-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is characterized by a high rate of local recurrence (LR) even when the surgical margins are considered histopathologically 'normal'. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between early tumor-related markers detected in histologically normal margins (HNM) and LR as well as disease-free survival in OSCC. The loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of markers on 9p21 (D9s1747, RPS6, D9s162) and 17p13 (TP53) and the immunostaining results of the corresponding mutant P53, P14, P15, and P16 proteins were assessed and correlated with LR and disease-free survival in 71 OSCC patients who had HNM. Fifteen of 71 patients with HNM developed LR. The presence of the following molecular markers in surgical margins was significantly correlated with the development of LR: LOH on chromosome 9p21 (D9s1747 + RPS6 + D9s162), any LOH, P16, and P53 (chi-square test, P tumor-related markers in histologically 'normal' resection margins may be a useful method for assessing LR in OSCC patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Temsirolimus With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer Who Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-23

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  3. FEASIBILITY OF INDUCTION DOCETAXEL, CISPLATIN, 5-FLUOROURACIL, CETUXIMAB (TPF-C FOLLOWED BY CONCURRENT CETUXIMAB RADIOTHERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED HEAD AND NECK SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos eCharalambakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report our experience with a sequential regimen of induction TPF-C followed by radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Patients and Methods: Toxicity and outcome was retrospectively analyzed in 22 patients receiving sequential therapy with induction TPF-C followed by radioimmunotherapy between October 2008 and December 2011. Outcome was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analyses. In addition, we performed mutation analysis for PIK3CA genes and high-risk HPV-DNA detection using PCR. Results: Median follow-up was 16 months. Six patients were TNM Stage III, 15 patients IV (IVA or IVB and 1 patient Stage II with bulky disease. During TPF-C, Grade 3 and 4 toxicities occurred in 8 patients (36.4%, dose modifications in 7 (31.8%, delays in 1 (4.5%, and unplanned admissions in 5 (22.7%. Clinical tumor response was documented in 18 of the 21 patients who completed at least 3 cycles of TPF-C (85.7% with 3 patients developing complete response and 15 partial responses. Grade 3/4 mucositis was observed in 6 (31.6% patients. At a median follow up of 19 months, 13 patients were alive and 9 (40.9% had died including 7 patients as a result of disease persistence or recurrence and two as a result of unrelated causes. PIK3CA mutations were not identified and our 2 oropharynx cases were HPV negative.Conclusions: The combination of induction TPF-C with concurrent cetuximab radioimmunotherapy in patients with locally advanced HNSCC is tolerable, with encouraging efficacy.Keywords: HNSCC, TPF-C, cetuximab radiotherapy, toxicity and outcome, mutation analysis, PIK3CA, HPV-DNA.

  4. Local recurrence following breast-conserving treatment in women aged 40 years or younger: trends in risk and the impact on prognosis in a population-based cohort of 1143 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, C. van; Sangen, M.J. van der; Poortmans, P.M.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G.A.; Roukema, J.A.; Roumen, R.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Voogd, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate trends in the risk of local recurrences after breast-conserving treatment (BCT) and to examine the impact of local recurrence (LR) on distant relapse-free survival in a large, population-based cohort of women aged

  5. Relationship between interval from surgery to radiotherapy and local recurrence rate in patients with endometrioid-type endometrial cancer: a retrospective mono-institutional Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Gadducci, Angiolo; Perrone, Franco; La Liscia, Concetta; Cosio, Stefania; Moda, Stefano; Guerrieri, Maria Elena; Grandinetti, Antonella; Greco, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    To assess the relationship between the timing of radiotherapy and the risk of local failure in patients with endometrioid-type endometrial cancer who had undergone surgery and adjuvant external pelvic radiotherapy (with or without brachytherapy), but not chemotherapy. One hundred and seventy seven patients were analyzed in this study. The median follow-up of the survivors was 72 months. Radiotherapy was delivered after a median time of 14.6 weeks from surgery and the median overall treatment time was 6.4 weeks. The tumor relapsed in 32 (18.1%) patients after a median time of 21 months. The local recurrence (vaginal or central pelvic) occurred in 11 patients. The local recurrence rate was associated with tumor grade (p=0.02), myometrial invasion (p=0.046), FIGO stage (p=0.003), pathological node status (p=0.037) and time interval from surgery to radiotherapy using 9 weeks as the cut-off value (p=0.046), but not with the overall treatment time. All the local relapses occurred in patients who received adjuvant irradiation after an interval from surgery >9 weeks. The time interval from surgery to radiotherapy might affect the local recurrence rate in patients not receiving chemotherapy. Every possible effort should be made to start radiotherapy within 9 weeks, when radiotherapy only is deemed necessary as adjuvant treatment.

  6. Phase II study of OSI-211 (liposomal lurtotecan) in patients with metastatic or loco-regional recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. An EORTC New Drug Development Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffaud, F; Borner, M; Chollet, P; Vermorken, J B; Bloch, J; Degardin, M; Rolland, F; Dittrich, C; Baron, B; Lacombe, D; Fumoleau, P

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity and safety of OSI-211, the liposomal form of lurtotecan, in patients ineligible for curative surgery or radiotherapy and with metastatic/locoregional recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and target lesions either within a previously irradiated field ("within") or outside a previously irradiated field ("outside"). OSI-211 was given intravenously over 30 min on days 1 and 8 at 2.4 mg/m2/day, repeated every 21 days (1 cycle). From July 2001 to March 2002, 32 patients from 14 institutions were enrolled in the "within" arm and 18 in the "outside" arm. In the "within" arm, two patients were ineligible because their tumour site was not allowed in the protocol (nasopharynx, skin) and two other patients never started treatment. Of the 46 eligible patients who started treatment, there was one objective response (response rate: 2.2% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): [0-11.5%]). Twelve patients in the "within" arm and 6 in the "outside" arm had stable disease, with a median duration of 18 weeks, 95% CI (12.7-25.7). The median time to progression was 6 weeks (95%CI: [5.9-12.7] weeks). Haematological toxicity was moderate in both arms. The most common haematological toxicity was grade 1-2 anaemia in 79% of patients. Non-haematological toxicity was mild in both arms. The most common grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicity was infection in 8.5% of patients. OSI-211 administered on d1 and d8, every 3 weeks, is well tolerated, but shows only minimal activity in locally advanced/metastatic SCCHN.

  7. A phase II study of concomitant boost radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin for locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José Antonio; Rueda, Antonio; de Pasos, Antonio Sacchetti; Contreras, Jorge; Cobo, Manuel; Moreno, Paloma; Benavides, Manuel; Villanueva, Asunción; Alba, Emilio

    2006-04-01

    This phase II study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of weekly cisplatin along with concomitant boost accelerated radiation regimen in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma. A total of 94 patients (median age, 58 years) with UICC stage III (n = 19) and IV (n = 75) cancer of the oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx and oral cavity were included. Patients received radiotherapy with a concomitant boost scheme (1.8 Gy on days 1-40 and 1.5 Gy boost on days 25-40 with a total dose of 72 Gy) and concurrent cisplatin, 40 mg/m(2) weekly, for the first 4 weeks. Most patients (95%) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to protocol. Toxicity was manageable with grade III mucositis and pharyngeal-oesophageal toxicity in 85 and 50% of patients, respectively. Haematological toxicity was mild. Four patients (4%) died due to complications. With a median follow of 41 months, median overall survival and time to progression were 27 and 25 months, respectively. The estimated overall survival at 4 years was 41%. Concomitant boost accelerated radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin is a feasible schedule in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma, with acceptable toxicity and survival data.

  8. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.; Zahid, N. Idayu; Khyasudeen, M. Faisal; Giera, David S.; Thimm, Julian C.; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-01-01

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism. PMID:25731606

  9. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K; Zahid, N Idayu; Khyasudeen, M Faisal; Giera, David S; Thimm, Julian C; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-03-03

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism.

  10. Partially Automated Method for Localizing Standardized Acupuncture Points on the Heads of Digital Human Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungdae Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Having modernized imaging tools for precise positioning of acupuncture points over the human body where the traditional therapeutic method is applied is essential. For that reason, we suggest a more systematic positioning method that uses X-ray computer tomographic images to precisely position acupoints. Digital Korean human data were obtained to construct three-dimensional head-skin and skull surface models of six individuals. Depending on the method used to pinpoint the positions of the acupoints, every acupoint was classified into one of three types: anatomical points, proportional points, and morphological points. A computational algorithm and procedure were developed for partial automation of the positioning. The anatomical points were selected by using the structural characteristics of the skin surface and skull. The proportional points were calculated from the positions of the anatomical points. The morphological points were also calculated by using some control points related to the connections between the source and the target models. All the acupoints on the heads of the six individual were displayed on three-dimensional computer graphical image models. This method may be helpful for developing more accurate experimental designs and for providing more quantitative volumetric methods for performing analyses in acupuncture-related research.

  11. Carboplatin-pemetrexed in treatment of patients with recurrent/metastatic cancers of the head and neck; superior outcomes in oropharyngeal primaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu eMalhotra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background – Platinum based therapy in combination with 5-fluorouracil with cetuximab has shown the best survival in pts with recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of carboplatin, pemetrexed and to assess differential outcomes in patients with oropharyngeal primary and HPV related disease.Patients and Methods –The charts of consecutive patients with R/M SCCHN were reviewed. All patients receiving at least 1 cycle of the 2-drug regimen (pemetrexed 500 mg/m2, carboplatin area under the curve of 5 intravenously, were included for assessment of response, safety, toxicity and survival.Results - A total of 86 patients received this regimen between January 2008 and December 2012, of which, 63 were included in this analysis. Forty one percent (26 of the patients had cancers of the oropharynx, and of those, 50% had HPV positive disease, 32% (20 had cancers of the larynx and 24% (15 of the oral cavity. Median number of cycles administered was 4 (range 1-14 cycles with 50% of the patients receiving 4 or more cycles. Half the patients achieved stable disease as their best response, 8% (5 attained a partial response, 24% progressed on therapy and the remaining patients (12 could not have their response assessed.On the basis of Kaplan Meier analysis, median progression free survival (PFS was 5.1 months (95% CI 3.2, 6.2 and median overall survival (OS was 9.4 months (95% CI 4.3, 13.1. Among pts with oropharyngeal primary (n=26, median PFS was 6.4 months (95% CI 2.8, 7.9 and median OS was 16.6 months (95% CI 9.6, 19.5. Among HPV+ pts (n=13, median PFS was 7.0 months (95% CI 4.8, ne and median OS was 17.1 months (95% CI 11.2, 21.7. Conclusion: Combination carboplatin-pemetrexed is an effective and well tolerated treatment, associated with a median PFS of 5.1 months and a clinical benefit in at least 57% of the patients treated.

  12. Local recurrent and metastatic malignant melanoma. Long-term results and prognostic factors following percutaneous radiotherapy; Lokal rezidiviertes und metastasiertes malignes Melanom. Langzeitergebnisse und Prognosefaktoren nach perkutaner Radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seegenschmiedt, M.H. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Alfried-Krupp-von-Bohlen-und-Halbach-Krankenhaus, Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie, Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin; Keilholz, L.; Pieritz, A.; Urban, A.; Sauer, R. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Altendorf-Hofmann, A.; Hohenberger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Chirurgie; Schell, H. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Dermatologie

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is used as last resort for patients with advanced cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM). Herein our 20-year clinical experience is presented analyzing different endpoints and prognostic factors in patients with locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic MM. Patients and Methods: From 1977 to 1995, 2,917 consecutive patients were entered in the MM registry of our university hospital. RT was indicated in 121 patients (56 females, 65 males) for palliation in locally advanced recurrent and metastatic MM stages UICC IIB to IV. At the time of RT initiation, 11 patients had primary or recurrent lesions which were either not eligible for surgery or had residual disease (R2) after resection of a primary or recurrent MM lesion (UICC IIB); 57 patients had lymph node (n=33) or in-transit metastases (n=24) (UICC III), and 53 had distant organ metastases (7 M1a, 46 M1b) (UICC IV). The time from first diagnosis to on-study RT averaged overall 19 months (median: 18; range: 3 to 186 months). In 77 patients conventional RT and in 44 patients hypofractionated RT was applied with 2 to 6 Gy fractions up to a mean total RT dose of 45 (median: 48; range: 20 to 66) Gy. Results: At 3 months follow-up, complete response (CR) was achieved in 7 (64%), overall response (CR+PR) in all (100%) UICC IIB patients, in 25 (44%) and 44 (77%) of 57 UICC III patients, and in 9 (17%) and 26 (49%) of 53 UICC IV patients. Tumor progression during RT occurred in 25 (21%) patients. Patients with CR survived longer (median: 40 months) than those without CR (median 10 months) (p<0.01). At the time of evaluation and last FU (December 31, 1996), 26 patients were still alive: 6 (55%) stage UICC IIB, 17 (30%) stage UICC III, and 3 (6%) stage UICC IV patients (p<0.01). Univariate analysis revealed following prognostic factors for CR and long-term survival: UICC stage (p<0.001), primary location in the head and neck, total RT dose >40 Gy (all p<0.05), while age, gender and primary histological

  13. The incremental value of contrast-enhanced MRI in the detection of biopsy-proven local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy: effect of reader experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassberg, Cecilia; Akin, Oguz; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Zhang, Jingbo; Hricak, Hedvig

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively assess the incremental value of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) to T2-weighted MRI in the detection of postsurgical local recurrence of prostate cancer by readers of different experience levels, using biopsy as the reference standard. Fifty-two men with biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy underwent 1.5-T endorectal MRI with multiphase contrast-enhanced imaging and had biopsy within 3 months of MRI. Two radiologists (reader 1 had 1 year and reader 2 had 6 years of experience) independently reviewed each MRI study and classified the likelihood of recurrent cancer on a 5-point scale. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (A(z)) were calculated to assess readers' diagnostic performance with T2-weighted MRI alone and combined with CE-MRI. Interobserver agreement was assessed using Cohen kappa statistics. Thirty-three patients (63%) had biopsy-proven local recurrence of prostate cancer. With the addition of CE-MRI to T2-weighted imaging, the A(z) for cancer detection increased significantly for reader 1 (0.77 vs 0.85; p = 0.0435) but not for reader 2 (0.86 vs 0.88; p = 0.7294). The use of CE-MRI improved interobserver agreement from fair (κ = 0.39) to moderate (κ = 0.58). CE-MRI increased interobserver agreement and offered incremental value to T2-weighted MRI in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer for the relatively inexperienced reader.

  14. Positron-emission tomography CT to identify local recurrence in stage I lung cancer patients 1 year after stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essler, M.; Wantke, J.; Mayer, B.; Scheidhauer, K. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Bundschuh, R.A. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Haller, B. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik und Epidemiologie; Astner, S.T.; Molls, M.; Andratschke, N. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in stage I lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who have suspicious or unclear local recurrence findings in CT 1 year after treatment. Patients and methods: A group of 29 patients with unclear or suspicious CT findings 1 year after SBRT were examined with PET/CT. The ability of standard uptake values (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean} and posttherapeutic reduction in SUV) to detect local failure and identify patients at a high risk of disease-specific death was evaluated using logrank statistics. Histology and clinical follow-up were the gold standards for local recurrence. Results: SUV{sub mean} greater than 3.44 (p = 0.001); SUV{sub max} greater than 5.48 (p = 0.009) or a relative reduction in SUV{sub mean} or SUV{sub max} of less than 43 (p = 0.030) or 52 % (p = 0.025), respectively, was indicative of local recurrence. These parameters also correlated with an increased risk of disease-specific death: SUV{sub mean} greater than 2.81 (p = 0.023); SUV{sub max} greater than 3.45 (p = 0.007) or a relative reduction in SUV{sub mean} or SUV{sub max} of less than 32 (p = 0.015) or 52 % (p = 0.013), respectively, was indicative of an increased risk of disease-specific death. Conclusion: PET/CT performed 1 year after SBRT can reliably identify local recurrence and therefore help to clarify unclear CT findings. As posttherapeutic glucose metabolism also correlates with disease-specific survival, PET/CT may help to stratify lung cancer patients for additional treatment 1 year after SBRT. (orig.)

  15. Dose establishing a safety margin reduce local recurrence in subsegmental transarterial chemoembolization for small nodular hepatocellular carcinomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyo Jin; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Jae, Hwan Jun; Hur, Sae Beam; Chung, Jin Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To test the hypothesis that a safety margin may affect local tumor recurrence (LTR) in subsegmental chemoembolization. In 101 patients with 128 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) nodules (1-3 cm in size and ≤ 3 in number), cone-beam CT-assisted subsegmental lipiodol chemoembolization was performed. Immediately thereafter, a non-contrast thin-section CT image was obtained to evaluate the presence or absence of intra-tumoral lipiodol uptake defect and safety margin. The effect of lipiodol uptake defect and safety margin on LTR was evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to indentify determinant factors of LTR. Of the 128 HCC nodules in 101 patients, 49 (38.3%) nodules in 40 patients showed LTR during follow-up period (median, 34.1 months). Cumulative 1- and 2-year LTR rates of nodules with lipiodol uptake defect (n = 27) and those without defect (n = 101) were 58.1% vs. 10.1% and 72.1% vs. 19.5%, respectively (p < 0.001). Among the 101 nodules without a defect, the 1- and 2-year cumulative LTR rates for nodules with complete safety margin (n = 52) and those with incomplete safety margin (n = 49) were 9.8% vs. 12.8% and 18.9% vs. 19.0% (p = 0.912). In multivariate analyses, ascites (p = 0.035), indistinct tumor margin on cone-beam CT (p = 0.039), heterogeneous lipiodol uptake (p = 0.023), and intra-tumoral lipiodol uptake defect (p < 0.001) were determinant factors of higher LTR. In lipiodol chemoembolization, the safety margin in completely lipiodolized nodule without defect will not affect LTR in small nodular HCCs.

  16. Combined radiochemotherapy with docetaxel in patients with unresectable locally advanced head and neck tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, K.; Heinrich, B.; Zimmermann, F.; Molls, M.; Feldmann, H.J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Kau, R. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkranke; Sommer, G.; Achterrath, W. [Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, Koeln (Germany)

    2000-02-01

    Background: As the treatment with Docetaxel in metastatic head and neck cancer resulted in an encouraging response rate, the following phase-I study examined the effects of a combined radiochemotherapy with weekly Docetaxel in patients with inoperable advanced head and neck tumors. Patients and Methods: Six patients with Stage IV head and neck cancer were included into the study. Within the treatment regimen the primary tumor and the involved lymph nodes were irradiated up to a total dose of 70 Gy, the non involved cervical and supraclavicular lymph nodes received 50 Gy in conventional fractionation. Simultaneously Docetaxel was given 1 hour before radiotherapy. The initial dose was 15 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: A dose escalation was impossible because of several dose limiting toxicities (NCI-CTC) already in the first dose level. Two patients showed skin reactions Grade 4, 2 patients pulmonary complications Grade 4, 2 patients neurologic side effects Grade 3 and 1 a thrombocytopenia Grade 3. The response rate resulted in 3 complete and 1 partial remission, 1 death, 1 patient was not evaluable. Conclusion: Unexpectedly already in the first dose level several dose limiting toxicities were evaluated. For that reason the treatment scheme is not feasible. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Da die Behandlung mit Docetaxel bei metastasierten HNO-Tumoren eine guenstige Ansprechrate ergeben hat, untersuchte die folgende Phase-I-Studie die Effekte einer kombinierten Radiochemotherapie mit woechentlicher Gabe von Docetaxel bei Patienten mit inoperablen fortgeschrittenen HNO-Tumoren. Patienten und Methoden: In der Zeit von September 1997 bis Maerz 1998 wurden sechs Patienten mit fortgeschrittenen HNO-Tumoren im Stadium IV in die Studie eingeschlossen. Innerhalb des Therapieregimes wurden der Primaertumor und die befallenen Lymphknoten bis 70 Gy bestrahlt, die nicht befallenen zervikalen und supraklavikulaeren Lymphknoten erhielten 50 Gy in konventioneller Fraktionierung. Simultan wurde

  17. Five versus ten fractions per week radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanjis Viranna Tallari

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: After induction chemotherapy, HFRT seems to be more efficacious than CFRT in locally advanced HNSCC, by increasing significantly the probability of progression-free survival and locoregional control.

  18. Propranolol Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  19. Multifractal Analysis of Local Packing Entropies for Recurrence Time%局部回归时间Packing熵的重分形分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭春霞

    2014-01-01

    We consider the multifractal analysis of local packing entropies for recurrence time.Futhermore we show the connections between the packing topological entropy and (q,τ)-Packing entropy for level set Kα.%利用packing维数这一工具定义水平集Kα的(q,τ)-packing熵,并给出对于水平集Kα的packing熵与(q,τ)-packing二者之间的关系。

  20. Genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene as predictors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Cheng-Yuan; Qin, Xiao-Jian; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Fang-Ning; Zhang, Gui-Ming; Sun, Li-Jiang; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinically localized prostate cancer is curative. Nevertheless many patients suffered from biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Mounting evidence suggest that estrogen and xenobiotic carcinogens play an essential role in progression of prostate cancervia oxidative estrogen metabolism. CYP1B1 is an enzyme involved in the hydroxylation of estrogens, a reaction of key relevance in estrogen metabolism. Given the role of CYP1B1 in the oxidative metabolism of endo...

  1. Dual-Energy CT-Based Differentiation of Benign Posttreatment Changes From Primary or Recurrent Malignancy of the Head and Neck: Comparison of Spectral Hounsfield Units at 40 and 70 keV and Iodine Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Hideomi; Buehler, Mark; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Keshavarzi, Nahid; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    The goals of our study were to evaluate dual-energy CT (DECT) differences between benign posttreatment changes and primary or recurrent head and neck malignancies in terms of spectral Hounsfield units for virtual monochromatic series at 40 keV and iodine concentration and compare their utility with that of spectral Hounsfield units at 70 keV. A retrospective review of patients with a history of head and neck malignancy evaluated with DECT of the neck from November 2012 through December 2014 revealed 16 patients with benign posttreatment changes and 24 with malignancies (17 primary tumors and seven recurrent tumors). One reader placed ROIs within benign posttreatment changes or malignant tumors in each patient to generate spectral Hounsfield units at 40 keV, iodine concentration, and spectral Hounsfield units at 70 keV, and the Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to evaluate the differences between the two cohorts. ROC curves were also generated, and AUC and partial AUC were calculated at the three following specificities: 75%, 80%, and 90%. Malignant tissues were significantly different from benign posttreatment changes in spectral Hounsfield units at 40 keV (p concentration (p units at 70 keV (p = 0.0001). The AUCs were 0.949, 0.943, and 0.858 for spectral Hounsfield units at 40 keV, iodine concentration, and spectral Hounsfield units at 70 keV, respectively. Both spectral Hounsfield units at 40 keV and iodine concentration had statistically higher partial AUCs than spectral Hounsfield units at 70 keV at 90% specificity (p = 0.0133 and 0.0063, respectively) but were not significantly different from each other. DECT-derived spectral Hounsfield units at 40 keV and iodine concentration may be superior to spectral Hounsfield units at 70 keV, which is similar to MDCT, in differentiating benign posttreatment changes from primary or recurrent head and neck malignancies.

  2. No increase of local recurrence rate in breast cancer patients treated with skin-sparing mastectomy followed by immediate breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mierlo, D R J; Lopez Penha, T R; Schipper, R J; Martens, M H; Serroyen, J; Lobbes, M B I; Heuts, E M; Tuinder, S; Smidt, M L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of local recurrence after SSM with IBR and to determine whether complications lead to postponement of adjuvant therapy. Patients that underwent IBR after SSM between 2004 and 2011 were included. A total of 157 reconstruction procedures were performed in 147 patients for invasive breast cancer (n = 117) and ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 40). The median follow-up was 39 months [range 6-97]. Estimated 5-year local recurrence rate was 2.9% (95% CI 0.1-5.7). The median time to start adjuvant therapy was 27.5 days [range 19-92] in 18 patients with complications, and 23.5 days [range 8-54] in 46 patients without complications (p = 0.025). In our single-institution cohort, IBR after SSM carried an acceptable local recurrence rate. Complications caused a delay of adjuvant treatment but this was within guidelines and therefore not clinically relevant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Methodology to predict a maximum follow-up period for breast cancer patients without significantly reducing the chance of detecting a local recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Richard F.; Asselain, Bernard; DeRycke, Yann

    2004-03-01

    For breast cancer where the prognosis of early stage disease is very good and even when local recurrences do occur they can present several years after treatment, the hospital resources required for annual follow-up examinations of what can be several hundreds of patients are financially significant. If, therefore, there is some method to estimate a maximum length of follow-up Tmax necessary, then cost savings of physicians' time as well as outpatient workload reductions can be achieved. In modern oncology where expenses continue to increase exponentially due to staff salaries and the expense of chemotherapy drugs and of new treatment and imaging technology, the economic situation can no longer be ignored. The methodology of parametric modelling, based on the lognormal distribution is described, showing that useful estimates for Tmax can be made, by making a trade-off between Tmax and the fraction of patients who will experience a delay in detection of their local recurrence. This trade-off depends on the chosen tail of the lognormal. The methodology is described for stage T1 and T2 breast cancer and it is found that Tmax = 4 years which is a significant reduction on the usual maximum of 10 years of follow-up which is employed by many hospitals for breast cancer patients. The methodology is equally applicable for cancers at other sites where the prognosis is good and some local recurrences may not occur until several years post-treatment.

  4. Parenteral Nutrition for Patients Treated for Locally Advanced Inoperable Tumors of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage IV; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage IV; Locally Advanced Malignant Neoplasm

  5. Contribution of head shadow and pinna cues to chronic monaural sound localization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanrooij, M. van; Opstal, A.J. van

    2004-01-01

    Monaurally deaf people lack the binaural acoustic difference cues in sound level and timing that are needed to encode sound location in the horizontal plane (azimuth). It has been proposed that these people therefore rely on spectral pinna cues of their normal ear to localize sounds. However, the

  6. Contribution of head shadow and pinna cues to chronic monaural sound localization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanrooij, M. van; Opstal, A.J. van

    2004-01-01

    Monaurally deaf people lack the binaural acoustic difference cues in sound level and timing that are needed to encode sound location in the horizontal plane (azimuth). It has been proposed that these people therefore rely on spectral pinna cues of their normal ear to localize sounds. However, the ac

  7. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, Joycelin, E-mail: canavanjoycelin@gmail.com [Radiation Therapy Program and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L. [Radiation Therapy Program and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  8. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, C; Dahele, M; Paul, M A; van de Ven, P M; de Langen, A J; Senan, S; Smit, E F; Hartemink, K J

    2016-04-01

    Curative intent treatment options for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after radical chemoradiotherapy for locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are limited. In selected patients, surgery can be technically feasible, although it is widely believed to be hazardous. As data regarding the outcome of this approach is sparse, we evaluated our institutional experience with salvage surgery. Patients with a pulmonary resection for in-field locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy (≥60 Gy) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, were identified and retrospectively analyzed. A total of 15 patients treated between January 2007 and August 2015 were eligible for evaluation. In 13 patients (87%), the indication for surgery was a locoregional recurrence, while 2 patients had persistent tumor. The prior median radiotherapy dose was 66 Gy (range 60-70). All patients underwent an anatomical resection, with 8 patients having a pneumonectomy, and all pathological specimens revealed the presence of viable tumor. The in-hospital morbidity rate was 40% (6 patients), and the 90-day mortality rate was 6.7% (1 patient). Median follow-up was 12.1 months. The estimated median overall and event-free survivals were 46 months and 43.6 months, respectively. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy, resulted in acceptable morbidity, mortality and promising outcome. It should be considered as a treatment option for selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The bat head-related transfer function reveals binaural cues for sound localization in azimuth and elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytekin, Murat; Grassi, Elena; Sahota, Manjit; Moss, Cynthia F

    2004-12-01

    Directional properties of the sound transformation at the ear of four intact echolocating bats, Eptesicus fuscus, were investigated via measurements of the head-related transfer function (HRTF). Contributions of external ear structures to directional features of the transfer functions were examined by remeasuring the HRTF in the absence of the pinna and tragus. The investigation mainly focused on the interactions between the spatial and the spectral features in the bat HRTF. The pinna provides gain and shapes these features over a large frequency band (20-90 kHz), and the tragus contributes gain and directionality at the high frequencies (60 to 90 kHz). Analysis of the spatial and spectral characteristics of the bat HRTF reveals that both interaural level differences (ILD) and monaural spectral features are subject to changes in sound source azimuth and elevation. Consequently, localization cues for horizontal and vertical components of the sound source location interact. Availability of multiple cues about sound source azimuth and elevation should enhance information to support reliable sound localization. These findings stress the importance of the acoustic information received at the two ears for sound localization of sonar target position in both azimuth and elevation.

  10. Moving to get aHead: Local Mobility and Collaborative Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jacob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus

    2003-01-01

    actors move about continuously in order to accomplish their work. They do so because they need to get access to knowledge, resources, persons and/or places. We analyze the integral nature of mobility to this kind of work practice from the ethnographic description of a hospital department......Local mobility is a central aspect of collaborative work that is in need of close analysis. Between the face-to-face interaction of offices or control rooms and longdistance interaction facilitated through e.g. telephones, e-mail, the www or teleconferences lie a number of work-settings in which......, and the challenges that actors have to face to accomplish their work. Based on this ethnographic case, we propose a set of concepts for understanding local mobility as an intermediate field of distributed cooperation between centres of coordination and remote collaboration. Finally, we introduce the concept...

  11. Evaluating the Performance of BSBL Methodology for EEG Source Localization On a Realistic Head Model

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Sajib; Nesterets, Ya I; Tahtali, M; de Hoog, Frank; Gureyev, T E

    2015-01-01

    Source localization in EEG represents a high dimensional inverse problem, which is severely ill-posed by nature. Fortunately, sparsity constraints have come into rescue as it helps solving the ill-posed problems when the signal is sparse. When the signal has a structure such as block structure, consideration of block sparsity produces better results. Knowing sparse Bayesian learning is an important member in the family of sparse recovery, and a superior choice when the projection matrix is highly coherent (which is typical the case for EEG), in this work we evaluate the performance of block sparse Bayesian learning (BSBL) method for EEG source localization. It is already accepted by the EEG community that a group of dipoles rather than a single dipole are activated during brain activities; thus, block structure is a reasonable choice for EEG. In this work we use two definitions of blocks: Brodmann areas and automated anatomical labelling (AAL), and analyze the reconstruction performance of BSBL methodology fo...

  12. Predictive factors for the local recurrence and distant metastasis of phyllodes tumors of the breast:a retrospective analysis of 192 cases at a single center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wei; Yan-Xia Shi; Yu-Ting Tan; Yu-Cen Cai; Zhong-Yu Yuan; Dong Yang; Shu-Sen Wang; Rou-Jun Peng; Xiao-Yu Teng; Dong-Geng Liu

    2014-01-01

    The local recurrence rate of phylodes tumors of the breast varies widely among different subtypes, and distant metastasis is associated with poor survival. This study aimed to identify factors that are predictive of local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overal survival (OS) in patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast. Clinical data of all patients with a phyllodes tumor of the breast (n = 192) treated at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between March 1997 and December 2012 were reviewed. The Pearsonχ2 test was used to investigate the relationship between clinical features of patients and histotypes of tumors. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to identify factors that are predictive of LRFS, DMFS, and OS. In total, 31 (16.1%) patients developed local recurrence, and 12 (6.3%) developed distant metastasis. For the patients who developed local recurrence, the median age at the diagnosis of primary tumor was 33 years (range, 17-56 years), and the median size of primary tumor was 6.0 cm (range, 0.8-18 cm). For patients who developed distant metastasis, the median age at the diagnosis of primary tumor was 46 years (range, 24-68 years), and the median size of primary tumor was 5.0 cm (range, 0.8-18 cm). In univariate analysis, age, size, hemorrhage, and margin status were found to be predictive factors for LRFS (P = 0.009, 0.024, 0.004, and 0.001, respectively), whereas histotype, epithelial hyperplasia, margin status, and local recurrence were predictors of DMFS (P = 0.001, 0.007, 0.007, and < 0.001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors for LRFS included age [hazard ratio (HR) = 3.045,P = 0.005], tumor size (HR = 2.668,P = 0.013), histotype (HR = 1.715,P = 0.017), and margin status (HR = 4.530,P< 0.001). Histotype (DMFS: HR = 4.409, P = 0.002; OS: HR = 4.194,P = 0.003) and margin status (DMFS: HR = 2.581,P = 0.013; OS: HR = 2.507, P = 0.020) were

  13. Recurrent recurrent gallstone ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Z; Ahmed, M S; Alexander, D J; Miller, G V; Chintapatla, S

    2010-07-01

    We describe the second reported case of three consecutive episodes of gallstone ileus and ask the question whether recurrent gallstone ileus justifies definitive surgery to the fistula itself or can be safely managed by repeated enterotomies.

  14. Enhanced skin toxicity with concomitant cetuximab and radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujor, L.; Grillo, I.M.; Pimentel, N. [Hospital Santa Maria, Radioterapia, Lisboa (Portugal); Macor, C.; Catarina, M. [Hospital Santa Maria, ORL, Lisboa (Portugal); Ribeiro, L. [Hospital Santa Maria, Oncologia, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: When associated with radiotherapy the monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab might be exacerbate skin toxicity. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze acute dermatological toxicity in ten consecutive patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated from march 2008 to May 2009 according to Bonner protocol. Patients and methods: We have treated with radiotherapy and cetuximab ten patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx or oral cavity, stage 3-4B and non metastatic. All our patients were 3D planned and scheduled for conventional fractionation 70 Gy/35 fractions over 47 days, five days weekly. Uninvolved neck received 50 Gy and gross nodal disease received 70 Gy as the primary tumor. Cetuximab was administered one week before radiotherapy at a loading dose of 400 mg per square meter of body surface area over 120 minutes, followed by weekly 60 minutes infusions at 250 mg per square meter for the duration of radiotherapy. Results: In eight patients (80%) grade 3 radiation dermatitis occurred as early as with 28 Gy at a median dose of 42 Gy (range 28-60 Gy). the median radiotherapy dose was 6 Gy with an overall treatment time of 57.7 days (range 41-70 days). were administered 78 cycles of cetuximab, one patient discontinued after five cycles due to infusion reactions. There was no correlation between toxicity and acne-like rash due to cetuximab. Conclusion: Our results albeit in disagreement with the original study are rather similar with the experience of other European centers that encounter grade 3-4 radiation dermatitis in 49% of their patients or Australian centers that reported 79% of same degree of toxicity. (authors)

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Metachronous Multisite Oligo-Recurrence: A Long-Surviving Case with Sequential Oligo-Recurrence in Four Different Organs Treated Using Locally Radical Radiotherapy and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Onishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for oligometastases represents a recent trend in radiation oncology. While abundant data are available regarding the use of SBRT for the treatment of lung or liver oligometastases from various retrospective series and prospective trials, relatively little information has been accumulated for the treatment of oligometastases at sites other than the lungs and liver, particularly for sequential oligometastases in multiple organs. Oligometastases with primary lesions controlled is called “oligo-recurrence.” We describe herein the case of a lung cancer patient who developed repeated oligo-recurrence at multiple sites that were each controlled by radical radiotherapy and achieved long-term survival and discuss the merits of locally aggressive radiotherapy for this type of disease condition with reviewing the literature. Although further investigation should be undertaken to clarify the benefits, objectives, and methods of SBRT for the treatment of oligometastases, we believe utilization of SBRT may be worthwhile for patients with remote metastases who hope for treatment to acquire better local control and possible longer survival.

  16. Association with pregnancy increases the risk of local recurrence but does not impact overall survival in breast cancer: A case-control study of 87 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, A S; De Rycke, Y; Stevens, D; Donnadieu, A; Langer, A; Rouzier, R; Lerebours, F

    2016-12-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) constitutes 7% of all BCs in young women. The prognosis of PABC remains controversial. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the association of pregnancy with BC on the rates of overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and distant and local recurrence-free survival. We conducted a retrospective unicenter case-control study. We enrolled PABC patients treated at our institution between 1992 and 2009. For each case, 2 BC controls were matched for age and year of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the parameters associated with prognosis. Eighty-seven PABC patients were enrolled and matched with 174 controls. The univariate analysis did not reveal any significant differences in OS, DFS or distant recurrence rates between the 2 groups. Pregnancy associated status, a tumor larger than T2 and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as the primary treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of local relapse. The multivariate analysis showed that the pregnancy associated status and the tumor size were strong prognostic factors of local recurrence. Pregnancy associated status negates the prognostic value of tumor size, as both T0-T2 and T3-T4 PABC patients have the same poor prognosis as control BC patients with T3-T4 tumors. Interestingly, although PABC patients have more locally advanced tumors, they did not have a higher rate of radical surgery than the control BC patients. Pregnancy associated status is a strong prognostic factor of local relapse in BC. In PABC patients, when possible, radical surgery should be the preferred first treatment step.

  17. MODERN METHODS OF RADIATION TREATMENT OF TUMORS OF THE HEAD AND NECK (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Absalyamov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the current trends in radiation therapy of primary and recurrent, localized and locally advanced head and neck tumors. Address the use of radiation therapy as a stand-alone options, or in combination with surgery. Describe the characteristics and evaluate the use of the most modern methods.

  18. Detection of local recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in terms of salvage radiotherapy using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI without endorectal coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rischke Hans Christian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI without endorectal coil (EC in the detection of local recurrent prostate cancer (PC after radical prostatectomy (RP. Material and methods Thirty-three patients with recurrent PC underwent DCE-MRI without EC before salvage radiotherapy (RT. At median 15 (mean 16±4.9, range 12–27 months after completion of RT all patients showed complete biochemical response. Additional follow up post RT DCE-MRI scans were available. Prostate specific antigen (PSA levels at the time of imaging were correlated to the imaging findings. Results In 22/33 patients (67% early contrast enhancing nodules were detected in the post-prostatectomy fossa on pre-RT DCE-MRI images. The average pre-RT PSA level of the 22 patients with positive pre-RT DCE-MRI findings was significantly higher (mean, 0.74±0.64 ng/mL compared to the pre-RT PSA level of the 11 patients with negative pre-RT DCE-MRI (mean, 0.24±0.13 ng/mL (p Conclusions This is the first study that shows that DCE-MRI without EC can detect local recurrent PC with an estimated accuracy of 83% at low PSA levels. All false negative DCE-MRI scans were detected using a PSA cut-off of ≥0.54 ng/mL.

  19. Local and distant recurrences in rectal cancer patients are predicted by the nonspecific immune response; specific immune response has only a systemic effect - a histopathological and immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulder-Stapel Adri

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasion and metastasis is a complex process governed by the interaction of genetically altered tumor cells and the immunological and inflammatory host reponse. Specific T-cells directed against tumor cells and the nonspecific inflammatory reaction due to tissue damage, cooperate against invasive tumor cells in order to prevent recurrences. Data concerning involvement of individual cell types are readily available but little is known about the coordinate interactions between both forms of immune response. Patients and methods The presence of inflammatory infiltrate and eosinophils was determined in 1530 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma from a multicenter trial. We selected 160 patients to analyze this inflammatory infiltrate in more detail using immunohistochemistry. The association with the development of local and distant relapses was determined using univariate and multivariate log rank testing. Results Patients with an extensive inflammatory infiltrate around the tumor had lower recurrence rates (3.4% versus 6.9%, p = 0.03, showing the importance of host response against tumor cells. In particular, peritumoral mast cells prevent local and distant recurrence (44% versus 15%, p = 0.007 and 86% versus 21%, p Conclusions We showed that next to properties of tumor cells, the amount and type of inflammation is also relevant in the control of rectal cancer. Knowledge of the factors involved may lead to new approaches in the management of rectal cancer.

  20. Automatic localization of landmark sets in head CT images with regression forests for image registration initialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongqing; Liu, Yuan; Noble, Jack H.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2016-03-01

    Cochlear Implants (CIs) are electrode arrays that are surgically inserted into the cochlea. Individual contacts stimulate frequency-mapped nerve endings thus replacing the natural electro-mechanical transduction mechanism. CIs are programmed post-operatively by audiologists but this is currently done using behavioral tests without imaging information that permits relating electrode position to inner ear anatomy. We have recently developed a series of image processing steps that permit the segmentation of the inner ear anatomy and the localization of individual contacts. We have proposed a new programming strategy that uses this information and we have shown in a study with 68 participants that 78% of long term recipients preferred the programming parameters determined with this new strategy. A limiting factor to the large scale evaluation and deployment of our technique is the amount of user interaction still required in some of the steps used in our sequence of image processing algorithms. One such step is the rough registration of an atlas to target volumes prior to the use of automated intensity-based algorithms when the target volumes have very different fields of view and orientations. In this paper we propose a solution to this problem. It relies on a random forest-based approach to automatically localize a series of landmarks. Our results obtained from 83 images with 132 registration tasks show that automatic initialization of an intensity-based algorithm proves to be a reliable technique to replace the manual step.

  1. Radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases-software-assisted evaluation of the ablation zone in MDCT: tumor-free follow-up versus local recurrent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Sebastian; Bruners, Philipp; Schiffl, Katharina; Sedlmair, Martin; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Günther, Rolf W; Das, Marco; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in change of size and CT value between local recurrences and tumor-free areas after CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic metastases during follow-up by means of dedicated software for automatic evaluation of hepatic lesions. Thirty-two patients with 54 liver metastases from breast or colorectal cancer underwent triphasic contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate hepatic metastatic spread and localization before CT-guided RFA and for follow-up after intervention. Sixteen of these patients (65.1 + or - 10.3 years) with 30 metastases stayed tumor-free (group 1), while the other group (n = 16 with 24 metastases; 62.0 + or - 13.8 years) suffered from local recurrent disease (group 2). Applying an automated software tool (SyngoCT Oncology; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), size parameters (volume, RECIST, WHO) and attenuation were measured within the lesions before, 1 day after, and 28 days after RFA treatment. The natural logarithm (ln) of the quotient of the volume 1 day versus 28 days after RFA treament was computed: lnQ1//28/0(volume). Analogously, ln ratios of RECIST, WHO, and attenuation were computed and statistically evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA. One lesion in group 2 was excluded from further evaluation due to automated missegmentation. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to initial volume, RECIST, and WHO (p free and local-recurrent ablation zones with respect to the corresponding size parameters. A new parameter (lnQ1//28/0(volume/RECIST/WHO/attenuation)) was introduced, which appears to be of prognostic value at early follow-up CT.

  2. Positive predictive value of CEA and Ca19-9 as tumor markers for recurrent colorectal cancer in cases where conventional work-up fail to localize disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Bocheva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Routine surveillance of colorectal cancer includes serial measurements of CEA levels. Although not routinely indicated Ca 19-9 is also a tool for recurrence. When any of these serum markers is elevated during follow up, this could represent a recurrence. The management of elevated tumor marker levels include clinical exams, endoscopy and conventional imaging –ultrasound, CT, MRI.Objective: To evaluate the positive predictive value of CEA and Ca19-9 as tumor markers for recurrent colorectal cancer in cases where conventional imaging and endoscopic studies fail to localize disease.Materials and methods: A total of 75 patients with elevated CEA and/or Ca19-9 serum levels and negative endoscopic exam as well as negative abdominal CT and Chest X-ray were included in the study. CEA levels were tested in 50 patients. Ca 19-9 was tested in 65 patients. 34 of the patients had both markers tested. All patients underwent whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT. Patients with negative of equivocal PET scan were further followed up (10 to 24 months.Results: Based on the reference standard – the results from PET/CT, if positive and the results from follow-up in cases of negative or equivocal scans, the positive predictive value of Ca 19-9 was 84% and that of CEA -83%. There was no significant difference in the PPV of Ca19-9 and CEA.Conclusion: Elevated CEA and Ca 19-9 levels in patients under active surveillance after operation for colorectal cancer have high positive predictive value for recurrence, even in cases where conventional work-up – endoscopy and CT don’t localize disease.

  3. The stability of source localization in a whole-head magnetoencephalography system demonstrated by auditory evoked field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuen-Lin; Yang, Hong-Chang; Tsai, Sung-Ying; Liu, Yu-Wei; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kwon, Hyukchan

    2011-10-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), which is a very sensitive magnetic sensor, has been widely used to detect the ultra-small magnetic signals in many different territories, especially in the biomagnetic measurement. In this study, a 128-channel SQUID first-order axial gradiometer system for whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements was setup to characterize the auditory evoked magnetic fields (AEFs). A 500 Hz monaural pure tone persisting 425 ms with the sound pressure level of 80 dB was randomly applied to the left ear of subject with the inter-stimulus interval of 1.5 ˜ 2.8 s to prevent fatigue of nerves. We demonstrated the characteristic waveforms of AEFs can be accurately recorded and analyzed. Using source localization processes, the origins of AEFs were successfully calculated to be at the auditory cortices which are brain areas known for responsive to sound stimulus. A phantom experiment also proved the good localization accuracy of the established MEG system and measurement procedures. The validated performance of the SQUID system suggests that this technique can also be employed in other brain research.

  4. Association of acute adverse effects with high local SAR induced in the brain from prolonged RF head and neck hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibzadeh, F.; Verhaart, R. F.; Verduijn, G. M.; Fortunati, V.; Rijnen, Z.; Franckena, M.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2015-02-01

    To provide an adequate level of protection for humans from exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to assure that any adverse health effects are avoided. The basic restrictions in terms of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) were prescribed by IEEE and ICNIRP. An example of a therapeutic application of non-ionizing EMF is hyperthermia (HT), in which intense RF energy is focused at a target region. Deep HT in the head and neck (H&N) region involves inducing energy at 434 MHz for 60 min on target. Still, stray exposure of the brain is considerable, but to date only very limited side-effects were observed. The objective of this study is to investigate the stringency of the current basic restrictions by relating the induced EM dose in the brain of patients treated with deep head and neck (H&N) HT to the scored acute health effects. We performed a simulation study to calculate the induced peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (psSAR10g) in the brains of 16 selected H&N patients who received the highest SAR exposure in the brain, i.e. who had the minimum brain-target distance and received high forwarded power during treatment. The results show that the maximum induced SAR in the brain of the patients can exceed the current basic restrictions (IEEE and ICNIRP) on psSAR10g for occupational environments by 14 times. Even considering the high local SAR in the brain, evaluation of acute effects by the common toxicity criteria (CTC) scores revealed no indication of a serious acute neurological effect. In addition, this study provides pioneering quantitative human data on the association between maximum brain SAR level and acute adverse effects when brains are exposed to prolonged RF EMF.

  5. Local Recurrence of Breast Cancer 52 Years after Halsted Mastectomy: Is There a Role for More Aggressive Ipsilateral Surveillance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Agarwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the longest reported case of breast cancer recurrence, 52 years after initial diagnosis, in a patient initially treated with Halsted mastectomy. Observation and palpation of the chest wall resulted in late presentation, and this patient went on to demonstrate metastatic disease. Current surveillance guidelines lack specific recommendations regarding monitoring of the ipsilateral chest wall. In addition, the growing utilization of breast reconstruction poses an additional challenge to surveillance strategies of the ipsilateral breast. However, the emergence of MRI may present a new opportunity to identify ipsilateral recurrence. The changing landscape of breast cancer therapy warrants guidance from groups of national import such as ASCO, in the surveillance of breast cancer patients.

  6. The clinical observation of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with FOLFOX chemotherapy for rectal cancer of postoperative local recurrence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yeqin Zhou; Mi Liu; Daiyuan Ma; Tao Ren; Xiaojie Ma; Xianfu Li; Bangxian Tan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with FOLFOX scheme chemotherapy in the treatment of postoperative recurrence of rectal cancer. Methods: Sixty-eight cases of recurrent rectal cancer were divided randomly into two groups: 34 cases of conformal radiotherapy plus FOLFOX chemotherapy group (experiment group) and 34 cases of conformal radiotherapy (control group). After 6 MvX line with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy technologies for recurrent lesions and pelvic cavity around subclinical lymphatic drainage radiotherapy after radiotherapy to DT 40 Gy to reposit was made use of between both groups, experiment group was made the new treatment plan to continue to irradiate to 50 Gy, and then Shrinkage GTV was pushed quantity in the field 66 Gy. Researchers took chemotherapy in the first week and the fourth week after radiotherapy, with 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, calcium leucovorin 200 mg, d1-5 with intravenous drip, Oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 and d1 with intravenous drip 2 h, 21 days was one cycle. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Results: The survival rates for 1, 2 and 3 years for experiment group and control group were 88.2%, 64.7%, 47.1% and 66.7%, 38.2%, 29.4% (P = 0.03), the 2-year rate of distant metastases was 32.4% and 58.8% (P = 0.032) respectively. The median survival time was 33 and 20 months respectively. There were some side effects between the groups, but there was no statistical difference. Conclusion: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plus FOLFOX chemotherapy can be considered as a safe and effective approach to treat rectal cancer patients of postoperative recurrence, and can improve the survival rates of patients and reduce distant metastasis rate obviously and make the acute adverse reaction rate insignificantly.

  7. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer: a phase I-II feasibility study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijvers, D.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Kerger, J.; Joosens, E.; Laer, C. van; Awada, A.; Weyngaert, D. van den; Nguyen, H.V.; Bouder, C. Le; Castelijns, J.A.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Mulder, P.; Vermorken, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the safety profile and activity of the combination of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in chemotherapy-naive patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with locally advanced unresectable SCCHN were treated wi

  8. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer : a phase I-II feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijvers, D; Van Herpen, C; Kerger, J; Joosens, E; Van Laer, C; Awada, A; Van den Weyngaert, D; Nguyen, H; Le Bouder, C; Castelijns, JA; Kaanders, J; De Mulder, P; Vermorken, JB

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety profile and activity of the combination of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in chemotherapy-naive patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods: Patients with locally advanced unresectable SCCHN were treated wi

  9. Low skeletal muscle mass is a predictive factor for chemotherapy dose-limiting toxicity in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendrich, Anne W; Swartz, Justin E; Bril, Sandra I; Wegner, Inge; de Graeff, Alexander|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/187695997; Smid, Ernst J; de Bree, Remco; Pothen, Ajit J

    OBJECTIVES: Low skeletal muscle mass (SMM) or sarcopenia is emerging as an adverse prognostic factor for chemotherapy dose-limiting toxicity (CLDT) and survival in cancer patients. Our aim was to determine the impact of low SMM on CDLT in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell

  10. Improvement of recurrence-free survival after radical prostatectomy for locally advanced prostate cancer in relation to the time of surgical intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to comparatively estimate the frequency of a positive surgical margin and 5-year biochemical recurrent-free survival (BRFS rates in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer in relation to the time of radical retropubic prostatectomy.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 274 patients with prostate cancer (pT3-4N0-1M0 who were divided into 2 groups of 68 and 20 patients operated on in 1997 to 2006 and 2007 to 2012, respectively. Two surgeons made surgical interventions by the standardized procedure. The 5-year BRFS rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. A biochemical recurrence was defined as a prostatespecific antigen level of t 0.2 ng / ml in 2 consecutive measurements or as the initiation of adjuvant therapy.Results. The detection rate of a positive surgical margin decreased from 55.9 % in 1997–2006 to 37.9 % in 2007–2012 (p = 0.01; the 5-year recurrence-free survival rates were 38.8 % versus 66.2 % (p < 0.001.Conclusion. These changes would probably be a result of surgeons» better experience and improved surgical techniques in the course of time.

  11. Local recurrences after breast-conserving treatments in breast cancer: risk factors and effect on survival; Recidives locales apres traitement conservateur du cancer du sein: facteurs de risque et influence sur la survie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowen, D.; Resbeut, M.; Largillier, R.; Houvenaeghel, G.; Jacquemier, J.; Bardou, V.J.; Viens, P.; Maraninchi, D. [Institut Paoli-Calmettes, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1998-09-01

    To determine the risk factors for local and distant failure in node-negative breast cancer treated with breast-conservative surgery and radiotherapy and to determine the relationship between these two events. We retrospectively selected 908 patients who received conservative surgery and radiotherapy but no chemotherapy between 1980 and 1995, for a mode-negative breast cancer. Patients were divided in two groups according to the status of the margins of resection. All pathology specimens were reviewed. In case of negative margins, the risk factors for local recurrences picked up by the Cox model were histologic multi-focus (P=0.0076), peritumoral vessel invasion (P=0.021) and age {>=}40 years (P=0.024), and in case of involved margins, negative oestrogen receptors (P=0.0012), histologic multi-focus (P=0.0028), and absence of hormonal therapy (P=0.017). The 10-year local recurrence rate was 18 % in case of negative margins and 29 % in case of involved margins, although in the latter case patients received high-dose adjuvant radiotherapy. Accordingly, the 10-year distant failure rates were 16 % and 27 %, respectively. Many arguments suggest that local and distant failures are closely related. Patients with histologic multi-focus or positive margins are at high risk of local failure and then of distant failure, and require a more aggressive initial treatment. (author)

  12. Optimal Recurrence Grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Graben, Peter beim; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    We optimally estimate the recurrence structure of a multivariate time series by Markov chains obtained from recurrence grammars. The goodness of fit is assessed with a utility function derived from the stochastic Markov transition matrix. It assumes a local maximum for the distance threshold of the optimal recurrence grammar. We validate our approach by means of the nonlinear Lorenz system and its linearized stochastic surrogates. Finally we apply our optimization procedure to the segmentation of neurophysiological time series obtained from anesthetized animals. We propose the number of optimal recurrence domains as a statistic for classifying an animals' state of consciousness.

  13. Thermal Index Evaluation of Local SAR in MRI-Based Head Models of Adult and Children for Portable Telephones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Osamu; Miyamoto, Kayoko; Wang, Jianqing

    Biological hazards due to radio-frequency (RF) waves result mainly from the temperature rise in tissue. It should be, therefore, clarified to what extent the RF waves of portable telephones increase the temperature-rise in human brain that includes the central part governing the body-temperature regulation function. In this paper, we calculated both the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the resultant temperature-rise for 900 MHz and 2 GHz portable telephones using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for three typical use positions, i.e., the vertical position, cheek position and tilt position. As a result, we found that there was an increase for median and 1% value of the cumulative distribution of temperature-rise in children’s brains for any use positions of the portable telephones compared to that in the adult’s brain, and also that the increasing trend in children’s brains for temperature-rise is identical to the temperature-rise trend in children’s hypothalamus. In addition, we found that the ten-gram averaged peak SAR among the adult and children heads had the same trend as that of the 0.1% value of the relatively cumulative distribution of temperature-rise, which shows that the ten-gram averaged peak SAR reflects only the localized temperature-rise in the brain surface.

  14. Modified Weekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Is Acceptable in Postoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

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    Hsueh-Ju Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Triweekly cisplatin-based postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT has high intolerance and toxicities in locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC. We evaluated the effect of a modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy in postoperative CCRT. Methods. A total of 117 patients with LAHNC were enrolled between December 2007 and December 2012. Survival, compliance/adverse events, and independent prognostic factors were analyzed. Results. Median follow-up time was 30.0 (3.1–73.0 months. Most patients completed the entire course of postoperative CCRT (radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy, 94.9%; ≥6 times weekly chemotherapy, 75.2%. Only 17.1% patients required hospital admission. The most common adverse effect was grade 3/4 mucositis (28.2%. No patient died due to protocol-related adverse effects. Multivariate analysis revealed the following independent prognostic factors: oropharyngeal cancer, extracapsular spread, and total radiation dose. Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 70.9% and 79.5%, respectively. Conclusion. Modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy is an acceptable regimen in postoperative CCRT for LAHNC.

  15. Do Standardised Prognostic Algorithms Reflect Local Practice? Application of EORTC Risk Tables for Non-Muscle Invasive (pTa/pT1 Bladder Cancer Recurrence and Progression in a Local Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Pillai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A risk calculator algorithm to allow prediction of probabilities of 1- and 5-year recurrence and progression rates in individuals with pTa/pT1 bladder cancer has been proposed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and was incorporated into the European Association of Urology guidelines in 2006. We attempted to validate this algorithm in a cohort of patients with known outcome. Prognostic data were collected from a consecutively presenting cohort of 109 patients with non-muscle invasive (pTa/pT1 transitional cell cancer (TCC at a single institution between 1983 and 1985. Using the same statistical models as in the EORTC original paper, predicted probabilities of 1- and 5-year recurrence and progression were calculated. Patients were divided into four risk groups for recurrence (Ir-IVr and progression (Ip-IVp, respectively, using six prognostic criteria. These were then compared to the probabilities predicted in the EORTC algorithm. The predicted 1- and 5-year probabilities of recurrence were significantly higher in the study population as compared to the original EORTC algorithm for all four risk groups. The predicted 1-year probabilities for progression in groups Ip/IIIp and at 5-years for groups Ip/IIp were in accordance with the original algorithm, but were higher for the other progression groups. The concordance for the model of prediction using the study group for recurrence at 1 and 5 years was 62 and 63%, respectively, and for progression was 65 and 67, respectively. We were unable to validate the proposed algorithm in our group of patients. Although our study has limitations that prevent firm conclusions on the validity of the algorithm, it does expose some of the drawbacks of standardised nomograms when applied to local clinical practice.

  16. Salvage stereotactic body radiotherapy for locally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after sublobar resection and I125 vicryl mesh brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beant Singh Gill

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Locally-recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (LR-NSCLC remains challenging treat, particularly in patients having received prior radiotherapy. Heterogeneous populations and varied treatment intent in existing literature result in significant limitations in evaluating efficacy of lung re-irradiation. In order to better establish the impact of re-irradiation in patients with LR-NSCLC following high-dose radiotherapy, we report outcomes for patients treated with prior sublobar resection and brachytherapy that subsequently underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT.Methods: A retrospective review of patients initially treated with sublobar resection and I125 vicryl mesh brachytherapy, who later developed LR-NSCLC along the suture line, was performed. Patients received salvage SBRT with curative intent. Dose and fractionation was based on tumor location and size, with a median prescription dose of 48 Gy in 4 fractions (range 20-60 Gy in 1-4 fractions.Results: Thirteen consecutive patients were identified with median follow-up of 2.1 years (range 0.7-5.6 years. Two in-field local failures occurred at 7.5 and 11.1 months, resulting in 2-year local control of 83.9% (95% CI 63.5-100.0%. Two-year disease-free survival and overall survival estimates were 38.5% (95% CI 0.0-65.0% and 65.8% (95% CI, 38.2-93.4%. Four patients (31% remained disease-free at last follow-up. All but one patient who experienced disease recurrence developed isolated or synchronous distant metastases. Only one patient (7.7% developed grade ≥3 toxicity, consisting of grade 3 esophageal stricture following a centrally located recurrence previously treated with radiofrequency ablation.Conclusion: Despite high local radiation doses delivered to lung parenchyma previously with I125 brachytherapy, re-irradiation with SBRT for LR-NSCLC results in excellent local control with limited morbidity, allowing for potential disease cure in a subset of patients.

  17. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with interstitial hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate carcinoma following external beam radiation therapy: a prospective phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukiełka, Andrzej M; Strnad, Vratislav; Stauffer, Paul; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Hetnał, Marcin; Nahajowski, Damian; Walasek, Tomasz; Brandys, Piotr; Matys, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Optimal treatment for patients with only local prostate cancer recurrence after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) failure remains unclear. Possible curative treatments are radical prostatectomy, cryosurgery, and brachytherapy. Several single institution series proved that high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDRBT) are reasonable options for this group of patients with acceptable levels of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A standard dose prescription and scheme have not been established yet, and the literature presents a wide range of fractionation protocols. Furthermore, hyperthermia has shown the potential to enhance the efficacy of re-irradiation. Consequently, a prospective trial is urgently needed to attain clear structured prospective data regarding the efficacy of salvage brachytherapy with adjuvant hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new prospective phase II trial that would meet this need. The primary aim of this prospective phase II study combining Iridium-192 brachytherapy with interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) is to analyze toxicity of the combined treatment; a secondary aim is to define the efficacy (bNED, DFS, OS) of salvage brachytherapy. The dose prescribed to PTV will be 30 Gy in 3 fractions for HDRBT, and 60 Gy in 2 fractions for PDRBT. During IHT, the prostate will be heated to the range of 40-47°C for 60 minutes prior to brachytherapy dose delivery. The protocol plans for treatment of 77 patients.

  18. Influences of local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics on fish assemblages within impoundments of low-head dams in the tributaries of the Qingyi River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Li, Yu-Ru; Chu, Ling; Zhu, Ren; Wang, Li-Zhu; Yan, Yun-Zhi

    2016-03-18

    Low-head dam impoundments modify local habitat and alter fish assemblages; however, to our knowledge, the pattern of how fish assemblages in the impoundments relate to local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics is still unclear. We used data collected in 62 impoundments created by low-head dams in headwater streams of the Qingyi River, China, to examine relationships between fish assemblages and local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics. We also assessed the relative importance of the three groups of factors in determining fish species richness and composition. Linear regression models showed that fish species richness was related to substrate heterogeneity, confluence link, and dam number upstream. Redundancy analysis showed that fish species compositions were influenced by substrate heterogeneity, confluence link, dam height, dam numbers upstream and downstream. Overall, dam characteristics were more important in affecting fish species richness but less important in determining fish species composition than local habitat (i.e., substrate heterogeneity) and tributary position. Our results suggest that low-head dam may affect fish species richness in impoundments by modifying local habitat and constraining fish movement, and the relative abundances of those fish species may depend more on species habitat presences and stream size than on impoundment size and number.

  19. Feasibility of MR Imaging/MR Spectroscopy-Planned Focal Partial Salvage Permanent Prostate Implant (PPI) for Localized Recurrence After Initial PPI for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Charles C., E-mail: hsucc@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, Howard [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Pickett, Barby [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Crehange, Gilles [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dijon University, Dijon (France); Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Dea, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics and Computational Biology Core, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Gottschalk, Alexander R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Kurhanewicz, John [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-planned partial salvage permanent prostate implant (psPPI) among patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence after initial PPI without evidence of distant disease. Methods and Materials: From 2003-2009, 15 patients underwent MRI/magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) planning for salvage brachytherapy (psPPI, I-125 [n=14; 144 Gy]; Pd-103 [n=1; 125 Gy]) without hormone therapy. Full dose was prescribed to areas of recurrence and underdosage, without entire prostate implantation. Limiting urethral and rectal toxicity was prioritized. Follow-up was from salvage date to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration failure (Phoenix criteria = nadir + 2.0; ASTRO = 3 consecutive rises), recurrence, distant metastases, or last follow-up PSA level. Progression-free survival (PFS) was defined as no PSA failure or biopsy-proven recurrence without all-cause mortality. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: At salvage, median age was 68 years, and PSA concentration was 3.5 ng/mL (range, 0.9-5.6 ng/mL). Abnormal MRI/MRS findings were evident in 40% of patients. Biopsy-proven recurrences consisted of a single focus (80%) or 2 foci (20%). At recurrence, Gleason score was 6 (67%) or {>=}7 (27%). Median interval between initial and salvage implantation was 69 months (range, 28-132 months). psPPI planning characteristics limited doses to the rectum (mean V100 = 0.5% [0.07 cc]) and urethra (V100 = 12% [0.3 cc]). At median follow-up (23.3 months; range, 8-88 months), treatment failure (n=2) resulted only in localized recurrence; both patients underwent second psPPI with follow-up PSA tests at 12 and 26 months, resulting in 0.6 and 0.7 ng/mL, respectively. American Society for Radiation Oncology PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 86.7%, 78.4%, and 62.7%, respectively, with 5 patients for whom treatment failed (n=3 with negative transrectal ultrasound

  20. Local Administration of Bisphosphonate-soaked Hydroxyapatite for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Rabbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Hui Ma; Wan-Shou Guo; Zi-Rong Li; Bai-Liang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Systemic administration ofbisphosphonates has shown promising results in the treatment ofosteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH).However,few studies have evaluated the efficacy of local zoledronate (ZOL) administration in the treatment of ONFH.The purpose of this study was to investigate whether local administration of bisphosphonate-soaked hydroxyapatite (HA) could improve bone healing in an experimental rabbit model of ONFH.Methods:This experimental study was conducted between October 2014 and June 2015.Forty-five rabbits underwent simulated ONFH surgery.Immediately following surgery,they were divided into three groups:model (untreated,n =15),HA (treated with HA alone,n =15),and HA + ZOL (treated with HA soaked in a low-dose ZOL solution,n =15).Histological,immunohistochemical,and quantitative analyses were performed to evaluate bone formation and resorption 2,4,and 8 weeks after surgery.Results:Gross bone matrix and hematopoietic tissue formation were observed in the HA + ZOL group 4 weeks after surgery.The immunohistochemical staining intensities for 5-bromodeoxyuridine,runt-related transcription factor 2,osteocalcin,osteopontin,and osteoprotegerin were significantly higher in the HA + ZOL group than that in the model (P < 0.001,P < 0.001,P < 0.001,P < 0.001,and P =0.018,respectively) and HA groups (P =0.003,P =0.049,P < 0.00l,P =0.020,and P =0.019,respectively),whereas receptor activator of the nuclear factor-κB ligand staining intensity was significantly lower in the HA + ZOL group than that in the model and HA groups (P =0.029 and P =0.015,respectively) 4 weeks after surgery.No significant differences in bone formation or bone resorption marker expression were found between the three groups 2 or 8 weeks after surgery (P > 0.05).Conclusions:Local administration of HA soaked in a low-dose ZOL solution increased new bone formation while inhibiting bone resorption in an animal model of ONFH,which might provide new evidence for joint

  1. [SIB-IMRT radiotherapy given concomitantly with cisplatin for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCHNC). Evaluation of the early results and toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiprian, Dorota; Jarząbski, Andrzej; Pawłowska, Beata; Michalski, Wojciech; Kawecki, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    Concomitant radiochemotherapy become the treatment of choice for locally advanced SCHNC. This strategy of treatment has a limitation, which is an acute and late toxicity. The IMRT technique provides the possibility of better sparing of healthy tissue. Radiobiological and clinical data also suggest that accelerated fractionation and higher dose per fraction given in GTV may produce better locoregional control. Therefore it might be expected that concomitant chemotherapy and SIB-IMRT radiotherapy could increase locoregional control and reduce acute and late radiation reactions. The evaluation of early results and toxicity of this treatment modality is presented. The evaluation of the early results and toxicity of SIB-IMRT radiotherapy given concomitantly with cisplatin for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCHNC). SIB-IMRT technique was applied. The boost volume was limited to the GTV + 3mm margin (macroscopic tumor extension was defined on the basis of CT and/or MRI examinations). Dose per fraction given to this volume was 2.25 Gy up to 67.5 Gy of total dose. The PTV-CTV + 3mm - was defined as an area of increased risk of microscopic spread. Dose per fraction given to this volume was 2 Gy up to 60 Gy. The PTV1-ETV+ 3mm (electively irradiated volume) received dose per fraction -1.8 Gy up to 54-56 Gy. Overall treatment time was 6 weeks (5 fractions per week, 30 fractions). Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin in daily dose100mg/m2 given two times during irradiation (1 and 22 day of treatment). The evaluation of early tolerance was performed once weekly during the treatment than during the follow up every 2 months. The early reactions were scored according to the EORTC/RTOG scale. Between June 2006 and December 2009 99 patients diagnosed with III and IV clinical stage of SCHNC were treated with this method. 65 patients were diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer, 18 with laryngeal cancer and 16 with hypopharyngeal cancer. PEG was performed at

  2. Recurrent varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rotker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicocele recurrence is one of the most common complications associated with varicocele repair. A systematic review was performed to evaluate varicocele recurrence rates, anatomic causes of recurrence, and methods of management of recurrent varicoceles. The PubMed database was evaluated using keywords "recurrent" and "varicocele" as well as MESH criteria "recurrent" and "varicocele." Articles were not included that were not in English, represented single case reports, focused solely on subclinical varicocele, or focused solely on a pediatric population (age <18. Rates of recurrence vary with the technique of varicocele repair from 0% to 35%. Anatomy of recurrence can be defined by venography. Management of varicocele recurrence can be surgical or via embolization.

  3. Final Results of Local-Regional Control and Late Toxicity of RTOG 9003: A Randomized Trial of Altered Fractionation Radiation for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitler, Jonathan J., E-mail: jjbeitl@emory.edu [Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fu, Karen K. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Trotti, Andy [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center at the University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida (United States); Spencer, Sharon A. [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Garden, Adam S. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Shenouda, George [McGill University, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, Kian K. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To test whether altered radiation fractionation schemes (hyperfractionation [HFX], accelerated fractionation, continuous [AFX-C], and accelerated fractionation with split [AFX-S]) improved local-regional control (LRC) rates for patients with squamous cell cancers (SCC) of the head and neck when compared with standard fractionation (SFX) of 70 Gy. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV (or stage II base of tongue) SCC (n=1076) were randomized to 4 treatment arms: (1) SFX, 70 Gy/35 daily fractions/7 weeks; (2) HFX, 81.6 Gy/68 twice-daily fractions/7 weeks; (3) AFX-S, 67.2 Gy/42 fractions/6 weeks with a 2-week rest after 38.4 Gy; and (4) AFX-C, 72 Gy/42 fractions/6 weeks. The 3 experimental arms were to be compared with SFX. Results: With patients censored for LRC at 5 years, only the comparison of HFX with SFX was significantly different: HFX, hazard ratio (HR) 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.62-1.00), P=.05; AFX-C, 0.82 (95% confidence interval 0.65-1.05), P=.11. With patients censored at 5 years, HFX improved overall survival (HR 0.81, P=.05). Prevalence of any grade 3, 4, or 5 toxicity at 5 years; any feeding tube use after 180 days; or feeding tube use at 1 year did not differ significantly when the experimental arms were compared with SFX. When 7-week treatments were compared with 6-week treatments, accelerated fractionation appeared to increase grade 3, 4 or 5 toxicity at 5 years (P=.06). When the worst toxicity per patient was considered by treatment only, the AFX-C arm seemed to trend worse than the SFX arm when grade 0-2 was compared with grade 3-5 toxicity (P=.09). Conclusions: At 5 years, only HFX improved LRC and overall survival for patients with locally advanced SCC without increasing late toxicity.

  4. Estimate of the impact of FDG-avidity on the dose required for head and neck radiotherapy local control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeho; Setton, Jeremy S.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Oh, Jung Hun; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Although FDG-avid tumors are recognized as a potential target for dose escalation, there is no clear basis for selecting a boost dose to counter this apparent radioresistance. Using a novel analysis method, based on the new concept of an outcome-equivalent dose, we estimate the extra dose required to equalize local control between FDG-avid and non-avid head and neck tumors. Materials and methods Based on a literature review, five reports of head and neck cancer (423 patients in total), along with an internal validation dataset from our institution (135 oropharynx patients), were used in this analysis. To compensate for the heterogeneity among multi-institutional patient cohorts and corresponding treatment techniques, local control data of the cohorts were fit to a single dose–response curve with a clinically representative steepness (γ50 = 2), thereby defining an ‘outcome-equivalent dose’ (OED) for each institutional cohort. Separate dose–response curves were then determined for the FDG-avid and FDG-non-avid patient cohorts, and the ratio of TD50 (tumor dose required for 50% of control) values between the high- and low-FDG-uptake groups (TD50,high/TD50,low) was estimated, resulting in an estimated metabolic dose-modifying factor (mDMF) due to FDG-avidity. Results For individual datasets, the estimated mDMFs were found to be in the range of 1.07–1.62, decreasing if the assumed slope (γ50) increased. Weighted logistic regression for the six datasets resulted in a mDMF of 1.19 [95% CI: 1.04–1.34] for a γ50 value of 2, which translates to a needed dose increase of about 1.5 Gy per unit increase in the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVm) of FDG-PET [95% CI: 0.3–2.7]. Assumptions of lower or higher γ50 values (1.5 or 2.5) resulted in slightly different mDMFs: 1.26 or 1.15, respectively. A validation analysis with seven additional datasets, based on relaxed criteria, was consistent with the estimated mDMF. Conclusions We

  5. Local recurrences in cervical cancer patients in the setting of image-guided brachytherapy: a comparison of spatial dose distribution within a matched-pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Maximilian P; Kirisits, Christian; Nesvacil, Nicole; Dimopoulos, Johannes C A; Berger, Daniel; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    It has been shown that a cumulative dose of ≥87 Gy (EQD2) of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) to the high risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) confer a local control rate >95% in locally advanced cervical cancer. This study examines the dose distribution within the HR CTV and intermediate (IR) CTV in patients with cervical cancer treated with definitive EBRT +/- concomitant chemotherapy and MRI-based IGABT between patients with local recurrence (LR) and patients in continuous complete local remission (CCLR). From 1998 to 2010, 265 patients were treated with definitive EBRT +/- concomitant chemotherapy and IGABT. Twenty-four LRs were documented. For the statistical analysis all patients with LR were matched to patients in CCLR from our database according to the following criteria: FIGO stage, histology, lymph node status, tumour size and chemotherapy. DVH parameters (D50, D90, D98, D100) were reported for HR CTV and IR CTV. In order to report the minimum dose in the region where the recurrence occurred, the HR CTV/IR CTV were divided into four quadrants on transversal planes. The minimum dose at the HR CTV/IR CTV contour was measured (within the corresponding quadrant closest to the LR) in the treatment planning system. A mean minimum point dose (MPD) was calculated by averaging these measurements on four consecutive slices at the level of the recurrence for each of the 4 brachytherapy fractions. EQD2 doses were calculated by summation of all BT and external beam therapy fractions. For each matched patient in the control group the measurements were performed on the same quadrant and at the same level. Sufficient image data were available for 21 LRs. Eight central failures and 13 non-central failures were observed. The mean D90 and D100 for HR CTV were 77 Gy and 61 Gy for patients with LR and 95 Gy and 71 Gy for patients in CCLR, respectively (p<0.01). The MPD for HR CTV was 72 Gy for patients in the LR arm and 99 Gy

  6. Pretreatment performance status and nutrition are associated with early mortality of locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Huang, Jen-Seng; Lai, Chien-Hong; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lan, Yii-Jenq; Tsai, Jason Chien-Sheng; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Yang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Hsu

    2013-05-01

    Unexpected fatal events in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy are a clinical concern. Malnutrition, which is reported frequently in head and neck cancer patients, are associated with immunity derangement. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for early death of patients undergoing chemoradiation. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 194 stage III, IVA, and IVB head and neck cancer patients who were treated with chemoradiation between 2007 and 2009. We defined early death as death while receiving chemoradiation or within 60 days of treatment completion. Risk factors for early death were tested using univariate and multivariate analyses. Fourteen patients (7.2 %) experienced early death, 78.6 % of whom died of infection. Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between early death and several pretreatment variables, including Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) >1, hemoglobin total lymphocyte count 1, BMI total lymphocyte count malnutrition before chemoradiation independently predict early death in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation. Cautious management of head and neck cancer patients with these risk factors is required throughout chemoradiation period.

  7. Palliative radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer after failure of induction chemotherapy: Comparison of two fractionation schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash Chandra Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Among patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancers (LAHNSCC, the prognosis after nonresponse or progression despite induction chemotherapy (IC is dismal, and further treatment is often palliative in intent. Given that nonresponse to chemotherapy could indicate subsequent radioresistance, we intended to assess the outcomes with two different fractionation schemes. Aims: To compare the outcomes of two fractionation schemes- ′standard′ (consisting 3GyX5 daily fractions for 2 consecutive weeks versus ′hybrid′ (6GyX3 fractions on alternate days during the 1 st week, followed by 2GyX5 daily fractions in the 2 nd week. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized controlled two-arm unblinded trial. Materials and Methods: Patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal, laryngeal, and hypopharyngeal cancers treated with a minimum of two cycles of taxane, platinum, and fluorouracil-based IC were eligible if residual disease volume amounted >30 cm 3 . Kaplan-Meier survival curves were compared by the log-rank test. Response rates were compared using the unpaired t-test. Quality of life (QOL was measured via patient reported questionnaires. Results: Of the initially enrolled 51 patients, 45 patients (24 from standard arm, and 21 from the hybrid arm were eligible for analysis. Despite being underpowered to attain statistical significance, there still seemed to be a trend towards improvement in progression-free (Hazard ratio (HR for progression: 0.5966; 95% CI 0.3216-1.1066 and overall survival (HR for death: 0.6062; 95% CI 0.2676-1.3734 with the hybrid arm when compared to the standard arm. Benefits were also observed with regards to response rates and QOL. Rate of complications were similar in both arms. Conclusions: In comparison to the routinely used palliative fractionation scheme of 30 Gray (Gy in 10 fractions (Fr, the use of hybrid fractionation which integrates hypofractionation in the 1 st week, followed by

  8. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Francois, E-mail: francois.meyer@chuq.qc.ca [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu [Radiation Therapy Department, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Geoffrey [Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Bairati, Isabelle [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help

  9. Compliance and outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with alternating chemo-radiotherapy in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, Vittorio; Fumagalli, Marco; Biscari, Luciana; Martinelli, Roberto; Ferri, Teore; Bella, Mariangela; Ceci, Guido; Delisi, Vincenzo; Di Blasio, Beatrice; Leonardi, Francesco; Michiara, Maria; Pucci, Francesca; Vasini, Giovanna; Camisa, Roberta; Cascinu, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility in clinical practice of alternating chemo-radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. From August 1993 to April 1998 at the Division of Medical Oncology of Parma, 48 consecutive patients were observed, and 38 (79%) started the Merlano chemo-radiotherapy. The characteristics of the patients were: males (32, 84%); median age, 57 years; PS <2 (32, 84%). The primary sites were the oropharynx (18, 47%), oral cavity (8, 21%), hypopharynx (7, 19%), larynx (5, 13%); stage IV disease was present in 29 (76%) patients. Twenty-five (66%) patients were married, and 24 (63%) resided outside of the city. The compliance was very low: 21 patients (55%) performed all the programmed cycles of chemotherapy, whereas only 5 patients (13%) performed the chemo-radiotherapy at full doses without any delay. The objective responses were 3 (8%) complete and 21 (55%) complete plus partial responses. Failures were 2 (5%) stable disease and 2 (5%) progressive disease, and the response was not assessable in 10 (26%). The median duration of the response was 8 months. The median overall survival and the time to progression were 18 and 13 months, respectively; the 5-year overall and relapse-free survival were 36% and 26%, respectively. Nine (24%) patients were still alive as of August 30, 2001, 8 (21%) of them without progression. Twenty-six patients (68%) died with a local-regional relapse. One patient (3%) died for a second cancer. Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was leukopenia (n = 25, 66%) and thrombocytopenia (n = 9, 24%); grade 3-4 non-hematologic toxicity was diarrhea (n = 3, 8%) and mucositis (n = 2, 5%). Two patients (5%) died for intestinal infarction and perforation possibly related to treatment. Compliance to the chemo-radiotherapy was very poor. The response rate was lower than that reported in clinical trials, whereas overall survival was comparable. The alternating chemo-radiotherapy is a very complex treatment that cannot be easily

  10. Perfusion CT of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek Abdel, E-mail: arazek@mans.edu.eg; Tawfik, Ahmed Mohamed, E-mail: ahm_m_tawfik@hotmail.com; Elsorogy, Lamiaa Galal Ali, E-mail: lamia2elsorogy@hotmail.com; Soliman, Nermin Yehia, E-mail: nermin_eid@hotmail.com

    2014-03-15

    We aim to review the technique and clinical applications of perfusion CT (PCT) of head and neck cancer. The clinical value of PCT in the head and neck includes detection of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) as it allows differentiation of HNSCC from normal muscles, demarcation of tumor boundaries and tumor local extension, evaluation of metastatic cervical lymph nodes as well as determination of the viable tumor portions as target for imaging-guided biopsy. PCT has been used for prediction of treatment outcome, differentiation between post-therapeutic changes and tumor recurrence as well as monitoring patient after radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. PCT has a role in cervical lymphoma as it may help in detection of response to chemotherapy and early diagnosis of relapsing tumors.

  11. Prospective, blinded trial of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography positron emission tomography in staging primary and recurrent cancer of the head and neck.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the use of computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for the staging of head and neck cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January to July 2009, 15 consecutive head and neck cancer patients (11 men and four women; mean age 59 years; age range 19 to 81 years) underwent computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for pre-therapeutic evaluation. All scans were staged, as per the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumour-node-metastasis classification, by two blinded consultant radiologists, in two sittings. Diagnoses were confirmed by histopathological examination of endoscopic biopsies, and in some cases whole surgical specimens. RESULTS: Tumour staging showed a 74 per cent concordance, node staging an 80 per cent concordance and metastasis staging a 100 per cent concordance, comparing the two imaging modalities. CONCLUSION: This study found radiological staging discordance between the two imaging modalities. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is an emerging staging modality with superior visualisation of metastatic disease, which does not require exposure to ionising radiation.

  12. Clinical evaluation of accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer with concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin (CBDCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Sekiya, Yuichi; Araki, Hitoshi [Chiba Cancer Center (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    From May 1994 to May 1996, 39 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation (1.6 Gy, twice daily, 10 times a week, with minimum interval of 6 hours between fractions and the total tumor dose to 70.4 Gy) and concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin (30 mg/body). The average age was 64.2 years (38-85). The median follow-up period was 16.4 months with a range of 2-36 months. Complete response rate was 66.7%. The organ preservation rates were almost acceptable in advanced cases. The major acute toxicity was stomatitis, but no therapeutic interruption was observed. Grade 4 laryngeal late sequelae was observed in 2 cases. We think this method is effective for locally advanced head and neck cancer but total dose should be reduced to 67.2 Gy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. (author)

  13. Overall survival and local recurrence of 406 completely resected stage IIIa-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients: questionnaire survey of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group to plan for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Y; Kato, H; Koike, T; Tsuchiya, R; Fujisawa, T; Shimizu, N; Watanabe, Y; Mitsudomi, T; Yoshimura, M

    2001-10-01

    the group of completely resected stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients (NSCLC) is considered to be heterogeneous in various aspects including survival and the recurrent pattern. In the present study, we attempted to clarify the factors which separate these patients into high and low risk groups based on the survival and local recurrence. a questionnaire survey on the survival and local recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer patients with pathological stage IIIA-N2 disease who underwent a complete resection from January 1992 to December 1993 was performed by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group as of July 1999. The information on the survival of 406 patients and that of local recurrence in 332 of them was available. the 5-year survival of the 406 patients was 31.0%. In a univariate analysis, the age, clinical and pathological T status, number of N2 stations, pathological N1 disease, operative modality and postoperative radiotherapy were all found to be important prognostic factors. Clinical N2 disease marginally influenced the survival (P=0.07). In a multivariate analysis of these variables including clinical N2 disease, the survival was significantly worse in the case of multiple N2 stations (hazard ratio=1.741), the presence of pathological N1 disease (1.403), pathological T2 or 3 disease (1.399) and an age older than 65 (1.327). The rate of freedom from any local recurrence at the bronchial stump, or in the hilar, mediastinal or supraclavicular lymph nodes at 5 years was 64%. In a univariate analysis of the freedom from local recurrence, the clinical N status, pathological T status, pathological N1 disease and number of N2 stations were all found to be important prognostic factors. A multivariate analysis revealed the freedom from local recurrence to be adversely influenced by multiple N2 stations (hazard ratio=2.05), and the presence of either clinical N1 or 2 (1.733) disease. The 5-year survival and the rate of freedom from local recurrence at 5

  14. Postoperative recurrence of an IPMN of the pancreas with a fistula to the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesato, Masaya; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Shinichi; Aoki, Taito; Akai, Takashi; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Tanizawa, Tohru; Miyazaki, Masaru; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2010-10-16

    We report on a case of a 74 year old man who was diagnosed with a recurrence of non-invasive carcinoma of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (non-invasive IPMN) by postoperative gastroscopy (GS). A pylorus preserving pancreatico duodenectomy for IPMN in the pancreatic head was performed. A histopathological study revealed non-invasive adenocarcinoma. At first, the local recurrence of the tumor around the superior mesenteric artery circumference was diagnosed and disappeared with gemcitabine. Later, the GS showed the elevated lesion with mucin hypersecretion in the remnant stomach. The lesion had a central dip and a fistula common to the pancreas was confirmed on fisterography. We diagnosed a recurrence of IPMN and administered chemotherapy again. However, he died of his original illness. There are no reports of postoperative recurrence of IPMN checked by GS. It should be remembered that the elevated lesion of the remnant stomach is considered as one of the recurrent patterns of IPMN.

  15. A randomized feasibility study evaluating the effect of radiotherapy alone or combined with 5-fluorouracil in the treatment of locally recurrent or inoperable colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, M; Bertelsen, K; Dalmark, M

    1993-01-01

    The effect of radiotherapy alone or given simultaneously with 5-FU in the treatment of locally recurrent or inoperable colorectal carcinoma was investigated in a randomized feasibility trial. Twenty-nine patients were randomized to radiotherapy alone (50 Gy/5 weeks + 10-20 Gy boost), and 30...... patients to the same radiotherapy with weekly 5-FU (600 mg/m2) given before treatment every Monday during the first 5 weeks. The two groups were comparable with regard to age, sex, previous treatment, symptoms, tumour size and performance status. Treatment compliance to radiotherapy was the same in both...... to be the only parameters having prognostic influence on survival. Addition of 5-FU did neither influence the objective or symptomatic response, nor the development of distant metastases. However, addition of the drug resulted in an apparent increase in the frequency of severe acute radiation complications (33...

  16. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging assessment of circumferential resection margin predicts disease-free survival and local recurrence: 5-year follow-up results of the MERCURY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan J; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian R; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic relevance of preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement is unknown. This follow-up study of 374 patients with rectal cancer reports the relationship between preoperative MRI assessment of CRM staging, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM stage, and clinical variables with overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and time to local recurrence (LR). Patients underwent protocol high-resolution pelvic MRI. Tumor distance to the mesorectal fascia of ≤ 1 mm was recorded as an MRI-involved CRM. A Cox proportional hazards model was used in multivariate analysis to determine the relationship of MRI assessment of CRM to survivorship after adjusting for preoperative covariates. Surviving patients were followed for a median of 62 months. The 5-year OS was 62.2% in patients with MRI-clear CRM compared with 42.2% in patients with MRI-involved CRM with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.97 (95% CI, 1.27 to 3.04; P < .01). The 5-year DFS was 67.2% (95% CI, 61.4% to 73%) for MRI-clear CRM compared with 47.3% (95% CI, 33.7% to 60.9%) for MRI-involved CRM with an HR of 1.65 (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.69; P < .05). Local recurrence HR for MRI-involved CRM was 3.50 (95% CI, 1.53 to 8.00; P < .05). MRI-involved CRM was the only preoperative staging parameter that remained significant for OS, DFS, and LR on multivariate analysis. High-resolution MRI preoperative assessment of CRM status is superior to AJCC TNM-based criteria for assessing risk of LR, DFS, and OS. Furthermore, MRI CRM involvement is significantly associated with distant metastatic disease; therefore, colorectal cancer teams could intensify treatment and follow-up accordingly to improve survival outcomes.

  17. SU-E-T-302: Dosimetric Comparison Between Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J-Y; Huang, B-T; Zhang, J-Y; Ma, C-C [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) technique with fixed-gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: CT datasets of eleven nasopharyngeal-carcinoma patients were included. Dual-arc VMAT and seven-field IMRT plans were created for each case, and were then compared in terms of conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) and delivery time. Results: The D98% (near-minimal dose) of PTV in the VMAT plans was slightly lower than that of the IMRT plans (P < 0.05), while the CI was higher than that of the IMRT plans (P < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the HI between the two plans (P > 0.05). Compared with the IMRT plans, the VMAT plans demonstrated lower Dmean (mean dose) of the bilateral temporal lobes and the whole surrounding normal tissue (P < 0.05), but slightly higher Dmean of brainstem (P < 0.05). In terms of the other OARs, no significant differences were found (P > 0.05). The MUs of the VMAT plans (672 ± 112) was significantly lower than that of the IMRT plans (917 ± 206), by 25 ± 13% (P < 0.05). The average delivery time of the VMAT plans (2.3 ± 0.1 min) was less than that of the IMRT plans (5.1 ± 0.4 min), by 54 ± 3%. Conclusion: For locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma, the VMAT technique could achieve equivalent or superior dose distribution of the target and better protect the bilateral temporal lobes, compared with the IMRT technique. Moreover, it could reduce the MU and delivery time effectively.

  18. Predicting local recurrence following breast-conserving treatment: parenchymal signal enhancement ratio (SER) around the tumor on preoperative MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Nariya; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Yun, Bo La; Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: river7774@gmail.com; Chie, Eui Kyu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Background: The level of background parenchymal enhancement around tumor is known to be associated with breast cancer risk. However, there is no study investigating predictive power of parenchymal signal enhancement ratio (SER) around tumor for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Purpose: To investigate whether the breast parenchymal SER around the tumor on preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is associated with subsequent IBTR in breast cancer patients who had undergone breast-conserving treatment. Material and Methods: Nineteen consecutive women (mean age, 44 years; range, 34-63 years) with breast cancer who developed IBTR following breast-conserving treatment and 114 control women matched for age, as well as T and N stages were included. We compared the clinicopathologic features of the two groups including nuclear grade, histologic grade, hormonal receptor status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) status, lymphovascular invasion, negative margin width, use of adjuvant therapy, and parenchymal SER around the tumor on preoperative DCE-MRI. The SER was measured on a slice showing the largest dimension of the tumor. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent factors associated with IBTR. Results: In univariate analysis, ER negativity (odds ratio [OR] = 4.7; P = 0.040), PR negativity (OR = 4.0; P = 0.013), HER-2 positivity (OR = 3.6; P = 0.026), and a parenchymal SER greater than 0.53 (OR = 23.3; P = 0.011) were associated with IBTR. In multivariate analysis, ER negativity (OR = 3.8; P = 0.015) and a parenchymal SER greater than 0.53 (OR = 13.2; P = 0.040) on preoperative MRI were independent factors associated with IBTR. Conclusion: In addition to ER negativity, a higher parenchymal SER on preoperative MRI was an independent factor associated with subsequent IBTR in patients with breast cancer who had undergone breast-conserving treatment.

  19. Concurrent use of cisplatin or cetuximab with definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Antonin; Blanchard, Pierre; Bellefqih, Sara; Brahimi, Nacera; Deutsch, Eric; Daly-Schveitzer, Nicolas; Tao, Yungan [Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Villejuif (France); Guigay, Joel [Gustave Roussy, Department of Medical Oncology, Villejuif (France); Janot, Francois; Temam, Stephane [Gustave Roussy, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Villejuif (France); Bourhis, Jean [Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Villejuif (France); University Hospital Lausanne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present work was to compare outcomes of definitive concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with cetuximab-based bioradiotherapy (BRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Between 2006 and 2012, 265 patients with locally advanced HNSCC were treated at our institution with CRT (n = 194; 73 %) with three cycles of cisplatin (100 mg/m{sup 2}, every 3 weeks) or BRT (n = 71; 27 %) with weekly cetuximab. Patients receiving BRT had more pre-existing conditions (Charlson index ≥ 2) than the CRT group (p = 0.005). Median follow-up was 29 months. In all, 56 % of patients treated with CRT received the planned three cycles (92 % at least two cycles) and 79 % patients treated with BRT received six cycles or more. The 2-year actuarial overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 72 % and 61 %, respectively. In the multivariate analysis (MVA), T4 stage, N2-3 stage, smoking status (current smoker as compared with never smoker), and non-oropharyngeal locations predicted for OS, whereas BRT association with OS was of borderline significance (p = 0.054). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control (LRC) and distant control (DC) rates were 73 and 79 %, respectively. CRT was independently associated with an improved LRC (2-year LRC: 76 % for CRT vs. 61 % for BRT) and DC (2-year LRC: 81 % for CRT vs. 68 % for BRT) in comparison with BRT (p < 0.001 and p = 0.01 in the MVA). Subgroup analyses showed that T4 patients benefited significantly from CRT (vs. BRT) in LRC, while T1-3 did not. BRT patients had more G3-4 skin complications (p < 0.001) and CRT patients had higher rates of feeding tube placement (p = 0.006) and G3-4 gastrointestinal toxicities (p < 0.001). This retrospective analysis showed a better LRC in locally advanced HNSCC treated by cisplatin-based CRT than cetuximab-based BRT, and a nonsignificant trend towards an improved OS. (orig.) [German] Die Therapieeffektivitaet mit Platin

  20. DEAR1 is a dominant regulator of acinar morphogenesis and an independent predictor of local recurrence-free survival in early-onset breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T Lott

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer in young women tends to have a natural history of aggressive disease for which rates of recurrence are higher than in breast cancers detected later in life. Little is known about the genetic pathways that underlie early-onset breast cancer. Here we report the discovery of DEAR1 (ductal epithelium-associated RING Chromosome 1, a novel gene encoding a member of the TRIM (tripartite motif subfamily of RING finger proteins, and provide evidence for its role as a dominant regulator of acinar morphogenesis in the mammary gland and as an independent predictor of local recurrence-free survival in early-onset breast cancer. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Suppression subtractive hybridization identified DEAR1 as a novel gene mapping to a region of high-frequency loss of heterozygosity (LOH in a number of histologically diverse human cancers within Chromosome 1p35.1. In the breast epithelium, DEAR1 expression is limited to the ductal and glandular epithelium and is down-regulated in transition to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, an early histologic stage in breast tumorigenesis. DEAR1 missense mutations and homozygous deletion (HD were discovered in breast cancer cell lines and tumor samples. Introduction of the DEAR1 wild type and not the missense mutant alleles to complement a mutation in a breast cancer cell line, derived from a 36-year-old female with invasive breast cancer, initiated acinar morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D basement membrane culture and restored tissue architecture reminiscent of normal acinar structures in the mammary gland in vivo. Stable knockdown of DEAR1 in immortalized human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs recapitulated the growth in 3D culture of breast cancer cell lines containing mutated DEAR1, in that shDEAR1 clones demonstrated disruption of tissue architecture, loss of apical basal polarity, diffuse apoptosis, and failure of lumen formation. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining of a tissue

  1. Comparing two lower-dose cisplatin programs for radio-chemotherapy of locally advanced head-and-neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rades, Dirk; Seidl, Daniel; Janssen, Stefan; Strojan, Primoz; Karner, Katarina; Bajrovic, Amira; Hakim, Samer G; Wollenberg, Barbara; Schild, Steven E

    2017-02-01

    Radio-chemotherapy is a common treatment for locally advanced squamous cell head-and-neck cancers (LA-SCCHN). Cisplatin (100 mg/m(2)) every 3 weeks is very common but associated with considerable toxicity. Therefore, cisplatin programs with lower daily doses were introduced. There is a lack of studies comparing lower-dose programs. In this study, 85 patients receiving radio-chemotherapy with 20 mg/m(2) cisplatin on 5 days every 4 weeks (group A) were retrospectively compared to 85 patients receiving radio-chemotherapy with 30-40 mg/m(2) cisplatin weekly (group B). Groups were matched for nine factors including age, gender, performance score, tumor site, T-/N-category, surgery, hemoglobin before radio-chemotherapy, and radiation technique. One- and 3-year loco-regional control rates were 83 and 69 % in group A versus 74 and 63 % in group B (p = 0.12). One- and 3-year survival rates were 93 % and 73 % in group A versus 91 and 49 % in group B (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, survival was significantly better for group A (HR 1.17; p = 0.002). In groups A and B, 12 and 28 % of patients, respectively, did not receive a cumulative cisplatin dose ≥180 mg/m(2) (p = 0.016). Toxicity rates were not significantly different. On subgroup analyses, group A patients had better loco-regional control (p = 0.040) and survival (p = 0.005) than group B patients after definitive radio-chemotherapy. In patients receiving adjuvant radio-chemotherapy, outcomes were not significantly different. Thus, 20 mg/m(2) cisplatin on 5 days every 4 weeks resulted in better loco-regional control and survival in patients receiving definitive radio-chemotherapy and may be preferable for these patients. Confirmation of these results in a randomized trial is warranted.

  2. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  3. Methodologies for localizing loco-regional hypopharyngeal carcinoma recurrences in relation to FDG-PET positive and clinical radiation therapy target volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Anne Kirkebjerg; Korreman, Stine; Bentzen, Søren M;

    2010-01-01

    Focal methods to determine the source of recurrence are presented, tested for reproducibility and compared to volumetric approaches with respect to the number of recurrences ascribed to the FDG-PET positive and high dose volumes....

  4. Methodologies for localizing loco-regional hypopharyngeal carcinoma recurrences in relation to FDG-PET positive and clinical radiation therapy target volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Anne Kirkebjerg; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Tomé, Wolfgang;

    2010-01-01

    Focal methods to determine the source of recurrence are presented, tested for reproducibility and compared to volumetric approaches with respect to the number of recurrences ascribed to the FDG-PET positive and high dose volumes.......Focal methods to determine the source of recurrence are presented, tested for reproducibility and compared to volumetric approaches with respect to the number of recurrences ascribed to the FDG-PET positive and high dose volumes....

  5. Recurrent dermatitis from jellyfish envenomation.

    OpenAIRE

    Menahem, S; Shvartzman, P.

    1994-01-01

    Jellyfish envenomation can cause an immediate local skin reaction, which is usually a painful linear vesiculourticarial eruption. Persistent, delayed, or recurrent dermatitis is less common. Because jellyfish sting reactions and their management are unfamiliar to family physicians, we describe a case of recurrent local dermatitis after jellyfish envenomation and suggest appropriate treatment.

  6. Prospective randomized trial to compare accelerated (six fractions a week radiotherapy against concurrent chemoradiotherapy (using conventional fractionation in locally advanced head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT is currently considered to be the standard of care in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The optimum radiotherapy schedule for best local control and acceptable toxicity is not yet clear. We aimed at shortening of treatment time by using accelerated radiation, thereby comparing the disease response, loco-regional tumor control and tolerability of accelerated radiation (six fractions per week against CCRT in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: We conducted the prospective randomized study for a period of 2 years from June 2011 to May 2013 in 133 untreated patients of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. Study group (66 patients received accelerated radiotherapy with 6 fractions per week (66Gy/33#/5½ weeks. Control group (67 patients received CCRT with 5 fractions per week radiation (66 Gy/33#/6½ weeks along with intravenous cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 weekly. Tumor control, survival, acute and late toxicities were assessed. Results: Median overall treatment time was 38 days and 45 days in the accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiation arm, respectively. At a median follow up of 12 months, 41 patients (62.1% in the accelerated radiotherapy arm and 47 patients (70.1% in the CCRT arm were disease free (P = 0.402. Local disease control was comparable in both the arms. Acute toxicities were significantly higher in the CCRT arm as compared with accelerated radiotherapy arm. There was no difference in late toxicities between the two arms. Conclusion: We can achieve, same or near to the same local control, with lower toxicities with accelerated six fractions per week radiation compared with CCRT especially for Indian population.

  7. The Usefulness of Pre-Radiofrequency Ablation SUVmax in 18F-FDG PET/CT to Predict the Risk of a Local Recurrence of Malignant Lung Tumors after Lung Radiofrequency Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada,Sosuke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic usefulness of Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT in the prediction of local recurrence of malignant lung tumors by analyzing the pre-radiofrequency ablation (RFA maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax. We performed a historical cohort study of consecutive malignant lung tumors treated by RFA from January 2007 to May 2008 at Okayama University Hospital. We selected only lung tumors examined by PET/CT within 90 days before RFA and divided them (10 primary and 29 metastatic into 3 groups according to their tertiles of SUVmax. We calculated recurrence odds ratios in the medium group and the high group compared to the low group using multivariate logistic analysis. After we examined the relationship between SUVmax and recurrence in a crude model, we adjusted for some factors. Tumors with higher SUVmax showed higher recurrence odds ratios (medium group;1.84, high group;4.14, respectively. The tumor size also increased the recurrence odds ratio (2.67;we thought this was mainly due to selection bias because we excluded tumors less than 10mm in diameter. This study demonstrated the pre-RFA SUVmax in PET/CT may be a prognostic factor for local recurrence of malignant lung tumors.

  8. Prognostic role of metabolic parameters of {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT scan performed during radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Myo; Forstner, Dion [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lin, Peter; Shon, Ivan Ho; Lin, Michael [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Positron Emission Tomography, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lee, Mark T. [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Bray, Victoria; Fowler, Allan [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Chicco, Andrew [Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Positron Emission Tomography, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Tieu, Minh Thi [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Department of Radiation Oncology, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT performed in the third week (iPET) of definitive radiation therapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced mucosal primary head and neck squamous-cell-carcinoma (MPHNSCC). Seventy-two patients with MPHNSCC treated with radical RT underwent staging PET-CT and iPET. The maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesional glycolysis (TLG) of primary tumour (PT) and index node (IN) [defined as lymph node(s) with highest TLG] were analysed, and results were correlated with loco-regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), metastatic failure-free survival(MFFS) and overall survival (OS), using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Optimal cutoffs (OC) were derived from receiver operating characteristic curves: SUV{sub max-PT} = 4.25 g/mL, MTV{sub PT} = 3.3 cm{sup 3}, TLG{sub PT} = 9.4 g, for PT, and SUV{sub max-IN} = 4.05 g/mL, MTV{sub IN} = 1.85 cm{sup 3} and TLG{sub IN} = 7.95 g for IN. Low metabolic values in iPET for PT below OC were associated with statistically significant better LRFS and DFS. TLG was the best predictor of outcome with 2-year LRFS of 92.7 % vs. 71.1 % [p = 0.005, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.03) and MTV (p = 0.022)], DFS of 85.9 % vs. 60.8 % [p = 0.005, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.025) and MTV (p = 0.018)], MFFS of 85.9 % vs. 83.7 % [p = 0.488, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.52) and MTV (p = 0.436)], and OS of 81.1 % vs. 75.0 % [p = 0.279, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.345) and MTV (p = 0.512)]. There were no significant associations between the percentage reduction of primary tumour metabolic parameters and outcomes. In patients with nodal disease, metabolic parameters below OC (for both PT and IN) were significantly associated with all oncological outcomes, while TLG was again the best predictor: LRFS of 84.0 % vs. 55.3 % (p = 0.017), DFS of 79.4 % vs. 38.6 % (p = 0.001), MFFS 86.4 % vs. 68.2 % (p = 0

  9. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: Role of wide local excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raashid Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective of the present study was to study the outcome of surgical treatment of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Materials and Methods: This study included 45 patients both retrospective and prospective from December 1995 to December 2010. Results: Out of 45 patients, 30 were males and 15 females with the male to female ratio of 2:1. Mean age of presentation was 38.4 + 13.2 years. Commonest mode of presentation was raised firm multinodular lesion with fixity to overlying skin. Site distribution was 42.22% trunk, 57.88% extremities and head and neck. None of the patients had lymph node involvement All patients underwent wide local excision. On histological examination, 8 patients had positive margins. Overall recurrence rate was 22.22%. (please clarify what is the difference between the rate of recurrence following surgery and the overall recurrence rate Only 2 patients developed metastasis to lungs in the course of their follow-up. Out of 45 patients, 35 remained recurrence free over a varying period of 5 months to 13 years (mean 68 months. Ten patients developed one or more local recurrences. Average time from initial treatment to recurrence was 32 months. All patients with recurrent tumors were subjected to salvage treatment, i.e., re-excision. Average recurrence-free period was 36 + 44 months within a mean follow-up of 68 months. Conclusion: Because of the potential of local recurrence, therapy for DFSP should be directed toward adequate local excision of the primary lesion. Minimal resection should include a surrounding margin, comprising 3-cm margin of normal skin and removal of underlying deep fascia. Compromising on margins invites higher chances of local recurrence.

  10. Molecular Cloning, Expression Analysis and Localization of Exo70A1 Related to Self Incompatibility in Non-Heading Chinese Cabbage (Brassica campestrisssp. chinensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; GE Ting-ting; PENG Hai-tao; WANG Cheng; LIU Tong-kun; HOU Xi-lin; LI Ying

    2013-01-01

    The exocyst is a conserved protein complex, and required for vesicles tethering, fusion and polarized exocytosis. Exo70A1, the exocyst subunit, is essential for assembly of the exocyst complex. To better understand potential roles of Exo70A1 in non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestrisssp. chinensis), we obtained the full-length cDNA ofExo70A1 gene, which consisted of 1917 bp and encoded a protein of 638 amino acids. BlastX showed BcExo70A1 shared 94.9% identity with Brassica oleraceavar. acephala (AEI26267.1), and clustered into a same group with other homologues inB. oleracea var. acephala andBrassica napus. Subcellular localization analysis showed BcExo70A1 was localized to punctate structures in cytosol of onion epithelial cells. Results showed that BcExo70A1 was widely presented in stamens, young stems, petals, unpollinated pistils, roots and leaves of self compatible and incompatible plants. The transcripts ofBcExo70A1 in non-heading Chinese cabbage declined during initial 1.5 h after incompatible pollination, while an opposite trend was presented after compatible pollination. Our study reveals that BcExo70A1 could play essential roles in plant growth and development, and is related to the rejection of self pollen in non-heading Chinese cabbage.

  11. Galectin-1 Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Local Recurrence and Survival After Definitive Radiation Therapy for Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Eng-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chanchien, Chan-Chao; Lin, Hao [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chung-Chi; Wang, Chong-Jong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chao-Cheng, E-mail: huangcc@cgmh.org.tw [Department of Pathology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of galectin-1 in patients with cervical cancer after definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 154 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma. Patients underwent curative-intent radiation therapy. Paraffin-embedded tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry staining for galectin-1. The rates of cancer-specific survival (CSS), local recurrence (LR), and distant metastasis were compared among patient tissue samples with no, weak, and strong galectin-1 expression. The Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazard model with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Results: The areas under the curve for the intracellular expression scores of galectin-1 for both LR and CSS were significantly higher than those for stromal expression. There were no significant differences in the demographic data, such as stage and serum tumor markers, between patients with and without intracellular expression of galectin-1 in cancer tissue samples. Using multivariate analyses, the hazard ratios of LR and CSS were 2.60 (95% CI 1.50-4.52) (P=.001) and 1.94 (95% CI 1.18-3.19) (P=.010), respectively. Conclusion: Galectin-1 is an independent prognostic factor associated with LR and CSS in stage I-II cervical cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy. Further studies targeting galectin-1 may improve the local control of cervical cancer.

  12. Breast-conserving surgery in locally advanced breast cancer submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Safety and effectiveness based on ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and long-term follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Guilherme Freire Angotti; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Abrahão-Machado, Lucas Faria; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Nunes, João Soares; Folgueira, Maria Aparecida Azevedo Koike; da Costa Vieira, René Aloisio

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast-conserving surgery for locally advanced breast cancer. METHODS: A retrospective observational cohort study was performed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer submitted to breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on an adriamycin-cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel regimen. We evaluated the clinical, pathologic, immunohistochemistry, and surgical factors that contribute to ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and locoregional recurrence. A Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox model were used to evaluate the main factors related to disease-free survival. RESULTS: Of the 449 patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 98 underwent breast-conserving surgery. The average diameter of the tumors was 5.3 cm, and 87.2% reached a size of up to 3 cm. Moreover, 86.7% were classified as clinical stage III, 74.5% had T3-T4 tumors, 80.5% had N1-N2 axilla, and 89.8% had invasive ductal carcinoma. A pathologic complete response was observed in 27.6% of the tumors, and 100.0% of samples had free margins. The 5-year actuarial overall survival rate was 81.2%, and the mean follow-up was 72.8 months. The rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and locoregional recurrence were 11.2% and 15.3%, respectively. Multifocal morphology response was the only factor related to ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence disease-free survival (p=0.04). A multivariate analysis showed that the pathologic response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST)-breast cutoff was the only factor related to locoregional recurrence disease-free survival (p=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Breast-conserving surgery is a safe and effective therapy for selected locally advanced breast tumors. PMID:28355358

  13. A comparative study of low dose weekly paclitaxel versus cisplatin with concurrent radiation in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Jain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare low dose weekly paclitaxel versus cisplatin with concurrent radiation in locally advanced head and neck cancers. Materials and Methods: From August 2005 to July 2006, a total of 100 biopsy proven, locally advanced head and neck cancers were enrolled for the study. All the patients were stratified in two groups, study group A and control group B. Study group patients received injection Paclitaxel 20 mg/m 2 , I/V 1 hr infusion weekly for 6 weeks and control group patients received injection Cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 , I/V 2 hrs infusion weekly for 6 weeks. All patients received 66-70 Gy concurrent radiation at the rate of 2 Gy/day, 5 #/week, in 6-7 weeks by cobalt theratron phoenix - 80 teletherapy units. Result: Complete response achieved in 73% of patients in study group and 64% of patients in control group. There was no statistically significant difference observed between the study group and the control group (χ2 = 1.167, df = 1, level of significance 0.05. On 3-10 months of follow-up 59% of patients in the study group and 42% of patients in the control group are alive and disease free. Local toxicities including mucositis, dysphasia and skin reactions were more in the study group but tolerable. Conclusion: Efficacy of paclitaxel in low dose weekly schedule is comparable to cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Further analysis and follow-up are needed to evaluate if this benefit will translate into prolonged survival.

  14. How well does the new lung cancer staging system predict for local/regional recurrence after surgery?: A comparison of the TNM 6 and 7 systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepek, Joseph M; Chino, Junzo P; Marks, Lawrence B; D'amico, Thomas A; Yoo, David S; Onaitis, Mark W; Ready, Neal E; Hubbs, Jessica L; Boyd, Jessamy; Kelsey, Chris R

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate how well the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) 6 and TNM 7 staging systems predict rates of local/regional recurrence (LRR) after surgery alone for non-small cell lung cancer. All patients who underwent surgery for non-small cell lung cancer at Duke between 1995 and 2005 were reviewed. Those undergoing sublobar resections, with positive margins or involvement of the chest wall, or those who received any chemotherapy or radiation therapy (RT) were excluded. Disease recurrence at the surgical margin, or within ipsilateral hilar and/or mediastinal lymph nodes, was considered as a LRR. Stage was assigned based on both TNM 6 and TNM 7. Rates of LRR were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis evaluated the hazard ratio of LRR by stage within TNM 6 and TNM 7. A total of 709 patients were eligible for the analysis. Median follow-up was 32 months. For all patients, the 5-year actuarial risk of LRR was 23%. Conversion from TNM 6 to TNM 7 resulted in 21% stage migration (upstaging in 13%; downstaging in 8%). Five-year rates of LRR for stages IA, IB, IIA, IIB, and IIIA disease using TNM 6 were 16%, 26%, 43%, 35%, and 40%, respectively. Using TNM 7, corresponding rates were 16%, 23%, 37%, 39%, and 30%, respectively. The hazard ratios for LRR were statistically different for IA and IB in both TNM 6 and 7 but were also different for IB and IIA in TNM 7. LRR risk increases monotonically for stages IA to IIB in the new TNM 7 system. This information might be valuable when designing future studies of postoperative RT.

  15. Clinical trial of nintedanib in patients with recurrent or metastatic salivary gland cancer of the head and neck: A multicenter phase 2 study (Korean Cancer Study Group HN14-01).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youjin; Lee, Su Jin; Lee, Ji Yun; Lee, Se-Hoon; Sun, Jong-Mu; Park, Keunchil; An, Ho Jung; Cho, Jae Yong; Kang, Eun Joo; Lee, Ha-Young; Kim, Jinsoo; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Hye Ryun; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Choi, Moon Young; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2017-06-01

    Salivary gland cancers (SGCs) are uncommon and account for less than 5% of all head and neck cancers, but they are histologically heterogeneous. No specific therapy, including targeted agents, has consistently improved clinical outcomes in recurrent/metastatic SGC. Recent studies suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) play important roles in SGC. Nintedanib is a potent small-molecule, triple-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR1, VEGFR2, and VEGFR3; fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 [FGFR1], FGFR2, and FGFR3; and PDGFRα and PDGFRß). This study sought to determine the antitumor activity of nintedanib in patients with recurrent or metastatic SGC. This open-label, multicenter, phase 2, single-arm study was conducted at 11 hospitals in South Korea. Patients with pathologically confirmed recurrent and/or metastatic SGC for whom at least 1 line of systemic chemotherapy had failed were enrolled. Nintedanib was given orally at 200 mg twice a day until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was the response rate. The secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, overall survival, toxicity, and the disease-control rate. The Simon 2-stage minimax design was used. The median age of the patients was 54 years, 60% were female, and 95% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1. The majority of the patients had adenoid cystic carcinoma (65%), and 40% received at least 2 prior rounds of chemotherapy. After 20 patients were enrolled, the study was stopped because no responders were observed at stage I. There were no partial responses, but the disease-control rate was 75% (15 of 20). The median duration of stable disease was 8.2 months (range, 1.76-12.36 months). At the time of the data cutoff, with a median follow-up of 9.5 months, the median overall survival had not been reached, and the progression-free survival rate at 6 months was

  16. Radiotherapy for patients with isolated local recurrence of primary resected pancreatic cancer. Prolonged disease-free interval associated with favorable prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akira; Itasaka, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Michio; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Kyoto University, Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Takaori, Kyoichi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Uemoto, Shinji [Kyoto University, Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of radiotherapy and prognostic factors for recurrent pancreatic cancer. The study comprised 30 patients who developed a locoregional recurrence of primarily resected pancreatic cancer and received radiotherapy between 2000 and 2013 with a median dose of 54 Gy (range, 39-60 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy included gemcitabine for 18 patients and S-1 for seven patients. The treatment outcomes and prognostic factors were retrospectively analyzed. The median follow-up after radiotherapy was 14.6 months. The 1-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 69 %, 67 %, and 32 %, respectively. The median overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 15.9 and 6.9 months, respectively. Tumor marker reduction and ≥ 50 % reduction were observed in 18 and two patients, respectively. Of the seven patients who exhibited pain symptoms, four and two patients were partly and completely relieved, respectively. Late grade 3 ileus and gastroduodenal bleeding were observed in one patient each. Among the clinicopathological factors evaluated, only a disease-free interval of greater than 18.9 months exhibited a significant association with improved overall survival (p = 0.017). Radiotherapy for isolated locally recurrent pancreatic cancer resulted in encouraging local control, overall survival, and palliative effects with mild toxicity, particularly in patients with a prolonged disease-free interval. This treatment strategy should be prospectively evaluated. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung strahlentherapeutischer Behandlungsergebnisse und prognostischer Faktoren bei rezidivierendem Pankreaskrebs. In dieser Studie wurden 30 Patienten aufgenommen, bei denen es nach primaer reseziertem Pankreaskrebs zu lokoregionaeren Rezidiven kam und die zwischen 2000 und 2013 strahlentherapeutisch mit einer mittleren Dosis von 54 Gy (Bereich 39-60 Gy) behandelt wurden. Im Rahmen der gleichzeitig durchgefuehrten Chemotherapie wurde

  17. Long-term outcomes of a phase II randomized controlled trial comparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy with or without weekly cisplatin for the treatment of locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Guan; Shuai Liu; HanYu Wang; Ying Guo; WeiWei Xiao; ChunYan Chen; Chong Zhao; TaiXiang Lu; Fei Han

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salvage treatment for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is complicated and relatively limited. Radiotherapy, combined with effective concomitant chemotherapy, may improve clinical treatment out‑comes. We conducted a phase II randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efcacy of intensity‑modulated radio‑therapy with concomitant weekly cisplatin on locally recurrent NPC. Methods: Between April 2002 and January 2008, 69 patients diagnosed with non‑metastatic locally recurrent NPC were randomly assigned to either concomitant chemoradiotherapy group (n = 34) or radiotherapy alone group(n= 35). All patients received intensity‑modulated radiotherapy. The radiotherapy dose for both groups was 60 Gy in 27 fractions for 37 days (range 23–53 days). The concomitant chemotherapy schedule was cisplatin 30 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion weekly during radiotherapy. Results: The median follow‑up period of all patients was 35 months (range 2–112 months). Between concomitant chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy groups, there was only significant difference in the 3‑year and 5‑year overall survival (OS) rates (68.7% vs. 42.2%, P = 0.016 and 41.8% vs. 27.5%, P = 0.049, respectively). Subgroup analysis showedthat concomitant chemoradiotherapy significantly improved the 5‑year OS rate especially for patients in stage rT3–4 (33.0% vs. 13.2%, P = 0.009), stages III–IV (34.3% vs. 13.2%, P = 0.006), recurrence interval >30 months (49.0% vs. 20.6%,P= 0.017), and tumor volume >26 cm3 (37.6% vs. 0%, P = 0.006). Conclusion: Compared with radiotherapy alone, concomitant chemoradiotherapy can improve OS of the patients with locally recurrent NPC, especially those with advanced T category (rT3–4) and stage (III–IV) diseases, recurrence intervals >30 months, and tumor volume >26 cm3.

  18. The risk reduction of recurrent periodontal pathogens of local application minocycline HCl 2% gel, used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing for chronic periodontitis treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeroso, Y; Akase, T; Sunarto, H; Kemal, Y; Salim, R; Octavia, M; Viandita, A; Setiawan, J; Bachtiar, BM

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological effects of local application minocycline HCl 2% gel, used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) for treatment of chronic periodontitis (CP). CP is an inflammation of periodontal tissue that is caused mainly by bacterial infection, where periodontal destruction such as loss of attachment and bone destruction occurred. Methods A total of 81 subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis whose baseline clinical attachment loss (CAL) was ≥4 mm were randomly assigned to receive SRP alone (control group, N=39) or SRP followed by four times of local application of minocycline HCl gel (Periocline) once a week (test group, N=42). Pocket depth, CAL, and papilla bleeding index were examined at baseline, 21 days, 2, 3, and 6 months. Subgingival plaque samples were collected with sterile curettes and were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction for the presence of three periodontal pathogens (Porphyromonas gingivalis [P.g.], Tannerella forsythia [T.f.], and Treponema denticola [T.d.]) at baseline, 2, 3, and 6 months. Results The number of bacteria was reduced in both groups at 2 months after baseline (SRP treatment). The changes (2–6 months) in T.d. and T.f. counts in the test group were significantly lower than those in the control group. In the control group, a significant regrowth of P.g., T.f., and T.d. was observed from 2 to 6 months and of P.g. and T.f. from 3 to 6 months. On the other hand, in the test group, the number of the three bacteria did not significantly increase during the 6-month period. Conclusion The results showed that local application of minocycline, used as an adjunct to SRP, was effective for suppressing regrowth of periodontal pathogens, suggesting its risk reduction of recurrent periodontal pathogens in CP. PMID:28331333

  19. Genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene as predictors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng-Yuan; Qin, Xiao-Jian; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Fang-Ning; Zhang, Gui-Ming; Sun, Li-Jiang; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is curative. Nevertheless many patients suffered from biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Mounting evidence suggest that estrogen and xenobiotic carcinogens play an essential role in progression of prostate cancervia oxidative estrogen metabolism. CYP1B1 is an enzyme involved in the hydroxylation of estrogens, a reaction of key relevance in estrogen metabolism. Given the role of CYP1B1 in the oxidative metabolism of endogenous/exogenous estrogen and compounds, CYP1B1 polymorphisms have the potential to modify its expression and subsequently lead to progression. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene may influence clinical outcome in clinically localized prostate cancer patients. In this cohort study, we genotyped 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the CYP1B1 gene in 312 patients treated with RP. For replication, these SNPs were genotyped in an independent cohort of 426 patients. The expression level of CYP1B1 in the adjacent normal prostate tissues was quantified by reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to identify SNPs that correlated with BCR. CYP1B1 rs1056836 was significantly associated with BCR (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.40-0.89, P = 0.002) and relative CYP1B1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest inherited genetic variation in the CYP1B1 gene may contribute to variable clinical outcomes for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer.

  20. Primary tumor microRNA signature predicts recurrence and survival in patients with locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Daisuke; Zaidi, Ali H; Martin, Samantha A; Omstead, Ashten N; Kosovec, Juliann E; Huleihel, Luai; Saldin, Lindsey T; DiCarlo, Christina; Silverman, Jan F; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Finley, Gene G; Badylak, Stephen F; Kelly, Ronan J; Jobe, Blair A

    2016-12-06

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is an aggressive cancer necessitating the development of improved risk stratification tools for personalized care. Previously, microRNAs have been shown to correlate with the progression and prognosis of various cancer types; however, the value in EAC remains largely unexplored. We performed global microRNA profiling on 32 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded EAC specimens to identify microRNAs associated with progression. Literature search and pathway analysis further refined output to five significantly deregulated candidate biomarkers. Four of the five microRNAs (miR-652-5p, miR-7-2-3p, miR-3925-3p, and miR-219-3p) were validated by qRT-PCR. Survival outcomes were evaluated in testing set of 26 stage II/III EAC patients to determine the prognostic relevance of the selected microRNAs. In the testing set, miR-652-5p and miR-7-2-3p expressions were significantly associated with progression-free survival (p-value = .00771 and p-value = .00293). The highest area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.8212 for the combination of miR-652-5p and miR-7-2-3p. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that the miR-652-5p/miR-7-2-3p signature may serve as a promising prognostic marker in patients with locally advanced EAC.

  1. Concurrent Chemoradiation with Low-Dose Weekly Cisplatin in Locally Advanced Stage IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Myoung Hee; Kang, Jung Hun; Song, Haa-Na; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Kimun; Woo, Seung Hoon; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with 3-weekly doses of cisplatin is a standard treatment for loco-regionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, treatment with 3-weekly doses of cisplatin is often associated with several adverse events. Therefore, we conducted this retrospective analysis to determine the efficacy and tolerance of CRT with a low weekly dose of cisplatin in stage IV HNSCC patients. Materials and Methods Medical records of patients who were d...

  2. Cisplatin, hyperthermia, and radiation (trimodal therapy) in patients with locally advanced head and neck tumors: A phase I-II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amichetti, M.; Graiff, C.; Fellin, G.; Pani, G.; Bolner, A.; Maluta, S. (Divisione di Radioterapia Oncologica, Trento (Italy)); Valdagni, R. (Divisione di Radioterapia Oncologica, Trento (Italy) Istituto per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Trento (Italy))

    1993-08-01

    Hyperthermia is now being widely used to treat clinical malignancies, especially combined with radiotherapy and more rarely with chemotherapy. The combination of heat, radiation, and chemotherapy (trimodality) can lead to potent interaction. The present Phase I-II study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and acute toxicity of a combination of cisplantin, hyperthermia, and irradiation in the treatment of superficial cervical nodal metastases from head and neck cancer. Eighteen patients with measurable neck metastases from previously untreated squamous cell head and neck tumors were entered into the trial. Therapy consisted of a conventional irradiation (total dose 70 Gy, 2 Gy five times a week) combined with a weekly administration of 20 mg/m[sup 2] iv of cisplatin and a total of two sessions of local external microwave hyperthermia (desired temperature of 42.5[degrees]C for 30 min). Feasibility of the treatment was demonstrated. Acute local toxicity was mild; no thermal blisters or ulcerations were reported and only two patients experienced local pain during hyperthermia. Cutaneous toxicity appeared greater than in previous studies with irradiation plus hyperthermia and irradiation plus cisplatin. Systematic toxicity was moderate with major toxic effects observed in three patients (World Health Organization (WHO) grade 3 anaemia). Even though it was not an aim of the study to evaluate the nodal response, they observed a complete response rate of 72.2% (95% confidence interval 51-93.4%), 16.6% of partial response and 11.1% of no change. The study confirms the feasibility of the combination of cisplantin, heat, and radiation with an acceptable toxicity profile. The trimodal therapy deserves further evaluation as a way to enhance the efficacy of irradiation in the treatment of nodal metastases from head and neck tumors. 43 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Estimating the intended sound direction of the user: toward an auditory brain-computer interface using out-of-head sound localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Nambu

    Full Text Available The auditory Brain-Computer Interface (BCI using electroencephalograms (EEG is a subject of intensive study. As a cue, auditory BCIs can deal with many of the characteristics of stimuli such as tone, pitch, and voices. Spatial information on auditory stimuli also provides useful information for a BCI. However, in a portable system, virtual auditory stimuli have to be presented spatially through earphones or headphones, instead of loudspeakers. We investigated the possibility of an auditory BCI using the out-of-head sound localization technique, which enables us to present virtual auditory stimuli to users from any direction, through earphones. The feasibility of a BCI using this technique was evaluated in an EEG oddball experiment and offline analysis. A virtual auditory stimulus was presented to the subject from one of six directions. Using a support vector machine, we were able to classify whether the subject attended the direction of a presented stimulus from EEG signals. The mean accuracy across subjects was 70.0% in the single-trial classification. When we used trial-averaged EEG signals as inputs to the classifier, the mean accuracy across seven subjects reached 89.5% (for 10-trial averaging. Further analysis showed that the P300 event-related potential responses from 200 to 500 ms in central and posterior regions of the brain contributed to the classification. In comparison with the results obtained from a loudspeaker experiment, we confirmed that stimulus presentation by out-of-head sound localization achieved similar event-related potential responses and classification performances. These results suggest that out-of-head sound localization enables us to provide a high-performance and loudspeaker-less portable BCI system.

  4. Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke;

    Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy......Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy...

  5. Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That is Locally Advanced or Metastatic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  6. Follow-up strategies in head and neck cancer other than upper aerodigestive tract squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Digonnet, A.; Hamoir, M.; Andry, G.; Poorten, V. Van der; Haigentz Jr., M.; Langendijk, J.A.; Bree, R. de; Hinni, M.L.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Paleri, V.; Rinaldo, A.; Werner, J.A.; Takes, R.P.; Ferlito, A.

    2013-01-01

    Post-therapy follow-up for patients with head and neck cancer other than upper aerodigestive tract squamous cell carcinoma should meet several objectives: to detect both local, regional or distant recurrences, to evaluate acute and long-term treatment-related side effects, to guide the

  7. Impact of symptom burden on work-related abilities in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: Results from a substudy of the VIRGO observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeland, Charles S; Mayer, Musa; Dreyer, Nancy A; Yim, Yeun Mi; Yu, Elaine; Su, Zhaohui; Mun, Yong; Sloan, Jeff A; Kaufman, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Limited data exist on the association of symptom burden, daily activity impairment, and work productivity (WP) in patients with advanced breast cancer. This cross-sectional analysis evaluated baseline patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) receiving first-line hormonal therapy or chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy in the VIRGO observational study. The primary PRO study endpoint, symptom severity and interference score, was measured using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI). Secondary endpoints included Activity Level Scale (ALS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire (WPAI:SHP) scores. Overall, 152 patients (chemotherapy cohort, 104; hormonal therapy cohort, 48) answered questionnaires. Fatigue, decreased sexual interest, disturbed sleep, emotional distress, and drowsiness were the most common severe symptoms, and were of moderate-to-severe intensity in 38.8%-52.0% of patients. Mean percent daily activity impairment was 30% for study patients, and WP impairment ranged from 20% to 40% across indices in employed patients (n, 58). Significant positive correlations existed for MDASI severity and interference scores with activity impairment and WP indices (Pearson correlation coefficients [R] = 0.47-0.82; p work-related ability.

  8. [Treatment of recurrent posterior epistaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bro, Søren Pauli; Bille, Jesper; Petersen, Kristian Bruun

    2017-08-21

    30% of the patients presenting with epistaxis at emergency wards and otorhinolaryngeal specialist departments have posterior bleeding. Traditional treatment with packing often leads to initial treatment failure, and many patients experience recurrent bleeding within the following month. Recurrent posterior epistaxis should be treated with local electrocautery or endoscopic ligation of the sphenopalatine artery to reduce patient discomfort, hospital stay, risk of treatment failure and recurrence.

  9. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detection and localization of residual or recurrent disease in patients with multiple myeloma after stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derlin, Thorsten; Wisotzki, Christian; Klutmann, Susanne [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Weber, Christoph; Habermann, Christian R.; Herrmann, Jochen [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Ayuk, Francis; Wolschke, Christine; Kroeger, Nicolaus [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic performance of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT for the detection and localization of residual or recurrent disease in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) after stem cell transplantation. A total of 197 whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 99 patients with MM at different time points in the course of disease after autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Post-transplant PET/CT scans and clinical remission status as determined by the clinical gold standard (Uniform Response Criteria) were analysed and compared. A total of 576 focal osseous and extramedullary lesions were detected in 79 scans. Additional diffuse bone marrow involvement was detected in 17 patients. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT had a sensitivity of 54.6%, a specificity of 82.1%, a positive predictive value of 82.3%, a negative predictive value of 54.2% and an overall accuracy of 65.5%. The sensitivity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was shown to depend on the disease category according to the Uniform Response Criteria for myeloma. In patients with MM in the post-transplant setting, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT may (1) contribute to the detection and localization of disease, (2) provide information about the extent of distinct myeloma manifestations and the total disease burden and (3) add information about the metabolic activity of disease, but (4) has substantially lower sensitivity for this purpose compared to the pretreatment setting. (orig.)

  10. Predictors of Local Recurrence After Rituximab-Based Chemotherapy Alone in Stage III and IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Guiding Decisions for Consolidative Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegadeesh, Naresh; Rajpara, Raj; Esiashvili, Natia; Shi, Zheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Yuan [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Shared Resource, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Okwan-Duodu, Derrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Flowers, Christopher R. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K., E-mail: drkhurram2000@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The role of consolidative radiation therapy (RT) for stage III and IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the era of rituximab is not well defined. There is evidence that some patients with bulky disease may benefit, but patient selection criteria are not well established. We sought to identify a subset of patients who experienced a high local failure rate after receiving rituximab-based chemotherapy alone and hence may benefit from the addition of consolidative RT. Methods and Materials: Two hundred eleven patients with stage III and IV DLBCL treated between August 1999 and January 2012 were reviewed. Of these, 89 had a complete response to systemic therapy including rituximab and received no initial RT. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed, with local recurrence (LR) as the primary outcome. Results: The median follow-up time was 43.9 months. Fifty percent of patients experienced LR at 5 years. In multivariate analysis, tumor ≥5 cm and stage III disease were associated with increased risk of LR. The 5-year LR-free survival was 47.4% for patients with ≥5-cm lesions versus 74.7% for patients with <5-cm lesions (P=.01). In patients with <5-cm tumors, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was ≥15 in all patients with LR. The 5-year LR-free survival was 100% in SUV<15 versus 68.8% in SUV≥15 (P=.10). Conclusions: Advanced-stage DLBCL patients with stage III disease or with disease ≥5 cm appear to be at an increased risk for LR. Patients with <5-cm disease and SUVmax ≥15 may be at higher risk for LR. These patients may benefit from consolidative RT after chemoimmunotherapy.

  11. Hyperthermia with radiation in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer: A report of randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilgol Nagraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Head and neck cancer is the leading cause of male mortality due to cancer in India. Surgery, radiation alone or in combination has been the backbone of treatment strategies. Chemo-radiation has emerged as the standard of care in most types of head and neck cancer. This strategy has the advantage of maintaining both structure and functions, albeit with increased acute and delayed side effects. Radiation with hyperthermia can achieve the same objective without additional toxicities. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 patients were randomized to radiation therapy (RT alone or RT-hyperthermia (RT-HT arm. Twenty-six patients were included in RT alone arm and 28 patients in the RT-HT arm. Both groups were evenly matched for age, sex, and stage. Patients in both the arms received radiation to a dose of 66-70 Gy in 6.5-7 weeks. Patients in the study group received weekly HT. HT was started after impedance matching to last for 30 minutes. Results: Complete response was seen in 42.4% of RT alone group compare to 78.6% in the HT group. The difference was statistically significant ( < 0.05. Kaplan-Meir analysis of survival also showed a significant improvement in favor of RT-HT. No dose limiting thermal burns and excessive mucosal or thermal toxicity were recorded. Conclusion: Radiofrequency (RF based heating and radical radiation of head and neck cancers is better than in RT alone group. HT should be considered as a valid option wherever the facility for HT is available. This report should infuse greater confidence in radiation Oncologists to practice HT as an adjuvant treatment modality.