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Sample records for localized prostate cancer

  1. Optimizing the Management of High-Risk, Localized Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sundi, Debasish; Jeong, Byong Chang; Lee, Seung Bae; Han, Misop

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer has a high prevalence and a rising incidence in many parts of the world. Although many screen-detected prostate cancers may be indolent, prostate cancer remains a major contributor to mortality in men. Therefore, the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of localized prostate cancer with lethal potential are of great importance. High-risk, localized prostate cancer has multiple definitions. Treatment options that should be individualized to each patient include observation, radi...

  2. Active surveillance for localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Berg, Kasper D; Røder, M Andreas

    2015-01-01

    and costs of AS in patients with localized PCa. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 317 PCa patients were followed in a prospective, single-arm AS cohort. The primary outcomes were number of patient contacts, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, biopsies, hospital admissions due to biopsy complications......OBJECTIVE: Evidence supports active surveillance (AS) as a means to reduce overtreatment of low-risk prostate cancer (PCa). The consequences of close and long-standing follow-up with regard to outpatient visits, tests and repeated biopsies are widely unknown. This study investigated the trajectory...

  3. Active surveillance for localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thostrup, Mathias; Thomsen, Frederik B; Iversen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    risk of biochemical recurrence were investigated and compared in men with very low-risk, low-risk and intermediate-risk PCa in the cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 451 men were followed on AS and monitored with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, digital rectal examinations and rebiopsies......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of active surveillance (AS) is to reduce overtreatment of men with localized prostate cancer (PCa) without compromising survival. The objective of this study was to update a large Scandinavian single-center AS cohort. Furthermore, the use of curative treatment and subsequent...

  4. Radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.J.; Richardson, G.; Hafermann, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1965, 401 patients with prostate cancer have received intensive local pelvic radiation therapy at the Virginia Mason Medical Center. Two hundred twenty-one of this series were in the Stage C category. The 36 Stage B cancers were either medically nonoperable, or advanced extent, or had high-grade histopathology. Ten patients each were in diffuse Stage A or Stage D groups, the latter receiving local palliative inensive treatment to the prostate area. The mean age of the patients was 67.6 years. The five year survival of the Stage C group was 57.7%. There was no apparent influence on the survival of irradiated Stage C patients who received estrogen therapy. Current treatment techniques employ 10 megavolt photon beam with whole pelvic nodal fields and bilateral are rotational boost fields. The incidence of reactions and complications is presented

  5. The management of localized and locally advanced prostate cancer - 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. - The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. - Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. - The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachy therapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. - Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. - Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. - The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  6. Case of prostate cancer with anterior localization multiparametric MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer most often originates from acinar epithelium. Most of the clinically palpable carcinomas are located predominantly in the rear/dorzo-lateraI zones of the gland, but the tumors in the transition zone anatomical may spread to the periphery. The detection of a neoplastic process in the front parts of the gland is rare and poses difficulties in diagnosis. We present a rare case of anterior location of prostate carcinoma with invasion of bladder, blood vessels and seminal vesicles. At present, diagnosis of prostate cancer in most men is demonstrated by elevated serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), or positive rectal examination or ultrasonography. Multi parametric MR study is a promising method for detecting prostate cancer. When used in conjunction with PSA values and rectal examination, MRI is increasingly accepted as a standard for the diagnosis and characterization of prostate carcinoma. Key words; Prostate Cancer. Anterior Localization. Multi Parametric MRI

  7. Potency after permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potters, Louis; Torre, Taryn; Fearn, Paul A.; Leibel, Steven A.; Kattan, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The evaluation of potency preservation after treatment of localized prostate cancer with transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) and the efficacy of sildenafil were studied. Methods and Materials: This study comprised 482 patients who were able to maintain an erection suitable for intercourse before treatment from a cohort of 1166 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with PPB. All patients have been followed prospectively, and actuarial analysis was performed to assess potency preservation over time. Patients treated with sildenafil were evaluated as to its efficacy. Results: The median follow-up of this cohort was 34 months (6-92), with a median age of 68 years (47-80). Potency was preserved in 311 of the 482 patients, with a 5-year actuarial potency rate of 52.7%. The 5-year actuarial potency rate for patients treated with PPB as monotherapy was 76%, and, for those treated with combination external beam radiotherapy (EBT) + PPB, 56% (p=0.08). Patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAAD) + PPB had a 5-year potency rate of 52%, whereas those with combination EBT + PPB + NAAD had a potency rate of 29% (p=0.13). Cox regression analysis identified that pretreatment use of NAAD and patient age predicted for impotence (p=0.0001 and 0.04, respectively). Of 84 patients treated with sildenafil, 52 had a successful outcome (62%). The response to sildenafil was significantly better in those patients not treated with NAAD (p=0.04). Conclusions: The actuarial potency rates at 5 years for patients treated with PPB are lower than generally acknowledged, except for those patients treated with PPB as monotherapy. Patients who received sildenafil exhibited improved potency in a majority of cases

  8. Local Progression among Men with Conservatively Treated Localized Prostate Cancer: Results from the Transatlantic Prostate Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, James A.; Kattan, Michael W.; Fearn, Paul; Fisher, Gabrielle; Berney, Daniel M.; Oliver, Tim; Foster, Christopher S.; Møller, Henrik; Reuter, Victor; Cuzick, Jack; Scardino, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Men with clinically detected localized prostate cancer treated without curative intent are at risk of complications from local tumor growth. We investigated rates of local progression and need for local therapy among such men. Methods Men diagnosed with prostate cancer during 1990–1996 were identified from cancer registries throughout the United Kingdom. Inclusion criteria were age ≤76 yr at diagnosis, PSA level ≤100 ng/ml, and, within 6 mo after diagnosis, no radiation therapy, radical prostatectomy, evidence of metastatic disease, or death. Local progression was defined as increase in clinical stage from T1/2 to T3/T4 disease, T3 to T4 disease, and/or need for transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) to relieve symptoms >6 mo after cancer diagnosis. Results The study included 2333 men with median follow-up of 85 mo (range: 6–174). Diagnosis was by TURP in 1255 men (54%), needle biopsy in 1039 (45%), and unspecified in 39 (2%). Only 29% were treated with hormonal therapy within 6 mo of diagnosis. Local progression occurred in 335 men, including 212 undergoing TURP. Factors most predictive of local progression on multivariable analysis were PSA at diagnosis and Gleason score of the diagnostic tissue (detrimental), and early hormonal therapy (protective). We present a nomogram that predicts the likelihood of local progression within 120 mo after diagnosis. Conclusions Men with clinically detected localized prostate cancer managed without curative intent have an approximately 15% risk for local progression within 10 yr of diagnosis. Among those with progression, the need for treatment is common, even among men diagnosed by TURP. When counseling men who are candidates for management without curative intent, the likelihood of symptoms from local progression must be considered. PMID:17544572

  9. Focal irreversible electroporation as primary treatment for localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, Willemien; Scheltema, Matthijs J.; Siriwardana, Amila R.; Kalsbeek, Anton M. F.; Thompson, James E.; Ting, Francis; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Shnier, Ron; Delprado, Warick; Stricker, Phillip D.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the safety, quality of life (QoL) and short-term oncological outcomes of primary focal IRE for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. To identify potential risk factors for oncological failure. Patients that met both the consensus guidelines on patient criteria and selection

  10. Molecular biomarkers to guide precision medicine in localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Minke; Mehra, Niven; Sedelaar, Michiel; Gerritsen, Winald; Schalken, Jack A

    2017-08-01

    Major advances through tumor profiling technologies, that include next-generation sequencing, epigenetic, proteomic and transcriptomic methods, have been made in primary prostate cancer, providing novel biomarkers that may guide precision medicine in the near future. Areas covered: The authors provided an overview of novel molecular biomarkers in tissue, blood and urine that may be used as clinical tools to assess prognosis, improve selection criteria for active surveillance programs, and detect disease relapse early in localized prostate cancer. Expert commentary: Active surveillance (AS) in localized prostate cancer is an accepted strategy in patients with very low-risk prostate cancer. Many more patients may benefit from watchful waiting, and include patients of higher clinical stage and grade, however selection criteria have to be optimized and early recognition of transformation from localized to lethal disease has to be improved by addition of molecular biomarkers. The role of non-invasive biomarkers is challenging the need for repeat biopsies, commonly performed at 1 and 4 years in men under AS programs.

  11. Quality Indicators for Global Benchmarking of Localized Prostate Cancer Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampurno, Fanny; Zheng, Jia; Di Stefano, Lydia; Millar, Jeremy L; Foster, Claire; Fuedea, Ferran; Higano, Celestia; Hulan, Hartwig; Mark, Stephen; Moore, Caroline; Richardson, Alison; Sullivan, Frank; Wenger, Neil S; Wittmann, Daniela; Evans, Sue

    2018-03-01

    We sought to develop a core set of clinical indicators to enable international benchmarking of localized prostate cancer management using data available in the TrueNTH (True North) Global Registry. An international expert panel completed an online survey and participated in a face to face meeting. Participants included 3 urologists, 3 radiation oncologists, 2 psychologists, 1 medical oncologist, 1 nurse and 1 epidemiologist with prostate cancer expertise from a total of 7 countries. Current guidelines on prostate cancer treatment and potential quality indicators were identified from a literature review. These potential indicators were refined and developed through a modified Delphi process during which each panelist independently and repeatedly rated each indicator based on importance (satisfying the indicator demonstrated a provision of high quality care) and feasibility (the likelihood that data used to construct the indicator could be collected at a population level). The main outcome measure was items with panel agreement indicted by a disagreement index less 1, median importance 8.5 or greater and median feasibility 9 or greater. The expert panel endorsed 33 indicators. Seven of these 33 prostate cancer quality indicators assessed care relating to diagnosis, 7 assessed primary treatment, 1 assessed salvage treatment and 18 assessed health outcomes. We developed a set of quality indicators to measure prostate cancer care using numerous international evidence-based clinical guidelines. These indicators will be pilot tested in the TrueNTH Global Registry. Reports comparing indicator performance will subsequently be distributed to groups at participating sites with the purpose of improving the consistency and quality of prostate cancer management on a global basis. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychological distress in Japanese men with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiki, Shunichi; Saito, Seiichi; Arai, Yoichi; Tochigi, Tatsuo; Numata, Isao; Ioritani, Naomasa

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate: the level of psychological distress; and the relationships between the level of psychological distress and general or disease-specific HRQOL of Japanese men with localized prostate cancer following surgery or radiotherapy. The study was a retrospective cross-sectional survey of 253 men with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy and 87 with external beam radiotherapy were collected. The measures used four questionnaires including: the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Health Survey; The University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index; International Prostate Symptom Score; and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Mean anxiety and depression scores were 4.0 and 4.7, respectively (standard deviation, 3.3 and 3.7). On the anxiety section of HADS, 291 patients (85%) scored 7 points or less; and on the depression scale, 183 (54%) patients scored 4 points or less. Those 'cases' (HADS total, >10) with psychological distress scored lower in all domains of the general and disease related health-related quality of life (HRQOL) than the 'non-cases' (HADS total, ≤10) except for sexual domains. Logistic regression modeling suggested that the men who tended to experience moderate to high distress suffered from worse urinary and bowel symptoms. Most patients who underwent radical prostatectomy or external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer experienced low levels of psychological distress after treatment. However, men who were experiencing urinary and bowel symptoms tended to suffer from moderate to higher distress compared with men reporting no or fewer such symptoms. (author)

  13. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoecht, Stefan [Xcare Gruppe, Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Saarlouis (Germany); Aebersold, Daniel M. [University of Bern, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radio-Onkologie, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Albrecht, Clemens [Universitaetsklinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Strahlentherapie, Klinikum Nuernberg Nord, Nuremberg (Germany); Boehmer, Dirk [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Berlin (Germany); Flentje, Michael [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany); Ganswindt, Ute [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Munich (Germany); Hoelscher, Tobias [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Dresden (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix [Universitaetsklinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Landeskrankenhaus, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Zips, Daniel [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Wiegel, Thomas [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm, Abteilung Strahlentherapie, Ulm (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    This article gives an overview on the current status of hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer with a special focus on the applicability in routine use. Based on a recently published systematic review the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) expert panel added additional information that has become available since then and assessed the validity of the information on outcome parameters especially with respect to long-term toxicity and long-term disease control. Several large-scale trials on moderate hypofractionation with single doses from 2.4-3.4 Gy have recently finished recruiting or have published first results suggestive of equivalent outcomes although there might be a trend for increased short-term and possibly even long-term toxicity. Large phase 3 trials on extreme hypofractionation with single doses above 4.0 Gy are lacking and only very few prospective trials have follow-up periods covering more than just 2-3 years. Until the results on long-term follow-up of several well-designed phase 3 trials become available, moderate hypofractionation should not be used in routine practice without special precautions and without adherence to the highest quality standards and evidence-based dose fractionation regimens. Extreme hypofractionation should be restricted to prospective clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Diese Uebersichtsarbeit soll den aktuellen Status der hypofraktionierten Radiotherapie des Prostatakarzinoms mit dem Fokus auf die Anwendung in der Routinetherapie darstellen. Basierend auf einem kuerzlich erschienen systematischen Review zur Hypofraktionierung sind durch das DEGRO Expertengremium zusaetzliche, in der Zwischenzeit verfuegbar gewordene Informationen mit beruecksichtigt worden. Die Validitaet der Aussagen zu Ergebnissen wurde speziell im Hinblick auf die Langzeittoxizitaet und -erkrankungskontrolle bewertet. Mehrere grosse Phase-3-Studien zur moderaten Hypofraktionierung mit Dosen von 2,4-3,4 Gy pro Fraktion

  14. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensuu, T.K.; Blomqvist, C.P.; Kajanti, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma is one of the leading causes of male cancer deaths. However, the routine diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have not yet been established. Although the outcome of surgical and radiotherapeutical approaches has frequently been reported to be comparable, the profile of side effects is different. This could offer the basis for selecting the treatment of choice in individual cases. During the last decade the radiotherapeutical technique has markedly improved, in part due to the achievements in the field of computer assisted tomography planning and conformal technique; the outcome of side-effects has decreased with concurrent increase in the rate of local control. The prescribing, recording and reporting of irradiation have also recently developed, as well as the staging of the disease. Therefore we consider it timely to review progress in this subject and to emphasize the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer. (orig.)

  15. Salvage cryotherapy for local recurrence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvorning Ternov, Klara; Krag Jakobsen, Ane; Bratt, Ola; Ahlgren, Göran

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to present the outcome of patients treated with salvage cryotherapy after radiotherapy for prostate cancer at one institution. Consecutive patients treated between 2007 and 2013 with transperineal cryotherapy for biopsy-verified local recurrence after radiotherapy were investigated. An external reviewer retrieved outcome data retrospectively from medical records. Complications were graded according to the Clavien classification. One patient with less than 1 year of follow-up was excluded from the analysis of side-effects. Thirty patients were included, 29 of whom had a follow-up of at least 1 year. The median follow-up was 2.7 years (range 1-6.5 years). Eleven of the 23 patients without hormonal treatment at the time of cryotherapy reached a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir of less than 0.5 ng/ml. At the end of follow-up five of these 23 patients still had a PSA below 0.5 ng/ml and 10 were free from recurrence according to the Phoenix definition. Clinical recurrence (verified with imaging or biopsies) was detected in 13 patients, six of which were local. One patient died from prostate cancer. Eleven patients had urinary incontinence grade 1-2 and three had grade 3-4, seven had pelvic pain, three had severe but transitory tissue sloughing, three developed a urethral stricture or had prolonged urinary retention, and one developed a urinary fistula 4.5 years after cryotherapy. Salvage cryotherapy should be considered as an alternative to hormonal treatment and surgery for local recurrence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The results compare well to those reported from centres with longer experience.

  16. Radical prostatectomy in clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    ) is regarded as primary therapy by others. This study examined the outcome for high-risk localized PCa patients treated with RP. Material and methods. Of 1300 patients who underwent RP, 231 were identified as high-risk. Patients were followed for biochemical recurrence (BCR) (defined as prostate-specific......Abstract Objective. The optimal therapeutic strategy for high-risk localized prostate cancer (PCa) is controversial. Supported by randomized trials, the combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and endocrine therapy (ET) is advocated by many, while radical prostatectomy (RP...... antigen ≥ 0.2 ng/ml), metastatic disease and survival. Excluding node-positive patients, none of the patients received adjuvant therapy before BCR was confirmed. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard models. Results. Median follow-up was 4.4 years...

  17. The value of dynamic contrast enhanced power Doppler ultrasound imaging in the localization of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossen, Tjerk E. B.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A.; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to define enhancement characteristics that correlate to the presence of prostate cancer (PCa) and to evaluate the value of these characteristics in the localization of prostate cancer. METHODS: 29 patients with proven prostate malignancy, scheduled for

  18. Active surveillance for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Brasso, Klaus; Klotz, Laurence H

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection for the AS stra......Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection...

  19. Role of brachytherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to application of brachytherapy for treating the localized prostate cancer (PC. Statistics for incidence and detectability of this pathology and its dynamics for recent years are represented. Brief analysis of other methods which are conveniently used for treatment of PC, such as radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy, was performed. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods have been discussed. Brief history about the development of brachytherapy from first experience to wide-spread use in clinical practice is reported. The detailed review of series of large trials from Russia and other countries for efficiency and safety of brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer for recent 15 years is also represented. Two types of brachytherapy in current clinical oncology i.e. low-dose technique with permanent implantation of microsources and high-dose temporary isotope implantation, specifics of its application in different groups of patients have been described. The procedure of brachytherapy and its three main steps i.e. planning, implantation and control assessment after implantation have been characterized in details. The conclusion about benefits of using of brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer as minimally invasive and efficient method was made. 

  20. Estimating Preferences for Treatments in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ávila, Mónica; Becerra, Virginia; Guedea, Ferran; Suárez, José Francisco; Fernandez, Pablo; Macías, Víctor; Mariño, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Studies of patients' preferences for localized prostate cancer treatments have assessed radical prostatectomy and external radiation therapy, but none of them has evaluated brachytherapy. The aim of our study was to assess the preferences and willingness to pay of patients with localized prostate cancer who had been treated with radical prostatectomy, external radiation therapy, or brachytherapy, and their related urinary, sexual, and bowel side effects. Methods and Materials: This was an observational, prospective cohort study with follow-up until 5 years after treatment. A total of 704 patients with low or intermediate risk localized prostate cancer were consecutively recruited from 2003 to 2005. The estimation of preferences was conducted using time trade-off, standard gamble, and willingness-to-pay methods. Side effects were measured with the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC), a prostate cancer-specific questionnaire. Tobit models were constructed to assess the impact of treatment and side effects on patients' preferences. Propensity score was applied to adjust for treatment selection bias. Results: Of the 580 patients reporting preferences, 165 were treated with radical prostatectomy, 152 with external radiation therapy, and 263 with brachytherapy. Both time trade-off and standard gamble results indicated that the preferences of patients treated with brachytherapy were 0.06 utilities higher than those treated with radical prostatectomy (P=.01). Similarly, willingness-to-pay responses showed a difference of €57/month (P=.004) between these 2 treatments. Severe urinary incontinence presented an independent impact on the preferences elicited (P<.05), whereas no significant differences were found by bowel and sexual side effects. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that urinary incontinence is the side effect with the highest impact on preferences and that brachytherapy and external radiation therapy are more valued than radical

  1. Estimating Preferences for Treatments in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ávila, Mónica [Health Services Research Unit, IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Becerra, Virginia [Health Services Research Unit, IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona (Spain); Guedea, Ferran [Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Institut Català d' Oncologia, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Suárez, José Francisco [Servicio de Urología, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Fernandez, Pablo [Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Instituto Oncológico de Guipúzcoa, San Sebastián (Spain); Macías, Víctor [Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Institut Oncologic del Valles-Hospital General de Catalunya, Sant Cugat del Vallès (Spain); Mariño, Alfonso [Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Centro Oncológico de Galicia, A Coruña (Spain); and others

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Studies of patients' preferences for localized prostate cancer treatments have assessed radical prostatectomy and external radiation therapy, but none of them has evaluated brachytherapy. The aim of our study was to assess the preferences and willingness to pay of patients with localized prostate cancer who had been treated with radical prostatectomy, external radiation therapy, or brachytherapy, and their related urinary, sexual, and bowel side effects. Methods and Materials: This was an observational, prospective cohort study with follow-up until 5 years after treatment. A total of 704 patients with low or intermediate risk localized prostate cancer were consecutively recruited from 2003 to 2005. The estimation of preferences was conducted using time trade-off, standard gamble, and willingness-to-pay methods. Side effects were measured with the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC), a prostate cancer-specific questionnaire. Tobit models were constructed to assess the impact of treatment and side effects on patients' preferences. Propensity score was applied to adjust for treatment selection bias. Results: Of the 580 patients reporting preferences, 165 were treated with radical prostatectomy, 152 with external radiation therapy, and 263 with brachytherapy. Both time trade-off and standard gamble results indicated that the preferences of patients treated with brachytherapy were 0.06 utilities higher than those treated with radical prostatectomy (P=.01). Similarly, willingness-to-pay responses showed a difference of €57/month (P=.004) between these 2 treatments. Severe urinary incontinence presented an independent impact on the preferences elicited (P<.05), whereas no significant differences were found by bowel and sexual side effects. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that urinary incontinence is the side effect with the highest impact on preferences and that brachytherapy and external radiation therapy are more valued than radical

  2. Ejaculatory Function After Permanent 125I Prostate Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyghe, Eric; Delannes, Martine; Wagner, Fabien M.; Delaunay, Boris; Nohra, Joe; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Shut-Yee, J. Yeung; Plante, Pierre; Soulie, Michel; Thonneau, Patrick; Bachaud, Jean Marc

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Ejaculatory function is an underreported aspect of male sexuality in men treated for prostate cancer. We conducted the first detailed analysis of ejaculatory function in patients treated with permanent 125 I prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Of 270 sexually active men with localized prostate cancer treated with permanent 125 I prostate brachytherapy, 241 (89%), with a mean age of 65 years (range, 43-80), responded to a mailed questionnaire derived from the Male Sexual Health Questionnaire regarding ejaculatory function. Five aspects of ejaculatory function were examined: frequency, volume, dry ejaculation, pleasure, and pain. Results: Of the 241 sexually active men, 81.3% had conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy; however, the number of patients with rare/absent ejaculatory function was double the pretreatment number (p < .0001). The latter finding was correlated with age (p < .001) and the preimplant International Index of Erectile Function score (p < .001). However, 84.9% of patients with maintained ejaculatory function after implantation reported a reduced volume of ejaculate compared with 26.9% before (p < .001), with dry ejaculation accounting for 18.7% of these cases. After treatment, 30.3% of the patients experienced painful ejaculation compared with 12.9% before (p = .0001), and this was associated with a greater number of implanted needles (p = .021) and the existence of painful ejaculation before implantation (p < .0001). After implantation, 10% of patients who continued to be sexually active experienced no orgasm compared with only 1% before treatment. in addition, more patients experienced late/difficult or weak orgasms (p = .001). Conclusion: Most men treated with brachytherapy have conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy. However, most of these men experience a reduction in volume and a deterioration in orgasm.

  3. Treatment of localized prostate cancer with brachytherapy: six years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Pablo; Dourado, Leandro; Giudice, Carlos; Villamil, Wenceslao; Palacios, Victor; Sardi, Mabel; Damia, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    The usage of ultrasound scan to perform prostate biopsy punctures, the new radiation therapies and the more accurate selection of patients has allowed brachytherapy to play an important role in the treatment of the localized pathology. The objective of this paper is to review the results obtained when treating the localized prostate cancer by using brachytherapy with mud 125. Materials and methods: Between December 1999 and July 2006, 100 prostate cancer patients were treated at the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, using brachytherapy with mud 125. One of the patients was treated with a combined therapy (brachytherapy + external radiotherapy). For that reason, the patient was not taken into consideration for this paper. The average age was 65.95 (52-79). The tumoral stages were T1c in 81% of the patients and T2a in 19% of them. The PSA was always below 15 ng/ml, with an average of 8.92 ng/ml; inferior to 10 ng/ml in 72 patients and between 10 and 15 ng/m ml in 28 of them. The average prostate volume was 34.68 c.c. (18.70 c.c.-58.00 c.c.). The combined Gleason score was below 6 (except for three patients with Gleason 7 who had a PSA below 10, stage T1c). The dose used was 16,000 cGy as recommended by the TG43. The energy charge of each seed was between 0.28 and 0.40 mci. Thirty days later, a prostate axial computer tomography was carried out every 3 mm. with a scanning set every 5 mm. to perform a dosimetric control of the implant. Results: The average age was 65.95 (52-79). The control computer tomography showed an adequate dosimetric coverage for the entire prostate volume, with a maximum urethral dose not above 400 Gy and a maximum rectal dose below 100 Gy. The PSA of all patients decreased to a normal level 6 months after the treatment started. The average follow-up of the 71 patients able to be tested from an oncological perspective lasted 31.15 months, with a minimum of 18 and a maximum of 72 months. Currently, seven patients of those tested (9.86%) manifest

  4. Pretreatment tables predicting pathologic stage of locally advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joniau, Steven; Spahn, Martin; Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Tombal, Bertrand; Tosco, Lorenzo; Marchioro, Giansilvio; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Walz, Jochen; Kneitz, Burkhard; Bader, Pia; Frohneberg, Detlef; Tizzani, Alessandro; Graefen, Markus; van Cangh, Paul; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Montorsi, Francesco; van Poppel, Hein; Gontero, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Pretreatment tables for the prediction of pathologic stage have been published and validated for localized prostate cancer (PCa). No such tables are available for locally advanced (cT3a) PCa. To construct tables predicting pathologic outcome after radical prostatectomy (RP) for patients with cT3a PCa with the aim to help guide treatment decisions in clinical practice. This was a multicenter retrospective cohort study including 759 consecutive patients with cT3a PCa treated with RP between 1987 and 2010. Retropubic RP and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients were divided into pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and biopsy Gleason score (GS) subgroups. These parameters were used to construct tables predicting pathologic outcome and the presence of positive lymph nodes (LNs) after RP for cT3a PCa using ordinal logistic regression. In the model predicting pathologic outcome, the main effects of biopsy GS and pretreatment PSA were significant. A higher GS and/or higher PSA level was associated with a more unfavorable pathologic outcome. The validation procedure, using a repeated split-sample method, showed good predictive ability. Regression analysis also showed an increasing probability of positive LNs with increasing PSA levels and/or higher GS. Limitations of the study are the retrospective design and the long study period. These novel tables predict pathologic stage after RP for patients with cT3a PCa based on pretreatment PSA level and biopsy GS. They can be used to guide decision making in men with locally advanced PCa. Our study might provide physicians with a useful tool to predict pathologic stage in locally advanced prostate cancer that might help select patients who may need multimodal treatment. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer (BRCA1 or BRCA2) or a very strong family history of breast cancer, your risk of prostate cancer may be higher. Obesity. Obese men diagnosed with prostate cancer may be more likely ...

  6. Determination of Six Transmembrane Protein of Prostate 2 Gene Expression and Intracellular Localization in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora İrer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to determine the relationship between the RNA and protein expression profile of six transmembrane protein of prostate 2 (STAMP2 gene and androgen and the intracellular localization of STAMP2. Materials and Methods: RNA and protein were obtained from androgen treated lymph node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP cells, untreated LNCaP cells, DU145 cells with no androgen receptor, and STAMP2 transfected COS-7 cells. The expression profile of STAMP2 gene and the effect of androgenes on the expression was shown in RNA and protein levels by using Northern and Western blotting methods. In addition, intracellular localization of the naturally synthesized STAMP2 protein and the transfected STAMP2 protein in COS-7 cells after androgen administration in both LNCaP cells was determined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: We found that the RNA and protein expression of STAMP2 gene in LNCaP cells are regulated by androgenes, the power of expression is increased with the duration of androgen treatment and there is no STAMP2 expression in DU145 cells which has no androgen receptor. As a result of the immunofluorescence microscopy study we observed that STAMP2 protein was localized at golgi complex and cell membrane. Conclusion: In conclusion, we have demonstrated that STAMP2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the prostate cancer and in the androgen-dependent androgen-independent staging of prostate cancer. In addition, STAMP2 protein, which is localized in the intracellular golgi complex and cell membrane, may be a new target molecule for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Imaging of prostate cancer local recurrences: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis; Vitry, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Because prostate cancer local recurrences can be efficiently treated by salvage therapies, it becomes critical to detect them early. The first alert is the rise of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level after the post-treatment nadir, which can correspond to a distant recurrence, a local recurrence or both. This so-called biochemical failure (BF) is defined as PSA level >0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy (RP) and PSA level > nadir+2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. There is no consensual definition of BF after cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation or brachytherapy. Local recurrences after RP are treated by radiotherapy, those after radiotherapy by RP, cryotherapy, brachytherapy or HIFU ablation. Recurrences after cryotherapy or HIFU ablation can be treated by a second session or radiotherapy. Recurrences after brachytherapy are difficult to treat. In patients with BF, MRI can detect local recurrences, whatever the initial treatment was. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI seems particularly accurate. The role of spectroscopy remains controversial. Ultrasound-based techniques are less accurate, but this may change with the advent of ultrasonic contrast media. These recent advances in imaging may improve the outcome of salvage therapies (by improving patient selection and treatment targeting) and should open the way to focal salvage treatments in the near future. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of prostate cancer local recurrences: why and how?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis [Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Medecine Lyon Nord (France); Service d' Imagerie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); INSERM U 556, Lyon (France); Vitry, Thierry [Service d' Imagerie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France)

    2010-05-15

    Because prostate cancer local recurrences can be efficiently treated by salvage therapies, it becomes critical to detect them early. The first alert is the rise of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level after the post-treatment nadir, which can correspond to a distant recurrence, a local recurrence or both. This so-called biochemical failure (BF) is defined as PSA level >0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy (RP) and PSA level > nadir+2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. There is no consensual definition of BF after cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation or brachytherapy. Local recurrences after RP are treated by radiotherapy, those after radiotherapy by RP, cryotherapy, brachytherapy or HIFU ablation. Recurrences after cryotherapy or HIFU ablation can be treated by a second session or radiotherapy. Recurrences after brachytherapy are difficult to treat. In patients with BF, MRI can detect local recurrences, whatever the initial treatment was. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI seems particularly accurate. The role of spectroscopy remains controversial. Ultrasound-based techniques are less accurate, but this may change with the advent of ultrasonic contrast media. These recent advances in imaging may improve the outcome of salvage therapies (by improving patient selection and treatment targeting) and should open the way to focal salvage treatments in the near future. (orig.)

  9. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Friis, S; Juel, K

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  10. Economic evaluation of diagnostic localization following biochemical prostate cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barocas, Daniel A; Bensink, Mark E; Berry, Kristin; Musa, Zahra; Bodnar, Carolyn; Dann, Robert; Ramsey, Scott D

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess potential cost-effectiveness of using a prostate cancer specific functional imaging technology capable of identifying residual localized disease versus small volume metastatic disease for asymptomatic men with low but detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA) elevation following radical prostatectomy. Markov modeling was used to estimate the incremental impact on healthcare system costs (2012 USD) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of two alternative strategies: (i) using the new diagnostic to guide therapy versus (ii) current usual care-using a combination of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scan to guide therapy. Costs were based on estimates from literature and Medicare reimbursement. Prostate cancer progression, survival, utilities, and background risk of all-cause mortality were obtained from literature. Base-case diagnostic sensitivity (75 percent), specificity (90 percent), and cost (USD 2,500) were provided by our industry partner GE Healthcare. The new diagnostic strategy provided an average gain of 1.83 (95 percent uncertainty interval [UI]: 1.24-2.64) QALYs with added costs of USD 15,595 (95 percent UI: USD -6,330-44,402) over 35 years. The resulting incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 8,516/QALY (95 percent UI: USD -2,947-22,372). RESULTS were most influenced by the utility discounting rate and test performance characteristics; however, the new diagnostic provided clinical benefits over a wide range of sensitivity and specificity. This analysis suggests a diagnostic technology capable of identifying whether men with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy have localized versus metastatic disease would be a cost-effective alternative to current standard work-up. The results support additional investment in development and validation of such a diagnostic.

  11. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase ≥25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease ≥25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  12. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taira, Al V. [Western Radiation Oncology, Mountain View, CA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  13. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R.; Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results

  14. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  15. Clinical utility of the percentage of positive prostate biopsies in predicting prostate cancer-specific and overall survival after radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Keshaviah, Aparna; Manola, Judith; Cote, Kerri; Loffredo, Marian; Iskrzytzky, Olga; Renshaw, Andrew A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the percentage of positive prostate biopsies provides clinically relevant information to a previously established risk stratification system with respect to the end points of prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) and overall survival after radiotherapy for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A Cox regression multivariable analysis was used to evaluate the ability of the percentage of positive prostate biopsies to predict PCSS and overall survival for 381 men who underwent radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer during the prostate-specific antigen era. Results: At a median follow-up of 4.3 years (range 0.8-13.3), the presence of ≤50% positive biopsies vs. >50% positive biopsies provided a clinically relevant stratification of the 7-year estimates of PCSS (100% vs. 57%, p=0.004) in intermediate-risk patients. Moreover, all patients could be stratified into a minimal or high-risk cohort on the basis of the 10-year estimates of PCSS (100% vs. 55%, p 50%] intermediate-risk + high-risk) cohort for prostate cancer-specific death after conventional dose radiotherapy. Additional follow-up and independent validation are needed to confirm these findings

  16. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  17. PSA bounce phenomenon after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Masashi; Lederer, J.L.; Fukagai, Takashi; Yoshida, Hideki; Shimada, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    We described the temporarily increase phenomenon in prostate-specific antigen level (PSA bounce) after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) for localized prostate cancer. From December 1998 to May 2003, 500 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with TIPPB using iodine-125 or palladium-103. We examined 200 patients who have more than 2-year PSA follow-up. Median follow-up length was 1,069 days (range, 712-1,411 days). No patient received neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormone therapy. PSA determinations were performed every 3 months for the first 2 years after procedure, and every 6 months hereafter. PSA bounce was defined as an increase of 0.1 ng/ml or greater above the preceding PSA level after implant followed by a subsequent decrease below that level. The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus panel criteria 1996 were used to define biochemical failure. PSA bounce was observed in 40% (80/200) of the cases receiving TIPPB. The median time to PSA bounce was 13 months from the day of implant. The median magnitude of the PSA bounce was 0.3 ng/ml from the pre-bounce level. Twelve cases demonstrated biochemical failure according to the ASTRO consensus guidelines of three consecutive rises in PSA. Ten of these subsequently showed a drop in PSA, consistent with biologic control of their disease. Two cases remain classified as apparent biochemical failures. A transient rise in the PSA following TIPPB, the so-called ''bounce'' is a common occurrence. The apparent PSA control of ten of twelve cases failing by the ASTRO criteria raises some concern. Further observation will be necessary to determine ways to discriminate these from true disease progression. (author)

  18. Sexual dysfunction after curietherapy and external radiotherapy of the prostate for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyghe, E.; Bachaud, J.-M.; Achard, J.-L.; Bossi, A.; Droupy, S.

    2009-01-01

    Knowing the importance of sexuality items in the choice by the patient of the modality of treatment of localized prostate cancer, we aimed at reviewing and updating the effects of prostate radiotherapy and brachytherapy on sexual functions. A PubMed search was done using the keywords: prostate cancer, erectile dysfunction, radiotherapy, brachytherapy, ejaculation and orgasm. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual troubles occur progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. Even though the pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy result in erectile dysfunction have not yet been fully clarified, arterial damage and exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation seem to be two main causes of erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may also be important in the etiology of erectile dysfunction. Another important factor following radiotherapy is the treatment modality. Not many data about ejaculation and orgasm after radiation treatments have been published yet. Recent data show that most of the population treated by brachytherapy conserves ejaculation and orgasm after treatment, even if a majority describe reduction of volume and deterioration of orgasm. Patients need to be correctly informed on the possible sequela of radiotherapy and brachytherapy on their sexual well-being while planning their treatment. Patients should also be informed about the possible treatment modalities for erectile dysfunction. (authors)

  19. Orgasm after prostate curietherapy with iodine 125 permanent implants for localized cancer of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaunay, B.; Plante, P.; Huyghe, E.; Delannes, M.; Bachaud, J.-M.; Salloum, A.; Thoulouzan, M.; Soulie, M.; Delavierre, D.; Wagner, F.; Jonca, F.

    2011-01-01

    Orgasm is a domain of male sexuality that remains underreported in literature. Our aim was to realize the first detailed analysis of orgasm in patients treated by 125 I permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. In a series of 270 sexually active men treated by prostate brachytherapy ( 125 I permanent implantation), 241 (89%), mean age of 65 (43 80), participated in a mailed survey about sexual function after a mean time of 36 months (9 70). Erectile and ejaculatory functions and orgasm were explored using a mailed questionnaire. Two questions focused on orgasm. The first was about quality of orgasm (fast/intense/late, difficult/weak/absent) and the second about the presence of painful orgasm and its frequency (always/sometimes/often). After prostate brachytherapy, 81.3% of sexually active men conserved ejaculation and 90% orgasm. There was a significant deterioration of the quality of orgasm (P ≡ 0.0001). More than 50% of the patients had an altered orgasm (weak, difficult, absent) after brachytherapy, vs 16% before implantation (P ≡ 0.001). Men with a diminished ejaculation volume often had a weak/difficult orgasm (P ≡ 0.007). Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy did not seem to impact the quality of orgasm or the frequency of painful ejaculation. Patients who had an IIEF-5 score higher than 12 had frequently intense orgasm (26.7% vs 2.7%; P < 0.001) after brachytherapy. Sixty patients (30.3%) experienced often/sometimes painful ejaculation 12.9% (n ≡ 31) before implantation (P ≡ 0.0001). Most of the patients treated by prostate brachytherapy conserved orgasm after treatment. However, most of the patients described a deterioration of the quality of orgasm. (authors)

  20. Maximum tumor diameter is not an independent prognostic factor in high-risk localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van I.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Kok, D.E.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that maximum tumor diameter (MTD) is a predictor of recurrence in prostate cancer (PC). This study investigates the prognostic value of MTD for biochemical recurrence (BCR) in patients with PC, after radical prostatectomy (RP), with emphasis on high-risk localized prostate

  1. Body Mass Index and Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure Following Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efstathiou, Jason A.; Skowronski, Rafi Y.; Coen, John J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We investigated whether BMI is associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analyses were conducted on 374 patients undergoing brachytherapy for stage T1c-T2cNXM0 prostate cancer from 1996-2001. Forty-nine patients (13%) received supplemental EBRT and 131 (35%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Height and weight data were available for 353 (94%). Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and PSA failure (nadir + 2 ng/ml definition). Covariates included age, race, preimplantation PSA, Gleason score, T category, percent of prescription dose to 90% of the prostate, use of supplemental EBRT, and ADT. Results: Median age, PSA, and BMI were 66 years (range, 42-80 years), 5.7 ng/ml (range, 0.4-22.6 ng/ml), and 27.1 kg/m 2 (range, 18.2-53.6 kg/m 2 ), respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.0 years (range, 3.0-10.2 years), there were 76 PSA recurrences. The BMI was not associated with PSA failure. Six-year PSA failure rates were 30.2% for men with BMI less than 25 kg/m 2 , 19.5% for BMI of 25 or greater to less than 30 kg/m 2 , and 14.4% for BMI of 30 kg/m 2 or greater (p = 0.19). Results were similar when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using alternative definitions of PSA failure, and excluding patients treated with EBRT and/or ADT. In multivariate analyses, only baseline PSA was significantly associated with shorter time to PSA failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20; p 0.0006). Conclusions: Unlike after surgery or EBRT, BMI is not associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that brachytherapy may be a preferred treatment strategy in obese

  2. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Anna Lia; Gui, Benedetta; D’Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo; Clementi, Valeria; Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mantini, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio 1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value 2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  3. Bicalutamide as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to standard care of patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer: first analysis of the early prostate cancer program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, William A; Wirth, Manfred P; McLeod, David G

    2002-01-01

    We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer.......We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer....

  4. Treatment Decision Regret Among Long-Term Survivors of Localized Prostate Cancer: Results From the Prostate Cancer Outcomes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Richard M; Lo, Mary; Clark, Jack A; Albertsen, Peter C; Barry, Michael J; Goodman, Michael; Penson, David F; Stanford, Janet L; Stroup, Antoinette M; Hamilton, Ann S

    2017-07-10

    Purpose To determine the demographic, clinical, decision-making, and quality-of-life factors that are associated with treatment decision regret among long-term survivors of localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods We evaluated men who were age ≤ 75 years when diagnosed with localized prostate cancer between October 1994 and October 1995 in one of six SEER tumor registries and who completed a 15-year follow-up survey. The survey obtained demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical data and measured treatment decision regret, informed decision making, general- and disease-specific quality of life, health worry, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concern, and outlook on life. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify factors associated with regret. Results We surveyed 934 participants, 69.3% of known survivors. Among the cohort, 59.1% had low-risk tumor characteristics (PSA decision regret: 8.2% of those whose disease was managed conservatively, 15.0% of those who received surgery, and 16.6% of those who underwent radiotherapy. Factors associated with regret on multivariable analysis included reporting moderate or big sexual function bother (reported by 39.0%; OR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.51 to 5.0), moderate or big bowel function bother (reported by 7.7%; OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.04 to 5.15), and PSA concern (mean score 52.8; OR, 1.01 per point change; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.02). Increasing age at diagnosis and report of having made an informed treatment decision were inversely associated with regret. Conclusion Regret was a relatively infrequently reported outcome among long-term survivors of localized prostate cancer; however, our results suggest that better informing men about treatment options, in particular, conservative treatment, might help mitigate long-term regret. These findings are timely for men with low-risk cancers who are being encouraged to consider active surveillance.

  5. Prediction of extraprostatic extension by prostate specific antigen velocity, endorectal MRI, and biopsy Gleason score in clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Koshiro; Nakashima, Jun; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Kikuchi, Eiji; Miyajima, Akira; Nakagawa, Ken; Ohigashi, Takashi; Oya, Mototsugu; Murai, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical value of prostate specific antigen velocity (PSAV) in predicting the extraprostatic extension of clinically localized prostate cancer. One hundred and three patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer were included in the analysis. The correlation between preoperative parameters, including PSA-based parameters, clinical stage, and histological biopsy findings, and the pathological findings were analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify a significant set of independent predictors for the local extent of the disease. Sixty-four (60.2%) patients had organ confined prostate cancer and 39 (39.8%) patients had extraprostatic cancer. The biopsy Gleason score, PSA, PSA density, PSA density of the transition zone, and PSAV were significantly higher in the patients with extraprostatic cancer than in those with organ confined cancer. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the biopsy Gleason score, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging findings, and PSAV were significant predictors of extraprostatic cancer (P<0.01). Probability curves for extraprostatic cancer were generated using these three preoperative parameters. The combination of PSAV, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging findings, and biopsy Gleason score can provide additional information for selecting appropriate candidates for radical prostatectomy. (author)

  6. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Prostate Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Prostate ...

  7. Toxicity Profile With a Large Prostate Volume After External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Fischedick, Karin; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Nussen, Sandra; Eble, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of prostate volume on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) before and at different intervals after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A group of 204 patients was surveyed prospectively before (Time A), at the last day (Time B), 2 months after (Time C), and 16 months (median) after (Time D) radiotherapy, with a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). The group was divided into subgroups with a small (11-43 cm 3 ) and a large (44-151 cm 3 ) prostate volume. Results: Patients with large prostates presented with lower urinary bother scores (median 79 vs. 89; p = 0.01) before treatment. Urinary function/bother scores for patients with large prostates decreased significantly compared to patients with small prostates due to irritative/obstructive symptoms only at Time B (pain with urination more than once daily in 48% vs. 18%; p 3 vs. 47 cm 3 ; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with a large prostate volume have a great risk of irritative/obstructive symptoms (particularly dysuria) in the acute radiotherapy phase. These symptoms recover rapidly and do not influence long-term HRQOL

  8. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spera, G.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of prostate cancer. The techniques used are: transrectal ultrasound, laparascopy, bone scan, chest x-ray, radiography, chemoterapy and radiotherapy

  9. Reexamining the role of prostate specific antigen density in predicting outcome for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingenito, Anthony C.; Ennis, Ronald D.; Hsu, I.-C.; Begg, Melissa; Benson, Mitchell C.; Schiff, Peter B.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective To evaluate the prognostic significance of prostate specific antigen density (PSAD) in clinically localized prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy and to compare with other prognostic factors. Materials and Methods Between January 1989 and December 1993, 278 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received definitive radiotherapy using computed tomography (CT) guided conformal technique. Ninety-six patients were excluded on the basis of prior transurethral prostatectomy (n = 40), pretreatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) not evaluable (n = 46), no available treatment planning CT scan (n = 7) or lost to follow-up (n = 3). The records of 182 evaluable patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patient characteristics were as follows: T1, 39; T2, 68; T3, 75. Gleason's score 2-4, 25; 5-6, 68; 7, 40; 8-10, 35; 14 not specified. Pretreatment PSA ≤ 4, 18; 4-10, 54; 10-20, 51; 20-50, 37; > 50, 22. The median PSA was 12.6 ng/ml and median PSAD was 0.3. PSAD was defined as the ratio of the pretreatment serum PSA to the prostate volume measured from CT treatment planning scans by one investigator (A.C.I.). Prostate volumes were calculated using the prolate ellipse formula, i.e. 0.52 (H x L x W). All PSA values were determined using the Hybritech assay. Biochemical failure was defined as two consecutive elevations in PSA separated by at least 3 months and a final PSA value greater than 1 ng/ml. Biochemical disease-free survival (BDFS) was calculated using Kaplan-Meier method and differences between groups were analyzed using the logrank statistic. Multivariate analysis (Cox regression analysis) was used to compare the significance of factors identified on univariate analysis. Median follow-up was 2.1 years. Results In univariate analysis, PSA (p 4, 100%; 4-10, 78%; 10-20, 45%; 20-50, 65%; > 50, 18%. The 3 year BDFS by PSAD was 0.60, 36%. A direct multivariate analysis including PSA and PSAD was not possible due to the high

  10. Analysis of prostate cancer localization toward improved diagnostic accuracy of transperineal prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiro Sakamoto

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: The concordance of prostate cancer between prostatectomy specimens and biopsies is comparatively favorable. According to our study, the diagnostic accuracy of transperineal prostate biopsy can be improved in our institute by including the anterior portion of the Apex-Mid and Mid regions in the 12-core biopsy or 16-core biopsy, such that a 4-core biopsy of the anterior portion is included.

  11. Iodine-125 seed implantation (permanent brachytherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Shin; Katayama, Yoshihisa; Tanimoto, Ryuta

    2008-01-01

    From January 2004 to March 2007, 308 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated using iodine-125 ( 125 I) seed implantation (permanent brachytherapy) at Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences. We evaluated the treatment's efficacy and morbidity in 300 prostate cancer patients who were followed up for more than 1 month after brachytherapy. Based on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, patients with a prostate volume of less than 40 ml in transrectal ultrasound imaging were classified as low or intermediate risk. The median patient age was 67 years (range 50 to 79 years), the median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value before biopsy was 6.95 ng/ml (range 1.13 to 24.7 ng/ml), and the median prostate volume was 24.33 ml (range 9.3 to 41.76 ml). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 1 to 36 months) and the PSA levels decreased in almost all patients after brachytherapy. Although 194 of 300 patients (64.7%) complained of difficulty in urination, pollakisuria/urgency, miction pain, and/or urinary incontinence, all of which might be associated with radiation prostatitis during the first month after brachytherapy, these symptoms gradually improved. 125 I seed implantation brachytherapy is safe and effective for localized prostate cancer within short-term follow up. (author)

  12. Prostate-specific antigen and radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagars, Gunar K; Pollack, Alan; Kavadi, Vivek S; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to: (a) define the prognostic significance of pretreatment serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in localized prostate cancer treated with radiation; (b) define the prognostic usefulness of postradiation PSA levels; (c) evaluate the outcome of radiation using PSA as an endpoint. Methods and Materials: Disease outcome in 707 patients with Stages T1 (205 men), T2 (256 men), T3 (239 men), and T4 (7 men), receiving definitive external radiation as sole therapy, was evaluated using univariate and multivariate techniques. Results: At a mean follow-up of 31 months, 157 patients (22%) developed relapse or a rising PSA. Multivariate analysis revealed pretreatment PSA level to be the most significant prognostic factor, with lesser though significant contributions due to Gleason grade (2-6 vs. 7-10) and transurethral resection in (T3(T4)) disease. The following four prognostic groupings were defined: group I, PSA {<=} 4 ng/ml, any grade; group II, 4 < PSA {<=} 20, grades 2-6; group III, 4 < PSA {<=} 20, grades 7-10; group IV, PSA > 20, any grade. Five-year actuarial relapse rates in these groups were: I, 12%; II, 34%; III, 40%; and IV, 81%. Posttreatment nadir PSA was an independent determinant of outcome and only patients with nadir values < 1 ng/ml fared well (5-year relapse rate 20%). Using rising PSA as an endpoint the 461 patients with (T1(T2)) disease had an actuarial freedom from disease rate of 70% at 5 years, which appeared to plateau, suggesting that many were cured. No plateau was evident for (T3(T4)) disease. Conclusion: Pretreatment serum PSA is the single most important predictor of disease outcome after radiation for local prostate cancer. Tumor grade has a lesser though significant prognostic role. Postirradiation nadir PSA value during the first year is a sensitive indicator of response to treatment. Only nadir values < 1 ng/ml are associated with a favorable outlook. A significant fraction of men with (T1(T2

  13. Prostate-specific antigen and radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagars, Gunar K.; Pollack, Alan; Kavadi, Vivek S.; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to: (a) define the prognostic significance of pretreatment serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in localized prostate cancer treated with radiation; (b) define the prognostic usefulness of postradiation PSA levels; (c) evaluate the outcome of radiation using PSA as an endpoint. Methods and Materials: Disease outcome in 707 patients with Stages T1 (205 men), T2 (256 men), T3 (239 men), and T4 (7 men), receiving definitive external radiation as sole therapy, was evaluated using univariate and multivariate techniques. Results: At a mean follow-up of 31 months, 157 patients (22%) developed relapse or a rising PSA. Multivariate analysis revealed pretreatment PSA level to be the most significant prognostic factor, with lesser though significant contributions due to Gleason grade (2-6 vs. 7-10) and transurethral resection in (T3(T4)) disease. The following four prognostic groupings were defined: group I, PSA ≤ 4 ng/ml, any grade; group II, 4 20, any grade. Five-year actuarial relapse rates in these groups were: I, 12%; II, 34%; III, 40%; and IV, 81%. Posttreatment nadir PSA was an independent determinant of outcome and only patients with nadir values < 1 ng/ml fared well (5-year relapse rate 20%). Using rising PSA as an endpoint the 461 patients with (T1(T2)) disease had an actuarial freedom from disease rate of 70% at 5 years, which appeared to plateau, suggesting that many were cured. No plateau was evident for (T3(T4)) disease. Conclusion: Pretreatment serum PSA is the single most important predictor of disease outcome after radiation for local prostate cancer. Tumor grade has a lesser though significant prognostic role. Postirradiation nadir PSA value during the first year is a sensitive indicator of response to treatment. Only nadir values < 1 ng/ml are associated with a favorable outlook. A significant fraction of men with (T1(T2)) disease may be cured with radiation. There was no evidence for a cured fraction among

  14. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics after primary stereotactic body radiation therapy using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hyun Park

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: PSA decline occurred rapidly in the first month, and then the rate of PSA decline fell off steadily over time throughout 2 years after treatment. Also, SBRT using CyberKnife leads to long-term favorable BCR-free survival in localized prostate cancer.

  15. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino J.; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment

  16. Sexual function with localized prostate cancer: active surveillance vs radical therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Roderick C. N.; Korfage, Ida J.; Roobol, Monique J.; Bangma, Chris H.; de Koning, Harry J.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare sexual function of men with localized prostate cancer (PCa) on active surveillance (AS) with similar patients who received radical therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS Two groups of men with screening-detected localized PCa were compared. The first were men on AS within the prospective

  17. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Anna Lia, E-mail: alvalentini@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Gui, Benedetta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); D' Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Clementi, Valeria [Clinical Science Development Group, GE Healthcare, Milan (Italy); Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi [OU Clinic Radiobiology, I.F.C.A. Florence (Italy); Mantini, Giovanna [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio <5:1. Cancerous metabolism (CM) was defined by choline-to-creatine ratio >1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value <0.05 was statistically significant. The patients' outcomes were verified in 2011. Results: MRSI documented MA in 84 of 109 and CM in 25 of 109 cases. LR showed that age, GS, stage, and initial and recent PSA had no significant impact on MRSI results which were significantly related to PSA values at the time of MRSI and to TEFRT. Patients were divided into three groups according to TEFRT: <1 year, 1-2 years, and >2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  18. Hypoxic Prostate/Muscle PO2 Ratio Predicts for Outcome in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turaka, Aruna; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate tumor oxygenation status with long-term biochemical outcome after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Custom-made Eppendorf PO 2 microelectrodes were used to obtain PO 2 measurements from the prostate (P), focused on positive biopsy locations, and normal muscle tissue (M), as a control. A total of 11,516 measurements were obtained in 57 men with localized prostate cancer immediately before prostate brachytherapy was given. The Eppendorf histograms provided the median PO 2 , mean PO 2 , and % 2 ratio on BF. Results: With a median follow-up time of 8 years, 12 men had ASTRO BF and 8 had Phoenix BF. On multivariate analysis, P/M PO 2 ratio 2 ratio 2 ratio) significantly predicts for poor long-term biochemical outcome, suggesting that novel hypoxic strategies should be investigated.

  19. [Epigenetics of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Wen-Quan

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in males, and its etiology and pathogenesis remain unclear. Epigenesis is involved in prostate cancer at all stages of the process, and closely related with its growth and metastasis. DNA methylation and histone modification are the most important manifestations of epigenetics in prostate cancer. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis of DNA methylation include whole-genome hypomethylation, aberrant local hypermethylation of promoters and genomic instability. DNA methylation is closely related to the process of prostate cancer, as in DNA damage repair, hormone response, tumor cell invasion/metastasis, cell cycle regulation, and so on. Histone modification causes corresponding changes in chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription, and it may affect the cycle, differentiation and apoptosis of cells, resulting in prostate cancer. Some therapies have been developed targeting the epigenetic changes in prostate cancer, including DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylase inhibitors, and have achieved certain desirable results.

  20. A randomised comparison of 'Casodex' (bicalutamide) 150 mg monotherapy versus castration in the treatment of metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer.......To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer....

  1. Ex vivo MRI evaluation of prostate cancer: Localization and margin status prediction of prostate cancer in fresh radical prostatectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidkamp, Jan; Hoogenboom, Martijn; Kovacs, Iringo E; Veltien, Andor; Maat, Arie; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the ability of high field ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to localize prostate cancer (PCa) and to predict the margin status in fresh radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens using histology as the reference standard. This Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved study had written informed consent. Patients with biopsy-proved PCa and a diagnostic multiparametric 3T MRI examination of the prostate prior to undergoing RP were prospectively included. A custom-made container provided reference between the 7T ex vivo MRI obtained from fresh RP specimens and histological slicing. On ex vivo MRI, PCa was localized and the presence of positive surgical margins was determined in a double-reading session. These findings were compared with histological findings obtained from completely cut, whole-mount embedded, prostate specimens. In 12 RP specimens, histopathology revealed 36 PCa lesions, of which 17 (47%) and 20 (56%) were correlated with the ex vivo MRI in the first and second reading session, respectively. Nine of 12 (75%) index lesions were localized in the first session, in the second 10 of 12 (83%). Seven and 8 lesions of 11 lesions with Gleason score >6 and >0.5 cc were localized in the first and second session, respectively. In the first session none of the four histologically positive surgical margins (sensitivity 0%) and 9 of 13 negative margins (specificity 69%) were detected. In second session the sensitivity and specificity were 25% and 88%, respectively. Ex vivo MRI enabled accurate localization of PCa in fresh RP specimens, and the technique provided information on the margin status with high specificity. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:439-448. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Prediction of PSA bounce after permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Kunimitsu; Nakashima, Jun; Sugawara, Akitomo

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to calculate the frequency and features of the development of a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after prostate brachytherapy alone, to correlate the bounce with clinical and dosimetric factors and to identify factors that predict PSA bounce. PSA bounce was evaluated in 86 patients with T1-T2 prostate cancer who underwent radioactive seed implantation using iodine-125 (I-125) without hormonal therapy or external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from September 2004 to December 2007. A PSA bounce was defined as a rise of at least 0.4 ng/ml greater than a previous PSA level with a subsequent decline equal to, or less than, the initial nadir. Calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, the incidence of PSA bounce at a 2-year follow-up was 26%. Median time to the PSA bounce was 15 months. Univariate analysis demonstrated that age, dose received by 90% of the prostate gland (D90), volume of gland receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100), and V150 were significantly associated with the PSA bounce, while pretreatment PSA level, Gleason score, pretreatment prostate volume, clinical T stage, and V200 were not. In multivariate analysis, age 67 years or less and D90 more than 180 Gy were identified as independent factors for predicting the PSA bounce (P<0.05). PSA bounce is not a rare phenomenon after prostate brachytherapy. It is more common in younger patients and patients receiving higher doses of radiation. (author)

  3. Is Preoperative Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio a Reliable Prognostic Parameter for Localized Prostate Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tümay İpekçi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In spite of all efforts, prostate cancer is still the 2nd highest cause of cancer-related deaths in men. For this reason new developments are needed in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of prostate cancer. Neutrophil/lymphocyte (N/L ratio is a cheap and effective parameter used for research into many solid tumors; but there are not enough studies on the reliability of this parameter in prostate cancer. In this study we researched the efficacy of N/L ratio in localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Between March 9, 2012 and April 23, 2017, the data of 140 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy with localized prostate cancer were screened retrospectively. The patients’ ages, preoperative prostate specific antigen (PSA and N/L ratio, pathologic stage, pathologic Gleason score, tumor volume, lymph node involvement, surgical margin positivity and presence or absence of 3rd month biochemical recurrence were noted. The correlations between N/L ratio with age, PSA, pathologic parameters, surgical margin positivity and biochemical recurrence were investigated. Results: The mean age of patients was 63.0±5.9 years, mean PSA value was 10.8±8.5 ng/mL and mean N/L ratio was 2.5±1.9. There was no correlation found between N/L ratio and PSA, pathologic stage, Gleason score, lymph node involvement, tumor volume, surgical margin positivity and biochemical recurrence (p>0.05. Conclusion: In our study investigating 140 patients with localized prostate cancer, we did not identify any correlation between N/L ratio and PSA, surgical stage and Gleason score, surgical margin positivity, and 3rd month biochemical recurrence. When the literature is investigated, it appears that N/L ratio is effective for metastatic prostate cancer. To provide a more accurate judgment of the role of N/L ratio in localized prostate cancer, there is a need for new studies with broader patient series.

  4. Treatment decision-making by men with localized prostate cancer: the influence of personal factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donna L; Ellis, William J; Woods, Nancy Fugate; Schwien, Christina; Mullen, Kristin H; Yang, Claire

    2003-01-01

    For many men with localized prostate cancer, there is no definite answer or unequivocal choice regarding treatment modality. This high-stakes treatment decision is made in the context of great uncertainty. The purpose of this study is to systematically document meaningful and relevant aspects of treatment decision-making reported by men with localized prostate cancer. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 44 men who were within 6 months of a diagnosis of localized prostate cancer. Using content analysis and grounded theory analytic techniques, major aspects and processes of men's treatment decision making are identified and described. The participants reported their experiences beginning with influential personal history factors, followed by detailed descriptions of information gathering and the important influence of expected treatment outcomes and other individuals' cancer histories and/or shared opinions. Twenty of the 44 (45%) participants relied heavily on the influence of another's opinion or history to finalize a decision, yet only 10 of the 44 (22.7%) reported this individual to be their physician. A common process, "making the best choice for me" was explicated. Clinicians assume that men are making rational treatment decisions based on reliable information, yet this study documents a different reality. Patient education about medical therapies and the patients' own medical factors is not enough. A clinic visit dialogue that brings personal factors to the conversation along with medical factors can guide a man to making his "best choice" for localized prostate cancer.

  5. Is there any association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Ceylan, Cavit; Kilinc, Fatih; Gazel, Eymen; Resorlu, Berkan; Odabas, Oner

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer. The data of 440 patients who had undergone prostate biopsies due to high PSA levels and suspicious digital rectal examination findings were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of accompanying NIH IV prostatitis. The exclusion criteria were as follows: Gleason score>6, PSA level>20ng/mL, >2 positive cores, >50% cancerous tissue per biopsy, urinary tract infection, urological interventions at least 1 week previously (cystoscopy, urethral catheterization, or similar procedure), history of prostate biopsy, and history of androgen or 5-alpha reductase use. All patient's age, total PSA and free PSA levels, ratio of free to total PSA, PSA density and prostate volume were recorded. In total, 101 patients were included in the study. Histopathological examination revealed only PCa in 78 (77.2%) patients and PCa+NIH IV prostatitis in 23 (22.7%) patients. The median total PSA level was 7.4 (3.5-20.0) ng/mL in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group and 6.5 (0.6-20.0) ng/mL in the PCa group (p=0.67). The PSA level was≤10ng/mL in 60 (76.9%) patients in the PCa group and in 16 (69.6%) patients in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group (p=0.32). Our study showed no statistically significant difference in PSA levels between patients with and without NIH IV prostatitis accompanying PCa.

  6. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bey, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Stines, J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extra-capsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk. (authors)

  7. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Logager, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data.......To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data....

  8. Cancer-related communication, relationship intimacy, and psychological distress among couples coping with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon; Badr, Hoda; Zaider, Talia; Nelson, Christian; Kissane, David

    2010-03-01

    The present study evaluated intimacy as a mechanism for the effects of relationship-enhancing (self-disclosure, mutual constructive communication) and relationship-compromising communication (holding back, mutual avoidance, and demand-withdraw communication) on couples' psychological distress. Seventy-five men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer in the past year and their partners completed surveys about communication, intimacy, and distress. Multi-level models with the couple as unit of analyses indicated that the association between mutual constructive communication, mutual avoidance, and patient demand-partner withdraw and distress could be accounted for by their influence on relationship intimacy. Intimacy did not mediate associations between self-disclosure, holding back, and partner demand-patient withdraw communication and distress. These findings indicate that the way in which couples talk about cancer-related concerns as well as the degree to which one or both partners avoid talking about cancer-related concerns can either facilitate or reduce relationship intimacy, and that it is largely by this mechanism that these three communication strategies impact psychological distress. Relationship intimacy and how patients and partners communicate to achieve this intimacy is important for the psychological adjustment of early stage prostate cancer survivors and their partners.

  9. Bicalutamide monotherapy compared with castration in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V

    2000-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiandrogen monotherapy may be a treatment option for some patients with advanced prostate cancer. We report a survival and safety update from an analysis of 2 studies in which patients with nonmetastatic (M0) locally advanced disease were treated with either 150 mg. bicalutamide mo...

  10. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy: Safe and Effective Brachytherapy for Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Ghilezan, Michel; Hill, Dennis R.; Schour, Lionel; Brandt, David; Gustafson, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used as the only treatment (monotherapy) for early prostate cancer is consistent with current concepts in prostate radiobiology, and the dose is reliably delivered in a prospectively defined anatomic distribution that meets all the requirements for safe and effective therapy. We report the disease control and toxicity of HDR monotherapy from California Endocurietherapy (CET) and William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: There were 298 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Two biologically equivalent hypofractionation protocols were used. At CET the dose was 42 Gy in six fractions (two implantations 1 week apart) delivered to a computed tomography–defined planning treatment volume. At WBH the dose was 38 Gy in four fractions (one implantation) based on intraoperative transrectal ultrasound real-time treatment planning. The bladder, urethral, and rectal dose constraints were similar. Toxicity was scored with the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.2 years. The median age of the patients was 63 years, and the median value of the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen was 6.0 ng/mL. The 8-year results were 99% local control, 97% biochemical control (nadir +2), 99% distant metastasis–free survival, 99% cause-specific survival, and 95% overall survival. Toxicity was scored per event, meaning that an individual patient with more than one symptom was represented repeatedly in the morbidity data table. Genitourinary toxicity consisted of 10% transient Grade 2 urinary frequency or urgency and 3% Grade 3 episode of urinary retention. Gastrointestinal toxicity was <1%. Conclusions: High disease control rates and low morbidity demonstrate that HDR monotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized prostate cancer.

  11. Prostate Cancer FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer FAQs Top 10 Things You Should Know About ... prostate cancer detected? What are the symptoms of prostate cancer? If the cancer is caught at its earliest ...

  12. Long-term oncologic results of salvage radical prostatectomy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, Fernando J.; Scardino, Peter T.; Stephenson, Andrew J.; DiBlasio, Christopher J.; Fearn, Paul A.; Eastham, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Salvage radical prostatectomy (RP) may potentially cure patients who have isolated local prostate cancer recurrence after radiotherapy (RT). We report the long-term cancer control associated with salvage RP in a consecutive cohort of patients and identify the variables associated with disease progression and cancer survival. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 consecutive patients underwent salvage RP with curative intent for biopsy-confirmed, locally recurrent, prostate cancer after RT. Disease progression after salvage RP was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of ≥0.2 ng/mL or by initiation of androgen deprivation therapy. Cancer-specific mortality was defined as active clinical disease progression despite castration. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate these endpoints. The median follow-up from RT was 10 years (range, 3-27 years) and from salvage RP was 5 years (range, 1-20 years). Results: Overall, the 5-year progression-free probability was 55% (95% confidence interval, 46-64%), and the median progression-free interval was 6.4 years. The preoperative PSA level was the only significant pretreatment predictor of disease progression in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). The 5-year progression-free probability for patients with a preoperative PSA level of 10 ng/mL was 86%, 55%, and 37%, respectively. The 10-year and 15-year cancer-specific mortality after salvage RP was 27% and 40%, respectively. The median time from disease progression to cancer-specific death was 10.3 years (95% confidence interval, 7.6-12.9). After multivariate analysis, the preoperative serum PSA level and seminal vesicle or lymph node status correlated independently with disease progression. Conclusions: Greater preoperative PSA levels are associated with disease progression and cancer-specific death. Long-term control of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT is possible when salvage RP is performed early in the course of recurrent

  13. Long term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H [Depts. of Urology and Ultrasound, Herlev Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months. Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40%), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is bigger than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these. The future role of ultrasonically guided implantation in the management of prostatic cancer is discussed. (au).

  14. Management of Biochemical Recurrence after Primary Localized Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, Oussama M.; Raj, Ganesh V.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is typically managed by well established therapies like radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, and external beam radiation therapy. While many patients can be cured with definitive local therapy, some will have biochemical recurrence (BCR) of disease detected by a rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Management of these patients is nuanced and controversial. The natural history indicates that a majority of patients with BCR will not die from prostate cancer but from other causes. Despite this, a vast majority of patients with BCR are empirically treated with non-curable systemic androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), with its myriad of real and potential side effects. In this review article, we examined the very definition of BCR after definitive local therapy, the current status of imaging studies in its evaluation, the need for additional therapies, and the factors involved in the decision making in the choice of additional therapies. This review aims to help clinicians with the management of patients with BCR. The assessment of prognostic factors including absolute PSA level, time to recurrence, PSA kinetics, multivariable nomograms, imaging, and biopsy of the prostatic bed may help stratify the patients into localized or systemic recurrence. Patients with low-risk of systemic disease may be cured by a salvage local therapy, while those with higher risk of systemic disease may be offered the option of ADT or a clinical trial. An algorithm incorporating these factors is presented.

  15. External beam radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer: when and how we optimize with concurrent hormonal deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Bridget F; Lee, W Robert

    2011-10-01

    Androgen deprivation plays a major role in the treatment of prostate cancer.Preclinical studies have shown that androgen deprivation provides both an independent cytotoxic effect and radiosensitization on prostate tumors. For men with non-metastatic prostate cancer, the addition of androgen deprivation to radiotherapy has been shown to improve survival for intermediate and high risk disease compared to radiation alone.This review discusses the clinical trial data regarding combination of androgen deprivation and radiation and provides recommendations for its use in men undergoing radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  16. Development of indicators of the quality of radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, Brita; Brundage, Michael; Pearcey, Robert; Bass, Brenda; Pickles, Tom; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Foley, Kimberley; Mackillop, William

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a set of indicators of the quality of radiotherapy (RT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Following a comprehensive review of the literature to identify candidate quality indicators, we utilized a modified Delphi technique to develop a set of indicators of the quality of RT for localized prostate cancer. The first Delphi round consisted of an online survey in which radiation oncologists were asked to rate the importance of the candidate quality indicators. The second round was a face-to-face meeting of a smaller group of radiation oncologists to discuss, rate, and rank a final set of quality indicators. Results: The literature review identified 57 candidate quality indicators. After the two rounds of the Delphi process, a final set of 25 indicators was agreed upon. The set includes quality indicators covering all aspects of prostate cancer radical RT management: pre-treatment assessment, external beam RT, brachytherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and follow-up. Conclusions: This new set of quality indicators is more comprehensive than others described in the literature, and can be applied to patterns of care studies that assess the quality of RT for prostate cancer. The process used to develop this set of indicators can be readily adapted for use in other contexts.

  17. Patient educational technologies and their use by patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baverstock, Richard J; Crump, R Trafford; Carlson, Kevin V

    2015-09-29

    Two urology practices in Calgary, Canada use patient educational technology (PET) as a core component of their clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine how patients interact with PET designed to inform them about their treatment options for clinically localized prostate cancer. A PET library was developed with 15 unique prostate-related educational modules relating to diagnosis, treatment options, and potential side effects. The PET collected data regarding its use, and those data were used to conduct a retrospective analysis. Descriptive analyses were conducted and comparisons made between patients' utilization of the PET library during first and subsequent access; Pearson's Chi-Square was used to test for statistical significance, where appropriate. Every patient (n = 394) diagnosed with localized prostate cancer was given access to the PET library using a unique identifier. Of those, 123 logged into the library and viewed at least one module and 94 patients logged into the library more than once. The average patient initially viewed modules pertaining to their diagnosis. Viewing behavior significantly changed in subsequent logins, moving towards modules pertaining to treatment options, decision making, and post-surgical information. As observed through the longitudinal utilization of the PET library, information technology offers clinicians an opportunity to provide an interactive platform to meet patients' dynamic educational needs. Understanding these needs will help inform the development of more useful PETs. The informational needs of patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer changed throughout the course of their diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Hormonal changes after localized prostate cancer treatment. Comparison between external beam radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, J; Celma, A; Placer, J; Maldonado, X; Trilla, E; Salvador, C; Lorente, D; Regis, L; Cuadras, M; Carles, J; Morote, J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on the hypothalamic pituitary axis of 120 men with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with RP or EBRT exclusively. 120 patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. Ninety two patients underwent RP and 28 patients EBRT exclusively. We measured serum levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (T), free testosterone, and estradiol at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after treatment completion. Patients undergoing RP were younger and presented a higher prostate volume (64.3 vs. 71.1 years, p<0.0001 and 55.1 vs. 36.5 g, p<0.0001; respectively). No differences regarding serum hormonal levels were found at baseline. Luteinizing hormone and FSH levels were significantly higher in those patients treated with EBRT at three months (luteinizing hormone 8,54 vs. 4,76 U/l, FSH 22,96 vs. 8,18 U/l, p<0,0001) while T and free testosterone levels were significantly lower (T 360,3 vs. 414,83ng/dl, p 0,039; free testosterone 5,94 vs. 7,5pg/ml, p 0,018). At 12 months FSH levels remained significantly higher in patients treated with EBRT compared to patients treated with RP (21,01 vs. 8,51 U/l, p<0,001) while T levels remained significantly lower (339,89 vs. 402,39ng/dl, p 0,03). Prostate cancer treatment influences the hypothalamic pituitary axis. This influence seems to be more important when patients with prostate cancer are treated with EBRT rather than RP. More studies are needed to elucidate the role that prostate may play as an endocrine organ. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Signs Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors ... earlier. So what are the warning signs of prostate cancer? Unfortunately, there usually aren’t any early warning ...

  20. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  1. Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancers-Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsa, N; Nagaraja, H; Shweta, S; Raghunath, S K

    2017-06-01

    Twenty-five to thirty percent of patients with prostate cancer present with locally advanced disease. While risk stratification remains the same with high incidence of upstaging of disease on imaging and histopathological evaluation; there have been progressive refinements in surgical therapy. With availability of reasonably robust data, radical prostatectomy in men with locally advanced prostate cancers seems to effect improvement in both cancer specific and overall survival rates in comparison to the current standard of care of radiation with androgen deprivation therapy. Studies using radical prostatectomy as a part of multimodality approach have also shown promising results. There is an imminent need for well-designed prospective studies of benefits of radical prostatectomy over radiation and androgen deprivation as well as benefits of multimodality therapy over monotherapy. Surgery for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer is technically challenging. Surgical outcomes are comparable to those of organ-confined disease when performed in high-volume centers. Neoadjuvant therapies prior to radical prostatectomy might improve surgical outcomes, but whether they will translate into a better cancer specific and overall survival are yet to be ascertained.

  2. Radiotherapy and local hyperthermia plus androgen suppression in locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maluta, S.; Marciai, N.; Gabbani, M.; Palazzi, M.; Dall'Oglio, S.; Grandinetti, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In advanced prostatic cancer, hyperthermia may be useful in order to enhance irradiation efficacy so to avoid delivering of too high dose of radiotherapy which increases acute and late sequelae. A multi-centric phase II study is warranted to give hyperthermia a level 3 evidence in prostate cancer treatment. A randomized phase III study to demonstrate efficacy of hyperthermia is not available because of the optimal results obtained by using radiotherapy combined with androgen suppression. To evaluate hyperthermia gain, LHT should be combined with radiotherapy alone in patients refusing androgen suppression or affected by hormone refractory prostate carcinoma (HRPC). Patients with HRPC have multiple possibilities of treatment improving performance status and median survival, as chemotherapy regimens, and new agents. All these treatments modalities need to be confirmed by phase III trials. Also hyperthermia may be considered among these promising approaches. (author)

  3. Automated prostate cancer localization without the need for peripheral zone extraction using multiparametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Yetik, Imam Samil

    2011-06-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to have higher localization accuracy than transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for prostate cancer. Therefore, automated cancer segmentation using multiparametric MRI is receiving a growing interest, since MRI can provide both morphological and functional images for tissue of interest. However, all automated methods to this date are applicable to a single zone of the prostate, and the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate needs to be extracted manually, which is a tedious and time-consuming job. In this paper, our goal is to remove the need of PZ extraction by incorporating the spatial and geometric information of prostate tumors with multiparametric MRI derived from T2-weighted MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). In order to remove the need of PZ extraction, the authors propose a new method to incorporate the spatial information of the cancer. This is done by introducing a new feature called location map. This new feature is constructed by applying a nonlinear transformation to the spatial position coordinates of each pixel, so that the location map implicitly represents the geometric position of each pixel with respect to the prostate region. Then, this new feature is combined with multiparametric MR images to perform tumor localization. The proposed algorithm is applied to multiparametric prostate MRI data obtained from 20 patients with biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer. The proposed method which does not need the masks of PZ was found to have prostate cancer detection specificity of 0.84, sensitivity of 0.80 and dice coefficient value of 0.42. The authors have found that fusing the spatial information allows us to obtain tumor outline without the need of PZ extraction with a considerable success (better or similar performance to methods that require manual PZ extraction). Our experimental results quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed

  4. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldstein, Cora; Poetter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor; Doerr, Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4-field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects. (orig.) [de

  5. Chemotherapy and novel therapeutics before radical prostatectomy for high-risk clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Eugene K; Eastham, James A

    2015-05-01

    Although both surgery and radiation are potential curative options for men with clinically localized prostate cancer, a significant proportion of men with high-risk and locally advanced disease will demonstrate biochemical and potentially clinical progression of their disease. Neoadjuvant systemic therapy before radical prostatectomy (RP) is a logical strategy to improve treatment outcomes for men with clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer. Furthermore, delivery of chemotherapy and other systemic agents before RP affords an opportunity to explore the efficacy of these agents with pathologic end points. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, primarily with docetaxel (with or without androgen deprivation therapy), has demonstrated feasibility and safety in men undergoing RP, but no study to date has established the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapies. Other novel agents, such as those targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, clusterin, and immunomodulatory therapeutics, are currently under investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hit by waves-living with local advanced or localized prostate cancer treated with endocrine therapy or under active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervik, Bente; Nordøy, Tone; Asplund, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of living with prostate cancer have shown that the illness and the treatment cause physical as well as psychosocial problems. The aim of this study was to illuminate men's experiences living with localized or local advanced prostate cancer when curative treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy is not an option at the time of diagnosis. The study was conducted via qualitative interviews, using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Ten men treated with endocrine therapy or under active surveillance were interviewed. Being diagnosed with prostate cancer was described as a shock, with different aspects of the illness revealed gradually. The limited amount of time available for meeting with health care providers contributed to patients' feelings of being left alone with difficulty getting information and help. Sexual and urinary problems were perceived as a threat to their manhood. The spouses provided the closest everyday support. The life situation of these patients can be understood as living in a "state of readiness," expecting something to happen regarding their illness, and not always knowing where to get help. The results confirm existing knowledge of patient's experiences in living with prostate cancer regarding the initial shock perceived by the patients, the bodily alterations, and the important role of their spouses. Nurses, as well as general practitioners, must play a more active role in follow-up to ensure that the men and their spouses receive better help and support.

  7. Normalization of prostate specific antigen in patients treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, Matthew D; Padula, Gilbert DA; Chun, Patrick Y; Davis, Alan T

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the expected time to prostate specific antigen (PSA) normalization with or without neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAAD) therapy after treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. A retrospective cohort research design was used. A total of 133 patients with clinical stage T1c to T3b prostate cancer (2002 AJCC staging) treated in a community setting between January 2002 and July 2005 were reviewed for time to PSA normalization using 1 ng/mL and 2 ng/mL as criteria. All patients received IMRT as part of their management. Times to PSA normalization were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Significance was assessed at p < 0.05. Fifty-six of the 133 patients received NAAD (42.1%). Thirty-one patients (23.8%) received radiation to a limited pelvic field followed by an IMRT boost, while 99 patients received IMRT alone (76.2%). The times to serum PSA normalization < 2 ng/mL when treated with or without NAAD were 298 ± 24 and 302 ± 33 days (mean ± SEM), respectively (p > 0.05), and 303 ± 24 and 405 ± 46 days, respectively, for PSA < 1 ng/mL (p < 0.05). Stage T1 and T2 tumors had significantly increased time to PSA normalization < 1 ng/mL in comparison to Stage T3 tumors. Also, higher Gleason scores were significantly correlated with a faster time to PSA normalization < 1 ng/mL. Use of NAAD in conjunction with IMRT leads to a significantly shortened time to normalization of serum PSA < 1 ng/mL in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer

  8. Does increased local bone resorption secondary to breast and prostate cancer result in increased cartilage degradation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeming, Diana J; Byrjalsen, Inger; Qvist, Per

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast and prostate cancer patients often develop lesions of locally high bone turnover, when the primary tumor metastasizes to the bone causing an abnormal high bone resorption at this site. The objective of the present study was to determine whether local increased bone turnover in ...... experiments revealed that osteoclasts released CTXI fragments but not CTXII from bone specimens. The same was observed for cathepsin K. CONCLUSION: Data suggest that an uncoupling between bone resorption and cartilage degradation occurs in breast and lung cancer patient....

  9. Use of brachytherapy with permanent implants of iodine-125 in localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bladou, F.; Serment, G.; Salem, N.; Simonian, M.; Rosello, R.; Ternier, F.

    2002-01-01

    Approximately 15,000 cases of early stage prostate cancer T1 and T2 are diagnosed every year in France by testing for PSA and performing prostatic biopsies. The treatment of these localized forms is based in most cases on radical prostatectomy or nn external beam radiotherapy. Although the ontological results obtained by these two therapeutic methods are satisfactory and equivalent in the long term, the side effects can be important. For a number of years, trans-perineal brachytherapy using permanent implants of iodine -125 or palladium-103 has proved itself as an alternative therapy with equivalent medium to long-term results. The low urinary, digestive and sexual side effects of prostate brachytherapy are important reasons for the enthusiasm among patients and the medical community for this therapy and the growing number of applications and centres which practice it. In September 1998 we started the prostate brachytherapy programmes- in Marseilles with close collaboration between the department of urology of the Hopital Salvator, and the departments of radiotherapy, medical imaging and medical physics of the Institut Paoli-Calmettes. To date, around 250 patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate have benefited from this alternative therapy in our centre. Preliminary results, with a 3 year-follow-up, are comparable to results published in the literature by pioneer teams. (authors)

  10. Serum testosterone levels after external beam radiation for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagars, Gunar K.; Pollack, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether serum total testosterone levels change after external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighty-five men with clinically localized prostate cancer (T1-T3, N0/NX, M0) who underwent external beam radiation therapy without androgen ablation had pretreatment and 3-month posttreatment total serum testosterone levels determined by radioimmunoassay. Scattered doses to the testicles were measured with thermoluminescent dosimetry in 10 men. Results: Pretreatment serum testosterone levels ranged from 185 to 783 ng/dl, with a mean of 400 ng/dl and a median of 390 ng/dl. The coefficient of variation was 30%. Postradiation 3-month testosterone levels ranged from 163 ng/dl to 796 ng/dl, with mean and median values of 356 ng/dl and 327 ng/ml, respectively. The coefficient of variation was 34%. The 3-month value was significantly lower than the pretreatment value (Wilcoxon paired p = 0.0001). The mean absolute fall was 94 ng/dl and the mean percentage fall was 9%. Although the fall in testosterone level was statistically significant, the difference was very small quantitatively. In contrast, serum prostate-specific antigen levels fell dramatically by 3 months after radiation. Testicular scattered doses ranged from 1.84 to 2.42 Gy, with a mean of 2.07 Gy for a prostatic tumor dose of 68 Gy. Conclusions: Although significant, the fall in serum testosterone level after radiation for localized prostate cancer was small and likely of no pathophysiologic consequence. It is unlikely that scattered testicular radiation plays any significant role in the genesis of this change in testosterone level, which most likely occurs as a nonspecific stress response

  11. Localized Prostate Cancer and Quality of Life: Screening, treatment and methodological issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.J. Korfage (Ida)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn Western countries prostate cancer is the most prevalent malignancy in males. In its early stage prostate cancer usually does not cause any pain or other symptoms. It can be detected early by testing for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Since the 1980s the PSA-test has been applied

  12. Focal cryotherapy of localized prostate cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Taimur Tariq; Ahmed, Hashim; Kanthabalan, Abi; Lau, Benjamin; Ghei, Maneesh; Maraj, Barry; Arya, Manit

    2014-11-01

    Radical/whole gland treatment for prostate cancer has significant side-effects. Therefore focal treatments such as cryotherapy have been used to treat localized lesions whilst aiming to provide adequate cancer control with minimal side-effects. We performed a systematic review of Pubmed/Medline and Cochrane databases' to yield 9 papers for primary focal prostate cryotherapy and 2 papers for focal salvage treatment (radio-recurrent). The results of 1582 primary patients showed biochemical disease-free survival between 71-93% at 9-70 months follow-up. Incontinence rates were 0-3.6% and ED 0-42%. Recto-urethral fistula occurred in only 2 patients. Salvage focal cryotherapy had biochemical disease-free survival of 50-68% at 3 years. ED occurred in 60-71%. Focal cryotherapy appears to be an effective treatment for primary localized prostate cancer and compares favorably to radical/whole gland treatments in medium-term oncological outcomes and side-effects. Although more studies are needed it is also effective for radio-recurrent cancer with a low complications rates.

  13. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for local prostate cancer recurrence after radical radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodkiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies salvage interstitial radiation therapy for recurrent prostate cancer, launched at the end of the XX century. In recent years, more and more attention is paid to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT as a method of treating local recurrence.The purpose of research – preliminary clinical results of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy applied in cases of suspected local recurrence or of residual tumour after radiotherapy.Preliminary findings indicate the possibility of using HDR-BT, achieving local tumor control with low genitourinary toxicity.

  14. Normalization of prostate specific antigen in patients treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz Matthew D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine the expected time to prostate specific antigen (PSA normalization with or without neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAAD therapy after treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods A retrospective cohort research design was used. A total of 133 patients with clinical stage T1c to T3b prostate cancer (2002 AJCC staging treated in a community setting between January 2002 and July 2005 were reviewed for time to PSA normalization using 1 ng/mL and 2 ng/mL as criteria. All patients received IMRT as part of their management. Times to PSA normalization were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Significance was assessed at p Results Fifty-six of the 133 patients received NAAD (42.1%. Thirty-one patients (23.8% received radiation to a limited pelvic field followed by an IMRT boost, while 99 patients received IMRT alone (76.2%. The times to serum PSA normalization 0.05, and 303 ± 24 and 405 ± 46 days, respectively, for PSA Conclusions Use of NAAD in conjunction with IMRT leads to a significantly shortened time to normalization of serum PSA

  15. 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.; Baltas, D.; Kurek, R.; Roeddiger, S.; Kontova, M.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Skazikis, G.; Zamboglou, N.; Dannenberg, T.; Buhleier, T.; Tunn, U.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: pilot study to evaluate feasibility, acute toxicity and conformal quality of three-dimensional (3-D) conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer using intraoperative real-time planning. Patients and methods: between 05/2002 and 05/2003, 52 patients with prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 10 ng/ml, Gleason score ≤ 7 and clinical stage ≤ T2a were treated. Median PSA was 6.4 ng/ml and median Gleason score 5. 24/52 patients had stage T1c and 28/52 stage T2a. For transrectal ultrasound-(TRUS-)guided transperineal implantation of flexible plastic needles into the prostate, the real-time HDR planning system SWIFT trademark was used. After implantation, CT-based 3-D postplanning was performed. All patients received one implant for four fractions of HDR brachytherapy in 48 h using a reference dose (D ref ) of 9.5 Gy to a total dose of 38.0 Gy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed to evaluate the conformal quality of each implant using D 90 , D 10 urethra, and D 10 rectum. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the CTC (common toxicity criteria) scales. Results: median D 90 was 106% of D ref (range: 93-115%), median D 10 urethra 159% of D ref (range: 127-192%), and median D 10 rectum 55% of D ref (range: 35-68%). Median follow-up is currently 8 months. In 2/52 patients acute grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was observed. No gastrointestinal toxicity > grade 1 occurred. Conclusion: 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy using intraoperative real-time planning is a feasible and highly conformal treatment for localized prostate cancer associated with minimal acute toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to evaluate late toxicity and biochemical control. (orig.)

  16. Early versus delayed hormonal treatment in locally advanced or asymptomatic metastatic prostatic cancer patient dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezioso, Domenico; Iacono, Fabrizio; Romeo, Giuseppe; Ruffo, Antonio; Russo, Nicola; Illiano, Ester

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the effectiveness of hormonal treatment (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists and/or antiandrogens) as an early or as a deferred intervention for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) and/or asymptomatic metastasis. Systematic review of trials published in 1950-2007. Sources included MEDLINE and bibliographies of retrieved articles. Eligible trials included adults with a history of LAPC who are not suitable for curative local treatment of prostate cancer. We retrieved 22 articles for detailed review, of which 8 met inclusion criteria. The Veterans Administration Cooperative Urological Research Group suggested that delaying hormonal therapy did not compromise overall survival and that many of the patients died of causes other than prostate cancer. In European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 30846 trial, the median survival for delayed endocrine treatment was 6.1 year, and for immediate treatment 7.6 year, the HR for survival on delayed versus immediate treatment was 1.23 (95 % CI 0.88-1.71), indicating a 23 % nonsignificant trend in favour of early treatment. In EORTC 30891, the immediate androgen deprivation resulted in a modest but statistically significant increase in overall survival. The protocol SAKK 08/88 showed the lack of any major advantage of immediate compared with deferred hormonal treatment regarding quality of life or overall survival. The early intervention with hormonal treatment for patients with LAPC provides important reductions in all-cause mortality, prostate cancer-specific mortality, overall progression, and distant progression compared with deferring their use until standard care has failed to halt the disease.

  17. Active Surveillance Versus Watchful Waiting for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Model to Inform Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Stacy; Zhou, Qinlian; Siebert, Uwe; Rochau, Ursula; Jahn, Beate; Mühlberger, Nikolai; Carter, H Ballentine; Lepor, Herbert; Braithwaite, R Scott

    2017-12-01

    An increasing proportion of prostate cancer is being managed conservatively. However, there are no randomized trials or consensus regarding the optimal follow-up strategy. To compare life expectancy and quality of life between watchful waiting (WW) versus different strategies of active surveillance (AS). A Markov model was created for US men starting at age 50, diagnosed with localized prostate cancer who chose conservative management by WW or AS using different testing protocols (prostate-specific antigen every 3-6 mo, biopsy every 1-5 yr, or magnetic resonance imaging based). Transition probabilities and utilities were obtained from the literature. Primary outcomes were life years and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Secondary outcomes include radical treatment, metastasis, and prostate cancer death. All AS strategies yielded more life years compared with WW. Lifetime risks of prostate cancer death and metastasis were, respectively, 5.42% and 6.40% with AS versus 8.72% and 10.30% with WW. AS yielded more QALYs than WW except in cohorts age >65 yr at diagnosis, or when treatment-related complications were long term. The preferred follow-up strategy was also sensitive to whether people value short-term over long-term benefits (time preference). Depending on the AS protocol, 30-41% underwent radical treatment within 10 yr. Extending the surveillance biopsy interval from 1 to 5 yr reduced life years slightly, with a 0.26 difference in QALYs. AS extends life more than WW, particularly for men with higher-risk features, but this is partly offset by the decrement in quality of life since many men eventually receive treatment. More intensive active surveillance protocols extend life more than watchful waiting, but this is partly offset by decrements in quality of life from subsequent treatment. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. What is the optimal management of high risk, clinically localized prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, James A; Evans, Christopher P; Zietman, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    To summarize the presentations and debate regarding the optimal treatment of localized high-risk prostate cancer as presented at the 2009 Spring Meeting of the Society of Urologic Oncology. The debate was centered on presentations arguing for radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiotherapy as the optimal treatment for this condition. The meeting presentations are summarized by their respective presenters herein. Dr. James Eastham presents the varied definitions for "high-risk" prostate cancer as strongly influencing which patients end up in this cohort. Based upon this, between 3% and 38% of patients with high-risk features could be defined as "high-risk". Despite that, these men do not have a uniformly poor prognosis after RP, and attention to surgical principles as outlined improve outcomes. Disease-specific survival at 12 years is excellent and up to one-half of these men may not need adjuvant or salvage therapies, depending on their specific disease characteristics. Adjuvant or salvage radiotherapies improve outcomes and are part of a sequential approach to treating these patients. Dr. Anthony Zietman presented radiotherapy as the gold-standard based upon large, randomized clinical trials of intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients. Compared with androgen deprivation alone, the addition of radiotherapy provided a 12% cancer-specific survival advantage and 10% overall survival advantage. Dose escalation seems to confer further improvements in cancer control without significant escalation of toxicities, with more data forthcoming. There are no randomized trials comparing RP to radiotherapy for any risk category. In high-risk prostate cancer patients, both approaches have potential benefits and cumulative toxicities that must be matched to disease characteristics and patient expectations in selecting a treatment course. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months....... Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40......%), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is less than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these...

  20. Long-term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H

    1991-01-01

    %), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is less than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these......Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months....... Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40...

  1. The Early Prostate Cancer program: bicalutamide in nonmetastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Roder, Martin Andreas; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The Early Prostate Cancer program is investigating the addition of bicalutamide 150 mg to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer. The third program analysis, at 7.4 years' median follow-up, has shown that bicalutamide 150 mg does not benefit patients...

  2. Local Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer: What is the Evidence So Far?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Leonel Almeida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Advances in technological, laboratorial, and imaging studies and new treatments available in the last decades significantly improved prostate cancer survival rates. However, this did not occur in metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa at diagnosis which, in young and fit patients, will become invariably resistant to the established treatments. Progression will lead to an impairment in patients’ quality of life and disease-related death. Methods. The authors intend to perform a literature review of the advantages of primary treatment of mPCa. Articles were retrieved and filtered for relevance from PubMed, SciELO, and ScienceDirect until March 2017. Results. Primary treatment is currently indicated only in cases of nonmetastatic PCa. Nonetheless, there might be some benefits in doing local treatment in mPCa in order to control local disease, prevent new metastasis, and improve the efficacy of chemotherapy and hormonotherapy with similar complications rate when compared to locally confined cancer. Independent factors that have a negative influence are age above 70 years, cT4 stage or high-grade disease, PSA≥20 ng/ml, and pelvic lymphadenopathies. The presence of 3 or more of these factors conditions CSS and OS is the same between patients who performed local treatment and those who did not. Metastasis degree and location number can also influence outcome. Meanwhile, patients with visceral metastases have worse results. Conclusions. There is growing evidence supporting local treatment in cases of metastatic prostate cancer at diagnosis in the context of a multimodal approach. However, it should be kept in mind that most of the existing studies are retrospective and it would be important to make consistent prospective studies with well-defined patient selection criteria in order to sustain the existing data and understand the main indications to select patients and perform primary treatment in mPCa.

  3. Local Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer: What is the Evidence So Far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonel Almeida, Pedro; Jorge Pereira, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Advances in technological, laboratorial, and imaging studies and new treatments available in the last decades significantly improved prostate cancer survival rates. However, this did not occur in metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) at diagnosis which, in young and fit patients, will become invariably resistant to the established treatments. Progression will lead to an impairment in patients' quality of life and disease-related death. The authors intend to perform a literature review of the advantages of primary treatment of mPCa. Articles were retrieved and filtered for relevance from PubMed, SciELO, and ScienceDirect until March 2017. Primary treatment is currently indicated only in cases of nonmetastatic PCa. Nonetheless, there might be some benefits in doing local treatment in mPCa in order to control local disease, prevent new metastasis, and improve the efficacy of chemotherapy and hormonotherapy with similar complications rate when compared to locally confined cancer. Independent factors that have a negative influence are age above 70 years, cT4 stage or high-grade disease, PSA ≥ 20 ng/ml, and pelvic lymphadenopathies. The presence of 3 or more of these factors conditions CSS and OS is the same between patients who performed local treatment and those who did not. Metastasis degree and location number can also influence outcome. Meanwhile, patients with visceral metastases have worse results. There is growing evidence supporting local treatment in cases of metastatic prostate cancer at diagnosis in the context of a multimodal approach. However, it should be kept in mind that most of the existing studies are retrospective and it would be important to make consistent prospective studies with well-defined patient selection criteria in order to sustain the existing data and understand the main indications to select patients and perform primary treatment in mPCa.

  4. Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietzak, Eugene J; Eastham, James A

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal strategies combining local and systemic therapy offer the greatest chance of cure for many with men with high-risk prostate cancer who may harbor occult metastatic disease. However, no systemic therapy combined with radical prostatectomy has proven beneficial. This was in part due to a lack of effective systemic agents; however, there have been several advancements in the metastatic and castrate-resistant prostate cancer that might prove beneficial if given earlier in the natural history of the disease. For example, novel hormonal agents have recently been approved for castration-resistant prostate cancer with some early phase II neoadjuvant showing promise. Additionally, combination therapy with docetaxel-based chemohormonal has demonstrated a profound survival benefit in metastatic hormone-naïve patients and might have a role in eliminating pre-existing ADT-resistant tumor cells in the neoadjuvant setting. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)/Alliance 90203 trial has finished accrual and should answer the question as to whether neoadjuvant docetaxel-based chemohormonal therapy provides an advantage over prostatectomy alone. There are also several promising targeted agents and immunotherapies under investigation in phase I/II trials with the potential to provide benefit in the neoadjuvant setting.

  5. Combined transperineal radiofrequency (RF) interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (PC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urakami, Shinji; Gonda, Nobuko; Kikuno, Nobuyuki

    2001-01-01

    Hyperthermia has been used effectively as a radiation sensitizer. Interstitial hyperthermoradiotherapy has been therefore utilized as a minimal invasive therapy in attempts to improve local tumor control for various cancers, but not for urological cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of transperineal hyperthermoradiotherapy for localized PC. Based on our basic study of hyperthermoradiotherapy, we devised the procedure of combined transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Two patients with localized PC underwent transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with brachytherapy operation the 192-Ir remote after-loading system (RALS). Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, a total number of 12-18 stainless steel needles for 192-Ir RALS were implanted into the prostatic gland and seminal vesicles (SV) in an optimized pattern. Eight of the needles were used as electrodes for hyperthermia, and were electrically insultated using the vinyl catheter along the length of the subdermal fatty tissue to protect from overheating. Three other needles were utilized for continuous temperature mapping in the prostate. Rectal temperature was also monitored. Total radiation doses of 70 Gy to the prostate and SV were planned as a combination of brachytherapy (24 Gy/4 fraction) and external irradiation using a four-field box technique (46 Gy/23 fraction). Hyperthermic treatment (goal of 42 to 43 deg C for 60 minutes) was performed twice following the 1st and 4th brachytherapy at an interval of more than 48 hours for the recovery of cancer cells from thermotolerance. Both patients reached the treatment goal of all intraprostatic temperatures >43.0 deg C, which was considered favorable for hyperthermia, and the rectal temperatures of both patients remained <38 deg C during hyperthermia. In serial PSA measurements of both patients, serum PSA was less than 1.0 ng/ml within 3 months and has since

  6. Daily variations in delivered doses in patients treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Langen, Katja M.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Jeswani, Sam; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Haimerl, Jason; Olivera, Gustavo H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to study the variations in delivered doses to the prostate, rectum, and bladder during a full course of image-guided external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to 78 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 39 fractions. Daily target localization was performed using intraprostatic fiducials and daily megavoltage pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans, resulting in a total of 390 CT scans. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on each CT by a single physician. Daily dosimetric analysis was performed with dose recalculation. The study endpoints were D95 (dose to 95% of the prostate), rV2 (absolute rectal volume receiving 2 Gy), and bV2 (absolute bladder volume receiving 2 Gy). Results: For the entire cohort, the average D95 (±SD) was 2.02 ± 0.04 Gy (range, 1.79-2.20 Gy). The average rV2 (±SD) was 7.0 ± 8.1 cc (range, 0.1-67.3 cc). The average bV2 (±SD) was 8.7 ± 6.8 cc (range, 0.3-36.8 cc). Unlike doses for the prostate, there was significant daily variation in rectal and bladder doses, mostly because of variations in volume and shape of these organs. Conclusion: Large variations in delivered doses to the rectum and bladder can be documented with daily megavoltage CT scans. Image guidance for the targeting of the prostate, even with intraprostatic fiducials, does not take into account the variation in actual rectal and bladder doses. The clinical impact of techniques that take into account such dosimetric parameters in daily patient set-ups should be investigated

  7. Salvage brachytherapy for local recurrences of prostate cancer treated previously with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawkowska-Suwinska, Marzena; Fijałkowski, Marek; Białas, Brygida; Szlag, Marta; Kellas-Ślęczka, Sylwia; Nowicka, Elżbieta; Behrendt, Katarzyna; Plewicki, Grzegorz; Smolska-Ciszewska, Beata; Giglok, Monika; Zajusz, Aleksander; Owczarek, Grzegorz

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze early effects and toxicity of salvage high dose rate brachytherapy for local recurrences of adenocarcinoma of the prostate after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). In MCS Memorial Institute of Oncology in Gliwice a research programme on salvage HDR brachytherapy for local recurrences of prostate cancer treated previously with EBRT has been ongoing since February 2008. The treatment consisted of 3 fractions of 10 Gy each given every 14 days. Maximal urethral doses were constrained to be ≤ 120% of the prescribed dose. Maximal bladder and rectum doses were constrained to be ≤ 70% of the prescribed dose. Fifteen eligible patients were treated and analyzed from February 2008. All patients completed the treatment without major complications. The most common early complications were: macroscopic haematuria, pain in lower part of the abdomen, and transient dysuria. During the first week after the procedure a transient increase in IPSS score was noticed. The Foley catheter was removed on day 2 to 5. No complications after spinal anaesthesia were observed. Acute toxicity according to EORTC/RTOG was low. For bladder EORTC/RTOG score ranged from 0 to 2. Only in two patients grade 1 toxicity for rectum was observed. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 9 months. In one patient grade 2 rectal toxicity was observed, and one had urethral stricture. Other patients did not have any other significant late toxicity of the treatment. Two patients developed bone metastases. Salvage brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (3 × 10 Gy every 14 days) seems to be a safe and well tolerated procedure. A significant decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level is seen in patients with hormone-responsive cancer. Long-term efficiency and toxicity of the procedure are yet to be established.

  8. Locally advanced prostatic cancer: experience with combined pelvic external beam irradiation and interstitial thermobrachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, Steven L; Kapp, Daniel S; Goffinet, Don R; Prionas, Stavros; Cox, Richard S; Bagshaw, Malcolm A

    1995-07-01

    prior to source loading and a second just after removal of the irridium sources. Temperatures were characterized by the T90, the temperature that was exceeded by 90% of the temperatures measured within the prostate. Although the objective was to achieve a temperature of 43 deg. C for 45 minutes, the mean T90 achieved was 39.9{+-}0.3 deg. C (range: 37.2 to 41.3 deg. C). Patients were followed with clinical examination and measurement of the serum PSA every 3 to 4 months during the first two years after therapy and every 6 months, thereafter. Follow-up ranges from 0.8 to 6.5 years (median 3.5 years). PSA values for each patient were fitted to determine rates of decline in PSA after therapy and rates of rise in PSA among those recurring after therapy. Results: PSA levels declined in all patients at a more rapid rate than generally observed after external beam radiation, alone. PSA levels have subsequently risen in 19 patients and are indeterminate in 3 others. Twelve of these 22 patients have experienced clinical relapse: 8 had distant metastasis only, 2 recurred within the prostate alone, and 2 had both local and distant relapse. One patient died of prostate cancer 3 years after treatment; 2 died of intercurrent diseases 1.3 and 5.3 years after treatment with rising PSA trends. Control varied by primary stage: with T3 disease, 14 of 19 patients (79%) have rising or indeterminate PSA trends and 7 clinically relapsed (5 distant, 1 local, and 1 local and distant); with T2 disease, 7 of 14 (50%) have rising PSA trends and 4 have relapsed clinically (2 distant, 1 local, 1 local and distant). Among 17 patients with initial PSA values above 19, 4 have no PSA rise from 3.2 to 4.2 years after treatment, 13 (76%) have rising PSA patterns and 8 have relapsed clinically (6 distant, 1 local, 1 local and distant). Among 16 patients with initial PSA values below 19, 9 (56%) remain clinically and biochemically disease free. Only 46% of temperatures measured in tumor exceeded 42 deg. C. T

  9. Prostate Cancer Foundation News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding a Doctor Treatment Options Side Effects Managing Prostate Cancer Treatment Related Side Effects Clinical Trials Patient Resources Guides Videos Prostate Cancer FAQs Information by Stage Newly Diagnosed with Prostate ...

  10. Impact of Image Guidance on Outcomes After External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To verify whether rectal distention at the time of planning impacts outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with daily image guidance. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2002, a total of 488 prostate cancer patients were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was 70 Gy delivered at 2.5 Gy per fraction in all cases. All cases were treated with a 4-mm margin posteriorly. In all cases the total rectal volume documented on the CT scan was used for treatment planning. No special bowel preparation instructions were given, either for the simulation or the daily treatments. Before each daily treatment, alignment of the prostate was performed with the B-mode acquisition and targeting (BAT) transabdominal ultrasound system. The median follow-up for all 488 patients was 60 months (range, 24-96 months). Results: For all patients the biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate at 5 years was 86%. The 5-year bRFS rate for the rectal distention 3 , 50 to 3 , and ≥100 cm 3 groups was 90%, 83%, and 85%, respectively (p = 0.18). To adjust for other potential variables affecting bRFS rates, a multivariate time-to-failure analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model was performed. Rectal distention was not an independent predictor of biochemical failure on multivariate analysis (p = 0.80). Rectal distention was not a predictor of rectal or urinary toxicity. Conclusion: The use of daily image guidance eliminates errors such as rectal distention at the initial planning stage that can affect outcomes after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

  11. The source of pretreatment serum prostate-specific antigen in clinically localized prostate cancer--T, N, or M?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagars, Gunar K.; Kavadi, Vivek S.; Pollack, Alan; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von; Sands, M. Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an important marker for prostate cancer and has been shown to be secreted from the primary tumor and from metastases. However, the relative contribution of the primary and micrometastatic disease to the serum level of PSA in patients with clinically localized disease has not been delineated. This study addresses the source of pretreatment serum PSA in patients with clinically localized disease. Methods and Materials: The fall in serum PSA level following radical prostatectomy (280 patients; 105 T1, 165 T2, 10 T3) or definitive radiotherapy (427 patients; 122 T1, 147 T2, 158 T3/T4) was analyzed with the assumption that any fall in PSA following local treatment reflects the fraction of PSA produced in the prostate and its primary tumor. Results: Serum PSA level became undetectable in 277 of the 280 (99%) patients within 6 months of radical prostatectomy. The three patients who did not achieve undetectable levels had postsurgical values ≤ 0.9 ng/ml. Following definitive radiotherapy, nadir serum PSA values were between ≤ 0.3 and 20.3 ng/ml, with mean and median values of 1.9 and 1.2 ng/ml, respectively. Nadir PSA was undetectable in 52 patients (12%). Four patients' PSA did not fall, but rose from the start, and each developed metastatic disease within 9 months, and in each metastases appeared to contribute to pretreatment serum PSA. In the remaining patients, the maximal factor by which PSA fell to its nadir was higher the higher the pretreatment PSA level. We present arguments that this is most consistent with the hypothesis that virtually all detectable pretreatment serum PSA derives from the primary tumor. Confirmatory evidence that little of the pretreatment serum PSA came from metastases was obtained by extrapolating the rising PSA profile in 97 patients back to pretreatment time. Back-extrapolated PSA contributed a mean of 7% and a median of 5% to the pretreatment serum value. Because such back-extrapolated values

  12. Preoperative and Postoperative Nomograms Incorporating Surgeon Experience for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Michael W.; Vickers, Andrew J.; Yu, Changhong; Bianco, Fernando J.; Cronin, Angel M.; Eastham, James A.; Klein, Eric A.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Pontes, Jose Edson; Scardino, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Accurate preoperative and postoperative risk assessment has been critical for counseling patients regarding radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer. In addition to other treatment modalities, neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapies have been considered. The growing literature suggested that the experience of the surgeon may affect the risk of prostate cancer recurrence. The purpose of this study was to develop and internally validate nomograms to predict the probability of recurrence, both preoperatively and postoperatively, with adjustment for standard parameters plus surgeon experience. METHODS The study cohort included 7724 eligible prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy by 1 of 72 surgeons. For each patient, surgeon experience was coded as the total number of cases conducted by the surgeon before the patient’s operation. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were developed to predict recurrence. Discrimination and calibration of the models was assessed following bootstrapping methods, and the models were presented as nomograms. RESULTS In this combined series, the 10-year probability of recurrence was 23.9%. The nomograms were quite discriminating (preoperative concordance index, 0.767; postoperative concordance index, 0.812). Calibration appeared to be very good for each. Surgeon experience seemed to have a quite modest effect, especially postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS Nomograms have been developed that consider the surgeon’s experience as a predictor. The tools appeared to predict reasonably well but were somewhat little improved with the addition of surgeon experience as a predictor variable. PMID:19156928

  13. Expression and Genetic Variation in Neuroendocrine Signaling Pathways in Lethal and Nonlethal Prostate Cancer among Men Diagnosed with Localized Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Donghao; Carlsson, Jessica; Penney, Kathryn L; Davidsson, Sabina; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Mucci, Lorelei A; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Andrén, Ove; Fang, Fang; Fall, Katja

    2017-12-01

    Background: Recent data suggest that neuroendocrine signaling pathways may play a role in the progression of prostate cancer, particularly for early-stage disease. We aimed to explore whether expression of selected genes in the adrenergic, serotoninergic, glucocorticoid, and dopaminergic pathways differs in prostate tumor tissue from men with lethal disease compared with men with nonlethal disease. Methods: On the basis of the Swedish Watchful Waiting Cohort, we included 511 men diagnosed with incidental prostate cancer through transurethral resection of the prostate during 1977-1998 with follow-up up to 30 years. For those with tumor tissue ( N = 262), we measured mRNA expression of 223 selected genes included in neuroendocrine pathways. Using DNA from normal prostate tissue ( N = 396), we genotyped 36 SNPs from 14 receptor genes. Lethal prostate cancer was the primary outcome in analyses with pathway gene expression and genetic variants. Results: Differential expression of genes in the serotoninergic pathway was associated with risk of lethal prostate cancer ( P = 0.007); similar but weaker associations were noted for the adrenergic ( P = 0.014) and glucocorticoid ( P = 0.020) pathways. Variants of the HTR2A (rs2296972; P = 0.002) and NR3CI (rs33388; P = 0.035) genes (within the serotoninergic and glucocorticoid pathways) were associated with lethal cancer in overdominant models. These genetic variants were correlated with expression of several genes in corresponding pathways ( P pathways, particularly serotoninergic pathway, are associated with lethal outcome in the natural course of localized prostate cancer. Impact: This study provides evidence of the role of neuroendocrine pathways in prostate cancer progression that may have clinical utility. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(12); 1781-7. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer: results of a dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.; Duclos, Marie; Shamsa, Falah; Porter, Arthur T.; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to assess the incidence of chronic complications and histologic and biochemical control following hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1991 and October 1994, 49 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were entered on the first two dose levels of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated three dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum tumor dose of 78 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 6 weeks at 1.3 Gy, b.i.d. No increase in chronic toxicity compared with conventional radiotherapy was noted; therefore, an additional 24 patients were treated to a minimum tumor dose of 82.8 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 7 weeks at 1.15 Gy, b.i.d. Toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scale. Efficacy was assessed through scheduled postradiation prostate specific antigen values and ultrasound-guided biopsies. The median follow-up for the entire group was 20 months. Results: The hyperfractionated external radiation was well tolerated with minimal acute morbidity. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was 17%. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 genitourinary toxicity was 16%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two dose levels. No Grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity was noted. At 12 months, 84% of patients had a prostate specific antigen ≤ 4; and 53%; ≤ 1 ng/ml. At 12 months, 71% of patients had post radiation biopsies that were either negative (55%) or showed a marked therapeutic effect (16%). Conclusion: The use of hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy facilitated dose escalation with no increase in chronic toxicity compared to standard doses. The initial tumor response based on prostate specific antigen measurements and

  15. Familial prostate cancer has a more aggressive course than sporadic prostate cancer after treatment for localized disease, mainly due to a higher rate of distant metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Klein, Eric A.; Suh, John H; Kupelian, Varant A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We had already established that familial prostate cancer, defined as prostate cancer diagnosed in a father or brother, was an independent predictor of biochemical failure after treatment for localized disease. Our aim was to determine whether differences in outcome could be observed with respect to clinical failures (either local or distant) between the two forms of prostate cancer. Methods: Of the 1685 consecutive cases with localized prostate carcinoma treated between 1986 and 1996, patients with the following were excluded from the present study: no pretreatment Prostatic Specific Antigen (iPSA) level (n=54), no biopsy Gleason score (bGS) (n=25), adjuvant or neoadjuvant treatment (n=234), no available follow-up PSA level (n=30). We also excluded 617 patients who did not have a minimum of 3 years potential follow-up. The analysis was performed on 725 cases. Radiotherapy (RT) was the primary treatment in 330 patients and radical prostatectomy (RP) in 395 patients. Five percent had clinical stage T3 disease (n=37). Positive family history was defined as the presence of prostate cancer in a first degree relative (father or brother). The outcomes of interest were biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), local relapse-free survival (locRFS), distant relapse-free survival (dRFS). We used proportional hazards to analyze the effect of family history and other potential confounding variables (i.e. age, race, treatment modality, stage, biopsy GS, and iPSA levels) on treatment outcome. We included pathologic findings (extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle involvement, surgical margin involvement, and lymph node metastases) in a separate analysis for RP patients. Results: The median follow-up was 45 months. Eight percent of all cases (n=57) had a positive family history. The 5-year bRFS rates for patients with negative and positive family history were 54% and 38%, respectively (p<0.001). The 5-year cRFS rates for patients

  16. Maximizing dosimetric benefits of IMRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer through multicriteria optimization planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Craft, David; Paly, Jon; Zietman, Anthony; Efstathiou, Jason

    2013-01-01

    We examine the quality of plans created using multicriteria optimization (MCO) treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in treatment of localized prostate cancer. Nine random cases of patients receiving IMRT to the prostate were selected. Each case was associated with a clinically approved plan created using Corvus. The cases were replanned using MCO-based planning in RayStation. Dose-volume histogram data from both planning systems were presented to 2 radiation oncologists in a blinded evaluation, and were compared at a number of dose-volume points. Both physicians rated all 9 MCO plans as superior to the clinically approved plans (p −5 ). Target coverage was equivalent (p = 0.81). Maximum doses to the prostate and bladder and the V50 and V70 to the anterior rectum were reduced in all MCO plans (p<0.05). Treatment planning time with MCO took approximately 60 minutes per case. MCO-based planning for prostate IMRT is efficient and produces high-quality plans with good target homogeneity and sparing of the anterior rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, without sacrificing target coverage

  17. Maximizing dosimetric benefits of IMRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer through multicriteria optimization planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Craft, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Paly, Jon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason, E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We examine the quality of plans created using multicriteria optimization (MCO) treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in treatment of localized prostate cancer. Nine random cases of patients receiving IMRT to the prostate were selected. Each case was associated with a clinically approved plan created using Corvus. The cases were replanned using MCO-based planning in RayStation. Dose-volume histogram data from both planning systems were presented to 2 radiation oncologists in a blinded evaluation, and were compared at a number of dose-volume points. Both physicians rated all 9 MCO plans as superior to the clinically approved plans (p<10{sup −5}). Target coverage was equivalent (p = 0.81). Maximum doses to the prostate and bladder and the V50 and V70 to the anterior rectum were reduced in all MCO plans (p<0.05). Treatment planning time with MCO took approximately 60 minutes per case. MCO-based planning for prostate IMRT is efficient and produces high-quality plans with good target homogeneity and sparing of the anterior rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, without sacrificing target coverage.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of intraoperative low-energy photon radiotherapy using sphericalapplicators in locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François eBuge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy is standard care for locally advanced prostatecancer (stage pT3R1. Intraoperative low-energy photon radiotherapy offers several advantages overexternal beam radiotherapy, and several systems are now available for its delivery, using sphericalapplicators which require only limited shielding. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibilityof this technique for the prostate bed.Materials & Methods: Applicators were assessed using MRI image data and cadavericdissection. In cadavers, targeted tissues, defined as a urethral section, both neurovascular bundlesections, the bladder neck and the beds of the seminal vesicles, were marked with metallic surgicalclips. Distances between clips and applicator were measured using CT. A dosimetric study of theapplication of 12 Gy at 5mm depth was performed using CT images of prostatectomized cadavers.Results: Using MRI images from 34 prostate cancer patients, we showed that the ideal applicatordiameter ranges from 45 to 70 mm. Using applicators of different sizes to encompass the prostate bedin nine cadavers, we showed that the distance between target tissues and applicator was less than 2mm for all target tissues except the upper extremity of the seminal vesicles (19 mm. Dosimetric studyshowed a good dose distribution in all target tissues in contact with the applicator, with a lowprobability of rectum and bladder complication.Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy of the prostate bed is feasible, with good coverage oftargeted tissues. Clinical study of safety and efficacy is now required.

  19. Radiotherapy for local progression in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Yuzo; Akakura, Koichiro; Akimoto, Susumu; Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Ito, Haruo

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of radiotherapy on the local progression of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. From 1986 to 1995, 38 patients were diagnosed with local progression without distant progression after hormonal therapy at Chiba University Hospital. Eleven cases were treated with irradiation for local progression. External beam irradiation was delivered to the prostate at a dose of 50-66.6 Gy. In patients treated with radiotherapy, the duration from initial treatment to local recurrence was 6-80 months (mean±SD: 33.9±22.9 months). The follow-up period after irradiation was 7-64 months (mean±SD: 25.4±18.8 months). Three and 5 year cause-specific survival rates from radiotherapy were 46.2 and 23.1%, respectively. Radiotherapy had a marked effect on symptoms associated with local progression and no patients suffered from the symptoms after the radiotherapy. Complications of radiotherapy were limited. In patients with hormone refractory local progression without distant progression, low morbidity, low mortality radiotherapy offers a variable therapy to other palliative treatments because radiotherapy is able to control local symptoms for a long period of time. (author)

  20. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao (Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-01-01

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  1. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-12-31

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  2. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldstein, Cora; Poetter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Christian-Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiooncology, Vienna (Austria)

    2018-01-15

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4-field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects. (orig.) [German] Ziel der vorgestellten Arbeit ist es, die Haeufigkeit frueher und spaeter Nebenwirkungen nach postoperativer Bestrahlung von Prostatakarzinompatienten zu analysieren. Verglichen wurden dabei die Nebenwirkungen von lokaler

  3. Palliative radiotherapy for local progression of hormone refractory stage D2 prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Satoru; Kawai, Tsuneo; Yonese, Junji; Yamauchi, Tamio; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Ueda, Tomohiro

    1993-01-01

    From 1970 to 1992, 10 patients with hormone refractory stage D2 adenocarcinoma of the prostate presenting themselves with urinary retention and/or gross hematuria were treated by palliative irradiation for local progression at Cancer Institute Hospital. External beam irradiation was delivered to the primary lesion at dose of 38 Gy to one patient and 30∼27 Gy to seven patients. Five of these patients in whom an urethral catheter had been indwelt were able to void without difficulty following the treatment. Of four patients with severe hematuria resulting from vesical tamponade, none had hematuria after the treatment. These effect lasted until patients' death or more than 11 months follow-up. In other 2 patients, irradiation had to be discontinued at dose less than 20 Gy because of deteriorated general conditions and no significant effect. Complications of the treatment were minimal. These results indicate that the optimal dose of local palliative irradiation is around 30 Gy. Irradiation is a good choice for palliation of locally progressive hormone refactory prostate cancer in view of its certain and long-lasting effect, low invasiveness and minimal complications. When to institute palliative irradiation is one of the most important question in order to secure a good quality of life of patients. From our experiences, it is our belief that if local progression is symptomatic, palliative irradiation should be initiated as soon as possible. (author)

  4. Palliative radiotherapy for local progression of hormone refractory stage D2 prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Satoru; Kawai, Tsuneo; Yonese, Junji; Yamauchi, Tamio; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Ueda, Tomohiro (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital)

    1993-09-01

    From 1970 to 1992, 10 patients with hormone refractory stage D2 adenocarcinoma of the prostate presenting themselves with urinary retention and/or gross hematuria were treated by palliative irradiation for local progression at Cancer Institute Hospital. External beam irradiation was delivered to the primary lesion at dose of 38 Gy to one patient and 30[approx]27 Gy to seven patients. Five of these patients in whom an urethral catheter had been indwelt were able to void without difficulty following the treatment. Of four patients with severe hematuria resulting from vesical tamponade, none had hematuria after the treatment. These effect lasted until patients' death or more than 11 months follow-up. In other 2 patients, irradiation had to be discontinued at dose less than 20 Gy because of deteriorated general conditions and no significant effect. Complications of the treatment were minimal. These results indicate that the optimal dose of local palliative irradiation is around 30 Gy. Irradiation is a good choice for palliation of locally progressive hormone refactory prostate cancer in view of its certain and long-lasting effect, low invasiveness and minimal complications. When to institute palliative irradiation is one of the most important question in order to secure a good quality of life of patients. From our experiences, it is our belief that if local progression is symptomatic, palliative irradiation should be initiated as soon as possible. (author).

  5. Osteoporosis and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads Hvid; Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of osteoporosis and risk factors of osteoporotic fractures before androgen deprivation in Danish men. Treatment and prognosis of prostate cancer necessitate management of long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy...... (ADT), including accelerated bone loss resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporotic fractures are associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Material and methods. Patients with prostate cancer awaiting initiation of ADT were consecutively included. Half of the patients had localized disease and were...... level was 30.5 g/l (1-5714 g/l). The average Gleason score was 7.8 (range 5-10, SD 1.1). Fifty patients had localized prostate cancer and the other 55 patients had disseminated disease. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 10% and the prevalence of osteopenia was 58% before ADT. There was no significant...

  6. Low Incidence of Fatigue after Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjeev eDash

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue is a common side-effect of conventional prostate cancer radiation therapy. The increased delivery precision necessitated by the high dose per fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT offers the potential of reduce target volumes and hence the exposure of normal tissues to high radiation doses. Herein, we examine the level of fatigue associated with SBRT treatment.Methods: Forty patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated SBRT, and a minimum of 12 months follow-up were included in this analysis. Self-reported fatigue and other quality of life measures were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-SBRT.Results: Mean levels of fatigue were elevated at 1 month post-SBRT compared to baseline values (p=0.02. Fatigue at the 3-month follow-up and later were higher but not statistically significantly different compared to baseline. African-American patients reported higher fatigue post-SBRT than Caucasian patients. Fatigue was correlated with hormonal symptoms as measured by the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC quality of life questionnaire, but not with urinary, bowel, or sexual symptoms. Age, co-morbidities, smoking, prostate specific antigen (PSA levels, testosterone levels, and tumor stage were not associated with fatigue. Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate fatigue as a side-effect of SBRT. In contrast to standard radiation therapy, results suggest SBRT-related fatigue is short-term rather than a long-term side effect of SBRT. These results also suggest post-SBRT fatigue to be a more frequent complication in African-Americans than Caucasians.

  7. Comparison of mortality outcomes after radical prostatectomy versus radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer. A population-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollah, F.; Schmitges, J.; Sun, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the mortality outcomes of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy as treatment modalities for patients with localized prostate cancer. Our cohort consisted of 68 665 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, between 1992 and 2005. Propensity-score matching was used to minimize potential bias related to treatment assignment. Competing-risks analyses tested the effect of treatment type on cancer-specific mortality, after accounting for other-cause mortality. All analyses were stratified according to prostate cancer risk groups, baseline Charlson Comorbidity Index and age. For patients treated with radical prostatectomy versus radiotherapy, the 10-year cancer-specific mortality rates were 1.4 versus 3.9% in low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and 6.8 versus 11.5% in high-risk prostate cancer, respectively. Rates were 2.4 versus 5.9% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of 0, 2.4 versus 5.1% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of 1, and 2.9 versus 5.2% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of ≥2. Rates were 2.1 versus 5.0% in patients aged 65-69 years, 2.8 versus 5.5% in patients aged 70-74 years, and 2.9 versus 7.6% in patients aged 75-80 years (all P<0.001). At multivariable analyses, radiotherapy was associated with less favorable cancer-specific mortality in all categories (all P<0.001). Patients treated with radical prostatectomy fare substantially better than those treated with radiotherapy. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer benefit the most from radical prostatectomy. Conversely, the lowest benefit was observed in patients with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and/or multiple comorbidities. An intermediate benefit was observed in the other examined categories. (author)

  8. Treatment profile and complications associated with cryotherapy for localized prostate cancer: A population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Calpurnyia B.; Jang, Thomas L.; Shao, Yu-Hsuan; Kabadi, Shaum; Moore, Dirk F.; Lu-Yao, Grace L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the treatment patterns and 3 to 12-month complication rates associated with receiving prostate cryotherapy in a population-based study. Men > 65 years diagnosed with incident localized prostate cancer in Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) - Medicare linked database from 2004 to 2005 were identified. A total of 21,344 men were included in the study, of which 380 were treated initially with cryotherapy. Recipients of cryotherapy versus aggressive forms of prostate therapy (i.e. radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy) were more likely to be older, have one co-morbidity, low income, live in the South, and be diagnosed with indolent cancer. Complication rates increased from 3 to 12 months following cryotherapy. By the twelfth month, the rates for urinary incontinence, lower urinary tract obstruction, erectile dysfunction, and bowel bleeding reached 9.8%, 28.7%, 20.1%, and 3.3%, respectively. Diagnoses of hydronephrosis, urinary fistula, or bowel fistula were not evident. The rates of corrective invasive procedures for lower urinary tract obstruction and erectile dysfunction were both cryotherapy were modest; however, diagnoses for lower urinary tract obstruction and erectile dysfunction were common. PMID:21519347

  9. Locally advanced prostate cancer: a population-based study of treatment patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T; Elkin, Elena B; Yee, David S; Feifer, Andrew; Ehdaie, Behfar; Jacks, Lindsay M; Atoria, Coral L; Zelefsky, Michael J; Scher, Howard I; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2012-05-01

    Study Type--Therapy (practice patterns). Level of Evidence 2b. What's known on the subject? And what does the study add? The treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer varies widely even though there is level one evidence supporting the use of multimodality therapy as compared with monotherapy. This study defines treatment patterns of locally advanced prostate cancer within the United States and identifies predicators of who receives multimodality therapy rather than monotherapy. • To identify treatment patterns and predictors of receiving multimodality therapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC). • The cohort comprised patients ≥66 years with clinical stage T3 or T4 non-metastatic prostate cancer diagnosed between 1998 and 2005 identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry records linked with Medicare claims. • Treatments were classified as radical prostatectomy (RP), radiation therapy (RT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) received within 6 and 24 months of diagnosis. • We assessed trends over time and used multivariable logistic regression to identify predictors of multimodality treatment. • Within the first 6 months of diagnosis, 1060 of 3095 patients (34%) were treated with a combination of RT and ADT, 1486 (48%) received monotherapy (RT alone, ADT alone or RP alone), and 461 (15%) received no active treatment. • The proportion of patients who received RP increased, exceeding 10% in 2005. • Use of combined RT and ADT and use of ADT alone fluctuated throughout the study period. • In all 6% of patients received RT alone in 2005. • Multimodality therapy was less common in patients who were older, African American, unmarried, who lived in the south, and who had co-morbidities or stage T4 disease. • Treatment of LAPC varies widely, and treatment patterns shifted during the study period. • The slightly increased use of multimodality therapy since 2003 is encouraging, but

  10. Dose escalation by hypo fractionation in localized prostate cancer - a large single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, A.; Klein, E.; Kupelian, P.

    2003-01-01

    To report the outcomes of high dose radiation therapy using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) with hypo fractionation in localized prostate cancer at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. A total of 278 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT between 1998 and 2001. All cases had available pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and biopsy Gleason scores (bGS), no nodal metastasis, a minimum 2 year follow-up, and >5 follow-up PSA levels. The frequency by T-stage was: T1-T2A in 86%, T2B-T2C in 9%, and T3 in 5%. The median iPSA was 8.35. The frequency by bGS was: =7 in 45%. The age range for the patients was from 48 to 85 years (median 68 years). The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 24-49 months). The median doses delivered were 83Gy (delivered at 2.5Gy per fraction to 70 Gy; this being equivalent to 83 Gy at standard fractionation of 1.8 Gy using an alpha/beta of 2). The ASTRO definition for biochemical failure was used. Toxicity was assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. The 3-year biochemical relapse free survival (bRFS) for the entire cohort at three years was 91%. Any (grade 1 or higher) acute genito-urinary (GU) side effects were seen in 79% of patients. Grade 2 or higher acute GU toxicity was seen in 18% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) acute gastro-intestinal (GI) side effects were seen in 65% of patients. Grade 2 or higher acute GI toxicity was seen in 11% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) late GU side effects were seen in 3% of patients. Grade 2 or higher late GU toxicity was seen in 1.5% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) late GI side effects were seen in 13% of patients. Grade 2 or higher late GI toxicity was seen in 5% of patients. Higher doses of radiation delivered by IMRT resulted in excellent bRFS outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer receiving external beam radiation therapy. IMRT can be effectively used to safely increase dose delivery without compromising on quality of life

  11. Conformal radiation therapy of localized prostate cancer: acute tolerance and early evaluation of effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zierhut, D.; Flentje, M.; Sroka-Perez, G.; Rudat, V.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: In a prospective trial early effectiveness and acute toxicity of conformal 3D-planned radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer was quantified using dose-volume-histogramms and evaluated with respect of treatment technique. Results: Eleven patients (of 32) had none, 15 mild (RTOG grade 1) and 6 moderate symptoms (RTOG grade 2, mainly diarrhoea, dysuria and polyuria). Acute complications leading to treatment interruption did not occur. In 16 patients symptoms disappeared within 6 weeks after radiotherapy. Only 2 men had symptoms which lasted longer than 3 months and were endoscopically examined. Up to now no late complications were detected. Incidence and severity of toxicity was significantly (p [de

  12. Imaging and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    1996-01-01

    prostate gland. Only recently have advances in dynamic contrast enhanced CT scanning demonstrated differences in the internal zonal architecture of the prostate gland. The sensitivity of staging of local spread of prostate cancer is variable ranging from 18% to 75%. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate gland is a relatively new technique for staging prostate cancer. There is excellent tissue contrast between prostate cancers in the peripheral zone and normal prostate tissue. Initial evaluation of MRI for staging prostate cancer was disappointing due to poor accuracy of MRI for evaluation of small structures such as the neurovascular bundles, using the body coil. Subsequently specialized receiver (surface) coils have been designed to allow high resolution imaging of the prostate and to assess for extracapsular extension of tumor. These coils may be placed within the rectum or wrapped around the anterior and posterior pelvic walls. Images obtained with the endorectal or phased array coils are of better quality as measured by signal-to-noise and improved resolution. Improved accuracy of 16% has been demonstrated with the endorectal coil. The overall accuracy of staging prostate cancers has been reported between 69% and 89%. In order to evaluate the prostate, T1 and T2-weighted images of the prostate gland are obtained. T1-weighted images are most useful for visualizing the neurovascular bundles. Extension of tumor into the neurovascular bundle is evident when there is obliteration of high signal intensity fat between the prostate and the neurovascular bundle. Zonal architecture and the presence of prostate cancer is assessed on the T2-weighted images. Prostate cancer generally appears as areas of low signal intensity on the T2-weighted images. The seminal vesicles are of intermediate signal on T1-weighted images and are high signal on T2-weighted images appearing as tubular structures. When prostate cancer invades the seminal vesicles the normal high signal of T2

  13. High dose rate interstitial brachytherapy with external beam irradiation for localized prostate cancer. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Jo, Yoshimasa; Yoden, Eisaku; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Imajo, Yoshinari [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Nagase, Naomi; Narihiro, Naomasa; Kubota, Juichi

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the biochemical and pathological results of combined external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy (HDR-Ir192) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Between October 1997 and August 1999, 39 evaluable patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate diagnosed by biopsy were treated with interstitial and external beam irradiation. Patients ranged in age from 58-82 years, with a mean of 69.7 years. T1c, T2 and T3 tumors, according to the UICC classification system (1997), were found in 7, 21 and 11 cases respectively. The mean initial pre-treatment PSA was 35.9 ng/ml (median 13.2), with 77% of the patients having had a pre-treatment PSA greater than 10 ng/ml. Of all patients, 17 had received pre-treatment hormonal therapy. Hormonal pretreatment was stopped at the beginning of radiotherapy in all cases. External beam four-field box irradiation was given to the small pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy/25 fractions. Three HDR-Ir192 treatments were given over a 30-h period, with 5.5 Gy per fraction at the circumference of the prostate gland over the course of this study. Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA level >1.5 ng/ml and rising on three consecutive values. If serial post-treatment PSA levels showed a continuous downward trend, failure was not scored. The patient with clinical evidence of progression was classified as a clinical failure. The median follow-up at the time of evaluation was 19.6 months. A post-treatment PSA level {<=}1.0 ng/ml was seen in 26 (67%) patients, and values from >1.0 to {<=}2.0 ng/ml were seen in 10 (26%) patients. Biochemical failure was not seen in 38 patients except for one patient who developed a distant bone metastasis with negative prostatic biopsy 15 months after treatment. Biochemical control rate was 100% (38/38) except for the patient with bone metastasis classified as clinical failure. Negative biopsies 18 months after treatment were found in 93% (14/15) of patients. Only one patient

  14. Bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150 mg as adjuvant to radiotherapy in patients with localised or locally advanced prostate cancer: Results from the randomised Early Prostate Cancer Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyrrell, Chris J [Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Payne, Heather [Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom); See, William A [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); McLeod, David G [Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Wirth, Manfred P [Department of Urology, Technical University of Dresden (Germany); Iversen, Peter [Department of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Armstrong, Jon [AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom); Morris, Clive [AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Background and purpose: The ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) programme is assessing bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150 mg, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with localised or locally advanced prostate cancer (n=8113). This paper presents an exploratory analysis of the subgroup of the EPC programme who received radiotherapy with curative intent (n=1370) in order to determine the efficacy (in terms of progression-free survival [PFS]) and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg in this setting. Patients and methods: 1370 patients with T1-4, M0, any N prostate cancer received bicalutamide 150 mg or placebo adjuvant to radiotherapy of curative intent. This analysis was undertaken at median 5.3 years' follow-up. Results: In patients with locally advanced disease (n=305), bicalutamide adjuvant to radiotherapy significantly increased PFS by 53% (event-time ratio 1.53; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.16, 2.02) compared with placebo and reduced the risk of disease progression by 42% (hazard ratio [HR] 0.58; 95% CI 0.41, 0.84; P=0.00348). In these patients, objective progression was experienced by 33.5% of those randomised to bicalutamide versus 48.6% for those randomised to placebo. The between-group difference in patients with localised disease (n=1065) failed to reach statistical significance (HR 0.80; 95% CI 0.62, 1.03; P=0.088). The most common adverse events were breast pain (74.8%) and gynaecomastia (66.6%), which were mild to moderate in >90% of cases. Conclusions: Bicalutamide 150 mg/day given as adjuvant to radiotherapy significantly improved PFS in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. For patients with localised disease, the results at this stage from the radiotherapy subgroup and the overall EPC programme suggest that adjuvant hormonal therapy is currently not appropriate. There were no unexpected tolerability findings.

  15. Management of Localized Prostate Cancer by Focal Transurethral Resection of Prostate Cancer: An Application of Radical TUR-PCa to Focal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Morita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We analyzed radical TUR-PCa against localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods. Seventy-nine out of 209 patients with prostate cancer in one lobe were studied. Patients’ age ranged from 58 to 91 years and preoperative PSA, 0.70 to 17.30 ng/mL. In other 16 additional patients we performed focal TUR-PCa. Patients’ age ranged from 51 to 87 years and preoperative PSA, 1.51 to 25.74 ng/mL. Results. PSA failure in radical TUR-PCa was 5.1% during the mean follow-up period of 58.9 months. The actuarial biochemical non-recurrence rate was 98.2% for pT2a and 90.5% for pT2b. Bladder neck contracture occurred in 28 patients (35.4%. In 209 patients, pathological study revealed prostate cancer of the peripheral zone near the neurovascular bundle bilaterally in 25%, unilaterally in 39% and no cancer bilaterally in 35%, suggesting the possibility of focal TUR-PCa. Postoperative PSA of 16 patients treated by focal TUR-PCa was stable between 0.007 and 0.406 ng/mL at 24.2 months’ follow-up. No patients suffered from urinary incontinence. Bladder neck contracture developed in only 1 patient and all 5 patients underwent nerve-preserving TUR-PCa did not show erectile dysfunction. Conclusion. Focal TUR-PCa was considered to be a promising option among focal therapies against localized prostate cancer.

  16. Management of Localized Prostate Cancer by Focal Transurethral Resection of Prostate Cancer: An Application of Radical TUR-PCa to Focal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masaru; Matsuura, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Background. We analyzed radical TUR-PCa against localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods. Seventy-nine out of 209 patients with prostate cancer in one lobe were studied. Patients' age ranged from 58 to 91 years and preoperative PSA, 0.70 to 17.30 ng/mL. In other 16 additional patients we performed focal TUR-PCa. Patients' age ranged from 51 to 87 years and preoperative PSA, 1.51 to 25.74 ng/mL. Results. PSA failure in radical TUR-PCa was 5.1% during the mean follow-up period of 58.9 months. The actuarial biochemical non-recurrence rate was 98.2% for pT2a and 90.5% for pT2b. Bladder neck contracture occurred in 28 patients (35.4%). In 209 patients, pathological study revealed prostate cancer of the peripheral zone near the neurovascular bundle bilaterally in 25%, unilaterally in 39% and no cancer bilaterally in 35%, suggesting the possibility of focal TUR-PCa. Postoperative PSA of 16 patients treated by focal TUR-PCa was stable between 0.007 and 0.406 ng/mL at 24.2 months' follow-up. No patients suffered from urinary incontinence. Bladder neck contracture developed in only 1 patient and all 5 patients underwent nerve-preserving TUR-PCa did not show erectile dysfunction. Conclusion. Focal TUR-PCa was considered to be a promising option among focal therapies against localized prostate cancer.

  17. Prostatic specific antigen for prostate cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Nogueira

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA has been used for prostate cancer detection since 1994. PSA testing has revolutionized our ability to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients. In the last two decades, PSA screening has led to a substantial increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC. This increased detection caused the incidence of advanced-stage disease to decrease at a dramatic rate, and most newly diagnosed PC today are localized tumors with a high probability of cure. PSA screening is associated with a 75% reduction in the proportion of men who now present with metastatic disease and a 32.5% reduction in the age-adjusted prostate cancer mortality rate through 2003. Although PSA is not a perfect marker, PSA testing has limited specificity for prostate cancer detection, and its appropriate clinical application remains a topic of debate. Due to its widespread use and increased over-detection, the result has been the occurrence of over-treatment of indolent cancers. Accordingly, several variations as regards PSA measurement have emerged as useful adjuncts for prostate cancer screening. These procedures take into consideration additional factors, such as the proportion of different PSA isoforms (free PSA, complexed PSA, pro-PSA and B PSA, the prostate volume (PSA density, and the rate of change in PSA levels over time (PSA velocity or PSA doubling time. The history and evidence underlying each of these parameters are reviewed in the following article.

  18. Prostatic specific antigen for prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Lucas; Corradi, Renato; Eastham, James A

    2009-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been used for prostate cancer detection since 1994. PSA testing has revolutionized our ability to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients. In the last two decades, PSA screening has led to a substantial increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC). This increased detection caused the incidence of advanced-stage disease to decrease at a dramatic rate, and most newly diagnosed PC today are localized tumors with a high probability of cure. PSA screening is associated with a 75% reduction in the proportion of men who now present with metastatic disease and a 32.5% reduction in the age-adjusted prostate cancer mortality rate through 2003. Although PSA is not a perfect marker, PSA testing has limited specificity for prostate cancer detection, and its appropriate clinical application remains a topic of debate. Due to its widespread use and increased over-detection, the result has been the occurrence of over-treatment of indolent cancers. Accordingly, several variations as regards PSA measurement have emerged as useful adjuncts for prostate cancer screening. These procedures take into consideration additional factors, such as the proportion of different PSA isoforms (free PSA, complexed PSA, pro-PSA and B PSA), the prostate volume (PSA density), and the rate of change in PSA levels over time (PSA velocity or PSA doubling time). The history and evidence underlying each of these parameters are reviewed in the following article.

  19. Contemporary analysis of erectile, voiding, and oncologic outcomes following primary targeted cryoablation of the prostate for clinically localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Diblasio

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate erectile function (EF and voiding function following primary targeted cryoablation of the prostate (TCAP for clinically localized prostate cancer (CaP in a contemporary cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients treated between 2/2000-5/2006 with primary TCAP. Variables included age, Gleason sum, pre-TCAP prostate specific antigen (PSA, prostate volume, clinical stage, pre-TCAP hormonal ablation, pre-TCAP EF and American Urologic Association Symptom Score (AUASS. EF was recorded as follows: 1 = potent; 2 = sufficient for intercourse; 3 = partial/insufficient; 4 = minimal/insufficient; 5 = none. Voiding function was analyzed by comparing pre/post-TCAP AUASS. Statistical analysis utilized SAS software with p < 0.05 considered significant. RESULTS: After exclusions, 78 consecutive patients were analyzed with a mean age of 69.2 years and follow-up 39.8 months. Thirty-five (44.9% men reported pre-TCAP EF level of 1-2. Post-TCAP, 9 of 35 (25.7% regained EF of level 1-2 while 1 (2.9% achieved level 3 EF. Median pre-TCAP AUASS was 8.75 versus 7.50 postoperatively (p = 0.39. Six patients (7.7% experienced post-TCAP urinary incontinence. Lower pre-TCAP PSA (p = 0.008 and higher Gleason sum (p = 0.002 were associated with higher post-TCAP AUASS while prostate volume demonstrated a trend (p = 0.07. Post-TCAP EF and stable AUASS were not associated with increased disease-recurrence (p = 0.24 and p = 0.67, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Stable voiding function was observed post-TCAP, with an overall incontinence rate of 7.7%. Further, though erectile dysfunction is common following TCAP, 25.7% of previously potent patients demonstrated erections suitable for intercourse. While long-term data is requisite, consideration should be made for prospective evaluation of penile rehabilitation following primary TCAP.

  20. Role of image-guided patient repositioning and online planning in localized prostate cancer IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerma, Fritz A.; Liu, Bei; Wang, Zhendong; Yi, Byongyong; Amin, Pradip; Liu, Sandy; Feng Yuanming; Yu, Cedric X.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the expected benefit of image-guided online replanning over image-guided repositioning of localized prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Materials and methods: On 10 to 11 CT scans of each of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients, the prostate, bladder and rectum are manually segmented. Using a 3-mm PTV margin expansion from the CTV, an IMRT plan is made on the first CT scan of each patient. Online repositioning is simulated by recalculating the IMRT plan from the initial CT scan on the subsequent CT scans of each patient. For online replanning, IMRT is replanned twice on all CT scans, using 0-mm and 3-mm margins. The doses from subsequent CT images of each patient are then deformed to the initial CT anatomy using a mesh-based thin-plate B-spline deformation method and are accumulated for DVH and isodose review. Results: Paired t-tests show that online replanning with 3-mm margins significantly increases the prostate volume receiving the prescribed dose over replanning with 0-mm margins (p-value 0.004); gives marginally better target coverage than repositioning with 3-mm margins(p-value 0.06-0.343), and reduces variations in target coverage over repositioning. Fractional volumes of rectum and bladder receiving 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, and 95% (V75, V80, V85, V90, and V95) of the prescription dose are evaluated. V90 and V95 values for the rectum are 1.6% and 0.7 % for 3-mm margin replanning and 1% and 0.4 % for 0-mm margin replanning, with p-values of 0.010-0.011. No significant differences between repositioning and replanning with 3-mm margins are found for both the rectum and the bladder. Conclusions: Image-guided replanning using 3-mm margins reduces target coverage variations, and maintains comparable rectum and bladder sparing to patient repositioning in localized prostate cancer IMRT. Marginal reductions in doses to rectum and bladder are possible when planning margins are eliminated in the online replanning scenario

  1. Very High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer: Outcomes Following Definitive Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narang, Amol K.; Gergis, Carol; Robertson, Scott P.; He, Pei; Ram, Ashwin N.; McNutt, Todd R.; Griffith, Emily; DeWeese, Theodore A.; Honig, Stephanie; Singh, Harleen; Song, Danny Y.; Tran, Phuoc T.; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Existing definitions of high-risk prostate cancer consist of men who experience significant heterogeneity in outcomes. As such, criteria that identify a subpopulation of National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) high-risk prostate cancer patients who are at very high risk (VHR) for poor survival outcomes following prostatectomy were recently developed at our institution and include the presence of any of the following disease characteristics: multiple NCCN high-risk factors, primary Gleason pattern 5 disease and/or ≥5 biopsy cores with Gleason sums of 8 to 10. Whether these criteria also apply to men undergoing definitive radiation is unclear, as is the optimal treatment regimen in these patients. Methods and Materials: All men consecutively treated with definitive radiation by a single provider from 1993 to 2006 and who fulfilled criteria for NCCN high-risk disease were identified (n=288), including 99 patients (34%) with VHR disease. Multivariate-adjusted competing risk regression models were constructed to assess associations between the VHR definition and biochemical failure (BF), distant metastasis (DM), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM). Multivariate-adjusted Cox regression analysis assessed the association of the VHR definition with overall mortality (OM). Cumulative incidences of failure endpoints were compared between VHR men and other NCCN high-risk men. Results: Men with VHR disease compared to other NCCN high-risk men experienced a higher 10-year incidence of BF (54.0% vs 35.4%, respectively, P<.001), DM (34.9% vs 13.4%, respectively, P<.001), PCSM (18.5% vs 5.9%, respectively, P<.001), and OM (36.4% vs 27.0%, respectively, P=.04). VHR men with a detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration at the end of radiation (EOR) remained at high risk of 10-year PCSM compared to VHR men with an undetectable EOR PSA (31.0% vs 13.7%, respectively, P=.05). Conclusions: NCCN high-risk prostate cancer patients who meet VHR

  2. Pomegranate-Extract Pill in Preventing Tumor Growth in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Active Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    PSA Level Less Than or Equal to Fifteen; PSA Level Less Than Ten; Stage I Prostate Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer AJCC v7

  3. Initial Results of Using Daily CT Localization to Correct Portal Error in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattanzi, Joseph; McNeely, Shawn; Barnes, Scott; Das, Indra; Schultheiss, Timothy E; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of daily CT simulation in prostate cancer to correct errors in portal placement and organ motion. Improved localization with this technique should allow the reduction of target margins and facilitate dose escalation in high risk patients while minimizing the risk of normal tissue morbidity. Methods and Materials : Five patients underwent standard CT simulation with the alpha cradle cast, IV contrast, and urethrogram. All were initially treated to 46 Gy in a four field conformal technique which included the prostate, seminal vesicles and pelvic lymph nodes (GTV 1 ). The prostate or prostate and seminal vesicles (GTV 2 ) then received 56 Gy with a 1.0 cm margin to the PTV. At 50 Gy a second CT simulation was performed with IV contrast, urethrogram and the alpha cradle secured to a rigid sliding board. The prostate was contoured, a new isocenter generated, and surface markers placed. Prostate only treatment portals for the final conedown (GTV 3 ) were created with 0.25 cm isodose margins to the PTV. The final six fractions in 2 patients with favorable disease and eight fractions in 3 patients with unfavorable disease were delivered using the daily CT technique. On each treatment day the patient was placed in his cast on the sliding board and a CT scan performed. The daily isocenter was calculated in the A/P and lateral dimension and compared to the 50 Gy CT simulation isocenter. Couch and surface marker shifts were calculated to produce perfect portal alignment. To maintain positioning, the patient was transferred to a gurney while on the sliding board in his cast, transported to the treatment room and then transferred to the treatment couch. The patient was then treated to the corrected isocenter. Portal films and real time images were obtained for each portal. Results: Utilizing CT-CT image registration (fusion) of the daily and 50 Gy baseline CT scans the isocenter changes were quantified to reflect the contribution of positional

  4. Daily CT localization for correcting portal errors in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattanzi, Joseph; McNeely, Shawn; Hanlon, Alexandra; Das, Indra; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction: Improved prostate localization techniques should allow the reduction of margins around the target to facilitate dose escalation in high-risk patients while minimizing the risk of normal tissue morbidity. A daily CT simulation technique is presented to assess setup variations in portal placement and organ motion for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Six patients who consented to this study underwent supine position CT simulation with an alpha cradle cast, intravenous contrast, and urethrogram. Patients received 46 Gy to the initial Planning Treatment Volume (PTV 1 ) in a four-field conformal technique that included the prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes as the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV 1 ). The prostate or prostate and seminal vesicles (GTV 2 ) then received 56 Gy to PTV 2 . All doses were delivered in 2-Gy fractions. After 5 weeks of treatment (50 Gy), a second CT simulation was performed. The alpha cradle was secured to a specially designed rigid sliding board. The prostate was contoured and a new isocenter was generated with appropriate surface markers. Prostate-only treatment portals for the final conedown (GTV 3 ) were created with a 0.25-cm margin from the GTV to PTV. On each subsequent treatment day, the patient was placed in his cast on the sliding board for a repeat CT simulation. The daily isocenter was recalculated in the anterior/posterior (A/P) and lateral dimension and compared to the 50-Gy CT simulation isocenter. Couch and surface marker shifts were calculated to produce portal alignment. To maintain proper positioning, the patients were transferred to a stretcher while on the sliding board in the cast and transported to the treatment room where they were then transferred to the treatment couch. The patients were then treated to the corrected isocenter. Portal films and electronic portal images were obtained for each field. Results: Utilizing CT-CT image registration (fusion) of the daily and 50

  5. MRI evaluation following partial HIFU therapy for localized prostate cancer: A single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoquetis, L; Malavaud, B; Game, X; Beauval, J B; Portalez, D; Soulie, M; Rischmann, P

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the value of MRI for surveillance of primary hemi-HIFU therapy for localized PCa in a single-center. Patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with hemi-HIFU from October 2009 to March 2014. All patients performed MRI before focal therapy, the reader was blinded to the treatment. Oncological failure was defined as positive biopsy or biochemical recurrence (Phoenix). Twenty-five patients were treated with hemi-HIFU in one center. The median nadir PSA was 1.45±1.4ng/mL. Prostate volume decreased from 45 cc to 25 cc on MRI findings. At 20 months, none of the patients had histological recurrence. Biochemical-free survival rate was 88%. MRI evaluation had a negative predictive value of 100% on the treated area and 81% on the untreated area. PSAd≥0.1ng/mL(2) was a predictive factor for cancer on untreated area (P=0.042). MRI control at 6 months is a potentially effective evaluation of treated area after hemi-HIFU and may replace randomized biopsies if PSAd<0.1ng/mL(2) during follow-up. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Maria Carlsen; Andersen, Morten Heebøll; Høyer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Background Active surveillance (AS) of low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) is an accepted alternative to active treatment. However, the conventional diagnostic trans-rectal ultrasound guided biopsies (TRUS-bx) underestimate PCa aggressiveness in almost half of the cases, when compared with the surgical...... lesions. Significant cancer was defined as GS > 6 or GS 6 (3 + 3) lesions with ≥ 6 mm maximal cancer core length (MCCL). Results A total of 78 patients were included and in 21 patients a total of 22 PIRADS-score 4 or 5 lesions were detected. MRGB pathology revealed that 17 (81%) of these and 22......% of the entire AS population harbored significant cancers at AS inclusion. In eight (38%) cases, the GS was upgraded. Also, nine patients (43%) had GS 6 (3 + 3) foci with MCCL ≥ 6 mm. Conclusion In an AS cohort based on TRUS and TRUS-bx diagnostic strategies, supplemental mpMRI and in-bore MRGB were able...

  7. Radiotherapy and androgen ablation for clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, Alan; Zagars, Gunar K; Kopplin, Susan

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: The response of patients with clinical stages T1-4 prostate cancer to radiotherapy is variable. A particularly poor prognostic group has been found to be comprised of those with pretreatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels above 30 ng/ml with any tumor grade, or PSA levels > 10 and {<=} 30 with tumors grade 3 or 4. These patients have over an 80% actuarial risk of biochemical failure 3 years after definitive external beam radiotherapy. Thus, patients with these high-risk features require more aggressive therapy. During the last 3-4 years, the policy to treat such patients with radiotherapy and androgen ablation (XRT/HORM) was instituted. A retrospective comparison was made between high-risk patients treated with radiotherapy alone (XRT) vs. XRT/HORM. Methods and Materials: Between 1987 and 1991, there were 81 high-risk patients treated with XRT. There were 38 high-risk patients treated with XRT/HORM between 1990 and 1992. The median follow-up was 37 months for the XRT group and 22 months for the XRT/HORM group. No patient had clinical, radiographic, or pathologic evidence of lymph node involvement. The median dose to the prostate was 66 Gy for the XRT group and 68 Gy for the XRT/HORM group. Results: The distributions of several potential prognostic factors were analyzed. Significant differences between the groups were observed for tumor grade, pretreatment prostatic acid phosphatase, and age. The XRT/HORM group was composed of patients with worse features, including a greater proportion of patients with grade 4 tumors, more with abnormal acid phosphatase levels, and more under 60 years of age. The actuarial incidence of a rising PSA at 3 years for the XRT group was 81% vs. 15% for the XRT/HORM group (p < 0.0001). In addition, local relapse at 3 years was 34% for the XRT group and 15% for the XRT/HORM group (p < 0.02). There was no difference between the groups in terms of survival. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed using several

  8. Assessing the acceptability and usability of an interactive serious game in aiding treatment decisions for patients with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichlin, Lindsey; Mani, Nithya; McArthur, Kara; Harris, Amy M; Rajan, Nithin; Dacso, Clifford C

    2011-01-12

    Men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer face a potentially life-altering treatment decision that can be overwhelming. Enhancing patient knowledge through education can significantly reduce feelings of uncertainty while simultaneously increasing confidence in decision making. Serious games have been shown in other populations to increase health knowledge and assist with the health decision-making process. We developed an interactive serious game, Time After Time, which translates evidence-based treatment outcome data into an accessible and understandable format that men can utilize in their prostate cancer treatment decision-making process. The game specifically aims to raise men's awareness and understanding of the impact of health-related quality of life issues associated with the major treatment options and to enrich their conversations with their health care providers. This study determined the acceptability and usability of the alpha version of Time After Time, an interactive decision aid for men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, in order to inform future iterations of the serious game. The study employed a mixed methods approach to assess the acceptability and usability of the Time After Time serious game using qualitative focus groups and a quantitative Likert scale survey. A total of 13 men who had already completed treatment for localized prostate cancer completed the survey and participated in focus group meetings. The majority of the study participants rated Time After Time as an appropriate decision tool for localized prostate cancer and verified that it meets its goals of increasing focus on side effects and generating questions for the patient's health care team. However, participants also expressed concerns about game usability and the diversity of information covered regarding treatment options and potential treatment outcomes. Serious games are a promising approach to health education and decision support for older men. Participants

  9. Conformal radiotherapy to 76 Gy in localized prostate cancer. Therapeutic modalities and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontvert, D.; Mammar, H.; Flam, T.; Debre, B.; Thiounn, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Jourdan-Da Silvae, N.; Beuzeboc, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to describe therapeutic modalities for localized prostate cancer treated by conformal radiation to 76 Gy with or without androgen ablation. To evaluate the preliminary results in terms of survival, biological control and toxicity. Patients and method: between January 1998 and June 2001, 321 patients with localized prostate cancer were irradiated at Institut Curie. Tumors were stratified into the three Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center prognostic groups (1998) for analysis: favorable risk group (F.G.) 23%, intermediate risk group (I.G.) 36.5%, unfavorable risk group (U.G.) 40.5%. Androgen deprivation, mainly neo-adjuvant, less or equal to one year was prescribed to 93.8% of patients (72.6% less or equal to six months). Planning target volume prescription doses were: prostate: 76 Gy, seminal vesicles: 56 to 76 Gy, and pelvic lymph nodes: 44 Gy to 16.8% of patients. Results: the five-year actuarial overall survival was 94% (95% I.C.: 90-97%). The median post-therapeutic follow-up was 36 months (nine to 60 months). The 48-month actuarial rates of biochemical control for the three prognostic groups were statistically different according to both the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus (A.S.T.R.O. 1997) and the Fox Chase Cancer Center definitions of biochemical failure (F.C.C.C. 2000) with respectively 87 and 94% for F.G., 78 and 84% for I.G., 54 and 58% for U.G. (P < 10-6 and P < 10-8). At time of our analysis, late post-treatment rectal and bladder bleedings were 17,4 and 13,6%, respectively. According to a 1-4 scale adapted from M.D. Anderson Cancer Center criteria: rectal bleedings were grade 1 (9.6%), grade 2 (6.2%) and grade 3 (1.6%). Bladder bleedings were grade 2 (13%) and grade 3 (0.6%). Analysis of rectal bleeding risk factors showed significant correlations with pelvic lymph nodes irradiation for grade 2 and 3, (P = 0.02), and for all grades, a correlation with smaller rectal wall volumes (P = 0.03), and greater

  10. Solitary recurrence of castration-resistant prostate cancer with low or undetectable levels of prostate specific antigen salvaged with local ablative radiation therapy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiachien Jake; Ying, James; Kapur, Payal; Wohlfeld, Bryan; Roehrborn, Claus; Kim, Dong W Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer recurrences are usually first detected by increased levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA), and systemic therapy is often initiated if distant metastasis is confirmed. However, low or nearly undetectable levels of PSA in the modern era of ultrasensitive PSA assay may be difficult to interpret in patients with a history of prostate cancer. Deciding whether to initiate additional systemic therapy in limited indolent metastatic disease while balancing the quality of life of the patient and ensuring the oncologic control of the disease may be challenging. In the present study, the case of a biopsy-confirmed solitary spine recurrence of prostate cancer with nearly undetectable but persistent levels of PSA (0.05 ng/ml) is reported. Treatment of the recurrence with local ablative radiotherapy improved the pain experienced by the patient, and reduced his levels of PSA to undetectable limits (<0.05 ng/ml). Repeated imaging analysis, PSA assay and clinical assessment demonstrated durable control of the disease without the requirement for additional systemic treatments. The present case highlighted the importance of initiating appropriate work-up according to the clinical scenario. Local treatment for solitary or oligometastatic recurrence of prostate cancer may enhance the effectiveness of current therapeutic strategies and benefit certain patients.

  11. 18F-DCFBC Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted PET/CT Imaging in Localized Prostate Cancer: Correlation With Multiparametric MRI and Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mena, Esther; Lindenberg, Liza; Adler, Stephen; Bednarova, Sandra; Berman, Rose; Ton, Anita T; McKinney, Yolanda; Eclarinal, Philip; Hill, Craig; Afari, George; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Mease, Ronnie C; Merino, Maria J; Jacobs, Paula M; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Pomper, Martin G; Choyke, Peter L

    2017-10-01

    To assess the ability of (N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-F-fluorobenzyl-L-cysteine) (F-DCFBC), a prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted PET agent, to detect localized prostate cancer lesions in correlation with multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and histopathology. This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996-compliant, prospective, institutional review board-approved study included 13 evaluable patients with localized prostate cancer (median age, 62.8 years [range, 51-74 years]; median prostate-specific antigen, 37.5 ng/dL [range, 3.26-216 ng/dL]). Patients underwent mpMRI and F-DCFBC PET/CT within a 3 months' window. Lesions seen on mpMRI were biopsied under transrectal ultrasound/MRI fusion-guided biopsy, or a radical prostatectomy was performed. F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were evaluated blinded and separately for tumor detection on a lesion basis. For PET image analysis, MRI and F-DCFBC PET images were fused by using software registration; imaging findings were correlated with histology, and uptake of F-DCFBC in tumors was compared with uptake in benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules and normal peripheral zone tissue using the 80% threshold SUVmax. A total of 25 tumor foci (mean size, 1.8 cm; median size, 1.5 cm; range, 0.6-4.7 cm) were histopathologically identified in 13 patients. Sensitivity rates of F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were 36% and 96%, respectively, for all tumors. For index lesions, the largest tumor with highest Gleason score, sensitivity rates of F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were 61.5% and 92%, respectively. The average SUVmax for primary prostate cancer was higher (5.8 ± 4.4) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules (2.1 ± 0.3) or that of normal prostate tissue (2.1 ± 0.4) at 1 hour postinjection (P = 0.0033). The majority of index prostate cancers are detected with F-DCFBC PET/CT, and this may be a prognostic indicator based on uptake and staging. However, for detecting prostate cancer with high sensitivity, it

  12. Dosimetric effects of the prone and supine positions on image guided localized prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bei; Lerma, Fritz A.; Patel, Shilpen; Amin, Pradip; Feng Yuanming; Yi, B.-Y.; Yu, Cedric

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare target coverage and doses to rectum and bladder in IMRT of localized prostate cancer in the supine versus prone position, with the inclusion of image guidance. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with early stage localized prostate carcinoma who received external beam radiotherapy in the supine and prone positions underwent approximately 10 serial CT examinations in their respective treatment position in non-consecutive days, except for one patient who was treated prone but serially imaged supine. The prostate, bladder and rectum were contoured on all CT scans. A PTV was generated on the first scan of each patient's CT series by expanding the prostate with a 5 mm margin and an IMRT plan was created. The resultant IMRT plan was then applied to that patient's remaining serial CT scans by aligning the initial CT image set with the subsequent serial CT image sets using (1) skin marks, (2) bony anatomy and (3) center of mass of the prostate. The dosimetric results from these three alignments were compared between the supine and prone groups. To account for the uncertainties associated with prostate delineation and intra-fractional geometric changes, a fictional 'daily PTV' was generated by expanding the prostate with a 3 mm margin on each serial CT scan. Thus, a more realistic target coverage index, V95, was quantified as the fraction of the daily PTV receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose. Dose-volume measures of the organs at risk were also compared. The fraction of the daily PTV contained by the initial PTV after each alignment method was quantified on each patient's serial CT scan, and is defined as PTV overlap index. Results: As expected, alignment based on skin marks yielded unacceptable dose coverage for both groups of patients. Under bony alignment, the target coverage index, V95, was 97.3% and 93.6% for prone and supine patients (p < 0.0001), respectively. The mean PTV overlap indices were 90.7% and 84.7% for prone and supine

  13. LDR vs. HDR brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer: the view from radiobiological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher R

    2002-01-01

    Permanent LDR brachytherapy and temporary HDR brachytherapy are competitive techniques for clinically localized prostate radiotherapy. Although a randomized trial will likely never be conducted comparing these two forms of brachytherapy, a comparative radiobiological modeling analysis proves useful in understanding some of their intrinsic differences, several of which could be exploited to improve outcomes. Radiobiological models based upon the linear quadratic equations are presented for fractionated external beam, fractionated (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy, and (125)I and (103)Pd LDR brachytherapy. These models incorporate the dose heterogeneities present in brachytherapy based upon patient-derived dose volume histograms (DVH) as well as tumor doubling times and repair kinetics. Radiobiological parameters are normalized to correspond to three accepted clinical risk factors based upon T-stage, PSA, and Gleason score to compare models with clinical series. Tumor control probabilities (TCP) for LDR and HDR brachytherapy (as monotherapy or combined with external beam) are compared with clinical bNED survival rates. Predictions are made for dose escalation with HDR brachytherapy regimens. Model predictions for dose escalation with external beam agree with clinical data and validate the models and their underlying assumptions. Both LDR and HDR brachytherapy achieve superior tumor control when compared with external beam at conventional doses (LDR brachytherapy as boost achieves superior tumor control than when used as monotherapy. Stage for stage, both LDR and current HDR regimens achieve similar tumor control rates, in agreement with current clinical data. HDR monotherapy with large-dose fraction sizes might achieve superior tumor control compared with LDR, especially if prostate cancer possesses a high sensitivity to dose fractionation (i.e., if the alpha/beta ratio is low). Radiobiological models support the current clinical evidence for equivalent outcomes in localized

  14. [Orgasm after curietherapy with permanent iodine-125 radioimplants for localized prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, B; Delannes, M; Salloum, A; Delavierre, D; Wagner, F; Jonca, F; Thoulouzan, M; Plante, P; Bachaud, J-M; Soulie, M; Huyghe, E

    2011-12-01

    Orgasm is a domain of male sexuality that remains underreported in literature. Our aim was to realize the first detailed analysis of orgasm in patients treated by 125 I permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. In a series of 270 sexually active men treated by prostate brachytherapy (125I permanent implantation), 241 (89%), mean age of 65 (43-80), participated in a mailed survey about sexual function after a mean time of 36 months (9-70). Erectile and ejaculatory functions and orgasm were explored using a mailed questionnaire. Two questions focused on orgasm. The first was about quality of orgasm (fast/intense/late, difficult/weak/absent) and the second about the presence of painful orgasm and its frequency (always/sometimes/often). After prostate brachytherapy, 81.3% of sexually active men conserved ejaculation and 90% orgasm. There was a significant deterioration of the quality of orgasm (P=0.0001). More than 50% of the patients had an altered orgasm (weak, difficult, absent) after brachytherapy, vs 16% before implantation (P=0.001). Men with a diminished ejaculation volume often had a weak/difficult orgasm (P=0.007). Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy did not seem to impact the quality of orgasm or the frequency of painful ejaculation. Patients who had an IIEF-5 score higher than 12 had frequently intense orgasm (26.7% vs 2.7%; Porgasm after treatment. However, most of the patients described a deterioration of the quality of orgasm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic resonance assessment of prostate localization variability in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeirs, Geert M.; Meerleer, Gert O. de; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Neve, Wilfried J. de

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To measure prostate motion with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Seven patients with prostate carcinoma were scanned supine on a 1.5-Tesla MRI system with weekly pretreatment and on-treatment HASTE T2-weighted images in 3 orthogonal planes. The bladder and rectal volumes and position of the prostatic midpoint (PMP) and margins relative to the bony pelvis were measured. Results: All pretreatment positions were at the mean position as computed from the on-treatment scans in each patient. The PMP variability (given as 1 SD) in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and right-left (RL) directions was 2.6, 2.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The largest variabilities occurred at the posterior (3.2 mm), superior (2.6 mm), and inferior (2.6 mm) margins. A strong correlation was found between large rectal volume (>95th percentile) and anterior PMP displacement. A weak correlation was found between bladder volume and superior PMP displacement. Conclusions: All pretreatment positions were representative of the subsequent on-treatment positions. A clinical target volume (CTV) expansion of 5.3 mm in any direction was sufficient to ascertain a 95% coverage of the CTV within the planning target volume (PTV), provided that a rectal suppository is administered to avoid rectal overdistension and that the patient has a comfortably filled bladder (<300 mL)

  16. The Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. In the United States, 90% of men with prostate cancer are more than age 60 years, diagnosed by early detection with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, and have disease believed confined to the prostate gland (clinically localized). Common treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting (WW), surgery to remove the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy), external-beam radiation therapy and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy), and androgen deprivation. Little is known about the relative effectiveness and harms of treatments because of the paucity of randomized controlled trials. The Department of Veterans Affairs/National Cancer Institute/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Cooperative Studies Program Study #407:Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in 1994, is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with WW in men with clinically localized prostate cancer. We describe the study rationale, design, recruitment methods, and baseline characteristics of PIVOT enrollees. We provide comparisons with eligible men declining enrollment and men participating in another recently reported randomized trial of radical prostatectomy vs WW conducted in Scandinavia. We screened 13 022 men with prostate cancer at 52 US medical centers for potential enrollment. From these, 5023 met initial age, comorbidity, and disease eligibility criteria, and a total of 731 men agreed to participate and were randomized. The mean age of enrollees was 67 years. Nearly one-third were African American. Approximately 85% reported that they were fully active. The median PSA was 7.8ng/mL (mean 10.2ng/mL). In three-fourths of men, the primary reason for biopsy leading to a diagnosis of prostate cancer was a PSA elevation or rise. Using previously developed tumor risk

  17. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y.; Weischenfeldt, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer...... in prostate cancer, and suggest interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial mutational profiles in prostate cancer....

  18. The Prostate cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial:VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy to watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Timothy J; Brawer, Michael K; Barry, Michael J; Jones, Karen M; Kwon, Young; Gingrich, Jeffrey R; Aronson, William J; Nsouli, Imad; Iyer, Padmini; Cartagena, Ruben; Snider, Glenn; Roehrborn, Claus; Fox, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Ninety percent of men with prostate cancer are over aged 60 years, diagnosed by early detection with the prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test and have disease believed confined to the prostate gland (clinically localized). Common treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting surgery to remove the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy), external beam radiation therapy and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy) and androgen deprivation. Little is known about the relative effectiveness and harms of treatments due to the paucity of randomized controlled trials. The VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program Study #407: Prostate cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in 1994, is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy to watchful waiting in men with clinically localized prostate cancer. We describe the study rationale, design, recruitment methods and baseline characteristics of PIVOT enrollees. We provide comparisons with eligible men declining enrollment and men participating in another recently reported randomized trial of radical prostatectomy versus watchful waiting conducted in Scandinavia. We screened 13,022 men with prostate cancer at 52 United States medical centers for potential enrollment. From these, 5023 met initial age, comorbidity and disease eligibility criteria and a total of 731 men agreed to participate and were randomized. The mean age of enrollees was 67 years. Nearly one-third were African-American. Approximately 85% reported they were fully active. The median prostate specific antigen (PSA) was 7.8 ng/mL (mean 10.2 ng/mL). In three-fourths of men the primary reason for biopsy leading to a diagnosis of prostate cancer was a PSA elevation or rise. Using previously developed tumor risk categorizations incorporating PSA levels, Gleason

  19. Determining if pretreatment PSA doubling time predicts PSA trajectories after radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, Daniel E.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Pan, Charlie C.; Williams, Scott G.; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: To determine if pretreatment PSA doubling time (PSA-DT) can predict post-radiation therapy (RT) PSA trajectories for localized prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Three hundred and seventy-five prostate cancer patients treated with external beam RT without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were identified with an adequate number of PSA values. We utilized a linear mixed model (LMM) analysis to model longitudinal PSA data sets after definitive treatment. Post-treatment PSA trajectories were allowed to depend on the pre-RT PSA-DT, pre-RT PSA (iPSA), Gleason score (GS), and T-stage. Results: Pre-RT PSA-DT had a borderline impact on predicting the rate of PSA rise after nadir (p = 0.08). For a typical low risk patient (T1, GS ≤ 6, iPSA 10), the predicted PSA-DT post-nadir was 21% shorter for pre-RT PSA-DT 24 month (19 month vs. 24 month). Additional significant predictors of post-RT PSA rate of rise included GS (p < 0.0001), iPSA (p < 0.0001), and T-stage (p = 0.02). Conclusions: We observed a trend between rapidly rising pre-RT PSA and the post-RT post-nadir PSA rise. This effect appeared to be independent of iPSA, GS, or T-stage. The results presented suggest that pretreatment PSA-DT may help predict post-RT PSA trajectories

  20. Evaluation of Image-Guidance Strategies in the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Lee, Choonik; Langen, Katja M.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Manon, Rafael R.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare different image-guidance strategies in the alignment of prostate cancer patients. Using data from patients treated using daily image guidance, the remaining setup errors for several different strategies were retrospectively calculated. Methods and Materials: The alignment data from 74 patients treated with helical tomotherapy were analyzed, resulting in a data set of 2,252 fractions during which a megavoltage computed tomography image was used for image guidance with intraprostatic metallic fiducials. Given the daily positional adjustments, a variety of protocols, differing in imaging frequency and method, were retrospectively studied. The residual setup errors were determined for each protocol. Results: As expected, the systematic errors were effectively reduced with imaging. However, the random errors were unaffected. Even when image guidance was performed every other day with a running mean of the previous displacements, residual setup errors >5 mm occurred in 24% of all fractions. This frequency increased to about 40% if setup errors >3 mm were scored. Conclusion: Setup errors increased with decreasing frequency of image guidance. However, residual errors were still significant at the 5-mm level, even with imaging was performed every other day. This suggests that localizations must be performed daily in the set up of prostate cancer patients during a course of external beam radiotherapy

  1. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  2. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  3. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  4. Prostate cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Kjaer, S K

    1998-01-01

    To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period.......To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period....

  5. Percutaneous radiation therapy for localized and generalized stages of prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.P.; Schnepper, E.; Castrup, W.

    1981-01-01

    Eighty-three patients with prostatic cancer, who underwent megavoltage therapy of the carcinoma or of its metastases, are reported. The majority of the patients had advanced disease (Stage C or D according to Flocks) when they came to be treated, and thus the general prognosis was bad. Radiation therapy, however, represents on the whole an important constituent of therapy in prostatic cancer, with regard to the practicability as well as to palliative treatment of metastases to the skeleton. (orig.) [de

  6. Perineural Invasion is a Marker for Pathologically Advanced Disease in Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Irwin H.; Roberts, Rebecca; Shah, Rajal B.; Wojno, Kirk J.; Wei, John T.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if perineural invasion (PNI) should be included in addition to prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy Gleason score, and clinical T-stage for risk-stratification of patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed prostatectomy findings for 1550 patients, from a prospectively collected institutional database, to determine whether PNI was a significant predictor for upgrading of Gleason score or pathologic T3 disease after patients were stratified into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups (on the basis of PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and clinical T-stage). Results: For the overall population, PNI was associated with a significantly increased frequency of upgrading and of pathologic T3 disease. After stratification, PNI was still associated with significantly increased odds of pathologic T3 disease within each risk group. In particular, for low-risk patients, there was a markedly increased risk of extraprostatic extension (23% vs. 7%), comparable to that of intermediate-risk patients. Among high-risk patients, PNI was associated with an increased risk of seminal vesicle invasion and lymph node involvement. Furthermore, over 80% of high-risk patients with PNI were noted to have an indication for postoperative radiation. Conclusions: Perineural invasion may be useful for risk-stratification of prostate cancer. Our data suggest that low-risk patients with PNI on biopsy may benefit from treatment typically reserved for those with intermediate-risk disease. In addition, men with high-risk disease and PNI, who are contemplating surgery, should be informed of the high likelihood of having an indication for postoperative radiation therapy

  7. Radical prostatectomy in the 21st century - the gold standard for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schostak, M; Miller, K; Schrader, M

    2008-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy for treatment of prostate cancer is a technically sophisticated operation. Simpler therapies have therefore been developed in the course of decades. The decisive advantage of a radical operation is the chance of a cure with minimal collateral damage. It is the only approach that enables precise tumor staging. The 10-year progression-free survival probability is approximately 85% for a localized tumor with negative resection margins. This high cure rate is unsurpassed by competitive treatment modalities. Nowadays, experienced surgeons achieve excellent functional results (for example, recovery of continence and erectile function) with minimum morbidity. Even in the locally advanced stage, results are very good compared to those obtained with other treatment modalities. Pathological staging enables stratified adjuvant therapy based on concrete information. The overall prognosis can thus be significantly improved.

  8. Sextant localization of prostate cancer in peripheral zone by MRI: correlation with systemic biopsy pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Rong; Wang Xiaoying; Li Feiyu; Xu Yufeng; Jiang Xuexiang; He Yunfeng; Liu Pengcheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of sextant localization of prostate cancer (PCa) in PZ (peripheral zone) by MR Imaging. Methods: Fifty-one cases of PCa and 29 cases of benign prostate diseases were enrolled in the study. Each peripheral zone was divided into 6 sections (left/right bottom, middle and tip ) in the same fashion for biopsy and the characteristics of each sextant was evaluated separately. Being blinded to clinical data, 2 radiologists with different subspeciahy experience analyzed MR images of the 480 sections of these 80 cases retrospectively. Each sextant region impression of likelihood for cancer was estimated by the rank of a five-point rating scale (1=definite PCa, 2=probable PCa, 3=possible PCa, 4=probably not PCa, 5=definitely not PCa). If definite PCa was considered, then it was staged furthermore. Each diagnosis of sextant region was compared with the pathological result of corresponding biopsy site. Result: (1) Four hundred and seventy sections (205 cancerous and 265 benign) were proved by biopsy. The diagnosis efficacy was best when cutoff point was 2. There was moderate consistency between the results of MRI and pathology with the kappa value of 0.549-0.560. The total accuracy was 78.1%-78.3% with the sensitivity of 69.3%-76.1% and the specificity of 84.9%-80.0%. The positive predictive value was 78.0%-74.6% and the negative predictive value was 78.1%-81.2%. (2) The ROC analysis demonstrated that Az with total impression recorded by two readers had not significant difference(0.829±0.020 vs. 0.840±0.019, U=-0.3988, P>0.05). Conclusion: MRI may be an elementary way to localize PCa in PZ, but the diagnosis efficacy need to be improved furthermore. (authors)

  9. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: 10-Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauswald, Henrik; Kamrava, Mitchell R.; Fallon, Julia M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Park, Sang-June; Van, Thanh; Borja, Lalaine; Steinberg, Michael L.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey, E-mail: JDemanes@mednet.ucla.edu

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was originally used with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to increase the dose to the prostate without injuring the bladder or rectum. Numerous studies have reported HDR brachytherapy is safe and effective. We adapted it for use without EBRT for cases not requiring lymph node treatment. Patients and Methods: We entered the patient demographics, disease characteristics, and treatment parameters into a prospective registry and serially added follow-up data for 448 men with low-risk (n=288) and intermediate-risk (n=160) prostate cancer treated from 1996 to 2009. Their median age was 64 years (range 42-90). The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 6.0 ng/mL (range 0.2-18.2). The Gleason score was ≤6 in 76% and 7 in 24%. The median dose was 43.5 Gy in 6 fractions. The clinical and biochemical disease control and survival rates were calculated. Adverse events were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Events. Results: The median follow-up period was 6.5 years (range 0.3-15.3). The actuarial 6- and 10-year PSA progression-free survival was 98.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 96.9%-99.4%) and 97.8% (95% CI 95.5%-98.9%). Overall survival at 10 years was 76.7% (95% CI 69.9%-82.2%). The local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and cause-specific survival were 99.7% (95% CI 97.9%-99.9%), 98.9% (95% CI 96.3%-99.7%), and 99.1% (95% CI 95.8%-99.8%). T stage, initial PSA level, Gleason score, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group, patient age, and androgen deprivation therapy did not significantly correlate with disease control or survival. No late grade 3 to 4 rectal toxicities developed. Late grade 3 to 4 genitourinary toxicity occurred in 4.9% (grade 3 in 4.7%). Conclusions: HDR monotherapy is a safe and highly effective treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  10. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Katherine; Konety, Badrinath; Ordonez, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field. PMID:26949522

  11. Evaluating the influence of organ motion during photon vs. proton therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer using biological models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Kia; G Andersen, Andreas; Casares-Magaz, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    beam angles for pelvic irradiation, we aimed to evaluate the influence of organ motion for PT using biological models, and to compare this with contemporary photon-based RT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight locally advanced prostate cancer patients with a planning CT (pCT) and 8-9 repeated CT scans (r...

  12. Quality assurance in the 22991 EORTC ROG trial in localized prostate cancer : Dummy run and individual case review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matzinger, Oscar; Poortmans, Philip; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Maingon, Philippe; Budiharto, Tom; van den Bergh, Alfons C. M.; Davis, J. Bernard; Musat, Elena; Ataman, Fatma; Huyskens, Dominique P.; Gulyban, Akos; Bolla, Michel

    Introduction: EORTC trial 22991 was designed to evaluate the addition of concomitant and adjuvant short-term hormonal treatments to curative radiotherapy in terms of disease-free survival for patients with intermediate risk localized prostate cancer. In order to assess the compliance to the 3D

  13. eHealth Literacy and Partner Involvement in Treatment Decision Making for Men With Newly Diagnosed Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lixin; Tatum, Kimberly; Greene, Giselle; Chen, Ronald C

    2017-03-01

    To examine how the eHealth literacy of partners of patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer affects their involvement in decision making, and to identify the factors that influence their eHealth literacy.
. Cross-sectional exploratory study.
. North Carolina.
. 142 partners of men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer. 
. A telephone survey and descriptive and multiple linear regression analyses were used.
. The partners' eHealth literacy, involvement in treatment decision making, and demographics, and the health statuses of the patients and their partners. 
. Higher levels of eHealth literacy among partners were significantly associated with their involvement in getting a second opinion, their awareness of treatment options, and the size of the social network they relied on for additional information and support for treatment decision making for prostate cancer. The factor influencing eHealth literacy was the partners' access to the Internet for personal use, which explained some of the variance in eHealth literacy.
. This study described how partners' eHealth literacy influenced their involvement in treatment decision making for prostate cancer and highlighted the influencing factors (i.e., partners' access to the Internet for personal use).
. When helping men with prostate cancer and their partners with treatment decision making, nurses need to assess eHealth literacy levels to determine whether nonelectronically based education materials are needed and to provide clear instructions on how to use eHealth resources.

  14. Health-related quality of life in Japanese men with localized prostate cancer. Assessment with the SF-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Mikio; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Takegami, Misa; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Suzukamo, Yoshimi

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate health related quality of life (HRQOL) using the Medical Outcomes Study 8-items Short Form Health Survey (SF-8) questionnaire in Japanese patients with early prostate cancer. A cross-sectional analysis was done in 457 patients with prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and watchful waiting or a combination these therapies. General HRQOL was measured using the Japanese version of the SF-8 questionnaire and disease-specific HRQOL was assessed using the Japanese version of the Extended Prostate Cancer Index Composite. The external beam radiotherapy group reported significantly lower values for the physical health component summary score (PCS) in comparison to the radical prostatectomy and brachytherapy groups (P<0.05). In the analysis of both the PCS and the mental health component summary score (MCS) over time after treatment, higher scores with time were found in the radical prostatectomy group. No significant change over time after androgen deprivation therapy in the PCS was found. In contrast, the MCS was found to deteriorate in the early period, showing a significant increase over time. SF-8 in combination with the Extended Prostate Cancer Index Composite has shown to be a helpful tool in the HRQOL assessment of Japanese patients treated for localized prostate cancer. (author)

  15. Localized field conformation radiotherapy combined with endocrine therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Kaizu, Toshihide; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    To improve the quality of life (QOL) of the patients with prostate cancer, we limit the radiotherapy target volume to the prostate and seminal vesicles while using endocrine therapy towards the disease outside the target volume. Radiotherapy technique was rotation conformation technique with computer-controlled multileaf collimators to the total doses of up to 66-70 Gy. Among 145 evaluable cases with the median age of 74, overall and cause-specific 5-year survival rates were 59.3% and 84.1%, respectively, and the relative survival rate of the Stage A-C cases was 100%. The two thirds (33/50) of the deaths were not of prostate cancer. The rate of severe complication was 1.4%. As for QOL, the rate of impotence was 90%, however, the patients' overall satisfaction towards the treatment was 90%. From this analysis, this combined treatment seems beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  16. [Histopathological changes due to transurethural microwave thermotherapy associated with androgen deprivation therapy in patients with localized prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jujo, Yutaka; Koshiba, Ken; Suzuki, Ryuta; Hoshiai, Osamu; Endo, Tadao; Aihara, Masahiro; Katsuta, Masayuki; Nakajo, Hirotaka

    2006-03-01

    The 2nd generation transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT), equipped with high energy microwave generator and urethral cooling device is widely accepted as an less invasive effective modality to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. For prostatic cancer, however, it is generally estimated as insufficient because of limitation in penetration of microwave into deep prostatic tissue. In this study, we examined histopathologic changes after androgen deprivation theraphy (ADT) and TUMT. Ten patients with localized prostate cancer underwent ADT for 3 months, and then TUMT was proceeded using Urowave (Dornier MedTech GmbH). Additional 3 months after TUMT and continued ADT, TURP in radical fashion was performed in all the patients, and all the resected chips were submitted for pathological study. Significant reduction in prostate volume was noted after NHT for 3 months from 37.4 +/- 9.6 ml to 22.0 +/- 5.6 ml. The pathological study of resected chips revealed progressive fibrotic changes without viable cancer cells in 9 of 10 patients. In 1 patient, however, some remnant of carcinomatous foci were noted in a resected chip from the middle lobe of the prostate. Although the number of patient is limited and longer follow-up is needed, the results in present series was interested and worth considering.

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer: the Georgetown University experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Leonard N; Lei, Siyuan; Batipps, Gerald P; Kowalczyk, Keith; Bandi, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivers fewer high-dose fractions of radiation which may be radiobiologically favorable to conventional low-dose fractions commonly used for prostate cancer radiotherapy. We report our early experience using SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Patients treated with SBRT from June 2008 to May 2010 at Georgetown University Hospital for localized prostate carcinoma, with or without the use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), were included in this retrospective review of data that was prospectively collected in an institutional database. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® with doses of 35 Gy or 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Biochemical control was assessed using the Phoenix definition. Toxicities were recorded and scored using the CTCAE v.3. Quality of life was assessed before and after treatment using the Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12), the American Urological Association Symptom Score (AUA) and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) questionnaires. Late urinary symptom flare was defined as an AUA score ≥ 15 with an increase of ≥ 5 points above baseline six months after the completion of SBRT. One hundred patients (37 low-, 55 intermediate- and 8 high-risk according to the D’Amico classification) at a median age of 69 years (range, 48–90 years) received SBRT, with 11 patients receiving ADT. The median pre-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was 6.2 ng/ml (range, 1.9-31.6 ng/ml) and the median follow-up was 2.3 years (range, 1.4-3.5 years). At 2 years, median PSA decreased to 0.49 ng/ml (range, 0.1-1.9 ng/ml). Benign PSA bounce occurred in 31% of patients. There was one biochemical failure in a high-risk patient, yielding a two-year actuarial biochemical relapse free survival of 99%. The 2-year actuarial incidence rates of GI and GU toxicity ≥ grade 2 were 1% and 31%, respectively. A median baseline AUA symptom score of 8 significantly increased to 11 at 1 month (p = 0.001), however returned to

  18. Quality of life in locally advanced prostate cancer patients who underwent hormonal treatment combined with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Hirofumi; Naito, Seiji; Fukui, Iwao; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Matsuoka, Naoki; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the feasibility of quality of life (QOL) research and to evaluate the QOL prospectively in locally advanced prostate cancer patients treated with hormonal treatment combined with radiotherapy. The treatment schedule was that patients with decreasing prostatic specific antigen (PSA) levels below 10 ng/ml after receiving 6 months of neoadjuvant hormonal treatment were randomly divided into two groups; one group was the continuous hormonal treatment group and the other was the intermittent hormonal treatment group. Both groups received a total dose of 72 Gy external beam radiotherapy with concomitant hormonal treatment followed by 6 months of adjuvant hormonal treatment following radiotherapy. At 14 months, patients either underwent continuous or intermittent hormonal treatment according to the random allocation. QOL was assessed at baseline, and at 6, 8, 14, and 20 months after treatment using functional assessment of cancer treatment-general (FACT-G), P with the other 3 items comprising bother of urination, bother of bowel movement, and bother of sexual activity. Between January 2000 and June 2003, a total of 188 patients were enrolled in this study. The rate of collection of baseline QOL sheets was 98.0%. The rate of answer to questions of QOL sheets was 99.0%. At baseline, the average score of FACT-G, P was 120.7 and the maximum score was more than twice the minimum score. Dysfunction of urination and bowel movement was correlated with the bother of urination and bowel movement, respectively. On the other hand, dysfunction of sexual activity was not correlated with the bother of sexual activity. In June 2003, all of the QOL sheets at baseline, and at 6, 8, and 14 months were completely collected from a total of 72 patients. Although QOL at 8 months was significantly affected compared with QOL at baseline and at 6 months, QOL at 14 months was significantly improved compared with that at 8 months and there was no significant

  19. Morbidity in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with non-curative intent. A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Friis, S; Juel, K

    1999-01-01

    . When prostate cancer-related admissions were excluded, the relative risk of admission was reduced to 1.35 (1.3-1.4) and 0.86 (0.83-0.89), respectively. The estimated costs associated with deferred therapy in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer exceeded the estimated cost in age...

  20. Advances in local and ablative treatment of oligometastasis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Henry Hi; Hong, Matthew Kh; Corcoran, Niall M; Siva, Shankar; Foroudi, Farshad

    2014-12-01

    Oligometastasis is a state of limited metastatic disease that may be amenable to aggressive local therapy to achieve long-term survival. This review aims to explore the role of ablative radiotherapy and surgical management of prostate cancer (CaP) patients with oligometastasis. We performed a systematic review of the literature from November 2003 to November 2013 in the PubMed and EMBASE databases using structured search terms. From our literature search, we identified 13 cases of oligometastatic CaP managed by surgery. The longest disease-free survival documented was 12 years following pulmonary metastasectomy. We also found 12 studies using radiotherapy to treat oligometastatic CaP with median follow-up ranging from 6 to 43 months. Local control rates and overall survival at 3 years range from 66 to 90% and from 54 to 92%, respectively. Most patients did not report any significant toxicity. The limited current literature suggests oligometastatic CaP may be amenable to more aggressive local ablative therapy to achieve prolonged local control and delay to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). There is a larger body of evidence supporting the use of radiotherapy than surgery in this disease state. However, no direct comparison with ADT is available to suggest an improvement in overall survival. Further studies are required to determine the role of aggressive-targeted local therapy in oligometastatic CaP. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Variation in Adherence to External Beam Radiotherapy Quality Measures Among Elderly Men With Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Jang, Thomas L.; Basch, Ethan M.; Schrag, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the variation in adherence to quality measures of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer and its relation to patient and provider characteristics in a population-based, representative sample of U.S. men. Methods and Materials: We evaluated EBRT quality measures proposed by a RAND expert panel of physicians among men aged ≥65 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2002 with localized prostate cancer and treated with primary EBRT using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare program. We assessed the adherence to five EBRT quality measures that were amenable to analysis using SEER-Medicare data: (1) use of conformal RT planning; (2) use of high-energy (>10-MV) photons; (3) use of custom immobilization; (4) completion of two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist in the year after therapy; and (5) radiation oncologist board certification. Results: Of the 11,674 patients, 85% had received conformal RT planning, 75% had received high-energy photons, and 97% had received custom immobilization. One-third of patients had completed two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist, although 91% had at least one visit with a urologist or radiation oncologist. Most patients (85%) had been treated by a board-certified radiation oncologist. Conclusions: The overall high adherence to EBRT quality measures masked substantial variation in geography, socioeconomic status in the area of residence, and teaching affiliation of the RT facility. Future research should examine the reasons for the variations in these measures and whether the variation is associated with important clinical outcomes

  2. Personality, treatment choice and satisfaction in patients with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, Craig A.; Erickson, Brad; Carney-Doebbling, Caroline; Gordon, Susanna; Fallon, Bernard; Konety, Badrinath R.

    2007-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP), external beam radiation (XRT) and brachytherapy (BTX) are the most commonly used treatments for localized prostate cancer. We studied whether patient personality influences treatment choice and overall treatment satisfaction. From 1998 to 2002, 219 consecutive patients treated with RP (n=74), XRT (n=73), or BTX (n=72) at our institution who remained free of biochemical recurrence were sent the Big Five Inventory (BFI) and a satisfaction/treatment participation questionnaire. We compared personality, satisfaction and participation scores between the three groups. Correlation between personality and satisfaction was determined. Multivariate regression was used to determine association between personality and satisfaction/participation after controlling for patient- and disease-related factors. Higher mean satisfaction and participation scores were observed within the RP and XRT groups, respectively (P=NS). No significant differences in personality were observed between groups. XRT patients tended to have higher extroversion, openness and agreeability scores, while RP patients tended to be more neurotic and conscientious (all P=NS). After controlling for other factors, a negative correlation was found between openness scores and satisfaction and a positive correlation between conscientiousness scores and satisfaction. Specific personality traits were associated with interest in participation in care for both RP and BTX patients but not for XRT patients. There are mild variations in personality as measured by the BFI between patients undergoing treatment for localized prostate cancer. Certain BFI-measured personality traits may be associated with levels of satisfaction following therapy. Disease concerns and provider recommendations may override the influence of personality in the decision-making process. (author)

  3. Personality, treatment choice and satisfaction in patients with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Craig A; Erickson, Brad; Carney-Doebbling, Caroline; Gordon, Susanna; Fallon, Bernard; Konety, Badrinath R

    2007-11-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP), external beam radiation (XRT) and brachytherapy (BTX) are the most commonly used treatments for localized prostate cancer. We studied whether patient personality influences treatment choice and overall treatment satisfaction. From 1998 to 2002, 219 consecutive patients treated with RP (n = 74), XRT (n = 73), or BTX (n = 72) at our institution who remained free of biochemical recurrence were sent the Big Five Inventory (BFI) and a satisfaction/treatment participation questionnaire. We compared personality, satisfaction and participation scores between the three groups. Correlation between personality and satisfaction was determined. Multivariate regression was used to determine association between personality and satisfaction/participation after controlling for patient- and disease-related factors. Higher mean satisfaction and participation scores were observed within the RP and XRT groups, respectively (P = NS). No significant differences in personality were observed between groups. XRT patients tended to have higher extroversion, openness and agreeability scores, while RP patients tended to be more neurotic and conscientious (all P = NS). After controlling for other factors, a negative correlation was found between openness scores and satisfaction and a positive correlation between conscientiousness scores and satisfaction. Specific personality traits were associated with interest in participation in care for both RP and BTX patients but not for XRT patients. There are mild variations in personality as measured by the BFI between patients undergoing treatment for localized prostate cancer. Certain BFI-measured personality traits may be associated with levels of satisfaction following therapy. Disease concerns and provider recommendations may override the influence of personality in the decision-making process.

  4. Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0185 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jonathan Melamed, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0185 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...infrastructure and operations of the Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network (PCBN). The aim of the PCBN is to provide prostate researchers with high-quality

  5. Advanced Imaging for the Early Diagnosis of Local Recurrence Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Panebianco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa after radical prostatectomy (RT is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  6. Potency probability following conformal megavoltage radiotherapy using conventional doses for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantz, C.A.; Song, P.; Farhangi, E.; Nautiyal, J.; Awan, A.; Ignacio, L.; Weichselbaum, R.; Vijayakumar, S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Impotence is a familiar sequela of definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer; however, nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (NSRP) has offered potency rates as high as 70% for selected for patients in several large series. To the authors' knowledge, age and stage-matched comparisons between the effects of EBRT and NSRP upon the normal age trend of impotence have not been performed. Herein, we report the change in potency over time in an EBRT-treated population, determine the significantly predisposing health factors affecting potency in this population, and compare age and stage-matched potency rates with those of normal males and prostatectomy patients. Methods and Materials: Our results are obtained from a retrospective study of 114 patients ranging in age from 52 to 85 (mean, 68) who were diagnosed with clinical stages A-C C (T1-T4N0M0) prostate cancer and then treated conformally with megavoltage x-rays to 6500-7000 cGy (180-200 cGy per fraction) using the four-field box technique. Information concerning pre-RT potency, medical and surgical history, and medications was documented for each patient as was time of post-RT change in potency during regular follow-up. The median follow-up time was 18.5 months. Results: The actuarial probability of potency for all patients gradually decreased throughout post-RT follow-up. At months 1, 12, 24, and 36, potency rates were 98, 92, 75, and 66%, respectively. For those patients who became impotent, the median time to impotence was 14 months. Factors identified from logistic regression analysis as significant predictors of post-EBRT impotence include pre-EBRT partial potency (p < 0.001), vascular disease (p < 0.001), and diabetes (p = 0.003). Next, an actuarial plot of potency probability to patient age for the EBRT-treated population was compared to that obtained from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study of normal males. The two curves were not significantly different (logrank

  7. Key papers in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney, Simon; Shah, Taimur Tariq; Patel, Hitendra R H; Arya, Manit

    2014-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and second leading cause of death in men. The evidence base for the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer is continually changing. We aim to review and discuss past and contemporary papers on these topics to provoke debate and highlight key dilemmas faced by the urological community. We review key papers on prostate-specific antigen screening, radical prostatectomy versus surveillance strategies, targeted therapies, timing of radiotherapy and alternative anti-androgen therapeutics. Previously, the majority of patients, irrespective of risk, underwent radical open surgical procedures associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging that not all prostate cancers are alike and that low-grade disease can be safely managed by surveillance strategies and localized treatment to the prostate. The question remains as to how to accurately stage the disease and ultimately choose which treatment pathway to follow.

  8. Correlation between chromosome 9p21 locus deletion and prognosis in clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Érika Aparecida Felix de; Pontes-Junior, José; Reis, Sabrina Thalita; Lima, Amanda Eunice Ramos; Souza, Isida C; Salgueiro, Jose Lucas; Fontes, Douglas; Dellê, Humberto; Coelho, Rafael Ferreira; Viana, Nayara Izabel; Leite, Kátia Ramos Moreira; Nahas, William C; Srougi, Miguel

    2017-05-04

    Some studies have reported that deletions at chromosome arm 9p occur frequently and represent a critical step in carcinogenesis of some neoplasms. Our aim was to evaluate the deletion of locus 9p21 and chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 in localized prostate cancer (PC) and correlate these alterations with prognostic factors and biochemical recurrence after surgery. We retrospectively evaluated surgical specimens from 111 patients with localized PC who underwent radical prostatectomy. Biochemical recurrence was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >0.2 ng/mL and the mean postoperative follow-up was 123 months. The deletions were evaluated using fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric and locus-specific probes in a tissue microarray containing 2 samples from each patient. We correlated the occurrence of any deletion with pathological stage, Gleason score, ISUP grade group, PSA and biochemical recurrence. We observed a loss of any probe in only 8 patients (7.2%). The most common deletion was the loss of locus 9p21, which occurred in 6.4% of cases. Deletions of chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 were observed in 2.3%, 1.2% and 1.8% patients, respectively. There was no correlation between chromosome loss and Gleason score, ISUP, PSA or stage. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 83% cases involving 9p21 deletions. Loss of 9p21 locus was significantly associated with time to recurrence (p = 0.038). We found low rates of deletion in chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 and 9p21 locus. We observed that 9p21 locus deletion was associated with worse prognosis in localized PC treated by radical prostatectomy.

  9. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z.; Alzimami, Khalid S.; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Fagiri, Maram A.

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applies high-intensity focused ultrasound energy to locally heat and destroy diseased or damaged tissue through ablation. This study intended to review HIFU to explain the fundamentals of HIFU, evaluate the evidence concerning the role of HIFU in the treatment of prostate cancer (PC), review the technologies used to perform HIFU and the published clinical literature regarding the procedure as a primary treatment for PC. Studies addressing HIFU in localized PC were identified in a search of internet scientific databases. The analysis of outcomes was limited to journal articles written in English and published between 2000 and 2013. HIFU is a non-invasive approach that uses a precisely delivered ultrasound energy to achieve tumor cell necrosis without radiation or surgical excision. In current urological oncology, HIFU is used clinically in the treatment of PC. Clinical research on HIFU therapy for localized PC began in the 1990s, and the majority of PC patients were treated with the Ablatherm device. HIFU treatment for localized PC can be considered as an alternative minimally invasive therapeutic modality for patients who are not candidates for radical prostatectomy. Patients with lower pre-HIFU PSA level and favourable pathologic Gleason score seem to present better oncologic outcomes. Future advances in technology and safety will undoubtedly expand the HIFU role in this indication as more of patient series are published, with a longer follow-up period

  10. Advantages and limitations of navigation-based multicriteria optimization (MCO) for localized prostate cancer IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, Conor K.; Bokrantz, Rasmus; O’Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of inverse planning is becoming increasingly important for advanced radiotherapy techniques. This study’s aims were to validate multicriteria optimization (MCO) in RayStation (v2.4, RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) against standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization in Oncentra (v4.1, Nucletron BV, the Netherlands) and characterize dose differences due to conversion of navigated MCO plans into deliverable multileaf collimator apertures. Step-and-shoot IMRT plans were created for 10 patients with localized prostate cancer using both standard optimization and MCO. Acceptable standard IMRT plans with minimal average rectal dose were chosen for comparison with deliverable MCO plans. The trade-off was, for the MCO plans, managed through a user interface that permits continuous navigation between fluence-based plans. Navigated MCO plans were made deliverable at incremental steps along a trajectory between maximal target homogeneity and maximal rectal sparing. Dosimetric differences between navigated and deliverable MCO plans were also quantified. MCO plans, chosen as acceptable under navigated and deliverable conditions resulted in similar rectal sparing compared with standard optimization (33.7 ± 1.8 Gy vs 35.5 ± 4.2 Gy, p = 0.117). The dose differences between navigated and deliverable MCO plans increased as higher priority was placed on rectal avoidance. If the best possible deliverable MCO was chosen, a significant reduction in rectal dose was observed in comparison with standard optimization (30.6 ± 1.4 Gy vs 35.5 ± 4.2 Gy, p = 0.047). Improvements were, however, to some extent, at the expense of less conformal dose distributions, which resulted in significantly higher doses to the bladder for 2 of the 3 tolerance levels. In conclusion, similar IMRT plans can be created for patients with prostate cancer using MCO compared with standard optimization. Limitations exist within MCO regarding conversion of navigated plans to

  11. Radiation therapy of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer and hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Hida, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    Ten patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy and hormone therapy to improve tumor control and survival. Eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy to improve their quality of life. Local control of the tumor was achieved in 9 of 10 patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer. Five of eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer obtained improved quality of life. Combined radiotherapy and hormone therapy were effective in the treatment of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer, and radiotherapy was useful for improving the quality of life of patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer. (author)

  12. Prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Vita; Silva, Joao L. F.; Srougi, Miguel; Nesrallah, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    The transperineal brachytherapy with 125 I/Pd 103 seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy

  13. Survey of factors underlying treatment choice for patients with localized prostate cancer (radical prostatectomy vs extrabeam radiotherapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramoto, Sakiko; Ota, Tomonori; Itaya, Naoshi; Maniwa, Akimitsu; Matsui, Takashi; Nishimura, Yoji; Shoji, Kazufusa

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding factors for decision-making on treatment by localized prostate cancer patients. We therefore conducted a survey series of cases for influence on treatment decision making, and also satisfaction after therapy. A total of 51 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) were mailed original questionnaires about their treatment decision-making factors and satisfaction and the results compared between the two groups. Some 48 (94.1%) patients responded to the questionnaire, 38 (79.2%) and 10 (20.8%) after RP and EBRT, respectively. The major factor determining the decision as to treatment approach was the physician in both groups (more than 90%). Excluding physicians, family or others were more important in the RP group than the EBRT group (p=0.023). RP group patients desired removal of their prostate for cancer control, while, EBRT group patients favored the less invasive approach in consideration of side effects. Over 80% patients indicated they would definitely or probably choose the same treatment again, although some of the RP group would switch to watchful-waiting because of sexual dysfunction, urinary incontinence and the invasive nature of the procedure. Physicians are in a most important position to help patients understand prostate cancer and treatment, outcomes, and need to help them make their best choice, with appropriate follow up including mental care. (author)

  14. Decision aid use during post-biopsy consultations for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Srikanth, Akshay; Henry, Stephen G; Langford, Aisha; Rovner, David R; Fagerlin, Angela

    2018-02-01

    Decision Aids (DAs) effectively translate medical evidence for patients but are not routinely used in clinical practice. Little is known about how DAs are used during patient-clinician encounters. To characterize the content and communicative function of high-quality DAs during diagnostic clinic visits for prostate cancer. 252 men newly diagnosed with localized prostate cancer who had received a DA, 45 treating physicians at 4 US Veterans Administration urology clinics. Qualitative analysis of transcribed audio recordings was used to inductively develop categories capturing content and function of all direct references to DAs (booklet talk). The presence or absence of any booklet talk per transcript was also calculated. Booklet talk occurred in 55% of transcripts. Content focused on surgical procedures (36%); treatment choice (22%); and clarifying risk classification (17%). The most common function of booklet talk was patient corroboration of physicians' explanations (42%), followed by either physician or patient acknowledgement that the patient had the booklet. Codes reflected the absence of DA use for shared decision-making. In regression analysis, predictors of booklet talk were fewer years of patient education (P = .027) and more time in the encounter (P = .027). Patient race, DA type, time reading the DA, physician informing quality and physician age did not predict booklet talk. Results show that good decision aids, systematically provided to patients, appeared to function not to open up deliberations about how to balance benefits and harms of competing treatments, but rather to allow patients to ask narrow technical questions about recommended treatments. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Long-Term Quality of Life Outcome After Proton Beam Monotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coen, John J., E-mail: jcoen@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Weyman, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Rodrigues, Anita [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Talcott, James A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: High-dose external radiation for localized prostate cancer results in favorable clinical outcomes and low toxicity rates. Here, we report long-term quality of life (QOL) outcome for men treated with conformal protons. Methods: QOL questionnaires were sent at specified intervals to 95 men who received proton radiation. Of these, 87 men reported 3- and/or 12-month outcomes, whereas 73 also reported long-term outcomes (minimum 2 years). Symptom scores were calculated at baseline, 3 months, 12 months, and long-term follow-up. Generalized estimating equation models were constructed to assess longitudinal outcomes while accounting for correlation among repeated measures in an individual patient. Men were stratified into functional groups from their baseline questionnaires (normal, intermediate, or poor function) for each symptom domain. Long-term QOL changes were assessed overall and within functional groups using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Statistically significant changes in all four symptom scores were observed in the longitudinal analysis. For the 73 men reporting long-term outcomes, there were significant change scores for incontinence (ID), bowel (BD) and sexual dysfunction (SD), but not obstructive/irritative voiding dysfunction (OID). When stratified by baseline functional category, only men with normal function had increased scores for ID and BD. For SD, there were significant changes in men with both normal and intermediate function, but not poor function. Conclusions: Patient reported outcomes are sensitive indicators of treatment-related morbidity. These results quantitate the long-term consequences of proton monotherapy for prostate cancer. Analysis by baseline functional category provides an individualized prediction of long-term QOL scores. High dose proton radiation was associated with small increases in bowel dysfunction and incontinence, with more pronounced changes in sexual dysfunction.

  16. Contemporary management of men with high-risk localized prostate cancer in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, A B; Matulewicz, R S; Schaeffer, E M; Liauw, S L; Feinglass, J M; Eggener, S E

    2017-09-01

    Surgery and radiation-based therapies are standard management options for men with clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer (PCa). Contemporary patterns of care are unknown. We hypothesize the use of surgery has steadily increased in more recent years. Using the National Cancer Data Base for 2004-2013, all men diagnosed with high-risk localized PCa were identified using National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. Temporal trends in initial management were assessed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate demographic and clinical factors associated with undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). In total, 127 391 men were identified. Use of RP increased from 26% in 2004 to 42% in 2013 (adjusted risk ratio (RR) 1.51, 95% CI 1.42-1.60, P<0.001), while external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) decreased from 49% to 42% (P<0.001). African American men had lower odds of undergoing RP (unadjusted rate of 28%, adjusted RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.66-0.72, <0.001) compared to White men (37%). Age was inversely associated with likelihood of receiving RP. Having private insurance was significantly associated with the increased use of RP (vs Medicare, adjusted odds ratio 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.08, P=0.015). Biopsy Gleason scores 8-10 with and without any primary Gleason 5 pattern were associated with decreased odds of RP (vs Gleason score ⩽6, both P<0.001). Academic and comprehensive cancer centers were more likely to perform RP compared to community hospitals (both P<0.001). The likelihood of receiving RP for high-risk PCa dramatically increased from 2004 to 2013. By 2013, the use of RP and EBRT were similar. African American men, elderly men and those without private insurance were less likely to receive RP.

  17. Information Seeking and Satisfaction with Information Sources Among Spouses of Men with Newly Diagnosed Local-Stage Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Aasthaa; Koepl, Lisel M; Fedorenko, Catherine R; Li, Chunyu; Smith, Judith Lee; Hall, Ingrid J; Penson, David F; Ramsey, Scott D

    2018-04-01

    Information sources about prostate cancer treatment and outcomes are typically designed for patients. Little is known about the availability and utility of information for partners. The objectives of our study were to evaluate information sources used by partners to understand prostate cancer management options, their perceived usefulness, and the relationship between sources used and satisfaction with treatment experience. A longitudinal survey of female partners of men newly diagnosed with local-stage prostate cancer was conducted in three different geographic regions. Partners and associated patients were surveyed at baseline (after patient diagnosis but prior to receiving therapy) and at 12 months following diagnosis. Information sources included provider, literature, friends or family members, Internet websites, books, traditional media, and support groups. Utility of an information source was defined as whether the partner would recommend it to caregivers of other patients with local-stage prostate cancer. Our study cohort included 179 partner-patient pairs. At diagnosis, partners consulted an average of 4.6 information sources. Non-Hispanic white partners were more likely than others to use friends and family as an information source (OR = 2.44, 95% CI (1.04, 5.56)). More educated partners were less likely to use support groups (OR = 0.31, 95% CI (0.14, 0.71)). At 12-month follow-up, partners were less likely to recommend books (OR = 0.23, 95% CI (0.11, 0.49)) compared to baseline. Partners consulted a large number of information sources in researching treatment options for local-stage prostate cancer and the types of sources accessed varied by race/ethnicity and educational attainment. Additional resources to promote selection of high-quality non-provider information sources are warranted to enable partners to better aid patients in their treatment decision-making process.

  18. A three-protein biomarker panel assessed in diagnostic tissue predicts death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severi, Gianluca; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Muller, David C; Pedersen, John; Longano, Anthony; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Mills, John

    2014-01-01

    Only a minority of prostate cancers lead to death. Because no tissue biomarkers of aggressiveness other than Gleason score are available at diagnosis, many nonlethal cancers are treated aggressively. We evaluated whether a panel of biomarkers, associated with a range of disease outcomes in previous studies, could predict death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease. Using a case-only design, subjects were identified from three Australian epidemiological studies. Men who had died of their disease, “cases” (N = 83), were matched to “referents” (N = 232), those who had not died of prostate cancer, using incidence density sampling. Diagnostic tissue was retrieved to assess expression of AZGP1, MUC1, NKX3.1, p53, and PTEN by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC). Poisson regression was used to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs) adjusted for age, Gleason score, and stage and to estimate survival probabilities. Expression of MUC1 and p53 was associated with increased mortality (MRR 2.51, 95% CI 1.14–5.54, P = 0.02 and 3.08, 95% CI 1.41–6.95, P = 0.005, respectively), whereas AZGP1 expression was associated with decreased mortality (MRR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20–0.96, P = 0.04). Analyzing all markers under a combined model indicated that the three markers were independent predictors of prostate cancer death and survival. For men with localized disease at diagnosis, assessment of AZGP1, MUC1, and p53 expression in diagnostic tissue by IHC could potentially improve estimates of risk of dying from prostate cancer based only on Gleason score and clinical stage

  19. Tobacco smoking, polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes, and risk of localized and advanced prostate cancer: results from the California Collaborative Prostate Cancer Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahabi, Ahva; Corral, Román; Catsburg, Chelsea; Joshi, Amit D; Kim, Andre; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Koo, Jocelyn; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Stern, Mariana C

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between tobacco smoking and prostate cancer (PCa) remains inconclusive. This study examined the association between tobacco smoking and PCa risk taking into account polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes as possible effect modifiers (9 polymorphisms and 1 predicted phenotype from metabolism enzyme genes). The study included cases (n = 761 localized; n = 1199 advanced) and controls (n = 1139) from the multiethnic California Collaborative Case–Control Study of Prostate Cancer. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between tobacco smoking variables and risk of localized and advanced PCa risk. Being a former smoker, regardless of time of quit smoking, was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.6). Among non-Hispanic Whites, ever smoking was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1–2.1), whereas current smoking was associated with risk of advanced PCa (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.0–1.9). However, no associations were observed between smoking intensity, duration or pack-year variables, and advanced PCa. No statistically significant trends were seen among Hispanics or African-Americans. The relationship between smoking status and PCa risk was modified by the CYP1A2 rs7662551 polymorphism (P-interaction = 0.008). In conclusion, tobacco smoking was associated with risk of PCa, primarily localized disease among non-Hispanic Whites. This association was modified by a genetic variant in CYP1A2, thus supporting a role for tobacco carcinogens in PCa risk

  20. The relationship between technical parameters of external beam radiation therapy and complications for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Shirato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Keishiro

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to review retrospectively the clinical course of chronic rectal bleeding as a complication of external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer and to analyze the relationship between technical parameters of radiation therapy and the complications. Seventy-one patients with stages A2, B and C were treated with local-field radiotherapy (total dose 52.5-66 Gy, daily dose 2.0-3.28 Gy, field area 30-81 cm 2 , number of fields 3-15 ports, planning simulations X-ray or CT-based) between 1989 and 1998 at three institutions. The protocols were consistent during this same period at these institutions. Multivariate analysis revealed pretreatment PSA and Gleason sum to be statistically significant predictors of 5 year prostatic specific antigen (PSA) relapse-free rates in a median follow-up period of 42 months (range 12-119 months). The significant risk factors for higher grading of acute morbidity were a biological equivalent dose, α/β=10 (BED 10 ) ≥65 Gy, dose per fraction ≥3.0 Gy, field area ≥42 cm 2 , fewer ports and X-ray planning simulation. However, no parameter was associated with higher grading of late morbidity. Eleven patients (15.4%) experienced a late GI complication: grade 1 (4.2%), grade 2 (9.8%), grade 3 (1.4%). The median time to occurrence of rectal bleeding was 12 months after radiotherapy and the mean duration of morbidity was 11 months. Higher total dose and dose per fraction, larger field area, fewer ports and X-ray simulation increased the grades of acute morbidity. A majority of chronic rectal bleedings were transient and responded to conservative treatment. (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in the radiation treatment planning of localized prostate cancer using intra-prostatic fiducial markers for computed tomography co-registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, C.C.; Damyanovich, A.; Haycocks, T.; Haider, M.; Bayley, A.; Catton, C.N.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility, and potential implications, of using intra-prostatic fiducial markers, rather than bony landmarks, for the co-registration of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in the radiation treatment planning of localized prostate cancer. Methods: All men treated with conformal therapy for localized prostate cancer underwent routine pre-treatment insertion of prostatic fiducial markers to assist with gross target volume (GTV) delineation and to identify prostate positioning during therapy. Six of these men were selected for investigation. Phantom MRI measurements were obtained to quantify image distortion, to determine the most suitable gold alloy marker composition, and to identify the spin-echo sequences that optimized both marker identification and the contrast between the prostate and the surrounding tissues. The GTV for each patient was contoured independently by three radiation oncologists on axial planning CT slices, and on axial MRI slices fused to the CT slices by matching the implanted fiducial markers. From each set of contours the scan common volume (SCV), and the scan encompassing volume (SEV), were obtained. The ratio SEV/SCV for a given scan is a measure of inter-observer variation in contouring. For each of the 18 patient-observer combinations the observer common volume (OCV) and the observer encompassing volume (OEV) was obtained. The ratio OEV/OCV for a given patient-observer combination is a measure of the inter-modality variation in contouring. The distance from the treatment planning isocenter to the prostate contours was measured and the discrepancy between the CT- and the MR-defined contour recorded. The discrepancies between the CT- and MR-defined contours of the posterior prostate were recorded in the sagittal plane at 1-cm intervals above and below the isocenter. Results: Phantom measurements demonstrated trivial image distortion within the required field of view, and an 18K Au/Cu alloy to

  2. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high (≥0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  3. Localized prostate cancer in elderly patients. Outcome after radiation therapy compared to matched younger patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, P.U.; Bitterli, M.; Luetolf, U.M.; Glanzmann, C.; Bernhard, J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To detect a difference in outcome (disease-specific survival, local tumor progression, late toxicity, quality of life) after curative radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer in elderly as compared to younger patients. Patients and methods: In a retrospective analysis 59 elderly patients (>74 years old) were matched 1:2 with younger patients from the data base according to tumor stage, grading, pre-treatment PSA values and year of radiotherapy. Surviving patients were contacted to fill in a validated questionnaire for quality of life measurement (EORTC QLQ-C30). Median follow-up for elderly and younger patients was 5.2 and 4.5 years, respectively. Results: Overall survival at 5 years was 66% for the elderly and 80% for younger patients. Intercurrent deaths were observed more frequently in the elderly population. There was no age-specific difference in disease-specific survival (78% vs 82%), late toxicity or quality of life. Clinically meaningful local tumor progression was observed in 15% and 14%, respectively, corresponding to data from the literature following hormonal ablation. Conclusions: There is no obvious difference in outcome including disease-specific survival, late toxicity and quality of life in elderly patients, compared to a matched younger population. A clinically meaningful local tumor progression following radiotherapy or hormonal ablation only is rare. Local radiotherapy or, alternatively, hormonal ablation is recommended to preserve local progression-free survival in elderly patients except for very early stage of disease (i.e. T1 G1-2 M0). (orig.) [de

  4. Survival and Complications Following Surgery and Radiation for Localized Prostate Cancer: An International Collaborative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Christopher J D; Glaser, Adam; Hu, Jim C; Huland, Hartwig; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Moon, Daniel; Murphy, Declan G; Nguyen, Paul L; Resnick, Matthew J; Nam, Robert K

    2018-01-01

    Evaluation of treatment options for localized prostate cancer (PCa) remains among the highest priorities for comparative effectiveness research. Surgery and radiotherapy (RT) are the two interventions most commonly used. To provide a critical narrative review of evidence of the comparative effectiveness and harms of surgery and RT in the treatment of localized PCa. A collaborative critical narrative review of the literature was conducted. Evidence to clearly guide treatment choice in PCa remains insufficient. Randomized trials are underpowered for clinically meaningful endpoints and have demonstrated no difference in overall or PCa-specific survival. Observational studies have consistently demonstrated an absolute survival benefit for men treated with radical prostatectomy, but are limited by selection bias and residual confounding errors. Surgery and RT are associated with comparable health-related quality of life following treatment in three randomized trials. Randomized data regarding urinary, erectile, and bowel function show few long-term (>5 yr) differences, although short-term continence and erectile function were worse following surgery and short-term urinary bother and bowel function were worse following RT. There has been recent recognition of other complications that may significantly affect the life trajectory of those undergoing PCa treatment. Of these, hospitalization, the need for urologic, rectoanal, and other major surgical procedures, and secondary cancers are more common among men treated with RT. Androgen deprivation therapy, frequently co-administered with RT, may additionally contribute to treatment-related morbidity. Technological innovations in surgery and RT have shown inconsistent oncologic and functional benefits. Owing to underpowered randomized control studies and the selection biases inherent in observational studies, the question of which treatment provides better PCa control cannot be definitively answered now or in the near future

  5. 3D conformal radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized prostate cancer: Is age a limiting factor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, A.; Negrea, T.; Lechevallier, E.; Coulange, C.; Murraciole, X.; Jouvea, E.; Sambuca, R.; Cowen, D.

    2011-01-01

    No study on side effects had showed that conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer is more harmful in patients older than 70 years to patients younger. The aim of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of conformal radiotherapy, with high dose for localized prostate cancer in patients older than 70 years and compared to patients younger than 70 years. Between 1996 and 2009, 104 patients were treated with radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized cancer prostate. Median follow-up was 105 months (9 300). Acute (occurred at ≤ three months) and late side effects of 55 patients older than 70 years (median age: 75 [71 92]) were graded according to the CTCAE 3.0 criteria and compared to the younger population. Median dose to the prostate was 75.6 Gy (67 80) in both groups. There were no significant differences in acute and late side effects between age groups. For patients above 70 years, the incidence of grade II or higher acute and late side effects were respectively 27 and 22% for urologic symptoms and 13 and 16% for rectal symptoms. The frequency of grade III late symptoms was low and ranged between 0 and 6% for the evaluated symptoms, irrespective of age group. Older patients had a better biochemical recurrence-free survival than younger patients (86 versus 77% at four years, P ≡ ns). High dose 3D conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer was well tolerated in patients older than 70 years. Age is not a limiting factor for conformal radiation therapy and hormonotherapy for older patients. (authors)

  6. Preliminary results of endorectal surface coil magnetic resonance imaging for local staging of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, G. J.; Barentsz, J. O.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Rosenbusch, G.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endorectal surface coil (ERC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the local staging of adenocarcinoma of the prostate (ACP). A total of 23 patients who were considered candidates for radical prostatectomy because of clinically localized ACP were examined by ERC-MRI.

  7. Survival benefit of early androgen receptor inhibitor therapy in locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal timing of endocrine therapy in non-metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is still an issue of debate. METHODS: A randomised, double-blind, parallel-group trial comparing bicalutamide 150mg once daily with placebo in addition to standard care in patients with hormone-naïve, non......-metastatic PCa. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate overall survival (OS) and multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was performed to analyse time-to-event (death). FINDINGS: A total of 1218 patients were included into the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group (SPCG)-6 study of which 607 were randomised...... disease (hazard ratios (HR)=0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63-0.94, p=0.01), regardless of baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA), with a survival benefit which was apparent throughout the study period. In contrast, survival favoured randomisation to the placebo arm in patients with localised...

  8. The link between benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, David Dynnes; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer are among the most common diseases of the prostate gland and represent significant burdens for patients and health-care systems in many countries. The two diseases share traits such as hormone-dependent growth and response to antiandrogen...... therapy. Furthermore, risk factors such as prostate inflammation and metabolic disruption have key roles in the development of both diseases. Despite these commonalities, BPH and prostate cancer exhibit important differences in terms of histology and localization. Although large-scale epidemiological...... studies have shown that men with BPH have an increased risk of prostate cancer and prostate-cancer-related mortality, it remains unclear whether this association reflects a causal link, shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms, or detection bias upon statistical analysis. Establishing BPH...

  9. Pathological Predictors for Site of Local Recurrence After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, Supriya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Toi, Ants [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Taback, Nathan [Division of Biostatistics, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Evans, Andrew [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto (Canada); Milosevic, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Morton, Gerard; Vesprini, Danny [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto (Canada); Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Menard, Cynthia, E-mail: Cynthia.Menard@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Rational design of targeted radiotherapy (RT) in prostate cancer (Pca) hinges on a better understanding of spatial patterns of recurrence. We sought to identify pathological factors predictive for site of local recurrence (LR) after external beam RT. Methods and Materials: Prospective databases were reviewed to identify men with LR after RT from 1997 through 2009. Patients with biochemical failure and biopsy-confirmed Pca more than 2 years after RT were evaluated. Prediction for site of recurrence based on the following pretreatment factors was determined on independent and cluster-sextant basis: presence of malignancy, dominant vs. nondominant percentage core length (PCL) involvement, PCL {>=} or <40%, and Gleason score. Sites of dominant PCL were defined as sextants with peak PCL involvement minus 10%, and >5% for each patient. Results: Forty-one patients with low-intermediate risk Pca constituted the study cohort. Median time to biopsy after RT was 51 months (range, 24-145). Of 246 sextants, 74 were involved with tumor at baseline. When sextants are treated as independent observations the presence of malignancy (77% vs. 22%, p = 0.0001), dominant PCL (90% vs. 46%, p = 0.0001), and PCL {>=}40% (89% vs. 68 %, p = 0.04) were found to be significant predictors for LR, although PCL {>=}40% did not retain statistical significance if sextants were considered correlated. The vast majority of patients (95%) recurred at the original site of dominant PCL or PCL {>=}40%, and 44% also recurred in regions of nondominant PCL <40% (n = 8) and/or benign sampling (n = 14) at baseline. Conclusions: LR after RT predominantly occurs in regions bearing higher histological tumor burden but are not isolated to these sites. Our data highlights the value of spatially resolved baseline pathological sampling and may assist in the design of clinical trials tailoring RT dose prescriptions to subregions of the prostate gland.

  10. Serum testosterone level as a predictor of biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Berg, Kasper Drimer

    2012-01-01

    Study Type - Aetiology (individual cohort) Level of Evidence 2b What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The precise relationship between serum testosterone (T) and prostate cancer (PCa) incidence and progression is controversial. Low pre-treatment serum T correlates with higher...

  11. Acceptability of short term neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, David S.; Denham, James W.; Mameghan, Hedy; Joseph, David; Turner, Sandra; Matthews, John; Franklin, Ian; Atkinson, Chris; North, John; Poulsen, Michael; Kovacev, Olga; Robertson, Randall; Francis, Lynne; Christie, David; Spry, Nigel A.; Tai, K.-H.; Wynne, Chris; Duchesne, Gillian

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the acceptability of short term neo-adjuvant maximal androgen deprivation (MAD) to patients treated with external beam radiation for locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods: Between 1996 and 2000, 818 patients with locally advanced, but non-metastatic, prostate cancer were entered into a randomised clinical trial (TROG 96.01), which compared radiation treatment alone with the same radiation treatment and 3 or 6 months neo-adjuvant MAD with goserelin and flutamide. Relevant symptoms, and how troublesome they were to the patient, were scored using a self-assessment questionnaire. This was completed by the patient at registration, and at specified times during and after treatment. Patients taking flutamide had liver function tests checked at regular intervals. Results: All patients have completed at least 12 months follow-up after treatment. Nearly all patients completed planned treatment with goserelin, but 27% of patients in the 6-month MAD treatment arm, and 20% in the 3-month arm, had to stop flutamide early. This was mainly due to altered liver function (up to 17% patients) and bowel side effects (up to 8% patients). However, although flutamide resulted in more bowel symptoms for patients on MAD, there was significant reduction in some urinary symptoms on this treatment. Acute bowel and urinary side effects at the end of radiation treatment were similar in all treatment arms. Side effect severity was unrelated to radiation target volume size, which was reduced by MAD, but symptomatology prior to any treatment was a powerful predictor. Of the 36% of patients who were sexually active before any treatment, the majority became inactive whilst on MAD. However, sexual activity at 12 months after radiation treatment was similar in all treatment arms, indicating that the effects of short term MAD on sexual function are reversible. Conclusion: Despite temporary effects on sexual activity, and compliance difficulties with flutamide, short-term neo

  12. A comparison of different three-dimensional treatment planning techniques for localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koswig, S.; Dinges, S.; Buchali, A.; Boehmer, D.; Salk, J.; Rosenthal, P.; Harder, C.; Schlenger, L.; Budach, V.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Four different three-dimensional planning techniques for localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer were compared with regard to dose homogeneity within the target volume and dose to organs at risk, dependent upon tumor stage. Patients and Methods: Six patients with stage T1, 7 patients with stage T2 and 4 patients with stage T3 were included in this study. Four different 3D treatment plans (rotation, 4-field, 5-field and 6-field technique) were calculated for each patient. Dose was calculated with the reference point at the isocenter (100%). The planning target volume was encompassed within the 95% isodose surface. All the techniques used different shaped portal for each beam. Dose volume histograms were created and compared for the planning target volume and the organs at risk (33%, 50%, 66% volume level) in all techniques. Results: The 4 different three-dimensional planning techniques revealed no differences concerning dose homogeneity within the planning target volume. The dose volume distribution at organs at risk show differences between the calculated techniques. In our study the best protection for bladder and rectum in stage T1 and T2 was achieved by the 6-field technique. A significant difference was achieved between 6-field and 4-field technique only in the 50% volume of the bladder (p=0.034), between the 6-field and rotation technique (all volume levels) and between 5-field and rotation technique (all volume levels). In stage T1, T2 6-field and 4-field technique in 50% (p-0.033) and 66% (p=0.011) of the rectum volume. In stage T3 a significant difference was not observed between the 4 techniques. The best protection of head of the femur was achieved by the rotation technique. Conclusion: In the localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer in stage T1 or T2 the best protection for bladder and rectum was achieved by a 3D-planned conformal 6-field technique. If the seminal vesicles have been included in the target volume and in the case of large

  13. On cribriform prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kweldam, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractThis general aim of the thesis is to study the clinical relevance, interobserver reproducibility, and genetics of cribriform growth in prostate cancer. More specifically, the aims and outline of this thesis are • To study the metastatic potential of modified Gleason score 3+3 prostate cancer in radical prostatectomies. (Chapter 2) • To examine the prognostic value of individual Gleason grade 4 patterns in prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy and diagnostic biopsy specimens...

  14. Conformal Brachytherapy Boost To External Beam Irradiation For Clinically Localized High Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, Michael J.; Wasserman, Stuart G.; Koval, John M.; Sorace, Richard A.; Cash, Jennifer; Wallner, Kent E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of using a Pd-103 implant as a boost in conjunction with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in patients having prostate cancer associated with adverse features. Materials and Methods: 114 consecutive high risk patients have been treated with combination EBRT and Pd-103 implant. 70 patients with follow-up range of 12-42 months (median 24 months) form the basis of this report. Each patient had at least one of the following risk factors for extra-capsular disease extension: Stage T2b or greater ((66(70))), Gleason score ≥ 7 ((38(70))), significantly elevated PSA (typically > 15 ng/ml)((30(70))) or elevated serum prostatic acid phosphatase (SPAP)((17(70))). Patients received median 4140 cGy EBRT to a limited pelvic field followed by a Pd-103 boost (median prescription dose: 8000 cGy). All patients have been followed in a prospective fashion with respect to PSA response, clinical evidence of disease progression and complications. Criteria for biochemical failure was relatively strict, and was analyzed using both, PSA > 2.0 and PSA > 1.0 as end points. Patients whose PSA was still decreasing at last follow-up were censored at that time. Freedom from failure rates were calculated by the method of Kaplan and Meier. Differences between groups were determined by the Log-rank method. Sexual potency was defined as the ability to attain and maintain an erection sufficient for intercourse. Results: Actuarial freedom from biochemical failure at 3 years after treatment was 90% and 78%, when PSA > 2 and PSA > 1 were used, respectively. There are no documented local relapses. 4 patients failed distantly, and all other failures are based solely on rising PSA values. Biochemical failure was higher in patients having Gleason score ≥ 7 (p=0.001), those with PSA >20 (p=0.014) and in those with elevated SPAP (p=0.007). The primary treatment related morbity was temporary, Grade 1-2 urinary symptoms. No patient developed rectal ulceration or prostatic

  15. Conformal Brachytherapy Boost To External Beam Irradiation For Clinically Localized High Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, Michael J; Wasserman, Stuart G; Koval, John M; Sorace, Richard A; Cash, Jennifer; Wallner, Kent E

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of using a Pd-103 implant as a boost in conjunction with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in patients having prostate cancer associated with adverse features. Materials and Methods: 114 consecutive high risk patients have been treated with combination EBRT and Pd-103 implant. 70 patients with follow-up range of 12-42 months (median 24 months) form the basis of this report. Each patient had at least one of the following risk factors for extra-capsular disease extension: Stage T2b or greater ((66(70))), Gleason score {>=} 7 ((38(70))), significantly elevated PSA (typically > 15 ng/ml)((30(70))) or elevated serum prostatic acid phosphatase (SPAP)((17(70))). Patients received median 4140 cGy EBRT to a limited pelvic field followed by a Pd-103 boost (median prescription dose: 8000 cGy). All patients have been followed in a prospective fashion with respect to PSA response, clinical evidence of disease progression and complications. Criteria for biochemical failure was relatively strict, and was analyzed using both, PSA > 2.0 and PSA > 1.0 as end points. Patients whose PSA was still decreasing at last follow-up were censored at that time. Freedom from failure rates were calculated by the method of Kaplan and Meier. Differences between groups were determined by the Log-rank method. Sexual potency was defined as the ability to attain and maintain an erection sufficient for intercourse. Results: Actuarial freedom from biochemical failure at 3 years after treatment was 90% and 78%, when PSA > 2 and PSA > 1 were used, respectively. There are no documented local relapses. 4 patients failed distantly, and all other failures are based solely on rising PSA values. Biochemical failure was higher in patients having Gleason score {>=} 7 (p=0.001), those with PSA >20 (p=0.014) and in those with elevated SPAP (p=0.007). The primary treatment related morbity was temporary, Grade 1-2 urinary symptoms. No patient developed rectal ulceration or prostatic

  16. Brachytherapy versus prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer: Results of a French multicenter prospective medico-economic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buron, Catherine; Le Vu, Beatrice; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal; Peiffert, Didier; Delannes, Martine; Flam, Thierry; Guerif, Stephane; Salem, Naji; Chauveinc, Laurent; Livartowski, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL), patient-reported treatment-related symptoms, and costs of iodine-125 permanent implant interstitial brachytherapy (IB) with those of radical prostatectomy (RP) during the first 2 years after these treatments for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 435 men with localized low-risk prostate cancer, from 11 French hospitals, treated with IB (308) or RP (127), were offered to complete the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core Quality of Life Questionnaire QLQ-C30 version 3 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the prostate cancer specific EORTC QLQ-PR25 module before and at the end of treatment, 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were conducted on HRQOL changes. Comparative cost analysis covered initial treatment, hospital follow-up, outpatient and production loss costs. Results: Just after treatment, the decrease of global HRQOL was less pronounced in the IB than in the RP group, with a 13.5 points difference (p < 0.0001). A difference slightly in favor of RP was observed 6 months after treatment (-7.5 points, p = 0.0164) and was maintained at 24 months (-8.2 points, p = 0.0379). Impotence and urinary incontinence were more pronounced after RP, whereas urinary frequency, urgency, and urination pain were more frequent after IB. Mean societal costs did not differ between IB ( Euro 8,019 at T24) and RP ( Euro 8,715 at T24, p = 0.0843) regardless of the period. Conclusions: This study suggests a similar cost profile in France for IB and RP but with different HRQOL and side effect profiles. Those findings may be used to tailor localized prostate cancer treatments to suit individual patients' needs

  17. Hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurka, Marie K; Chen, Leonard N; Bhagat, Aditi; Moures, Rudy; Kim, Joy S; Yung, Thomas; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Krishnan, Pranay; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Hematuria following prostate radiotherapy is a known toxicity that may adversely affect a patient’s quality of life. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT hematuria would be more common than with alternative radiation therapy approaches. Herein, we describe the incidence and severity of hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer at our institution. Two hundred and eight consecutive patients with prostate cancer treated with SBRT monotherapy with at least three years of follow-up were included in this retrospective analysis. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® (Accuray) to doses of 35–36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Toxicities were scored using the CTCAE v.4. Hematuria was counted at the highest grade it occurred in the acute and late setting for each patient. Cystoscopy findings were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Hematuria-associated bother was assessed via the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26. The median age was 69 years with a median prostate volume of 39 cc. With a median follow-up of 48 months, 38 patients (18.3%) experienced at least one episode of hematuria. Median time to hematuria was 13.5 months. In the late period, there were three grade 3 events and five grade 2 events. There were no grade 4 or 5 events. The 3-year actuarial incidence of late hematuria ≥ grade 2 was 2.4%. On univariate analysis, prostate volume (p = 0.022) and history of prior procedure(s) for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with hematuria. On multivariate analysis, history of prior procedure(s) for BPH (p < 0.0001) and α 1A antagonist use (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with the development of hematuria. SBRT for prostate cancer was well tolerated with hematuria rates comparable to other radiation modalities. Patients factors

  18. Treatment trends and Medicare reimbursements for localized prostate cancer in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'oglio, Paolo; Valiquette, Anne Sophie; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Tian, Zhe; Trudeau, Vincent; Larcher, Alessandro; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Capitanio, Umberto; Briganti, Alberto; Graefen, Markus; Montorsi, Francesco; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2018-03-19

    The absolute and proportional numbers of elderly patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (PCa) are on the rise. We examined treatment trends and reimbursement figures in localized PCa patients aged ≥80 years. Between 2000 and 2008, we identified 30 217 localized PCa patients aged ≥80 years in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare-linked database. Alternative treatment modalities consisted of conservative management (CM), radiation therapy (RT), radical prostatectomy (RP), and primary androgen-deprivation therapy (PADT). For all four modalities, utilization and reimbursements were examined. PADT was the most frequently used treatment modality between 2000 and 2005. CM became the dominant treatment modality from 2006-2008. RP rates were marginal and RT ranked third and its annual rate increased from 20.77% in 2000 to 29.13% in 2008. Median individual reimbursement of RT was highest and ranged from $29 343 in 2000 to $31 090 in 2008, followed by RP (from $20 560 in 2000 to $19 580 in 2008), PADT (from $18 901 in 2000 to $8000 in 2008) and CM (from $1824 in 2000 to $1938 in 2008). RT contributed to most of the cumulative annual reimbursements from 2003 (49.24%) to 2008 (72.97%). PADT ranked first from 2000 (54.56%) to 2002 (50.49%), but decreased by 19.40% in 2008. CM's contribution increased from 4.42% in 2000 to 6.96% in 2008. RP share of reimbursements was stable during the study period. Our results, focusing on localized PCa treatment in patients aged ≥80 years, showed an important increase in rates, median cost, and proportion of cumulative cost related to RT.

  19. Evaluation of urinary prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG score changes when starting androgen-deprivation therapy with triptorelin 6-month formulation in patients with locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Schalken, Jack A; Cabri, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    change at 6 months, according to baseline variables. Other outcome measures included urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG scores and statuses, and serum testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 months after initiation of ADT. Safety was assessed by recording adverse......OBJECTIVE: To assess prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG scores in patients with advanced and metastatic prostate cancer at baseline and after 6 months of treatment with triptorelin 22.5 mg, and analyse these scores in patient-groups defined by different disease characteristics....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Triptocare study was a prospective, open-label, multicentre, single-arm, Phase III study of triptorelin 22.5 mg in men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, who were naïve to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). The primary objective was to model the urinary PCA3...

  20. Hypoxic Prostate/Muscle PO{sub 2} Ratio Predicts for Outcome in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turaka, Aruna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K., E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Greenberg, Richard E. [Department of Surgery, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To correlate tumor oxygenation status with long-term biochemical outcome after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Custom-made Eppendorf PO{sub 2} microelectrodes were used to obtain PO{sub 2} measurements from the prostate (P), focused on positive biopsy locations, and normal muscle tissue (M), as a control. A total of 11,516 measurements were obtained in 57 men with localized prostate cancer immediately before prostate brachytherapy was given. The Eppendorf histograms provided the median PO{sub 2}, mean PO{sub 2}, and % <5 mm Hg or <10 mm Hg. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined using both the former American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) (three consecutive raises) and the current Phoenix (prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL) definitions. A Cox proportional hazards regression model evaluated the influence of hypoxia using the P/M mean PO{sub 2} ratio on BF. Results: With a median follow-up time of 8 years, 12 men had ASTRO BF and 8 had Phoenix BF. On multivariate analysis, P/M PO{sub 2} ratio <0.10 emerged as the only significant predictor of ASTRO BF (p = 0.043). Hormonal therapy (p = 0.015) and P/M PO{sub 2} ratio <0.10 (p = 0.046) emerged as the only independent predictors of the Phoenix BF. Kaplan-Meier freedom from BF for P/M ratio <0.10 vs. {>=}0.10 at 8 years for ASTRO BF was 46% vs. 78% (p = 0.03) and for the Phoenix BF was 66% vs. 83% (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Hypoxia in prostate cancer (low mean P/M PO{sub 2} ratio) significantly predicts for poor long-term biochemical outcome, suggesting that novel hypoxic strategies should be investigated.

  1. Introducing a prognostic score for pretherapeutic assessment of seminal vesicle invasion in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, Laurent; Porcher, Raphaeel; Anastasiadis, Aristotelis G.; Levrel, Olivier; Saint, Fabian; Taille, Alexandre de la; Vordos, Dimitrios; Cicco, Antony; Hoznek, Andras; Chopin, Dominique; Abbou, Clement-Claude; Lagrange, Jean-Leon

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To identify prostate cancer patients who will have the most likely benefit from sparing the seminal vesicles during 3D conformal radiation therapy. Methods and materials: From 1988 to 2001, 532 patients underwent radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Primary endpoint was the pathological evidence of seminal vesicle invasion. Variables for univariate and multivariate analyses were age, prostate weight, clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason score, number and site of positive prostate sextant biopsies. Multivariate logistic regression with backward stepwise variable selection was used to identify a set of independent predictors of seminal vesicle invasion, and the variable selection procedure was validated by non-parametric bootstrap. Results: Seminal vesicle invasion was reported in 14% of the cases. In univariate analysis, all variables except age and prostate weight were predictors of seminal vesicle invasion. In multivariate analysis, only the number of positive biopsies (P<0.0001), Gleason score (P<0.007) and PSA (P<0.0001) were predictors for seminal vesicles invasion. Based on the multivariate model, we were able to develop a prognostic score for seminal vesicle invasion, which allowed us to discriminate two patient groups: A group with low risk of seminal vesicles invasion (5.7%), and the second with a higher risk of seminal vesicles invasion (32.7%). Conclusions: Using the number of positive biopsies, Gleason score and PSA, it is possible to identify patients with low risk of seminal vesicles invasion. In this population, seminal vesicles might be excluded as a target volume in radiation therapy of prostate cancer

  2. The Prevalence of Cardiac Risk Factors in Men with Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Androgen Deprivation Therapy in British Columbia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot K. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. While androgen deprivation therapy (ADT reduces the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality in high-risk localized prostate cancer, it adversely affects cardiovascular (CV risk factor profiles in treated men. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 100 consecutive men with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency for ADT. Data on CV risk factors and disease were collected and Framingham risk scores were calculated. Results. The median age of the study cohort was 73 years. Established cardiovascular disease was present in 25% of patients. Among patients without established CV disease, calculated Framingham risk was high in 65%, intermediate in 33%, and low in 1%. Baseline hypertension was present in 58% of patients, dyslipidemia in 51%, and diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in 24%. Hypertension was more prevalent in the study cohort than in an age- and sex-matched population sample (OR 1.74, P=0.006; diabetes had a similar prevalence (OR 0.93, P=0.8. Conclusions. Patients receiving ADT have a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease and risk factors and are more likely to be hypertensive than population controls. Low rates of CV risk screening suggest opportunities for improved primary and secondary prevention of CV disease in this population.

  3. Evidence-based review of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: An ASTRO outcomes initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, David E.; Emami, Bahman; Mauch, Peter M.; Konski, Andre A.; Tao, May L.; Ng, Andrea K.; Klein, Eric A.; Mohideen, Najeeb; Hurwitz, Mark D.; Fraas, Bendick A.; Roach, Mack; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a systematic review of the evidence to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer; provide a clear presentation of the key clinical outcome questions related to the use of 3D-CRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer that may be answered by a formal literature review; and provide concise information on whether 3D-CRT improves the clinical outcomes in the treatment of localized prostate cancer compared with conventional RT. Methods and Materials: We performed a systematic review of the literature through a structured process developed by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's Outcomes Committee that involved the creation of a multidisciplinary task force, development of clinical outcome questions, a formal literature review and data abstraction, data review, and outside peer review. Results: Seven key clinical questions were identified. The results and task force conclusions of the literature review for each question are reported. Conclusion: The technological goals of reducing morbidity with 3D-CRT have been achieved. Randomized trials and follow-up of completed trials remain necessary to address these clinical outcomes specifically with regard to patient subsets and the use of hormonal therapy

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montserrat; Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  5. Spirituality is associated with less treatment regret in men with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Michelle A; Underwood, Willie; Homish, Gregory G; Homish, D Lynn; Orom, Heather

    2017-11-01

    Some patients with prostate cancer regret their treatment choice. Treatment regret is associated with lower physical and mental quality of life. We investigated whether, in men with prostate cancer, spirituality is associated with lower decisional regret 6 months after treatment and whether this is, in part, because men with stronger spiritual beliefs experience lower decisional conflict when they are deciding how to treat their cancer. One thousand ninety three patients with prostate cancer (84% white, 10% black, and 6% Hispanic; mean age = 63.18; SD = 7.75) completed measures of spiritual beliefs and decisional conflict after diagnosis and decisional regret 6 months after treatment. We used multivariable linear regression to test whether there is an association between spirituality and decisional regret and structural equation modeling to test whether decisional conflict mediated this relationship. Stronger spiritual beliefs were associated with less decisional regret (b = -0.39, 95% CI = -0.53, -0.26, P conflict partially (38%) mediated the effect of spirituality on regret (indirect effect: b = -0.16, 95% CI = -0.21, -0.12, P Spirituality may help men feel less conflicted about their cancer treatment decisions and ultimately experience less decisional regret. Psychosocial support post-diagnosis could include clarification of spiritual values and opportunities to reappraise the treatment decision-making challenge in light of these beliefs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui; Vees, Hansjoerg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We evaluate the contribution of 18 F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Materials and methods: Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median = 5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of 18 F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the 18 F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV man ) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV 40% and GTV 50% ), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV SBR ), and a region growing (GTV RG ) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Results: Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p = 0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Conclusions: Semi-automated segmentation techniques for 18 F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  7. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Vees, Hansjörg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-11-01

    We evaluate the contribution of (18)F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median=5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of (18)F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the (18)F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV(man)) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV(40%) and GTV(50%)), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV(SBR)), and a region growing (GTV(RG)) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p=0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Semi-automated segmentation techniques for (18)F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  8. Why we should not routinely apply irreversible electroporation as an alternative curative treatment modality for localized prostate cancer at this stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, J J; Ganzer, R; Hadaschik, B; Blana, A; Henkel, T; Köhrmann, K U; Machtens, S; Roosen, A; Salomon, G; Sentker, L; Witzsch, U; Schlemmer, H P; Baumunk, D; Köllermann, J; Schostak, M; Liehr, U B

    2017-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE), a new tissue ablation procedure available since 2007, could meet the requirements for ideal focal therapy of prostate cancer with its postulated features, especially the absence of a thermal ablation effect. Thus far, there is not enough evidence of its effectiveness or adverse effects to justify its use as a definitive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. Moreover, neither optimal nor individual treatment parameters nor uniform endpoints have been defined thus far. No advantages over established treatment procedures have as yet been demonstrated. Nevertheless, IRE is now being increasingly applied for primary prostate cancer therapy outside clinical trials, not least through active advertising in the lay press. This review reflects the previous relevant literature on IRE of the prostate or prostate cancer and shows why we should not adopt IRE as a routine treatment modality at this stage.

  9. Hypofractionated Proton Boost Combined with External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Johansson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton boost of 20 Gy in daily 5 Gy fractions followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 50 Gy in daily 2 Gy fractions were given to 278 patients with prostate cancer with T1b to T4N0M0 disease. Fifty-three percent of the patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT. The medium followup was 57 months. The 5-year PSA progression-free survival was 100%, 95%, and 74% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. The toxicity evaluation was supported by a patient-reported questionnaire before every consultant visit. Cumulative probability and actuarial prevalence of genitourinary (GU and gastrointestinal (GI toxicities are presented according to the RTOG classification. N-ADT did not influence curability. Mild pretreatment GU-symptoms were found to be a strong predictive factor for GU-toxicity attributable to treatment. The actuarial prevalence declined over 3 to 5 years for both GU and GI toxicities, indicating slow resolution of epithelial damage to the genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract. Bladder toxicities rather than gastrointestinal toxicities seem to be dose limiting. More than 5-year followup is necessary to reveal any sign of true progressive late side effects of the given treatment. Hypofractionated proton-boost combined with EBRT is associated with excellent curability of localized PC and acceptable frequencies of treatment toxicity.

  10. Hypofractionated Proton Boost Combined with External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Silvia; Åström, Lennart; Sandin, Fredrik; Isacsson, Ulf; Montelius, Anders; Turesson, Ingela

    2012-01-01

    Proton boost of 20 Gy in daily 5 Gy fractions followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 50 Gy in daily 2 Gy fractions were given to 278 patients with prostate cancer with T1b to T4N0M0 disease. Fifty-three percent of the patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT). The medium followup was 57 months. The 5-year PSA progression-free survival was 100%, 95%, and 74% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. The toxicity evaluation was supported by a patient-reported questionnaire before every consultant visit. Cumulative probability and actuarial prevalence of genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities are presented according to the RTOG classification. N-ADT did not influence curability. Mild pretreatment GU-symptoms were found to be a strong predictive factor for GU-toxicity attributable to treatment. The actuarial prevalence declined over 3 to 5 years for both GU and GI toxicities, indicating slow resolution of epithelial damage to the genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract. Bladder toxicities rather than gastrointestinal toxicities seem to be dose limiting. More than 5-year followup is necessary to reveal any sign of true progressive late side effects of the given treatment. Hypofractionated proton-boost combined with EBRT is associated with excellent curability of localized PC and acceptable frequencies of treatment toxicity. PMID:22848840

  11. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Oglio, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.delloglio@gmail.com [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Boehm, Katharina [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Trudeau, Vincent [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Tian, Zhe [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Larcher, Alessandro [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Shariat, Shahrokh F. [Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital, Vienna (Austria); and others

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  12. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Boehm, Katharina; Trudeau, Vincent; Tian, Zhe; Larcher, Alessandro; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto; Shariat, Shahrokh F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  13. Neoadjuvant docetaxel treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer: a clinicopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Zhou, Ming; Reuther, Alwyn M; Dreicer, Robert; Klein, Eric A

    2007-09-15

    The objective of the current study was to determine the histologic and molecular changes that occurred in patients with high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa) after neoadjuvant docetaxel chemotherapy. Patients who had locally advanced PCa (serum preoperative [initial] prostate-specific antigen [iPSA] level >or=15 ng/mL, or clinical >or=T2b disease, or biopsy Gleason score [GS] >or=8) and no evidence of metastatic disease received 6 doses of intravenous docetaxel (40 mg/m(2)) administered weekly for 6 weeks followed by radical prostatectomy (RP). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pretreatment and posttreatment markers. Twenty-eight patients completed chemotherapy and underwent RP at the Cleveland Clinic; none achieved a pathologic complete response. Pretreatment diagnostic prostate biopsies (PBx) were reviewed in all patients, and unstained sections of formalin-fixed tissue were available from 11 patients. The median patient age was 62 years (range, 49-72 years), and the median iPSA was 6.8 ng/mL (range, 2.5-24 ng/mL). At a median follow-up of 49.5 months (range, 23-72 months), 12 patients (43%) remained clinically and biochemically free of disease with no additional therapy, and 16 patients (57%) had biochemical failure. The pretreatment GS was 6 in 2 patients (7%), 7 in 10 patients (36%), 8 in 11 patients (39%) and 9 in 5 patients (18%). Two patients (7.1%) had organ-confined disease, and 23 patients (82.1%) had extraprostatic extension. Four patients (14.3%) had positive lymph nodes, and 11 patients (39.3%) had seminal vesicle involvement. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for a panel of markers involved in various cellular functions (alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase [AMACR], beta-tubulin I, beta-tubulin III, cyclin D1, p27, p21, Ki-67, p53, Bcl-2, and an apoptosis detection kit [ApopTag]) was performed on a tissue microarray that contained the posttreatment (RP) tissue specimens and on the PBx specimens, if available. When the IHC

  14. Radical External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Japan: Changing Trends in the Patterns of Care Process Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital at Beppu, Oita (Japan); Sasaki, Tomonari [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Kyushu Center, Fukuoka (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Araya, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To delineate changing trends in radical external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: Data from 841 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT in the Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) from 1996 to 2005 were analyzed. Results: Significant increases in the proportions of patients with stage T1 to T2 disease and decrease in prostate-specific antigen values were observed. Also, there were significant increases in the percentages of patients treated with radiotherapy by their own choice. Median radiation doses were 65.0 Gy and 68.4 Gy from 1996 to 1998 and from 1999 to 2001, respectively, increasing to 70 Gy from 2003 to 2005. Moreover, conformal therapy was more frequently used from 2003 to 2005 (84.9%) than from 1996 to 1998 (49.1%) and from 1999 to 2001 (50.2%). On the other hand, the percentage of patients receiving hormone therapy from 2003 to 2005 (81.1%) was almost the same as that from 1996 to 1998 (86.3%) and from 1999 to 2001 (89.7%). Compared with the PCS in the United States, patient characteristics and patterns of treatments from 2003 to 2005 have become more similar to those in the United States than those from 1996 to 1998 and those from 1999 to 2001. Conclusions: This study indicates a trend toward increasing numbers of patients with early-stage disease and increasing proportions of patients treated with higher radiation doses with advanced equipment among Japanese prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT during 1996 to 2005 survey periods. Patterns of care for prostate cancer in Japan are becoming more similar to those in the United States.

  15. A Younger Man With Localized Prostate Cancer Asks, "Which Type of Radiation Is Right for Me?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelman, Justin E

    2018-06-20

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice. A 61-year-old man presents with stage II prostate cancer after a period of active surveillance. Work-up reveals T1cN0M0 carcinoma, a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 4.8 ng/mL, and Grade Group II (highest Gleason 3+4) in three cores of 12 taken, at the right mid-gland and right apex. The patient has been on active surveillance for the past 16 months. He was originally diagnosed after biopsy for an elevated PSA with stage I prostate cancer, T1cN0M0; PSA, 4.5 ng/mL; Grade Group 1 (Gleason 3+3) in one core of 12 taken, also at the right mid-gland. A multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a heterogeneous peripheral zone without a dominant lesion and a calculated prostate volume of 28 mL. His medical history includes hypercholesterolemia, for which he takes atorvastatin. He is otherwise healthy and has no other significant medical or surgical history. His father had prostate cancer in his 70s and died of other causes at 89 years of age. The patient reports 2- to 3-hour urinary frequency and 0 to 1 nocturia, and has no difficulty obtaining or maintaining an erection. After meeting with his urologist, he sees a radiation oncologist.

  16. The role of metastasis-directed therapy and local therapy of the primary tumor in the management of oligometastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongchan; Park, Jee Soo; Ham, Won Sik

    2017-09-01

    Oligometastasis has been proposed as an intermediate stage of cancer spread between localized disease and widespread metastasis. Oligometastatic malignancy is now being diagnosed more frequently as the result of improvements in diagnostic modalities such as functional imaging. The importance of oligometastasis in managing metastatic prostate cancer is that it is possible to treat with a curative aim by metastasis-directed or local therapy in selected patients. Many studies have shown that these aggressive treatments lead to improved survival in other oligometastatic malignancies. However, few studies have shown definitive benefits of metastasis-directed or local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer. Review of the available studies suggests that stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) of metastatic lesions in oligorecurrent disease is a feasible and safe modality for managing oligometastatic prostate cancer. Also, stereotactic RT can delay the start of androgen deprivation therapy. Many retrospective studies of metastatic prostate cancer have shown that patients undergoing local therapy seem to have superior overall and cancer-specific survival compared with patients not receiving local therapy. Ongoing prospective randomized trials would be helpful to evaluate the role of local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer.

  17. The role of metastasis-directed therapy and local therapy of the primary tumor in the management of oligometastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongchan Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligometastasis has been proposed as an intermediate stage of cancer spread between localized disease and widespread metas-tasis. Oligometastatic malignancy is now being diagnosed more frequently as the result of improvements in diagnostic modalities such as functional imaging. The importance of oligometastasis in managing metastatic prostate cancer is that it is possible to treat with a curative aim by metastasis-directed or local therapy in selected patients. Many studies have shown that these aggressive treatments lead to improved survival in other oligometastatic malignancies. However, few studies have shown definitive benefits of metastasis-directed or local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer. Review of the available studies suggests that stereotac-tic radiotherapy (RT of metastatic lesions in oligorecurrent disease is a feasible and safe modality for managing oligometastatic prostate cancer. Also, stereotactic RT can delay the start of androgen deprivation therapy. Many retrospective studies of metastatic prostate cancer have shown that patients undergoing local therapy seem to have superior overall and cancer-specific survival compared with patients not receiving local therapy. Ongoing prospective randomized trials would be helpful to evaluate the role of local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer.

  18. Analysis of second malignancies after modern radiotherapy versus prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jiayi; Kestin, Larry L.; Ye, Hong; Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the risk of developing second primary cancers (SPCs) after radiotherapy (RT) versus prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer (PCa) in the modern era. Methods: The RT cohort consisted of 2120 patients matched on a 1:1 basis with surgical patients according to age and follow-up time. RT techniques consisted of conventional or two-dimensional RT (2DRT, 36%), three-dimensional conformal RT and/or intensity modulated RT (3DCRT/IMRT, 29%), brachytherapy (BT, 16%), and a combination of 2DRT and BT (BT boost, 19%). Results: The overall SPC risk was not significantly different between the matched-pair (HR 1.14, 95% CI 0.94-1.39), but the risk became significant >5 years or >10 years after RT (HR 1.86, 95% CI 1.36-2.55; HR 4.94, 95% CI 2.18-11.2, respectively). The most significant sites of increased risk were bladder, lymphoproliferative, and sarcoma. Of the different RT techniques, only 2DRT was associated with a significantly higher risk (HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.32-2.35), but not BT boost (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.50-1.38), 3DCRT/IMRT (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.55-1.21), or BT (HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.28-1.01). Conclusions: Radiation-related SPC risk varies depending on the RT technique and may be reduced by using BT, BT boost, or 3DCRT/IMRT.

  19. Increased risk of biochemical and local failure in patients with distended rectum on the planning CT for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crevoisier, Renaud de; Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Cheung, Rex; Cox, James D.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively test the hypothesis that rectal distension on the planning computed tomography (CT) scan is associated with an increased risk of biochemical and local failure among patients irradiated for prostate carcinoma when a daily repositioning technique based on direct prostate-organ localization is not used. Methods and Materials: This study included 127 patients who received definitive three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer to a total dose of 78 Gy at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Rectal distension was assessed by calculation of the average cross-sectional rectal area (CSA; defined as the rectal volume divided by length) and measuring three rectal diameters on the planning CT. The impact of rectal distension on biochemical control, 2-year prostate biopsy results, and incidence of Grade 2 or greater late rectal bleeding was assessed. Results: The incidence of biochemical failure was significantly higher among patients with distended rectums (CSA >11.2 cm 2 ) on the planning CT scan (p 0.0009, log-rank test). Multivariate analysis indicates that rectal distension and high-risk disease are independent risk factors for biochemical failure, with hazard ratios of 3.89 (95% C.I. 1.58 to 9.56, p = 0.003) and 2.45 (95% C.I. 1.18 to 5.08, p = 0.016), respectively. The probability of residual tumor without evidence of radiation treatment (as scored by the pathologist) increased significantly with rectal distension (p = 0.010, logistic analysis), and a lower incidence of Grade 2 or greater late rectal bleeding within 2 years was simultaneously observed with higher CSA values (p = 0.031, logistic analysis). Conclusions: We found strong evidence that rectal distension on the treatment-planning CT scan decreased the probability of biochemical control, local control, and rectal toxicity in patients who were treated without daily image-guided prostate localization, presumably because of geographic misses. Therefore, an

  20. Optimal contouring of seminal vesicle for definitive radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer: comparison between EORTC prostate cancer radiotherapy guideline, RTOG0815 protocol and actual anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Xin; Gao, Xian-Shu; Asaumi, Junichi; Zhang, Min; Li, Hong-Zhen; Ma, Ming-Wei; Zhao, Bo; Li, Fei-Yu; Wang, Dian

    2014-01-01

    Intermediate- to-high-risk prostate cancer can locally invade seminal vesicle (SV). It is recommended that anatomic proximal 1-cm to 2-cm SV be included in the clinical target volume (CTV) for definitive radiotherapy based on pathology studies. However, it remains unclear whether the pathology indicated SV extent is included into the CTV defined by current guidelines. The purpose of this study is to compare the volume of proximal SV included in CTV defined by EORTC prostate cancer radiotherapy guideline and RTOG0815 protocol with the actual anatomic volume. Radiotherapy planning CT images from 114 patients with intermediate- (36.8%) or high-risk (63.2%) prostate cancer were reconstructed with 1-mm-thick sections. The starting and ending points of SV and the cross sections of SV at 1-cm and 2-cm from the starting point were determined using 3D-view. Maximum (D 1H , D 2H ) and minimum (D 1L , D 2L ) vertical distance from these cross sections to the starting point were measured. Then, CTV of proximal SV defined by actual anatomy, EORTC guideline and RTOG0815 protocol were contoured and compared (paired t test). Median length of D 1H , D 1L , D 2H and D 2L was 10.8 mm, 2.1 mm, 17.6 mm and 8.8 mm (95th percentile: 13.5mm, 5.0mm, 21.5mm and 13.5mm, respectively). For intermediate-risk patients, the proximal 1-cm SV CTV defined by EORTC guideline and RTOG0815 protocol inadequately included the anatomic proximal 1-cm SV in 62.3% (71/114) and 71.0% (81/114) cases, respectively. While for high-risk patients, the proximal 2-cm SV CTV defined by EORTC guideline inadequately included the anatomic proximal 2-cm SV in 17.5% (20/114) cases. SV involvement indicated by pathology studies was not completely included in the CTV defined by current guidelines. Delineation of proximal 1.4 cm and 2.2 cm SV in axial plane may be adequate to include the anatomic proximal 1-cm and 2-cm SV. However, part of SV may be over-contoured

  1. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage modality for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Roedel, Claus; Tselis, Nikolaos; Zoga, Eleni; Strouthos, Iosif; Butt, Saeed Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    To review the current status of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a salvage modality (sHDR BRT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy (RT). A literature search was performed in PubMed using ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' as search terms. In all, 51 search results published between 2000 and 2016 were identified. Data tables were generated and summary descriptions created. The main outcome parameters used were biochemical control (BC) and toxicity scores. Eleven publications reported clinical outcome and toxicity with follow-up ranging from 4-191 months. A variety of dose and fractionation schedules were described, including 19.0 Gy in 2 fractions up to 42.0 Gy in 6 fractions. The 5-year BC ranged from 18-77%. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 0-32% and 0-5.1%, respectively. sHDR BRT appears as safe and effective salvage modality for the reirradiation of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT. (orig.) [de

  2. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Archana; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies

  3. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Archana, E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org; Vaishampayan, Ulka [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Lum, Lawrence G., E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies.

  4. WE-FG-BRA-02: Docetaxel Eluting Brachytherapy Spacers for Local Chemo-Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belz, J [Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States); Kumar, R; Sridhar, S [Northeastern University & Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Makrigiorgos, G; Nguyen, P [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); D’Amico, A [Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Cormack, R [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We propose an innovative combinatorial treatment strategy of Local ChemoRadiation Therapy (LCRT) using a sustained drug delivery platform in the form of a spacer to locally radio-sensitize the prostate with Docetaxel (DTX) enabling a synergistic cure with the use of lower radiation doses. These biodegradable spacers are physically similar to the inert spacers routinely used in prostate brachytherapy but are now loaded with formulations of DTX. Methods: Spacers were loaded with ∼500µg Docetaxel (DTX) for prostate cancer studies. The implants were characterized in vitro using SEM and HPLC. The release kinetic studies were carried out in buffer (pH 6.0) at 37°C. Subcutaneous PC3 tumors were xenografted in nude mice. Prostate cancer studies were done with and without radiation using SARRP at 5Gy, 10Gy, and 15Gy. Drug-loaded implants were injected once intratumorally using an 18G brachytherapy needle. Results: The release study in vitro showed a highly sustained release for multiple weeks at therapeutically relevant doses. The monotherapy with local DTX spacer showed sustained tumor inhibition compared to empty implants and an equivalent DTX dose given systemically. At 40 days, 89% survival was observed for mice treated with DTX implants compared with 0% in all other treatment groups. The combined treatment with local DTX spacer and radiation (10Gy) showed the highest degree of tumor suppression (significant tumor growth inhibition by day 90). The control mice showed continuous tumor growth and were scarified by day 56. Groups of mice treated with DTX-spacer or radiation alone showed initial tumor suppression but growth continued after day 60. A larger experiment is ongoing. Conclusion: This approach provides localized delivery of the chemotherapeutic sensitizer directly to the tumor and avoids the toxicities associated with both brachytherapy and current systemic delivery of docetaxel. Sustained release of DTX is an effective chemotherapy option alone or

  5. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT IN LOCALLY AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER USING CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachev Sergey Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of androgen deprivation and radiotherapy increase the probability of diseases full regresses and survival rate. Modern technical and technological opportunities of 3D CRT allow to increase total dose to prostate up to 72-76Gy vs. radiotherapy of 66-70Gy. In this study we compare the rates of post radiation toxicity and the efficiency of treatment for the patients receiving conventional radiotherapy and 3D CRT. The use of 3D CRT has not only result to increase of 10-years recurrence free survival rate from 74% (I grope to 86,5% (II grope, р=0,01, but also to increase of 10-years overall survival, 70% versus 78,4% (р=0,04. The proposed version of conformal 3D CRT radiation therapy made ​​it possible compared to conventional 2D RT radiation therapy by increasing SOD radiation to the tumor, accuracy and compliance with the quality assurance of radiation therapy significantly reduce rates of recurrence and significantly increase the performance of 10-year overall and disease-free survival.

  6. Improved detection of localized prostate cancer using co-registered MRI and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambor, Ivan, E-mail: ivjamb@utu.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); 2nd Department of Radiology, Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Bratislava (Slovakia); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Borra, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.borra@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Kemppainen, Jukka, E-mail: Jukka.Kemppainen@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lepomaeki, Virva, E-mail: Virva.Lepomaki@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta, E-mail: Riitta.Parkkola@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Dean, Kirsti, E-mail: Kirsti.Dean@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Alanen, Kalle, E-mail: Kalle.Alanen@tyks.fi [Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Arponen, Eveliina, E-mail: Eveliina.Arponen@utu.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Nurmi, Martti, E-mail: Martti.Nurmi@tyks.fi [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J., E-mail: Hannu.Aronen@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We aimed to study the ability of contrast enhanced MRI at 1.5 T and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT, both individually and using fused data, to detect localized prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six men with untreated prostate cancer and negative for metastatic disease on pelvic CT and bone scan were prospectively enrolled. A pelvic {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT scan was performed in all patients, and a contrast enhanced MRI scan in 33 patients (6 examinations using both endorectal coil and surface coils, and 27 examinations using surface coils only). After the imaging studies 10 patients underwent prostatectomy and 26 were treated by image guided external beam radiation treatment. Image fusion of co-registered PET and MRI data was performed based on anatomical landmarks visible on CT and MRI using an advanced in-house developed software package. PET/CT, MRI and fused PET/MRI data were evaluated visually and compared with biopsy findings on a lobar level, while a sextant approach was used for patients undergoing prostatectomy. Results: When using biopsy samples as method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for visual detection of prostate cancer on a lobar level by contrast enhanced MRI was 85%, 37%, 73% and that of {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT 88%, 41%, 74%, respectively. Fusion of PET with MRI data increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to 90%, 72% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Fusion of sequentially obtained PET/CT and MRI data for the localization of prostate cancer is feasible and superior to the performance of each individual modality alone.

  7. Higher-Than-Conventional Radiation Doses in Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment: A Meta-analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; Stefano, Eduardo Jose; Afonso, Sergio Luis

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine in a meta-analysis whether the outcomes in men with localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) are better than those in men treated with conventional-dose radiotherapy (CDRT), by quantifying the effect of the total dose of radiotherapy on biochemical control (BC). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as the proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing HDRT with CDRT for localized prostate cancer. To evaluate the dose-response relationship, we conducted a meta-regression analysis of BC ratios by means of weighted linear regression. Results: Seven RCTs with a total patient population of 2812 were identified that met the study criteria. Pooled results from these RCTs showed a significant reduction in the incidence of biochemical failure in those patients with prostate cancer treated with HDRT (p 2 gastrointestinal toxicity after HDRT than after CDRT. In the subgroup analysis, patients classified as being at low (p = 0.007), intermediate (p < 0.0001), and high risk (p < 0.0001) of biochemical failure all showed a benefit from HDRT. The meta-regression analysis also detected a linear correlation between the total dose of radiotherapy and biochemical failure (BC = -67.3 + [1.8 x radiotherapy total dose in Gy]; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed that HDRT is superior to CDRT in preventing biochemical failure in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer patients, suggesting that this should be offered as a treatment for all patients, regardless of their risk status.

  8. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  9. Health related quality of life patterns in patients treated with interstitial prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer--data from CaPSURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Tracy M; Sadetsky, Natalia; Pasta, David J; Grossfeld, Gary D; Kane, Christopher J; Mehta, Shilpa S; Carroll, Peter R; Lubeck, Deborah P

    2003-11-01

    We measured the impact brachytherapy monotherapy (BMT) has on general and disease specific health related quality of life (HRQOL) compared to patients treated with radical prostatectomy (RP). We studied 419 men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer who enrolled in CaPSURE (Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urological Research Endeavor) data base whose primary treatment was brachytherapy monotherapy (92) or radical prostatectomy (327). The validated RAND 36-Item Health Survey and the UCLA Prostate Cancer Index were used to measure HRQOL before treatment and at 6-month intervals during the first 2 years after treatment. Patients treated with BMT or RP did not differ greatly in general HRQOL after treatment. Both treatment groups showed early functional impairment in most general domains with scores returning to or approaching baseline in most domains 18 to 24 months after treatment. Patients treated with BMT had significantly higher urinary function scores at 0 to 6 months after treatment (84.5, SD 18.7) than patients treated with RP (63.3, SD 26.6). Urinary bother scores at 0 to 6 months after treatment were not significantly different between patients treated with BMT (67.7, SD 31.2) and those treated with RP (67.4, SD 29.1). Both treatment groups had decreases in sexual function that did not return to pretreatment levels. Overall BMT and RP are well tolerated procedures that cause mild changes in general HRQOL. Disease specific HRQOL patterns are different in patients treated with BMT or RP. Baseline and serial HRQOL measurements after treatment can provide valuable information regarding expected quality of life outcome after treatment for localized prostate cancer.

  10. The relationship between the bladder volume and optimal treatment planning in definitive radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Akahane, Keiko; Shikama, Naoto; Takahashi, Osamu; Hama, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is no current consensus regarding the optimal bladder volumes in definitive radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between the bladder volume and optimal treatment planning in radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Two hundred and forty-three patients underwent definitive radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for intermediate- and high-risk localized prostate cancer. The prescribed dose defined as 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 100 % of the prescription dose was 76 Gy in 38 fractions. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the prostate with a 5-mm margin and 2 cm of the proximal seminal vesicle. The PTV was defined as the CTV with a 5-mm margin. Treatment plans were optimized to satisfy the dose constraints defined by in-house protocols for PTV and organs at risk (rectum wall, bladder wall, sigmoid colon and small intestine). If all dose constraints were satisfied, the plan was defined as an optimal plan (OP). Results: An OP was achieved with 203 patients (84%). Mean bladder volume (± 1 SD) was 266 ml (± 130 ml) among those with an OP and 214 ml (±130 ml) among those without an OP (p = 0.02). Logistic regression analysis also showed that bladder volumes below 150 ml decreased the possibility of achieving an OP. However, the percentage of patients with an OP showed a plateau effect at bladder volumes above 150 ml. Conclusions. Bladder volume is a significant factor affecting OP rates. However, our results suggest that bladder volumes exceeding 150 ml may not help meet planning dose constraints

  11. Radiotherapy efficiency for patients of Polynesian origin suffering from localized prostate cancers: a comparative study; Efficacite de la radiotherapie chez les patients d'origine polynesienne atteints de cancers de la prostate localises: etude comparative mono-centrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, A.; Chargari, C.; Mozer, P.; Feuvret, L.; Lang, P.; Assouline, A.; Mazeron, J.J.; Simon, J.M. [CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Chargari, C. [Hopital d' instruction des armees du Val-de-Grace, 75 - Paris (France); Desrez, G.; Leroux, S. [Centre hospitalier Mamao, Papeete, Polynesie francaise (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a comparative study of survival probabilities without biochemical relapse for patients of Polynesian (46 patients) or European (106 patients) origin treated in the same establishment by exclusive conformational irradiation for a localized prostate cancer. Polynesian patients were younger with a greater proportion of low risk cancers. Side effects rates, survival probabilities without biochemical relapse by five years, prognostic with respect to cancer stage are compared with respect to the ethnic origin. Short communication

  12. Prostate cancer epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinaranagari, Swathi; Sharma, Pankaj; Bowen, Nathan J; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major health burden within the ever-increasingly aging US population. The molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer are diverse and heterogeneous. In this context, epigenetic changes, both global and gene specific, are now an emerging alternate mechanism in disease initiation and progression. The three major risk factors in prostate cancer: age, geographic ancestry, and environment are all influenced by epigenetics and additional significant insight is required to gain an understanding of the underlying mechanisms. The androgen receptor and its downstream effector pathways, central to prostate cancer initiation and progression, are subject to a multitude of epigenetic alterations. In this review we focus on the global perspective of epigenetics and the use of recent next-generation sequencing platforms to interrogate epigenetic changes in the prostate cancer genome.

  13. Cost comparison of curative therapies for localized prostate cancer in Japan. A single-institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Takefumi; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Matsumoto, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01

    In addition to open surgery, curative therapies for prostate cancer now include endoscopic surgery and radiation therapies. Because of the expansion and subdivision of treatment methods for prostate cancer, the medical fee point schedule in Japan was revised in fiscal year 2006. We examined changes in medical income and expenditure after this revision of the medical fee system. We studied income and expenditure, after institution of the new medical fee schedule, for the five types of therapies for prostate cancer performed at our hospital: two surgical therapies (radical retropubic prostatectomy and laparoscopic prostatectomy) and three radiation therapies (three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, 192 Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and 125 I low-dose-rate brachytherapy). Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was found to be associated with a profit of 199 yen per patient. Laparoscopic prostatectomy, a highly advanced medical treatment that the fee revision changed from a partially insured to an insured procedure, yielded a profit of 75672 yen per patient. However, high-dose-rate brachytherapy was associated with a loss of 654016 yen per patient. Given the loss in hospital income per patient undergoing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, the medical fee point system for this procedure should be reassessed. (author)

  14. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: a potential non-invasive marker of tumour aggressiveness in localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, N.M. de; Riches, S.F.; Van As, N.J.; Morgan, V.A.; Ashley, S.A.; Fisher, C.; Payne, G.S.; Parker, C.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) as a marker for disease aggressiveness by comparing tumour apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between patients with low- versus higher-risk localized prostate cancer. Method: Forty-four consecutive patients classified as low- [n = 26, stageT1/T2a, Gleason score ≤ 6, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10 (group 2)] risk, who subsequently were monitored with active surveillance or started neoadjuvant hormone and radiotherapy, respectively, underwent endorectal MRI. T2-weighted (T2W) and DW images (5 b values, 0-800 s/mm 2 ) were acquired and isotropic ADC maps generated. Regions of interest (ROIs) on T2W axial images [around whole prostate, central gland (CG), and tumour] were transferred to ADC maps. Tumour, CG, and peripheral zone (PZ = whole prostate minus CG and tumour) ADCs (fast component from b = 0-100 s/mm 2 , slow component from b = 100-800 s/mm 2 ) were compared. Results: T2W-defined tumour volume medians, and quartiles were 1.2 cm 3 , 0.7 and 3.3 cm 3 (group 1); and 6 cm 3 , 1.3 and 16.5 cm 3 (group 2). There were significant differences in both ADC fast (1778 ± 264 x 10 -6 versus 1583 ± 283 x 10 -6 mm 2 /s, p = 0.03) and ADC slow (1379 ± 321 x 10 -6 versus 1196 ± 158 x 10 -6 mm 2 /s, p = 0.001) between groups. Tumour volume (p = 0.002) and ADC slow (p = 0.005) were significant differentiators of risk group. Conclusion: Significant differences in tumour ADCs exist between patients with low-risk, and those with higher-risk localized prostate cancer. DW-MRI merits further study with respect to clinical outcomes

  15. Improved Biochemical Outcomes With Statin Use in Patients With High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Katz, Matthew S.; Mak, Kimberley; Yamada, Yoshiya; Feder, David J.; Zhang Zhigang; Jia Xiaoyu; Shi Weiji; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) and biochemical and survival outcomes after high-dose radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1711 men with clinical stage T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated with conformal RT to a median dose of 81 Gy during 1995-2007. Preradiotherapy medication data were available for 1681 patients. Three hundred eighty-two patients (23%) were taking a statin medication at diagnosis and throughout RT. Nine hundred forty-seven patients received a short-course of neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with RT. The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Results: The 5- and 8-year PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) rates for statin patients were 89% and 80%, compared with 83% and 74% for those not taking statins (p = 0.002). In a multivariate analysis, statin use (hazard ratio [HR] 0.69, p = 0.03), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) low-risk group, and ADT use were associated with improved PRFS. Only high-risk patients in the statin group demonstrated improvement in PRFS (HR 0.52, p = 0.02). Across all groups, statin use was not associated with improved distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (p = 0.51). On multivariate analysis, lower NCCN risk group (p = 0.01) and ADT use (p = 0.005) predicted improved DMFS. Conclusions: Statin use during high-dose RT for clinically localized prostate cancer was associated with a significant improvement in PRFS in high-risk patients. These data suggest that statins have anticancer activity and possibly provide radiosensitization when used in conjunction with RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  16. Heterogeneity of miRNA expression in localized prostate cancer with clinicopathological correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hussein Zedan

    Full Text Available In the last decade microRNAs (miRNAs have been widely investigated in prostate cancer (PCa and have shown to be promising biomarkers in diagnostic, prognostic and predictive settings. However, tumor heterogeneity may influence miRNA expression. The aims of this study were to assess the impact of tumor heterogeneity, as demonstrated by a panel of selected miRNAs in PCa, and to correlate miRNA expression with risk profile and patient outcome.Prostatectomy specimens and matched, preoperative needle biopsies from a retrospective cohort of 49 patients, who underwent curatively intended surgery for localized PCa, were investigated with a panel of 6 miRNAs (miRNA-21, miRNA-34a, miRNA-125b, miRNA-126, miRNA-143, and miRNA-145 using tissue micro-array (TMA and in situ hybridization (ISH. Inter- and intra-patient variation was assessed using intra-class correlation (ICC.Four miRNAs (miRNA-21, miRNA-34a, miRNA-125, and miRNA-126 were significantly upregulated in PCa compared to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, and except for miRNA-21 these miRNAs documented a positive correlation between the expression level in PCa cores and their matched BPH cores, (r > 0.72. The ICC varied from 0.451 to 0.764, with miRNA-34a showing an intra-tumoral heterogeneity accounting for less than 50% of the total variation. Regarding clinicopathological outcomes, only miRNA-143 showed potential as a prognostic marker with a higher expression correlating with longer relapse-free survival (p = 0.016.The present study documents significant upregulation of the expression of miRNA-21, miRNA-34a, miRNA-125, and miRNA-126 in PCa compared to BPH and suggests a possible prognostic value associated with the expression of miRNA-143. The results, however, document intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the expression of various miRNAs calling for caution when using these tumor tissue biomarkers in prognostic and predictive settings.

  17. 11C-Choline PET/pathology image coregistration in primary localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Prokic, Vesna; Weirich, Gregor; Wendl, Christina; Geinitz, Hans; Molls, Michael; Kirste, Simon; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Schwaiger, Markus; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Treiber, Uwe; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Krause, Bernd Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for the comparison of pathology specimens after prostatectomy (post-S) with PET images obtained before surgery (pre-S). This method was used to evaluate the merit of 11 C-choline PET/CT for delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in prostate cancer (PC). In 28 PC patients, 11 C-choline PET/CT was performed before surgery. PET/CT data were coregistered with the pathology specimens. GTV on PET images (GTV-PET) was outlined automatically and corrected manually. Tumour volume in the prostate (TVP) was delineated manually on the pathology specimens. Based on the coregistered PET/pathology images, the following parameters were assessed: SUVmax and SUVmean in the tumoral and nontumoral prostate (NP), GTV-PET (millilitres) and TVP (millilitres). PET/pathology image coregistration was satisfactory. Mean SUVmax in the TVP was lower than in the NP: 5.0 and 5.5, respectively (p = 0.093). Considering the entire prostate, SUVmax was located in the TVP in two patients, in the TVP and NP in 12 patients and exclusively in NP in 14 patients. Partial overlap the TVP and GTV-PET was seen in 71 % of patients, and complete overlap in 4 %. PET/pathology image coregistration can be used for evaluation of different imaging modalities. 11 C-Choline PET failed to distinguish tumour from nontumour tissue. (orig.)

  18. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer.Methods and MaterialsFrom October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients of newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition localized prostate cancer patients were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45Gy (25 fractions of 1.8Gy. The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy. Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0. Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition.ResultsMedian follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity.ConclusionsWhole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles.

  19. Mortality among men with locally advanced prostate cancer managed with noncurative intent: a nationwide study in PCBaSe Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akre, Olof; Garmo, Hans; Adolfsson, Jan; Lambe, Mats; Bratt, Ola; Stattin, Pär

    2011-09-01

    There are limited prognostic data for locally advanced prostate cancer PCa to guide in the choice of treatment. To assess mortality in different prognostic categories among men with locally advanced PCa managed with noncurative intent. We conducted a register-based nationwide cohort study within the Prostate Cancer DataBase Sweden. The entire cohort of locally advanced PCa included 14 908 men. After the exclusion of 2724 (18%) men treated with curative intent, 12 184 men with locally advanced PCa either with local clinical stage T3 or T4 or with T2 with serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) between 50 and 99 ng/ml and without signs of metastases remained for analysis. We followed up the patient cohort in the Cause of Death Register for ≤ 11 yr and assessed cumulative incidence of PCa -specific death stratified by age and clinical characteristics. The PCa -specific mortality at 8 yr of follow-up was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25-32%) for Gleason score (GS) 2-6, 41% (95% CI, 38-44%) for GS 7, 52% (95% CI, 47-57%) for GS 8, and 64% (95% CI, 59-69%) for GS 9-10. Even for men aged >85 yr at diagnosis with GS 8-10, PCa was a major cause of death: 42% (95% CI, 37-47%). Men with locally advanced disease and a PSAadvanced PCa, suggesting undertreatment, particularly among men in older age groups. Our results underscore the need for more studies of treatment with curative intent for locally advanced tumors. Copyright © 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Duration of Androgen Deprivation in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Update of NRG Oncology RTOG 9202

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, Colleen A.F., E-mail: clawton@mcw.edu [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Lin, Xiaolei [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hanks, Gerald E. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lepor, Herbert [New York University, New York, New York (United States); Grignon, David J. [Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Brereton, Harmar D. [Northeast Radiation Oncology Center, Dunmore, Pennsylvania (United States); Bedi, Meena [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Sutter General Hospital, Sacramento, California (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth L. [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Venkatesan, Varagur M. [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Horwitz, Eric M. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pisansky, Thomas M. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Kim, Harold [Wayne State University-Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Parliament, Matthew B. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Rabinovitch, Rachel [University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado (United States); Roach, Mack [University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Kwok, Young [University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Dignam, James J. [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Trial RTOG 9202 was a phase 3 randomized trial designed to determine the optimal duration of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) when combined with definitive radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of locally advanced nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Long-term follow-up results of this study now available are relevant to the management of this disease. Methods and Materials: Men (N=1554) with adenocarcinoma of the prostate (cT2c-T4, N0-Nx) with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <150 ng/mL and no evidence of distant metastasis were randomized (June 1992 to April 1995) to short-term ADT (STAD: 4 months of flutamide 250 mg 3 times per day and goserelin 3.6 mg per month) and definitive RT versus long-term ADT (LTAD: STAD with definitive RT plus an additional 24 months of monthly goserelin). Results: Among 1520 protocol-eligible and evaluable patients, the median follow-up time for this analysis was 19.6 years. In analysis adjusted for prognostic covariates, LTAD improved disease-free survival (29% relative reduction in failure rate, P<.0001), local progression (46% relative reduction, P=.02), distant metastases (36% relative reduction, P<.0001), disease-specific survival (30% relative reduction, P=.003), and overall survival (12% relative reduction, P=.03). Other-cause mortality (non–prostate cancer) did not differ (5% relative reduction, P=.48). Conclusions: LTAD and RT is superior to STAD and RT for the treatment of locally advanced nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate and should be considered the standard of care.

  1. Duration of Androgen Deprivation in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Update of NRG Oncology RTOG 9202

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, Colleen A.F.; Lin, Xiaolei; Hanks, Gerald E.; Lepor, Herbert; Grignon, David J.; Brereton, Harmar D.; Bedi, Meena; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Zeitzer, Kenneth L.; Venkatesan, Varagur M.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Kim, Harold; Parliament, Matthew B.; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Roach, Mack; Kwok, Young; Dignam, James J.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Trial RTOG 9202 was a phase 3 randomized trial designed to determine the optimal duration of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) when combined with definitive radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of locally advanced nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Long-term follow-up results of this study now available are relevant to the management of this disease. Methods and Materials: Men (N=1554) with adenocarcinoma of the prostate (cT2c-T4, N0-Nx) with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <150 ng/mL and no evidence of distant metastasis were randomized (June 1992 to April 1995) to short-term ADT (STAD: 4 months of flutamide 250 mg 3 times per day and goserelin 3.6 mg per month) and definitive RT versus long-term ADT (LTAD: STAD with definitive RT plus an additional 24 months of monthly goserelin). Results: Among 1520 protocol-eligible and evaluable patients, the median follow-up time for this analysis was 19.6 years. In analysis adjusted for prognostic covariates, LTAD improved disease-free survival (29% relative reduction in failure rate, P<.0001), local progression (46% relative reduction, P=.02), distant metastases (36% relative reduction, P<.0001), disease-specific survival (30% relative reduction, P=.003), and overall survival (12% relative reduction, P=.03). Other-cause mortality (non–prostate cancer) did not differ (5% relative reduction, P=.48). Conclusions: LTAD and RT is superior to STAD and RT for the treatment of locally advanced nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate and should be considered the standard of care.

  2. Distant Metastases Following Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( (www.nccn.org)) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289 patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results: For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. CSS rates were 99.8%, 98.0%, and 95.3% (p < 0.001) for low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival was 98.7%, 95.9% and 90.4% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, MFS was mostly closely related to Gleason score and year of treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Conclusions: Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high

  3. Changing prostate-specific antigen outcome after surgery or radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer during the prostate-specific antigen era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Chen, M.-H.; Oh-Ung, Jean; Renshaw, Andrew A.; Cote, Kerri; Loffredo, Marian; Richie, Jerome P.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the change in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) outcome after radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), controlling for follow-up during the PSA era. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 1440 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with RP (n=1059) or EBRT (n=381) between 1989 and 2000. A single genitourinary pathologist reviewed all pathology specimens. For patients with a 2-year minimal follow-up, the 2-year actual PSA outcome stratified by risk group (low vs. high) was calculated for three periods (January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1992; January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1996; and January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2000) and compared for each treatment modality. PSA failure was defined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition for all patients, and comparisons were made using a chi-square metric. Results: During the study period, the proportion of patients treated with RP and EBRT with low-risk disease increased significantly (p <0.0001) from 60% to 89% and from 26% to 76%, respectively. In addition, the 2-year actual PSA outcome also improved from 60% to 82% (RP: p<0.0001) and from 67% to 91% (RT: p=0.0008). The 2-year actual PSA outcome was not significantly different in the low-risk patients but improved during the three periods in the high-risk patients treated with RP (from 20% to 39% to 75%, p=0.0004) or EBRT (from 50% to 59% to 83%, p=0.01). This improvement in PSA outcome could be explained by a shift toward a more favorable PSA level (RP: p=0.0002; RT: p=0.006) and clinical T stage (RP: p=0.0008, RT: p<0.0001) distribution for patients with biopsy Gleason score ≥7 disease. Conclusion: Improved PSA outcome during the PSA era after RP or EBRT has resulted from a shift in presentation toward low-risk disease and earlier detection of high-grade disease

  4. Localized prostate cancer in elderly men aged 80-89, findings from a population-based registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatandoust, S; Kichenadasse, G; O'Callaghan, M; Vincent, A D; Kopsaftis, T; Walsh, S; Borg, M; Karapetis, C S; Moretti, K

    2018-03-30

    To investigate the rate of death due to Prostate Cancer (PCa) and disease characteristics in patients diagnosed with Localized Prostate Cancer (LPCa) at age 80-89 years in comparison with men diagnosed at age 70-79. This is a retrospective study of data from the South Australian Prostate Cancer Clinical Outcomes Collaborative (SA-PCCOC). Included were men diagnosed between 2005 and 2014, aged ≥70 with no evidence of metastatic disease at presentation. Propensity score matching and competing risk Fine and Grey regression were used to assess the chance of treatment (curative v non-curative) and treatment effect on PCa specific-mortality. Of the 1951 eligible patients, 1428 (76%) aged 70-79, and 460 (24%) aged 80-89 yr at diagnosis (median age of 74 (IQR=72-76) and 83 (IQR=81-85) respectively). The 80-89 group had higher Gleason scores and PSA values (all pcopyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. A Biopsy-based 17-gene Genomic Prostate Score as a Predictor of Metastases and Prostate Cancer Death in Surgically Treated Men with Clinically Localized Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Lu, Ruixiao; Zhang, Nan; Quesenberry, Charles P; Shan, Jun; Han, Jeong S; Tsiatis, Athanasios C; Leimpeter, Amethyst D; Lawrence, H Jeffrey; Febbo, Phillip G; Presti, Joseph C

    2018-01-01

    A 17-gene biopsy-based reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay, which provides a Genomic Prostate Score (GPS-scale 0-100), has been validated as an independent predictor of adverse pathology and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP) in men with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PCa). To evaluate GPS as a predictor of PCa metastasis and PCa-specific death (PCD) in a large cohort of men with localized PCa and long-term follow-up. A retrospective study using a stratified cohort sampling design was performed in a cohort of men treated with RP within Kaiser Permanente Northern California. RNA from archival diagnostic biopsies was assayed to generate GPS results. We assessed the association between GPS and time to metastasis and PCD in prespecified uni- and multivariable statistical analyses, based on Cox proportional hazard models accounting for sampling weights. The final study population consisted of 279 men with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa between 1995 and 2010 (median follow-up 9.8 yr), and included 64 PCD and 79 metastases. Valid GPS results were obtained for 259 (93%). In univariable analysis, GPS was strongly associated with time to PCD, hazard ratio (HR)/20 GPS units=3.23 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.84-5.65; pstrong independent predictor of long-term outcomes in clinically localized PCa in men treated with RP and may improve risk stratification for men with newly diagnosed disease. Many prostate cancers are slow growing and unlikely to spread or threaten a man's life, while others are more aggressive and require treatment. Increasingly, doctors are using new molecular tests, such as the17-gene Genomic Prostate Score (GPS), which can be performed at the time of initial diagnosis to help determine how aggressive a given patient's cancer may be. In this study, performed in a large community-based healthcare network, GPS was shown to be a strong predictor as to whether a man's prostate cancer will spread and

  6. Radiation dose response in patients with favorable localized prostate cancer (Stage T1-T2, biopsy Gleason ≤6, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen ≤10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Klein, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To study the radiation dose response as determined by biochemical relapse-free survival in patients with favorable localized prostate cancers, i.e., Stage T1-T2, biopsy Gleason score (bGS) ≤6, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) ≤10 ng/mL. Methods and Materials: A total of 292 patients with favorable localized prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy alone between 1986 and 1999. The median age was 69 years. Sixteen percent of cases (n=46) were African-American. The distribution by clinical T stage was as follows: T1/T2A, 243 (83%); and T2B/T2C, 49 (17%). The distribution by iPSA was as follows: ≤4 ng/mL, 49 (17%); and >4 ng/mL, 243 (83%). The mean iPSA level was 6.2 (median, 6.4). The distribution by bGS was as follows: ≤5 in 89 cases (30%) and 6 in 203 cases (70%). The median radiation dose was 70.0 Gy (range, 63.0-78.0 Gy). Doses of ≤70.0 Gy were delivered in 175 cases, 70.2-72.0 Gy in 24 cases, 74 Gy in 30 cases, and 78 Gy in 63 cases. For patients receiving 2 =5.7), and radiation dose (p=0.021, χ 2 =5.3) were independent predictors of outcome. Age (p=0.94), race (p=0.89), stage (p=0.45), biopsy GS (p=0.40), and radiation technique (p=0.45) were not. Conclusion: There is a clear radiation dose response in patients with favorable localized prostate cancers (i.e., Stage T1-T2, biopsy Gleason score ≤6, and iPSA ≤10 ng/mL). At least 74 Gy should be delivered to the prostate and periprostatic tissues. With our cohort of patients, longer follow-up will be needed to assess the importance of doses exceeding 74 Gy

  7. Evaluation of the utilization of external radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in Andalusia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito, José; Linares, Isabel; Castillo, Isabel; Martínez, Miguel; Vargas, Pilar; Herruzo, Ismael; Medina, José Antonio; Palacios, Amalia; Bayo, Eloísa; Peracaula, Francisco; Jaén, Javier; Sánchez, José Antonio; Ortiz, María José

    2015-12-30

    Around 27,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed every year in Spain and 5400 die from this disease. Radiotherapy (RT), alone or combined, has proven to be effective as initial treatment in patients with localized disease. Our objective was to evaluate the use of external beam RT (EBRT) in our region, comparing the indication rate and irradiation rate and examining variability in its application among hospitals. We conducted a review of RT guidelines and indication studies for prostate cancer (% expected irradiation). Data were gathered from all twelve public healthcare centers in Andalusia (Spain) on RT-treated prostate cancer patients during 2013 (% actual irradiation) and from nine of the centers on RT discharge reports. Information was classified according to type of hospital, tumor risk category and RT treatment (technique, dosage, volume, toxicity). The estimated RT rate was 67 % (1289/1917), 43 % were aged > 70 years, 44.7 % had ECOG performance status of 0); 44.7 % had high-risk tumors; 57 % underwent RT associated with hormone therapy; 70 % of patients receiving RT were treated with 3D planning (30 % IGRT); and doses were 70-76 Gy in 70 % of cases and >76 Gy in 10.7 %. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were < grade 2 in 79 and 89 % of patients, respectively. An irradiation rate significantly below the mean for the study was found in four provinces. There was a significant difference among provinces in the distribution of risk groups. Underutilization of EBRT was estimated to be around 30 % in prostate cancer patients, with an elevated variability in irradiation rates among hospitals related to differences in available technology and in the distribution of patients with different risk levels. These data should be a matter of concern to regional health managers, given the negative and measurable impact on the survival of patients.

  8. Evaluation of the utilization of external radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in Andalusia, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expósito, José; Linares, Isabel; Castillo, Isabel; Martínez, Miguel; Vargas, Pilar; Herruzo, Ismael; Medina, José Antonio; Palacios, Amalia; Bayo, Eloísa; Peracaula, Francisco; Jaén, Javier; Sánchez, José Antonio; Ortiz, María José

    2015-01-01

    Around 27,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed every year in Spain and 5400 die from this disease. Radiotherapy (RT), alone or combined, has proven to be effective as initial treatment in patients with localized disease. Our objective was to evaluate the use of external beam RT (EBRT) in our region, comparing the indication rate and irradiation rate and examining variability in its application among hospitals. We conducted a review of RT guidelines and indication studies for prostate cancer (% expected irradiation). Data were gathered from all twelve public healthcare centers in Andalusia (Spain) on RT-treated prostate cancer patients during 2013 (% actual irradiation) and from nine of the centers on RT discharge reports. Information was classified according to type of hospital, tumor risk category and RT treatment (technique, dosage, volume, toxicity). The estimated RT rate was 67 % (1289/1917), 43 % were aged > 70 years, 44.7 % had ECOG performance status of 0); 44.7 % had high-risk tumors; 57 % underwent RT associated with hormone therapy; 70 % of patients receiving RT were treated with 3D planning (30 % IGRT); and doses were 70–76 Gy in 70 % of cases and >76 Gy in 10.7 %. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were < grade 2 in 79 and 89 % of patients, respectively. An irradiation rate significantly below the mean for the study was found in four provinces. There was a significant difference among provinces in the distribution of risk groups. Underutilization of EBRT was estimated to be around 30 % in prostate cancer patients, with an elevated variability in irradiation rates among hospitals related to differences in available technology and in the distribution of patients with different risk levels. These data should be a matter of concern to regional health managers, given the negative and measurable impact on the survival of patients

  9. An Eight-Year Experience of HDR Brachytherapy Boost for Localized Prostate Cancer: Biopsy and PSA Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachand, Francois; Martin, Andre-Guy; Beaulieu, Luc; Harel, Francois M.Sc.; Vigneault, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), the 2-year biopsy outcome and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with an inversely planned high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Materials and methods: Data were collected from 153 patients treated between 1999 and 2006 with external beam pelvic radiation followed by an HDR Ir-192 prostate boost. These patients were given a boost of 18 to 20 Gy using inverse-planning with simulated annealing (IPSA).We reviewed and analyzed all prostate-specific antigen levels and control biopsies. Results: The median follow-up was 44 months (18-95 months). When categorized by risk of progression, 74.5% of patients presented an intermediate risk and 14.4% a high one. Prostate biopsies at 2 years posttreatment were negative in 86 of 94 patients (91.5%), whereas two biopsies were inconclusive. Biochemical control at 60 months was at 96% according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the Phoenix consensus definitions. A PSA bounce (PSA values of 2 ng/mL or more above nadir) was observed in 15 patients of 123 (9.8%). The median time to bounce was 15.2 months (interquartile range, 11.0-17.7) and the median bounce duration 18.7 months (interquartile range, 12.1-29). The estimate of overall survival at 60 months was 97.1% (95% CI, 91.6-103%). Conclusions: Considering that inverse planned HDR brachytherapy prostate boosts led to an excellent biochemical response, with a 2-year negative biopsy rate, we recommend a conservative approach in face of a PSA bounce even though it was observed in 10% of patients

  10. Multiparametric MRI of prostate cancer: an update on state-of-the-art techniques and their performance in detecting and localizing prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, John V; Mulkern, Robert V; Panych, Lawrence P; Fennessy, Fiona M; Fedorov, Andriy; Maier, Stephan E; Tempany, Clare M C

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) examinations of men with prostate cancer are most commonly performed for detecting, characterizing, and staging the extent of disease to best determine diagnostic or treatment strategies, which range from biopsy guidance to active surveillance to radical prostatectomy. Given both the exam's importance to individual treatment plans and the time constraints present for its operation at most institutions, it is essential to perform the study effectively and efficiently. This article reviews the most commonly employed modern techniques for prostate cancer MR examinations, exploring the relevant signal characteristics from the different methods discussed and relating them to intrinsic prostate tissue properties. Also, a review of recent articles using these methods to enhance clinical interpretation and assess clinical performance is provided. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2013;37:1035-1054. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. DNA methylation signatures for prediction of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy of clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Christa; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Vestergaard, Else Marie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Diagnostic and prognostic tools for prostate cancer (PC) are suboptimal, causing overtreatment of indolent PC and risk of delayed treatment of aggressive PC. Here, we identify six novel candidate DNA methylation markers for PC with promising diagnostic and prognostic potential. Methods...... Microarray-based screening and bisulfite sequencing of 20 nonmalignant and 29 PC tissue specimens were used to identify new candidate DNA hypermethylation markers for PC. Diagnostic and prognostic potential was evaluated in 35 nonmalignant prostate tissue samples, 293 radical prostatectomy (RP) samples...... into low- and high-methylation subgroups, was trained in cohort 1 (HR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.26 to 2.90) and validated in cohort 2 (HR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.31 to 4.13). Conclusion We identified six novel candidate DNA methylation markers for PC. C1orf114 hypermethylation and a three-gene methylation signature were...

  12. Nomogram incorporating PSA level to predict cancer-specific survival for men with clinically localized prostate cancer managed without curative intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Michael W.; Cuzick, Jack; Fisher, Gabrielle; Berney, Daniel M.; Oliver, Tim; Foster, Christopher S.; Møller, Henrik; Reuter, Victor; Fearn, Paul; Eastham, James; Scardino, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The prognosis of men with clinically localized prostate cancer is highly variable, and it is difficult to counsel a man who may be considering avoiding, or delaying, aggressive therapy. After collecting data on a large cohort of men who received no initial active prostate cancer therapy, we sought to develop, and to internally validate, a nomogram for prediction of disease-specific survival. Methods Working with 6 cancer registries within England and numerous hospitals in the region, we constructed a population-based cohort of men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1990 and 1996. All men had baseline serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) measurements, centralized pathologic grading, and centralized review of clinical stage assignment. Based upon the clinical and pathological data from 1,911 men, we developed and validated a statistical model that served as the basis for the nomogram. The discrimination and calibration of the nomogram were assessed with use of one third of the men, who were omitted from modeling and used as a test sample. Results The median age of the included men was 70.4 years. The 25th and 75th percentiles of PSA were 7.3 and 32.6 ng/ml respectively, and the median was 15.4 ng/ml. Forty-two percent of the men had high grade disease. The nomogram predicted well with a concordance index of 0.73 and had good calibration. Conclusions We have developed an accurate tool for predicting the probability that a man with clinically localized prostate cancer will survive his disease for 120 months if the cancer is not treated with curative intent immediately. The tool should be helpful for patient counseling and clinical trial design. PMID:18000803

  13. Epigenetics in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Albany, Costantine; Alva, Ajjai S.; Aparicio, Ana M.; Singal, Rakesh; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Sonpavde, Guru; Hahn, Noah M.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG) rich sequ...

  14. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Dose Painting for Localized Prostate Cancer Using 11C-choline Positron Emission Tomography Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joe H.; Lim Joon, Daryl; Lee, Sze Ting; Gong, Sylvia J.; Anderson, Nigel J.; Scott, Andrew M.; Davis, Ian D.; Clouston, David; Bolton, Damien; Hamilton, Christopher S.; Khoo, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose painting using 11 C-choline positron emission tomography PET scans in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was an RT planning study of 8 patients with prostate cancer who had 11 C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy. Two contours were semiautomatically generated on the basis of the PET scans for each patient: 60% and 70% of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV 60% and SUV 70% ). Three IMRT plans were generated for each patient: PLAN 78 , which consisted of whole-prostate radiation therapy to 78 Gy; PLAN 78-90 , which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 78 Gy, a boost to the SUV 60% to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV 70% to 90 Gy; and PLAN 72-90 , which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 72 Gy, a boost to the SUV 60% to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV 70% to 90 Gy. The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to reach prescription doses while adhering to published dose constraints. Tumor control probabilities based on PET scan-defined volumes (TCP PET ) and on prostatectomy-defined volumes (TCP path ), and rectal normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were compared between the plans. Results: All plans for all patients reached prescription doses while adhering to dose constraints. TCP PET values for PLAN 78 , PLAN 78-90 , and PLAN 72-90 were 65%, 97%, and 96%, respectively. TCP path values were 71%, 97%, and 89%, respectively. Both PLAN 78-90 and PLAN 72-90 had significantly higher TCP PET (P=.002 and .001) and TCP path (P 78 . PLAN 78-90 and PLAN 72-90 were not significantly different in terms of TCP PET or TCP path . There were no significant differences in rectal NTCPs between the 3 plans. Conclusions: IMRT dose painting for localized prostate cancer using 11 C-choline PET scans is technically feasible. Dose painting results in higher TCPs without higher NTCPs.

  15. Long-Term Outcome and Toxicity of Salvage Brachytherapy for Local Failure After Initial Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burri, Ryan J.; Stone, Nelson N.; Unger, Pam; Stock, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe long-term outcomes and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) for local failure after initial radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2008, 37 men with local failure after initial prostate radiotherapy (32 external-beam radiation therapy [EBRT] and 5 BT) underwent salvage BT with 103 Pd or 125 I. Estimates of freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF, Phoenix definition) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicities were graded using CTCv3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 86 months (range, 2-156). The median dose to 90% of the prostate volume was 122 Gy (range, 67-166). The 10-year FFbF and CSS were 54% and 96%, respectively. On univariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >10 ng/mL at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with FFbF (p = 0.01), and there were trends for both age <70 years (p = 0.08) and PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.08) at the time of salvage BT. On multivariate analysis, only presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.046) was significantly associated with improved FFbF. There were three Grade 3 toxicities and one Grade 4 toxicity. Pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT was the only variable significantly associated with Grade ≥2 toxicity (p = 0.03). Conclusion: With a median follow-up of 86 months, salvage prostate BT was associated with a 10-year FFbF of 54% and CSS of 96%. Improved FFbF was associated with a presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL. Toxicity was worse in patients who had undergone pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT. Careful patient selection for salvage BT may result in improved outcomes and reduced toxicity.

  16. MR spectroscopy in diagnosis of local recurrence of T3N0M0 of prostate cancer after cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ming; Guo Zhi; Si Tongguo; Wang Haitao; Xiao Bohan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in detecting local recurrence in patients with T 3 N 0 M 0 prostate cancer after cryotherapy. Methods: Sixty-five patients with T 3 N 0 M 0 prostate cancer underwent cryotherapy. The preoperative data of conventional MRI, MRS, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy were collected. After cryotherapy, the prostate specific antigen (PSA) of all patients was detected monthly.If PSA >5 μg/L, MRI, MRS, and TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were planned within a week. If PSA was unremarkable, MRI, MRS, and TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were planned 12 months after cryotherapy. The prostate was divided 6 regions and the cancerous and noncancerous were marked. The signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of choline (Cho), citrate (Cit) and the ratios of Cho + creatine (Cre)/Cit of each regions were measured in pre-operation and postoperation. The patients were divided into non-recurrence and recurrence group according to TRUS-guided biopsy. The S/N of Cho, Cit, and the ratio of Cho + Cre/Cit were compared between the groups before and after cryotherapy by using independent samples t-test. Results: (1) Fifteen patients were confirmed local recurrence 12 months after cryotherapy, including 11 patients with an evaluate PSA level and 4 patients with PSA unremarkable. (2) The S/N of Cho, Cit and the ratios of Cho + Cre/Cit in the cancerous and noncancerous regions before cryotherapy in the sixty-five patients were 25±9, 11±5, and 18±5, and 39 ±12, 2.33±0.60, and 0.53 ± 0.19. There had significant difference between that of two groups (t values were 11.36, 9.81, and 13.39, respectively, P=0.00). (3) In the patients with non-recurrence, The S/N of Cho, Cit in the cancerous and noncancerous regions were 4 ± 2 and 3 ± 2 (t=1.024, P=0.305), and 2±2 and 4 ±3 (t=1.147, P=0.178) and no difference was found. In necrotic area,the ratios of Cho + Cre/Cit could not be calculated because of low level of the

  17. Monotherapy of androgen deprivation therapy versus radical prostatectomy among veterans with localized prostate cancer: comparative effectiveness analysis of retrospective cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Jinan Liu1,2, Lizheng Shi1,2,3, Oliver Sartor31Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 2Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, Tulane University, 3School of Medicine and Tulane Cancer Center, New Orleans, LA, USABackground: This retrospective cohort study aimed to examine the comparative effectiveness of monotherapy of primary androgen deprivation therapy or radical prostatectomy.Methods: Male patients with localized prostate cancer (T1-T2, N0, M0 were identified in the Veterans Affairs Veterans Integrated Service Network 16 data warehouse (January 2003 to June 2006, with one-year baseline and at least three-year follow-up data (until June 2009. Patients were required to be 18–75 years old and without other recorded cancer history. The initiation of primary androgen deprivation therapy or monotherapy of radical prostatectomy within six months after the first diagnosis of prostate cancer was used as the index date. Primary androgen deprivation therapy patients were matched to the radical prostatectomy patients via propensity score, which was predicted from a logistic regression of treatment selection (primary androgen deprivation therapy versus radical prostatectomy on age, race, marital status, insurance type, cancer stage, Charlson comorbidity index, and alcohol and tobacco use. The overall survival from initiation of index treatment was then analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards model.Results: The two cohorts were well matched at baseline (all P > 0.05. During a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the cumulative incidence of death was 13 (10.57% among 123 primary androgen deprivation therapy patients and four (3.25% among 123 radical prostatectomy patients (P < 0.05. The overall three-year survival rate was 92.68% for primary androgen deprivation therapy and 98.37% for radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05. Patients who received primary androgen deprivation therapy had almost three times as

  18. Local detection of prostate cancer by positron emission tomography with 2-fluorodeoxyglucose comparison of filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlakow, A.; Larson, S. M.; Coakley, F.; Akhurst, T.; Macapinlac, H. A.; Hricak, H.; Gonen, M.; Kelly, W.; Scher, H.; Leibel, S.; Humm, J.; Scardino, P.

    2001-01-01

    To compare filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction (IRSAC) in the local imaging of prostate cancer by positron emission tomography with 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). 13 patients with primary (n=7) or recurrent (n=6) prostate cancer who had increased uptake in the prostate on FDG-PET performed without urinary catheterization, contemporaneous biopsy confirming the presence of active tumor in the prostate, were retrospectively identified. Two independent nuclear medicine physicians separately rated FBP and IRSAC images for visualization of prostatic activity on a 4-point scale. Results were compared using biopsy and cross-sectional imaging findings as the standard of reference. IRSAC images were significantly better that FBP in terms of visualization of prostatic activity in 12 of 13 patients, and were equivalent in 1 patient (p<0.001, Wilcoxon signed ranks test). In particular, 2 foci of tumor activity in 2 different patients seen on IRSAC images were not visible on FBP images. In 11 patients who had a gross tumor mass evident on cross-sectional imaging, there was good agreement between PET and cross-sectional anatomic imaging with respect to tumor localization. In selected patients, cancer can be imaged within the prostate using FDG-PET, and IRSAC is superior to FBP in image reconstruction for local tumor visualization

  19. Prostate Cancer Ambassadors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Anissa I.; Hunter, Jaimie C.; Carlisle, Veronica A.; Richmond, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    African American men bear a higher burden of prostate cancer than Caucasian men, but knowledge about how to make an informed decision about prostate cancer screening is limited. A lay health advisor model was used to train “Prostate Cancer Ambassadors” on prostate cancer risk and symptoms, how to make an informed decision for prostate-specific antigen screening, and how to deliver the information to members of their community. Training consisted of two, 6-hour interactive sessions and was implemented in three predominantly African American communities over an 8-month period between 2013 and 2014. Following training, Ambassadors committed to contacting at least 10 people within 3 months using a toolkit composed of wallet-sized informational cards for distribution, a slide presentation, and a flip chart. Thirty-two Ambassadors were trained, with more than half being females (59%) and half reporting a family history of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer knowledge improved significantly among Ambassadors (p ≤ .0001). Self-efficacy improved significantly for performing outreach tasks (p < .0001), and among women in helping a loved one with making an informed decision (p = .005). There was also an improvement in collective efficacy in team members (p = .0003). Twenty-nine of the Ambassadors fulfilled their commitment to reach at least 10 people (average number of contacts per Ambassador was 11). In total, 355 individuals were reached with the prostate cancer information. The Ambassador training program proved successful in training Ambassadors to reach communities about prostate cancer and how to make an informed decision about screening. PMID:27099348

  20. Clinical and biochemical outcomes of men undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, David; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Safdieh, Joseph; Weiner, Joseph; Rotman, Marvin; Schwartz, David [Veterans Affairs, New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Rineer, Justin [University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We analyzed outcomes of patients with prostate cancer undergoing either radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) +/- salvage radiation or definitive radiation therapy (RT) +/- androgen deprivation. From 2003-2010 there were 251 patients who underwent RRP and 469 patients who received RT (> or =7,560 cGy) for prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed with the log-rank test to compare biochemical control (bCR), distant metastatic-free survival (DMPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) between the two groups. The median follow-up was 70 months and 61.3% of the men were African American. For low risk disease the 6-year bCR were 90.3% for RT and 85.6% for RRP (p = 0.23) and the 6-year post-salvage bCR were 90.3% vs. 90.9%, respectively (p = 0.84). For intermediate risk disease the 6-year bCR were 82.6% for RT and 59.7% for RRP (p < 0.001) and 82.6% vs. 74.0%, respectively, after including those salvaged with RT (p = 0.06). For high risk disease, the 6-year bCR were 67.4% for RT and 41.3% for RRP (p < 0.001) and after including those salvaged with RT was 67.4% vs. 43.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to DMPFS or PCSS. Treatment approaches utilizing RRP +/- salvage radiation or RT +/- androgen deprivation yielded equivalent DMPFS and PCSS outcomes. Biochemical control rates, using their respective definitions, appeared equivalent or better in those who received treatment with RT.

  1. Clinical and biochemical outcomes of men undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, David; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Safdieh, Joseph; Weiner, Joseph; Rotman, Marvin; Schwartz, David; Rineer, Justin

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed outcomes of patients with prostate cancer undergoing either radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) +/- salvage radiation or definitive radiation therapy (RT) +/- androgen deprivation. From 2003-2010 there were 251 patients who underwent RRP and 469 patients who received RT (> or =7,560 cGy) for prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed with the log-rank test to compare biochemical control (bCR), distant metastatic-free survival (DMPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) between the two groups. The median follow-up was 70 months and 61.3% of the men were African American. For low risk disease the 6-year bCR were 90.3% for RT and 85.6% for RRP (p = 0.23) and the 6-year post-salvage bCR were 90.3% vs. 90.9%, respectively (p = 0.84). For intermediate risk disease the 6-year bCR were 82.6% for RT and 59.7% for RRP (p < 0.001) and 82.6% vs. 74.0%, respectively, after including those salvaged with RT (p = 0.06). For high risk disease, the 6-year bCR were 67.4% for RT and 41.3% for RRP (p < 0.001) and after including those salvaged with RT was 67.4% vs. 43.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to DMPFS or PCSS. Treatment approaches utilizing RRP +/- salvage radiation or RT +/- androgen deprivation yielded equivalent DMPFS and PCSS outcomes. Biochemical control rates, using their respective definitions, appeared equivalent or better in those who received treatment with RT.

  2. How does health literacy affect quality of life among men with newly diagnosed clinically localized prostate cancer? Findings from the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lixin; Mishel, Merle; Bensen, Jeannette T; Chen, Ronald C; Knafl, George J; Blackard, Bonny; Farnan, Laura; Fontham, Elizabeth; Su, L Joseph; Brennan, Christine S; Mohler, James L; Godley, Paul A

    2012-08-01

    Health literacy deficits affect half of the US overall patient population, especially the elderly, and are linked to poor health outcomes among noncancer patients. Yet little is known about how health literacy affects cancer populations. The authors examined the relation between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and health literacy among men with prostate cancer. Data analysis included 1581 men with newly diagnosed clinically localized prostate cancer from a population-based study, the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP). Participants completed assessment of health literacy using Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) and HRQOL using the Short Form-12 General Health Survey (SF12). Bivariate and multivariate regression was used to determine the potential association between REALM and HRQOL, while controlling for sociodemographic and illness-related variables. Higher health literacy level was significantly associated with better mental well-being (SF12-Mental Component Summary [MCS]; P < .001) and physical well-being (SF12-Physical Component Summary [PCS]; P < .001) in bivariate analyses. After controlling for sociodemographic (age, marital status, race, income, and education) and illness-related factors (types of cancer treatment, tumor aggressiveness, and comorbidities), health literacy remained significantly associated with SF12-MCS scores (P < .05) but not with SF12-PCS scores. Among patients with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer, those with low health literacy levels were more vulnerable to mental distress than those with higher health literacy levels, but physical well-being was no different. These findings suggest that health literacy may be important in patients managing prostate cancer and the effects of treatment, and provide the hypothesis that supportive interventions targeting patients with lower health literacy may improve their HRQOL. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  3. Strategies for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer: A Guide for Radiation Oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a serious health issue, especially considering the recent epidemiological trend and its corresponding socioeconomic impact. Challenges encountered by treating physicians include the long natural history of the disease, the fact that it is more prevalent in the elderly and the difficulty in performing a complete critical review of medical evidence due to the plethora of available information. In addition, the difficulty in deciding if and when therapeutic intervention should be initiated is an important issue pertaining to this type of malignancy. However, there is one area where there is a uniform consensus: the applicability of the multidisciplinary approach in the management of prostate cancer. Clinical guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to help practitioners, managers and patients make decisions about appropriate health care for specific circumstances. Clinicians need simple, patient specific, user friendly guidelines. The main purposes of clinical guidelines are to: (a) provide recommendations for the treatment of individual patients by practitioners; (b) help develop standards to assess the individual practice of health professionals; (c) be used in the education and training of health professionals; (d) assist patients in making informed decisions; and (e) improve communication between patients and health professionals. Clinical guidelines for the management of prostate cancer exist in the published literature. However, these guidelines have usually been developed in and for affluent health care environments where all modern diagnostic and treatment modalities are available. In limited resource environments, the radiation oncologist is faced with the question of what the minimum acceptable (evidence based) line of action would be, considering the limited resources available. Clinical guidelines focusing on low to middle income countries aim to provide these practitioners with a practical tool. This publication is

  4. Strategies for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer: A Guide for Radiation Oncologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-09-15

    Prostate cancer is a serious health issue, especially considering the recent epidemiological trend and its corresponding socioeconomic impact. Challenges encountered by treating physicians include the long natural history of the disease, the fact that it is more prevalent in the elderly and the difficulty in performing a complete critical review of medical evidence due to the plethora of available information. In addition, the difficulty in deciding if and when therapeutic intervention should be initiated is an important issue pertaining to this type of malignancy. However, there is one area where there is a uniform consensus: the applicability of the multidisciplinary approach in the management of prostate cancer. Clinical guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to help practitioners, managers and patients make decisions about appropriate health care for specific circumstances. Clinicians need simple, patient specific, user friendly guidelines. The main purposes of clinical guidelines are to: (a) provide recommendations for the treatment of individual patients by practitioners; (b) help develop standards to assess the individual practice of health professionals; (c) be used in the education and training of health professionals; (d) assist patients in making informed decisions; and (e) improve communication between patients and health professionals. Clinical guidelines for the management of prostate cancer exist in the published literature. However, these guidelines have usually been developed in and for affluent health care environments where all modern diagnostic and treatment modalities are available. In limited resource environments, the radiation oncologist is faced with the question of what the minimum acceptable (evidence based) line of action would be, considering the limited resources available. Clinical guidelines focusing on low to middle income countries aim to provide these practitioners with a practical tool. This publication is

  5. Adjuvant hormone therapy in patients undergoing high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Neimark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of using the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone leuprorelin with the Atrigel delivery system in doses of 7.5, 22.5, and 45 mg as an adjuvant regimen in high- and moderate-risk cancer patients who have received high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. Moderate- and high-risk locally advanced prostate cancer (PC patients treated with HIFU (n = 28 and HIFU in combination with hormone therapy during 6 months (n = 31 were examined.Results. The investigation has shown that leuprorelin acetate monotherapy used within 6 months after HIFU therapy can achieve the highest reduction in prostate-specific antigen levels and positively affect the symptoms of the disease. HIFU in combination with androgen deprivation substantially diminishes the clinical manifestations of the disease and improves quality of life in HIFU-treated patients with PC, by reducing the degree of infravesical obstruction (according to uroflowmetric findings and IPSS scores, and causes a decrease in prostate volume as compared to those who have undergone HIFU only. Treatment with leuprorelin having the Atrigel delivery system has demonstrated the low incidence of adverse reactions and good tolerability.

  6. High-dose-rate brachytherapy with two or three fractions as monotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskin, Peter; Rojas, Ana; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Robert; Alonzi, Roberto; Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate late urinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs) and biochemical control of disease after high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in locally advanced prostate cancer. Patients and methods: 227 consecutive patients were treated with 3 × 10.5 Gy (n = 109) or 2 × 13 Gy (n = 118) HDR-BT alone. Biochemical failure was assessed using the Phoenix definition of PSA nadir + 2 μg/l and late AEs using the RTOG scoring system and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Results: Kaplan–Meier estimates and prevalence of late events indicate that urinary, bowel and IPSS symptoms are higher after 31.5 Gy than after 26 Gy, however differences are significant only for Grade 1 and 2 urinary toxicity. Kaplan–Meier estimates of morbidity are consistently and considerably higher than time-point estimates of prevalence; which reflects the transient nature of most symptoms. At 3 years 93% and 97% of patients treated with 26 and 31.5 Gy, respectively, were free from biochemical relapse (p = 0.5) and 91% for the latter regimen at 5 years. In univariate and multivariate analysis risk-category was the only significant predictor of relapse (p < 0.03). Conclusion: These HDR-BT schedules achieved high levels of biochemical control of disease in patients with advanced prostate cancer with few severe complications seen throughout the first 3 years

  7. Morbidity in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with non-curative intent. A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Juel, K

    1999-01-01

    clinically localized prostate cancer reported to the Danish Cancer Registry in the period 1977-1992. Morbidity in patients and age-matched controls was extracted from The Danish Hospital Discharge Registry. Admissions were stratified by discharge diagnosis. Overall 4744 patients were hospitalized for 251...

  8. Radiation therapy alone is not successful as salvage treatment for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oas, Lute G; Zagars, Gunar K; Pollack, Alan

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objectives: To evaluate radiotherapy (XRT) as potential salvage treatment for patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after redical prostatectomy (RP). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate who received definitive XRT between 1987 and 1993 for biopsy-proven (n=18) or for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) - producing (n=6) recurrent disease following RP were evaluated. No patient had clinically or radiographically evident distant disease. Biopsies of suspicious nodules or ultrasound findings in the prostatic fossa were positive in 18 and negative in 3. Three patients had no focal abnormalities and had no biopsy. The time between RP and XRT varied from 6 to 277 months (mean 52 months). XRT doses to the prostatic fossa ranged from 60 to 70 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Outcome was analyzed relative to local control, metastatic disease and PSA status. Persistently undetectable PSA was required to define freedom from disease. Results: Pre-XRT PSA levels ranged from 0.7 to 26.8 ng/ml (mean 7.3 ng/ml, median 2.5 ng/ml). Although PSA fell post-XRT in all but 3 patients and 10 (52%) achieved undetectable levels, the outcome at a median follow-up of 42 months (range 13-90 months) was poor, with 15 patients (63%) developing persistent/progressive disease. The patterns of progression in these 15 were: local 3, metastatic 3, persistent PSA 9. All patients whose PSA was persistently detectable developed a rising PSA profile. The actuarial incidence of freedom from disease at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years was 75%, 43%, 36% and 27% respectively. The only factor correlating to outcome was the pre-XRT PSA level. The 9 patients who remain free of disease had a mean PSA level of 3.6 ng/ml compared to a mean level of 9.6 ng/ml among the 15 who failed (p<0.01). All patients with a pre-XRT level >2.5 ng/ml developed disease relapse, whereas the 4-year freedom from disease in those with levels {<=}2.5 ng/ml was 52%. Eleven of the 15 patients

  9. Multiparametric MRI in the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futterer, Jurgen J. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2017-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men aged 50 years and older in developed countries and the third leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Multiparametric prostate MR imaging is currently the most accurate imaging modality to detect, localize, and stage prostate cancer. The role of multi-parametric MR imaging in the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer are discussed. In addition, insights are provided in imaging techniques, protocol, and interpretation.

  10. Epigenetics in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albany, Costantine; Alva, Ajjai S; Aparicio, Ana M; Singal, Rakesh; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Sonpavde, Guru; Hahn, Noah M

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG) rich sequence islands within gene promoter regions is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, suggesting that treatment-induced restoration of a "normal" epigenome could be clinically beneficial. Histone modification leads to altered tumor gene function by changing chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription. The reversibility of epigenetic aberrations and restoration of tumor suppression gene function have made them attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment with modulators that demethylate DNA and inhibit histone deacetylases.

  11. Epigenetics in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantine Albany

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG rich sequence islands within gene promoter regions is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, suggesting that treatment-induced restoration of a “normal” epigenome could be clinically beneficial. Histone modification leads to altered tumor gene function by changing chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription. The reversibility of epigenetic aberrations and restoration of tumor suppression gene function have made them attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment with modulators that demethylate DNA and inhibit histone deacetylases.

  12. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: disease control and quality of life at 6 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Alan J; Santoro, Michael; Diblasio, Fred; Ashley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) may yield disease control for prostate cancer in a brief, hypofractionated treatment regimen without increasing treatment toxicity. Our report presents a 6-year update from 304 low- (n = 211), intermediate- (n = 81), and high-risk (n = 12) prostate cancer patients who received CyberKnife SBRT. The median PSA at presentation was 5.8 ng/ml. Fifty-seven patients received neoadjuvant hormonal therapy for up to one year. The first 50 patients received a total dose of 35 Gy in 5 fractions of 7 Gy. The subsequent 254 patients received a total dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions of 7.25 Gy. Toxicity was assessed with the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaire and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group urinary and rectal toxicity scale. Biochemical failure was assessed using the nadir + 2 definition. No patients experienced Grade III or IV acute complications. Fewer than 5% of patients experienced any acute Grade II urinary or rectal toxicities. Late urinary Grade II complications were observed in 4% of patients treated to 35 Gy and 9% of patients treated to 36.25 Gy. Five (2%) late Grade III urinary toxicities occurred in patients who were treated with 36.25 Gy. Late Grade II rectal complications were observed in 2% of patients treated to 35 Gy and 5% of patients treated to 36.25 Gy. Bowel and urinary quality of life (QOL) scores initially decreased, but later returned to baseline values. An overall decrease of 20% in the sexual QOL score was observed. QOL in each domain was not differentially affected by dose. For patients that were potent prior to treatment, 75% stated that they remained sexually potent. Actuarial 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival was 97% for low-risk, 90.7% for intermediate-risk, and 74.1% for high-risk patients. PSA fell to a median of 0.12 ng/ml at 5 years; dose did not influence median PSA levels. In this large series with long-term follow-up, we found excellent biochemical control rates and

  13. Treatment outcome of localized prostate cancer by 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a customized rectal balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Chang Geol; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk; Suh, Chang Ok; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome and long-term toxicity of 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer using a customized rectal balloon. We reviewed medical records of 86 prostate cancer patients who received curative radiotherapy between January 2004 and December 2011 at our institution. Patients were designated as low (12.8%), intermediate (20.9%), or high risk (66.3%). Thirty patients received a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions over 5 weeks via IMRT (the Hypo-IMRT group); 56 received 70.2 Gy in 39 fractions over 7 weeks via 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (the CF-3DRT group, which served as a reference for comparison). A customized rectal balloon was placed in Hypo-IMRT group throughout the entire radiotherapy course. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 47 patients (Hypo-IMRT group, 17; CF-3DRT group, 30). Late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up period was 74.4 months (range, 18.8 to 125.9 months). The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients were 100%, 100%, and 88.5%, respectively, for the Hypo-IMRT group and 80%, 77.8%, and 63.6%, respectively, for the CF-3DRT group (p < 0.046). No patient presented with acute or late GU toxicity > or =grade 3. Late grade 3 GI toxicity occurred in 2 patients (3.6%) in the CF-3DRT group and 1 patient (3.3%) in the Hypo-IMRT group. Hypo-IMRT with a customized rectal balloon resulted in excellent biochemical control rates with minimal toxicity in localized prostate cancer patients.

  14. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: rigid compliance to dose-volume constraints as a warranty of acceptable toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Michael J; Nadalin, Wladmir; Weltman, Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo M; Luz, Fábio P; Cecílio, Paulo J; Cruz, José C da; Moreira, Frederico R; Santos, Adriana S; Martins, Lidiane C

    2007-01-01

    To report the toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with localized prostate cancer, as a sole treatment or after radical prostatectomy. Between August 2001 and December 2003, 132 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT and 125 were evaluable to acute and late toxicity analysis, after a minimum follow-up time of one year. Clinical and treatment data, including normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints, were reviewed. Gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) signs and symptoms were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scales. Median prescribed dose was 76 Gy. Median follow-up time was of 26.1 months. From the 125 patients, 73 (58.4%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GI and 97 (77.2%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GU toxicity. Grade 3 GI acute toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (1.6%) and Grade 3 GU acute toxicity in only 3 patients (2.4%). Regarding Grade 1 and 2 late toxicity, 26 patients (20.8%) and 21 patients (16.8%) presented GI and GU toxicity, respectively. Grade 2 GI late toxicity occurred in 6 patients (4.8%) and Grade 2 GU late toxicity in 4 patients (3.2%). None patient presented any Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Non-conformity to DVH constraints occurred in only 11.2% of treatment plans. On univariate analysis, no significant risk factor was identified for Grade 2 GI late toxicity, but mean dose delivered to the PTV was associated to higher Grade 2 GU late toxicity (p = 0.042). IMRT is a well tolerable technique for routine treatment of localized prostate cancer, with short and medium-term acceptable toxicity profiles. According to the data presented here, rigid compliance to DHV constraints might prevent higher incidences of normal tissue complication

  15. Association of rectal toxicity with thermal dose parameters in treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with radiation and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, Mark D.; Kaplan, Irving D.; Hansen, Jorgen L.; Prokopios-Davos, Savina; Topulos, George P.; Wishnow, Kenneth; Manola, Judith; Bornstein, Bruce A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2002-01-01

    .66 (p=0.03), and 2.29 (p=0.08), respectively. A model combining these three parameters explained 48.6% of the variability among groups. Conclusion: Rectal toxicity correlates with maximum allowable rectal wall temperature, average rectal wall Tmax, and average prostate Tmax for patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound hyperthermia combined with radiation for treatment of advanced clinically localized prostate cancer. Further definition of this association of thermal dose parameters with rectal toxicity in treatment of pelvic malignancies with hyperthermia should advance the goal of delivering thermal therapy in an effective yet safe manner

  16. A phase II study of localized prostate cancer treated to 75.6 Gy with 3D conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichol, Alan; Chung, Peter; Lockwood, Gina; Rosewall, Tara; Divanbiegi, Lorella; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Rob; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To prospectively evaluate toxicity, biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) and biopsy-proven local control for prostate cancer patients treated with 75.6 Gy in 42 fractions using 6-field conformal radiotherapy to prostate alone. Patients and methods: From 1997 to 1999, 140 patients with T1-2NxM0, Gleason score ≤8, and PSA ≤20 ng/ml prostate cancer were assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute and late toxicity scores. bFFS was determined for 120 patients treated without hormones. Post-treatment prostate biopsies were performed at a median of 3 years and a late toxicity questionnaire was administered at a median of 5 years. Results: Clinically important acute toxicities were gastrointestinal (GI) grade 2: 22% and 3: 0%, and genitourinary (GU) grade 2: 24% and 3: 2%. Late physician-assessed toxicities were GI ≥grade 2: 2%, and GU ≥grade 2: 1%. The 3-year bFFS of patients failure-free before biopsy was 93% (95% CI: 83-100) from a negative biopsy and 22% (95% CI: 0-56) from a positive biopsy (P=0.001). Patients reported significantly more late toxicity than physicians (GI: P=0.003, GU: P<0.001). At 5.0 years median follow-up, cause-specific survival was 98% (95% CI: 96-100), overall survival was 91% (95% CI: 86-97), and bFFS was 55% (95% CI: 45-64). Conclusions: 75.6 Gy caused modest levels of acute and late toxicity. Three-year biopsies predicted subsequent biochemical outcome

  17. Ten years experience in organ preservation using HDR brachytherapy boost for nodal negative, locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, G.; Wirth, B.; Bertermann, H.; Galalae, R.; Kohr, P.; Wilhelm, R.; Kimmig, B.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: In 1986 Bertermann and Brix established the combined external beam (EBT) and HDR brachytherapy (BT) boost treatment for localized prostate cancer. The aim of this analysis is to judge the results of this method after 10 years experience. Material and methods: The treatment and follow-up data of 158 histologically proven, localized (N- by imaging) prostate cancer patients were analyzed. Tumor stages (using transrectal ultrasound/TRUS/) ranged from A2 (T1b) in two, to B (T2) in 105 and C (T3) in 51 cases. Tumor grading: 21 highly differentiated (G1), 79 moderately differentiated (G2) as well as 52 poorly differentiated (G3) and one undifferentiated (G4) tumor. Forty-four patients (pts) had previous surgery on the bladder neck. Forty-eight pts had transitory androgen deprivation or antiandrogen treatment prior to radiation, which lasted for a max. of 6 months and was finished before radiation. Initial PSA was known in 126 cases. In 13% values under 4 ng/ml (Hybritech), as well as 46% not above 20 ng/ml and 40 % above 20 ng/ml, respectively. Ultrasound guided conformal BT treatment planning was carried out. The 2x 15 Gy HDR-BT boost was integrated into the EBT schedule, the total dose was 50 Gy for subclinical disease and 70 Gy for the prostate in 6-7 weeks. Regular follow-up by clinical examination, TRUS + volumetry, PSA, bone scan and after 12 months biopsy. Median follow-up 55 months (6-144 months). Results: Eight of 158 pts died of prostate cancer, 15 of intercurrent disease. Clinical progression in 18 cases (12 systemic, 5 local, 1 both syst. + local). All cases of clinical progression with PSA elevation. All pts, whose PSA did not decrease under 1 ng/ml developed progression (p<0.001). Progression developed in 11% of the 107 organ-confined (T1-2 or A2-B) and 7 (14%) of the advanced tumors (T3 or C). The relation between tumor grading and total progression (clinical + PSA) was as follows: four out of 26 G1 tumors, 9 out of 79 G2 tumors and 21 of the 53

  18. Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0413 TITLE: Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Buttitta CONTRACTING...Quiescence in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting uiescence in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0413 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A major problem in prostate cancer is finding and eliminating the non-proliferating or “quiescent” cancer cells. This is because early

  19. Prostate-specific antigen doubling time as a progression criterion in an active surveillance programme for patients with localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebaek; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Brasso, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the role of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time (PSAdt) as a progression criterion in patients with low-risk prostate cancer managed by active surveillance (AS). To assess the correlation between PSAdt during AS and final histopathology after radical prostatectomy...

  20. Hydrogel injection reduces rectal toxicity after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Berneking, Vanessa; Koenig, Liane; Frank, Dilini; Bretgeld, Marilou; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Injection of a hydrogel spacer before prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) is known to reduce the dose to the rectal wall. Clinical results from the patient's perspective are needed to better assess a possible benefit. A group of 167 consecutive patients who received prostate RT during the years 2010 to 2013 with 2-Gy fractions up to 76 Gy (without hydrogel, n = 66) or 76-80 Gy (with hydrogel, n = 101) were included. The numbers of interventions resulting from bowel problems during the first 2 years after RT were compared. Patients were surveyed prospectively before RT, at the last day of RT, and at a median of 2 and 17 months after RT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Baseline patient characteristics were well balanced. Treatment for bowel symptoms (0 vs. 11 %; p < 0.01) and endoscopic examinations (3 vs. 19 %; p < 0.01) were performed less frequently with a spacer. Mean bowel function scores did not change for patients with a spacer in contrast to patients without a spacer (mean decrease of 5 points) >1 year after RT in comparison to baseline, with 0 vs. 12 % reporting a new moderate/big problem with passing stools (p < 0.01). Statistically significant differences were found for the items ''loose stools'', ''bloody stools'', ''painful bowel movements'' and ''frequency of bowel movements''. Spacer injection is associated with a significant benefit for patients after prostate cancer RT. (orig.) [German] Bei der Radiotherapie (RT) des Prostatakarzinoms kann die Dosis an der Rektumwand durch die Injektion eines Hydrogelabstandhalters gesenkt werden. Klinische Ergebnisse aus der Sicht des Patienten sind zur Einschaetzung eines moeglichen Vorteils erforderlich. Eine Gruppe von 167 konsekutiven Patienten, die in den Jahren 2010-2013 eine Prostata-RT mit Einzeldosen von 2 bis 76 Gy (ohne Hydrogel, n = 66) bzw. 76-80 Gy (mit Hydrogel, n = 101

  1. Pubertal development and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonilla, Carolina; Lewis, Sarah J; Martin, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    , 0.91-1.00) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio amongst cases, per tertile: 0.94; 95 % CI, 0.90-0.98), but not with disease grade. CONCLUSIONS: Older age at sexual maturation is causally linked to a reduced risk of later prostate cancer, especially aggressive disease.......BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have observed a positive association between an earlier age at sexual development and prostate cancer, but markers of sexual maturation in boys are imprecise and observational estimates are likely to suffer from a degree of uncontrolled confounding. To obtain...... to a difference of one Tanner stage between pubertal boys of the same age) was associated with a 77 % (95 % CI, 43-91 %) reduced odds of high Gleason prostate cancer. In PRACTICAL, the puberty genetic score was associated with prostate cancer stage (OR of advanced vs. localized cancer, per tertile: 0.95; 95 % CI...

  2. Associations between volume changes and spatial dose metrics for the urinary bladder during local versus pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Moiseenko, Vitali; Hopper, Austin; Pettersson, Niclas Johan; Thor, Maria; Knopp, Rick; Deasy, Joseph O; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Einck, John

    2017-06-01

    Inter-fractional variation in urinary bladder volumes during the course of radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer causes deviations between planned and delivered doses. This study compared planned versus daily cone-beam CT (CBCT)-based spatial bladder dose distributions, for prostate cancer patients receiving local prostate treatment (local treatment) versus prostate including pelvic lymph node irradiation (pelvic treatment). Twenty-seven patients (N = 15 local treatment; N = 12 pelvic treatment) were treated using daily image-guided RT (1.8 Gy@43-45 fx), adhering to a full bladder/empty rectum protocol. For each patient, 9-10 CBCTs were registered to the planning CT, using the clinically applied translations. The urinary bladder was manually segmented on each CBCT, 3 mm inner shells were generated, and semi and quadrant sectors were created using axial/coronal cuts. Planned and delivered DVH metrics were compared across patients and between the two groups of treatment (t-test, p bladder volume variations and the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the bladder and its sectors were evaluated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r s ). Bladder volumes varied considerably during RT (coefficient of variation: 16-58%). The population-averaged planned and delivered DVH metrics were not significantly different at any dose level. Larger treatment bladder volumes resulted in increased absolute volume of the posterior/inferior bladder sector receiving intermediate-high doses, in both groups. The superior bladder sector received less dose with larger bladder volumes for local treatments (r s  ± SD: -0.47 ± 0.32), but larger doses for pelvic treatments (r s  ± SD: 0.74 ± 0.24). Substantial bladder volume changes during the treatment course occurred even though patients were treated under a full bladder/daily image-guided protocol. Larger bladder volumes resulted in less bladder wall spared at the posterior-inferior sector, regardless the

  3. Salvage HIFU after radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after HIFU in locally recurrent prostate cancer: Retrospective analysis of morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.-W.; Hannoun-Leviac, J.-M.; Chevallier, D.; Rouscoff, Y.; Durand, M.; Amiel, J.; Gal, J.; Natale, R.; Chand, M.-E.; Raffaelli, C.; Ambrosetti, D.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the toxicity of therapeutic sequences High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)-salvage radiotherapy (HIFU-RT) or radiotherapy-salvage HIFU (RT-HIFU) in case of locally recurrent prostate cancer. Nineteen patients had a local recurrence of prostate cancer. Among them, 10 patients were treated by HIFU-RT and 9 patients by RT- HIFU (4 by external beam radiotherapy [EBR] and 5 by brachytherapy [BRACHY]). Urinary side effects were assessed using CTCAE v4. At the time of the initial management, the median age was 66.5 years (53 72), the median PSA was 10.8 ng/mL (3.4 50) and the median initial Gleason score was 6.3 (5 8). Median follow-up after salvage treatment was 46.3 months (2 108). Thirty percent of the patients in the HIFU-RT group and 33.3 % of the patients in the RT-HIFU group, all belonging to the sub-group BRACHY-HIFU, had urinary complication greater than or equal to grade 2. Among all the patients, only 1 had grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. BRACHY-HIFU sequence seems to be purveyor of many significant urinary side effects. A larger database is needed to confirm this conclusion. (authors)

  4. Meta-analysis of comparison between brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaodong; Jiang Qing; Yuan Gengbiao; Wang Jiawu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the therapeutic effect of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer using a Meta-analysis. Methods: The published data with randomized control trials (RCT) on comparison of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in PubMed, Wanfang database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBMdisc), the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Ovid and Cochrane library were searched and screened. The quality of the studies included was evaluated and the data with 5-year event free survival rate for comparison were extracted. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 5.0 (Cochrane reviews software). Results: From six trials, there were 5903 patients that were eligible for the analysis, in which 3323 patients were treated by brachytherapy and other 2580 by radical prostatectomy. The odds ratio of all trials was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.69-1.45, P=0.99) and there was no significant difference of 5-year event free survival rate between two treatment groups. Conclusion: This Meta analysis shows that brachytherapy may have comparable treatment effect than radical prostatectomy. (authors)

  5. Comparison of Pelvic Phased-Array versus Endorectal Coil Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla for Local Staging of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have demonstrated the superiority of endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over pelvic phased-array coil MRI at 1.5 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer. However, few have studied which evaluation is more accurate at 3 Tesla MRI. In this study, we compared the accuracy of local staging of prostate cancer using pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil MRI at 3 Tesla. Materials and Methods Between January 2005 and May 2010, 151 patients underwent radi...

  6. Scoring systems used for the interpretation and reporting of multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer detection, localization, and characterization: Could standardization lead to improved utilization of imaging within the diagnostic pathway?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickinson, L.; Ahmed, H.U.; Allen, C.; Barentsz, J.O.; Carey, B.; Futterer, J.J.; Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Hoskin, P.; Kirkham, A.P.; Padhani, A.R.; Persad, R.; Puech, P.; Punwani, S.; Sohaib, A.; Tombal, B.; Villers, A.; Emberton, M.

    2013-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is increasingly being used earlier in the prostate cancer diagnostic pathway in order to detect and localize disease. Its results can be used to help decide on the indication, type, and localization of a prostate biopsy for cancer diagnosis. In

  7. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage modality for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Roedel, Claus; Tselis, Nikolaos [J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Zoga, Eleni [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Strouthos, Iosif [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Butt, Saeed Ahmed [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach am Main (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    To review the current status of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a salvage modality (sHDR BRT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy (RT). A literature search was performed in PubMed using ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' as search terms. In all, 51 search results published between 2000 and 2016 were identified. Data tables were generated and summary descriptions created. The main outcome parameters used were biochemical control (BC) and toxicity scores. Eleven publications reported clinical outcome and toxicity with follow-up ranging from 4-191 months. A variety of dose and fractionation schedules were described, including 19.0 Gy in 2 fractions up to 42.0 Gy in 6 fractions. The 5-year BC ranged from 18-77%. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 0-32% and 0-5.1%, respectively. sHDR BRT appears as safe and effective salvage modality for the reirradiation of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassende Darstellung relevanter Literatur zur interstitiellen High-Dose-Rate-Brachytherapie als Salvage-Modalitaet (sHDR-BRT) bei der Behandlung des lokal rezidivierten Prostatakarzinoms nach vorausgegangener definitiver Radiotherapie (RT). In der PubMed-Datenbank wurde eine Literaturrecherche mit den Suchbegriffen ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' durchgefuehrt. Zwischen den Jahren 2000 und 2016 wurden 51 Publikationen identifiziert. Die biochemische Kontrolle (BC) sowie das assoziierte Toxizitaetsprofil waren onkologische Hauptpunkte in der Analyse der beruecksichtigten Literatur. Von onkologischen Ergebnissen und Toxizitaeten berichteten 11 Publikationen bei einer medianen Nachbeobachtungszeit von 4-191 Monaten. Eine Variabilitaet von Dosis- und Fraktionierungsregimen wurde beschrieben mit totalen physikalischen Dosen von 19,0 Gy in 2 Fraktionen bis zu 42,0 Gy in 6 Fraktionen

  8. Conformal radiation therapy with or without intensity modulation in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Peignaux, K.; Ammor, A.; Bolla, M.

    2005-01-01

    Conformal radiation therapy has now to be considered as a standard treatment of localized prostatic adenocarcinomas. Using conformational methods and intensity modulated radiation therapy requires a rigorous approach for their implementation in routine, focused on the reproducibility of the treatment, target volume definitions, dosimetry, quality control, setup positioning. In order to offer to the largest number of patients high-dose treatment, the clinicians must integrate as prognostic factors accurate definition of microscopic extension as well as the tolerance threshold of critical organs. High-dose delivery is expected to be most efficient in intermediary risks and locally advanced diseases. Intensity modulated radiation therapy is specifically dedicated to dose escalation. Perfect knowledge of classical constraints of conformal radiation therapy is required. Using such an approach in routine needs a learning curve including the physicists and a specific quality assurance program. (author)

  9. Hyaluronan Biosynthesis in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCarthy, James B

    2006-01-01

    Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the last several years metastasis represents the major cause of frustration and failure in the successful treatment of prostate cancer patients. Hyaluronan (HA...

  10. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  11. Surveillance after prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supiot, S.; Rio, E.; Clement-Colmou, K.; Bouchot, O.; Rigaud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up after prostate cancer radiotherapy aims at detecting local or metastatic relapse, as well as long-term toxicity, requiring adapted treatments. Several scientific societies have published guidelines including clinical, biological and imaging recommendations. More data suggest a role for aggressive salvage therapy in case of local failure following radiotherapy. An adequate follow-up is required for the sake of patients' safety, i.e. to a posteriori validate dose constraints and radiation technique in each radiotherapy department. (authors)

  12. Propensity Score Matched Comparison of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy vs Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Survival Analysis from the National Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ricco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available PurposeNo direct comparisons between extreme hypofractionation and conventional fractionation have been reported in randomized trials for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The goal of this study is to use a propensity score matched (PSM analysis with the National Cancer Database (NCDB for the comparison of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for organ confined prostate cancer.MethodsMen with localized prostate cancer treated with radiation dose ≥72 Gy for IMRT and ≥35 Gy for SBRT to the prostate only were abstracted from the NCDB. Men treated with previous surgery, brachytherapy, or proton therapy were excluded. Matching was performed to eliminate confounding variables via PSM. Simple 1–1 nearest neighbor matching resulted in a matched sample of 5,430 (2,715 in each group. Subset analyses of men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA > 10, GS = 7, and GS > 7 yielded matched samples of 1,020, 2,194, and 247, respectively.ResultsNo difference in survival was noted between IMRT and SBRT at 8 years (p = 0.65. Subset analyses of higher risk men with PSA > 10 or GS = 7 histology or GS > 7 histology revealed no difference in survival between IMRT and SBRT (p = 0.58, p = 0.68, and p = 0.62, respectively. Variables significant for survival for the matched group included: age (p < 0.0001, primary payor (p = 0.0001, Charlson/Deyo Score (p = 0.0002, PSA (p = 0.0013, Gleason score (p < 0.0001, and use of hormone therapy (p = 0.02.ConclusionUtilizing the NCDB, there is no difference in survival at 8 years comparing IMRT to SBRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Subset analysis confirmed no difference in survival even for intermediate- and high-risk patients based on Gleason Score and PSA.

  13. Genomic rearrangements of PTEN in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopheap ePhin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The phosphatase and tensin homolog gene on chromosome 10q23.3 (PTEN is a negative regulator of the PIK3/Akt survival pathway and is the most frequently deleted tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer. Monoallelic loss of PTEN is present in up to 60% of localized prostate cancers and complete loss of PTEN in prostate cancer is linked to metastasis and androgen independent progression. Studies on the genomic status of PTEN in prostate cancer initially used a two-color fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH assay for PTEN copy number detection in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue preparations. More recently, a four-color FISH assay containing two additional control probes flanking the PTEN locus with a lower false-positive rate was reported. Combined with the detection of other critical genomic biomarkers for prostate cancer such as ERG, AR, and MYC, the evaluation of PTEN genomic status has proven to be invaluable for patient stratification and management. Although less frequent than allelic deletions, point mutations in the gene and epigenetic silencing are also known to contribute to loss of PTEN function, and ultimately to prostate cancer initiation. Overall, it is clear that PTEN is a powerful biomarker for prostate cancer. Used as a companion diagnostic for emerging therapeutic drugs, FISH analysis of PTEN is promisingly moving human prostate cancer closer to more effective cancer management and therapies.

  14. Five-year biochemical outcome and toxicity with transperineal CT-planned permanent I-125 prostate implantation for patients with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hollister, Timothy; Raben, Adam; Matthews, Sheeba; Wallner, Kent E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse-free survival outcome and incidence of long-term morbidity for patients with localized prostate cancer treated with CT-planned permanent I-125 prostate implantation using a transperineal technique (TPI). Methods and Materials: Between 1989-1996, 248 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with TPI. The median age was 65 years (range: 45-80 years). The clinical stage was T1c in 143 patients (58%), Stage T2a in 102 (41%), and T2b in 3 (1%). Thirty patients (12%) had Gleason scores 10 ng/mL and Gleason score >6) were classified as having intermediate and unfavorable risk disease, respectively. PSA relapse was defined according to the American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology Consensus Statement, and toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity scoring scale. The median follow-up was 48 months (range: 12-126 months). Results: Thirty-eight patients (15%) developed a PSA relapse, and the overall 5-year PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) rate was 71%. The 5-year PRFS rates for favorable-risk (n = 146), intermediate-risk (n = 85), and unfavorable-risk (n = 17) patients were 88%, 77%, and 38%, respectively (p 10 ng/mL and Gleason score >6 as independent predictors for biochemical relapse after TPI. The 5-year actuarial likelihood of late Grade 2 urinary toxicity was 41%. The 5-year likelihood of urethral stricture development was 10%, and the median time to stricture development was 18 months. One patient (0.4%) in the early phase of this clinical experience developed a Grade 4 urethral complication. The actuarial incidence of late Grade 2 rectal bleeding was 9%. One patient (0.4%) developed a Grade 4 rectal complication. Conclusions: Especially for favorable risk disease, the 5-year biochemical outcome with this approach was excellent and appears to be comparable to other therapeutic interventions. Grade 2 urinary symptoms were common in

  15. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho [The Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy.

  16. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2017-01-01

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy

  17. Favorable outcomes in locally advanced and node positive prostate cancer patients treated with combined pelvic IMRT and androgen deprivation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Narrang, Amol; Tafjord, Gunnar; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Russnes, Kjell Magne; Stensvold, Andreas; Hole, Knut Håkon; Tran, Phuoc; Eilertsen, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The most appropriate treatment for men with prostate cancer and positive pelvic nodes, N+, is an area of active controversy. We report our 5-years outcomes in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (T1-T4N0-N1M0) treated with definitive radiotherapy encompassing the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes (intensity modulated radiotherapy, IMRT) and long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Of the 138 consecutive eligible men all living patients have been followed up to almost 5 years. Survival endpoints for 5-year biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression proportional hazards models were constructed for all survival endpoints. The RTOG morbidity grading system for physician rated toxicity was applied. Patients with locally advanced T3-T4 tumors (35 %) and N1 (51 %) have favorable outcome when long-term ADT is combined with definitive radiotherapy encompassing pelvic lymph nodes. The 5-year BFFS, RFS, PCSS and OS were 71.4, 76.2, 94.5 and 89.0 %, respectively. High Gleason sum (9–10) had a strong independent prognostic impact on BFFS, RFS and OS (p = 0.001, <0.001, and 0.005 respectively). The duration of ADT (= > 28 months) showed a significant independent association with improved PCSS (p = 0.02) and OS (p = 0.001). Lymph node involvement was not associated with survival endpoints in the multivariate analysis. The radiotherapy induced toxicity seen in our study population was moderate with rare Grade 3 GI side effects and up to 11 % for Grade 3 GU consisting mainly of urgency and frequency. Pelvic IMRT in combination with long-term ADT can achieve long-lasting disease control in men with N+ disease and unfavorable prognostic factors. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0540-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  18. Evaluating organ delineation, dose calculation and daily localization in an open-MRI simulation workflow for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doemer, Anthony; Chetty, Indrin J; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Nurushev, Teamour; Hearshen, David; Pantelic, Milan; Traughber, Melanie; Kim, Joshua; Levin, Kenneth; Elshaikh, Mohamed A; Walker, Eleanor; Movsas, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This study describes initial testing and evaluation of a vertical-field open Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner for the purpose of simulation in radiation therapy for prostate cancer. We have evaluated the clinical workflow of using open MRI as a sole modality for simulation and planning. Relevant results related to MRI alignment (vs. CT) reference dataset with Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) for daily localization are presented. Ten patients participated in an IRB approved study utilizing MRI along with CT simulation with the intent of evaluating the MRI-simulation process. Differences in prostate gland volume, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb were assessed with MRI and compared to CT. To evaluate dose calculation accuracy, bulk-density-assignments were mapped onto respective MRI datasets and treated IMRT plans were re-calculated. For image localization purposes, 400 CBCTs were re-evaluated with MRI as the reference dataset and daily shifts compared against CBCT-to-CT registration. Planning margins based on MRI/CBCT shifts were computed using the van Herk formalism. Significant organ contour differences were noted between MRI and CT. Prostate volumes were on average 39.7% (p = 0.002) larger on CT than MRI. No significant difference was found in seminal vesicle volumes (p = 0.454). Penile bulb volumes were 61.1% higher on CT, without statistical significance (p = 0.074). MRI-based dose calculations with assigned bulk densities produced agreement within 1% with heterogeneity corrected CT calculations. The differences in shift positions for the cohort between CBCT-to-CT registration and CBCT-to-MRI registration are −0.15 ± 0.25 cm (anterior-posterior), 0.05 ± 0.19 cm (superior-inferior), and −0.01 ± 0.14 cm (left-right). This study confirms the potential of using an open-field MRI scanner as primary imaging modality for prostate cancer treatment planning simulation, dose calculations and daily image localization

  19. Use of brachytherapy with permanent implants of iodine-125 in localized prostate cancer; La curietherapie par implants permanents d'I-125 dans le cancer localise de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bladou, F.; Serment, G. [Hopital Salvador, Service d' Urologie, 13 - Marseille (France); Salem, N.; Simonian, M. [Hopital Salvador, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 13 - Marseille (France); Rosello, R.; Ternier, F. [Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Dept. de Radiologie, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2002-07-01

    Approximately 15,000 cases of early stage prostate cancer T1 and T2 are diagnosed every year in France by testing for PSA and performing prostatic biopsies. The treatment of these localized forms is based in most cases on radical prostatectomy or nn external beam radiotherapy. Although the ontological results obtained by these two therapeutic methods are satisfactory and equivalent in the long term, the side effects can be important. For a number of years, trans-perineal brachytherapy using permanent implants of iodine -125 or palladium-103 has proved itself as an alternative therapy with equivalent medium to long-term results. The low urinary, digestive and sexual side effects of prostate brachytherapy are important reasons for the enthusiasm among patients and the medical community for this therapy and the growing number of applications and centres which practice it. In September 1998 we started the prostate brachytherapy programmes- in Marseilles with close collaboration between the department of urology of the Hopital Salvator, and the departments of radiotherapy, medical imaging and medical physics of the Institut Paoli-Calmettes. To date, around 250 patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate have benefited from this alternative therapy in our centre. Preliminary results, with a 3 year-follow-up, are comparable to results published in the literature by pioneer teams. (authors)

  20. Preliminary results of endorectal surface coil magnetic resonance imaging for local staging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, G.H.; Barentsz, J.O.; Rosette, J.J.M.C.H. de la; Rosenbusch, G.

    1994-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of endorectal surface coil (ERC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the local staging of adenocarcinoma of the prostate (ACP). Materials and methods: A total of 23 patients who were considered candidates for radical prostatectomy because of clinically localized ACP were examined by ERC-MRI. All patients underwent laparoscopic or open lymph-node dissection prior to surgery. Four patients had positive lymph nodes at operation. A total of 19 underwant radical prostatectomy, allowing comparison of the MRI data with the surgical pathologic findings. Results: Twelve patients had extraglandular spread of ACP (T3) and 7 had locally confined ACP (T2). ERC-MRI predicted correctly a T3 tumor in 10 of 12 cases and a T2 tumor in 4 of 7 cases. ERC-MRI was 74% accurate in differentiating T2 from T3 tumor. Three cases of overestimation were in studies with poor image quality because of bowel movement motion artifacts. Conclusion: ERC-MRI was found to be a sensitive modality in staging clinically localized ACP. (orig.) [de

  1. Split-Course, High-Dose Palliative Pelvic Radiotherapy for Locally Progressive Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogna, Nirdosh Kumar, E-mail: kumar_gogna@health.qld.gov.au [Radiation Oncology Services, Mater Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Baxi, Siddhartha; Hickey, Brigid; Baumann, Kathryn [Radiation Oncology Services, Mater Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Holt, Tanya [Radiation Oncology Services, Mater Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local progression, in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer, often causes significant morbidity. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) provides effective palliation in this setting, with most published studies supporting the use of high-dose regimens. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of split-course hypofractionated RT used at our institution in treating this group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 men with locoregionally progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer, treated with a split course of pelvic RT (45-60 Gy in 18-24 fractions) between 2000 and 2008 were analyzed. The primary endpoints were the response rate and actuarial locoregional progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints included overall survival, compliance, and acute and late toxicity. Results: The median age was 71 years (range, 53-88). Treatment resulted in an overall initial response rate of 91%, a median locoregional progression-free survival of 43 months, and median overall survival of 28 months. Compliance was excellent and no significant late toxicity was reported. Conclusions: The split course pelvic RT described has an acceptable toxicity profile, is effective, and compares well with other high-dose palliative regimens that have been previously reported.

  2. Comparison of the outcome and morbidity for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer treated by high-dose-rate brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) versus EBRT alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Fumin; Wang Yuming; Wang Chongjong; Huang Hsuanying; Chiang Pohui

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the survival, gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer treated by high-dose-rate-brachytherapy (HDR-BT) plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) versus EBRT alone at a single institute in Taiwan. Eighty-eight patients with T1c-T3b prostate cancer consecutively treated by EBRT alone (33 patients) or HDR-BT+EBRT (55 patients) were studied. The median dose of EBRT was 70.2 Gy in the EBRT group and 50.4 Gy in the HDR-BT group. HDR-BT was performed 2-3 weeks before EBRT, with 12.6 Gy in three fractions over 24 h. Five patients (15.2%) in the EBRT group and seven (12.7%) in the HDR-BT group developed a biochemical relapse. The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates were 65.0% in the EBRT group and 66.7% in the HDR-BT group (P=0.76). The 5-year actuarial likelihood of late ≥Grade 2 and ≥Grade 3 GI toxicity in the EBRT versus HDR-BT group was 62.8 versus 7.7% (P<0.001) and 19.6 versus 0% (P=0.001), respectively. In a multivariate analysis, the only predictor for late GI toxicity was the mode of RT. The 5-year actuarial likelihood of late ≥Grade 2 and ≥Grade 3 GU toxicity in the EBRT versus HDR-BT group was 14.8 versus 15.9% (P=0.86) and 3.6 versus 8.5% (P=0.40), respectively. The addition of HDR-BT before EBRT with a reduced dose from the EBRT produces a comparable survival outcome and GU toxicity but a significantly less GI toxicity for prostate cancer patients. (author)

  3. Prostate-specific antigen: does the current evidence support its use in prostate cancer screening?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Although widely used, the value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in screening asymptomatic men for prostate cancer is controversial. Reasons for the controversy relate to PSA being less than an ideal marker in detecting early prostate cancer, the possibility that screening for prostate cancer may result in the overdetection and thus overtreatment of indolent disease and the lack of clarity as to the definitive or best treatment for men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Although the results from some randomized prospective trials suggest that screening with PSA reduces mortality from prostate cancer, the overall benefit was modest. It is thus currently unclear as to whether the modest benefit of reduced mortality outweighs the harms of overdetection and overtreatment. Thus, prior to undergoing screening for prostate cancer, men should be informed of the risks and benefits of early detection. Newly emerging markers that may complement PSA in the early detection of prostate cancer include specific isoforms of PSA and PCA3.

  4. What is a “good” treatment decision?: Decisional control, knowledge, treatment decision-making, and quality of life in men with clinically localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orom, Heather; Biddle, Caitlin; Underwood, Willie; Nelson, Christian J.; Homish, D. Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Objective We explored whether active patient involvement in decision making and greater patient knowledge are associated with better treatment decision making experiences and better quality of life (QOL) among men with clinically localized prostate cancer. Localized prostate cancer treatment decision-making is an advantageous model for studying patient treatment decision-making dynamics as there are multiple treatment options and a lack of empirical evidence to recommend one over the other; consequently, it is recommended that patients be fully involved in making the decision. Methods Men with newly diagnosed clinically localized prostate cancer (N=1529) completed measures of decisional control, prostate cancer knowledge, and their decision-making experience (decisional conflict, and decision-making satisfaction and difficulty) shortly after they made their treatment decision. Prostate cancer-specific QOL was assessed 6-months after treatment. Results More active involvement in decision making and greater knowledge were associated with lower decisional conflict and higher decision-making satisfaction, but greater decision-making difficulty. An interaction between decisional control and knowledge revealed that greater knowledge was only associated with greater difficulty for men actively involved in making the decision (67% of sample). Greater knowledge, but not decisional control predicted better QOL 6-months post-treatment. Conclusion Although men who are actively involved in decision making and more knowledgeable may make more informed decisions, they could benefit from decisional support (e.g., decision-making aids, emotional support from providers, strategies for reducing emotional distress) to make the process easier. Men who were more knowledgeable about prostate cancer and treatment side effects at the time they made their treatment decision may have appraised their QOL as higher because they had realistic expectations about side effects. PMID:26957566

  5. Morbidity and mortality of local failure after definitive therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellhammer, P.F.; Whitmore, R.B. III; Kuban, D.A.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Ladaga, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    We reviewed our experience with morbidity and mortality associated with clinical local failure after definitive therapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate by interstitial 125-iodine implantation, external beam radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. Morbid complications included unilateral ureteral obstruction; bladder obstruction and/or incontinence requiring treatment by transurethral resection, or placement of a urethral or suprapubic catheter; hematuria requiring intervention for clot evacuation or fulguration, and perineal and/or pelvic pain. Lethal complications included bilateral ureteral obstruction or bowel obstruction. We treated 108 patients with 125-iodine, 178 with external beam radiotherapy and 67 with radical prostatectomy. Clinical local failure occurred in 26 per cent of the 125-iodine, 17 per cent of the external beam radiotherapy and 12 per cent of the radical prostatectomy groups. The total incidence of local failure with 125-iodine was statistically higher than for radical prostatectomy. Stage C and poorly differentiated tumors were associated with a statistically higher incidence of local failure compared to lower stage and grade tumors. However, within each stage and grade there was no significant difference in local failure between treatment modalities. There was negligible morbidity or mortality secondary to local failure associated with stage A2, stage B1 or well differentiated tumors regardless of treatment modality. There was no difference in the morbidity and mortality between treatment modalities for stage C or poorly differentiated tumors. However, for stage B2 or moderately differentiated tumors treated by 125-iodine implantation there was a statistically greater incidence of morbidity and mortality than that associated with external beam radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy

  6. Updated results of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO phoenix definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Pellizzon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic factors for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR according to the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The charts of 209 patients treated between 1997 and 2005 with localized RT and HDR as a boost at the Department of Radiation Oncology, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil were reviewed. Clinical and treatment parameters i.e.: patient's age, Gleason score, clinical stage, initial PSA (iPSA, risk group (RG for biochemical failure, doses of RT and HDR were evaluated. Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median RT and HDR doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. RESULTS: Disease specific survival (DSS at 3.3 year was 94.2%. Regarding RG, for the LR (low risk, IR (intermediate risk and HR (high risk, the DSS rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis prognostic factors related to DSS were RG (p = 0.040, Gleason score ≤ 6 ng/mL (p = 0.002, total dose of HDR ≥ 20 Gy (p < 0.001 On multivariate analysis the only statistical significant predictive factor for biochemical control (bNED was the RG, p < 0.001 (CI - 1.147-3.561. CONCLUSIONS: Although the radiation dose administered to the prostate is an important factor related to bNED, this could not be established with statistical significance in this group of patients. To date , in our own experience, HDR associated to RT could be considered a successful approach in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  7. Long-Term Outcome for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present the largest series of prostate cancer brachytherapy patients treated with modern brachytherapy techniques and postimplant day 0 dosimetric evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and July 2006, 1,656 consecutive patients were treated with permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Risk group stratification was carried out according to the Mt. Sinai guidelines. Median follow-up was 7.0 years. The median day 0 minimum dose covering at least 90% of the target volume was 118.8% of the prescription dose. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on the evaluated survival parameters. Results: At 12 years, biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 95.6%, 98.2%, and 72.6%, respectively. For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, bPFS was 98.6%, 96.5%, and 90.5%; CSS was 99.8%, 99.3%, and 95.2%; and OS was 77.5%, 71.1%, and 69.2%, respectively. For biochemically controlled patients, the median posttreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration was 0.02 ng/ml. bPFS was most closely related to percent positive biopsy specimens and risk group, while Gleason score was the strongest predictor of CSS. OS was best predicted by patient age, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco use. At 12 years, biochemical failure and cause-specific mortality were 1.8% and 0.2%, 5.1% and 2.1%, and 10.4% and 7.1% for Gleason scores 5 to 6 and 7 and ≥8, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent long-term outcomes are achievable with high-quality brachytherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. These results compare favorably to alternative treatment modalities including radical prostatectomy.

  8. Proposed Rectal Dose Constraints for Patients Undergoing Definitive Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Linda W.; Xia Ping; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Akazawa, Michelle; Scala, Matthew; Pickett, Barby M.S.; Hsu, I-C.; Speight, Joycelyn; Roach, Mack

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although several institutions have reported rectal dose constraints according to threshold toxicity, the plethora of trials has resulted in multiple, confusing dose-volume histogram recommendations. A set of standardized, literature-based constraints for patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer would help guide the practice of prostate RT. The purpose of this study was to develop these constraints, demonstrate that they are achievable, and assess the corresponding rectal toxicity. Methods and Materials: An extensive literature search identified eight key studies relating dose-volume histogram data to rectal toxicity. A correction factor was developed to address differences in the anatomic definition of the rectum across studies. The dose-volume histogram constraints recommended by each study were combined to generate the constraints. The data from all patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated RT were then compared against these constraints. Acute rectal toxicity was assessed. Results: A continuous, proposed rectal dose-constraint curve was generated. Intensity-modulated RT not only met this constraint curve, but also was able to achieve at least 30-40% lower dose to the rectum. The preliminary clinical results were also positive: 50% of patients reported no acute bowel toxicity, 33% reported Grade 1 toxicity, and 17% reported Grade 2 toxicity. No patients reported Grade 3-4 acute rectal toxicity. Conclusions: In this study, we developed a set of proposed rectal dose constraints. This allowed for volumetric assessment of the dose-volume relationship compared with single dose-volume histogram points. Additional research will be performed to validate this threshold as a class solution for rectal dose constraints

  9. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic neoadjuvant study of hedgehog pathway inhibitor Sonidegib (LDE-225) in men with high-risk localized prostate cancer undergoing prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ashley E; Hughes, Robert M; Glavaris, Stephanie; Ghabili, Kamyar; He, Ping; Anders, Nicole M; Harb, Rana; Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Marchionni, Luigi; Schaeffer, Edward M; Partin, Alan W; Allaf, Mohamad E; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Chapman, Carolyn; O'Neal, Tanya; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Hurley, Paula J; Rudek, Michelle A; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2017-11-28

    To determine the pharmacodynamic effects of Sonidegib (LDE-225) in prostate tumor tissue from men with high-risk localized prostate cancer, by comparing pre-surgical core-biopsy specimens to tumor tissue harvested post-treatment at prostatectomy. We conducted a prospective randomized (Sonidegib vs. observation) open-label translational clinical trial in men with high-risk localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients in each arm who achieved at least a two-fold reduction in GLI1 mRNA expression in post-treatment versus pre-treatment tumor tissue. Secondary endpoints included the effect of pre-surgical treatment with Sonidegib on disease progression following radical prostatectomy, and safety. Fourteen men were equally randomized (7 per arm) to either neoadjuvant Sonidegib or observation for 4 weeks prior to prostatectomy. Six of seven men (86%) in the Sonidegib arm (and none in the control group) achieved a GLI1 suppression of at least two-fold. In the Sonidegib arm, drug was detectable in plasma and in prostatic tissue; and median intra-patient GLI1 expression decreased by 63-fold, indicating potent suppression of Hedgehog signaling. Sonidegib was well tolerated, without any Grade 3-4 adverse events observed. Disease-free survival was comparable among the two arms (HR = 1.50, 95% CI 0.26-8.69, P = 0.65). Hedgehog pathway activity (as measured by GLI1 expression) was detectable at baseline in men with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Sonidegib penetrated into prostatic tissue and induced a >60-fold suppression of the Hedgehog pathway. The oncological benefit of Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer remains unclear.

  10. Fifteen-Year Biochemical Relapse-Free Survival, Cause-Specific Survival, and Overall Survival Following I125 Prostate Brachytherapy in Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Seattle Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvester, John E.; Grimm, Peter D.; Wong, Jason; Galbreath, Robert W.; Merrick, Gregory; Blasko, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report 15-year biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) outcomes of patients treated with I 125 brachytherapy monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer early in the Seattle experience. Methods and Materials: Two hundred fifteen patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were consecutively treated from 1988 to 1992 with I 125 monotherapy. They were prospectively followed as a tight cohort. They were evaluated for BRFS, CSS, and OS. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate outcomes by pretreatment clinical prognostic factors. BRFS was analyzed by the Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/mL) definition. CSS and OS were evaluated by chart review, death certificates, and referring physician follow-up notes. Gleason scoring was performed by general pathologists at a community hospital in Seattle. Time to biochemical failure (BF) was calculated and compared by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire cohort was 80.4%. BRFS by D'Amico risk group classification cohort analysis was 85.9%, 79.9%, and 62.2% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively. Follow-up ranged from 3.6 to 18.4 years; median follow-up was 15.4 years for biochemically free of disease patients. Overall median follow-up was 11.7 years. The median time to BF in those who failed was 5.1 years. CSS was 84%. OS was 37.1%. Average age at time of treatment was 70 years. There was no significant difference in BRFS between low and intermediate risk groups. Conclusion: I 125 monotherapy results in excellent 15-year BRFS and CSS, especially when taking into account the era of treatment effect.

  11. The survival analysis on localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hong; Li Gaofeng; Wu Qinhong; Li Xuenan; Zhong Qiuzi; Xu Yonggang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively investigate clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy followed by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Between March 2003 and October 2008, 54 localized prostate cancer treated by IMRT were recruited. All patients had received endocrine therapy before IMRT. The endocrine therapy included surgical castration or medical castration in combination with antiandrogens. The target of IMRT was the prostate and seminal vesicles with or without pelvis. The biochemical failure was defined according to the phoenix definition. By using the risk grouping standard proposed by D'Amico, patients were divided into three groups: low-risk group (n = 5), intermediate-risk group (n = 12), and high-risk group (n = 37). Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the overall survival rate. Prognostic factors were analyzed by univariate and multiple Cox regression analysis. Results: The follow-up rate was 98%. The number of patients under follow-up was 39 at 3 years and 25 at 5 years. Potential prognostic factors, including risk groups, mode of endocrine therapy, time of endocrine therapy, phoenix grouping before IMRT, the prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) before radiotherapy, PSA value before IMRT, interval of endocrine therapy and IMRT, irradiation region, and irradiation dose were analyzed by survival analysis. In univariate analysis, time of endocrine therapy (75 % vs 95 %, χ 2 = 6. 45, P = 0. 011), phoenix grouping before IMRT (87% vs 96%, χ 2 = 4. 36, P = 0. 037), interval of endocrine therapy and IMRT (80% vs 95%, χ 2 = 11.60, P= 0. 001), irradiation dose (75% vs 91%, χ 2 =5.92, P= 0. 015) were statistically significant prognostic factors for 3 - year overall survival , and risk groups (85 vs 53 vs 29, χ 2 = 6. 40, P =0. 041) and PSADT before IMRT (62 vs 120, U =24. 50, P =0. 003) were significant factors for the median survival time. In the multiple Cox

  12. The bicalutamide Early Prostate Cancer Program. Demography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, W A.; McLeod, D; Iversen, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal treatment for early prostate cancer has yet to be established. A well-tolerated hormonal therapy such as bicalutamide could be a useful treatment option in this setting, either as adjuvant or immediate therapy. A major collaborative clinical trials program was set up...... to investigate bicalutamide as a treatment option for local prostate cancer (localized or locally advanced disease). METHODS: The bicalutamide Early Prostate Cancer program comprises three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of similar design that are being conducted in distinct geographical...... areas (North America; Australia, Europe, Israel, South Africa and Mexico; and Scandinavia). Men with T1b-4N0-1M0 (TNM 1997) prostate cancer have been randomized on a 1:1 basis to receive bicalutamide 150 mg daily or placebo. Recruitment to the program closed in July 1998, and follow-up is ongoing. Study...

  13. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  14. Prostate cancer: body-array versus endorectal coil MR imaging at 3 T--comparison of image quality, localization, and staging performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Futterer, J.J.; Hambrock, T.; Takahashi, S.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Huisman, H.J.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Knipscheer, B.C.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively compare image quality and accuracy of prostate cancer localization and staging with body-array coil (BAC) versus endorectal coil (ERC) T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3 T, with histopathologic findings as the reference standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After

  15. Health-related quality-of-life effects of radical prostatectomy and primary radiotherapy for screen-detected or clinically diagnosed localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madalinska, J. B.; Essink-Bot, M. L.; de Koning, H. J.; Kirkels, W. J.; van der Maas, P. J.; Schröder, F. H.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: The current study was undertaken within the framework of a screening trial to compare the health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes of two primary treatment modalities for localized prostate cancer: radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We

  16. The application of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound to measure volume of affected tissue after HIFU treatment for localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedelaar, J. P.; Aarnink, R. G.; van Leenders, G. J.; Beerlage, H. P.; Debruyne, F. M.; Wijkstra, H.; de la Rosette, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Adequate monitoring of volume and location of affected tissue might provide helpful information when performing localized ablative therapy for prostate cancer. We hypothesize that the change in blood flow patterns after therapy in comparison to the blood flow pattern prior to therapy

  17. Initial results of 3-dimensional 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the localization of prostate cancer at 3 Tesla: should we use an endorectal coil?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakar, D.; Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Huisman, H.J.; Barentsz, J.O.; Futterer, J.J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of 3 Tesla, 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in the localization of prostate cancer (PCa) with and without the use of an endorectal coil (ERC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our prospective study

  18. Early versus delayed endocrine treatment of pN1-3 M0 prostate cancer without local treatment of the primary tumor: results of European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer 30846--a phase III study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, Fritz H.; Kurth, Karl Heinz; Fosså, Sophie D.; Hoekstra, Wytze; Karthaus, Peter P. M.; Debois, Muriel; Collette, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    The timing of endocrine treatment for prostate cancer remains controversial. The issue is addressed in protocol 30846 of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer for patients with lymph node positive cancer without local treatment of the primary tumor. A total of 302 patients

  19. Proton Therapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Relapse of Prostate Cancer Following Cryosurgery or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzman, Adam L.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Letter, Haley P.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Henderson, Randal H.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Williams, Christopher R.; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after cryosurgery (CS) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an emerging problem for which optimal management is unknown. Proton therapy (PT) may offer advantages over other local therapeutic options. This article reviews a single institution's experience using PT for salvage of local recurrent disease after HIFU or CS. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 21 consecutive patients treated with salvage PT following a local recurrence of prostate cancer after CS (n=12) or HIFU (n=9) between January 2007 and July 2014. Patients were treated to a median dose of 74 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range: 74-82 Gy[RBE]) and 8 patients received androgen deprivation therapy with radiation therapy. Patients were evaluated for quality of life (QOL) by using the Expanded Prostate Index Composite questionnaire and toxicity by using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment, every 6 months for 2 years after treatment, and then annually. Results: Median follow-up was 37 months (range: 6-95 months). The 3-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 77%. The 3-year grade 3 toxicity rate was 17%; however, 2 of these patients had pre-existing grade 3 GU toxicities from their HIFU/CRYO prior to PT. At 1 year, bowel summary, urinary incontinence, and urinary obstructive QOL scores declined, but only the bowel QOL score at 12 months met the minimally important difference threshold. Conclusions: PT achieved a high rate of bPFS with acceptable toxicity and minimal changes in QOL scores compared with baseline pre-PT functions. Although most patients have done fairly well, the study size is small, follow-up is short, and early results suggest that outcomes with PT for salvage after HIFU or CS failure are inferior to outcomes with PT given in the de novo setting with respect to disease control, toxicity, and QOL.

  20. Proton Therapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Relapse of Prostate Cancer Following Cryosurgery or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzman, Adam L. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Letter, Haley P.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Henderson, Randal H.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Williams, Christopher R. [Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after cryosurgery (CS) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an emerging problem for which optimal management is unknown. Proton therapy (PT) may offer advantages over other local therapeutic options. This article reviews a single institution's experience using PT for salvage of local recurrent disease after HIFU or CS. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 21 consecutive patients treated with salvage PT following a local recurrence of prostate cancer after CS (n=12) or HIFU (n=9) between January 2007 and July 2014. Patients were treated to a median dose of 74 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range: 74-82 Gy[RBE]) and 8 patients received androgen deprivation therapy with radiation therapy. Patients were evaluated for quality of life (QOL) by using the Expanded Prostate Index Composite questionnaire and toxicity by using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment, every 6 months for 2 years after treatment, and then annually. Results: Median follow-up was 37 months (range: 6-95 months). The 3-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 77%. The 3-year grade 3 toxicity rate was 17%; however, 2 of these patients had pre-existing grade 3 GU toxicities from their HIFU/CRYO prior to PT. At 1 year, bowel summary, urinary incontinence, and urinary obstructive QOL scores declined, but only the bowel QOL score at 12 months met the minimally important difference threshold. Conclusions: PT achieved a high rate of bPFS with acceptable toxicity and minimal changes in QOL scores compared with baseline pre-PT functions. Although most patients have done fairly well, the study size is small, follow-up is short, and early results suggest that outcomes with PT for salvage after HIFU or CS failure are inferior to outcomes with PT given in the de novo setting with respect to disease control, toxicity, and QOL.

  1. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eunpi; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A.; Kurland, Brenda F.; Marck, Brett T.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; Montgomery, R. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  2. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eunpi [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Mostaghel, Elahe A. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kurland, Brenda F. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Marck, Brett T. [Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington (United States); Matsumoto, Alvin M. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington (United States); Dalkin, Bruce L. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Montgomery, R. Bruce, E-mail: rbmontgo@uw.edu [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  3. Urethrogram-directed Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients with Contraindications to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima ePaydar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-directed stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has been established as a safe and effective treatment for prostate cancer. For patients with contraindications to MRI, CT-urethrogram is an alternative imaging approach to identify the location of the prostatic apex to guide treatment. This study sought to evaluate the safety of urethrogram-directed SBRT for prostate cancer.Methods: Between February 2009 and January 2014, 31 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with urethrogram-directed SBRT with or without supplemental intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT at Georgetown University Hospital. SBRT was delivered either as a primary treatment of 35-36.25 Gray (Gy in 5 fractions or as a boost of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions followed by supplemental conventionally fractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (45-50.4 Gy. Toxicities were recorded and scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE v.4.0.Results: The median patient age was 70 years with a median prostate volume of 38 cc. The median follow-up was 3.7 years. The patients were elderly (Median age = 70, and comorbidities were common (Carlson Comorbidity Index > 2 in 36%. 71% of patients utilized alpha agonists prior to treatment, and 9.7% had prior procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. The 3-year actuarial incidence rates of > Grade 3 GU toxicity and > Grade 2 GI toxicity were 3.2% and 9.7%, respectively. There were no Grade 4 or 5 toxicities.Conclusions: MRI is the preferred imaging modality to guide prostate SBRT treatment. However, urethrogram-directed SBRT is a safe alternative for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer who are unable to undergo MRI.

  4. Outcome According to Elective Pelvic Radiation Therapy in Patients With High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer: A Secondary Analysis of the GETUG 12 Phase 3 Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Pierre; Faivre, Laura; Lesaunier, François; Salem, Naji; Mesgouez-Nebout, Nathalie; Deniau-Alexandre, Elisabeth; Rolland, Frédéric; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Houédé, Nadine; Mourey, Loïc; Théodore, Christine; Krakowski, Ivan; Berdah, Jean-François; Baciuchka, Marjorie; Laguerre, Brigitte; Davin, Jean-Louis; Habibian, Muriel; Culine, Stéphane; Laplanche, Agnès; Fizazi, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The role of pelvic elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in the management of prostate cancer is controversial. This study analyzed the role of pelvic radiation therapy (RT) on the outcome in high-risk localized prostate cancer patients included in the Groupe d'Etude des Tumeurs Uro-Genitales (GETUG) 12 trial. Patients with a nonpretreated high-risk localized prostate cancer and a staging lymphadenectomy were randomly assigned to receive either goserelin every 3 months for 3 years and 4 cycles of docetaxel plus estramustine or goserelin alone. Local therapy was administered 3 months after the start of systemic treatment. Performance of pelvic ENI was left to the treating physician. Only patients treated with primary RT were included in this analysis. The primary endpoint was biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS). A total of 413 patients treated from 2002 to 2006 were included, of whom 358 were treated using primary RT. A total of 208 patients received pelvic RT and 150 prostate-only RT. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration, Gleason score, or T stage did not differ according to performance of pelvic RT; pN+ patients more frequently received pelvic RT than pN0 patients (PENI in multivariate analysis (HR: 1.10 [95% CI: 0.78-1.55], P=.60), even when analysis was restricted to pN0 patients (HR: 0.88 [95% CI: 0.59-1.31], P=.53). Pelvic ENI was not associated with increased acute or late patient reported toxicity. This unplanned analysis of a randomized trial failed to demonstrate a benefit of pelvic ENI on bPFS in high-risk localized prostate cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Incremental value of diffusion weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation treatment: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akin, Oguz; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Gultekin, David H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Pei, Xin; Sperling, Dahlia; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Schwartz, Lawrence H. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-09-15

    To assess the incremental value of diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to T2-weighted MRI (T2WI) in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients (median age, 70 years) with a history of radiotherapy-treated prostate cancer underwent multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) and transrectal prostate biopsy. Two readers independently scored the likelihood of cancer on a 1-5 scale, using T2WI alone and then adding DW-MRI and DCE-MRI. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated at the patient and prostate-side levels. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from DW-MRI and the K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, v{sub e}, AUGC90 and AUGC180 from DCE-MRI were recorded. Biopsy was positive in 16/24 (67%) and negative in 8/24 (33%) patients. AUCs for readers 1 and 2 increased from 0.64 and 0.53 to 0.95 and 0.86 with MP-MRI, at the patient level, and from 0.73 and 0.66 to 0.90 and 0.79 with MP-MRI, at the prostate-side level (p values < 0.05). Biopsy-positive and biopsy-negative prostate sides differed significantly in median ADC [1.44 vs. 1.68 (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s)], median K{sup trans} [1.07 vs. 0.34 (1/min)], and k{sub ep} [2.06 vs 1.0 (1/min)] (p values < 0.05). MP-MRI was significantly more accurate than T2WI alone in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. (orig.)

  6. Long-term erectile function following permanent seed brachytherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Hindson, Benjamin R.; Beaufort, Catherine; Pharoah, Paul; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Erectile function (EF) is commonly affected following prostate cancer treatment. We aim to evaluate the long-term EF following seed brachytherapy (BT) treatment. Materials and methods: The study consisted of 366 patients treated with BT at our institution, who completed the IIEF-5 questionnaire and reported no or mild erectile dysfunction (ED) pre-BT. The probability of EF preservation post-BT was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier methods. The difference in EF preservation by patient-, tumour- and treatment-related factors was assessed using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression was used to estimate the effect of each factor on EF preservation. Results: Of the 366 patients, 277 (76%) reported normal EF, and 89 (24%) reported mild ED. The patients were followed-up for a median of 41 months (range: 3–124), and the 5-year actuarial rate of EF preservation was 59%. Age at BT seed implant, presence of medical comorbidities, Gleason score and the biologically effective dose (BED) are associated with EF preservation (P < 0.005). The association for these four factors remains statistically significant in multivariate analysis, with Gleason score having the strongest effect (HR = 3.7; 95% CI = 2.6–5.4). Conclusion: The 5-year actuarial rate of EF preservation post-BT in our cohort is 59%, and is influenced by multiple factors

  7. Quality of life impact of treatments for localized prostate cancer: Cohort study with a 5 year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montse; Guedea, Ferran; Suárez, José Francisco; Paula, Belén de; Macías, Víctor; Mariño, Alfonso; Hervás, Asunción; Herruzo, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess long-term quality of life (QoL) impact of treatments in localized prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Material and methods: Observational, prospective cohort study with pre-treatment QoL evaluation and follow-up until five years after treatment. 704 patients with low or intermediate risk localized prostate cancer were consecutively recruited in 2003–2005. QoL was measured by the EPIC questionnaire, with urinary irritative–obstructive, incontinence, bowel, sexual, and hormonal scores (ranging 0–100). Results: Brachytherapy’s QoL impact was restricted to the urinary domain, Generalized Estimating Equation models showed score changes at five years of −12.0 (95% CI = −15.0, −9.0) in incontinence and −5.3 (95% CI = −7.5, −3.1) in irritative–obstructive scales. Compared to brachytherapy, radical prostatectomy fared +3.3 (95% CI = +0.0, +6.5) points better in irritative–obstructive but −17.1 (95% CI = −22.7, −11.5) worse in incontinence. Sexual deterioration was observed in radical prostatectomy (−19.1; 95% CI = −25.1, −13.1) and external radiotherapy groups (−7.5; 95% CI = −12.5, −2.5). Conclusions: Brachytherapy is the treatment causing the least impact on QoL except for moderate urinary irritative–obstructive symptoms. Our study provides novel long-term valuable information for clinical decision making, supporting brachytherapy as a possible alternative to radical prostatectomy for patients seeking an attempted curative treatment, while limiting the risk for urinary incontinence and sexual impact on QoL

  8. Health-related quality of life after salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment for locally radiorecurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, V.; Baco, E.; Dahl, A.A.; Karlsen, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for locally radiorecurrent prostate cancer (PCa). Since June 2006 we have treated 61 patients consecutively by salvage HIFU. All patients were offered the University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) questionnaire at baseline and at follow-up. Scores ranged from 0 (worst) to 100 (best). Clinically significant changes were defined as a minimum difference of 10 points between the baseline score and the score at follow-up. Fifty-seven patients (93%) had evaluable data at baseline, compared with 46 (75%) after treatment. The mean time lapse between HIFU treatment and questionnaire response was 17.5 months (range 6-29 months). The mean score for urinary function decreased from 79.7±12.1 prior to HIFU to 67.4±17.8 after HIFU (P<0.001). The mean score for sexual function decreased from 32.1±24.1 prior to HIFU to 17.2±17.0 after HIFU (P<0.001). There were no significant effects on bowel function. There was a significant reduction in the mean score for Physical HRQOL, but the mean score for Mental HRQOL was did not change significantly. Treatment of localized radiorecurrent PCa by salvage HIFU is associated with clinically significant reductions in urinary and sexual function domains after a mean follow-up of 17.5 months. (author)

  9. Prostate-Specific Antigen Halving Time While on Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is Associated With Biochemical Control in Men Treated With Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Renuka; Jani, Ashesh B.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether the PSA response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is associated with biochemical control in men treated with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a cohort of men treated with curative-intent RT for localized prostate cancer between 1988 and 2005, 117 men had PSA values after the first and second months of neoadjuvant ADT. Most men had intermediate-risk (45%) or high-risk (44%) disease. PSA halving time (PSAHT) was calculated by first order kinetics. Median RT dose was 76 Gy and median total duration of ADT was 4 months. Freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF, nadir + 2 definition) was analyzed by PSAHT and absolute PSA nadir before the start of RT. Results: Median follow-up was 45 months. Four-year FFBF was 89%. Median PSAHT was 2 weeks. A faster PSA decline (PSAHT ≤2 weeks) was associated with greater FFBF (96% vs. 81% for a PSAHT >2 weeks, p = 0.0110). Those within the fastest quartile of PSAHTs (≤ 10 days) achieved a FFBF of 100%. Among high-risk patients, a PSAHT ≤2 weeks achieved a 4-yr FFBF of 93% vs. 70% for those with PSAHT >2 weeks (p = 0.0508). Absolute PSA nadir was not associated with FFBF. On multivariable analysis, PSAHT (p = 0.0093) and Gleason score (p = 0.0320) were associated with FFBF, whereas T-stage (p = 0.7363) and initial PSA level (p = 0.9614) were not. Conclusions: For men treated with combined ADT and RT, PSA response to the first month of ADT may be a useful criterion for prognosis and treatment modification.

  10. Patient costs associated with external beam radiotherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer: the benefits of hypofractionated over conventionally fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethukavalan, Perakaa; Cheung, Patrick; Tang, Colin I; Quon, Harvey; Morton, Gerard; Nam, Robert; Loblaw, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the out-of-pocket costs for patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and calculate the patient-related savings of being treated with a 5-fraction versus a standard 39-fraction approach. Seventy patients accrued to the pHART3 (n = 84) study were analyzed for out-of-pocket patient costs as a result of undergoing treatment. All costs are in Canadian dollars. Using the postal code of the patient's residence, the distance between the hospital and patient home was found using Google Maps. The Canada Revenue Agency automobile allowance rate was then applied to determine the cost per kilometer driven. The average cost of travel from the hospital and pHART3 patient's residence was $246 per person after five trips. In a standard fractionation regimen, pHART3 patients would have incurred an average cost of $1921 after 39 visits. The patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy would have paid an average of $38 in parking while those receiving conventional treatment would have paid $293. The difference in out-of-pocket costs for the patients receiving a standard versus hypofractionated treatment was $1930. Medium term prospective data shows that hypofractionated radiotherapy is an effective treatment method for localized prostate cancer. Compared to standard EBRT, hypofractionated radiotherapy requires significantly fewer visits. Due to the long distance patients may have to travel to the cancer center and the expense of parking, the short course treatment saves each patient an average of $1900. A randomized study of standard versus hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy should be conducted to confirm a favorable efficacy and tolerability profile of the shorter fractionation scheme.

  11. Consensus and differences in primary radiotherapy for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer in Switzerland. A survey on patterns of practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panje, Cedric M. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Universitaetsspital Zuerich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Dal Pra, Alan [Inselspital Bern, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bern (Switzerland); Zilli, Thomas [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva (Switzerland); Zwahlen, Daniel R. [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chur (Switzerland); Papachristofilou, Alexandros [Universitaetsspital Basel, Department of Radiation Oncology, Basel (Switzerland); Herrera, Fernanda G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Matzinger, Oscar [Hopital Riviera-Chablais, Department of Radiation Oncology, Vevey (Switzerland); Plasswilm, Ludwig; Putora, Paul Martin [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT), with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), is an established treatment option for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Despite high-level evidence from several randomized trials, risk group stratification and treatment recommendations vary due to contradictory or inconclusive data, particularly with regard to EBRT dose prescription and ADT duration. Our aim was to investigate current patterns of practice in primary EBRT for prostate cancer in Switzerland. Treatment recommendations on EBRT and ADT for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer were collected from 23 Swiss radiation oncology centers. Written recommendations were converted into center-specific decision trees, and analyzed for consensus and differences using a dedicated software tool. Additionally, specific radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques from the participating centers were assessed. The most commonly prescribed radiation dose was 78 Gy (range 70-80 Gy) across all risk groups. ADT was recommended for intermediate-risk patients for 6 months in over 80 % of the centers, and for high-risk patients for 2 or 3 years in over 90 % of centers. For recommendations on combined EBRT and ADT treatment, consensus levels did not exceed 39 % in any clinical scenario. Arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is implemented for routine prostate cancer radiotherapy by 96 % of the centers. Among Swiss radiation oncology centers, considerable ranges of radiotherapy dose and ADT duration are routinely offered for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer. In the vast majority of cases, doses and durations are within the range of those described in current evidence-based guidelines. (orig.) [German] Die Radiotherapie (RT) ist als Monotherapie oder in Kombination mit einer Androgendeprivationstherapie (ADT) eine etablierte Behandlungsoption fuer das lokalisierte und lokal fortgeschrittene Prostatakarzinom. Trotz der guten Evidenzlage durch zahlreiche

  12. Epigenome-Wide Tumor DNA Methylation Profiling Identifies Novel Prognostic Biomarkers of Metastatic-Lethal Progression in Men Diagnosed with Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanshan; Geybels, Milan S; Leonardson, Amy; Rubicz, Rohina; Kolb, Suzanne; Yan, Qingxiang; Klotzle, Brandy; Bibikova, Marina; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Troyer, Dean; Lance, Raymond; Lin, Daniel W; Wright, Jonathan L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Fan, Jian-Bing; Feng, Ziding; Stanford, Janet L

    2017-01-01

    Aside from Gleason sum, few factors accurately identify the subset of prostate cancer patients at high risk for metastatic progression. We hypothesized that epigenetic alterations could distinguish prostate tumors with life-threatening potential. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation profiling was performed in surgically resected primary tumor tissues from a population-based (n = 430) and a replication (n = 80) cohort of prostate cancer patients followed prospectively for at least 5 years. Metastasis was confirmed by positive bone scan, MRI, CT, or biopsy, and death certificates confirmed cause of death. AUC, partial AUC (pAUC, 95% specificity), and P value criteria were used to select differentially methylated CpG sites that robustly stratify patients with metastatic-lethal from nonrecurrent tumors, and which were complementary to Gleason sum. Forty-two CpG biomarkers stratified patients with metastatic-lethal versus nonrecurrent prostate cancer in the discovery cohort, and eight of these CpGs replicated in the validation cohort based on a significant (P prostate cancer include CpGs in five genes (ALKBH5, ATP11A, FHAD1, KLHL8, and PI15) and three intergenic regions. In the validation dataset, the AUC for Gleason sum alone (0.82) significantly increased with the addition of four individual CpGs (range, 0.86-0.89; all P epigenetic biomarkers warrant further investigation as they may improve prognostic classification of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer and provide new insights on tumor aggressiveness. Clin Cancer Res; 23(1); 311-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. To Share or Not to Share: Malaysian Healthcare Professionals' Views on Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment Decision Making Roles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yew Kong Lee

    Full Text Available To explore the views of Malaysian healthcare professionals (HCPs on stakeholders' decision making roles in localized prostate cancer (PCa treatment.Qualitative interviews and focus groups were conducted with HCPs treating PCa. Data was analysed using a thematic approach. Four in-depth interviews and three focus group discussions were conducted between December 2012 and March 2013 using a topic guide. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed thematically.The participants comprised private urologists (n = 4, government urologists (n = 6, urology trainees (n = 6, government policy maker (n = 1 and oncologists (n = 3. HCP perceptions of the roles of the three parties involved (HCPs, patients, family included: HCP as the main decision maker, HCP as a guide to patients' decision making, HCP as a facilitator to family involvement, patients as main decision maker and patient prefers HCP to decide. HCPs preferred to share the decision with patients due to equipoise between prostate treatment options. Family culture was important as family members often decided on the patient's treatment due to Malaysia's close-knit family culture.A range of decision making roles were reported by HCPs. It is thus important that stakeholder roles are clarified during PCa treatment decisions. HCPs need to cultivate an awareness of sociocultural norms and family dynamics when supporting non-Western patients in making decisions about PCa.

  14. To Share or Not to Share: Malaysian Healthcare Professionals' Views on Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment Decision Making Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yew Kong; Lee, Ping Yein; Cheong, Ai Theng; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Ong, Teng Aik; Razack, Azad Hassan Abdul

    2015-01-01

    To explore the views of Malaysian healthcare professionals (HCPs) on stakeholders' decision making roles in localized prostate cancer (PCa) treatment. Qualitative interviews and focus groups were conducted with HCPs treating PCa. Data was analysed using a thematic approach. Four in-depth interviews and three focus group discussions were conducted between December 2012 and March 2013 using a topic guide. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed thematically. The participants comprised private urologists (n = 4), government urologists (n = 6), urology trainees (n = 6), government policy maker (n = 1) and oncologists (n = 3). HCP perceptions of the roles of the three parties involved (HCPs, patients, family) included: HCP as the main decision maker, HCP as a guide to patients' decision making, HCP as a facilitator to family involvement, patients as main decision maker and patient prefers HCP to decide. HCPs preferred to share the decision with patients due to equipoise between prostate treatment options. Family culture was important as family members often decided on the patient's treatment due to Malaysia's close-knit family culture. A range of decision making roles were reported by HCPs. It is thus important that stakeholder roles are clarified during PCa treatment decisions. HCPs need to cultivate an awareness of sociocultural norms and family dynamics when supporting non-Western patients in making decisions about PCa.

  15. Automated segmentation of reference tissue for prostate cancer localization in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Pieter C.; Hambrock, Thomas; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Huisman, Henkjan J.

    2010-03-01

    For pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) MRI the arterial input function needs to be estimated. Previously, we demonstrated that PK parameters have a significant better discriminative performance when per patient reference tissue was used, but required manual annotation of reference tissue. In this study we propose a fully automated reference tissue segmentation method that tackles this limitation. The method was tested with our Computer Aided Diagnosis (CADx) system to study the effect on the discriminating performance for differentiating prostate cancer from benign areas in the peripheral zone (PZ). The proposed method automatically segments normal PZ tissue from DCE derived data. First, the bladder is segmented in the start-to-enhance map using the Otsu histogram threshold selection method. Second, the prostate is detected by applying a multi-scale Hessian filter to the relative enhancement map. Third, normal PZ tissue was segmented by threshold and morphological operators. The resulting segmentation was used as reference tissue to estimate the PK parameters. In 39 consecutive patients carcinoma, benign and normal tissue were annotated on MR images by a radiologist and a researcher using whole mount step-section histopathology as reference. PK parameters were computed for each ROI. Features were extracted from the set of ROIs using percentiles to train a support vector machine that was used as classifier. Prospective performance was estimated by means of leave-one-patient-out cross validation. A bootstrap resampling approach with 10,000 iterations was used for estimating the bootstrap mean AUCs and 95% confidence intervals. In total 42 malignant, 29 benign and 37 normal regions were annotated. For all patients, normal PZ was successfully segmented. The diagnostic accuracy obtained for differentiating malignant from benign lesions using a conventional general patient plasma profile showed an accuracy of 0.64 (0.53-0.74). Using the

  16. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Zhang Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased

  17. Health-related quality-of-life effects of radical prostatectomy and primary radiotherapy for screen-detected or clinically diagnosed localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madalinska, J B; Essink-Bot, M L; de Koning, H J; Kirkels, W J; van der Maas, P J; Schröder, F H

    2001-03-15

    The current study was undertaken within the framework of a screening trial to compare the health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes of two primary treatment modalities for localized prostate cancer: radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy. We conducted a prospective longitudinal cohort study among 278 patients with early screen-detected (59%) or clinically diagnosed (41%) prostate cancer using both generic and disease-specific HRQOL measures (SF-36, UCLA Prostate Cancer Index [urinary and bowel modules] and items relating to sexual functioning) at three points in time: t1 (baseline), t2 (6 months later), and t3 (12 months after t1). Questionnaires were completed by 88% to 93% of all initially enrolled patients. Patients referred for primary radiotherapy were significantly older than prostatectomy patients (63 v 68 years, P screen-detected and clinically diagnosed cancer reported similar posttreatment HRQOL. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy differed in the type of HRQOL impairment. Because the HRQOL effects may be valued differently at the individual level, patients should be made fully aware of the potential benefits and adverse consequences of therapies for early prostate cancer. Differences in posttreatment HRQOL were not related to the method of cancer detection.

  18. Higher than standard radiation doses (≥72 Gy) with or without androgen deprivation in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Mohan, Dasarahally S.; Lyons, Janice; Klein, Eric A.; Reddy, Chandana A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect on biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) and clinical disease-free survival of radiation doses delivered to the prostate and periprostatic tissues for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1041 consecutive localized prostate cancer cases treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT) at our institution between 7/86 and 2/99 were reviewed. All cases had available pretreatment parameters including pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA), biopsy Gleason score (bGS), and clinical T stage. The median age was 69 years. Twenty-three percent of cases (n = 238) were African-American. The distribution by clinical T stage was as follows: T1 in 365 cases (35%), T2 in 562 cases (54%), and T3 in 114 cases (11%). The median iPSA level was 10.1 ng/ml (range: 0.4-692.9). The distribution by biopsy Gleason score (bGS) was as follows: ≤6 in 580 cases (56%) and ≥7 in 461 cases (44%). Androgen deprivation (AD) in the adjuvant or neoadjuvant setting was given in 303 cases (29%). The mean RT dose was 71.9 Gy (range: 57.6-78.0 Gy). The median RT dose was 70.2 Gy, with 458 cases (44%) receiving at least 72.0 Gy. The average dose in patients receiving <72 Gy was 68.3 Gy (median 68.4) versus 76.5 Gy (median 78.0) for patients receiving ≥72 Gy. The mean follow-up was 38 months (median 33 months). The number of follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels available was 5998. Results: The 5- and 8-year bRFS rates were 61% (95% CI 55-65%) and 58% (95% CI 51-65%), respectively. The 5-year bRFS rates for patients receiving radiation doses ≥72 Gy versus <72 Gy were 87% (95% CI 82-92%) and 55% (95% CI 49-60%), respectively. The 8-year bRFS rates for patients receiving radiation doses ≥72 Gy versus <72 Gy were 87% (95% CI 82-92%) and 51% (95% CI 44-58%), respectively (p < 0.001). A multivariate analysis of factors affecting bRFS was performed using the following parameters: age (continuous variable), race, T-stage (T1-T2 vs. T3

  19. The role of serial free/total prostate-specific antigen ratios in a watchful observation protocol for men with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, V; Choo, R; De Boer, G; Klotz, L; Danjoux, C; Morton, G; Szumacher, E; Fleshner, N; Bunting, P

    2002-05-01

    To examine the change in the free/total prostate specific antigen ratio (f/tPSA) with time and to assess the potential value of serial measurements of f/tPSA as a determinant of disease progression in untreated, low-to-intermediate grade prostate cancer (T1b-T2b N0M0, Gleason score < or = 7 and PSA < or = 15 ng/mL). In a prospective single-arm cohort study from November 1995, patients were conservatively managed with watchful observation alone unless they met arbitrarily defined criteria (clinical, histological and biochemical) of disease progression. Patients were followed regularly and underwent blood tests including PSA and f/tPSA. The initial and mean f/tPSA and the rate of change of f/tPSA with time were evaluated against the rate constant for the PSA doubling time (PSATd). Correlation analyses were used to evaluate any association between baseline clinical variables and either the rate of change of f/tPSA or initial f/tPSA. As of December 2000, 161 of a total of 206 accrued patients had three or more f/tPSA measurements and formed the basis of the study (median age 70 years; median follow-up 2.7 years). The median initial f/tPSA was 0.16; there was a significant negative correlation between this value and the initial total PSA. The mean f/tPSA and rate of change of f/tPSA with time were significantly negatively correlated with the rate constant for PSATd. Also, the rate of change of f/tPSA correlated negatively with clinical T stage, but not with other baseline variables, including initial PSA, age and Gleason score. The f/tPSA in men with untreated, clinically localized prostate cancer varied widely. The negative correlation between the rate of change of f/tPSA with time and rate constant for PSATd suggests that both might provide valuable information to allow clinicians to develop a strategy for optimizing the timing of therapeutic intervention for those patients choosing watchful observation alone.

  20. Radiotherapy options for localized prostate cancer based upon pretreatment serum prostate-specific antigen levels and biochemical control: A comprehensive review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Kini, Vijay R.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To review all the available radiotherapy (RT) literature on localized prostate cancer treatment where serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were used to both stratify patients and evaluate outcome and determine if any conclusions can be reached regarding an optimal radiotherapeutic management for this disease. Methods and Materials: A MEDLINE search was conducted to obtain all articles in English on prostate cancer treatment employing RT from 1986-1997. Studies were considered eligible for review only if they met all the following criteria: 1) pretreatment PSA values were recorded and grouped for subsequent evaluation, 2) posttreatment PSA values were continuously monitored, 3) definitions of biochemical control were stated, and 4) the median follow-up was given. Results: Of the 246 articles identified, only 20 met the inclusion criteria; 4 using conformal external beam RT, 8 using conventional external beam RT, and 8 using interstitial brachytherapy (4 using a permanent implant alone, 3 combining external beam RT with a permanent implant, and 1 combining a conformal temporary interstitial implant boost with external beam RT). No studies using neutrons (with or without external beam RT) or androgen deprivation (combined with external beam RT) were identified where patients were stratified by pretreatment PSA levels. Results for all therapies were extremely variable with the 3-5-year rates of biochemical control for patients with pretreatment PSA levels ≤4 ng/ml ranging from 48 to 100%, for PSA levels >4 and ≤10 ng/ml ranging from 44 to 90%, for PSA levels >10 and ≤20 ng/ml ranging from 27 to 89%, and for PSA levels >20 ranging from 14 to 89%. The median Gleason score, T-stage, definition of biochemical control, and follow-up were substantially different from series to series. No RT option consistently produced superior results. Conclusions: When data are reviewed from studies using serum PSA levels to stratify patients and to evaluate

  1. Quality of life following 3D conformal radiation therapy or permanent interstitial brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, J.M.; Kong, F.M.; Mansur, D.B.; Ahmed, N.; Perez, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Both 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT) and Transperineal Interstitial Permanent Brachytherapy (TIPPB) are offered as suitable non-surgical alternatives to radical prostatectomy. Despite equivalent cancer control, very little data has been published that compares Quality of Life (QOL) in contemporary cohorts of patients choosing these treatments. Materials and Methods: Since 1998, patients selecting either 3DCRT alone or TIPPB (monotherapy or boost after external beam) for primary management of localized prostate cancer were asked to participate in a prospective assessment of QOL measures. In this preliminary report, 41 3DCRT and 40 TIPPB (34 monotherapy, 6 boost) patients completed validated QOL instruments at each followup visit. QOL instruments included the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), FACT-P, and Sexual Adjustment Questionnaire (SAQ). Results: The average age of men in each group was 69 years. Choice of treatment was left to the patient unless there were significant medical or technical contraindications to either modality. 3DCRT total doses ranged from 61-78 Gy (mean 73.5Gy) and TIPPB doses were 145Gy (TG43) in 34 I-125 implants and 115 Gy in 1 Pd-103 (monotherapy) or 90 Gy in 5 Pd-103 (boost) implants. Patients undergoing TIPPB reported significantly worse urinary and sexual function than their counterparts receiving 3DCRT. The mean cumulative IPSS was 12.5 with TIPPB compared to 8.3 with 3DCRT (p=0.036). Differences were most pronounced in the first 12 months after treatment, particularly with respect to the strength of stream and the need to strain. TIPPB patients were more likely to report a need to urinate frequently (p=0.02), require a pad (p=0.001), be bothered (p=0.02), or have activity limited by urinary side effects (p=0.01). TIPPB patients were less likely to resume sexual activity within 6 months after treatment (p=0.0003) and engaged in sexual activity less often (p= 0.016) than 3DCRT patients. They were also more

  2. The Danish Prostate Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Høyer, Søren; Friis, Søren

    2016-01-01

    variables include Gleason scores, cancer staging, prostate-specific antigen values, and therapeutic measures (active surveillance, surgery, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy). DESCRIPTIVE DATA: In total, 22,332 patients with prostate cancer were registered in DAPROCAdata as of April 2015......AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Prostate Cancer Database (DAPROCAdata) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively collected data on patients with incident prostate cancer in Denmark since February 2010. The overall aim of the DAPROCAdata is to improve the quality of prostate cancer...... care in Denmark by systematically collecting key clinical variables for the purposes of health care monitoring, quality improvement, and research. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with histologically verified prostate cancer are included in the DAPROCAdata. MAIN VARIABLES: The DAPROCAdata...

  3. Reirradiation of Prostate Cancer Local Failures After Previous Curative Radiation Therapy: Long-Term Outcome and Tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilli, Thomas; Benz, Eileen; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, feasibility, side-effect profile, and proof of concept of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without a brachytherapy (BT) boost for salvage of exclusive local failure after primary EBRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with presumed exclusive local recurrence after primary EBRT with or without BT were considered eligible for reirradiation. The median normalized total dose in 2-Gy fractions (NTD_2_G_y, α/β ratio = 1.5 Gy) was 74 Gy (range, 66-98.4 Gy) at first irradiation. Median time between the first irradiation and the reirradiation was 6.1 years (range, 4.7-10.2 years). Results: Between 2003 and 2008 salvage treatment was delivered with a median NTD_2_G_y of 85.1 Gy (range, 70-93.4) to the prostate with EBRT with (n=10) or without (n=4) BT. Androgen deprivation was given to 12 patients (median time of 12 months). No grade ≥3 toxicity was observed during and within 6 weeks after RT. After a median follow-up of 94 months (range, 48-172 months) after salvage RT, 5-year grade ≥3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity-free survival figures were 77.9% ± 11.3% and 57.1% ± 13.2%, respectively. Four patients presented with combined grade 4 genitourinary/gastrointestinal toxicity. The 5-year biochemical relapse-free, local relapse-free, distant metastasis-free, and cancer-specific survival rates were 35.7% ± 12.8%, 50.0% ± 13.4%, 85.7% ± 9.4%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Salvage whole-gland reirradiation for patients with a suspicion of exclusive local recurrence after initial RT may be associated with a high rate of severe radiation-induced side effects and poor long-term biochemical and local control.

  4. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions.

  5. The Accuracy of Prostate Cancer Localization Diagnosed on Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy Compared to 3-Dimensional Transperineal Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Krughoff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prostate cancer is often understaged following 12-core transrectal ultrasound- (TRUS- guided biopsies. Our goal is to understand where cancers are typically missed by this method. Methods. Transperineal 3-dimensional mapping biopsy (3DMB provides a more accurate depiction of disease status than transrectal ultrasound- (TRUS- guided biopsy. We compared 3DMB findings in men with prior TRUS-guided biopsies to determine grade and location of missed cancer. Results were evaluated for 161 men with low-risk organ confined prostate cancer. Results. The number of cancer-positive biopsy zones per patient with TRUS was 1.38 ± 1.21 compared to 3.33 ± 4.06 with 3DMB, with most newly discovered cancers originating from the middle lobe and apex. Approximately half of all newly discovered cancerous zones resulted from anterior 3DMB sampling. Gleason upgrade was recognized in 56 patients using 3DMB. When both biopsy methods found positive cores in a given zone, Gleason upgrades occurred most frequently in the middle left and right zones. TRUS cancer-positive zones not confirmed by 3DMB were most often the basal zones. Conclusion. Most cancer upgrades and cancers missed from TRUS biopsy originated in the middle left zone of the prostate, specifically in anterior regions. Anterior sampling may lead to more accurate diagnosis and appropriate followup.

  6. Long-term morbidity and quality of life in patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing definitive radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Fossaa, Sophie D.; Waehre, Haakon R.; Olsen, Dag Rune

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess morbidity, side effects, and quality of life (QoL) in patients treated for localized prostate cancer with curative aim. Methods and Materials: This descriptive cross-sectional study comprises 154 patients who had undergone definitive radiotherapy (RAD) and 108 patients with radical prostatectomy (PRECT) at the Norwegian Radium Hospital during 1987-1995. At least 1 year after treatment the patients completed several questionnaires assessing quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 instrument [EORTC QLQ-C30]), lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS): International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), or sexuality (selected questions from the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale [PAIS]). Urinary incontinence and bowel distress were evaluated by ad hoc constructed questionnaires. A control group (OBS) consisted of 38 patients following the watch-and-wait policy. Results: Twenty percent of the patients from the RAD Group had moderate (14%) or severe (6%) LUTS as compared to 12% in the PRECT group. However, 35% of men from the latter group reported moderate to severe urinary incontinence. 'Overall' sexuality was moderately or severely impaired in 71% of the PRECT and 50% of the RAD patients. In the former group high age was correlated with erectile impotency (p 1 year after definitive radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy with no difference as compared to the age-matched normal population. Clinicians should be aware of the fact that general QoL dimensions (physical function, emotional function, fatigue) are as a rule of greater significance for QoL than sexuality and lower urinary tract symptoms

  7. Subgroup analysis of patients with localized prostate cancer treated within the Dutch-randomized dose escalation trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Levendag, Peter C.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of dose escalation within prognostic risk groups in prostate cancer. Patients and methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 664 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive 68- or 78-Gy of radiotherapy. Two prognostic models were examined: a risk group model (low-, intermediate-, and high-risk) and PSA-level groupings. High-risk patients with hormonal therapy (HT) were analyzed separately. Outcome variable was freedom from failure (FFF) (clinical failure or PSA nadir + 2 μg/L). Results: In relation to the advantage of high-dose radiotherapy, intermediate-risk patients benefited most from dose escalation. However no significant heterogeneity could be demonstrated between the risk groups. For two types of PSA-level groupings: PSA 8 μg/L, the test for heterogeneity was significant (p = 0.03 and 0.05, respectively). Patients with PSA 8-18 μg/L (n = 297, HR = 0.59) derived the greatest benefit from dose escalation. No heterogeneity could be demonstrated for high-risk patients with and without HT. Conclusion: Intermediate-risk group derived the greatest benefit for dose escalation. However, from this trial no indication was found to exclude low-risk or high-risk patients from high-dose radiotherapy. Patients could be selected for high-dose radiotherapy based on PSA-level groupings: for patients with a PSA < 8 μg/L high-dose radiotherapy is probably not indicated, but should be confirmed in other randomized studies.

  8. A pilot survey of sexual function and quality of life following 3D conformal radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, Mack; Chinn, Daniel M.; Holland, John; Clarke, Michelle

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of high dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) for prostate cancer on the sexual function-related quality of life of patients and their partners. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 124 consecutive patients (median age 72.3 years) treated with 3D CRT for localized prostate cancer were surveyed and reported being potent prior to treatment. The answers to survey questions assessing the impact of quality of life related to sexual function from these 60 patients and their partners forms the basis for this retrospective analysis. Results: Following 3D CRT, 37 of 60 patients (62%) retained sexual function sufficient for intercourse. Intercourse at least once per month was reduced from 71 to 40%, whereas intercourse less than once per year increased from 12 to 35%. Following treatment, 25% of patients reported that the change in sexual dysfunction negatively affected their relationship or resulted in poor self-esteem. This outcome was associated with impotence following treatment (p < 0.01). Patients who had partners and satisfactory sexual function appeared to be at a higher risk of having a negatively affected relationship or losing self-esteem if they become impotent (p < 0.05). Partners of patients who reported a negatively affected relationship or loss of self-esteem appear to be less likely to return the survey instrument used (p = 0.02). Conclusions: More work is needed to evaluate the impact of radiotherapy and other treatments on the quality of life of patients and their partners to allow adequate informed consent to be given

  9. Quality assurance in the 22991 EORTC ROG trial in localized prostate cancer: Dummy run and individual case review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzinger, Oscar; Poortmans, Philip; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Maingon, Philippe; Budiharto, Tom; Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den; Davis, J. Bernard; Musat, Elena; Ataman, Fatma; Huyskens, Dominique P.; Gulyban, Akos; Bolla, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: EORTC trial 22991 was designed to evaluate the addition of concomitant and adjuvant short-term hormonal treatments to curative radiotherapy in terms of disease-free survival for patients with intermediate risk localized prostate cancer. In order to assess the compliance to the 3D conformal radiotherapy protocol guidelines, all participating centres were requested to participate in a dummy run procedure. An individual case review was performed for the largest recruiting centres as well. Materials and methods: CT-data of an eligible prostate cancer patient were sent to 30 centres including a description of the clinical case. The investigator was requested to delineate the volumes of interest and to perform treatment planning according to the protocol. Thereafter, the investigators of the 12 most actively recruiting centres were requested to provide data on five randomly selected patients for an individual case review. Results: Volume delineation varied significantly between investigators. Dose constraints for organs at risk (rectum, bladder, hips) were difficult to meet. In the individual case review, no major protocol deviations were observed, but a number of dose reporting problems were documented for centres using IMRT. Conclusions: Overall, results of this quality assurance program were satisfactory. The efficacy of the combination of a dummy run procedure with an individual case review is confirmed in this study, as none of the evaluated patient files harboured a major protocol deviation. Quality assurance remains a very important tool in radiotherapy to increase the reliability of the trial results. Special attention should be given when designing quality assurance programs for more complex irradiation techniques

  10. Health related quality of life in Japanese men after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiki, Shunichi

    2004-01-01

    We performed a retrospective survey of general and disease specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (XRT) in Japanese men. A total of 186 patients underwent RP and 78 underwent XRT for clinically localized prostate cancer between 2000 and 2002. We measured the general and disease specific HRQOL with the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Health Survey and the University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index, respectively. Each treatment group was further divided into four subgroups according to the time scale. Patients from the RP group were significantly younger than those from the XRT group. The tumor characteristics differed significantly in their distributions among the treatment groups. Patients undergoing XRT had low scores in most of the general measures of HRQOL just after treatment, but after 6 months there were no differences between the treatment groups, except for the physical domains. The RP group was associated with worse urinary function, whereas the XRT group had worse bowel function and bother during the first 6 months after treatment. Thereafter, however, urinary and bowel domain did not differ between the groups. Both groups reported poor sexual function, although the RP group scored lower sexual bother. The patients who underwent RP had significantly worse urinary and better bowel function than those treated with XRT. Both treatment groups had decrements in sexual function throughout the post-treatment period; careful attention should be paid to this side-effect in preoperative counselling, especially in younger patients, regardless of the primary treatments. (author)

  11. The GETUG 70 Gy vs. 80 Gy randomized trial for localized prostate cancer: Feasibility and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Guerif, Stephane; Le Prise, Elisabeth; Cosset, Jean Marc; Lefloch, Olivier; Chauvet, Bruno; Salem, Naji; Chapet, Olivier; Bourdin, Sylvain; Bachaud, Jean Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Lagrange, Jean-L.eon; Malissard, Luc; Simon, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal M.D.; Hay, Men H.; Dubray, Bernard; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bey, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To describe treatments and acute tolerance in a randomized trial comparing 70 Gy and 80 Gy to the prostate in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Between September 1999 and February 2002, 306 patients were randomized to receive 70 Gy (153 patients) or 80 Gy (153 patients) in 17 institutions. Patients exhibited intermediate-prognosis tumors. If the risk of node involvement was greater than 10%, surgical staging was required. Previous prostatectomy was excluded, and androgen deprivation was not admitted. The treatment was delivered in two steps. PTV1-including seminal vesicles, prostate, and a 1-0.5-cm margin-received 46 Gy given with a 4-field conformal technique. PTV2, reduced to prostate with the same margins, irradiated with at least 5 fields. Dose was prescribed according to ICRU recommendations in the 70 Gy group, but adapted at the 80 Gy level. Results: All patients but one in the 80 Gy arm completed the treatment. In the 70 Gy arm, the mean dose to the PTV2 was 69.5 Gy. In the 80 Gy arm, the mean dose in the PTV2 was 78.5 Gy. Acute toxicity according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale during treatment was reported in 306 patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the two arms: 12% had no toxicity, 80% complained of bladder toxicity, and 70% complained of rectal symptoms. Two months after the end of treatment, 43% of the 70 Gy level and 48% of the 80 Gy level complained of side effects, including 24% and 20% of sexual disorders. There was 6% and 2% of Grade 3 urinary and rectal toxicity. Five patients required a 10-29-day suspension of the treatment. Acute Grade 2 and 3 side effects were related to PTV and CTV1 size, which was the only independent predictive factor in multivariate analysis. Toxicity was not related to the center, age, arm of treatment, or selected data from dose-volume histogram of organ at risk. Conclusion: Treatments were completed in respect to constraints. Acute toxicity

  12. Diagnostic usefulness of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging with dynamic contrast-enhancement in patients with localized prostate cancer. Mapping studies with biopsy specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Samma, Shoji; Joko, Masanori; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Takewa, Megumi; Kitano, Satoru; Okajima, Eigoro

    1999-01-01

    New diagnostic criteria for dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in prostate cancer are presented. The diagnostic usefulness of endorectal MR imaging with dynamic contrast-enhancement in localized prostate cancer and the validity of these criteria were evaluated. Eighteen untreated patients who were suspected of localized prostate cancer were included in the study. They received endorectal dynamic MR imaging before systematic sextant needle biopsy. First, a mapping study with the findings of MR images and histopathology of biopsy specimens was performed in eight patients out of 18 to compare the difference in T2-weighted images with the endorectal coil and the body coil in the same individuals. Second, another mapping study was performed in all 18 patients by analyzing the findings of endorectal dynamic MR images. For the diagnosis of prostate cancer in MR imaging, we offered diagnostic criteria from our experience in addition to those in plain T2-weighted images from the literature. The overall diagnostic rates of endorectal dynamic MR imaging were 88.9% in accuracy, 100% in sensitivity, and 81.8% in specificity. In the comparison of the endorectal and body coils in T2-weighted images in eight patients, there was no difference in the diagnostic rates except for one more histopathologic false positive portion in endorectal MR imaging. In the second mapping study in 18 patients, the diagnostic rates were 92.6% in accuracy, 88.9% in sensitivity and 93.3% in specificity. Endorectal dynamic imaging raised the diagnostic sensitivity from 77.8 to 88.9%. The data demonstrated the validity of this diagnostic criteria and the diagnostic usefulness of endorectal dynamic MR imaging in localized prostate cancer. (author)

  13. Incremental value of diffusion weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation treatment: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, Oguz; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Hricak, Hedvig; Gultekin, David H.; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya; Pei, Xin; Sperling, Dahlia; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the incremental value of diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to T2-weighted MRI (T2WI) in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients (median age, 70 years) with a history of radiotherapy-treated prostate cancer underwent multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) and transrectal prostate biopsy. Two readers independently scored the likelihood of cancer on a 1-5 scale, using T2WI alone and then adding DW-MRI and DCE-MRI. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated at the patient and prostate-side levels. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from DW-MRI and the K trans , k ep , v e , AUGC90 and AUGC180 from DCE-MRI were recorded. Biopsy was positive in 16/24 (67%) and negative in 8/24 (33%) patients. AUCs for readers 1 and 2 increased from 0.64 and 0.53 to 0.95 and 0.86 with MP-MRI, at the patient level, and from 0.73 and 0.66 to 0.90 and 0.79 with MP-MRI, at the prostate-side level (p values -3 mm 2 /s)], median K trans [1.07 vs. 0.34 (1/min)], and k ep [2.06 vs 1.0 (1/min)] (p values < 0.05). MP-MRI was significantly more accurate than T2WI alone in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. (orig.)

  14. Correlations of post-implant regional dosimetric parameters at 24 hours and one month, with clinical results of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichiro Okazaki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the correlations of post-implant regional dosimetrics at 24 hours (24 h and 1 month after implant procedures, with clinical outcomes of low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods : Between January 2008 and December 2014, 130 consecutive patients treated for localized prostate cancer, receiving definitive iodine-125 ( 125 I brachytherapy treatment were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent post-implant CT imaging for dosimetric analysis at 24 h and 1 month after implantation procedure. Prostate contours were divided into quadrants: anterior-superior (ASQ, posterior-superior (PSQ, anterior-inferior (AIQ, and posterior-inferior (PIQ. Predictive factors and cut-off values of biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS and toxicities of LDR brachytherapy were analyzed. Results : The median follow-up time was 69.5 months. Seven patients (5.4% had biochemical failure. The 3-year and 5-year BFFS rates were 96.7% and 93.1%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen and Gleason score were significant prognostic factors for biochemical failure. D 90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the volume of PSQ and PIQ at 24 h, and D 90 of PSQ at 1 month were also significant factors. The cut-off values of PSQ D 90 were 145 Gy at 24 h and 160 Gy at 1 month. D 90 of the whole prostate was not significant at 24 h and at 1 month. D 90 of PSQ at 1 month was a significant factor for rectal hemorrhage. Conclusions : Post-implant D 90 of PSQ is significantly associated with BFFS for localized prostate cancer not only at 1 month, but also at 24 hours. D 90 of PSQ at 1 month is also a significant factor for rectal hemorrhage.

  15. Review article: Prostate cancer screening using prostate specific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer among men in Nigeria and early detection is key to cure and survival but its screening through prostate specific antigen (PSA) has remain controversial in literature. Screening with prostate specific antigen (PSA) has led to more men diagnosed with prostate cancer than ...

  16. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics after stereotactic body radiotherapy as monotherapy or boost after whole pelvic radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Jung Kim

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: In this report of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients, an initial period of rapid PSA decline was followed by a slow decline, which resulted in a lower PSA nadir. The PSA kinetics of SBRT monotherapy appears to be comparable to those achieved with SBRT boost with WPRT.

  17. Bicalutamide 150 mg plus standard care vs standard care alone for early prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLeod, David G; Iversen, Peter; See, William A

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate, in the ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) trial programme, the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once daily in addition to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer....

  18. Rectal dose sparing with a balloon catheter and ultrasound localization in conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rakesh R.; Orton, Nigel; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Chappell, Rick; Ritter, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare the rectal wall and bladder volume in the high dose region with or without the use of a balloon catheter with both three-dimensional (3D)-conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy (CRT, IMRT) approaches in the treatment of prostate cancer. Material and methods: Five patients with a wide range of prostate volumes and treated with primary external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer were selected for analysis. Pinnacle TM treatment plans were generated utilizing a 3D conformal six-field design and an IMRT seven coplanar-field plan with a novel, three-step optimization and with ultrasound localization. Separate plans were devised with a rectal balloon deflated or air inflated with and without inclusion of the seminal vesicles (SV) in the target volume. The prescription dose was 76 Gy in 38 fractions of 2 Gy each. Cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for the planning target volume (PTV), rectal wall, and bladder with an inflated (60 cc air) or deflated balloon with and without SV included. The volumes of rectal wall and bladder above 60, 65, and 70 Gy with each treatment approach were evaluated. Results: Daily balloon placement was well-tolerated with good patient positional reproducibility. Inflation of the rectal balloon in all cases resulted in a significant decrease in the absolute volume of rectal wall receiving greater than 60, 65, or 70 Gy. The rectal sparing ratio (RSR), consisting of a structure's high dose volume with the catheter inflated, divided by the volume with the catheter deflated, was calculated for each patient with and without seminal vesicle inclusion for 3D-CRT and IMRT. For 3D-CRT, RSRs with SV included were 0.59, 0.59, and 0.56 and with SV excluded were 0.60, 0.58, and 0.54 at doses of greater than 60, 65, and 70 Gy, respectively. Similarly, for IMRT, the mean RSRs were 0.59, 0.59, and 0.63 including SV and 0.71, 0.66, and 0.67 excluding SV at these same dose levels

  19. Outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer treated by radiotherapy after confirming the absence of lymph node invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Noriyuki; Shimbo, Masaki; Amiya, Yoshiyasu; Tomioka, Susumu; Shima, Takayuki; Murakami, Shino; Nakatsu, Hiroomi; Oota, Sayako; Shimazaki, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Management of lymph nodes in radiotherapy for prostate cancer is an issue for curative intent. To find the influence of lymph nodes, patients with T1-T3 prostate cancer and surgically confirmed negative nodes were treated with radiotherapy. After lymphadenectomy, 118 patients received photon beam radiotherapy with 66 Gy to the prostate. No adjuvant treatment was performed until biochemical failure. After failure, hormone therapy was administered. Follow-up period was 57 months (mean). Biochemical failure occurred in 47 patients. Few failures were observed in patients with low (24%) and intermediate risks (14%). In contrast, 64% of high-risk patients experienced failure, 97% of whom showed until 36 months. Most patients with failure responded well to hormone therapy. After 15 months (mean), a second biochemical failure occurred in 21% of patients who had the first failure, most of them were high risk. Factors involving failure were high initial and nadir prostate-specific antigen, advanced stage, short prostate-specific antigen-doubling time and duration between radiation and first failure. Failure showed an insufficient reduction in prostate-specific antigen after radiotherapy. Factor for second failure was prostate-specific antigen-doubling time at first failure. Half of high-risk patients experienced biochemical failure, indicating one of the causes involves factors other than lymph nodes. Low-, intermediate- and the other half of high-risk patients did not need to take immediate hormone therapy after radiotherapy. After failure, delayed hormone therapy was effective. Prostate-specific antigen parameters were predictive factors for further outcome. (author)

  20. Hypofractionated intensity modulated irradiation for localized prostate cancer, results from a phase I/II feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junius, Sara; Haustermans, Karin; Bussels, Barbara; Oyen, Raymond; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Depuydt, Tom; Verstraete, Jan; Joniau, Steven; Van Poppel, Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    To assess acute (primary endpoint) and late toxicity, quality of life (QOL), biochemical or clinical failure (secondary endpoints) of a hypofractionated IMRT schedule for prostate cancer (PC). 38 men with localized PC received 66 Gy (2.64 Gy) to prostate,2 Gy to seminal vesicles (50 Gy total) using IMRT. Acute toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy (RT), at 1–3 months afterwards using RTOG acute scoring system. Late side effects were scored at 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 36 months after RT using RTOG/EORTC criteria. Quality of life was assessed by EORTC-C30 questionnaire and PR25 prostate module. Biochemical failure was defined using ASTRO consensus and nadir+2 definition, clinical failure as local, regional or distant relapse. None experienced grade III-IV toxicity. 10% had no acute genito-urinary (GU) toxicity, 63% grade I; 26% grade II. Maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) scores 0, I, II were 37%, 47% and 16%. Maximal acute toxicity was reached weeks 4–5 and resolved within 4 weeks after RT in 82%. Grade II rectal bleeding needing coagulation had a peak incidence of 18% at 16 months after RT but is 0% at 24–36 months. One developed a urethral stricture at 2 years (grade II late GU toxicity) successfully dilated until now. QOL urinary symptom scores reached a peak incidence 1 month after RT but normalized 6 months later. Bowel symptom scores before, at 1–6 months showed similar values but rose slowly 2–3 years after RT. Nadir of sexual symptom scores was reached 1–6 months after RT but improved 2–3 years later as well as physical, cognitive and role functional scales. Emotional, social functional scales were lowest before RT when diagnosis was given but improved later. Two years after RT global health status normalized. This hypofractionated IMRT schedule for PC using 25 fractions of 2.64 Gy did not result in severe acute side effects. Until now late urethral, rectal toxicities seemed acceptable as well as failure rates. Detailed analysis of

  1. Expression of Bcl-2, p53, and MDM2 in Localized Prostate Cancer With Respect to the Outcome of Radical Radiotherapy Dose Escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergis, Roy; Corbishley, Catherine M.; Thomas, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Established prognostic factors in localized prostate cancer explain only a moderate proportion of variation in outcome. We analyzed tumor expression of apoptotic markers with respect to outcome in men with localized prostate cancer in two randomized controlled trials of radiotherapy dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2001, 308 patients with localized prostate cancer received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy at our institution in one of two dose-escalation trials. The biopsy specimens in 201 cases were used to make a biopsy tissue microarray. We evaluated tumor expression of Bcl-2, p53, and MDM2 by immunohistochemistry with respect to outcome. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years, and 5-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) was 70.4% (95% CI, 63.5-76.3%). On univariate analysis, expression of Bcl-2 (p < 0.001) and p53 (p = 0.017), but not MDM2 (p = 0.224), was significantly associated with FFBF. Expression of Bcl-2 remained significantly associated with FFBF (p = 0.001) on multivariate analysis, independently of T stage, Gleason score, initial prostate-specific antigen level, and radiotherapy dose. Seven-year biochemical control was 61% vs. 41% (p = 0.0122) for 74 Gy vs. 64 Gy, respectively, among patients with Bcl-2-positive tumors and 87% vs. 81% (p = 0.423) for 74 Gy vs. 64 Gy, respectively, among patients with Bcl-2-negative tumors. There was no statistically significant interaction between dose and Bcl-2 expression. Conclusions: Bcl-2 expression was a significant, independent determinant of biochemical control after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer. These data generate the hypothesis that Bcl-2 expression could be used to inform the choice of radiotherapy dose in individual patients.

  2. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression defines a subset of locally advanced prostate cancer: Potential opportunities for synergistic targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Shi, Yang; Hicks, Jessica L; Cao, Xuhong; Siddiqui, Javed; Jiang, Hui; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent ERG gene fusions, the most common genetic alterations in prostate cancer, drive overexpression of the nuclear transcription factor ERG, and are early clonal events in prostate cancer progression. The nuclear transcription factor MYC is also frequently overexpressed in prostate cancer and may play a role in tumor initiation and/or progression. The relationship between nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression in prostate cancer, as well as the clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of ERG-positive/MYC high tumors, is not well understood. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ERG and MYC was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs), and nuclear staining was scored semi-quantitatively (IHC product score range = 0-300). Correlation between nuclear ERG and MYC protein expression and association with clinicopathologic parameters and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy was assessed. 29.1% of all tumor nodules showed concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression (i.e., ERG-positive/MYC high), including 35.0% of secondary nodules. Overall, there was weak positive correlation between ERG and MYC expression across all tumor nodules (rpb  = 0.149, P = 0.045), although this correlation was strongest in secondary nodules (rpb  = 0.520, P = 0.019). In radical prostatectomy specimens, ERG-positive/MYC high tumors were positively associated with the presence of extraprostatic extension (EPE), relative to all other ERG/MYC expression subgroups, however, there was no significant association between concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression and time to biochemical recurrence. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression is common in prostate cancer and defines a subset of locally advanced tumors. Recent data indicates that BET bromodomain proteins regulate ERG gene fusion and MYC gene expression in prostate cancer, suggesting possible synergistic

  3. A Randomized Trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01) Comparing Short Versus Protracted Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, John G

    2010-08-24

    PURPOSE: To examine the long-term outcomes of a randomized trial comparing short (4 months; Arm 1) and long (8 months; Arm 2) neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 1997 and 2001, 276 patients were enrolled and the data from 261 were analyzed. The stratification risk factors were prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng\\/mL, Gleason score >\\/=7, and Stage T3 or more. The intermediate-risk stratum had one factor and the high-risk stratum had two or more. Staging was done from the bone scan and computed tomography findings. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure-free survival. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 102 months. The overall survival, biochemical failure-free survival. and prostate cancer-specific survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms, overall or at 5 years. The cumulative probability of overall survival at 5 years was 90% (range, 87-92%) in Arm 1 and 83% (range, 80-86%) in Arm 2. The biochemical failure-free survival rate at 5 years was 66% (range, 62-71%) in Arm 1 and 63% (range, 58-67%) in Arm 2. CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference was found in biochemical failure-free survival between 4 months and 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  4. From Prostate to Bone: Key Players in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thobe, Megan N. [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Clark, Robert J. [Department of Molecular Pathogenesis and Molecular Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bainer, Russell O. [Department of Human Genetics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Prasad, Sandip M.; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W., E-mail: crinkers@uchicago.edu [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2011-01-27

    Bone is the most common site for metastasis in human prostate cancer patients. Skeletal metastases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and overall greatly affect the quality of life of prostate cancer patients. Despite advances in our understanding of the biology of primary prostate tumors, our knowledge of how and why secondary tumors derived from prostate cancer cells preferentially localize bone remains limited. The physiochemical properties of bone, and signaling molecules including specific chemokines and their receptors, are distinct in nature and function, yet play intricate and significant roles in prostate cancer bone metastasis. Examining the impact of these facets of bone metastasis in vivo remains a significant challenge, as animal models that mimic the natural history and malignant progression clinical prostate cancer are rare. The goals of this article are to discuss (1) characteristics of bone that most likely render it a favorable environment for prostate tumor cell growth, (2) chemokine signaling that is critical in the recruitment and migration of prostate cancer cells to the bone, and (3) current animal models utilized in studying prostate cancer bone metastasis. Further research is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the extravasation of disseminated prostate cancer cells into the bone and to provide a better understanding of the basis of cancer cell survival within the bone microenvironment. The development of animal models that recapitulate more closely the human clinical scenario of prostate cancer will greatly benefit the generation of better therapies.

  5. From Prostate to Bone: Key Players in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thobe, Megan N.; Clark, Robert J.; Bainer, Russell O.; Prasad, Sandip M.; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W.

    2011-01-01

    Bone is the most common site for metastasis in human prostate cancer patients. Skeletal metastases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and overall greatly affect the quality of life of prostate cancer patients. Despite advances in our understanding of the biology of primary prostate tumors, our knowledge of how and why secondary tumors derived from prostate cancer cells preferentially localize bone remains limited. The physiochemical properties of bone, and signaling molecules including specific chemokines and their receptors, are distinct in nature and function, yet play intricate and significant roles in prostate cancer bone metastasis. Examining the impact of these facets of bone metastasis in vivo remains a significant challenge, as animal models that mimic the natural history and malignant progression clinical prostate cancer are rare. The goals of this article are to discuss (1) characteristics of bone that most likely render it a favorable environment for prostate tumor cell growth, (2) chemokine signaling that is critical in the recruitment and migration of prostate cancer cells to the bone, and (3) current animal models utilized in studying prostate cancer bone metastasis. Further research is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the extravasation of disseminated prostate cancer cells into the bone and to provide a better understanding of the basis of cancer cell survival within the bone microenvironment. The development of animal models that recapitulate more closely the human clinical scenario of prostate cancer will greatly benefit the generation of better therapies

  6. Single High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Session as a Whole Gland Primary Treatment for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: 10-Year Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Limani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the treatment outcomes of a single session of whole gland high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU for patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa. Methods. Response rates were defined using the Stuttgart and Phoenix criteria. Complications were graded according to the Clavien score. Results. At a median follow-up of 94months, 48 (44.4% and 50 (46.3% patients experienced biochemical recurrence for Phoenix and Stuttgart definition, respectively. The 5- and 10-year actuarial biochemical recurrence free survival rates were 57% and 40%, respectively. The 10-year overall survival rate, cancer specific survival rate, and metastasis free survival rate were 72%, 90%, and 70%, respectively. Preoperative high risk category, Gleason score, preoperative PSA, and postoperative nadir PSA were independent predictors of oncological failure. 24.5% of patients had self-resolving LUTS, 18.2% had urinary tract infection, and 18.2% had acute urinary retention. A grade 3b complication occurred in 27 patients. Pad-free continence rate was 87.9% and the erectile dysfunction rate was 30.8%. Conclusion. Single session HIFU can be alternative therapy for patients with low risk PCa. Patients with intermediate risk should be informed about the need of multiple sessions of HIFU and/or adjuvant treatments and HIFU performed very poorly in high risk patients.

  7. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudit Verma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person’s genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed.

  8. Does Small Prostate Predict High Grade Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliskan, S.; Kaba, S.; Koca, O.; Ozturk, M. I.

    2017-01-01

    groups 1 and 2, respectively at final pathology (p=0.373). Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that smaller prostates are more likely to compose higher percentage of the high grade prostate cancer, local advanced disease, and the Gleason upgrading. The positive surgical margin rate is higher in patients with small prostates when it is compared with the other patients. (author)

  9. Prostate atypia: does repeat biopsy detect clinically significant prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorin, Ryan P; Wiener, Scott; Harris, Cory D; Wagner, Joseph R

    2015-05-01

    While the treatment pathway in response to benign or malignant prostate biopsies is well established, there is uncertainty regarding the risk of subsequently diagnosing prostate cancer when an initial diagnosis of prostate atypia is made. As such, we investigated the likelihood of a repeat biopsy diagnosing prostate cancer (PCa) in patients in which an initial biopsy diagnosed prostate atypia. We reviewed our prospectively maintained prostate biopsy database to identify patients who underwent a repeat prostate biopsy within one year of atypia (atypical small acinar proliferation; ASAP) diagnosis between November 1987 and March 2011. Patients with a history of PCa were excluded. Chart review identified patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP), radiotherapy (RT), or active surveillance (AS). For some analyses, patients were divided into two subgroups based on their date of service. Ten thousand seven hundred and twenty patients underwent 13,595 biopsies during November 1987-March 2011. Five hundred and sixty seven patients (5.3%) had ASAP on initial biopsy, and 287 (50.1%) of these patients underwent a repeat biopsy within one year. Of these, 122 (42.5%) were negative, 44 (15.3%) had atypia, 19 (6.6%) had prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and 102 (35.6%) contained PCa. Using modified Epstein's criteria, 27/53 (51%) patients with PCa on repeat biopsy were determined to have clinically significant tumors. 37 (36.3%) proceeded to RP, 25 (24.5%) underwent RT, and 40 (39.2%) received no immediate treatment. In patients who underwent surgery, Gleason grade on final pathology was upgraded in 11 (35.5%), and downgraded 1 (3.2%) patient. ASAP on initial biopsy was associated with a significant risk of PCa on repeat biopsy in patients who subsequently underwent definitive local therapy. Patients with ASAP should be counseled on the probability of harboring both clinically significant and insignificant prostate cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Outcomes following negative prostate biopsy for patients with persistent disease after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob H. Cohen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: When faced with biochemical recurrence after definitive radiotherapy for prostate cancer, clinicians must determine whether the recurrence is local or systemic. Post radiotherapy prostate biopsies to detect persistent local disease are difficult to interpret histopathologically and are subject to sampling error. Our study examines outcomes for patients with a negative prostate biopsy performed for rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels after prostate radiation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of 238 prostate cancer patients with a negative biopsy following definitive radiotherapy. Seventy-five of these patients had biochemical recurrence at the time of biopsy. A negative biopsy was defined as the absence of prostate cancer without radiation-treatment effect in the specimen. RESULTS: Patients underwent biopsy at a mean of 41 months after the completion of radiation. They had a mean PSA of 6. Patients were followed for an average of 63 months. Thirty-two patients (43% developed metastasis, and 11 (15% died of prostate cancer despite a negative post-radiation biopsy. Five of nine patients (56% with sequential biopsies had a positive second biopsy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with PSA recurrence and a negative post-radiation biopsy have a high chance of persistent local disease, progression, and death from prostate cancer. Furthermore, an initial negative biopsy does not rule-out local recurrence. Patients with biochemical recurrence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer need to be evaluated earlier for local recurrence.

  11. Circulating and intraprostatic sex steroid hormonal profiles in relation to male pattern baldness and chest hair density among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cindy Ke; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Hafi, Muhannad; Veneroso, Carmela C; Lynch, Barlow; Falk, Roni T; Niwa, Shelley; Emanuel, Eric; Gao, Yu-Tang; Hemstreet, George P; Zolfghari, Ladan; Carroll, Peter R; Manyak, Michael J; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Levine, Paul H; Hsing, Ann W; Cook, Michael B

    2017-12-01

    Prospective cohort studies of circulating sex steroid hormones and prostate cancer risk have not provided a consistent association, despite evidence from animal and clinical studies. However, studies using male pattern baldness as a proxy of early-life or cumulative androgen exposure have reported significant associations with aggressive and fatal prostate cancer risk. Given that androgens underlie the development of patterned hair loss and chest hair, we assessed whether these two dermatological characteristics were associated with circulating and intraprostatic concentrations of sex steroid hormones among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. We included 248 prostate cancer patients from the NCI Prostate Tissue Study, who answered surveys and provided a pre-treatment blood sample as well as fresh frozen adjacent normal prostate tissue. Male pattern baldness and chest hair density were assessed by trained nurses before surgery. General linear models estimated geometric means and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) of each hormone variable by dermatological phenotype with adjustment for potential confounding variables. Subgroup analyses were performed by Gleason score (balding status with serum testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and a weak association with elevated intraprostatic testosterone. Conversely, neither circulating nor intraprostatic sex hormones were statistically significantly associated with chest hair density. Age-adjusted correlation between binary balding status and three-level chest hair density was weak (r = 0.05). There was little evidence to suggest that Gleason score or race modified these associations. This study provides evidence that balding status assessed at a mean age of 60 years may serve as a clinical marker for circulating sex hormone concentrations. The weak-to-null associations between balding status and intraprostatic sex hormones reaffirm differences in organ

  12. Epigenetic modifications in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngollo, Marjolaine; Dagdemir, Aslihan; Karsli-Ceppioglu, Seher; Judes, Gaelle; Pajon, Amaury; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Boiteux, Jean-Paul; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Guy, Laurent; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique J

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in France. Apart from the genetic alterations in prostate cancer, epigenetics modifications are involved in the development and progression of this disease. Epigenetic events are the main cause in gene regulation and the three most epigenetic mechanisms studied include DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNA expression. In this review, we summarized epigenetic mechanisms in prostate cancer. Epigenetic drugs that inhibit DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone acetylation might be able to reactivate silenced gene expression in prostate cancer. However, further understanding of interactions of these enzymes and their effects on transcription regulation in prostate cancer is needed and has become a priority in biomedical research. In this study, we summed up epigenetic changes with emphasis on pharmacologic epigenetic target agents.

  13. Time to second prostate specific antigen (PSA) failure is a surrogate endpoint for prostate cancer death in prospective trials of therapy for localized disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietman, A L; Dallow, K C; Shipley, W U; Heney, N M; McManus, P L

    1995-07-01

    Purpose In assessing the efficacy of the competing curative therapies for prostate cancer the most relevant endpoint is cancer specific death. Due to the long natural history of the disease and the use of salvage androgen suppression prospective trials need to mature for at least a decade to provide meaningful results. An endpoint that predicted for cancer death with high probability would allow more rapid completion of prospective studies, hopefully before the tested therapies become outdated. Materials and methods 202 patients entered into a single institution prospective randomized study for T3-4 prostate cancer between 1982 and 1992 were evaluated. All received radical irradiation to either a standard dose of 67.2Gy or a higher dose of 75.6Gy (the latter employing a proton beam boost). 76 men have received androgen suppression or orchiectomy for salvage following relapse (median follow-up 6.9 years). Of this group 35 experienced a second relapse heralded by a rise in the serum PSA. Second failure was scored on the date that the serum PSA rose to greater than 10% above the post-androgen suppression nadir. Kaplan-Meier analysis was made of survival from the time of second PSA failure and the cause of death established in all patients who subsequently died. Results The median duration of response to hormone therapy following first failure was 27.2 months. The actuarial survival from the time of second biochemical relapse was 93%, 66%, 35%, and 0% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years respectively (50% at 32 months). 16 patients have so far died after second failure all from causes related to their prostate cancer. Conclusion Second PSA failure appears to be a secure surrogate for impending prostate cancer death. Its use as an endpoint in prospective studies should allow earlier reporting by 2 - 3 years.

  14. ACR Appropriateness Criteria for external beam radiation therapy treatment planning for clinically localized prostate cancer, part II of II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas G. Zaorsky, MD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: External beam radiation is a key component of the curative management of T1 and T2 prostate cancer. By combining the most recent medical literature, these Appropriateness Criteria can aid clinicians in determining the appropriate treatment delivery and personalized approaches for individual patients.

  15. A Dosimetric Comparison between Conventional Fractionated and Hypofractionated Image-guided Radiation Therapies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: To deliver the hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer, VMAT significantly increased PTV D95% dose and decreased the dose of radiation delivered to adjacent normal tissues comparing to 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT. Daily online image-guidance and better management of bladder and rectum could make a more precise treatment delivery.

  16. Initial results of 3-dimensional 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the localization of prostate cancer at 3 Tesla: should we use an endorectal coil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakar, Derya; Heijmink, Stijn W T P J; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Huisman, Henkjan; Barentsz, Jelle O; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Scheenen, Tom W J

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of 3 Tesla, 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in the localization of prostate cancer (PCa) with and without the use of an endorectal coil (ERC). Our prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Between October 2004 and January 2006, 18 patients with histologically proven PCa on biopsy and scheduled for radical prostatectomy were included and underwent 3D-MRSI with and without an ERC. The prostate was divided into 14 regions of interest (ROIs). Four readers independently rated (on a 5-point scale) their confidence that cancer was present in each of these ROIs. These findings were correlated with whole-mount prostatectomy specimens. Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve were determined. A difference with a P Tesla slightly but significantly increased the localization performance compared with not using an ERC.

  17. Early diagnosis of prostate cancer in the Western Cape | Heyns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Early stage prostate cancer does not cause symptoms, and even metastatic disease may exist for years without causing symptoms or signs. Whereas early stage prostate cancer can be cured with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, the prognosis of patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer is ...

  18. cExternal beam radiation results in minimal changes in post void residual urine volumes during the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orio, Peter F III; Merrick, Gregory S; Allen, Zachariah A; Butler, Wayne M; Wallner, Kent E; Kurko, Brian S; Galbreath, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of external beam radiation therapy (XRT) on weekly ultrasound determined post-void residual (PVR) urine volumes in patients with prostate cancer. 125 patients received XRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. XRT was delivered to the prostate only (n = 66) or if the risk of lymph node involvement was greater than 10% to the whole pelvis followed by a prostate boost (n = 59). All patients were irradiated in the prone position in a custom hip-fix mobilization device with an empty bladder and rectum. PVR was obtained at baseline and weekly. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated as predictors for weekly PVR changes. The mean patient age was 73.9 years with a mean pre-treatment prostate volume of 53.3 cc, a mean IPSS of 11.3 and a mean baseline PVR of 57.6 cc. During treatment, PVR decreased from baseline in both cohorts with the absolute difference within the limits of accuracy of the bladder scanner. Alpha-blockers did not predict for a lower PVR during treatment. There was no significant difference in mean PVR urine volumes or differences from baseline in either the prostate only or pelvic radiation groups (p = 0.664 and p = 0.458, respectively). Patients with a larger baseline PVR (>40 cc) had a greater reduction in PVR, although the greatest reduction was seen between weeks one and three. Patients with a small PVR (<40 cc) had no demonstrable change throughout treatment. Prostate XRT results in clinically insignificant changes in weekly PVR volumes, suggesting that radiation induced bladder irritation does not substantially influence bladder residual urine volumes

  19. cExternal beam radiation results in minimal changes in post void residual urine volumes during the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallner Kent E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of external beam radiation therapy (XRT on weekly ultrasound determined post-void residual (PVR urine volumes in patients with prostate cancer. Methods 125 patients received XRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. XRT was delivered to the prostate only (n = 66 or if the risk of lymph node involvement was greater than 10% to the whole pelvis followed by a prostate boost (n = 59. All patients were irradiated in the prone position in a custom hip-fix mobilization device with an empty bladder and rectum. PVR was obtained at baseline and weekly. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated as predictors for weekly PVR changes. Results The mean patient age was 73.9 years with a mean pre-treatment prostate volume of 53.3 cc, a mean IPSS of 11.3 and a mean baseline PVR of 57.6 cc. During treatment, PVR decreased from baseline in both cohorts with the absolute difference within the limits of accuracy of the bladder scanner. Alpha-blockers did not predict for a lower PVR during treatment. There was no significant difference in mean PVR urine volumes or differences from baseline in either the prostate only or pelvic radiation groups (p = 0.664 and p = 0.458, respectively. Patients with a larger baseline PVR (>40 cc had a greater reduction in PVR, although the greatest reduction was seen between weeks one and three. Patients with a small PVR ( Conclusion Prostate XRT results in clinically insignificant changes in weekly PVR volumes, suggesting that radiation induced bladder irritation does not substantially influence bladder residual urine volumes.

  20. A multicenter study shows PTEN deletion is strongly associated with seminal vesicle involvement and extracapsular extension in localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Dean A; Jamaspishvili, Tamara; Wei, Wei; Feng, Ziding; Good, Jennifer; Hawley, Sarah; Fazli, Ladan; McKenney, Jesse K; Simko, Jeff; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Carroll, Peter R; Gleave, Martin; Lance, Raymond; Lin, Daniel W; Nelson, Peter S; Thompson, Ian M; True, Lawrence D; Brooks, James D; Squire, Jeremy A

    2015-08-01

    Loss of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor gene is a promising marker of aggressive prostate cancer. Active surveillance and watchful waiting are increasingly recommended to patients with small tumors felt to be low risk, highlighting the difficulties of Gleason scoring in this setting. There is an urgent need for predictive biomarkers that can be rapidly deployed to aid in clinical decision-making. Our objectives were to assess the incidence and ability of PTEN alterations to predict aggressive disease in a multicenter study. We used recently developed probes optimized for sensitivity and specificity in a four-color FISH deletion assay to study the Canary Retrospective multicenter Prostate Cancer Tissue Microarray (TMA). This TMA was constructed specifically for biomarker validation from radical prostatectomy specimens, and is accompanied by detailed clinical information with long-term follow-up. In 612 prostate cancers, the overall rate of PTEN deletion was 112 (18.3%). Hemizygous PTEN losses were present in 55/612 (9.0%) of cancers, whereas homozygous PTEN deletion was observed in 57/612 (9.3%) of tumors. Significant associations were found between PTEN status and pathologic stage (P free survival (number of events = 189), pre-operative prostate specific antigen (PSA) (P free survival in multivariate models, as were seminal vesicle invasion, extracapsular extension, and Gleason score, and preoperative PSA. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that the assay can be readily introduced at first diagnosis in a cost effective manner analogous to the use of FISH for analysis of HER2/neu status in breast cancer. Combined with published research beginning 17 years ago, both the data and tools now exist to implement a PTEN assay in the clinic. © 2015 The Authors. The Prostate, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Blood lipids and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Caroline J; Bonilla, Carolina; Holly, Jeff M P

    2016-01-01

    Genetic risk scores were used as unconfounded instruments for specific lipid traits (Mendelian randomization) to assess whether circulating lipids causally influence prostate cancer risk. Data from 22,249 prostate cancer cases and 22,133 controls from 22 studies within the international PRACTICAL...... into logistic regression models to estimate the presence (and direction) of any causal effect of each lipid trait on prostate cancer risk. There was weak evidence for an association between the LDL genetic score and cancer grade: the odds ratio (OR) per genetically instrumented standard deviation (SD) in LDL.......95, 3.00; P = 0.08). The rs12916-T variant in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) was inversely associated with prostate cancer (OR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.00; P = 0.03). In conclusion, circulating lipids, instrumented by our genetic risk scores, did not appear to alter prostate cancer risk...

  2. Impact of radiation dose on achieving nadir PSA levels after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Leibel, Steven A.; Kelson, Suzanne; Fuks, Zvi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Several reports have documented the prognostic value of a post-irradiation nadir PSA of ≤1 ng/ml in prostatic cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to determine which pre-treatment and treatment-related variables impact upon achieving such nadir levels. Materials and Methods: Between January 1987 and June 1995, 740 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). 214 (29%) patients were treated with neo-adjuvant androgen ablation prior to therapy and were excluded from this analysis. Among the 526 evaluable patients, the clinical stage were as follows: T 1 C=128 (24%); T 2 A=76 (14%); T 2 B=116 (22%); T 2 C=99 (19%) and T 3 =107 (21%). The prescription dose to the planning target volume (PTV) was 64.8-68.4 Gy in 87 patients (17%); 70.2 Gy in 191 (36%); 75.6 Gy in 209 (40%) and 81 Gy in 39 (7%). The median pre-treatment PSA value was 11.2 ng/ml (range 0.3-114). The median follow-up was 20 months (range: 6-76 months). Results: 242 patients (46%) had PSA levels which declined to ≤1.0 ng/ml. The median time to a nadir level of ≤1.0 was 15.6 months (range: 1-43 months) from completion of 3D-CRT. 154 (29%) patients continued to show declining PSA levels within the first 2 years after therapy, and 130 patients (25%) failed to nadir at PSA levels of ≤1.0 ng/ml. Among patients with nadir PSA levels ≤1, the 3 year PSA relapse-free survival was 91% compared to 29% for patients with nadir PSA levels >1 ng/ml (p<0.0001). A Cox-regression analysis demonstrated that nadir PSA ≤1 was the strongest predictor of PSA relapse-free survival (p<0.001) followed by Gleason score ≤ 6 (p<0.001) and stage< T3 (p=0.004). Among patients who received doses of ≥75.6 Gy, the likelihood of achieving PSA nadir levels ≤1.0 at 24 and 36 months was 86% and 93%, respectively, compared to 74 and 80%, respectively, among those who received lower doses (p<0.001). Doses of ≥75.6 Gy was the strongest

  3. Implementation and utility of a daily ultrasound-based localization system with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morr, Jody; DiPetrillo, Thomas; Tsai, J.-S.; Engler, Mark; Wazer, David E. MD.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of daily computer-assisted transabdominal ultrasonography for target position verification in the setting of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated using a sequential tomotherapy IMRT technique (Peacock) and daily computer-assisted transabdominal ultrasonography (BAT) for target localization. Patients were instructed to maintain a full bladder and were placed in the supine position using triangulation tattoos and a leg immobilizer to minimize pelvic rotation. The BAT ultrasound system is docked to the treatment collimator and electronically imports the CT simulation target contours and isocenter. The system is able to use the machine isocenter as a reference point to overlay the corresponding CT contours onto the ultrasound images captured in the transverse and sagittal planes. A touch screen menu is used to maneuver the CT contours in three dimensions such that they match the ultrasound images. The system then displays the three-dimensional couch shifts required to produce field alignment. Data were prospectively collected to measure the frequency by which useful ultrasound images were obtained, the amount of time required for localization/setup, and the direction/magnitude of the positional adjustments. Results: Of the 23 patients, the BAT ultrasound system produced images of sufficient quality to perform the overlay of the CT contours in 19 patients such that positional verification could be reliably performed. Poor image quality was associated with patient inability to maintain a full bladder, large body habitus, or other anatomic constraints. Of the 19 assessable patients, a total of 185 treatment alignments were performed (mean 8.8/patient). For all cases, the average time required for the daily ultrasound imaging and positional adjustments was 11.9 min. After the initial 5 cases, the user

  4. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  5. Focal therapy in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, W.

    2016-01-01

    Interesting developments took place in the treatment of prostate cancer including focal therapy for less aggressive organ-confined prostate cancer. Fortunately, curative treatment is often still an option for patients suffering from the lower staged tumors. In carefully selected patients, the

  6. Vitamin D in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2018-04-13

    Signaling through the vitamin D receptor has been shown to be biologically active and important in a number of preclinical studies in prostate and other cancers. Epidemiologic data also indicate that vitamin D signaling may be important in the cause and prognosis of prostate and other cancers. These data indicate that perturbation of vitamin D signaling may be a target for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. Large studies of vitamin D supplementation will be required to determine whether these observations can be translated into prevention strategies. This paper reviews the available data in the use of vitamin D compounds in the treatment of prostate cancer. Clinical data are limited which support the use of vitamin D compounds in the management of men with prostate cancer. However, clinical trials guided by existing preclinical data are limited.

  7. Vitamin D in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald L Trump

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Signaling through the vitamin D receptor has been shown to be biologically active and important in a number of preclinical studies in prostate and other cancers. Epidemiologic data also indicate that vitamin D signaling may be important in the cause and prognosis of prostate and other cancers. These data indicate that perturbation of vitamin D signaling may be a target for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. Large studies of vitamin D supplementation will be required to determine whether these observations can be translated into prevention strategies. This paper reviews the available data in the use of vitamin D compounds in the treatment of prostate cancer. Clinical data are limited which support the use of vitamin D compounds in the management of men with prostate cancer. However, clinical trials guided by existing preclinical data are limited.

  8. Vitamin D in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2018-01-01

    Signaling through the vitamin D receptor has been shown to be biologically active and important in a number of preclinical studies in prostate and other cancers. Epidemiologic data also indicate that vitamin D signaling may be important in the cause and prognosis of prostate and other cancers. These data indicate that perturbation of vitamin D signaling may be a target for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. Large studies of vitamin D supplementation will be required to determine whether these observations can be translated into prevention strategies. This paper reviews the available data in the use of vitamin D compounds in the treatment of prostate cancer. Clinical data are limited which support the use of vitamin D compounds in the management of men with prostate cancer. However, clinical trials guided by existing preclinical data are limited. PMID:29667615

  9. Meta-analysis of studies comparing oncologic outcomes of radical prostatectomy and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Gabriele; Musi, Gennaro; Bianchi, Roberto; Bottero, Danilo; Brescia, Antonio; Cioffi, Antonio; Cordima, Giovanni; Delor, Maurizio; Di Trapani, Ettore; Ferro, Matteo; Matei, Deliu Victor; Russo, Andrea; Mistretta, Francesco Alessandro; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare oncologic outcomes of radical prostatectomy (RP) with brachytherapy (BT). A literature review was conducted according to the 'Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses' (PRISMA) statement. We included studies reporting comparative oncologic outcomes of RP versus BT for localized prostate