WorldWideScience

Sample records for local time stepping

  1. High-resolution seismic wave propagation using local time stepping

    KAUST Repository

    Peter, Daniel

    2017-03-13

    High-resolution seismic wave simulations often require local refinements in numerical meshes to accurately capture e.g. steep topography or complex fault geometry. Together with explicit time schemes, this dramatically reduces the global time step size for ground-motion simulations due to numerical stability conditions. To alleviate this problem, local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time stepping scheme to adapt the time step to the element size, allowing nearoptimal time steps everywhere in the mesh. This can potentially lead to significantly faster simulation runtimes.

  2. Newmark local time stepping on high-performance computing architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Rietmann, Max

    2016-11-25

    In multi-scale complex media, finite element meshes often require areas of local refinement, creating small elements that can dramatically reduce the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to the CFL condition. Local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. We develop an efficient multilevel LTS-Newmark scheme and implement it in a widely used continuous finite element seismic wave-propagation package. In particular, we extend the standard LTS formulation with adaptations to continuous finite element methods that can be implemented very efficiently with very strong element-size contrasts (more than 100×). Capable of running on large CPU and GPU clusters, we present both synthetic validation examples and large scale, realistic application examples to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the method and implementation on thousands of CPU cores and hundreds of GPUs.

  3. Newmark local time stepping on high-performance computing architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietmann, Max; Grote, Marcus; Peter, Daniel; Schenk, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    In multi-scale complex media, finite element meshes often require areas of local refinement, creating small elements that can dramatically reduce the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to the CFL condition. Local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. We develop an efficient multilevel LTS-Newmark scheme and implement it in a widely used continuous finite element seismic wave-propagation package. In particular, we extend the standard LTS formulation with adaptations to continuous finite element methods that can be implemented very efficiently with very strong element-size contrasts (more than 100x). Capable of running on large CPU and GPU clusters, we present both synthetic validation examples and large scale, realistic application examples to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the method and implementation on thousands of CPU cores and hundreds of GPUs.

  4. Explicit local time-stepping methods for time-dependent wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Grote, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Semi-discrete Galerkin formulations of transient wave equations, either with conforming or discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretizations, typically lead to large systems of ordinary differential equations. When explicit time integration is used, the time-step is constrained by the smallest elements in the mesh for numerical stability, possibly a high price to pay. To overcome that overly restrictive stability constraint on the time-step, yet without resorting to implicit methods, explicit local time-stepping schemes (LTS) are presented here for transient wave equations either with or without damping. In the undamped case, leap-frog based LTS methods lead to high-order explicit LTS schemes, which conserve the energy. In the damped case, when energy is no longer conserved, Adams-Bashforth based LTS methods also lead to explicit LTS schemes of arbitrarily high accuracy. When combined with a finite element discretization in space with an essentially diagonal mass matrix, the resulting time-marching scheme...

  5. A p-Strategy with a Local Time-Stepping Method in a Discontinuous Galerkin Approach to Solve Electromagnetic Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Mallet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a local spatial approximation or p-strategy Discontinuous Galerkin method to solve the time-domain Maxwell equations. First, the Discontinuous Galerkin method with a local time-stepping strategy is recalled. Next, in order to increase the efficiency of the method, a local spatial approximation strategy is introduced and studied. While preserving accuracy and by using different spatial approximation orders for each cell, this strategy is very efficient to reduce the computational time and the required memory in numerical simulations using very distorted meshes. Several numerical examples are given to show the interest and the capacity of such method.

  6. Integration of FULLSWOF2D and PeanoClaw: Adaptivity and Local Time-Stepping for Complex Overland Flows

    KAUST Repository

    Unterweger, K.

    2015-01-01

    © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. We propose to couple our adaptive mesh refinement software PeanoClaw with existing solvers for complex overland flows that are tailored to regular Cartesian meshes. This allows us to augment them with spatial adaptivity and local time-stepping without altering the computational kernels. FullSWOF2D—Full Shallow Water Overland Flows—here is our software of choice though all paradigms hold for other solvers as well.We validate our hybrid simulation software in an artificial test scenario before we provide results for a large-scale flooding scenario of the Mecca region. The latter demonstrates that our coupling approach enables the simulation of complex “real-world” scenarios.

  7. High order finite volume methods on wavelet-adapted grids with local time-stepping on multicore architectures for the simulation of shock-bubble interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazialhosseini, Babak; Rossinelli, Diego; Bergdorf, Michael; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We present a space-time adaptive solver for single- and multi-phase compressible flows that couples average interpolating wavelets with high-order finite volume schemes. The solver introduces the concept of wavelet blocks, handles large jumps in resolution and employs local time-stepping for efficient time integration. We demonstrate that the inherently sequential wavelet-based adaptivity can be implemented efficiently in multicore computer architectures using task-based parallelism and introducing the concept of wavelet blocks. We validate our computational method on a number of benchmark problems and we present simulations of shock-bubble interaction at different Mach numbers, demonstrating the accuracy and computational performance of the method.

  8. Explicit Time-Stepping for Stiff ODEs

    CERN Document Server

    Eriksson, Kenneth; Logg, Anders; 10.1137/S1064827502409626

    2012-01-01

    We present a new strategy for solving stiff ODEs with explicit methods. By adaptively taking a small number of stabilizing small explicit time steps when necessary, a stiff ODE system can be stabilized enough to allow for time steps much larger than what is indicated by classical stability analysis. For many stiff problems the cost of the stabilizing small time steps is small, so the improvement is large. We illustrate the technique on a number of well-known stiff test problems.

  9. Variable bandwidth and one-step local M-estimator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范剑青; 蒋建成

    2000-01-01

    A robust version of local linear regression smoothers augmented with variable bandwidth is studied. The proposed method inherits the advantages of local polynomial regression and overcomes the shortcoming of lack of robustness of least-squares techniques. The use of variable bandwidth enhances the flexibility of the resulting local M- estimators and makes them possible to cope well with spatially inho-mogeneous curves, heteroscedastic errors and nonuniform design densities. Under appropriate regularity conditions, it is shown that the proposed estimators exist and are asymptotically normal. Based on the robust estimation equation, one-step local M-estimators are introduced to reduce computational burden. It is demonstrated that the one-step local M-estimators share the same asymptotic distributions as the fully iterative M-estimators, as long as the initial estimators are good enough. In other words, the one-step local M-estimators reduce significantly the computation cost of the fully iterative M-estim

  10. Time to Go Local!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Health Information, NLM On MedlinePlus.gov health topic pages, you will find "Go Local" links that take ... you visit one of the over 700 health topic pages on MedlinePlus.gov , you will see a box ...

  11. Four Steps to Being a Local Advocate for Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, K. Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Although advocacy can also take place at the state and national levels, the foundation of advocacy is high-quality teaching and local initiatives. The purpose of this article is to review four steps that can be taken by PE teachers who are interested in engaging in local advocacy efforts.

  12. Accurate and stable time stepping in ice sheet modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Gong; von Sydow, Lina

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce adaptive time step control for simulation of evolution of ice sheets. The discretization error in the approximations is estimated using "Milne's device" by comparing the result from two different methods in a predictor-corrector pair. Using a predictor-corrector pair the expensive part of the procedure, the solution of the velocity and pressure equations, is performed only once per time step and an estimate of the local error is easily obtained. The stability of the numerical solution is maintained and the accuracy is controlled by keeping the local error below a given threshold using PI-control. Depending on the threshold, the time step $\\Delta t$ is bound by stability requirements or accuracy requirements. Our method takes a shorter $\\Delta t$ than an implicit method but with less work in each time step and the solver is simpler. The method is analyzed theoretically with respect to stability and applied to the simulation of a 2D ice slab and a 3D circular ice sheet. %The automatic...

  13. Accurate and stable time stepping in ice sheet modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Lötstedt, Per; von Sydow, Lina

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we introduce adaptive time step control for simulation of the evolution of ice sheets. The discretization error in the approximations is estimated using "Milne's device" by comparing the result from two different methods in a predictor-corrector pair. Using a predictor-corrector pair the expensive part of the procedure, the solution of the velocity and pressure equations, is performed only once per time step and an estimate of the local error is easily obtained. The stability of the numerical solution is maintained and the accuracy is controlled by keeping the local error below a given threshold using PI-control. Depending on the threshold, the time step Δt is bound by stability requirements or accuracy requirements. Our method takes a shorter Δt than an implicit method but with less work in each time step and the solver is simpler. The method is analyzed theoretically with respect to stability and applied to the simulation of a 2D ice slab and a 3D circular ice sheet. The stability bounds in the experiments are explained by and agree well with the theoretical results.

  14. Variable bandwidth and one-step local M-estimator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A robust version of local linear regression smoothers augmented with variable bandwidth is studied. The proposed method inherits the advantages of local polynomial regression and overcomes the shortcoming of lack of robustness of least-squares techniques. The use of variable bandwidth enhances the flexibility of the resulting local M-estimators and makes them possible to cope well with spatially inhomogeneous curves, heteroscedastic errors and nonuniform design densities. Under appropriate regularity conditions, it is shown that the proposed estimators exist and are asymptotically normal. Based on the robust estimation equation, one-step local M-estimators are introduced to reduce computational burden. It is demonstrated that the one-step local M-estimators share the same asymptotic distributions as the fully iterative M-estimators, as long as the initial estimators are good enough. In other words, the one-step local M-estimators reduce significantly the computation cost of the fully iterative M-estimators without deteriorating their performance. This fact is also illustrated via simulations.

  15. The improved local linear prediction of chaotic time series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Qing-Fang; Peng Yu-Hua; Sun Jia

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Bayesian information criterion, this paper proposes the improved local linear prediction method to predict chaotic time aeries. This method uses spatial correlation and temporal correlation simultaneously. Simulation results show that the improved local linear prediction method can effectively make multi-step and one-step prediction of chaotic time aeries and the multi-step prediction performance and one-step prediction accuracy of the improved local linear prediction method are superior to those of the traditional local linear prediction method.

  16. Full-waveform data for building roof step edge localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słota, Małgorzata

    2015-08-01

    Airborne laser scanning data perfectly represent flat or gently sloped areas; to date, however, accurate breakline detection is the main drawback of this technique. This issue becomes particularly important in the case of modeling buildings, where accuracy higher than the footprint size is often required. This article covers several issues related to full-waveform data registered on building step edges. First, the full-waveform data simulator was developed and presented in this paper. Second, this article provides a full description of the changes in echo amplitude, echo width and returned power caused by the presence of edges within the laser footprint. Additionally, two important properties of step edge echoes, peak shift and echo asymmetry, were noted and described. It was shown that these properties lead to incorrect echo positioning along the laser center line and can significantly reduce the edge points' accuracy. For these reasons and because all points are aligned with the center of the beam, regardless of the actual target position within the beam footprint, we can state that step edge points require geometric corrections. This article presents a novel algorithm for the refinement of step edge points. The main distinguishing advantage of the developed algorithm is the fact that none of the additional data, such as emitted signal parameters, beam divergence, approximate edge geometry or scanning settings, are required. The proposed algorithm works only on georeferenced profiles of reflected laser energy. Another major advantage is the simplicity of the calculation, allowing for very efficient data processing. Additionally, the developed method of point correction allows for the accurate determination of points lying on edges and edge point densification. For this reason, fully automatic localization of building roof step edges based on LiDAR full-waveform data with higher accuracy than the size of the lidar footprint is feasible.

  17. 基于到达时间差的两步最小二乘定位算法%Two-step least square localization algorithm using time difference of arrival measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢胜东; 胡爱群; 黄毅; 姜禹

    2013-01-01

    为了提高单目标定位的精度,以到达时间差为物理量,提出了一种两步最小二乘定位算法(TSLS).TSLS 首先基于普通线性最小二乘估计模型,采用线性纠正最小二乘定位算法(LCLS)获得目标节点位置的估计值;然后计算出目标节点到达不同基站的距离差,并用该距离差来近似实际距离差;最后基于约束总体最小二乘估计模型,利用约束总体最小二乘定位算法(CTLS)对目标节点位置进行二次估计.由于 TSLS 本质上是通过减少 CTLS 的矩阵误差来提高 CTLS 的性能,因此可以看成是一种增强型 CTLS 算法.仿真分析表明,TSLS 算法的总体性能要优于 CTLS算法和 LCLS 算法.%In order to improve the localization precision for a single object,a two-step least square localization algorithm (TSLS)is proposed based on the time difference of arrival.The object loca-tion is first estimated by the line correct least square algorithm (LCLS)based on the common least square estimation model.Then the distance difference from the object to different base stations is computed based on the estimated location.Finally,the location is estimated by the constrained total least square algorithm (CTLS)based on the constrained total least square model,in which the dis-tance difference is approximated not by the measurement but by the calculation.Essentially,TSLS improves the performance of CTLS by reducing the errors in the matrix of CTLS,so it can be seen as an enhanced CTLS algorithm.Simulation results show that the performance of the TSLS is better than that of the CTLS and LCLS.

  18. A NEW ALGORITHM OF TIME STEPPING IN DYNAMIC VISCOELASTIC PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨海天; 高强; 郭杏林; 邬瑞锋

    2001-01-01

    A new scheme of time stepping for solving the dynamic viscoelastic problems are presented. By expanding variables at a discrete time interval, FEM based recurrent formulae are derived. A self-adaptive algorithm for different sizes of time steps can be carried out to improve computing accuracy. Numerical validation shows satisfactory performance.

  19. Combating cancer one step at a time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.N Sugitha Nadarajah

    2016-10-01

    widespread consequences, not only in a medical sense but also socially and economically,” says Dr. Abdel-Rahman. “We need to put in every effort to combat this fatal disease,” he adds.Tackling the spread of cancer and the increase in the number of cases reported every year is not without its challenges, he asserts. “I see the key challenges as the unequal availability of cancer treatments worldwide, the increasing cost of cancer treatment, and the increased median age of the population in many parts of the world, which carries with it a consequent increase in the risk of certain cancers,” he says. “We need to reassess the current pace and orientation of cancer research because, with time, cancer research is becoming industry-oriented rather than academia-oriented — which, in my view, could be very dangerous to the future of cancer research,” adds Dr. Abdel-Rahman. “Governments need to provide more research funding to improve the outcome of cancer patients,” he explains.His efforts and hard work have led to him receiving a number of distinguished awards, namely the UICC International Cancer Technology Transfer (ICRETT fellowship in 2014 at the Investigational New Drugs Unit in the European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; EACR travel fellowship in 2015 at The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK; and also several travel grants to Ireland, Switzerland, Belgium, Spain, and many other countries where he attended medical conferences. Dr. Abdel-Rahman is currently engaged in a project to establish a clinical/translational cancer research center at his institute, which seeks to incorporate various cancer-related disciplines in order to produce a real bench-to-bedside practice, hoping that it would “change research that may help shape the future of cancer therapy”.Dr. Abdel-Rahman is also an active founding member of the clinical research unit at his institute and is a representative to the prestigious European Organization for Research and

  20. Stochastic resonant-free multiple time-step algorithm for molecular dynamics with very large time steps

    CERN Document Server

    Leimkuhler, Ben; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is one of the most commonly used approaches for studying the dynamics and statistical distributions of many physical, chemical, and biological systems using atomistic or coarse-grained models. It is often the case, however, that the interparticle forces drive motion on many time scales, and the efficiency of a calculation is limited by the choice of time step, which must be sufficiently small that the fastest force components are accurately integrated. Multiple time-stepping algorithms partially alleviate this inefficiency by assigning to each time scale an appropriately chosen step-size. However, such approaches are limited by resonance phenomena, wherein motion on the fastest time scales limits the step sizes associated with slower time scales. In atomistic models of biomolecular systems, for example, resonances limit the largest time step to around 5-6 fs. In this paper, we introduce a set of stochastic isokinetic equations of motion that are shown to be rigorously ergodic and that can b...

  1. Reinvigorating performance evaluation: first steps in a local health department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathleen N; Gunzenhauser, Jeffrey D; Fielding, Jonathan E

    2010-01-01

    The ability of a local health department to assess and improve employee performance through an effective evaluation process is critical to overall organizational success. A constructive performance evaluation process not only provides meaningful feedback on work performance but also provides opportunities to reinforce work behaviors that support the organization's mission, to recognize exceptional work, and to guide future growth and learning. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health is creating a new approach to performance evaluation that recognizes 3 distinct components of work performance: standard business practices, competencies, and standards of practice. This multidimensional perspective acknowledges that the expectations of workers are complex and that evaluations of performance are not easily captured with single-dimension assessment tools. This report describes the conceptual relationships of these 3 components and how they integrate to form a single performance evaluation process. Key elements within this structure include a base document of competencies for all workers, expanded competency sets for professional staff, role-specific duty statements for workers who perform similar work, and standards of competent practice related to the mission of units to which individuals are assigned. Key first steps are to define the terminology of performance evaluation and to create role-specific duty statements.

  2. Diffeomorphic image registration with automatic time-step adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru; Klein, S.; Sommer, Stefan Horst;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated Euler's time-step adjustment scheme for diffeomorphic image registration using stationary velocity fields (SVFs). The proposed variational problem aims at bounding the inverse consistency error by adaptively adjusting the number of Euler's step required...

  3. Short-term time step convergence in a climate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hui; Rasch, Philip J; Taylor, Mark A; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    This paper evaluates the numerical convergence of very short (1 h) simulations carried out with a spectral-element (SE) configuration of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). While the horizontal grid spacing is fixed at approximately 110 km, the process-coupling time step is varied between 1800 and 1 s to reveal the convergence rate with respect to the temporal resolution. Special attention is paid to the behavior of the parameterized subgrid-scale physics. First, a dynamical core test with reduced dynamics time steps is presented. The results demonstrate that the experimental setup is able to correctly assess the convergence rate of the discrete solutions to the adiabatic equations of atmospheric motion. Second, results from full-physics CAM5 simulations with reduced physics and dynamics time steps are discussed. It is shown that the convergence rate is 0.4-considerably slower than the expected rate of 1.0. Sensitivity experiments indicate that, among the various subgrid-scale physical parameterizations, the stratiform cloud schemes are associated with the largest time-stepping errors, and are the primary cause of slow time step convergence. While the details of our findings are model specific, the general test procedure is applicable to any atmospheric general circulation model. The need for more accurate numerical treatments of physical parameterizations, especially the representation of stratiform clouds, is likely common in many models. The suggested test technique can help quantify the time-stepping errors and identify the related model sensitivities.

  4. CABARET scheme with conservation-flux asynchronous time-stepping for nonlinear aeroacoustics problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiletov, V. A.; Karabasov, S. A.

    2013-11-01

    Explicit time stepping renders many high-resolution computational schemes to become less efficient when dealing with non-uniform grids typical of many aeroacoustic applications. Asynchronous time stepping, i.e., updating the solution in different cell sizes according to their local rates, is known to be a promising way to improve the efficiency of explicit time-stepping methods without compromise in accuracy. In the present paper, a new asynchronous time-stepping algorithm is developed for the Compact Accurately Boundary-Adjusting high-REsolution Technique (CABARET) Euler method. This allows to significantly speedup the original single-step CABARET method with non-uniform grids and improves its accuracy at the same time. Numerical examples are provided and issues associated with the method performance on various grid resolutions are discussed.

  5. A time stepping method in analysis of nonlinear structural dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholampour A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new method is proposed for the direct time integration method for structural dynamics problems. The proposed method assumes second order variations of the acceleration at each time step. Therefore more terms in the Taylor series expansion were used compared to other methods. Because of the increase in order of variations of acceleration, this method has higher accuracy than classical methods. The displacement function is a polynomial with five constants and they are calculated using: two equations for initial conditions (from the end of previous time step, two equations for satisfying the equilibrium at both ends of the time step, and one equation for the weighted residual integration. Proposed method has higher stability and order of accuracy than the other methods.

  6. Self-intersection local times and collision local times of bifractional Brownian motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the local time and the self-intersection local time for a bifractional Brownian motion, and the collision local time for two independent bifractional Brownian motions. We mainly prove the existence and smoothness of the self-intersection local time and the collision local time, through the strong local nondeterminism of bifractional Brownian motion, L2 convergence and Chaos expansion.

  7. Self-intersection local times and collision local times of bifractional Brownian motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG YiMing; WANG YongJin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the local time and the self-intersection local time for a bifrac-tional Brownish motion, and the collision local time for two independent bifractional Brownian motions. We mainly prove the existence and smoothness of the self-intersection local time and the collision local time, through the strong local nondeterminism of bifractional Brownian motion, L2 convergence and Chaos expansion.

  8. Global phenomena from local rules: Peer-to-peer networks and crystal steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbiner, Amy

    Even simple, deterministic rules can generate interesting behavior in dynamical systems. This dissertation examines some real world systems for which fairly simple, locally defined rules yield useful or interesting properties in the system as a whole. In particular, we study routing in peer-to-peer networks and the motion of crystal steps. Peers can vary by three orders of magnitude in their capacities to process network traffic. This heterogeneity inspires our use of "proportionate load balancing," where each peer provides resources in proportion to its individual capacity. We provide an implementation that employs small, local adjustments to bring the entire network into a global balance. Analytically and through simulations, we demonstrate the effectiveness of proportionate load balancing on two routing methods for de Bruijn graphs, introducing a new "reversed" routing method which performs better than standard forward routing in some cases. The prevalence of peer-to-peer applications prompts companies to locate the hosts participating in these networks. We explore the use of supervised machine learning to identify peer-to-peer hosts, without using application-specific information. We introduce a model for "triples," which exploits information about nearly contemporaneous flows to give a statistical picture of a host's activities. We find that triples, together with measurements of inbound vs. outbound traffic, can capture most of the behavior of peer-to-peer hosts. An understanding of crystal surface evolution is important for the development of modern nanoscale electronic devices. The most commonly studied surface features are steps, which form at low temperatures when the crystal is cut close to a plane of symmetry. Step bunching, when steps arrange into widely separated clusters of tightly packed steps, is one important step phenomenon. We analyze a discrete model for crystal steps, in which the motion of each step depends on the two steps on either side of

  9. Adaptive time steps in trajectory surface hopping simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spörkel, Lasse; Thiel, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) simulations are often performed in combination with active-space multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatments. Technical problems may arise in such simulations if active and inactive orbitals strongly mix and switch in some particular regions. We propose to use adaptive time steps when such regions are encountered in TSH simulations. For this purpose, we present a computational protocol that is easy to implement and increases the computational effort only in the critical regions. We test this procedure through TSH simulations of a GFP chromophore model (OHBI) and a light-driven rotary molecular motor (F-NAIBP) on semiempirical MRCI potential energy surfaces, by comparing the results from simulations with adaptive time steps to analogous ones with constant time steps. For both test molecules, the number of successful trajectories without technical failures rises significantly, from 53% to 95% for OHBI and from 25% to 96% for F-NAIBP. The computed excited-state lifetime remains essentially the same for OHBI and increases somewhat for F-NAIBP, and there is almost no change in the computed quantum efficiency for internal rotation in F-NAIBP. We recommend the general use of adaptive time steps in TSH simulations with active-space CI methods because this will help to avoid technical problems, increase the overall efficiency and robustness of the simulations, and allow for a more complete sampling.

  10. Multi-time-step domain coupling method with energy control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahjoubi, N.; Krenk, Steen

    2010-01-01

    the individual time step. It is demonstrated that displacement continuity between the subdomains leads to cancelation of the interface contributions to the energy balance equation, and thus stability and algorithmic damping properties of the original algorithms are retained. The various subdomains can...

  11. Wireless Local Area Networks: The Next Evolutionary Step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarz, Nan

    2001-01-01

    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers recently approved a high-speed wireless standard that enables devices from different manufacturers to communicate through a common backbone, making wireless local area networks more feasible in schools. Schools can now use wireless access points and network cards to provide flexible…

  12. Stepping stones of Amsterdam, Local and global anchor points 2010.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bois, G. de Peter

    2011-01-01

    This report shows the results of research on the relation between local and global anchor points in the city of Amsterdam, executed by a small group of international students from Italy and Spain within the scope of two research modules in their Bachelor education at the University of Applied Scienc

  13. 4 Steps for Redesigning Time for Student and Teacher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareno, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Everybody complains about a lack of time in school, but few are prepared to do anything about it. Laying the foundation before making such a shift is essential to the success of the change. Once a broad-based team has been chosen to do the work, they can follow a process explained in four steps with the apt acronym of T.I.M.E.: Taking stock,…

  14. Local-time representation of path integrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x-dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x(t) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x. Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed.

  15. Modified precise time step integration method of structural dynamic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Mengfu; Zhou Xiyuan

    2005-01-01

    The precise time step integration method proposed for linear time-invariant homogeneous dynamic systems can provide precise numerical results that approach an exact solution at the integration points. However, difficulty arises when the algorithm is used for non-homogeneous dynamic systems, due to the inverse matrix calculation and the simulation accuracy of the applied loading. By combining the Gaussian quadrature method and state space theory with the calculation technique of matrix exponential function in the precise time step integration method, a new modified precise time step integration method (e.g., an algorithm with an arbitrary order of accuracy) is proposed. In the new method, no inverse matrix calculation or simulation of the applied loading is needed, and the computing efficiency is improved. In particular, the proposed method is independent of the quality of the matrix H. If the matrix H is singular or nearly singular, the advantage of the method is remarkable. The numerical stability of the proposed algorithm is discussed and a numerical example is given to demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the algorithm.

  16. Considerations for the independent reaction times and step-by-step methods for radiation chemistry simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation interacts with the water molecules of the tissues mostly by ionizations and excitations, which result in the formation of the radiation track structure and the creation of radiolytic species such as H.,.OH, H2, H2O2, and e-aq. After their creation, these species diffuse and may chemically react with the neighboring species and with the molecules of the medium. Therefore radiation chemistry is of great importance in radiation biology. As the chemical species are not distributed homogeneously, the use of conventional models of homogeneous reactions cannot completely describe the reaction kinetics of the particles. Actually, many simulations of radiation chemistry are done using the Independent Reaction Time (IRT) method, which is a very fast technique to calculate radiochemical yields but which do not calculate the positions of the radiolytic species as a function of time. Step-by-step (SBS) methods, which are able to provide such information, have been used only sparsely because these are time-consuming in terms of calculation. Recent improvements in computer performance now allow the regular use of the SBS method in radiation chemistry. The SBS and IRT methods are both based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). In this paper, several sampling algorithms of the GFDE and for the IRT method are presented. We show that the IRT and SBS methods are exactly equivalent for 2-particles systems for diffusion and partially diffusion-controlled reactions between non-interacting particles. We also show that the results obtained with the SBS simulation method with periodic boundary conditions are in agreement with the predictions by classical reaction kinetics theory, which is an important step towards using this method for modelling of biochemical networks and metabolic pathways involved in oxidative stress. Finally, the first simulation results obtained with the code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) are presented.

  17. Asynchronous adaptive time step in quantitative cellular automata modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The behaviors of cells in metazoans are context dependent, thus large-scale multi-cellular modeling is often necessary, for which cellular automata are natural candidates. Two related issues are involved in cellular automata based multi-cellular modeling: how to introduce differential equation based quantitative computing to precisely describe cellular activity, and upon it, how to solve the heavy time consumption issue in simulation. Results Based on a modified, language based cellular automata system we extended that allows ordinary differential equations in models, we introduce a method implementing asynchronous adaptive time step in simulation that can considerably improve efficiency yet without a significant sacrifice of accuracy. An average speedup rate of 4–5 is achieved in the given example. Conclusions Strategies for reducing time consumption in simulation are indispensable for large-scale, quantitative multi-cellular models, because even a small 100 × 100 × 100 tissue slab contains one million cells. Distributed and adaptive time step is a practical solution in cellular automata environment.

  18. Zero noise limits using local times

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We consider a well-known family of SDEs with irregular drifts and the correspondent zero noise limits. Using (mollified) local times, we show which trajectories are selected. The approach is completely probabilistic and relies on elementary stochastic calculus only.

  19. Sharing Steps in the Workplace: Changing Privacy Concerns Over Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nanna Gorm; Shklovski, Irina

    2016-01-01

    study of a Danish workplace participating in a step counting campaign. We find that concerns of employees who choose to participate and those who choose not to differ. Moreover, privacy concerns of participants develop and change over time. Our findings challenge the assumption that consumers......Personal health technologies are increasingly introduced in workplace settings. Yet little is known about workplace implementations of activity tracker use and the kind of experiences and concerns employees might have when engaging with these technologies in practice. We report on an observational...

  20. Time step size limitation introduced by the BSSN Gamma Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnetter, Erik, E-mail: schnetter@cct.lsu.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, LA (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Many mesh refinement simulations currently performed in numerical relativity counteract instabilities near the outer boundary of the simulation domain either by changes to the mesh refinement scheme or by changes to the gauge condition. We point out that the BSSN Gamma Driver gauge condition introduces a time step size limitation in a similar manner as a Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition, but which is independent of the spatial resolution. We give a didactic explanation of this issue, show why, especially, mesh refinement simulations suffer from it, and point to a simple remedy. (note)

  1. A Two-Step Regularization Framework for Non-Local Means

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙忠贵; 陈松灿; 乔立山

    2014-01-01

    As an effective patch-based denoising method, non-local means (NLM) method achieves favorable denoising performance over its local counterparts and has drawn wide attention in image processing community. The implementation of NLM can formally be decomposed into two sequential steps, i.e., computing the weights and using the weights to compute the weighted means. In the first step, the weights can be obtained by solving a regularized optimization. And in the second step, the means can be obtained by solving a weighted least squares problem. Motivated by such observations, we establish a two-step regularization framework for NLM in this paper. Meanwhile, using the framework, we reinterpret several non-local filters in the unified view. Further, taking the framework as a design platform, we develop a novel non-local median filter for removing salt-pepper noise with encouraging experimental results.

  2. Local Time of Additive Levy Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We studied the problem of existence of jointly continuous local time for an additive process.Here, “local time” is understood in the sence of occupation density, and by an additive Lévy process we mean a process X={X(t), t∈Rd+)} which has the decomposition X= X1 X2 … XN. We prove that if the product of it slower index and N is greater than d, then a jointly continuous local time can be obtained via Berman's method.

  3. Seven Steps in Identifying Local Climate Change Responses for Agriculture in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, R.H.; Ngo, An T.; Huynh, Chuong V.; Le, Huong T.; Dang, Nhan K.; Van, Tri P.D.; Halsema, van G.E.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a seven-step approach to identify and support local climate change (CC) responses in agriculture. The following seven steps comprise this approach: 1. Analyse past trends on the climatic factors and model the future trends. 2. Simulate the possible impacts of CC on the selected s

  4. Local Identity in Times of Jurisdictional Consolidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sune Welling; Kjær, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Reforming the public sector has become increasingly popular. Some of the reforms have been jurisdictional consolidations of subnational authorities such as regions and municipalities. One question which remains unanswered is whether such consolidations affect citizens’ local identity? We take...... a first step towards providing an answer by examining whether citizens’ affective attachment to their municipality – and other administrative and geographical areas – declined or flourished in connection with a large-scale municipal reform implemented in Denmark in 2007. Empirically, we make use...

  5. Simulating diffusion processes in discontinuous media: A numerical scheme with constant time steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lejay, Antoine, E-mail: Antoine.Lejay@iecn.u-nancy.fr [Universite de Lorraine, IECN, UMR 7502, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, F-54500 (France); CNRS, IECN, UMR 7502, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, F-54500 (France); Inria, Villers-les-Nancy, F-54600 (France); IECN, BP 70238, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Pichot, Geraldine, E-mail: Geraldine.Pichot@inria.fr [Inria, Rennes - Bretagne Atlantique, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); INRIA, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2012-08-30

    In this article, we propose new Monte Carlo techniques for moving a diffusive particle in a discontinuous media. In this framework, we characterize the stochastic process that governs the positions of the particle. The key tool is the reduction of the process to a Skew Brownian motion (SBM). In a zone where the coefficients are locally constant on each side of the discontinuity, the new position of the particle after a constant time step is sampled from the exact distribution of the SBM process at the considered time. To do so, we propose two different but equivalent algorithms: a two-steps simulation with a stop at the discontinuity and a one-step direct simulation of the SBM dynamic. Some benchmark tests illustrate their effectiveness.

  6. Exact relativistic time evolution for a step potential barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Villavicencio, J

    2000-01-01

    We derive an exact analytic solution to a Klein-Gordon equation for a step potential barrier with cutoff plane wave initial conditions, in order to explore wave evolution in a classical forbidden region. We find that the relativistic solution rapidly evanesces within a depth $2x_p$ inside the potential, where $x_p$ is the penetration length of the stationary solution. Beyond the characteristic distance $2x_p$, a Sommerfeld-type precursor travels along the potential at the speed of light, $c$. However, no spatial propagation of a main wavefront along the structure is observed. We also find a non-causal time evolution of the wavefront peak. The effect is only an apparent violation of Einstein causality.

  7. conditional on its local time at zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank B. Knight

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a recursion formula for the conditional moments of the area under the absolute value of Brownian bridge given the local time at 0. The method of power series leads to a Hermite equation for the generating function of the coefficients which is solved in terms of the parabolic cylinder functions. By integrating out the local time variable, this leads to an integral expression for the joint moments of the areas under the positive and negative parts of the Brownian bridge.

  8. Interfacial Phenomena and Natural Local Time

    CERN Document Server

    Appuhamillage, Thilanka; Thomann, Enrique; Waymire, Edward; Wood, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses a modification of local time for stochastic processes, to be referred to as `natural local time'. It is prompted by theoretical developments arising in mathematical treatments of recent experiments and observations of phenomena in the geophysical and biological sciences pertaining to dispersion in the presence of an interface of discontinuity in dispersion coefficients. The results illustrate new ways in which to use the theory of stochastic processes to infer macro scale parameters and behavior from micro scale observations in particular heterogeneous environments.

  9. Multiple-time-stepping generalized hybrid Monte Carlo methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escribano, Bruno, E-mail: bescribano@bcamath.org [BCAM—Basque Center for Applied Mathematics, E-48009 Bilbao (Spain); Akhmatskaya, Elena [BCAM—Basque Center for Applied Mathematics, E-48009 Bilbao (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain); Reich, Sebastian [Universität Potsdam, Institut für Mathematik, D-14469 Potsdam (Germany); Azpiroz, Jon M. [Kimika Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (UPV/EHU) and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P.K. 1072, Donostia (Spain)

    2015-01-01

    Performance of the generalized shadow hybrid Monte Carlo (GSHMC) method [1], which proved to be superior in sampling efficiency over its predecessors [2–4], molecular dynamics and hybrid Monte Carlo, can be further improved by combining it with multi-time-stepping (MTS) and mollification of slow forces. We demonstrate that the comparatively simple modifications of the method not only lead to better performance of GSHMC itself but also allow for beating the best performed methods, which use the similar force splitting schemes. In addition we show that the same ideas can be successfully applied to the conventional generalized hybrid Monte Carlo method (GHMC). The resulting methods, MTS-GHMC and MTS-GSHMC, provide accurate reproduction of thermodynamic and dynamical properties, exact temperature control during simulation and computational robustness and efficiency. MTS-GHMC uses a generalized momentum update to achieve weak stochastic stabilization to the molecular dynamics (MD) integrator. MTS-GSHMC adds the use of a shadow (modified) Hamiltonian to filter the MD trajectories in the HMC scheme. We introduce a new shadow Hamiltonian formulation adapted to force-splitting methods. The use of such Hamiltonians improves the acceptance rate of trajectories and has a strong impact on the sampling efficiency of the method. Both methods were implemented in the open-source MD package ProtoMol and were tested on a water and a protein systems. Results were compared to those obtained using a Langevin Molly (LM) method [5] on the same systems. The test results demonstrate the superiority of the new methods over LM in terms of stability, accuracy and sampling efficiency. This suggests that putting the MTS approach in the framework of hybrid Monte Carlo and using the natural stochasticity offered by the generalized hybrid Monte Carlo lead to improving stability of MTS and allow for achieving larger step sizes in the simulation of complex systems.

  10. The USMLE Step 2 CS: Time for a change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvin, Matthew D

    2016-08-01

    The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE(®)) Steps are a series of mandatory licensing assessments for all allopathic (MD degree) medical students in their transition from student to intern to resident physician. Steps 1, 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK), and 3 are daylong multiple-choice exams that quantify a medical student's basic science and clinical knowledge as well as their application of that knowledge using a three-digit score. In doing so, these Steps provide a standardized assessment that residency programs use to differentiate applicants and evaluate their competitiveness. Step 2 Clinical Skills (CS), the only other Step exam and the second component of Step 2, was created in 2004 to test clinical reasoning and patient-centered skills. As a Pass/Fail exam without a numerical scoring component, Step 2 CS provides minimal differentiation among applicants for residency programs. In this personal view article, it is argued that the current Step 2 CS exam should be eliminated for US medical students and propose an alternative consistent with the mission and purpose of the exam that imposes less of a burden on medical students.

  11. Implementation of variable time step stochastic dynamics for electronically inelastic gas-surface collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Murthy, C. S.; Redmon, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A variable time step algorithm has been implemented for solving the stochastic equations of motion for gas-surface collisions. It has been tested for a simple model of electronically inelastic collisions with an insulator surface in which the phonon manifold acts as a heat bath and electronic states are localized. In addition to reproducing the accurate nuclear dynamics of the surface atoms, numerical calculations have shown the algorithm to yield accurate ensemble averages of physical observables such as electronic transition probabilities and total energy loss of the gas atom to the surface. This new algorithm offers a gain in efficieny of up to an order of magnitude compared to fixed time step integration.

  12. Two-Step Time of Arrival Estimation for Pulse-Based Ultra-Wideband Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vincent Poor

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In cooperative localization systems, wireless nodes need to exchange accurate position-related information such as time-of-arrival (TOA and angle-of-arrival (AOA, in order to obtain accurate location information. One alternative for providing accurate position-related information is to use ultra-wideband (UWB signals. The high time resolution of UWB signals presents a potential for very accurate positioning based on TOA estimation. However, it is challenging to realize very accurate positioning systems in practical scenarios, due to both complexity/cost constraints and adverse channel conditions such as multipath propagation. In this paper, a two-step TOA estimation algorithm is proposed for UWB systems in order to provide accurate TOA estimation under practical constraints. In order to speed up the estimation process, the first step estimates a coarse TOA of the received signal based on received signal energy. Then, in the second step, the arrival time of the first signal path is estimated by considering a hypothesis testing approach. The proposed scheme uses low-rate correlation outputs and is able to perform accurate TOA estimation in reasonable time intervals. The simulation results are presented to analyze the performance of the estimator.

  13. Localizing Ground Penetrating RADAR: A Step Towards Robust Autonomous Ground Vehicle Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-14

    error and transition period between 50 s and 60 s corresponds to the northern 7 m radius U-turn. Journal of Field Robotics DOI 10.1002/rob Cornick et...estimating time-related bias errors . Journal of Field Robotics DOI 10.1002/rob 96 • Journal of Field Robotics —2016 Figure 17. Cumulative distribution of...the LIDAR systems be- cause of their use of optics and their operation in dynamic environments. Journal of Field Robotics 33(1), 82–102 (2016) C

  14. A varying time-step explicit numerical integration algorithm for solving motion equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zheng-hua; WANG Yu-huan; LIU Quan; YIN Xiao-tao; YANG Cheng

    2005-01-01

    If a traditional explicit numerical integration algorithm is used to solve motion equation in the finite element simulation of wave motion, the time-step used by numerical integration is the smallest time-step restricted by the stability criterion in computational region. However, the excessively small time-step is usually unnecessary for a large portion of computational region. In this paper, a varying time-step explicit numerical integration algorithm is introduced, and its basic idea is to use different time-step restricted by the stability criterion in different computational region. Finally, the feasibility of the algorithm and its effect on calculating precision are verified by numerical test.

  15. UTC TIME STEP on the 1st of July 1997

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    A positive leap second will be introduced in the UTC time scale UTC(JATC)、UTC (CSAO) and UTC time signals of BPL、BPM transmittings at the end of June 1997. The sequence of dates of the UTC second markers will be:

  16. Steps towards an axiomatic pregeometry of space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Bergliaffa, S E P; Vucetich, H; Bergliaffa, Santiago E. Perez; Romero, Gustavo E.; Vucetich, Hector

    1998-01-01

    We present a deductive theory of space-time which is realistic, objective, and relational. It is realistic because it assumes the existence of physical things endowed with concrete properties. It is objective because it can be formulated without any reference to cognoscent subjects or sensorial fields. Finally, it is relational because it assumes that space-time is not a thing but a complex of relations among things. In this way, the original program of Leibniz is consummated, in the sense that space is ultimately an order of coexistents, and time is an order of succesives. In this context, we show that the metric and topological properties of Minkowskian space-time are reduced to relational properties of concrete things. We also sketch how our theory can be extended to encompass a Riemmanian space-time.

  17. Local surface sampling step estimation for extracting boundaries of planar point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brie, David; Bombardier, Vincent; Baeteman, Grégory; Bennis, Abdelhamid

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach to estimate the surface sampling step of planar point clouds acquired by Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) which is varying with the distance to the surface and the angular positions. The local surface sampling step is obtained by doing a first order Taylor expansion of planar point coordinates. Then, it is shown how to use it in Delaunay-based boundary point extraction. The resulting approach, which is implemented in the ModiBuilding software, is applied to two facade point clouds of a building. The first is acquired with a single station and the second with two stations. In both cases, the proposed approach performs very accurately and appears to be robust to the variations of the point cloud density.

  18. Multiple time step molecular dynamics simulation for interaction between dislocations and grain boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan Li; Wei Yang

    2005-01-01

    A multiple time step algorithm, called reversible reference system propagator algorithm, is introduced for thelong time molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast to the conventional algorithms, the multiple time method has better convergence, stability and efficiency. The method is validated by simulating free relaxation and the hypervelocity impact of nano-clusters. The time efficiency of the multiple time step method enables us to investigate the long time interaction between lattice dislocations and low-angle grain boundaries.

  19. Electrifying emissions : reducing GHG emissions one step at a time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, R.

    2010-05-15

    Four waste heat generation systems were installed at compressor stations in Saskatchewan as part of SaskPower's effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and produce electricity in an environmentally responsible manner. NRGreen Power Limited Partnership, a sister company of Alliance Pipeline Ltd., was awarded the contract to construct the 4 waste heat power generation units at compressor stations along Alliance's natural gas pipeline system. Using technology developed and manufactured by Ormat Technologies, Inc., the waste heat units recover the exhaust heat from natural gas turbines, which compress the gas to transport it through the pipeline, and convert it into electricity. Each unit produces 5 megawatts of power, enough energy to power approximately 5,000 homes. The units are located in Kerrobert, Estlin, Loreburn and Alameda, Saskatchewan. The 3 main components of the units are the heat exchanger, a thermal oil loop and an energy converter. A unique feature of the waste heat power generation system is that it is entirely self-contained. The compressors on the Alliance system operate about 99 per cent of the time with a high degree of reliability, which is key for an electricity provider. This same technology could be applied to other jurisdictions where the Alliance pipeline crosses. NRGreen is also proposing to build waste heat power generation units at 3 of its existing compressor stations in Alberta. NRGreen has regulatory approval to install the units at Irma, Morinville and Windfall. Although opportunities may arise in the United States, challenges remain in getting the technology recognized as environmentally preferred or equivalent to other renewable sources. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  20. Detection and Correction of Step Discontinuities in Kepler Flux Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczak, J. J.; Morris, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    PDC 8.0 includes an implementation of a new algorithm to detect and correct step discontinuities appearing in roughly one of every 20 stellar light curves during a given quarter. The majority of such discontinuities are believed to result from high-energy particles (either cosmic or solar in origin) striking the photometer and causing permanent local changes (typically -0.5%) in quantum efficiency, though a partial exponential recovery is often observed [1]. Since these features, dubbed sudden pixel sensitivity dropouts (SPSDs), are uncorrelated across targets they cannot be properly accounted for by the current detrending algorithm. PDC detrending is based on the assumption that features in flux time series are due either to intrinsic stellar phenomena or to systematic errors and that systematics will exhibit measurable correlations across targets. SPSD events violate these assumptions and their successful removal not only rectifies the flux values of affected targets, but demonstrably improves the overall performance of PDC detrending [1].

  1. Local polynomial method for ensemble forecast of time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Regonda

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a nonparametric approach based on local polynomial regression for ensemble forecast of time series. The state space is first reconstructed by embedding the univariate time series of the response variable in a space of dimension (D with a delay time (τ. To obtain a forecast from a given time point t, three steps are involved: (i the current state of the system is mapped on to the state space, known as the feature vector, (ii a small number (K=α*n, α=fraction (0,1] of the data, n=data length of neighbors (and their future evolution to the feature vector are identified in the state space, and (iii a polynomial of order p is fitted to the identified neighbors, which is then used for prediction. A suite of parameter combinations (D, τ, α, p is selected based on an objective criterion, called the Generalized Cross Validation (GCV. All of the selected parameter combinations are then used to issue a T-step iterated forecast starting from the current time t, thus generating an ensemble forecast which can be used to obtain the forecast probability density function (PDF. The ensemble approach improves upon the traditional method of providing a single mean forecast by providing the forecast uncertainty. Further, for short noisy data it can provide better forecasts. We demonstrate the utility of this approach on two synthetic (Henon and Lorenz attractors and two real data sets (Great Salt Lake bi-weekly volume and NINO3 index. This framework can also be used to forecast a vector of response variables based on a vector of predictors.

  2. Local times of N-parameter Gaussian processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhengyan; CHENG Zongmao

    2005-01-01

    An N-parameter Gaussian stationary process X = { X ( t ): t ∈ RN+ } is introduced and the existence and joint continuity of its local times is presented. And the moments of local times are estimated. Furthermore moduli of continuity and large increment results for the local times are established.

  3. Large deviations for local times and intersection local times of fractional Brownian motions and Riemann-Liouville processes

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xia; Rosinski, Jan; Shao, Qi-Man

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we prove exact forms of large deviations for local times and intersection local times of fractional Brownian motions and Riemann-Liouville processes. We also show that a fractional Brownian motion and the related Riemann-Liouville process behave like constant multiples of each other with regard to large deviations for their local and intersection local times. As a consequence of our large deviation estimates, we derive laws of iterated logarithm for the corresponding local times. The key points of our methods: (1) logarithmic superadditivity of a normalized sequence of moments of exponentially randomized local time of a fractional Brownian motion; (2) logarithmic subadditivity of a normalized sequence of moments of exponentially randomized intersection local time of Riemann-Liouville processes; (3) comparison of local and intersection local times based on embedding of a part of a fractional Brownian motion into the reproducing kernel Hilbert space of the Riemann-Liouville process.

  4. First attempt to overcome the disaster of Dirac sea in imaginary time step method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; LIANG Hao-Zhao; MENG Jie

    2009-01-01

    Efforts have been made to solve the Dirac equation with axially deformed scalar and vector Woods-Saxon potentials in the coordinate space with the imaginary time step method. The results of the single-particle energies thus obtained are consistent with those calculated with the basis expansion method, which demonstrates the feasibility of the imaginary time step method for the relativistic static problems.

  5. Characterizing wave propagation to improve indoor step-level person localization using floor vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshekari, Mostafa; Pan, Shijia; Zhang, Pei; Noh, Hae Young

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to characterize frequency-dependent wave propagation of footstep induced floor vibration to improve robustness of vibration-based occupant localization. Occupant localization is an essential part of many smart structure applications (e.g., energy management, patient/customer tracking, etc.). Exist- ing techniques include visual (e.g. cameras and IR sensors), acoustic, RF, and load-based approaches. These approaches have many deployment and operational requirements that limits their adaptation. To overcome these limitations, prior work has utilized footstep-induced vibrations to allow sparse sensor configuration and non-intrusive detection. However, frequency dependent propagation characteristics and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of footstep-induced vibrations change the shape of the signal. Furthermore, estimating the wave propagation velocity for forming the multilateration equations and localizing the footsteps is a challenging task. They, in turn, lead to large errors of localization. In this paper, we present a structural vibration based indoor occupant localization technique using improved time-difference-of-arrival between multiple vibration sensors. In particular we overcome signal distortion by decomposing the signal into frequency components and focusing on high energy components for accurate indoor localization. Such decomposition leverages the frequency-specific propagation characteristics and reduces the effect of low SNR (by choosing the components of highest energy). Furthermore, we develop a velocity calibration method that finds the optimal velocity which minimizes the localization error. We validate our approach through field experiments in a building with human participants. We are able to achieve an average localization error of less than 0.21 meters, which corresponds to a 13X reduction in error when compared to the baseline method using raw data.

  6. Algorithms and Data Structures for Multi-Adaptive Time-Stepping

    CERN Document Server

    Jansson, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Multi-adaptive Galerkin methods are extensions of the standard continuous and discontinuous Galerkin methods for the numerical solution of initial value problems for ordinary or partial differential equations. In particular, the multi-adaptive methods allow individual and adaptive time steps to be used for different components or in different regions of space. We present algorithms for efficient multi-adaptive time-stepping, including the recursive construction of time slabs and adaptive time step selection. We also present data structures for efficient storage and interpolation of the multi-adaptive solution. The efficiency of the proposed algorithms and data structures is demonstrated for a series of benchmark problems.

  7. Vasorelaxation Study and Tri-Step Infrared Spectroscopy Analysis of Malaysian Local Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Sing Ch’ng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this paper is to investigate the activities of Malaysian local herbs (Clinacanthus nutans Lindau, Strobilanthes crispus, Murdannia bracteata, Elephantopus scaber Linn., Pereskia bleo, Pereskia grandifolia Haw., Vernonia amygdalina, and Swietenia macrophylla King for anti-hypertensive and vasorelaxant activity. An infrared (IR macro-fingerprinting technique consisting of conventional fourier transform IR (FTIR, second-derivative IR (SD-IR, and two-dimensional correlation IR (2D-correlation IR analyses were used to determine the main constituents and the fingerprints of the Malaysian local herbs. Methods: The herbs were collected, ground into powder form, and then macerated by using three different solvents: distilled water, 50% ethanol, and 95% ethanol, respectively. The potentials of the extracts produced from these herbs for use as vasorelaxants were determined. Additionally, the fingerprints of these herbs were analyzed by using FTIR spectra, SD-IR spectra, and 2D-correlation IR spectra in order to identify their main constituents and to provide useful information for future pharmacodynamics studies. Results: Swietenia macrophylla King has the highest potential in terms of vasorelaxant activity, followed by Vernonia amygdalina, Pereskia bleo, Strobilanthes crispus, Elephantopus scaber Linn., Pereskia grandifolia Haw., Clinacanthus nutans Lindau, and Murdannia bracteata. The tri-step IR macro-fingerprint of the herbs revealed that most of them contained proteins. Pereskia bleo and Pereskia grandifolia Haw. were found to contain calcium oxalate while Swietenia macrophylla King was found to contain large amounts of flavonoids. Conclusion: The flavonoid content of the herbs affects their vasorelaxant activity, and the tri-step IR macro- fingerprint method can be used as an analytical tool to determine the activity of a herbal medicine in terms of its vasorelaxant effect.

  8. A time step criterion for the stable numerical simulation of hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Lien Ramirez, Alina; Löhnert, Stefan; Neuweiler, Insa

    2017-04-01

    within the crack rises. The fluid flow within the crack and in the porous medium are simulated using the mass balance for water and Darcy's law for flow. The equations for flow and deformation in the rock and that for flow in the fracture are solved in a staggered manner. The two sets of equations are coupled via Lagrange multipliers. We present a time step criterion for the stability of the scheme and illustrate this criterion with test examples of crack propagation. [1] T. Boone and A. Ingraffea. A numerical procedure for simulation of hydraulically-driven fracture propagation in poroelastic media. Int. J. Numer. Anal. Met. 14, 27-47, (1990) [2] T. Mohammadnejad and A. Khoei. An extended finite element method for hydraulic fracture propagation in deformable porous media with the cohesive crack model. Finite Elements in Analysis and Design. 73, 77-95, (2013) [3] E.W. Remij, J.J.C. Remmers, J.M. Huyghe, D.M.J. Smeulders. The enhanced local pressure model for the accurate analysis of fluid pressure driven fracture in porous materials. Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. 286, 293-312, (2015)

  9. Adaptive Time Stepping for Transient Network Flow Simulation in Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; Ravindran, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    Fluid and thermal transients found in rocket propulsion systems such as propellant feedline system is a complex process involving fast phases followed by slow phases. Therefore their time accurate computation requires use of short time step initially followed by the use of much larger time step. Yet there are instances that involve fast-slow-fast phases. In this paper, we present a feedback control based adaptive time stepping algorithm, and discuss its use in network flow simulation of fluid and thermal transients. The time step is automatically controlled during the simulation by monitoring changes in certain key variables and by feedback. In order to demonstrate the viability of time adaptivity for engineering problems, we applied it to simulate water hammer and cryogenic chill down in pipelines. Our comparison and validation demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of this adaptive strategy.

  10. GOTHIC: Gravitational oct-tree code accelerated by hierarchical time step controlling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Yohei; Umemura, Masayuki

    2017-04-01

    The tree method is a widely implemented algorithm for collisionless N-body simulations in astrophysics well suited for GPU(s). Adopting hierarchical time stepping can accelerate N-body simulations; however, it is infrequently implemented and its potential remains untested in GPU implementations. We have developed a Gravitational Oct-Tree code accelerated by HIerarchical time step Controlling named GOTHIC, which adopts both the tree method and the hierarchical time step. The code adopts some adaptive optimizations by monitoring the execution time of each function on-the-fly and minimizes the time-to-solution by balancing the measured time of multiple functions. Results of performance measurements with realistic particle distribution performed on NVIDIA Tesla M2090, K20X, and GeForce GTX TITAN X, which are representative GPUs of the Fermi, Kepler, and Maxwell generation of GPUs, show that the hierarchical time step achieves a speedup by a factor of around 3-5 times compared to the shared time step. The measured elapsed time per step of GOTHIC is 0.30 s or 0.44 s on GTX TITAN X when the particle distribution represents the Andromeda galaxy or the NFW sphere, respectively, with 224 = 16,777,216 particles. The averaged performance of the code corresponds to 10-30% of the theoretical single precision peak performance of the GPU.

  11. Convergence for Imaginary Time Step evolution in the Fermi and Dirac seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The convergence for the Imaginary Time Step (ITS) evolution with time step is investigated by performing the ITS evolution for the Schrdinger-like equation and the charge-conjugate Schrdinger-like equation deduced from Dirac equation for the single proton levels of 12C in both the Fermi and Dirac seas. For the guaranteed convergence of the ITS evolution to the "exact" results,the time step should be smaller than a "critical" time step Δtc for a given single-particle level. The "critical" time step Δtc is more sensitive to the quantum numbers |κ| than to the energy of the single-particle level. For the single-particle levels with the same κ,their "critical" time steps are in the same order. For the single-particle levels with similar energy,a relatively small (large) "critical" time step for larger (smaller) |κ| is needed. These conclusions can be used in the future self-consistent calculation to optimize the evolution procedure.

  12. Local Observability of Systems on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Bartosiewicz

    2013-01-01

    unified way using the language of real analytic geometry, ideals of germs of analytic functions, and their real radicals. It is shown that some properties related to observability are preserved under various discretizations of continuous-time systems.

  13. Relative Locality in Curved Space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we construct the action describing dynamics of the particle moving in curved spacetime, with a non-trivial momentum space geometry. Curved momentum space is the core feature of theories where relative locality effects are presents. So far aspects of nonlinearities in momentum space have been studied only for flat or constantly expanding (De Sitter) spacetimes, relying on the their maximally symmetric nature. The extension of curved momentum space frameworks to arbitrary spacetime geometries could be relevant for the opportunities to test Planck-scale curvature/deformation of particles momentum space. As a first example of this construction we describe the particle with kappa-Poincar\\'e momentum space on a circular orbit in Schwarzschild spacetime, where the contributes of momentum space curvature turn out to be negligible. The analysis of this problem relies crucially on the solution of the soccer ball problem.

  14. Numerical stability analysis of an acceleration scheme for step size constrained time integrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandekerckhove, Christophe; Roose, Dirk; Lust, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    Time integration schemes with a fixed time step, much smaller than the dominant slow time scales of the dynamics of the system, arise in the context of stiff ordinary differential equations or in multiscale computations, where a microscopic time-stepper is used to compute macroscopic behaviour. We d

  15. Efficient Time-Step Coupling For Hybrid Continuum/Molecular Modelling of Unsteady Micro-Scale Gas Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerby, Duncan A.; Duque-Daza, Carlos A.; Borg, Matthew K.; Reese, Jason M.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we describe a numerical method for the efficient time-accurate coupling of hybrid continuum/molecular micro gas flow solvers. Hybrid approaches are commonly used when non-equilibrium effects in the flow field are spatially localized; in these regions a more accurate, but typically more expensive, solution procedure is adopted. Although this can greatly increase efficiency in steady flows, in unsteady flows the evolution of the solution as a whole is restricted by the maximum time step allowed by the molecular-based/kinetic model; numerically speaking, this is a stiff problem. In the method presented in this paper we exploit time-scale separation, when it exists, to partially decouple the temporal evolution of the two parts of the hybrid model. This affords major computational savings. The method is a modified/extended version of the seamless heterogeneous multiscale method (SHMM). Our approach allows multiple micro steps (molecular steps) before coupling with the macro (continuum) solver: we call this a multi-step SHMM. This maintains the main advantages of SHMM (computational speed-up and flexible application) while improving on accuracy and greatly reducing the number of continuum computations and instances of coupling required. The improved accuracy of the multi-step SHMM is demonstrated for two canonical one-dimensional transient flows (oscillatory Poiseuille and oscillatory Couette flow) and for rarefied-gas oscillatory Poiseuille flow.

  16. One-step fabrication of submicrostructures by low one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique with local thermal effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dam Thuy Trang; Tong, Quang Cong; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Lai, Ngoc Diep, E-mail: nlai@lpqm.ens-cachan.fr [Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Moléculaire, UMR 8537, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, CentraleSupélec, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 94235 Cachan (France)

    2016-01-07

    In this work, local thermal effect induced by a continuous-wave laser has been investigated and exploited to optimize the low one-photon absorption (LOPA) direct laser writing (DLW) technique for fabrication of polymer-based microstructures. It was demonstrated that the temperature of excited SU8 photoresist at the focusing area increases to above 100 °C due to high excitation intensity and becomes stable at that temperature thanks to the use of a continuous-wave laser at 532 nm-wavelength. This optically induced thermal effect immediately completes the crosslinking process at the photopolymerized region, allowing obtain desired structures without using the conventional post-exposure bake (PEB) step, which is usually realized after the exposure. Theoretical calculation of the temperature distribution induced by local optical excitation using finite element method confirmed the experimental results. LOPA-based DLW technique combined with optically induced thermal effect (local PEB) shows great advantages over the traditional PEB, such as simple, short fabrication time, high resolution. In particular, it allowed the overcoming of the accumulation effect inherently existed in optical lithography by one-photon absorption process, resulting in small and uniform structures with very short lattice constant.

  17. Some Results on Fractional Brownian Sheets and Their Local Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-mao Cheng; Zheng-yan Lin

    2008-01-01

    Let BHO={BHO(t),E RN+} be a real-valued fractional Brownian sheet. Define the (N,d)-Ganssian random field BH by where BH1,..., BHd are independent copies of BHO. The existence and joint continuity of local times of BH is proven in some given conditions in [22]. We then study further properties of the local times of BH, such as the moments of increments of local times, the large increments and the maximum moduli of continuity of local times and as a result, we answer the questions posed in [22].

  18. Single-Step Tunable Group Delay Phaser for Real-Time Spectrum Sniffing

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Tongfeng; Chen, Yifan; Wang, Rui; Caloz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a single-step tunable group delay phaser for spectrum sniffing. This device may be seen as a "time filter", where frequencies are suppressed by time separation rather than by spectral attenuation. Compared to its multiple-step counterpart, this phaser features higher processing resolution, greater simplicity, lower loss and better channel equalization, due to the smaller and channel-independent group delay swing. A three-channel example is provided for illustration.

  19. Error Analysis of a Fractional Time-Stepping Technique for Incompressible Flows with Variable Density

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the convergence properties of a new fractional time-stepping technique for the solution of the variable density incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The main feature of this method is that, contrary to other existing algorithms, the pressure is determined by just solving one Poisson equation per time step. First-order error estimates are proved, and stability of a formally second-order variant of the method is established. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  20. GOTHIC: Gravitational oct-tree code accelerated by hierarchical time step controlling

    CERN Document Server

    Miki, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    The tree method is a widely implemented algorithm for collisionless $N$-body simulations in astrophysics well suited for GPU(s). Adopting hierarchical time stepping can accelerate $N$-body simulations; however, it is infrequently implemented and its potential remains untested in GPU implementations. We have developed a Gravitational Oct-Tree code accelerated by HIerarchical time step Controlling named \\texttt{GOTHIC}, which adopts both the tree method and the hierarchical time step. The code adopts some adaptive optimizations by monitoring the execution time of each function on-the-fly and minimizes the time-to-solution by balancing the measured time of multiple functions. Results of performance measurements with realistic particle distribution performed on NVIDIA Tesla M2090, K20X, and GeForce GTX TITAN X, which are representative GPUs of the Fermi, Kepler, and Maxwell generation of GPUs, show that the hierarchical time step achieves a speedup by a factor of around 3--5 times compared to the shared time step...

  1. Using Electromyography to Detect the Weightings of the Local Muscle Factors to the Increase of Perceived Exertion During Stepping Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-Ju Hsu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Rate of perceived exertion (RPE is a clinically convenient indicator for monitoring exercise intensity in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. It might not be sensitive enough for clinicians to determine the patients’ physiological status because its association with the cardiovascular system and local muscle factors is unknown. This study used the electromyographic sensor to detect the local muscle fatigue and stabilization of patella, and analyzed the relationship between various local muscle and cardiovascular factors and the increase of RPE during stepping exercise, a common exercise program provided in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. Ten healthy adults (4 males and 6 females participated in this study. Each subject used their right bare foot to step up onto a 23-cm-high step at a constant speed until the RPE score reached 20. The RPE, heart rate (HR, and surface EMG of the rectus femoris (RF, vastus medialis, and vastus lateralis were recorded at 1-minute intervals during the stepping exercise. The generalized estimating equations (GEE analysis indicated that the increase in RPE significantly correlated with the increase in HR, and decrease in median frequency (MF of the EMG power spectrum of the RF. Experimental results suggest that the increase in RPE during stepping exercise was influenced by the cardiovascular status, localized muscle fatigue in the lower extremities. The weighting of the local muscle factors was more than half of the weighting of the cardiovascular factor.

  2. A multi-step standard-cell placement algorithm of optimizing timing and congestion behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯文婷; 洪先龙; 吴为民; 蔡懿慈

    2002-01-01

    The timing behavior and congestion behavior are two important goals in the performance-driven standard-cell placement. In this paper, we analyze the relationship between the timing and congestion behavior. We bring up a multi-step placement algorithm to reach the two goals. First, the timing-driven placement algorithm is used to find the global optimal solution. In the second step, the algorithm tries to decrease the maximum congestion while not deteriorating the timing behavior. We have implemented our algorithm and tested it with real circuits. The results show that the maximum delay can decrease by 30% in our timing-driven placement and in the second step the maximum congestion will decrease by 10% while the timing behavior is unchanged.

  3. A novel adaptive time stepping variant of the Boris-Buneman integrator for the simulation of particle accelerators with space charge

    CERN Document Server

    Toggweiler, Matthias; Arbenz, Peter; Yang, Jianjun J

    2012-01-01

    We show that adaptive time stepping in particle accelerator simulation is an enhancement for certain problems. The new algorithm has been implemented in the OPAL (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library) framework, and is compared to the existing code. The idea is to adjust the frequency of costly self field calculations, which are needed to model Coulomb interaction (space charge) effects. In analogy to a Kepler orbit simulation that requires a higher time step resolution at the close encounter, we propose to choose the time step based on the magnitude of the space charge forces. Inspired by geometric integration techniques, our algorithm chooses the time step proportional to a function of the current phase space state instead of calculating a local error estimate like a conventional adaptive procedure. In this paper we build up on first observations made in recent work. A more profound argument is given on how exactly the time step should be chosen. An intermediate algorithm, initially built to allow a...

  4. Modeling solute transport in distribution networks with variable demand and time step sizes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, Chad E.; Bilisoly, Roger Lee; Buchberger, Steven G. (University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Yarrington, Lane

    2004-06-01

    The effect of variable demands at short time scales on the transport of a solute through a water distribution network has not previously been studied. We simulate flow and transport in a small water distribution network using EPANET to explore the effect of variable demand on solute transport across a range of hydraulic time step scales from 1 minute to 2 hours. We show that variable demands at short time scales can have the following effects: smoothing of a pulse of tracer injected into a distribution network and increasing the variability of both the transport pathway and transport timing through the network. Variable demands are simulated for these different time step sizes using a previously developed Poisson rectangular pulse (PRP) demand generator that considers demand at a node to be a combination of exponentially distributed arrival times with log-normally distributed intensities and durations. Solute is introduced at a tank and at three different network nodes and concentrations are modeled through the system using the Lagrangian transport scheme within EPANET. The transport equations within EPANET assume perfect mixing of the solute within a parcel of water and therefore physical dispersion cannot occur. However, variation in demands along the solute transport path contribute to both removal and distortion of the injected pulse. The model performance measures examined are the distribution of the Reynolds number, the variation in the center of mass of the solute across time, and the transport path and timing of the solute through the network. Variation in all three performance measures is greatest at the shortest time step sizes. As the scale of the time step increases, the variability in these performance measures decreases. The largest time steps produce results that are inconsistent with the results produced by the smaller time steps.

  5. MASS TRANSFER CONTROL OF A BACKWARD-FACING STEP FLOW BY LOCAL FORCING- EFFECT OF REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zouhaier MEHREZ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of fluid mechanics and mass transfer in separated and reattaching flow over a backward-facing step by a local forcing, is studied using Large Eddy Simulation (LES.To control the flow, the local forcing is realized by a sinusoidal oscillating jet at the step edge. The Reynolds number is varied in the range 10000 ≤ Re≤ 50000 and the Schmidt number is fixed at 1.The found results show that the flow structure is modified and the local mass transfer is enhanced by the applied forcing. The observed changes depend on the Reynolds number and vary with the frequency and amplitude of the local forcing. For the all Reynolds numbers, the largest recirculation zone size reduction is obtained at the optimum forcing frequency St = 0.25. At this frequency the local mass transfer enhancement attains the maximum.

  6. The energy expenditure of stair climbing one step and two steps at a time: estimations from measures of heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Lewis G; Watkins, David A R; Duggan, Brendan M

    2012-01-01

    Stairway climbing provides a ubiquitous and inconspicuous method of burning calories. While typically two strategies are employed for climbing stairs, climbing one stair step per stride or two steps per stride, research to date has not clarified if there are any differences in energy expenditure between them. Fourteen participants took part in two stair climbing trials whereby measures of heart rate were used to estimate energy expenditure during stairway ascent at speeds chosen by the participants. The relationship between rate of oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]) and heart rate was calibrated for each participant using an inclined treadmill. The trials involved climbing up and down a 14.05 m high stairway, either ascending one step per stride or ascending two stair steps per stride. Single-step climbing used 8.5±0.1 kcal min(-1), whereas double step climbing used 9.2±0.1 kcal min(-1). These estimations are similar to equivalent measures in all previous studies, which have all directly measured [Formula: see text] The present study findings indicate that (1) treadmill-calibrated heart rate recordings can be used as a valid alternative to respirometry to ascertain rate of energy expenditure during stair climbing; (2) two step climbing invokes a higher rate of energy expenditure; however, one step climbing is energetically more expensive in total over the entirety of a stairway. Therefore to expend the maximum number of calories when climbing a set of stairs the single-step strategy is better.

  7. The energy expenditure of stair climbing one step and two steps at a time: estimations from measures of heart rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis G Halsey

    Full Text Available Stairway climbing provides a ubiquitous and inconspicuous method of burning calories. While typically two strategies are employed for climbing stairs, climbing one stair step per stride or two steps per stride, research to date has not clarified if there are any differences in energy expenditure between them. Fourteen participants took part in two stair climbing trials whereby measures of heart rate were used to estimate energy expenditure during stairway ascent at speeds chosen by the participants. The relationship between rate of oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text] and heart rate was calibrated for each participant using an inclined treadmill. The trials involved climbing up and down a 14.05 m high stairway, either ascending one step per stride or ascending two stair steps per stride. Single-step climbing used 8.5±0.1 kcal min(-1, whereas double step climbing used 9.2±0.1 kcal min(-1. These estimations are similar to equivalent measures in all previous studies, which have all directly measured [Formula: see text] The present study findings indicate that (1 treadmill-calibrated heart rate recordings can be used as a valid alternative to respirometry to ascertain rate of energy expenditure during stair climbing; (2 two step climbing invokes a higher rate of energy expenditure; however, one step climbing is energetically more expensive in total over the entirety of a stairway. Therefore to expend the maximum number of calories when climbing a set of stairs the single-step strategy is better.

  8. High order single step time delay compensation algorithm for structural active control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王焕定; 耿淑伟; 王伟

    2002-01-01

    The optimal instantaneous high order single step algorithm for active control is first discussed andthen, the n + 1 time step controlling force vector of the instantaneous optimal algorithm is derived from way of ntime state vector. An estimating algorithm, is developed from this to solve the problem of active control withtime delay compensation. The estimating algorithm based on this high order single step β method (HSM) foun-dation, is proven by simulation and experiment analysis, to be a valid solution to problem of active control withtime delay compensation.

  9. Efficient estimation of time-mean states of ocean models using 4D-Var and implicit time-stepping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwisscha van Scheltinga, A.D.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    We propose an efficient method for estimating a time-mean state of an ocean model subject to given observations using implicit time-stepping. The new method uses (i) an implicit implementation of the 4D-Var method to fit the model trajectory to the observations, and (ii) a preprocessor which applies

  10. Resuscitator’s perceptions and time for corrective ventilation steps during neonatal resuscitation☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinay; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Carrion, Vivien; Mathew, Bobby

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2010 neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) guidelines incorporate ventilation corrective steps (using the mnemonic – MRSOPA) into the resuscitation algorithm. The perception of neonatal providers, time taken to perform these maneuvers or the effectiveness of these additional steps has not been evaluated. Methods Using two simulated clinical scenarios of varying degrees of cardiovascular compromise –perinatal asphyxia with (i) bradycardia (heart rate – 40 min−1) and (ii) cardiac arrest, 35 NRP certified providers were evaluated for preference to performing these corrective measures, the time taken for performing these steps and time to onset of chest compressions. Results The average time taken to perform ventilation corrective steps (MRSOPA) was 48.9 ± 21.4 s. Providers were less likely to perform corrective steps and proceed directly to endotracheal intubation in the scenario of cardiac arrest as compared to a state of bradycardia. Cardiac compressions were initiated significantly sooner in the scenario of cardiac arrest 89 ± 24 s as compared to severe bradycardia 122 ± 23 s, p < 0.0001. There were no differences in the time taken to initiation of chest compressions between physicians or mid-level care providers or with the level of experience of the provider. Conclusions Effective ventilation of the lungs with corrective steps using a mask is important in most cases of neonatal resuscitation. Neonatal resuscitators prefer early endotracheal intubation and initiation of chest compressions in the presence of asystolic cardiac arrest. Corrective ventilation steps can potentially postpone initiation of chest compressions and may delay return of spontaneous circulation in the presence of severe cardiovascular compromise. PMID:25796996

  11. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, Jeffery D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Warsa, James S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lowrie, Robert B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Compton scattering is an important aspect of radiative transfer in high energy density applications. In this process, the frequency and direction of a photon are altered by colliding with a free electron. The change in frequency of a scattered photon results in an energy exchange between the photon and target electron and energy coupling between radiation and matter. Canfield, Howard, and Liang have presented a Monte Carlo method for simulating Compton scattering that models the photon-electron collision kinematics exactly. However, implementing their technique in multiphysics problems that include the effects of radiation-matter energy coupling typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value. This explicit evaluation can lead to unstable and oscillatory solutions. In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of this Monte Carlo method and present time-step limits that avoid instabilities and nonphysical oscillations by considering a spatially independent, purely scattering radiative-transfer problem. Examining a simplified problem is justified because it isolates the effects of Compton scattering, and existing Monte Carlo techniques can robustly model other physics (such as absorption, emission, sources, and photon streaming). Our analysis begins by simplifying the equations that are solved via Monte Carlo within each time step using the Fokker-Planck approximation. Next, we linearize these approximate equations about an equilibrium solution such that the resulting linearized equations describe perturbations about this equilibrium. We then solve these linearized equations over a time step and determine the corresponding eigenvalues, quantities that can predict the behavior of solutions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation as a function of time-step size and other physical parameters. With these results, we develop our time-step limits. This approach is similar to our recent investigation of time discretizations for the

  12. Boosting the accuracy and speed of quantum Monte Carlo: size-consistency and time-step

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Gillan, Michael J; Michaelides, Angelos; Alfè, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations for fermions are becoming the standard to provide high quality reference data in systems that are too large to be investigated via quantum chemical approaches. DMC with the fixed-node approximation relies on modifications of the Green function to avoid singularities near the nodal surface of the trial wavefunction. We show that these modifications affect the DMC energies in a way that is not size-consistent, resulting in large time-step errors. Building on the modifications of Umrigar {\\em et al.} and of DePasquale {\\em et al.} we propose a simple Green function modification that restores size-consistency to large values of time-step; substantially reducing the time-step errors. The new algorithm also yields remarkable speedups of up to two orders of magnitude in the calculation of molecule-molecule binding energies and crystal cohesive energies, thus extending the horizons of what is possible with DMC.

  13. Exponential time-differencing with embedded Runge–Kutta adaptive step control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalen, P.; Brio, M.; Moloney, J.V.

    2015-01-01

    We have presented the first embedded Runge–Kutta exponential time-differencing (RKETD) methods of fourth order with third order embedding and fifth order with third order embedding for non-Rosenbrock type nonlinear systems. A procedure for constructing RKETD methods that accounts for both order conditions and stability is outlined. In our stability analysis, the fast time scale is represented by a full linear operator in contrast to particular scalar cases considered before. An effective time-stepping strategy based on reducing both ETD function evaluations and rejected steps is described. Comparisons of performance with adaptive-stepping integrating factor (IF) are carried out on a set of canonical partial differential equations: the shock-fronts of Burgers equation, interacting KdV solitons, KS controlled chaos, and critical collapse of two-dimensional NLS.

  14. Step detection in single-molecule real time trajectories embedded in correlated noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikesh G Arunajadai

    Full Text Available Single-molecule real time trajectories are embedded in high noise. To extract kinetic or dynamic information of the molecules from these trajectories often requires idealization of the data in steps and dwells. One major premise behind the existing single-molecule data analysis algorithms is the gaussian 'white' noise, which displays no correlation in time and whose amplitude is independent on data sampling frequency. This so-called 'white' noise is widely assumed but its validity has not been critically evaluated. We show that correlated noise exists in single-molecule real time trajectories collected from optical tweezers. The assumption of white noise during analysis of these data can lead to serious over- or underestimation of the number of steps depending on the algorithms employed. We present a statistical method that quantitatively evaluates the structure of the underlying noise, takes the noise structure into account, and identifies steps and dwells in a single-molecule trajectory. Unlike existing data analysis algorithms, this method uses Generalized Least Squares (GLS to detect steps and dwells. Under the GLS framework, the optimal number of steps is chosen using model selection criteria such as Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC. Comparison with existing step detection algorithms showed that this GLS method can detect step locations with highest accuracy in the presence of correlated noise. Because this method is automated, and directly works with high bandwidth data without pre-filtering or assumption of gaussian noise, it may be broadly useful for analysis of single-molecule real time trajectories.

  15. Sequential time-step generation companies decisions in oligopolistic electricity market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez-Alcaraz, Guillermo [Programa de Graduados e Investigacion en Ingenieria Electrica, Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica y Electronica del Instituto Tecnologico de Morelia, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2008-05-15

    This paper studies the production decisions of generation companies (GENCOs) which are fully engaged in oligopolistic electricity markets. The model presented is based upon the static equilibrium model solved sequentially in time. By decomposing the problem in time, each time-step is solved independently using a Cournot-like market model. The time dimension is divided into discrete, 1-h time-steps. The model also incorporates the effects of technical and temporal constraints such as time on/off and ramp up/down. Since GENCOs tend toward repetitive decision-making, they can more easily learn from the market. The concept of forward expectations and the lessons derived from the market are introduced, and several numerical examples are provided. (author)

  16. Modified Pressure-Correction Projection Methods: Open Boundary and Variable Time Stepping

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, Andrea

    2014-10-31

    © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. In this paper, we design and study two modifications of the first order standard pressure increment projection scheme for the Stokes system. The first scheme improves the existing schemes in the case of open boundary condition by modifying the pressure increment boundary condition, thereby minimizing the pressure boundary layer and recovering the optimal first order decay. The second scheme allows for variable time stepping. It turns out that the straightforward modification to variable time stepping leads to unstable schemes. The proposed scheme is not only stable but also exhibits the optimal first order decay. Numerical computations illustrating the theoretical estimates are provided for both new schemes.

  17. Time signal filtering by relative neighborhood graph localized linear approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Aasted

    1994-01-01

    A time signal filtering algorithm based on the relative neighborhood graph (RNG) used for localization of linear filters is proposed. The filter is constructed from a training signal during two stages. During the first stage an RNG is constructed. During the second stage, localized linear filters...

  18. SELF-INTERSECTION LOCAL TIME OF ADDITIVE LEVY PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟玉泉; 胡迪鹤

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses the problem of existence of jointly continuous self-process X = {X(t), t ∈ RN+)} which has the decomposition X = X1 X2 ... Xv, eachThey prove that if Nrα> d(r - 1), then a jointly continuous local time of Z, i.e. theself-intersection local time of X, can be obtained.

  19. Double loop control strategy with different time steps based on human characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Gwang Min; Lee, Jinoh; Kim, Jung

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a cooperative control strategy in consideration of the force sensitivity of human. The strategy consists of two loops: one is the intention estimation loop whose sampling time can be variable in order to investigate the effect of the sampling time; the other is the position control loop with fixed time step. A high sampling rate is not necessary for the intention estimation loop due to the bandwidth of the mechanoreceptors in humans. In addition, the force sensor implemented in the robot is sensitive to the noise induced from the sensor itself and tremor of the human. Multiple experiments were performed with the experimental protocol using various time steps of the intention estimation loop to find the suitable sampling times in physical human robot interaction. The task involves pull-and-push movement with a two-degree-of-freedom robot, and the norm of the interaction force was obtained for each experiment as the measure of the cooperative control performance.

  20. Two step processes for meson production at the time of flight spectrometer at cosy.

    CERN Document Server

    Hassan, A M

    2000-01-01

    in this work the contribution of the two step mechanism to the cross section of the reaction pd-> sup 3 He eta is presented in a model calculation. a simple approach is used where relativistic kinematics and empirical cross sections are employed. the on-and off -shell effects and the selective fusion of the baryons to sup 3 He on the velocity matching concept are described . for the first time the folding process includes the angular and energy dependence of the two subsequent steps (step A:pp -> d pi sup + and step B:pi sup + n-> eta p) in the simulation . the angular and energy dependences and the fusion probability of the baryons to a bound baryonic system ( sup 3 He )are used to weigh the events in each corresponding step. the velocity matching is the reason for selective fusion of the baryons to sup 3 He. the angular distribution predicted by the two step processes shows a forward peak of sup 3 He in the center of mass system except in a small range of 0 to 10 MeV excess energy where the cross section is...

  1. Curriculum Type and Sophomore Students' Preparation Time for the USMLE Step 1 Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Boyd F.; Cariaga-Lo, Liza

    1994-01-01

    Seventeen medical students in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum reported that on average they spent twice as much time preparing for step 1 of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination as did 52 students in the traditional lecture-based curriculum at the same school. Different learning approaches were also employed. (SLD)

  2. Dependence of Hurricane Intensity and Structures on Vertical Resolution and Time-Step Size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Lin ZHANG; Xiaoxue WANG

    2003-01-01

    In view of the growing interests in the explicit modeling of clouds and precipitation, the effects of varyingvertical resolution and time-step sizes on the 72-h explicit simulation of Hurricane Andrew (1992) arestudied using the Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU/NCAR)mesoscale model (i.e., MMS) with the finest grid size of 6 km. It is shown that changing vertical resolutionand time-step size has significant effects on hurricane intensity and inner-core cloud/precipitation, butlittle impact on the hurricane track. In general, increasing vertical resolution tends to produce a deeperstorm with lower central pressure and stronger three-dimensional winds, and more precipitation. Similareffects, but to a less extent, occur when the time-step size is reduced. It is found that increasing thelow-level vertical resolution is more efficient in intensifying a hurricane, whereas changing the upper-levelvertical resolution has little impact on the hurricane intensity. Moreover, the use of a thicker surface layertends to produce higher maximum surface winds. It is concluded that the use of higher vertical resolution,a thin surface layer, and smaller time-step sizes, along with higher horizontal resolution, is desirable tomodel more realistically the intensity and inner-core structures and evolution of tropical storms as well asthe other convectively driven weather systems.

  3. Multi time-step wave-front reconstruction for tomographic Adaptive-Optics systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshito H; Oya, Shin; Lardiere, Olivier; Andersen, David R; Correia, Carlos; Jackson, Kate; Bradley, Colin

    2016-01-01

    In tomographic adaptive-optics (AO) systems, errors due to tomographic wave-front reconstruction limit the performance and angular size of the scientific field of view (FoV), where AO correction is effective. We propose a multi time-step tomographic wave-front reconstruction method to reduce the tomographic error by using the measurements from both the current and the previous time-steps simultaneously. We further outline the method to feed the reconstructor with both wind speed and direction of each turbulence layer. An end-to-end numerical simulation, assuming a multi-object AO (MOAO) system on a 30 m aperture telescope, shows that the multi time-step reconstruction increases the Strehl ratio (SR) over a scientific FoV of 10 arcminutes in diameter by a factor of 1.5--1.8 when compared to the classical tomographic reconstructor, depending on the guide star asterism and with perfect knowledge of wind speeds and directions. We also evaluate the multi time-step reconstruction method and the wind estimation meth...

  4. Parallel machine scheduling with step-deteriorating jobs and setup times by a hybrid discrete cuckoo search algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Cheng, Wenming; Wang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    This article considers the parallel machine scheduling problem with step-deteriorating jobs and sequence-dependent setup times. The objective is to minimize the total tardiness by determining the allocation and sequence of jobs on identical parallel machines. In this problem, the processing time of each job is a step function dependent upon its starting time. An individual extended time is penalized when the starting time of a job is later than a specific deterioration date. The possibility of deterioration of a job makes the parallel machine scheduling problem more challenging than ordinary ones. A mixed integer programming model for the optimal solution is derived. Due to its NP-hard nature, a hybrid discrete cuckoo search algorithm is proposed to solve this problem. In order to generate a good initial swarm, a modified Biskup-Hermann-Gupta (BHG) heuristic called MBHG is incorporated into the population initialization. Several discrete operators are proposed in the random walk of Lévy flights and the crossover search. Moreover, a local search procedure based on variable neighbourhood descent is integrated into the algorithm as a hybrid strategy in order to improve the quality of elite solutions. Computational experiments are executed on two sets of randomly generated test instances. The results show that the proposed hybrid algorithm can yield better solutions in comparison with the commercial solver CPLEX® with a one hour time limit, the discrete cuckoo search algorithm and the existing variable neighbourhood search algorithm.

  5. A multiple time stepping algorithm for efficient multiscale modeling of platelets flowing in blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Na; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-03-01

    We developed a multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithm for multiscale modeling of the dynamics of platelets flowing in viscous blood plasma. This MTS algorithm improves considerably the computational efficiency without significant loss of accuracy. This study of the dynamic properties of flowing platelets employs a combination of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and the coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) methods to describe the dynamic microstructures of deformable platelets in response to extracellular flow-induced stresses. The disparate spatial scales between the two methods are handled by a hybrid force field interface. However, the disparity in temporal scales between the DPD and CGMD that requires time stepping at microseconds and nanoseconds respectively, represents a computational challenge that may become prohibitive. Classical MTS algorithms manage to improve computing efficiency by multi-stepping within DPD or CGMD for up to one order of magnitude of scale differential. In order to handle 3-4 orders of magnitude disparity in the temporal scales between DPD and CGMD, we introduce a new MTS scheme hybridizing DPD and CGMD by utilizing four different time stepping sizes. We advance the fluid system at the largest time step, the fluid-platelet interface at a middle timestep size, and the nonbonded and bonded potentials of the platelet structural system at two smallest timestep sizes. Additionally, we introduce parameters to study the relationship of accuracy versus computational complexities. The numerical experiments demonstrated 3000x reduction in computing time over standard MTS methods for solving the multiscale model. This MTS algorithm establishes a computationally feasible approach for solving a particle-based system at multiple scales for performing efficient multiscale simulations.

  6. An implicit time-stepping scheme for rigid body dynamics with Coulomb friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEWART,DAVID; TRINKLE,JEFFREY C.

    2000-02-15

    In this paper a new time-stepping method for simulating systems of rigid bodies is given. Unlike methods which take an instantaneous point of view, the method is based on impulse-momentum equations, and so does not need to explicitly resolve impulsive forces. On the other hand, the method is distinct from previous impulsive methods in that it does not require explicit collision checking and it can handle simultaneous impacts. Numerical results are given for one planar and one three-dimensional example, which demonstrate the practicality of the method, and its convergence as the step size becomes small.

  7. Baby steps: The expanding financial base of local government in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Considine John

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There are two essential elements to this paper. In the first instance, we explore the specific details of revenue and expenditure trends for local authorities over the last decade. The analysis is framed against a longer-term political context of forty years which focuses especially on the weakness of local government in Ireland. Despite an official narrative of financial overdependence on central government, the comparative examination of budgetary records of local authorities reveals considerable diversity in both the revenue and expenditure patterns of authorities across the state. While some authorities are heavily reliant on central government funding, others have a much stronger base of local funding, and indeed the financial crisis since 2008 may have increased these differences. The second dimension to the research is an exploration of the impact of the great recession from 2008 on local government finance in Ireland. Using a framework of new institutionalism, we identify the crisis as another critical moment for local government. We consider the political, economic and administrative variables which have brought local government to a financial crossroads, and we explore the potential for long-lasting financial change in local government, as well as speculating on the nature and outcome of that change.

  8. Exact time-localized solutions in Vacuum String Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bonora, L; Santos, R J S; Tolla, D D

    2004-01-01

    We address the problem of finding star algebra projectors that exhibit localized time profiles. We use the double Wick rotation method, starting from an Euclidean (unconventional) lump solution, which is characterized by the Neumann matrix being the conventional one for the continuous spectrum, while the inverse of the conventional one for the discrete spectrum. This is still a solution of the projector equation and we show that, after inverse Wick-rotation, its time profile has the desired localized time dependence. We study it in detail in the low energy regime (field theory limit) and in the extreme high energy regime (tensionless limit) and show its similarities with the rolling tachyon solution.

  9. Multi-step-prediction of chaotic time series based on co-evolutionary recurrent neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Qian-Li; Zheng Qi-Lun; Peng Hong; Zhong Tan-Wei; Qin Jiang-Wei

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a co-evolutionary recurrent neural network (CERNN) for the multi-step-prediction of chaotic time series,it estimates the proper parameters of phase space reconstruction and optimizes the structure of recurrent neural networks by co-evolutionary strategy.The searching space was separated into two subspaces and the individuals are trained in a parallel computational procedure.It can dynamically combine the embedding method with the capability of recurrent neural network to incorporate past experience due to internal recurrence.The effectiveness of CERNN is evaluated by using three benchmark chaotic time series data sets:the Lorenz series,Mackey-Glass series and real-world sun spot series.The simulation results show that CERNN improves the performances of multi-step-prediction of chaotic time series.

  10. Shock-Timing Experiment Using a Two-Step Radiation Pulse with a Polystyrene Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng; PENG Xiao-Shi; JIAO Chun-Ye; LIU Shen-Ye; JIANG Xiao-Hua; DING Yong-Kun

    2011-01-01

    @@ A shock-timing experiment plays an important role in inertial confinement fusion studies, and the timing of multiple shock waves is crucial to the performance of inertial confinement fusion ignition targets.We present an experimental observation of a shock wave driven by a two-step radiation pulse in a polystyrene target.The experiment is carried out at Shen Guang 11 Yuan Xing (SGNYX) laser facility in China, and the generation and coalescence of the two shock waves, originating from each of the two radiation steps, is clearly seen with two velocity interferometers.This two-shock-wave coalescence is also simulated by the radioactive hydrodynamic code of a multi-1D program.The experimental measurements are compared with the simulations and quite good agreements are found, with relatively small discrepancies in shock timing.

  11. A coupled weather generator - rainfall-runoff approach on hourly time steps for flood risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Benjamin; Schneeberger, Klaus; Dung Nguyen, Viet; Vorogushyn, Sergiy; Huttenlau, Matthias; Merz, Bruno; Stötter, Johann

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation of potential monetary damage of flooding is an essential part of flood risk management. One possibility to estimate the monetary risk is to analyze long time series of observed flood events and their corresponding damages. In reality, however, only few flood events are documented. This limitation can be overcome by the generation of a set of synthetic, physically and spatial plausible flood events and subsequently the estimation of the resulting monetary damages. In the present work, a set of synthetic flood events is generated by a continuous rainfall-runoff simulation in combination with a coupled weather generator and temporal disaggregation procedure for the study area of Vorarlberg (Austria). Most flood risk studies focus on daily time steps, however, the mesoscale alpine study area is characterized by short concentration times, leading to large differences between daily mean and daily maximum discharge. Accordingly, an hourly time step is needed for the simulations. The hourly metrological input for the rainfall-runoff model is generated in a two-step approach. A synthetic daily dataset is generated by a multivariate and multisite weather generator and subsequently disaggregated to hourly time steps with a k-Nearest-Neighbor model. Following the event generation procedure, the negative consequences of flooding are analyzed. The corresponding flood damage for each synthetic event is estimated by combining the synthetic discharge at representative points of the river network with a loss probability relation for each community in the study area. The loss probability relation is based on exposure and susceptibility analyses on a single object basis (residential buildings) for certain return periods. For these impact analyses official inundation maps of the study area are used. Finally, by analyzing the total event time series of damages, the expected annual damage or losses associated with a certain probability of occurrence can be estimated for

  12. Development of a real time activity monitoring Android application utilizing SmartStep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Nagaraj; Melanson, Edward; Sazonov, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Footwear based activity monitoring systems are becoming popular in academic research as well as consumer industry segments. In our previous work, we had presented developmental aspects of an insole based activity and gait monitoring system-SmartStep, which is a socially acceptable, fully wireless and versatile insole. The present work describes the development of an Android application that captures the SmartStep data wirelessly over Bluetooth Low energy (BLE), computes features on the received data, runs activity classification algorithms and provides real time feedback. The development of activity classification methods was based on the the data from a human study involving 4 participants. Participants were asked to perform activities of sitting, standing, walking, and cycling while they wore SmartStep insole system. Multinomial Logistic Discrimination (MLD) was utilized in the development of machine learning model for activity prediction. The resulting classification model was implemented in an Android Smartphone. The Android application was benchmarked for power consumption and CPU loading. Leave one out cross validation resulted in average accuracy of 96.9% during model training phase. The Android application for real time activity classification was tested on a human subject wearing SmartStep resulting in testing accuracy of 95.4%.

  13. A GLOBAL LINEAR AND LOCAL QUADRATIC SINGLE-STEP NONINTERIOR CONTINUATION METHOD FOR MONOTONE SEMIDEFINITE COMPLEMENTARITY PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A noninterior continuation method is proposed for semidefinite complementarity problem (SDCP). This method improves the noninterior continuation methods recently developed for SDCP by Chen and Tseng. The main properties of our method are: (i)it is well defined for the monotones SDCP; (ii) it has to solve just one linear system of equations at each step; (iii) it is shown to be both globally linearly convergent and locally quadratically convergent under suitable assumptions.

  14. Probing Local Environments by Time-Resolved Stimulated Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved stimulated emission spectroscopy was employed to probe the local environment of DASPMI (4-(4-(dimethylaminostyryl-N-methyl-pyridinium iodide in binary solvents of different viscosity and in a sol-gel matrix. DASPMI is one of the molecules of choice to probe local environments, and the dependence of its fluorescence emission decay on viscosity has been previously used for this purpose in biological samples, solid matrices as well as in solution. The results presented in this paper show that time-resolved stimulated emission of DASPMI is a suitable means to probe the viscosity of local environments. Having the advantage of a higher time resolution, stimulated emission can provide information that is complementary to that obtained from fluorescence decay measurements, making it feasible to probe systems with lower viscosity.

  15. Direct Observations of PMC Local Time Variations by Aura OMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite obtains unique measurements for polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) analysis. Its wide cross-track viewing swath and high along-track spatial resolution makes it possible to directly evaluate PMC occurrence frequency and brightness variations between 6S" and 8S' latitude as a function of local time over a 12-14 h continuous period. OMI PMC local time variations are closely coupled to concurrent variations in measurement scattering angle, so that ice phase function effects must be considered when interpreting the observations. Two different phase functions corresponding to bright and faint clouds are examined in this analysis. OMI observations show maximum frequency and albedo values at 8-10 h local time in the Northern Hemisphere, with decreasing amplitude at higher latitudes. Southern Hemisphere values reach a minimum at 18-20 h LT. Larger variations are seen in Northern Hemisphere data. No statistically significant longitudinal dependence was seen.

  16. Direct Observations of PMC Local Time Variations by Aura OMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite obtains unique measurements for polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) analysis. Its wide cross-track viewing swath and high along-track spatial resolution makes it possible to directly evaluate PMC occurrence frequency and brightness variations between 6S" and 8S' latitude as a function of local time over a 12-14 h continuous period. OMI PMC local time variations are closely coupled to concurrent variations in measurement scattering angle, so that ice phase function effects must be considered when interpreting the observations. Two different phase functions corresponding to bright and faint clouds are examined in this analysis. OMI observations show maximum frequency and albedo values at 8-10 h local time in the Northern Hemisphere, with decreasing amplitude at higher latitudes. Southern Hemisphere values reach a minimum at 18-20 h LT. Larger variations are seen in Northern Hemisphere data. No statistically significant longitudinal dependence was seen.

  17. Solar wind control of the local time of substorm onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocott, Adrian; Case, Nathan; Laundal, Karl; Laurens, Hannah; Milan, Steve

    2017-04-01

    We use solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data, along with satellite global auroral imagery, to investigate what controls the magnetic local time (MLT) of substorm onset. We find that substorm onsets occur over a wide range of MLTs (18 - 4 hrs), with a typical MLT (mode) of 23 hrs. In agreement with previous studies, IMF BY , acts to move the onset to an earlier/later local time in the northern hemisphere and a later/earlier local time in the southern hemisphere, depending on the sign of BY , consistent with a twist of the conjugate magnetic field line. This effect explains a small fraction of the observed MLT variation (˜ 1 hr), but cannot account for the tendency of onset to be often displaced to earlier ( 23 hrs) MLTs in both hemispheres. We also inspect the relationship between solar wind V Y and onset MLT, which also has a small, but measurable effect on the local time of substorm onset. This effect acts in the same sense in the northern and southern hemispheres, moving onset to earlier times for positive V Y and later times for negative V Y . We find that a function relating both BY and V Y to onset MLT produces a better fit than a function based on either parameter alone.

  18. Block Time Step Storage Scheme for Astrophysical N-body Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Maxwell Xu; Kouwenhoven, M B N; Assmann, Paulina; Spurzem, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical research in recent decades has made significant progress thanks to the availability of various $N$-body simulation techniques. With the rapid development of high-performance computing technologies, modern simulations have been able to take the computing power of massively parallel clusters with more than $10^5$ GPU cores. While unprecedented accuracy and dynamical scales have been achieved, the enormous amount of data being generated continuously poses great challenges for the subsequent procedures of data analysis and archiving. As an urgent response to these challenges, in this paper we propose an adaptive storage scheme for simulation data, inspired by the block time step integration scheme found in a number of direct $N$-body integrators available nowadays. The proposed scheme, namely the block time step storage scheme, works by minimizing the data redundancy with assignments of data with individual output frequencies as required by the researcher. As demonstrated by benchmarks, the proposed...

  19. Schwarz type domain decomposition and subcycling multi-time step approach for solving Richards equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraz, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Modelling the transport processes in a vadose zone, e.g. modelling contaminant transport or the effect of the soil water regime on changes in soil structure and composition, plays an important role in predicting the reactions of soil biotopes to anthropogenic activity. Water flow is governed by the quasilinear Richards equation. The paper concerns the implementation of a multi-time-step approach for solving a nonlinear Richards equation. When modelling porous media flow with a Richards equation, due to a possible convection dominance and a convergence of a nonlinear solver, a stable finite element approximation requires accurate temporal and spatial integration. The method presented here enables adaptive domain decomposition algorithm together with a multi-time-step treatment of actively changing subdomains.

  20. Error correction in short time steps during the application of quantum gates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, L.A. de, E-mail: leonardo.castro@usp.br; Napolitano, R.D.J.

    2016-04-15

    We propose a modification of the standard quantum error-correction method to enable the correction of errors that occur due to the interaction with a noisy environment during quantum gates without modifying the codification used for memory qubits. Using a perturbation treatment of the noise that allows us to separate it from the ideal evolution of the quantum gate, we demonstrate that in certain cases it is necessary to divide the logical operation in short time steps intercalated by correction procedures. A prescription of how these gates can be constructed is provided, as well as a proof that, even for the cases when the division of the quantum gate in short time steps is not necessary, this method may be advantageous for reducing the total duration of the computation.

  1. Global Phenomena from Local Rules: Peer-to-Peer Networks and Crystal Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    degree of Doctor of Philosophy 2007 Advisory Committee: Professor James Yorke, Chair/Advisor Professor Brian Hunt, Co-Advisor Professor Dionisios Margetis...Massachusetts, USA, June 2007. [62] Pak-Wing Fok, Rodolfo R. Rosales, and Dionisios Margetis. Unification of step bunching phenomena on vicinal...vicinal substrates. Physical Review Letters, 89(6):1268–1271, February 1998. [73] Dionisios Margetis, Michael J. Aziz, and Howard A. Stone. Continuum

  2. Derivation and application of time step model in solidification process simulation

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The heat transfer during the casting solidification process includes the heat radiation of the high temperature casting and the mold, the heat convection between the casting and the mold, and the heat conduction inside the casting and from the casting to the mold. In this paper, a formula of time step in simulation of solidification is derived, considering the heat radiation, convection and conduction based on the conservation of energy. The different heat transfer conditions between the conv...

  3. Multiple Time-Step Dual-Hamiltonian Hybrid Molecular Dynamics - Monte Carlo Canonical Propagation Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunjie; Kale, Seyit; Weare, Jonathan; Dinner, Aaron R; Roux, Benoît

    2016-04-12

    A multiple time-step integrator based on a dual Hamiltonian and a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) is proposed to sample systems in the canonical ensemble. The Dual Hamiltonian Multiple Time-Step (DHMTS) algorithm is based on two similar Hamiltonians: a computationally expensive one that serves as a reference and a computationally inexpensive one to which the workload is shifted. The central assumption is that the difference between the two Hamiltonians is slowly varying. Earlier work has shown that such dual Hamiltonian multiple time-step schemes effectively precondition nonlinear differential equations for dynamics by reformulating them into a recursive root finding problem that can be solved by propagating a correction term through an internal loop, analogous to RESPA. Of special interest in the present context, a hybrid MD-MC version of the DHMTS algorithm is introduced to enforce detailed balance via a Metropolis acceptance criterion and ensure consistency with the Boltzmann distribution. The Metropolis criterion suppresses the discretization errors normally associated with the propagation according to the computationally inexpensive Hamiltonian, treating the discretization error as an external work. Illustrative tests are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  4. Variable time-stepping in the pathwise numerical solution of the chemical Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Silvana

    2012-12-21

    Stochastic modeling is essential for an accurate description of the biochemical network dynamics at the level of a single cell. Biochemically reacting systems often evolve on multiple time-scales, thus their stochastic mathematical models manifest stiffness. Stochastic models which, in addition, are stiff and computationally very challenging, therefore the need for developing effective and accurate numerical methods for approximating their solution. An important stochastic model of well-stirred biochemical systems is the chemical Langevin Equation. The chemical Langevin equation is a system of stochastic differential equation with multidimensional non-commutative noise. This model is valid in the regime of large molecular populations, far from the thermodynamic limit. In this paper, we propose a variable time-stepping strategy for the numerical solution of a general chemical Langevin equation, which applies for any level of randomness in the system. Our variable stepsize method allows arbitrary values of the time-step. Numerical results on several models arising in applications show significant improvement in accuracy and efficiency of the proposed adaptive scheme over the existing methods, the strategies based on halving/doubling of the stepsize and the fixed step-size ones.

  5. Localization on $AdS_2\\times S^1$

    CERN Document Server

    David, Justin R; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Narain, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Conformal symmetry relates the metric on $AdS_2 \\times S^{1}$ to that of $S^3$. This implies that under a suitable choice of boundary conditions for fields on $AdS_2$ the partition function of conformal field theories on these spaces must agree which makes $AdS_2 \\times S^{1}$ a good testing ground to study localization on non-compact spaces. We study supersymmetry on $AdS_2\\times S^1$ and determine the localizing Lagrangian for ${\\cal N}=2$ supersymmetric Chern-Simons theory on $AdS_2\\times S^1$. We evaluate the partition function of ${\\cal N}=2$ supersymmetric Chern-Simons theory on $AdS_2 \\times S^1$ using localization, where the radius of $S^1$ is $q$ times that of $AdS_2$. With boundary conditions on $AdS_2\\times S^1$ which ensure that all the physical fields are normalizable and lie in the space of square integrable wave functions in $AdS_2$, the result for the partition function precisely agrees with that of the theory on the $q$-fold covering of $S^3$.

  6. Some Theorems on Feller Processes: Transience, Local Times and Ultracontractivity

    CERN Document Server

    Schilling, René L

    2011-01-01

    We present sufficient conditions for the transience and the existence of local times of a Feller process, and the ultracontractivity of the associated Feller semigroup; these conditions are sharp for L\\'{e}vy processes. The proof uses a local symmetrization technique and a uniform upper bound for the characteristic function of a Feller process. As a byproduct, we obtain for stable-like processes (in the sense of R.\\ Bass) on $\\R^d$ with smooth variable index $\\alpha(x)\\in(0,2)$ a transience criterion in terms of the exponent $\\alpha(x)$; if $d=1$ and $\\inf_{x\\in\\R} \\alpha(x)\\in (1,2)$, then the stable-like process has local times.

  7. A novel adaptive time stepping variant of the Boris–Buneman integrator for the simulation of particle accelerators with space charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toggweiler, Matthias, E-mail: rmf7@m4t.ch [ETH Zürich, Computer Science Department, Universitätsstrasse 6, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5234 Villigen (Switzerland); MIT, Department of Physics, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, MA 02139 (United States); Adelmann, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.adelmann@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5234 Villigen (Switzerland); Arbenz, Peter, E-mail: arbenz@inf.ethz.ch [ETH Zürich, Computer Science Department, Universitätsstrasse 6, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Yang, Jianjun, E-mail: jianjun.yang@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5234 Villigen (Switzerland); China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, 102413 (China)

    2014-09-15

    We show that adaptive time stepping in particle accelerator simulation is an enhancement for certain problems. The new algorithm has been implemented in the OPAL (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library) framework. The idea is to adjust the frequency of costly self-field calculations, which are needed to model Coulomb interaction (space charge) effects. In analogy to a Kepler orbit simulation that requires a higher time step resolution at the close encounter, we propose to choose the time step based on the magnitude of the space charge forces. Inspired by geometric integration techniques, our algorithm chooses the time step proportional to a function of the current phase space state instead of calculating a local error estimate like a conventional adaptive procedure. Building on recent work, a more profound argument is given on how exactly the time step should be chosen. An intermediate algorithm, initially built to allow a clearer analysis by introducing separate time steps for external field and self-field integration, turned out to be useful by its own, for a large class of problems.

  8. Real-Time, Single-Step Bioassay Using Nanoplasmonic Resonator With Ultra-High Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang (Inventor); Ellman, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Fanqing Frank (Inventor); Su, Kai-Hang (Inventor); Wei, Qi-Huo (Inventor); Sun, Cheng (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A nanoplasmonic resonator (NPR) comprising a metallic nanodisk with alternating shielding layer(s), having a tagged biomolecule conjugated or tethered to the surface of the nanoplasmonic resonator for highly sensitive measurement of enzymatic activity. NPRs enhance Raman signals in a highly reproducible manner, enabling fast detection of protease and enzyme activity, such as Prostate Specific Antigen (paPSA), in real-time, at picomolar sensitivity levels. Experiments on extracellular fluid (ECF) from paPSA-positive cells demonstrate specific detection in a complex bio-fluid background in real-time single-step detection in very small sample volumes.

  9. Real-time, single-step bioassay using nanoplasmonic resonator with ultra-high sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang; Ellman, Jonathan A; Chen, Fanqing Frank; Su, Kai-Hang; Wei, Qi-Huo; Sun, Cheng

    2014-04-01

    A nanoplasmonic resonator (NPR) comprising a metallic nanodisk with alternating shielding layer(s), having a tagged biomolecule conjugated or tethered to the surface of the nanoplasmonic resonator for highly sensitive measurement of enzymatic activity. NPRs enhance Raman signals in a highly reproducible manner, enabling fast detection of protease and enzyme activity, such as Prostate Specific Antigen (paPSA), in real-time, at picomolar sensitivity levels. Experiments on extracellular fluid (ECF) from paPSA-positive cells demonstrate specific detection in a complex bio-fluid background in real-time single-step detection in very small sample volumes.

  10. Single-step propagators for calculation of time evolution in quantum systems with arbitrary interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonoskov, Ivan; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-05-01

    We propose and develop a general method of numerical calculation of the wave function time evolution in a quantum system which is described by Hamiltonian of an arbitrary dimensionality and with arbitrary interactions. For this, we obtain a general n-order single-step propagator in closed-form, which could be used for the numerical solving of the problem with any prescribed accuracy. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by considering a quantum problem with non-separable time-dependent Hamiltonian: the propagation of an electron in focused electromagnetic field with vortex electric field component.

  11. Local-in-Time Adjoint-Based Method for Optimal Control/Design Optimization of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    .We study local-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of ow matching functionals subject to the 2-D unsteady compressible Euler equations. The key idea of the local-in-time method is to construct a very accurate approximation of the global-in-time adjoint equations and the corresponding sensitivity derivative by using only local information available on each time subinterval. In contrast to conventional time-dependent adjoint-based optimization methods which require backward-in-time integration of the adjoint equations over the entire time interval, the local-in-time method solves local adjoint equations sequentially over each time subinterval. Since each subinterval contains relatively few time steps, the storage cost of the local-in-time method is much lower than that of the global adjoint formulation, thus making the time-dependent optimization feasible for practical applications. The paper presents a detailed comparison of the local- and global-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of a tracking functional governed by the Euler equations describing the ow around a circular bump. Our numerical results show that the local-in-time method converges to the same optimal solution obtained with the global counterpart, while drastically reducing the memory cost as compared to the global-in-time adjoint formulation.

  12. Effect of Velocity and Time-Step on the Continuity of a Discrete Moving Sound Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Seki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a basic study into 3-D audio display systems, this paper reports the conditions of moving sound image velocity and time-step where a discrete moving sound image is perceived as continuous motion. In this study, the discrete moving sound image was presented through headphones and ran along the ear-axis. The experiments tested the continuity of a discrete moving sound image using various conditions of velocity (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3, and 4 m/s and time-step (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.10, 0.12, and 0.14 s. As a result, the following were required in order to present the discrete moving sound image as continuous movement. (1 The 3-D audio display system was required to complete the sound image presentation process, including head tracking and HRTF simulation, in a time shorter than 0.02 s, in order to present sound image movement at all velocities. (2 A processing time longer than 0.1 s was not acceptable. (3 If the 3-D audio display system only presented very slow movement (less than about 0.5 m/s, processing times ranging from 0.04 s to 0.06 s were still acceptable.

  13. A double-step Savonius rotor for local production of electricity: a design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menet, J.L. [Valenciennes Univ. (France). Groupe de Recherche Energies et Environnement

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a study, carried out with the help of the French Agency of Innovation (ANVAR). It deals with the conception of a small Savonius rotor (i.e. of low power) for local production of electricity. Our challenge was to design, develop and ultimately build a prototype of such a rotor, which was considered as a complete electromechanical system. An optimised configuration was chosen for the geometry of the present prototype. The building data were calculated on the basis of the nominal wind velocity V=10 m/s. Particular care was necessary to choose the appropriate generator, which was finally a rewound conventional car alternator. The whole design of the prototype has confirmed the high efficiency and the low technicality of the Savonius rotors for local production of electricity. The present prototype is to be tested in situ. (author)

  14. Combined Effects of Numerical Method Type and Time Step on Water Stressed Actual Crop ET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ghahraman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Actual crop evapotranspiration (Eta is important in hydrologic modeling and irrigation water management issues. Actual ET depends on an estimation of a water stress index and average soil water at crop root zone, and so depends on a chosen numerical method and adapted time step. During periods with no rainfall and/or irrigation, actual ET can be computed analytically or by using different numerical methods. Overal, there are many factors that influence actual evapotranspiration. These factors are crop potential evapotranspiration, available root zone water content, time step, crop sensitivity, and soil. In this paper different numerical methods are compared for different soil textures and different crops sensitivities. Materials and Methods: During a specific time step with no rainfall or irrigation, change in soil water content would be equal to evapotranspiration, ET. In this approach, however, deep percolation is generally ignored due to deep water table and negligible unsaturated hydraulic conductivity below rooting depth. This differential equation may be solved analytically or numerically considering different algorithms. We adapted four different numerical methods, as explicit, implicit, and modified Euler, midpoint method, and 3-rd order Heun method to approximate the differential equation. Three general soil types of sand, silt, and clay, and three different crop types of sensitive, moderate, and resistant under Nishaboor plain were used. Standard soil fraction depletion (corresponding to ETc=5 mm.d-1, pstd, below which crop faces water stress is adopted for crop sensitivity. Three values for pstd were considered in this study to cover the common crops in the area, including winter wheat and barley, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beet, saffron, among the others. Based on this parameter, three classes for crop sensitivity was considered, sensitive crops with pstd=0.2, moderate crops with pstd=0.5, and resistive crops with pstd=0

  15. VARIABLE STEP-SIZE IMPLICIT-EXPLICIT LINEAR MULTISTEP METHODS FOR TIME-DEPENDENT PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Wang; Steven J. Ruuth

    2008-01-01

    Implicit-explicit (IMEX) linear multistep methods are popular techniques for solving partial differential equations (PDEs) with terms of different types. While fixed time-step versions of such schemes have been developed and studied, implicit-explicit schemes also naturally arise in general situations where the temporal smoothness of the solution changes. In this paper we consider easily implementable variable step-size implicit-explicit (VSIMEX) linear multistep methods for time-dependent PDEs. Families of order-p, p-step VSIMEX schemes are constructed and analyzed, where p ranges from 1 to 4. The corresponding schemes are simple to implement and have the property that they reduce to the classical IMEX schemes whenever constant time step-sizes are imposed. The methods are validated on the Burgers' equation. These results demonstrate that by varying the time step-size, VSIMEX methods can outperform their fixed time step counterparts while still maintaining good numerical behavior.

  16. Rapid expansion method (REM) for time‐stepping in reverse time migration (RTM)

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Reynam C.

    2009-01-01

    We show that the wave equation solution using a conventional finite‐difference scheme, derived commonly by the Taylor series approach, can be derived directly from the rapid expansion method (REM). After some mathematical manipulation we consider an analytical approximation for the Bessel function where we assume that the time step is sufficiently small. From this derivation we find that if we consider only the first two Chebyshev polynomials terms in the rapid expansion method we can obtain the second order time finite‐difference scheme that is frequently used in more conventional finite‐difference implementations. We then show that if we use more terms from the REM we can obtain a more accurate time integration of the wave field. Consequently, we have demonstrated that the REM is more accurate than the usual finite‐difference schemes and it provides a wave equation solution which allows us to march in large time steps without numerical dispersion and is numerically stable. We illustrate the method with post and pre stack migration results.

  17. Sensitivity of The High-resolution Wam Model With Respect To Time Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemets, K.; Soomere, T.

    The northern part of the Baltic Proper and its subbasins (Bothnian Sea, the Gulf of Finland, Moonsund) serve as a challenge for wave modellers. In difference from the southern and the eastern parts of the Baltic Sea, their coasts are highly irregular and contain many peculiarities with the characteristic horizontal scale of the order of a few kilometres. For example, the northern coast of the Gulf of Finland is extremely ragged and contains a huge number of small islands. Its southern coast is more or less regular but has up to 50m high cliff that is frequently covered by high forests. The area also contains numerous banks that have water depth a couple of meters and that may essentially modify wave properties near the banks owing to topographical effects. This feature suggests that a high-resolution wave model should be applied for the region in question, with a horizontal resolution of an order of 1 km or even less. According to the Courant-Friedrich-Lewy criterion, the integration time step for such models must be of the order of a few tens of seconds. A high-resolution WAM model turns out to be fairly sensitive with respect to the particular choice of the time step. In our experiments, a medium-resolution model for the whole Baltic Sea was used, with the horizontal resolution 3 miles (3' along latitudes and 6' along longitudes) and the angular resolution 12 directions. The model was run with steady wind blowing 20 m/s from different directions and with two time steps (1 and 3 minutes). For most of the wind directions, the rms. difference of significant wave heights calculated with differ- ent time steps did not exceed 10 cm and typically was of the order of a few per cents. The difference arose within a few tens of minutes and generally did not increase in further computations. However, in the case of the north wind, the difference increased nearly monotonously and reached 25-35 cm (10-15%) within three hours of integra- tion whereas mean of significant wave

  18. Image-Guided Non-Local Dense Matching with Three-Steps Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Zhang, Yongjun; Yue, Zhaoxi

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a new image-guided non-local dense matching algorithm that focuses on how to solve the following problems: 1) mitigating the influence of vertical parallax to the cost computation in stereo pairs; 2) guaranteeing the performance of dense matching in homogeneous intensity regions with significant disparity changes; 3) limiting the inaccurate cost propagated from depth discontinuity regions; 4) guaranteeing that the path between two pixels in the same region is connected; and 5) defining the cost propagation function between the reliable pixel and the unreliable pixel during disparity interpolation. This paper combines the Census histogram and an improved histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) feature together as the cost metrics, which are then aggregated based on a new iterative non-local matching method and the semi-global matching method. Finally, new rules of cost propagation between the valid pixels and the invalid pixels are defined to improve the disparity interpolation results. The results of our experiments using the benchmarks and the Toronto aerial images from the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) show that the proposed new method can outperform most of the current state-of-the-art stereo dense matching methods.

  19. Perturbed Strong Stability Preserving Time-Stepping Methods For Hyperbolic PDEs

    KAUST Repository

    Hadjimichael, Yiannis

    2017-09-30

    A plethora of physical phenomena are modelled by hyperbolic partial differential equations, for which the exact solution is usually not known. Numerical methods are employed to approximate the solution to hyperbolic problems; however, in many cases it is difficult to satisfy certain physical properties while maintaining high order of accuracy. In this thesis, we develop high-order time-stepping methods that are capable of maintaining stability constraints of the solution, when coupled with suitable spatial discretizations. Such methods are called strong stability preserving (SSP) time integrators, and we mainly focus on perturbed methods that use both upwind- and downwind-biased spatial discretizations. Firstly, we introduce a new family of third-order implicit Runge–Kuttas methods with arbitrarily large SSP coefficient. We investigate the stability and accuracy of these methods and we show that they perform well on hyperbolic problems with large CFL numbers. Moreover, we extend the analysis of SSP linear multistep methods to semi-discretized problems for which different terms on the right-hand side of the initial value problem satisfy different forward Euler (or circle) conditions. Optimal perturbed and additive monotonicity-preserving linear multistep methods are studied in the context of such problems. Optimal perturbed methods attain augmented monotonicity-preserving step sizes when the different forward Euler conditions are taken into account. On the other hand, we show that optimal SSP additive methods achieve a monotonicity-preserving step-size restriction no better than that of the corresponding non-additive SSP linear multistep methods. Furthermore, we develop the first SSP linear multistep methods of order two and three with variable step size, and study their optimality. We describe an optimal step-size strategy and demonstrate the effectiveness of these methods on various one- and multi-dimensional problems. Finally, we establish necessary conditions

  20. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelyan, Igor, E-mail: omelyan@ualberta.ca, E-mail: omelyan@icmp.lviv.ua [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G8 (Canada); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii Street, Lviv 79011 (Ukraine); Kovalenko, Andriy, E-mail: andriy.kovalenko@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G8 (Canada)

    2013-12-28

    steered by effective solvation forces allows huge outer time steps up to tens of picoseconds without affecting the equilibrium and conformational properties, and thus provides a 100- to 500-fold effective speedup in comparison to conventional MD with explicit solvent. With the statistical-mechanical 3D-RISM-KH account for effective solvation forces, the method provides efficient sampling of biomolecular processes with slow and/or rare solvation events such as conformational transitions of hydrated alanine dipeptide with the mean life times ranging from 30 ps up to 10 ns for “flip-flop” conformations, and is particularly beneficial for biomolecular systems with exchange and localization of solvent and ions, ligand binding, and molecular recognition.

  1. On the local time of random processes in random scenery

    CERN Document Server

    Castell, Fabienne; Pène, Françoise; Schapira, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Random walks in random scenery are processes defined by $Z_n:=\\sum_{k=1}^n\\xi_{X_1+...+X_k}$, where basically $(X_k,k\\ge 1)$ and $(\\xi_y,y\\in\\mathbb Z)$ are two independent sequences of i.i.d. random variables. We assume here that $X_1$ is $\\ZZ$-valued, centered and with finite moments of all orders. We also assume that $\\xi_0$ is $\\ZZ$-valued, centered and square integrable. In this case H. Kesten and F. Spitzer proved that $(n^{-3/4}Z_{[nt]},t\\ge 0)$ converges in distribution as $n\\to \\infty$ toward some self-similar process $(\\Delta_t,t\\ge 0)$ called Brownian motion in random scenery. In a previous paper, we established that ${\\mathbb P}(Z_n=0)$ behaves asymptotically like a constant times $n^{-3/4}$, as $n\\to \\infty$. We extend here this local limit theorem: we give a precise asymptotic result for the probability for $Z$ to return to zero simultaneously at several times. As a byproduct of our computations, we show that $\\Delta$ admits a bi-continuous version of its local time process which is locally H\\"o...

  2. Local dimension and finite time prediction in coupled map lattices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Muruganandam; G Francisco

    2005-03-01

    Forecasting, for obvious reasons, often become the most important goal to be achieved. For spatially extended systems (e.g. atmospheric system) where the local nonlinearities lead to the most unpredictable chaotic evolution, it is highly desirable to have a simple diagnostic tool to identify regions of predictable behaviour. In this paper, we discuss the use of the bred vector (BV) dimension, a recently introduced statistics, to identify the regimes where a finite time forecast is feasible. Using the tools from dynamical systems theory and Bayesian modelling, we show the finite time predictability in two-dimensional coupled map lattices in the regions of low BV dimension.

  3. One-step ahead prediction of foF2 using time series forecasting techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Belehaki

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problem of one-step ahead prediction of the critical frequency (foF2 of the middle-latitude ionosphere, using time series forecasting methods, is considered. The whole study is based on a sample of about 58000 observations of foF2 with 15-min time resolution, derived from the Athens digisonde ionograms taken from the Digisonde Portable Sounder (DPS4 located at Palaia Penteli (38° N, 23.5° E, for the period from October 2002 to May 2004. First, the embedding dimension of the dynamical system that generates the above sample is estimated using the false nearest neighbor method. This information is then utilized for the training of the predictors employed in this study, which are the linear predictor, the neural network predictor, the persistence predictor and the k-nearest neighbor predictor. The results obtained by the above predictors suggest that, as far as the mean square error is considered as performance criterion, the first two predictors are significantly better than the latter two predictors. In addition, the results obtained by the linear and the neural network predictors are not significantly different from each other. This may be taken as an indication that a linear model suffices for one step ahead prediction of foF2.

  4. Detection of Zika virus by SYBR green one-step real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-Yue; Liu, Si-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has rapidly spread to new areas of Americas, which were the first transmissions outside its traditional endemic areas in Africa and Asia. Due to the link with newborn defects and neurological disorder, numerous infected cases throughout the world and various mosquito vectors, the virus has been considered to be an international public health emergency. In the present study, we developed a SYBR Green based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid detection of ZIKV. Our results revealed that the real-time assay is highly specific and sensitive in detection of ZIKV in cell samples. Importantly, the replication of ZIKV at different time points in infected cells could be rapidly monitored by the real-time RT-PCR assay. Specifically, the real-time RT-PCR showed acceptable performance in measurement of infectious ZIKV RNA. This assay could detect ZIKV at a titer as low as 1PFU/mL. The real-time RT-PCR assay could be a useful tool for further virology surveillance and diagnosis of ZIKV.

  5. Critical time step for a bilinear laminated composite Mindlin shell element.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerand, Daniel Carl

    2004-06-01

    The critical time step needed for explicit time integration of laminated shell finite element models is presented. Each layer is restricted to be orthotropic when viewed from a properly oriented material coordinate system. Mindlin shell theory is used in determining the laminated response that includes the effects of transverse shear. The effects of the membrane-bending coupling matrix from the laminate material model are included. Such a coupling matrix arises even in the case of non-symmetric lay-ups of differing isotropic layers. Single point integration is assumed to be used in determining a uniform strain response from the element. Using a technique based upon one from the literature, reduced eigenvalue problems are established to determine the remaining non-zero frequencies. It is shown that the eigenvalue problem arising from the inplane normal and shear stresses is decoupled from that arising from the transverse shear stresses. A verification example is presented where the exact and approximate results are compared.

  6. Collaborative Methods for Real-time Localization in Urban Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Peyraud

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an effective solution for the localization of a vehicle in dense urban areas where GNSS-based methods fail because of poor satellite visibility. It advocates the use of a visual-based method processing georeferenced landmarks obtained after a learning path and stored in a new layer of the geographical information system (GIS used for navigation. Real-time localization gives, with few failures, accurate results in the areas covered by the GIS. The integrity of the localization is obtained by running another algorithm in parallel, processing odometric data combined with the geometric model of the drivable area and, when available, GNSS data in tight coupling. An ellipsoidal confidence domain is updated by using both extended Kalman filtering (EKF and set-membership estimation. Although less accurate, this estimation is reliable and, when the visual method fails, the availability of a confidence domain enables us to speed up the restart of the visual method while navigating cautiously. A large-scale experiment (>4 km was conducted in the centre of Paris. We compare the absolute localization results with the ground truth obtained by combining RTK-GPS and a high-end inertial measurement unit (IMU.

  7. Accuracy of sun localization in the second step of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation for north determination: a planetarium experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Alexandra; Száz, Dénes; Egri, Ádám; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, András; Nehéz, Dóra; Bernáth, Balázs; Horváth, Gábor

    2014-07-01

    It is a widely discussed hypothesis that Viking seafarers might have been able to locate the position of the occluded sun by means of dichroic or birefringent crystals, the mysterious sunstones, with which they could analyze skylight polarization. Although the atmospheric optical prerequisites and certain aspects of the efficiency of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation have been investigated, the accuracy of the main steps of this method has not been quantitatively examined. To fill in this gap, we present here the results of a planetarium experiment in which we measured the azimuth and elevation errors of localization of the invisible sun. In the planetarium sun localization was performed in two selected celestial points on the basis of the alignments of two small sections of two celestial great circles passing through the sun. In the second step of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation the navigator needed to determine the intersection of two such celestial circles. We found that the position of the sun (solar elevation θ(S), solar azimuth φ(S)) was estimated with an average error of +0.6°≤Δθ≤+8.8° and -3.9°≤Δφ≤+2.0°. We also calculated the compass direction error when the estimated sun position is used for orienting with a Viking sun-compass. The northern direction (ω(North)) was determined with an error of -3.34°≤Δω(North)≤+6.29°. The inaccuracy of the second step of this navigation method was high (Δω(North)=-16.3°) when the solar elevation was 5°≤θ(S)≤25°, and the two selected celestial points were far from the sun (at angular distances 95°≤γ(1), γ(2)≤115°) and each other (125°≤δ≤145°). Considering only this second step, the sky-polarimetric navigation could be more accurate in the mid-summer period (June and July), when in the daytime the sun is high above the horizon for long periods. In the spring (and autumn) equinoctial period, alternative methods (using a twilight board, for example) might be more

  8. Development of real time diagnostics and feedback algorithms for JET in view of the next step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murari, A.; Barana, O. [Consorzio RFX Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padua (Italy); Felton, R.; Zabeo, L.; Piccolo, F.; Sartori, F. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Assoc., Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E.; Mazon, D.; Laborde, L.; Moreau, D. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Albanese, R. [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, Univ. Mediterranea RC (Italy); Arena, P.; Bruno, M. [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, Univ.di Catania (Italy); Ambrosino, G.; Ariola, M. [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, Univ. Napoli Federico Napoli (Italy); Crisanti, F. [Associazone EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati (Italy); Luna, E. de la; Sanchez, J. [Associacion EURATOM CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Real time control of many plasma parameters will be an essential aspect in the development of reliable high performance operation of Next Step Tokamaks. The main prerequisites for any feedback scheme are the precise real-time determination of the quantities to be controlled, requiring top quality and highly reliable diagnostics, and the availability of robust control algorithms. A new set of real time diagnostics was recently implemented on JET to prove the feasibility of determining, with high accuracy and time resolution, the most important plasma quantities. With regard to feedback algorithms, new model-based controllers were developed to allow a more robust control of several plasma parameters. Both diagnostics and algorithms were successfully used in several experiments, ranging from H-mode plasmas to configuration with ITBs (internal thermal barriers). Since elaboration of computationally heavy measurements is often required, significant attention was devoted to non-algorithmic methods like Digital or Cellular Neural/Nonlinear Networks. The real time hardware and software adopted architectures are also described with particular attention to their relevance to ITER. (authors)

  9. Real time localization of Gamma Ray Bursts with INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, S; Borkowski, J J

    2003-01-01

    The INTEGRAL satellite has been successfully launched in October 2002 and has recently started its operational phase. The INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS) will distribute in real time the coordinates of the GRBs detected with INTEGRAL. After a brief introduction on the INTEGRAL instruments, we describe the main IBAS characteristics and report on the initial results. During the initial performance and verification phase of the INTEGRAL mission, which lasted about two months, two GRBs have been localized with accuracy of about 2-4 arcmin. These observations have allowed us to validate the IBAS software, which is now expected to provide quick (few seconds delay) and precise (few arcmin) localization for about 10-15 GRBs per year.

  10. Large Time-Stepping Spectral Methods for the Semiclassical Limit of the Defocusing Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongqi Liang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze a class of large time-stepping Fourier spectral methods for the semiclassical limit of the defocusing Nonlinear Schrödinger equation and provide highly stable methods which allow much larger time step than for a standard implicit-explicit approach. An extra term, which is consistent with the order of the time discretization, is added to stabilize the numerical schemes. Meanwhile, the first-order and second-order semi-implicit schemes are constructed and analyzed. Finally the numerical experiments are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the large time-stepping approaches.

  11. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  12. Influence of simulation time-step (temporal-scale) on optimal parameter estimation and runoff prediction performance in hydrological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizu, Javier; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Casalí, Javier; Goñi, Mikel

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, most hydrological catchment models are designed to allow their use for streamflow simulation at different time-scales. While this permits models to be applied for broader purposes, it can also be a source of error in hydrological processes simulation at catchment scale. Those errors seem not to affect significantly simple conceptual models, but this flexibility may lead to large behavior errors in physically based models. Equations used in processes such as those related to soil moisture time-variation are usually representative at certain time-scales but they may not characterize properly water transfer in soil layers at larger scales. This effect is especially relevant as we move from detailed hourly scale to daily time-step, which are common time scales used at catchment streamflow simulation for different research and management practices purposes. This study aims to provide an objective methodology to identify the degree of similarity of optimal parameter values when hydrological catchment model calibration is developed at different time-scales. Thus, providing information for an informed discussion of physical parameter significance on hydrological models. In this research, we analyze the influence of time scale simulation on: 1) the optimal values of six highly sensitive parameters of the TOPLATS model and 2) the streamflow simulation efficiency, while optimization is carried out at different time scales. TOPLATS (TOPMODEL-based Land-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme) has been applied on its lumped version on three catchments of varying size located in northern Spain. The model has its basis on shallow groundwater gradients (related to local topography) that set up spatial patterns of soil moisture and are assumed to control infiltration and runoff during storm events and evaporation and drainage in between storm events. The model calculates the saturated portion of the catchment at each time step based on Topographical Index (TI) intervals. Surface

  13. Constructing pairs of dual bandlimited framelets with desired time localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemvig, Jakob

    For sufficiently small translation parameters, we prove that any bandlimited function ψ, for which the dilations of its Fourier transform form a partition of unity, generates a wavelet frame with a dual frame also having the wavelet structure. This dual frame is generated by a finite linear...... combination of dilations of ψ with explicitly given coefficients. The result allows a simple construction procedure for pairs of dual wavelet frames whose generators have compact support in the Fourier domain and desired time localization. The construction is based on characteriszing equations for dual...

  14. Improving stability of stabilized and multiscale formulations in flow simulations at small time steps

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Ming-Chen

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to show that use of the element-vector-based definition of stabilization parameters, introduced in [T.E. Tezduyar, Computation of moving boundaries and interfaces and stabilization parameters, Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 43 (2003) 555-575; T.E. Tezduyar, Y. Osawa, Finite element stabilization parameters computed from element matrices and vectors, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. 190 (2000) 411-430], circumvents the well-known instability associated with conventional stabilized formulations at small time steps. We describe formulations for linear advection-diffusion and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and test them on three benchmark problems: advection of an L-shaped discontinuity, laminar flow in a square domain at low Reynolds number, and turbulent channel flow at friction-velocity Reynolds number of 395. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Derivation and application of time step model in solidification process simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The heat transfer during the casting solidification process includes the heat radiation of the high temperature casting and the mold, the heat convection between the casting and the mold, and the heat conduction inside the casting and from the casting to the mold. In this paper, a formula of time step in simulation of solidification is derived, considering the heat radiation, convection and conduction based on the conservation of energy. The different heat transfer conditions between the conventional sand casting and the permanent mold casting are taken into account in this formula. The characteristics of heat transfer in the interior and surface of the casting are also considered. The numerical experiments show that this formula can avoid computational dispersion, and improve the computational efficiency by about 20% in the simulation of solidification process.

  16. Decentralized identification for multivariable integrating processes with time delays from closed-loop step tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Hua; Li, Shaoyuan

    2007-04-01

    In order to identify those multivariable processes with integrating factors in their transfer function matrices, a simple yet robust decentralized identification method from closed-loop step tests is proposed. By the frequency response matrix computed from the closed-loop system data and the knowledge of the decentralized controller, the structural information of the multivariable integrating process is determined firstly and then the continuous parametric model with dead times is approximated similarly with the parameterization of the open-loop stable process. Computer simulations and an application to a 3 x 3 integrating multiple-tank water level system verify the validation of the proposed method even if the closed-loop system is affected by some stochastic noise sources.

  17. Derivation and application of time step model in solidification process simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GONG Wen-bang

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer during the casting solidification process includes the heat radiation of the high temperature casting and the mold, the heat convection between the casting and the mold, and the heat conduction inside the casting and from the casting to the mold. In this paper, a formula of time step in simulation of solidification is derived, considering the heat radiation, convection and conduction based on the conservation of energy. The different heat transfer conditions between the conventional sand casting and the permanent mold casting are taken into account in this formula. The characteristics of heat transfer in the interior and surface of the casting are also considered. The numerical experiments show that this formula can avoid computational dispersion, and improve the computational efficiency by about 20% in the simulation of solidification process.

  18. An optimal adaptive time-stepping scheme for solving reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chichia; Yu, Jui-Ling

    2007-04-01

    Reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis systems have proven to be fairly accurate mathematical models for many pattern formation problems in chemistry and biology. These systems are important for computer simulations of patterns, parameter estimations as well as analysis of the biological systems. To solve reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis systems, efficient and reliable numerical algorithms are essential for pattern generations. In this paper, a general reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis system is considered for specific numerical issues of pattern simulations. We propose a fully explicit discretization combined with a variable optimal time step strategy for solving the reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis system. Theorems about stability and convergence of the algorithm are given to show that the algorithm is highly stable and efficient. Numerical experiment results on a model problem are given for comparison with other numerical methods. Simulations on two real biological experiments will also be shown.

  19. Electric and hybrid electric vehicle study utilizing a time-stepping simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Shaltens, Richard K.; Beremand, Donald G.

    1992-01-01

    The applicability of NASA's advanced power technologies to electric and hybrid vehicles was assessed using a time-stepping computer simulation to model electric and hybrid vehicles operating over the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS). Both the energy and power demands of the FUDS were taken into account and vehicle economy, range, and performance were addressed simultaneously. Results indicate that a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) configured with a flywheel buffer energy storage device and a free-piston Stirling convertor fulfills the emissions, fuel economy, range, and performance requirements that would make it acceptable to the consumer. It is noted that an assessment to determine which of the candidate technologies are suited for the HEV application has yet to be made. A proper assessment should take into account the fuel economy and range, along with the driveability and total emissions produced.

  20. A shorter time step for eco-friendly reservoir operation does not always produce better water availability and ecosystem benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunxue; Yin, Xin'an; Yang, Zhifeng; Cai, Yanpeng; Sun, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The time step used in the operation of eco-friendly reservoirs has decreased from monthly to daily, and even sub-daily. The shorter time step is considered a better choice for satisfying downstream environmental requirements because it more closely resembles the natural flow regime. However, little consideration has been given to the influence of different time steps on the ability to simultaneously meet human and environmental flow requirements. To analyze this influence, we used an optimization model to explore the relationships among the time step, environmental flow (e-flow) requirements, and human water needs for a wide range of time steps and e-flow scenarios. We used the degree of hydrologic alteration to evaluate the regime's ability to satisfy the e-flow requirements of riverine ecosystems, and used water supply reliability to evaluate the ability to satisfy human needs. We then applied the model to a case study of China's Tanghe Reservoir. We found four efficient time steps (2, 3, 4, and 5 days), with a remarkably high water supply reliability (around 80%) and a low alteration of the flow regime (human needs under several e-flow scenarios. Our results show that adjusting the time step is a simple way to improve reservoir operation performance to balance human and e-flow needs.

  1. Silver nanoparticle enhanced immunoassays: one step real time kinetic assay for insulin in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Nina; Lobmaier, Christina; Wirth, Michael; Leitner, Alfred; Pittner, Fritz; Gabor, Franz

    2003-11-01

    Silver nanoparticle enhanced fluorescence is introduced as an alternative method to surface plasmon resonance techniques for real time monitoring of biorecognitive interactions or immunoassays. This method relies on the phenomenon that an electromagnetic near field is generated upon illumination on the surface of silver nanoparticles. The interaction of this field with nearby fluorophores results in fluorescence enhancement. Thus, fluorophores in the bulk solution can be discriminated from surface bound fluorophores. Anti-insulin-antibodies were immobilized on the surface of silver colloids in the following order: A ready to use microplate was prepared by bottom up coating with layers of aminosilane, silver nanoparticles, Fc-recognizing F(ab)(2)-fragments and anti-insulin-antibodies. At equilibrium conditions fluorescein-labeled insulin could only be detected in the presence of the colloid; the detection limit was 250 nM, and a fourfold increase in fluorescence was observed upon real time monitoring. The competitive assay of labeled and unlabeled insulin revealed a working range of 10-200 nM insulin in serum. The rapid single step immunoassay is easy to perform even in microplate format, its sensitivity is comparable to ELISA techniques, and offers broad application for real time monitoring of molecular recognitive processes.

  2. Automatic traveltime picking using local time-frequency maps

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The arrival times of distinct and sufficiently concentrated signals can be computed using Fourier transforms. In real seis- mograms, however, signals are far from distinct. We use local time-frequency maps of the seismograms and its frequency derivatives to obtain frequency-dependent (instantaneous) traveltimes. A smooth division is utilized to control the resolution of the instantaneous traveltimes to allow for a trade-off between resolution and stability. We average these traveltimes over the frequency band which is data-dependent. The resulting traveltime attribute is used to isolate different signals in seismic traces. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this automatic method for picking arrivals by applying it on synthetic and real data. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  3. Radiation reaction in curved space-time: local method

    CERN Document Server

    Gal'tsov, D; Staub, S; Gal'tsov, Dmitri; Spirin, Pavel; Staub, Simona

    2006-01-01

    Although consensus seems to exist about the validity of equations accounting for radiation reaction in curved space-time, their previous derivations were criticized recently as not fully satisfactory: some ambiguities were noticed in the procedure of integration of the field momentum over the tube surrounding the world-line. To avoid these problems we suggest a purely local derivation dealing with the field quantities defined only {\\em on the world-line}. We consider point particle interacting with scalar, vector (electromagnetic) and linearized gravitational fields in the (generally non-vacuum) curved space-time. To properly renormalize the self-action in the gravitational case, we use a manifestly reparameterization-invariant formulation of the theory. Scalar and vector divergences are shown to cancel for a certain ratio of the corresponding charges. We also report on a modest progress in extending the results for the gravitational radiation reaction to the case of non-vacuum background.

  4. Intersection local times, loop soups and permanental Wick powers

    CERN Document Server

    Jan, Yves Le; Rosen, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Several stochastic processes related to transient Lévy processes with potential densities u(x,y)=u(y-x), that need not be symmetric nor bounded on the diagonal, are defined and studied. They are real valued processes on a space of measures \\mathcal{V} endowed with a metric d. Sufficient conditions are obtained for the continuity of these processes on (\\mathcal{V},d). The processes include n-fold self-intersection local times of transient Lévy processes and permanental chaoses, which are `loop soup n-fold self-intersection local times' constructed from the loop soup of the Lévy process. Loop soups are also used to define permanental Wick powers, which generalizes standard Wick powers, a class of n-th order Gaussian chaoses. Dynkin type isomorphism theorems are obtained that relate the various processes. Poisson chaos processes are defined and permanental Wick powers are shown to have a Poisson chaos decomposition. Additional properties of Poisson chaos processes are studied and a martingale extension is obt...

  5. Discrete step model of helix-coil kinetics: Distribution of fluctuation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Douglas

    1996-07-01

    A method is outlined for the computer simulation of the cooperative kinetics required to construct the distribution function for time intervals between fluctuations in conformational states in macromolecules. Using the helix-coil transition in polyamino acids as an example, we develop a Monte Carlo cellular automata approximation of the kinetics of this system in discrete time. This approximation is tested against a number of exact solutions for homopolymers and is then used to calculate moments of the distribution function for the time intervals between switches in conformational state at a given site (e.g., given a switch from coil to helix at zero time, how long will it take before the state switches back). The maximum-entropy method is used to construct the very broad distribution function from the moments. In heteropolymers the diffusion of helix-coil boundaries is reduced, helix being more localized on strong helix-forming residues. We investigate the effect of a specific sequence of amino acid residues on conformational fluctuations by using the known σ and s values for the naturally occurring amino acids to simulate the kinetics of helix formation (limiting the range of cooperativity to the α-helix) in sperm whale myoglobin, giving the time evolution to the equilibrium probability profile in this system.

  6. Universal and local time components in Schumann resonance intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Nickolaenko

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We extend the technique suggested by Sentman and Fraser (1991 and discussed by Pechony and Price (2006, the technique for separating the local and universal time variations in the Schumann resonance intensity. Initially, we simulate the resonance oscillations in a uniform Earth-ionosphere cavity with the distribution of lightning strokes based on the OTD satellite data. Different field components were used in the Dayside source model for the Moshiri (Japan, geographic coordinates: 44.365° N, 142.24° E and Lehta (Karelia, Russia, 64.427° N, 33.974° E observatories. We use the extended Fourier series for obtaining the modulating functions. Simulations show that the algorithm evaluates the impact of the source proximity in the resonance intensity. Our major goal was in estimating the universal alteration factors, which reflect changes in the global thunderstorm activity. It was achieved by compensating the local factors present in the initial data. The technique is introduced with the model Schumann resonance data and afterwards we use the long-term experimental records at the above sites for obtaining the diurnal/monthly variations of the global thunderstorms.

  7. Effectiveness of Null Signal Sky Localization in Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq Hazboun, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    A null stream is constructed from the timing residuals of three pulsars by noting that the same source polarization amplitudes appear in the data stream from each pulsar. Linear combinations of a set of individual pulsar data streams can be shown to be a two-parameter family (the two sky position angles of the source) that can be minimized to determine the location of the source on the sky. Taking the product of a number of null streams allows for an even stronger localization of the gravitational wave's source; a large advantage in a PTA where there are more independent signals than other gravitational wave detectors. While a null stream contains the same information as any other data stream with the same number of pulsars, the statistics of a product of noisy signals is inherently different than for a sum of those same signals.A comparison of how null signal searches compare to other techniques for sky localization of PTA sources will be discussed, as well as an assessment of the types of searches for which the method may be useful.

  8. Local Kinetic Measures of Macromolecular Structure Reveal Partitioning Among Multiple Parallel Pathways from the Earliest Steps in the Folding of a Large RNA Molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laederach,A.; Shcherbakova, I.; Liang, M.; Brenowitz, M.; Altman, R.

    2006-01-01

    At the heart of the RNA folding problem is the number, structures, and relationships among the intermediates that populate the folding pathways of most large RNA molecules. Unique insight into the structural dynamics of these intermediates can be gleaned from the time-dependent changes in local probes of macromolecular conformation (e.g. reports on individual nucleotide solvent accessibility offered by hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) footprinting). Local measures distributed around a macromolecule individually illuminate the ensemble of separate changes that constitute a folding reaction. Folding pathway reconstruction from a multitude of these individual measures is daunting due to the combinatorial explosion of possible kinetic models as the number of independent local measures increases. Fortunately, clustering of time progress curves sufficiently reduces the dimensionality of the data so as to make reconstruction computationally tractable. The most likely folding topology and intermediates can then be identified by exhaustively enumerating all possible kinetic models on a super-computer grid. The folding pathways and measures of the relative flux through them were determined for Mg{sup 2+} and Na{sup +}-mediated folding of the Tetrahymena thermophila group I intron using this combined experimental and computational approach. The flux during Mg{sup 2+}-mediated folding is divided among numerous parallel pathways. In contrast, the flux during the Na{sup +}-mediated reaction is predominantly restricted through three pathways, one of which is without detectable passage through intermediates. Under both conditions, the folding reaction is highly parallel with no single pathway accounting for more than 50% of the molecular flux. This suggests that RNA folding is non-sequential under a variety of different experimental conditions even at the earliest stages of folding. This study provides a template for the systematic analysis of the time-evolution of RNA structure

  9. Implementation of Real-Time Machining Process Control Based on Fuzzy Logic in a New STEP-NC Compatible System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementing real-time machining process control at shop floor has great significance on raising the efficiency and quality of product manufacturing. A framework and implementation methods of real-time machining process control based on STEP-NC are presented in this paper. Data model compatible with ISO 14649 standard is built to transfer high-level real-time machining process control information between CAPP systems and CNC systems, in which EXPRESS language is used to define new STEP-NC entities. Methods for implementing real-time machining process control at shop floor are studied and realized on an open STEP-NC controller, which is developed using object-oriented, multithread, and shared memory technologies conjunctively. Cutting force at specific direction of machining feature in side mill is chosen to be controlled object, and a fuzzy control algorithm with self-adjusting factor is designed and embedded in the software CNC kernel of STEP-NC controller. Experiments are carried out to verify the proposed framework, STEP-NC data model, and implementation methods for real-time machining process control. The results of experiments prove that real-time machining process control tasks can be interpreted and executed correctly by the STEP-NC controller at shop floor, in which actual cutting force is kept around ideal value, whether axial cutting depth changes suddenly or continuously.

  10. Time-varying clustering for local lighting and material design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG PeiJie; GU YuanTing; WU XiaoLong; CHEN YanYun; WU EnHua

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive graphics processing unit (GPU)-based rellghting system in which local lighting condition,surface materials and viewing direction can all be changed on the fly.To support these changes,we simulate the lighting transportation process at run time,which is normally impractical for interactive use due to its huge computational burden.We greatly alleviate this burden by a hierarchical structure named a transportation tree that clusters similar emitting samples together within a perceptually acceptable error bound.Furthermore,by exploiting the coherence in time as well as in space,we incrementally adjust the dusters rather than computing them from scratch in each frame.With a pre-computed visibility map,we are able to efficiently estimate the indirect illumination in parallel on graphlce hardware,by simply summing up the radiance shoots from cluster representatives,plus a small number of operations of merging and splitting on clusters.With relighting based on the time-varying clusters,Interactive update of global illumination effects with multi-bounced indirect lighting is demonstrated in appllcations to msterial animation and scene decoration.

  11. Accurate molecular dynamics and nuclear quantum effects at low cost by multiple steps in real and imaginary time: Using density functional theory to accelerate wavefunction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapil, V.; Ceriotti, M., E-mail: michele.ceriotti@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Science and Modelling, Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); VandeVondele, J., E-mail: joost.vandevondele@mat.ethz.ch [Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-02-07

    The development and implementation of increasingly accurate methods for electronic structure calculations mean that, for many atomistic simulation problems, treating light nuclei as classical particles is now one of the most serious approximations. Even though recent developments have significantly reduced the overhead for modeling the quantum nature of the nuclei, the cost is still prohibitive when combined with advanced electronic structure methods. Here we present how multiple time step integrators can be combined with ring-polymer contraction techniques (effectively, multiple time stepping in imaginary time) to reduce virtually to zero the overhead of modelling nuclear quantum effects, while describing inter-atomic forces at high levels of electronic structure theory. This is demonstrated for a combination of MP2 and semi-local DFT applied to the Zundel cation. The approach can be seamlessly combined with other methods to reduce the computational cost of path integral calculations, such as high-order factorizations of the Boltzmann operator or generalized Langevin equation thermostats.

  12. Potentials and Limitations of Real-Time Elastography for Prostate Cancer Detection: A Whole-Mount Step Section Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Junker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate prostate cancer (PCa detection rates of real-time elastography (RTE in dependence of tumor size, tumor volume, localization and histological type. Materials and Methods. Thirdy-nine patients with biopsy proven PCa underwent RTE before radical prostatectomy (RPE to assess prostate tissue elasticity, and hard lesions were considered suspicious for PCa. After RPE, the prostates were prepared as whole-mount step sections and were compared with imaging findings for analyzing PCa detection rates. Results. RTE detected 6/62 cancer lesions with a maximum diameter of 0–5 mm (9.7%, 10/37 with a maximum diameter of 6–10 mm (27%, 24/34 with a maximum diameter of 11–20 20 mm (70.6%, 14/14 with a maximum diameter of >20 mm (100% and 40/48 with a volume ≥0.2 cm3 (83.3%. Regarding cancer lesions with a volume ≥ 0.2 cm³ there was a significant difference in PCa detection rates between Gleason scores with predominant Gleason pattern 3 compared to those with predominant Gleason pattern 4 or 5 (75% versus 100%; P=0.028. Conclusions. RTE is able to detect PCa of significant tumor volume and of predominant Gleason pattern 4 or 5 with high confidence, but is of limited value in the detection of small cancer lesions.

  13. One step at a time: how to toilet train children with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, June

    Toilet training children with learning disabilities can present challenges and requires careful assessmentand management. This article examines strategies for toilet training using a five step approach bladder and bowel control.

  14. Stability of the high-order finite elements for acoustic or elastic wave propagation with high-order time stepping

    KAUST Repository

    De Basabe, Jonás D.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the stability of some high-order finite element methods, namely the spectral element method and the interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method (IP-DGM), for acoustic or elastic wave propagation that have become increasingly popular in the recent past. We consider the Lax-Wendroff method (LWM) for time stepping and show that it allows for a larger time step than the classical leap-frog finite difference method, with higher-order accuracy. In particular the fourth-order LWM allows for a time step 73 per cent larger than that of the leap-frog method; the computational cost is approximately double per time step, but the larger time step partially compensates for this additional cost. Necessary, but not sufficient, stability conditions are given for the mentioned methods for orders up to 10 in space and time. The stability conditions for IP-DGM are approximately 20 and 60 per cent more restrictive than those for SEM in the acoustic and elastic cases, respectively. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 RAS.

  15. One-step electrodeposition process of CuInSe2: Deposition time effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O Meglali; N Attaf; A Bouraiou; M S Aida; S Lakehal

    2014-10-01

    CuInSe2 thin films were prepared by one-step electrodeposition process using a simplified twoelectrodes system. The films were deposited, during 5, 10, 15 and 20 min, from the deionized water solution consisting of CuCl2, InCl3 and SeO2 onto ITO-coated glass substrates. As-deposited films have been annealed under vacuum at 300 °C during 30 min. The structural, optical band gap and electrical resistivity of elaborated films were studied, respectively, using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV spectrophotometer and four-point probe method. The micro structural parameters like lattice constants, crystallite size, dislocation density and strain have been evaluated. The XRD investigation proved that the film deposited at 20 min present CuInSe2 single phase in its chalcopyrite structure and with preferred orientation along (1 1 2) direction, whereas the films deposited at 5, 10 and 15 min show the CuInSe2 chalcopyrite structure with the In2Se3 as secondary phase. We have found that the formation mechanism of CuInSe2 depends on the In2Se3 phase. The optical band gap of the films is found to decrease from 1.17 to 1.04 eV with increase in deposition time. All films show Raman spectra with a dominant A1 mode at 174 cm-1, confirming the chalcopyrite crystalline quality of these films. The films exhibited a range of resistivity varying from 2.3 × 10-3 to 4.4 × 10-1 cm.

  16. The Influence of Time Spent in Outdoor Play on Daily and Aerobic Step Count in Costa Rican Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera Castro, Maria del Rocio

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of time spent in outdoor play (i.e., on weekday and weekend days) on daily (i.e., average step count) and aerobic step count (i.e., average moderate to vigorous physical activity [MVPA] during the weekdays and weekend days) in fifth grade Costa Rican children. It was hypothesized that: (a)…

  17. What controls the local time extent of flux transfer events?

    CERN Document Server

    Milan, S E; Carter, J A; Walach, M -T; Hubert, B

    2016-01-01

    Flux transfer events (FTEs) are the manifestation of bursty and/or patchy magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause. We compare two sequences of the ionospheric signatures of flux transfer events observed in global auroral imagery and coherent ionospheric radar measurements. Both sequences were observed during very similar seasonal and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, though with differing solar wind speed. A key observation is that the signatures differed considerably in their local time extent. The two periods are 26 August 1998, when the IMF had components $\\mathit{B}_{\\mathit{z}}$ $\\approx$ -10 nT and $\\mathit{B}_{\\mathit{y}}$ $\\approx$ 9 nT and the solar wind speed was $\\mathit{V}_{\\mathit{x}}$ $\\approx$ 650 km $s^{-1}$, and 31 August 2005, IMF $\\mathit{B}_{\\mathit{z}}$ $\\approx$ -7 nT, $\\mathit{B}_{\\mathit{y}}$ $\\approx$ 17 nT, and $\\mathit{V}_{\\mathit{x}}$ $\\approx$ 380 km $s^{-1}$. In the first case, the reconnection rate was estimated to be near 160 kV, and the FTE signatures extended ...

  18. Non-local in time perturbations of linear hyperbolic PDEs

    CERN Document Server

    Lechner, Gandalf

    2013-01-01

    Linear Integro-differential equations of the form $(D+\\lambda W)f=0$ are studied, where $D$ is a normal or prenormal hyperbolic differential operator on $\\mathbb{R}^n$, $\\lambda\\in\\mathbb{C}$ is a coupling constant, and $W$ is a regular integral operator with compactly supported kernel. In particular, $W$ can be non-local in time, so that a Hamiltonian formulation is not possible. It is shown that for sufficiently small $|\\lambda|$, the hyperbolic character of $D$ is essentially preserved. Unique advanced/retarded fundamental solutions are constructed by means of a convergent expansion in $\\lambda$, and the solution spaces are analyzed. It is shown that the acausal behavior of the solutions is well-controlled, but the Cauchy problem is ill-posed in general. Nonetheless, a scattering operator can be calculated which describes the effect of $W$ on the space of solutions of $D$. It is also described how these structures occur in the context of wave or Dirac equations on noncommutative deformations of Minkowski s...

  19. Local Time-Dependent Charging in a Perovskite Solar Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Victor W; Guo, Yunlong; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Hermes, Ilka M; Li, Dan; Klasen, Alexander; Bretschneider, Simon A; Nakamura, Eiichi; Berger, Rüdiger; Weber, Stefan A L

    2016-08-03

    Efficient charge extraction within solar cells explicitly depends on the optimization of the internal interfaces. Potential barriers, unbalanced charge extraction, and interfacial trap states can prevent cells from reaching high power conversion efficiencies. In the case of perovskite solar cells, slow processes happening on time scales of seconds cause hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. In this work, we localized and investigated these slow processes using frequency-modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) on cross sections of planar methylammonium lead iodide (MAPI) perovskite solar cells. FM-KPFM can map the charge density distribution and its dynamics at internal interfaces. Upon illumination, space charge layers formed at the interfaces of the selective contacts with the MAPI layer within several seconds. We observed distinct differences in the charging dynamics at the interfaces of MAPI with adjacent layers. Our results indicate that more than one process is involved in hysteresis. This finding is in agreement with recent simulation studies claiming that a combination of ion migration and interfacial trap states causes the hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. Such differences in the charging rates at different interfaces cannot be separated by conventional device measurements.

  20. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  1. Kinetic Analysis of Parallel-Consecutive First-Order Reactions with a Reversible Step: Concentration-Time Integrals Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucientes, A. E.; de la Pena, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The concentration-time integrals method has been used to solve kinetic equations of parallel-consecutive first-order reactions with a reversible step. This method involves the determination of the area under the curve for the concentration of a given species against time. Computer techniques are used to integrate experimental curves and the method…

  2. The analogue method for precipitation prediction: finding better analogue situations at a sub-daily time step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Pascal; Obled, Charles; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2017-07-01

    Analogue methods (AMs) predict local weather variables (predictands) such as precipitation by means of a statistical relationship with predictors at a synoptic scale. The analogy is generally assessed on gradients of geopotential heights first to sample days with a similar atmospheric circulation. Other predictors such as moisture variables can also be added in a successive level of analogy. The search for candidate situations similar to a given target day is usually undertaken by comparing the state of the atmosphere at fixed hours of the day for both the target day and the candidate analogues. This is a consequence of using standard daily precipitation time series, which are available over longer periods than sub-daily data. However, it is unlikely for the best analogy to occur at the exact same hour for the target and candidate situations. A better analogue situation may be found with a time shift of several hours since a better fit can occur at different times of the day. In order to assess the potential for finding better analogues at a different hour, a moving time window (MTW) has been introduced. The MTW resulted in a better analogy in terms of the atmospheric circulation and showed improved values of the analogy criterion on the entire distribution of the extracted analogue dates. The improvement was found to increase with the analogue rank due to an accumulation of better analogues in the selection. A seasonal effect has also been identified, with larger improvements shown in winter than in summer. This may be attributed to stronger diurnal cycles in summer that favour predictors taken at the same hour for the target and analogue days. The impact of the MTW on the precipitation prediction skill has been assessed by means of a sub-daily precipitation series transformed into moving 24 h totals at 12, 6, and 3 h time steps. The prediction skill was improved by the MTW, as was the reliability of the prediction. Moreover, the improvements were greater for days

  3. Optimization of explicit time-stepping algorithms and Stream-Function-Coordinate (SFC) concept for fluid dynamics problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Yuan

    A new formulation of the stream function based on a stream function coordinate (SFC) concept for inviscid flow field calculations is presented. In addition, a new method is developed not only to accelerate, but also to stabilize the iterative schemes for steady and unsteady, linear and non-linear, scalar and system of coupled, partial differential equations. With this theory, the limitation on the time step size of an explicit scheme for solving unsteady problems and the limitation on the relaxation factors of an iterative scheme for solving steady state problems could be analytically determined. Moreover, this theory allows the determination of the optimal time steps for explicit time-stepping schemes and the optimal values of the acceleration factors for iterative schemes, if the transient behavior is immaterial.

  4. Employing per-component time step in DSMC simulations of disparate mass and cross-section gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Maltsev, Roman V

    2013-01-01

    A new approach to simulation of stationary flows by Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method is proposed. The idea is to specify an individual time step for each component of a gas mixture. The approach consists of modifications mainly to collision phase and recommendation on choosing time step ratios. It allows softening the demands on the computational resources for cases of disparate collision diameters of molecules and/or disparate molecular masses. These are the cases important in vacuum deposition technologies. Few tests of the new approach are made. Finally, the usage of new approach is demonstrated on a problem of silver nanocluster diffusion in carrier gas argon in conditions of silver deposition experiments.

  5. BIOMAP A Daily Time Step, Mechanistic Model for the Study of Ecosystem Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, J. R.; Neilson, R. P.; Drapek, R. J.; Pitts, B. S.

    2010-12-01

    of both climate and ecosystems must be done at coarse grid resolutions; smaller domains require higher resolution for the simulation of natural resource processes at the landscape scale and that of on-the-ground management practices. Via a combined multi-agency and private conservation effort we have implemented a Nested Scale Experiment (NeScE) that ranges from 1/2 degree resolution (global, ca. 50 km) to ca. 8km (North America) and 800 m (conterminous U.S.). Our first DGVM, MC1, has been implemented at all 3 scales. We are just beginning to implement BIOMAP into NeScE, with its unique features, and daily time step, as a counterpoint to MC1. We believe it will be more accurate at all resolutions providing better simulations of vegetation distribution, carbon balance, runoff, fire regimes and drought impacts.

  6. Real‐Time Precision Vehicle Localization Using Numerical Maps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Han, Seung‐Jun; Choi, Jeongdan

    2014-01-01

    .... Optimum vehicle ego‐motion estimation and road marking feature extraction techniques are adopted and then combined by an extended Kalman filter and particle filter to make up the localization technology...

  7. The effect of timing electrical stimulation to robotic-assisted stepping on neuromuscular activity and associated kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Askari, MS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Results of previous studies raise the question of how timing neuromuscular functional electrical stimulation (FES to limb movements during stepping might alter neuromuscular control differently than patterned stimulation alone. We have developed a prototype FES system for a rodent model of spinal cord injury (SCI that times FES to robotic treadmill training (RTT. In this study, one group of rats (n = 6 was trained with our FES+RTT system and received stimulation of the ankle flexor (tibialis anterior [TA] muscle timed according to robot-controlled hind-limb position (FES+RTT group; a second group (n = 5 received a similarly patterned stimulation, randomly timed with respect to the rats’ hind-limb movements, while they were in their cages (randomly timed stimulation [RS] group. After 4 wk of training, we tested treadmill stepping ability and compared kinematic measures of hind-limb movement and electromyography (EMG activity in the TA. The FES+RTT group stepped faster and exhibited TA EMG profiles that better matched the applied stimulation profile during training than the RS group. The shape of the EMG profile was assessed by "gamma," a measure that quantified the concentration of EMG activity during the early swing phase of the gait cycle. This gamma measure was 112% higher for the FES+RTT group than for the RS group. The FES+RTT group exhibited burst-to-step latencies that were 41% shorter and correspondingly exhibited a greater tendency to perform ankle flexion movements during stepping than the RS group, as measured by the percentage of time the hind limb was either dragging or in withdrawal. The results from this study support the hypothesis that locomotor training consisting of FES timed to hind-limb movement improves the activation of hind-limb muscle more so than RS alone. Our rodent FES+RTT system can serve as a tool to help further develop this combined therapy to target appropriate neurophysiological changes for locomotor control.

  8. The effect of timing electrical stimulation to robotic-assisted stepping on neuromuscular activity and associated kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Sina; Chao, TeKang; de Leon, Ray D; Won, Deborah S

    2013-01-01

    Results of previous studies raise the question of how timing neuromuscular functional electrical stimulation (FES) to limb movements during stepping might alter neuromuscular control differently than patterned stimulation alone. We have developed a prototype FES system for a rodent model of spinal cord injury (SCI) that times FES to robotic treadmill training (RTT). In this study, one group of rats (n = 6) was trained with our FES+RTT system and received stimulation of the ankle flexor (tibialis anterior [TA]) muscle timed according to robot-controlled hind-limb position (FES+RTT group); a second group (n = 5) received a similarly patterned stimulation, randomly timed with respect to the rats' hind-limb movements, while they were in their cages (randomly timed stimulation [RS] group). After 4 wk of training, we tested treadmill stepping ability and compared kinematic measures of hind-limb movement and electromyography (EMG) activity in the TA. The FES+RTT group stepped faster and exhibited TA EMG profiles that better matched the applied stimulation profile during training than the RS group. The shape of the EMG profile was assessed by "gamma," a measure that quantified the concentration of EMG activity during the early swing phase of the gait cycle. This gamma measure was 112% higher for the FES+RTT group than for the RS group. The FES+RTT group exhibited burst-to-step latencies that were 41% shorter and correspondingly exhibited a greater tendency to perform ankle flexion movements during stepping than the RS group, as measured by the percentage of time the hind limb was either dragging or in withdrawal. The results from this study support the hypothesis that locomotor training consisting of FES timed to hind-limb movement improves the activation of hind-limb muscle more so than RS alone. Our rodent FES+RTT system can serve as a tool to help further develop this combined therapy to target appropriate neurophysiological changes for locomotor control.

  9. Two-step build-up of a thermoreversible polymer network: From early local to late collective dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souguir, H; Ronsin, O; Caroli, C; Baumberger, T

    2015-04-01

    We probe the mechanisms at work in the build-up of thermoreversible gel networks, with the help of hybrid gelatin gels containing a controlled density of irreversible, covalent crosslinks (CLs), which we quench below the physical gelation temperature. The detailed analysis of the dependence on covalent crosslink density of both the shear modulus and optical activity evolutions with time after quench enables us to identify two stages of the physical gelation process, separated by a temperature-dependent crossover modulus: (i) an early nucleation regime during which rearrangements of the triple-helix CLs play a negligible role, and (ii) a late, logarithmic aging one, which is preserved, though slowed down, in the presence of irreversible CLs. We show that aging is fully controlled by rearrangements and discuss the implication of our results in terms of the switch from an early, local dynamics to a late, cooperative long-range one.

  10. Development and evaluation of a real-time one step Reverse-Transcriptase PCR for quantitation of Chandipura Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandale Babasaheb V

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chandipura virus (CHPV, a member of family Rhabdoviridae was attributed to an explosive outbreak of acute encephalitis in children in Andhra Pradesh, India in 2003 and a small outbreak among tribal children from Gujarat, Western India in 2004. The case-fatality rate ranged from 55–75%. Considering the rapid progression of the disease and high mortality, a highly sensitive method for quantifying CHPV RNA by real-time one step reverse transcriptase PCR (real-time one step RT-PCR using TaqMan technology was developed for rapid diagnosis. Methods Primers and probe for P gene were designed and used to standardize real-time one step RT-PCR assay for CHPV RNA quantitation. Standard RNA was prepared by PCR amplification, TA cloning and run off transcription. The optimized real-time one step RT-PCR assay was compared with the diagnostic nested RT-PCR and different virus isolation systems [in vivo (mice in ovo (eggs, in vitro (Vero E6, PS, RD and Sand fly cell line] for the detection of CHPV. Sensitivity and specificity of real-time one step RT-PCR assay was evaluated with diagnostic nested RT-PCR, which is considered as a gold standard. Results Real-time one step RT-PCR was optimized using in vitro transcribed (IVT RNA. Standard curve showed linear relationship for wide range of 102-1010 (r2 = 0.99 with maximum Coefficient of variation (CV = 5.91% for IVT RNA. The newly developed real-time RT-PCR was at par with nested RT-PCR in sensitivity and superior to cell lines and other living systems (embryonated eggs and infant mice used for the isolation of the virus. Detection limit of real-time one step RT-PCR and nested RT-PCR was found to be 1.2 × 100 PFU/ml. RD cells, sand fly cells, infant mice, and embryonated eggs showed almost equal sensitivity (1.2 × 102 PFU/ml. Vero and PS cell-lines (1.2 × 103 PFU/ml were least sensitive to CHPV infection. Specificity of the assay was found to be 100% when RNA from other viruses or healthy

  11. Local Social Services in Nordic countries in Times of Disaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eydal, Guðný Björk; Ómarsdóttir, Ingibjörg Lilja; Dahlberg, Rasmus

    of such disasters is on the rise according to forecasts. In order to enhance resilience and preparedness of those most vulnerable in disasters, the involvement of local social services in the emergency management system is of vital importance. The literature shows how social services can enhance social and human......The project focused on the emergency management systems in the five Nordic countries. It investigated whether local social services have a formal role in the contingency planning of the systems. The project was part of The Nordic Welfare Watch research project during the Icelandic Presidency...... of social services in all phases of emergency management. The guidelines for social services' contingency planning and their plans should be shared across the Nordic countries and among various actors on the state, regional and local levels. This task could also be implemented under the umbrella...

  12. Solving the maxwell equations by the Chebyshev method : A one-step finite-difference time-domain algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H; Michielsen, K; Kole, JS; Figge, MT

    2003-01-01

    We present a one-step algorithm that solves the Maxwell equations for systems with spatially varying permittivity and permeability by the Chebyshev method. We demonstrate that this algorithm may be orders of magnitude more efficient than current finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithms.

  13. 3D elastic wave modeling using modified high‐order time stepping schemes with improved stability conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2009-01-01

    We present two Lax‐Wendroff type high‐order time stepping schemes and apply them to solving the 3D elastic wave equation. The proposed schemes have the same format as the Taylor series expansion based schemes, only with modified temporal extrapolation coefficients. We demonstrate by both theoretical analysis and numerical examples that the modified schemes significantly improve the stability conditions.

  14. Fission description: First steps towards a full resolution of the time-dependent Hill-Wheeler equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrière, Marc; Dubray, Noël; Schunck, Nicolas; Regnier, David; Dossantos-Uzarralde, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    Dynamical description of low energy fission is, in our full microscopic approach, decomposed in two steps. In the first step we generate the Potential Energy Surface (PES) of the compound system we want to describe with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method with a Gogny interaction. The second step uses the Time Dependent Generator Coordinate Method (TDGCM) with the Gaussian Overlap Approximation (GOA). The GOA holds in two assumptions: the overlap matrix between HFB states has a gaussian shape (with respect to the difference between coordinates of states in deformation space); and the expectation value of the collective hamiltonian between these states can be expanded up to order two, leading in this case to a Schrödinger-like equation. In this work we replace TDGCM+GOA in the second step of our approach by an exact treatment of the TDGCM. The main equation of this method is the time-dependent Hill-Wheeler equation and involves two objects: the overlap matrix and the collective hamiltonian. We first calculate these matrices on a PES. Then, we build an "exact TDGCM" solver using a finite element method and a Crank-Nicolson scheme. In this talk, we will present the time-dependent Hill-Wheeler equation and discretization schemes (in time and deformation space). The analytic calculation of overlap matrix and collective hamiltonian will be detailed. Finally, first results with an exact treatment of the TDGCM will be discussed.

  15. Local unemployment and the timing of post-secondary schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievertsen, Hans Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Using Danish administrative data on all high school graduates from 1984 to 1992, I show that local unemployment has both a short- and a long-run effect on school enrollment and completion. The short-run effect causes students to advance their enrollment, and consequently their completion, of addi......Using Danish administrative data on all high school graduates from 1984 to 1992, I show that local unemployment has both a short- and a long-run effect on school enrollment and completion. The short-run effect causes students to advance their enrollment, and consequently their completion...

  16. A stabilized Runge–Kutta–Legendre method for explicit super-time-stepping of parabolic and mixed equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Chad D.; Balsara, Dinshaw S. [Physics Department, Univ. of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Aslam, Tariq D. [WX-9 Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS P952, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Parabolic partial differential equations appear in several physical problems, including problems that have a dominant hyperbolic part coupled to a sub-dominant parabolic component. Explicit methods for their solution are easy to implement but have very restrictive time step constraints. Implicit solution methods can be unconditionally stable but have the disadvantage of being computationally costly or difficult to implement. Super-time-stepping methods for treating parabolic terms in mixed type partial differential equations occupy an intermediate position. In such methods each superstep takes “s” explicit Runge–Kutta-like time-steps to advance the parabolic terms by a time-step that is s{sup 2} times larger than a single explicit time-step. The expanded stability is usually obtained by mapping the short recursion relation of the explicit Runge–Kutta scheme to the recursion relation of some well-known, stable polynomial. Prior work has built temporally first- and second-order accurate super-time-stepping methods around the recursion relation associated with Chebyshev polynomials. Since their stability is based on the boundedness of the Chebyshev polynomials, these methods have been called RKC1 and RKC2. In this work we build temporally first- and second-order accurate super-time-stepping methods around the recursion relation associated with Legendre polynomials. We call these methods RKL1 and RKL2. The RKL1 method is first-order accurate in time; the RKL2 method is second-order accurate in time. We verify that the newly-designed RKL1 and RKL2 schemes have a very desirable monotonicity preserving property for one-dimensional problems – a solution that is monotone at the beginning of a time step retains that property at the end of that time step. It is shown that RKL1 and RKL2 methods are stable for all values of the diffusion coefficient up to the maximum value. We call this a convex monotonicity preserving property and show by examples that it is very

  17. Real-time, step-wise, electrical detection of protein molecules using dielectrophoretically aligned SWNT-film FET aptasensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Taechang; Kim, Ki Su; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Lim, Geunbae

    2010-08-21

    Aptamer functionalized addressable SWNT-film arrays between cantilever electrodes were successfully developed for biosensor applications. Dielectrophoretically aligned SWNT suspended films made possible highly specific and rapid detection of target proteins with a large binding surface area. Thrombin aptamer immobilized SWNT-film FET biosensor resulted in a real-time, label-free, and electrical detection of thrombin molecules down to a concentration of ca. 7 pM with a step-wise rapid response time of several seconds.

  18. The effect of timing electrical stimulation to robotic-assisted stepping on neuromuscular activity and associated kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Sina Askari, MS; TeKang Chao; Ray D. de Leon, PhD; Deborah S. Won, PhD

    2013-01-01

    Results of previous studies raise the question of how timing neuromuscular functional electrical stimulation (FES) to limb movements during stepping might alter neuromuscular control differently than patterned stimulation alone. We have developed a prototype FES system for a rodent model of spinal cord injury (SCI) that times FES to robotic treadmill training (RTT). In this study, one group of rats (n = 6) was trained with our FES+RTT system and received stimulation of the ankle flexor (tibia...

  19. A dissociative fluorescence enhancement technique for one-step time-resolved immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Kaj R.; Mukkala, Veli-Matti; Hakala, Harri H.O.; Maekinen, Pauliina H.; Suonpaeae, Mikko U.; Hemmilae, Ilkka A. [PerkinElmer Inc, Wallac Oy, P.O. Box 10, Turku (Finland)

    2011-02-15

    The limitation of current dissociative fluorescence enhancement techniques is that the lanthanide chelate structures used as molecular probes are not stable enough in one-step assays with high concentrations of complexones or metal ions in the reaction mixture since these substances interfere with lanthanide chelate conjugated to the detector molecule. Lanthanide chelates of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are extremely stable, and we used EuDTPA derivatives conjugated to antibodies as tracers in one-step immunoassays containing high concentrations of complexones or metal ions. Enhancement solutions based on different {beta}-diketones were developed and tested for their fluorescence-enhancing capability in immunoassays with EuDTPA-labelled antibodies. Characteristics tested were fluorescence intensity, analytical sensitivity, kinetics of complex formation and signal stability. Formation of fluorescent complexes is fast (5 min) in the presented enhancement solution with EuDTPA probes withstanding strong complexones (ethylenediaminetetra acetate (EDTA) up to 100 mM) or metal ions (up to 200 {mu}M) in the reaction mixture, the signal is intensive, stable for 4 h and the analytical sensitivity with Eu is 40 fmol/L, Tb 130 fmol/L, Sm 2.1 pmol/L and Dy 8.5 pmol/L. With the improved fluorescence enhancement technique, EDTA and citrate plasma samples as well as samples containing relatively high concentrations of metal ions can be analysed using a one-step immunoassay format also at elevated temperatures. It facilitates four-plexing, is based on one chelate structure for detector molecule labelling and is suitable for immunoassays due to the wide dynamic range and the analytical sensitivity. (orig.)

  20. Phase-step calibration technique based on a two-run-times-two-frame phase-shift method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xianghong

    2006-12-10

    A novel phase-step calibration technique is presented on the basis of a two-run-times-two-frame phase-shift method. First the symmetry factor M is defined to describe the distribution property of the distorted phase due to phase-shifter miscalibration; then the phase-step calibration technique, in which two sets of two interferograms with a straight fringe pattern are recorded and the phase step is obtained by calculating M of the wrapped phase map, is developed. With this technique, a good mirror is required, but no uniform illumination is needed and no complex mathematical operation is involved. This technique can be carried out in situ and is applicable to any phase shifter, whether linear or nonlinear.

  1. Ultra-fast consensus of discrete-time multi-agent systems with multi-step predictive output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenle; Liu, Jianchang

    2016-04-01

    This article addresses the ultra-fast consensus problem of high-order discrete-time multi-agent systems based on a unified consensus framework. A novel multi-step predictive output mechanism is proposed under a directed communication topology containing a spanning tree. By predicting the outputs of a network several steps ahead and adding this information into the consensus protocol, it is shown that the asymptotic convergence factor is improved by a power of q + 1 compared to the routine consensus. The difficult problem of selecting the optimal control gain is solved well by introducing a variable called convergence step. In addition, the ultra-fast formation achievement is studied on the basis of this new consensus protocol. Finally, the ultra-fast consensus with respect to a reference model and robust consensus is discussed. Some simulations are performed to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  2. Time course and localization of brain activity in humor comprehension: An ERP/sLORETA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Midori; Terasawa, Yuri; Osumi, Takahiro; Masui, Keita; Ito, Yuichi; Sato, Arisa; Umeda, Satoshi

    2017-02-15

    Although a number of studies have investigated the incongruity-detection and resolution process in humor comprehension, it is difficult to functionally and anatomically dissociate these processes. We used event-related potentials (ERP) and standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography analysis (sLORETA) to examine the time course and localization of brain activity during incongruity detection and resolution. We used the same materials as in our previous fMRI study. Eighteen participants read funny and unfunny scenarios and judged whether the target sentence was funny or not. Results indicated that ERPs elicited by a funny punch line showed a P2 component followed by a P600 component over the centro-parietal electrode sites. Our sLORETA analysis of the P2 ERPs revealed a stronger activation for the funny vs. unfunny condition in the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). For the P600 ERPs, the funny punch line elicited greater activation in the temporal-parietal regions. These results indicate that incongruity-detection processes activate the SFG and mPFC in the P2 time window, while incongruity-resolution processes generate activation at the temporal-parietal regions in the P600 time window. These results provide the evidence that verbal humor comprehension is processed in steps which start with the incongruity detection in the early P2 time window and followed by a P600 component reflecting incongruity resolution.

  3. Tracking time-varying parameters with local regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Alfred Karsten; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Nielsen, Torben Skov;

    2000-01-01

    This paper shows that the recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm with forgetting factor is a special case of a varying-coe\\$cient model, and a model which can easily be estimated via simple local regression. This observation allows us to formulate a new method which retains the RLS algorithm, bu......, but extends the algorithm by including polynomial approximations. Simulation results are provided, which indicates that this new method is superior to the classical RLS method, if the parameter variations are smooth....

  4. Oscillatory dynamics of vasoconstriction and vasodilation identified by time-localized phase coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, L. W.; Vuksanović, V.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Stefanovska, A.

    2011-06-01

    We apply wavelet-based time-localized phase coherence to investigate the relationship between blood flow and skin temperature, and between blood flow and instantaneous heart rate (IHR), during vasoconstriction and vasodilation provoked by local cooling or heating of the skin. A temperature-controlled metal plate (≈10 cm2) placed on the volar side of the left arm was used to provide the heating and cooling. Beneath the plate, the blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry and the adjacent skin temperature by a thermistor. Two 1 h datasets were collected from each of the ten subjects. In each case a 30 min basal recording was followed by a step change in plate temperature, to either 24 °C or 42 °C. The IHR was derived from simultaneously recorded ECG. We confirm the changes in the energy and frequency of blood flow oscillations during cooling and heating reported earlier. That is, during cooling, there was a significant decrease in the average frequency of myogenic blood flow oscillations (p vasodilation, except in the myogenic interval. Weak phase coherence between temperature and blood flow was observed for unperturbed skin, but it increased in all frequency intervals as a result of heating. It was not significantly affected by cooling. We also show that significant (p vasodilation and vasoconstriction, in response to temperature change, are oscillatory in nature and are independent of central sources of variability.

  5. Local Parametric Analysis of Hedging in Discrete Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossaerts, P.L.M.; Hillion, P.

    1995-01-01

    When continuous-time portfolio weights are applied to a discrete-time hedging problem, errors are likely to occur. This paper evaluates the overall importance of the discretization-induced tracking error. It does so by comparing the performance of Black-Scholes hedge ratios against those obtained

  6. Top-level design and local-level paralysis: Local politics in times of political centralisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stepan, M.; Ahlers, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    China’s leadership under Xi has reinforced the party’s hierarchical commandstructures, demonstrated through its top-down campaigns, focusing on austerity,anti-corruption efforts and party discipline. It has reinvigorated sanctioningand incentive mechanisms for local cadres, with unknown effects on

  7. Free Modal Algebras Revisited: The Step-by-Step Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezhanishvili, N.; Ghilardi, Silvio; Jibladze, Mamuka

    2012-01-01

    We review the step-by-step method of constructing finitely generated free modal algebras. First we discuss the global step-by-step method, which works well for rank one modal logics. Next we refine the global step-by-step method to obtain the local step-by-step method, which is applicable beyond ran

  8. Convergence of a class of semi-implicit time-stepping schemes for nonsmooth rigid multibody dynamics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrea, B. I.; Anitescu, M.; Potra, F. A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Pennsylvania; Univ. of Maryland

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present a framework for the convergence analysis in a measure differential inclusion sense of a class of time-stepping schemes for multibody dynamics with contacts, joints, and friction. This class of methods solves one linear complementarity problem per step and contains the semi-implicit Euler method, as well as trapezoidal-like methods for which second-order convergence was recently proved under certain conditions. By using the concept of a reduced friction cone, the analysis includes, for the first time, a convergence result for the case that includes joints. An unexpected intermediary result is that we are able to define a discrete velocity function of bounded variation, although the natural discrete velocity function produced by our algorithm may have unbounded variation.

  9. A fast, robust, and simple implicit method for adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh-refinement grids

    CERN Document Server

    Benoit, Commercon; Romain, Teyssier

    2014-01-01

    Implicit solvers present strong limitations when used on supercomputing facilities and in particular for adaptive mesh-refinement codes. We present a new method for implicit adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh refinement-grids and implementing it in the radiation hydrodynamics solver we designed for the RAMSES code for astrophysical purposes and, more particularly, for protostellar collapse. We briefly recall the radiation hydrodynamics equations and the adaptive time-stepping methodology used for hydrodynamical solvers. We then introduce the different types of boundary conditions (Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin) that are used at the interface between levels and present our implementation of the new method in the RAMSES code. The method is tested against classical diffusion and radiation hydrodynamics tests, after which we present an application for protostellar collapse. We show that using Dirichlet boundary conditions at level interfaces is a good compromise between robustness and accuracy and that it ca...

  10. Adaptive statistic tracking control based on two-step neural networks with time delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yang; Guo, Lei; Wang, Hong

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a new type of control framework for dynamical stochastic systems, called statistic tracking control (STC). The system considered is general and non-Gaussian and the tracking objective is the statistical information of a given target probability density function (pdf), rather than a deterministic signal. The control aims at making the statistical information of the output pdfs to follow those of a target pdf. For such a control framework, a variable structure adaptive tracking control strategy is first established using two-step neural network models. Following the B-spline neural network approximation to the integrated performance function, the concerned problem is transferred into the tracking of given weights. The dynamic neural network (DNN) is employed to identify the unknown nonlinear dynamics between the control input and the weights related to the integrated function. To achieve the required control objective, an adaptive controller based on the proposed DNN is developed so as to track a reference trajectory. Stability analysis for both the identification and tracking errors is developed via the use of Lyapunov stability criterion. Simulations are given to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  11. Next Step for STEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Claire [CTSI; Bremner, Brenda [CTSI

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  12. Next Step for STEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Claire [CTSI; Bremner, Brenda [CTSI

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  13. Local Social Services in Nordic countries in Times of Disaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlberg, Rasmus; Eydal, Guðný Björk; Ómarsdóttir, Ingibjörg Lilja;

    , the services are legally obligated to make contingency plans. Furthermore, Finland, Norway and Sweden have prepared special guidelines on contingency planning for social services. In recent years the Nordic countries have all faced disasters due to natural, technical and man-made hazards. The frequency...... of the Svalbard Group. • There is a need to make the role of social services known in the emergency management systems, so that the relevant parties can activate the full potential of social services in all phases of the disaster cycle. It is likewise important to inform the social services of emergency......The project focused on the emergency management systems in the five Nordic countries. It investigated whether local social services have a formal role in the contingency planning of the systems. The project was part of The Nordic Welfare Watch research project during the Icelandic Presidency...

  14. Assessment of radiopacity of restorative composite resins with various target distances and exposure times and a modified aluminum step wedge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejeh Mir, Arash Poorsattar [Dentistry Student Research Committee (DSRC), Dental Materials Research Center, Dentistry School, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bejeh Mir, Morvarid Poorsattar [Private Practice of Orthodontics, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-09-15

    ANSI/ADA has established standards for adequate radiopacity. This study was aimed to assess the changes in radiopacity of composite resins according to various tube-target distances and exposure times. Five 1-mm thick samples of Filtek P60 and Clearfil composite resins were prepared and exposed with six tube-target distance/exposure time setups (i.e., 40 cm, 0.2 seconds; 30 cm, 0.2 seconds; 30 cm, 0.16 seconds, 30 cm, 0.12 seconds; 15 cm, 0.2 seconds; 15 cm, 0.12 seconds) performing at 70 kVp and 7 mA along with a 12-step aluminum stepwedge (1 mm incremental steps) using a PSP digital sensor. Thereafter, the radiopacities measured with Digora for Windows software 2.5 were converted to absorbencies (i.e., A=-log (1-G/255)), where A is the absorbency and G is the measured gray scale). Furthermore, the linear regression model of aluminum thickness and absorbency was developed and used to convert the radiopacity of dental materials to the equivalent aluminum thickness. In addition, all calculations were compared with those obtained from a modified 3-step stepwedge (i.e., using data for the 2nd, 5th, and 8th steps). The radiopacities of the composite resins differed significantly with various setups (p<0.001) and between the materials (p<0.001). The best predicted model was obtained for the 30 cm 0.2 seconds setup (R2=0.999). Data from the reduced modified stepwedge was remarkable and comparable with the 12-step stepwedge. Within the limits of the present study, our findings support that various setups might influence the radiopacity of dental materials on digital radiographs.

  15. Machine learning strategies for multi-step-ahead time series forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Taieb, Souhaib

    2014-01-01

    How much electricity is going to be consumed for the next 24 hours? What will be the temperature for the next three days? What will be the number of sales of a certain product for the next few months? Answering these questions often requires forecasting several future observations from a given sequence of historical observations, called a time series. Historically, time series forecasting has been mainly studied in econometrics and statistics. In the last two decades, machine learning, a fiel...

  16. Reduced Numerical Model for Methane Hydrate Formation under Conditions of Variable Salinity. Time-Stepping Variants and Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Peszynska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a reduced computational model of methane hydrate formation in variable salinity conditions, and give details on the discretization and phase equilibria implementation. We describe three time-stepping variants: Implicit, Semi-implicit, and Sequential, and we compare the accuracy and efficiency of these variants depending on the spatial and temporal discretization parameters. We also study the sensitivity of the model to the simulation parameters and in particular to the reduced phase equilibria model.

  17. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  18. Effect of Time Step Size and Turbulence Model on the Open Water Hydrodynamic Performance Prediction of Contra-Rotating Propellers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhan-zhi; XIONG Ying

    2013-01-01

    A growing interest has been devoted to the contra-rotating propellers (CRPs) due to their high propulsive efficiency,torque balance,low fuel consumption,low cavitations,low noise performance and low hull vibration.Compared with the single-screw system,it is more difficult for the open water performance prediction because forward and aft propellers interact with each other and generate a more complicated flow field around the CRPs system.The current work focuses on the open water performance prediction of contra-rotating propellers by RANS and sliding mesh method considering the effect of computational time step size and turbulence model.The validation study has been performed on two sets of contra-rotating propellers developed by David W Taylor Naval Ship R & D center.Compared with the experimental data,it shows that RANS with sliding mesh method and SST k-ω turbulence model has a good precision in the open water performance prediction of contra-rotating propellers,and small time step size can improve the level of accuracy for CRPs with the same blade number of forward and aft propellers,while a relatively large time step size is a better choice for CRPs with different blade numbers.

  19. Modeling of space-time focusing of localized nondiffracting pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Besieris, Ioannis M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we develop a method capable of modeling the space-time focusing of nondiffracting pulses. These pulses can possess arbitrary peak velocities and, in addition to being resistant to diffraction, can have their peak intensities and focusing positions chosen a priori. More specifically, we can choose multiple locations (spatial ranges) of space and time focalization; also, the pulse intensities can be chosen in advance. The pulsed wave solutions presented here can have very interesting applications in many different fields, such as free-space optical communications, remote sensing, medical apparatus, etc.

  20. Modeling of Space-Time Focusing of Localized Nondiffracting Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop a method capable of modeling the space-time focusing of nondiffracting pulses. The new pulses can possess arbitrary peak velocities and, in addition to being resistant to diffraction, can have their peak intensities and focusing positions chosen a priori. More specifically, we can choose multiple locations (spatial ranges) of space/time focalization; also, the pulse intensities can be chosen in advance. The pulsed wave solutions presented here can have very interesting applications in many different fields, such as free-space optical communications, remote sensing, medical apparatus, etc.

  1. Two-step memory within Continuous Time Random Walk. Description of double-action market dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gubiec, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    By means of a novel version of the Continuous-Time Random Walk (CTRW) model with memory, we describe, for instance, the stochastic process of a single share price on a double-auction market within the high frequency time scale. The memory present in the model is understood as dependence between successive share price jumps, while waiting times between price changes are considered as i.i.d. random variables. The range of this memory is defined herein by dependence between three successive jumps of the process. This dependence is motivated both empirically, by analysis of empirical two-point histograms, and theoretically, by analysis of the bid-ask bounce mechanism containing some delay. Our model turns out to be analytically solvable, which enables us a direct comparison of its predictions with empirical counterparts, for instance, with so significant and commonly used quantity as velocity autocorrelation function. This work strongly extends the capabilities of the CTRW formalism.

  2. Optimized Schwarz waveform relaxation and discontinuous Galerkin time stepping for heterogeneous problems

    CERN Document Server

    Halpern, Laurence; Japhet, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    We design and analyze a Schwarz waveform relaxation algorithm for domain decomposition of advection-diffusion-reaction problems with strong heterogeneities. The interfaces are curved, and we use optimized Robin or Ventcell transmission conditions. We analyze the semi-discretization in time with Discontinuous Galerkin as well. We also show two-dimensional numerical results using generalized mortar finite elements in space.

  3. Time stepping free numerical solution of linear differential equations: Krylov subspace versus waveform relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochev, Mikhail A.; Oseledets, I.V.; Tyrtyshnikov, E.E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, we propose an efficient implementation of the continuous time waveform relaxation method based on block Krylov subspaces. Second, we compare this new implementation against Krylov subspace methods combined with the shift and invert technique.

  4. Construction Time Analysis For Different Steps In Drill-AndBlast Method Of Hydro Power Tunnel Excavation

    OpenAIRE

    Erion Periku; Algest Aga

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important factors influencing the decision whether and how a tunnel is to be built are the estimated time and costs of construction. This study is based on construction time analysis for different steps in drill-and-blast method of hydro power tunnel excavation in working phase of 6.256,00 meters of tunnels which have different diameters varying from 4,20 to 7,60. There are made 737 field measurements and it is seen that many of the machinery and workmanship produc...

  5. The Local Fractal Properties of the Financial Time Series on the Polish Stock Exchange Market

    CERN Document Server

    Grech, D

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the local fractal properties of the financial time series based on the evolution of the Warsaw Stock Exchange Index (WIG) connected with the largest developing financial market in Europe. Calculating the local Hurst exponent for the WIG time series we find an interesting dependence between the behavior of the local fractal properties of the WIG time series and the crashes appearance on the financial market.

  6. Biomedical Signals Local Maxims Detection Using Time Frequency Transforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiz Romulus

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The wealth of genomic data currentlyavailable in online databases has caused a need fornew algorithms and analysis techniques to interpretgenomic data. In this paper we explore techniques forlocating critical genomic data in protein sequences andfor estimating the similarity between proteins. Byconverting genomic data into numeric sequencessignal processing methods can be applied to processthe resulting information. We demonstrate the use ofthe Short-Time Fourier Transform and theContinuous Wavelet Transform in locating importantamino acid properties contained in protein sequences.

  7. Timing of Z-ring localization in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, R.; Reshes, G.; Carmon, G.; Fischer-Friedrich, E.; Gov, N. S.; Fishov, I.; Feingold, M.

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial cell division takes place in three phases: Z-ring formation at midcell, followed by divisome assembly and building of the septum per se. Using time-lapse microscopy of live bacteria and a high-precision cell edge detection method, we have previously found the true time for the onset of septation, τc, and the time between consecutive divisions, τg. Here, we combine the above method with measuring the dynamics of the FtsZ-GFP distribution in individual Escherichia coli cells to determine the Z-ring positioning time, τz. To analyze the FtsZ-GFP distribution along the cell, we used the integral fluorescence profile (IFP), which was obtained by integrating the fluorescence intensity across the cell width. We showed that the IFP may be approximated by an exponential peak and followed the peak evolution throughout the cell cycle, to find a quantitative criterion for the positioning of the Z-ring and hence the value of τz. We defined τz as the transition from oscillatory to stable behavior of the mean IFP position. This criterion was corroborated by comparison of the experimental results to a theoretical model for the FtsZ dynamics, driven by Min oscillations. We found that τz cells that were analyzed. Moreover, our data suggested that τz is independent of τc, τg and the cell length at birth, L0. These results are consistent with the current understanding of the Z-ring positioning and cell septation processes.

  8. Spike-timing-based computation in sound localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan F M Goodman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Spike timing is precise in the auditory system and it has been argued that it conveys information about auditory stimuli, in particular about the location of a sound source. However, beyond simple time differences, the way in which neurons might extract this information is unclear and the potential computational advantages are unknown. The computational difficulty of this task for an animal is to locate the source of an unexpected sound from two monaural signals that are highly dependent on the unknown source signal. In neuron models consisting of spectro-temporal filtering and spiking nonlinearity, we found that the binaural structure induced by spatialized sounds is mapped to synchrony patterns that depend on source location rather than on source signal. Location-specific synchrony patterns would then result in the activation of location-specific assemblies of postsynaptic neurons. We designed a spiking neuron model which exploited this principle to locate a variety of sound sources in a virtual acoustic environment using measured human head-related transfer functions. The model was able to accurately estimate the location of previously unknown sounds in both azimuth and elevation (including front/back discrimination in a known acoustic environment. We found that multiple representations of different acoustic environments could coexist as sets of overlapping neural assemblies which could be associated with spatial locations by Hebbian learning. The model demonstrates the computational relevance of relative spike timing to extract spatial information about sources independently of the source signal.

  9. Hybrid High Fidelity Modeling of Radar Scenarios Using Atemporal, Discrete Event, and Time Step Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    computational power. Such simplifications can produce misleading results. For example, Radar Cross Section (RCS) effects in response to time-varying...and corresponding limitations of computational power. Such simplifications can produce misleading results. For example, Radar Cross Section (RCS...135 xvi Figure 6.1 The RCS of F-16 Falcon fighter model which is simulated by CST Studio software with signal frequency = 8 GHz. In (a), the RCS of

  10. Stability of networked control systems with multi-step delay based on time-division algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changlin MA; Huajing FANG

    2005-01-01

    A new control mode is proposed for a networked control system whose network-induced delay is longer than a sampling period. A time-division algorithm is presented to implement the control and for the mathematical modeling of such networked control system. The infinite horizon controller is designed, which renders the networked control system mean square exponentially stable. Simulation results show the validity of the proposed theory.

  11. Effect of moisture and drying time on the bond strength of the one-step self-etching adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Lee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To investigate the effect of dentin moisture degree and air-drying time on dentin-bond strength of two different one-step self-etching adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Twenty-four human third molars were used for microtensile bond strength testing of G-Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond. The dentin surface was either blot-dried or air-dried before applying these adhesive agents. After application of the adhesive agent, three different air drying times were evaluated: 1, 5, and 10 sec. Composite resin was build up to 4 mm thickness and light cured for 40 sec with 2 separate layers. Then the tooth was sectioned and trimmed to measure the microtensile bond strength using a universal testing machine. The measured bond strengths were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and regression analysis was done (p = 0.05. Results All three factors, materials, dentin wetness and air drying time, showed significant effect on the microtensile bond strength. Clearfil S3 Bond, dry dentin surface and 10 sec air drying time showed higher bond strength. Conclusions Within the limitation of this experiment, air drying time after the application of the one-step self-etching adhesive agent was the most significant factor affecting the bond strength, followed by the material difference and dentin moisture before applying the adhesive agent.

  12. A stochastical event-based continuous time step rainfall generator based on Poisson rectangular pulse and microcanonical random cascade models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohle, Ina; Niebisch, Michael; Zha, Tingting; Schümberg, Sabine; Müller, Hannes; Maurer, Thomas; Hinz, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall variability within a storm is of major importance for fast hydrological processes, e.g. surface runoff, erosion and solute dissipation from surface soils. To investigate and simulate the impacts of within-storm variabilities on these processes, long time series of rainfall with high resolution are required. Yet, observed precipitation records of hourly or higher resolution are in most cases available only for a small number of stations and only for a few years. To obtain long time series of alternating rainfall events and interstorm periods while conserving the statistics of observed rainfall events, the Poisson model can be used. Multiplicative microcanonical random cascades have been widely applied to disaggregate rainfall time series from coarse to fine temporal resolution. We present a new coupling approach of the Poisson rectangular pulse model and the multiplicative microcanonical random cascade model that preserves the characteristics of rainfall events as well as inter-storm periods. In the first step, a Poisson rectangular pulse model is applied to generate discrete rainfall events (duration and mean intensity) and inter-storm periods (duration). The rainfall events are subsequently disaggregated to high-resolution time series (user-specified, e.g. 10 min resolution) by a multiplicative microcanonical random cascade model. One of the challenges of coupling these models is to parameterize the cascade model for the event durations generated by the Poisson model. In fact, the cascade model is best suited to downscale rainfall data with constant time step such as daily precipitation data. Without starting from a fixed time step duration (e.g. daily), the disaggregation of events requires some modifications of the multiplicative microcanonical random cascade model proposed by Olsson (1998): Firstly, the parameterization of the cascade model for events of different durations requires continuous functions for the probabilities of the multiplicative

  13. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, John M., E-mail: finn@lanl.gov [T-5, Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  14. Energy–momentum localization in Marder space–time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Aygün; M Aygün; I Tarhan

    2007-01-01

    Considering the Einstein, Møller, Bergmann–Thomson, Landau–Lifshitz (LL), Papapetrou, Qadir–Sharif and Weinberg's definitions in general relativity, we find the momentum four-vector of the closed Universe based on Marder space–time. The momentum four-vector (due to matter plus field) is found to be zero. These results support the viewpoints of Banerjee–Sen, Xulu and Aydoġdu–Saltı. Another point is that our study agrees with the previous works of Cooperstock–Israelit, Rosen, Johri et al.

  15. Energy Momentum Localization in Marder Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Aygun, S; Tarhan, I; Aygun, Melis; Aygun, Sezgin; Tarhan, Ismail

    2006-01-01

    Considering the Einstein, Moller, Bergmann-Thomson, Landau-Lifshitz (LL), Papapetrou, Qadir-Sharif and Weinberg's definitions in general relativity, we find the momentum four-vector of the closed universe based on Marder space-time. The momentum four-vector (due to matter plus field) is found to be zero. These results supports the viewpoints of Banerjee-Sen, Xulu and Aydogdu-Salti. Another point is that our study agree with previous works of Cooperstock-Israelit, Rosen, Johri et al.

  16. Linear Unbiased Optimal Filter for Discrete-Time Systems with One-Step Random Delays and Inconsecutive Packet Dropouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ding

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the linear unbiased minimum variance estimation problem for discrete-time stochastic linear control systems with one-step random delay and inconsecutive packet dropout. A new model is developed to describe the phenomena of the one-step delay and inconsecutive packet dropout by employing a Bernoulli distributed stochastic variable. Based on the model, a recursive linear unbiased optimal filter in the linear minimum variance sense is designed by the method of completing the square. The solution to the linear filter is given by three equations including a Riccati equation, a Lyapunov equation and a simple difference equation. A sufficient condition for the existence of the steady-state filter is given. A simulation shows the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.    

  17. Sensitivity of ensemble Lagrangian reconstructions to assimilated wind time step resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pisso

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to define the optimal temporal and spatial resolution required for accurate offline diffusive Lagrangian reconstructions of high resolution in-situ tracers measurements based on meteorological wind fields and on coarse resolution 3-D tracer distributions. Increasing the time resolution of the advecting winds from three to one hour intervals has a modest impact on diffusive reconstructions in the case studied. This result is discussed in terms of the effect on the geometry of transported clouds of points in order to set out a method to assess the effect of meteorological flow on the transport of atmospheric tracers.

  18. One-step Real-time Food Quality Analysis by Simultaneous DSC-FTIR Microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Lin, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses an analytical technique that combines differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared (DSC-FTIR) microspectroscopy, which simulates the accelerated stability test and detects decomposition products simultaneously in real time. We show that the DSC-FTIR technique is a fast, simple and powerful analytical tool with applications in food sciences. This technique has been applied successfully to the simultaneous investigation of: encapsulated squid oil stability; the dehydration and intramolecular condensation of sweetener (aspartame); the dehydration, rehydration and solidification of trehalose; and online monitoring of the Maillard reaction for glucose (Glc)/asparagine (Asn) in the solid state. This technique delivers rapid and appropriate interpretations with food science applications.

  19. First steps towards real-time radiography at the NECTAR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecherl, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) (Germany)], E-mail: thomas.buecherl@radiochemie.de; Wagner, F.M. [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) (Germany)

    2009-06-21

    The beam tube SR10 at Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) provides an intense beam of fission neutrons for medical application (MEDAPP) and for radiography and tomography of technical and other objects (NECTAR). The high neutron flux of up to 9.8E+07 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (depending on filters and collimation) with a mean energy of about 1.9 MeV at the sample position at the NECTAR facility prompted an experimental feasibility study to investigate the potential for real-time (RT) radiography.

  20. Kalman Filtered Daily GRACE Gravity Field Solutions in Near Real-Time- First Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvas, Andreas; Mayer-Gurr, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    As part of the EGSIEM (European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management) project, a technology demonstrator for a near real-time (NRT) gravity field service will be established. In preparation of the operational phase, several aspects of the daily gravity field processing chain at Graz University of Technology have been inspected in order to improve the gravity field solutions and move towards NRT. The effect of these adaptions is investigated by comparison with post-processing and forward-only filtered solutions and evaluated using in-situ data.

  1. A Novel Bioinspired Vision System: A Step toward Real-Time Human-Robot Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahman Hafiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Building a human-like robot that could be involved in our daily lives is a dream of many scientists. Achieving a sophisticated robot's vision system, which can enhance the robot's real-time interaction ability with the human, is one of the main keys toward realizing such an autonomous robot. In this work, we are suggesting a bioinspired vision system that helps to develop an advanced human-robot interaction in an autonomous humanoid robot. First, we enhance the robot's vision accuracy online by applying a novel dynamic edge detection algorithm abstracted from the rules that the horizontal cells play in the mammalian retina. Second, in order to support the first algorithm, we improve the robot's tracking ability by designing a variant photoreceptors distribution corresponding to what exists in the human vision system. The experimental results verified the validity of the model. The robot could have a clear vision in real time and build a mental map that assisted it to be aware of the frontal users and to develop a positive interaction with them.

  2. Dual Time Stepping Algorithms With the High Order Harmonic Balance Method for Contact Interfaces With Fretting-Wear

    CERN Document Server

    Salles, Loic; Gouskov, Alexandre; Jean, Pierrick; Thouverez, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Contact interfaces with dry friction are frequently used in turbomachinery. Dry friction damping produced by the sliding surfaces of these interfaces reduces the amplitude of bladed-disk vibration. The relative displacements at these interfaces lead to fretting-wear which reduces the average life expectancy of the structure. Frequency response functions are calculated numerically by using the multi-harmonic balance method (mHBM). The dynamic Lagrangian frequency-time method is used to calculate contact forces in the frequency domain. A new strategy for solving nonlinear systems based on dual time stepping is applied. This method is faster than using Newton solvers. It was used successfully for solving Nonlinear CFD equations in the frequency domain. This new approach allows identifying the steady state of worn systems by integrating wear rate equations a on dual time scale. The dual time equations are integrated by an implicit scheme. Of the different orders tested, the first order scheme provided the best re...

  3. PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Adaptive Time-Step Method Demonstrated for the HTTR LOFC#1 Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Robin Ivey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Balestra, Paolo [Univ. of Rome (Italy); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-05-01

    A collaborative effort between Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of the Civil Nuclear Energy Working Group is underway to model the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) loss of forced cooling (LOFC) transient that was performed in December 2010. The coupled version of RELAP5-3D, a thermal fluids code, and PHISICS, a neutronics code, were used to model the transient. The focus of this report is to summarize the changes made to the PHISICS-RELAP5-3D code for implementing an adaptive time step methodology into the code for the first time, and to test it using the full HTTR PHISICS/RELAP5-3D model developed by JAEA and INL and the LOFC simulation. Various adaptive schemes are available based on flux or power convergence criteria that allow significantly larger time steps to be taken by the neutronics module. The report includes a description of the HTTR and the associated PHISICS/RELAP5-3D model test results as well as the University of Rome sub-contractor report documenting the adaptive time step theory and methodology implemented in PHISICS/RELAP5-3D. Two versions of the HTTR model were tested using 8 and 26 energy groups. It was found that most of the new adaptive methods lead to significant improvements in the LOFC simulation time required without significant accuracy penalties in the prediction of the fission power and the fuel temperature. In the best performing 8 group model scenarios, a LOFC simulation of 20 hours could be completed in real-time, or even less than real-time, compared with the previous version of the code that completed the same transient 3-8 times slower than real-time. A few of the user choice combinations between the methodologies available and the tolerance settings did however result in unacceptably high errors or insignificant gains in simulation time. The study is concluded with recommendations on which methods to use for this HTTR model. An important caveat is that these findings

  4. Geometrical Models of the Locally Anisotropic Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Balan, V; Kokarev, S S; Pavlov, D G; Siparov, S V; Voicu, N

    2011-01-01

    Along with the construction of non-Lorentz-invariant effective field theories, recent studies which are based on geometric models of Finsler space-time become more and more popular. In this respect, the Finslerian approach to the problem of Lorentz symmetry violation is characterized by the fact that the violation of Lorentz symmetry is not accompanied by a violation of relativistic symmetry. That means, in particular, that preservation of relativistic symmetry can be considered as a rigorous criterion of the viability for any non-Lorentz-invariant effective field theory. Although this paper has a review character, it contains (with few exceptions) only those results on Finsler extensions of relativity theory, that were obtained by the authors.

  5. Time-resolved, local temperature measurements during pulsed laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappes, Ralf S; Li Chen; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Gutmann, Jochen S, E-mail: kappes@mpip-mainz.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To analyse processes during laser heating, one needs to be able to measure temperatures of about 1000 K within one microsecond and with micrometre resolution. To achieve this accuracy, we set up a high-performance optical detection system with a microsecond gated camera in combination with selected interference filters to detect the thermal emission spectrum in the visible range. By fitting the emission spectrum to Planck's law, we are able to collect an area temperature profile for time intervals as short as one microsecond. Thus we can show that a polymer film, which is doped with an organic dye for energy conversion, can reach temperatures of at least 900 K, which is high above its 'normal' decomposition temperature. It is, furthermore, possible to relate the temperature to the effect of the laser beam on the polymer film.

  6. Acceleration of Ab Initio QM/MM Calculations under Periodic Boundary Conditions by Multiscale and Multiple Time Step Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kwangho

    2014-10-14

    Development of multiscale ab initio quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (AI-QM/MM) method for periodic boundary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and their acceleration by multiple time step approach are described. The developed method achieves accuracy and efficiency by integrating the AI-QM/MM level of theory and the previously developed semiempirical (SE) QM/MM-Ewald sum method [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2005, 1, 2] extended to the smooth particle-mesh Ewald (PME) summation method. In the developed methods, the total energy of the simulated system is evaluated at the SE-QM/MM-PME level of theory to include long-range QM/MM electrostatic interactions, which is then corrected on the fly using the AI-QM/MM level of theory within the real space cutoff. The resulting energy expression enables decomposition of total forces applied to each atom into forces determined at the low-level SE-QM/MM method and correction forces at the AI-QM/MM level, to integrate the system using the reversible reference system propagator algorithm. The resulting method achieves a substantial speed-up of the entire calculation by minimizing the number of time-consuming energy and gradient evaluations at the AI-QM/MM level. Test calculations show that the developed multiple time step AI-QM/MM method yields MD trajectories and potential of mean force profiles comparable to single time step QM/MM results. The developed method, together with message passing interface (MPI) parallelization, accelerates the present AI-QM/MM MD simulations about 30-fold relative to the speed of single-core AI-QM/MM simulations for the molecular systems tested in the present work, making the method less than one order slower than the SE-QM/MM methods under periodic boundary conditions.

  7. In the time of significant generational diversity - surgical leadership must step up!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, Samuel R; O'Donnell, Mark E; Gray, Richard J

    2014-02-01

    The diverse attitudes and motivations of surgeons and surgical trainees within different age groups present an important challenge for surgical leaders and educators. These challenges to surgical leadership are not unique, and other industries have likewise needed to grapple with how best to manage these various age groups. The authors will herein explore management and leadership for surgeons in a time of age diversity, define generational variations within "Baby-Boomer", "Generation X" and "Generation Y" populations, and identify work ethos concepts amongst these three groups. The surgical community must understand and embrace these concepts in order to continue to attract a stellar pool of applicants from medical school. By not accepting the changing attitudes and motivations of young trainees and medical students, we may disenfranchise a high percentage of potential future surgeons. Surgical training programs will fill, but will they contain the highest quality trainees?

  8. Modelling of Thermal Advective Reactive Flow in Hydrothermal Mineral Systems Using an Implicit Time-stepped Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, P. G.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding chemical and thermal processes taking place in hydrothermal mineral deposition systems could well be a key to unlocking new mineral reserves through improved targeting of exploration efforts. To aid in this understanding it is very helpful to be able to model such processes with sufficient fidelity to test process hypotheses. To gain understanding, it is often sufficient to obtain semi-quantitative results that model the broad aspects of the complex set of thermal and chemical effects taking place in hydrothermal systems. For example, it is often sufficient to gain an understanding of where thermal, geometric and chemical factors converge to precipitate gold (say) without being perfectly precise about how much gold is precipitated. The traditional approach is to use incompressible Darcy flow together with the Boussinesq approximation. From the flow field, the heat equation is used to advect-conduct the heat. The flow field is also used to transport solutes by solving an advection-dispersion-diffusion equation. The reactions in the fluid and between fluid and rock act as source terms for these advection-dispersion equations. Many existing modelling systems that are used for simulating such systems use explicit time marching schemes and finite differences. The disadvantage of this approach is the need to work on rectilinear grids and the number of time steps required by the Courant condition in the solute transport step. The second factor can be particularly significant if the chemical system is complex, requiring (at a minimum) an equilibrium calculation at each grid point at each time step. In the approach we describe, we use finite elements rather than finite differences, and the pressure, heat and advection-dispersion equations are solved implicitly. The general idea is to put unconditional numerical stability of the time integration first, and let accuracy assume a secondary role. It is in this sense that the method is semi-quantiative. However

  9. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Ninad B; Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment.

  10. The next step in real time data processing for large scale physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Paramesvaran, Sudarshan

    2016-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC represents one of the most challenging scientific environments for real time data analysis and processing. The steady increase in instantaneous luminosity will result in the CMS detector producing around 150 TB/s of data, only a small fraction of which is useful for interesting Physics studies. During 2015 the CMS collaboration will be completing a total upgrade of its Level 1 Trigger to deal with these conditions. In this talk a description of the major components of this complex system will be described. This will include a discussion of custom-designed electronic processing boards, built to the uTCA specification with AMC cards based on Xilinx 7 FPGAs and a network of high-speed optical links. In addition, novel algorithms will be described which deliver excellent performance in FPGAs and are combined with highly stable software frameworks to ensure a minimal risk of downtime. This upgrade is planned to take data from 2016. However a system of parallel running has been developed that will ...

  11. Repensar la publicidad local en tiempos de crisis/Rethinking local advertising in times of crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis GONZÁLEZ-ESTEBAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Durante los últimos años se han realizado numerosos estudios analizando la crisis de la prensa tradicional en España y aportando claves, más o menos acertadas, para su necesaria reinvención. La crisis global, unida a una crisis del sector prensa, ha golpeado duramente a uno de los eslabones más débiles, pero a la vez más necesarios: el periodismo de proximidad. Tal es así que en el ecosistema mediático local que analiza este libro se han producido cambios traumáticos en muy poco tiempo. En este sentido, cabe destacar el caso de uno de los medios investigados por la autora: el diario La Verdad. Cuando se inicia esta investigación, Vocento, empresa propietaria de La Verdad de Murcia, todavía mantenía las ediciones de Albacete y Elche (fundadas en los años setenta del pasado siglo y Alicante. A día de hoy, la única edición que ha sobrevivido a la crisis es la de Alicante que por otra parte es uno de los objetos de estudio de este libro, junto con el diario Información, líder en esta provincia y propiedad del grupo Prensa Ibérica.

  12. Short time step continuous rainfall modeling and simulation of extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callau Poduje, A. C.; Haberlandt, U.

    2017-09-01

    The design, planning, operation and overall assessment of urban drainage systems require long and continuous rain series in a high temporal resolution. Unfortunately, the availability of this data is usually short. Nevertheless a precipitation model could be used to tackle this shortcoming; therefore it is in the aim of this study to present a stochastic point precipitation model to reproduce average rainfall event properties along with extreme values. For this purpose a model is proposed to generate long synthetic series of rainfall for a temporal resolution of 5 min. It is based on an alternating renewal framework and events are characterized by variables describing durations, amounts and peaks. A group of 24 stations located in the north of Germany is used to set up and test the model. The adequate modeling of joint behaviour of rainfall amount and duration is found to be essential for reproducing the observed properties, especially for the extreme events. Copulas are advantageous tools for modeling these variables jointly; however caution must be taken in the selection of the proper copula. The inclusion of seasonality and small events is as well tested and found to be useful. The model is directly validated by generating long synthetic time series and comparing them with observed ones. An indirect validation is as well performed based on a fictional urban hydrological system. The proposed model is capable of reproducing seasonal behaviour and main characteristics of the rainfall events including extremes along with urban flooding and overflow behaviour. Overall the performance of the model is acceptable compared to the design practice. The proposed model is simple to interpret, fast to implement and to transfer to other regions, whilst showing acceptable results.

  13. Water age, exposure time, and local flushing time in semi-enclosed, tidal basins with negligible freshwater inflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; Defina, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of tidally flushed, semi-enclosed basins with negligible freshwater inflow, and under steady periodic flow conditions, three frequently used local transport time scales to quantify the efficiency of water renewal, namely water age, exposure time, and local flushing time are studied and compared to each other. In these environments, water renewal is strongly controlled by diffusion, and it is significantly affected by the return flow (i.e., the fraction of effluent water that returns into the basin on each flood tide). The definition of water age is here modified to account for the return flow, in analogy with exposure time and local flushing time. We consider approximate time scales, whose accuracy is analyzed, in order to overcome problems related to the size of the computational domain and to reduce the computational effort. A new approximate procedure is introduced to estimate water age, which is based on the water aging rate. Also, the concept of local flushing time as a relevant time scale is introduced. Under steady periodic conditions, we demonstrate that the local flushing time quantitatively corresponds to water age, and well approximates exposure time when the flow is dominated by diffusion. Since the effort required to compute water age and exposure time is greater than that required to compute the local flushing time, the present results can also have a practical interest in the assessment of water renewal efficiency of semi-enclosed water basins. The results of a modeling study, in which the lagoon of Venice is used as a benchmark, confirm the substantial quantitative equivalence between these three transport time scales in highly diffusive environments.

  14. Construction Time Analysis For Different Steps In Drill-AndBlast Method Of Hydro Power Tunnel Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erion Periku

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors influencing the decision whether and how a tunnel is to be built are the estimated time and costs of construction. This study is based on construction time analysis for different steps in drill-and-blast method of hydro power tunnel excavation in working phase of 6.256,00 meters of tunnels which have different diameters varying from 4,20 to 7,60. There are made 737 field measurements and it is seen that many of the machinery and workmanship productions rates per unit time are significantly lower, varying from 35% to 50%, of that defined in their technical specifications, measurements indicate that highest performance is reached in 7,60m diameter tunnel excavation. It is believed that these data will be helpful for planning and management process of tunnel construction projects, especially those planned to be built in Albania where labor market carries similar features.

  15. Differences in onset time between the vastus medialis and lateralis during stair stepping in individuals with genu varum or valgum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seol; Chung, Jun-Sub; Kong, Yong-Soo; Ko, Yu-Min; Park, Ji-Won

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the difference in onset time between the vastus medialis and lateralis according to knee alignment during stair ascent and descent to examine the effects of knee alignment on the quadriceps during stair stepping. [Subjects] Fifty-two adults (20 with genu varum, 12 with genu valgum, and 20 controls) were enrolled. Subjects with > 4 cm between the medial epicondyles of the knees were placed in the genu varum group, whereas subjects with > 4 cm between the medial malleolus of the ankle were placed in the genu valgum group. [Methods] Surface electromyography was used to measure the onset times of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis during stair ascent and descent. [Results] The vastus lateralis showed more delayed firing than the vastus medialis in the genu varum group, whereas vastus medialis firing was more delayed than vastus lateralis firing in the genu valgum group. Significant differences in onset time were detected between stair ascent and descent in the genu varum and valgum groups. [Conclusion] Genu varum and valgum affect quadriceps firing during stair stepping. Therefore, selective rehabilitation training of the quadriceps femoris should be considered to prevent pain or knee malalignment deformities.

  16. Application of local wave time-frequency method in reciprocating mechanical fault diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lei; Wang Fengtao; Ma Xiaojiang

    2006-01-01

    To diagnose the reciprocating mechanical fault. We utilized local wave time-frequency approach. Firstly,we gave the principle. Secondly, the application of local wave time-frequency was given. Finally, we discussed its virtue in reciprocating mechanical fault diagnosis.

  17. Generalized Local Time of the Indefinite Wiener Integral:White Noise Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjun GUO

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,the generalized local time of the indefinite Wiener integral Xt is discussed through white noise approach,which means to regard the local time as a Hida distribution.Moreover,similar result is also obtained in case of two independent Brownian motions by using the similar approach.

  18. Comparison of a Local Linearization Algorithm with Standard Numerical Integration Methods for Real-Time Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cook, Gerald; Lin, Ching-Fang

    1980-01-01

    The local linearization algorithm is presented as a possible numerical integration scheme to be used in real-time simulation. A second-order nonlinear example problem is solved using different methods. The local linearization approach is shown to require less computing time and give significant...... improvement in accuracy over the classical second-order integration methods....

  19. Local discrete cosine transformation domain Volterra prediction of chaotic time series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张家树; 李恒超; 肖先赐

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a local discrete cosine transformation (DCT) domain Volterra prediction method is proposed to predict chaotic time series, where the DCT is used to lessen the complexity of solving the coefficient matrix. Numerical simulation results show that the proposed prediction method can effectively predict chaotic time series and improve the prediction accuracy compared with the traditional local linear prediction methods.

  20. Time-resolved studies of NO 2 photoinitiated unimolecular decomposition: step-like variation of κ uni( E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, G. A.; Ionov, S. I.; Chen, Y.; Wittig, C.

    1992-07-01

    Time-resolved, subpicosecond-resolution measurements of NO 2 photoinitiated unimolecular decay rates are reported for jet-cooled samples in the vicinity of the dissociation threshold. The molecules are excited by 385-400 nm tunable subpicosecond pulses to the 2B 2 electronic state which is very strongly mixed with the 2A 1 ground electronic state. Subsequent decomposition is probed by a 226 nm subpicosecond pulse which excites LIF in the NO product. When changing the amount of energy in excess of the dissociation threshold, a step-like increase of the reaction rate versus energy is observed.

  1. Changing Safety Culture, One Step at a Time: The Value of the DOE-VPP Program at PNNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Isern, Nancy G.

    2005-02-01

    The primary value of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is the ongoing partnership between management and staff committed to change Laboratory safety culture one step at a time. VPP enables PNNL's safety and health program to transcend a top-down, by-the-book approach to safety, and it also raises grassroots safety consciousness by promoting a commitment to safety and health 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. PNNL VPP is a dynamic, evolving program that fosters innovative approaches to continuous improvement in safety and health performance at the Laboratory.

  2. Ultra-fast formation control of high-order discrete-time multi-agent systems based on multi-step predictive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenle; Liu, Jianchang; Wang, Honghai

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the ultra-fast formation control problem of high-order discrete-time multi-agent systems. Using the local neighbor-error knowledge, a novel ultra-fast protocol with multi-step predictive information and self-feedback term is proposed. The asymptotic convergence factor is improved by a power of q+1 compared to the routine protocol. To some extent, the ultra-fast algorithm overcomes the influence of communication topology to the convergence speed. Furthermore, some sufficient conditions are given herein. The ones decouple the design of the synchronizing gains from the detailed graph properties, and explicitly reveal how the agent dynamic and the communication graph jointly affect the ultra-fast formationability. Finally, some simulations are worked out to illustrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  3. Fast Determination of Distribution-Connected PV Impacts Using a Variable Time-Step Quasi-Static Time-Series Approach: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, Barry

    2017-08-24

    The increasing deployment of distribution-connected photovoltaic (DPV) systems requires utilities to complete complex interconnection studies. Relatively simple interconnection study methods worked well for low penetrations of photovoltaic systems, but more complicated quasi-static time-series (QSTS) analysis is required to make better interconnection decisions as DPV penetration levels increase. Tools and methods must be developed to support this. This paper presents a variable-time-step solver for QSTS analysis that significantly shortens the computational time and effort to complete a detailed analysis of the operation of a distribution circuit with many DPV systems. Specifically, it demonstrates that the proposed variable-time-step solver can reduce the required computational time by as much as 84% without introducing any important errors to metrics, such as the highest and lowest voltage occurring on the feeder, number of voltage regulator tap operations, and total amount of losses realized in the distribution circuit during a 1-yr period. Further improvement in computational speed is possible with the introduction of only modest errors in these metrics, such as a 91 percent reduction with less than 5 percent error when predicting voltage regulator operations.

  4. A quantitative method for evaluating numerical simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation with its applications to selecting appropriate element size and time step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Tse, Peter W; Tan, Haihui

    2016-01-01

    Lamb wave technique has been widely used in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). However, due to the multi-mode characteristics and dispersive nature, Lamb wave propagation behavior is much more complex than that of bulk waves. Numerous numerical simulations on Lamb wave propagation have been conducted to study its physical principles. However, few quantitative studies on evaluating the accuracy of these numerical simulations were reported. In this paper, a method based on cross correlation analysis for quantitatively evaluating the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb waves propagation is proposed. Two kinds of error, affecting the position and shape accuracies are firstly identified. Consequently, two quantitative indices, i.e., the GVE (group velocity error) and MACCC (maximum absolute value of cross correlation coefficient) derived from cross correlation analysis between a simulated signal and a reference waveform, are proposed to assess the position and shape errors of the simulated signal. In this way, the simulation accuracy on the position and shape is quantitatively evaluated. In order to apply this proposed method to select appropriate element size and time step, a specialized 2D-FEM program combined with the proposed method is developed. Then, the proper element size considering different element types and time step considering different time integration schemes are selected. These results proved that the proposed method is feasible and effective, and can be used as an efficient tool for quantitatively evaluating and verifying the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation.

  5. Review of Real-Time Simulator and the Steps Involved for Implementation of a Model from MATLAB/SIMULINK to Real-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkili, Suresh; Panda, Anup Kumar; Prattipati, Jayanthi

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays the researchers want to develop their model in real-time environment. Simulation tools have been widely used for the design and improvement of electrical systems since the mid twentieth century. The evolution of simulation tools has progressed in step with the evolution of computing technologies. In recent years, computing technologies have improved dramatically in performance and become widely available at a steadily decreasing cost. Consequently, simulation tools have also seen dramatic performance gains and steady cost decreases. Researchers and engineers now have the access to affordable, high performance simulation tools that were previously too cost prohibitive, except for the largest manufacturers. This work has introduced a specific class of digital simulator known as a real-time simulator by answering the questions "what is real-time simulation", "why is it needed" and "how it works". The latest trend in real-time simulation consists of exporting simulation models to FPGA. In this article, the Steps involved for implementation of a model from MATLAB to REAL-TIME are provided in detail.

  6. Time-Local Equation for the Exact Optimized Effective Potential in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sheng-Lun; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Chu, Shih-I.

    2017-06-01

    A long-standing challenge in the time-dependent density functional theory is to efficiently solve the exact time-dependent optimized effective potential (TDOEP) integral equation derived from orbital-dependent functionals, especially for the study of nonadiabatic dynamics in time-dependent external fields. In this Letter, we formulate a completely equivalent time-local TDOEP equation that admits a unique real-time solution in terms of time-dependent Kohn-Sham and effective memory orbitals. The time-local formulation is numerically implemented, with the incorporation of exponential memory loss to address the unaccounted for correlation component in the exact-exchange-only functional, to enable the study of the many-electron dynamics of a one-dimensional hydrogen chain. It is shown that the long time behavior of the electric dipole converges correctly and the zero-force theorem is fulfilled in the current implementation.

  7. The STEP model: Characterizing simultaneous time effects on practice for flight simulator performance among middle-aged and older pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome; Lazzeroni, Laura C

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the possible effects of the number of practice sessions (practice) and time between practice sessions (interval) among middle-aged and older adults in real-world tasks has important implications for skill maintenance. Prior training and cognitive ability may impact practice and interval effects on real-world tasks. In this study, we took advantage of existing practice data from 5 simulated flights among 263 middle-aged and older pilots with varying levels of flight expertise (defined by U.S. Federal Aviation Administration proficiency ratings). We developed a new Simultaneous Time Effects on Practice (STEP) model: (a) to model the simultaneous effects of practice and interval on performance of the 5 flights, and (b) to examine the effects of selected covariates (i.e., age, flight expertise, and 3 composite measures of cognitive ability). The STEP model demonstrated consistent positive practice effects, negative interval effects, and predicted covariate effects. Age negatively moderated the beneficial effects of practice. Additionally, cognitive processing speed and intraindividual variability (IIV) in processing speed moderated the benefits of practice and/or the negative influence of interval for particular flight performance measures. Expertise did not interact with practice or interval. Results indicated that practice and interval effects occur in simulated flight tasks. However, processing speed and IIV may influence these effects, even among high-functioning adults. Results have implications for the design and assessment of training interventions targeted at middle-aged and older adults for complex real-world tasks. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Advancing parabolic operators in thermodynamic MHD models: Explicit super time-stepping versus implicit schemes with Krylov solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, R. M.; Mikić, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.

    2017-05-01

    We explore the performance and advantages/disadvantages of using unconditionally stable explicit super time-stepping (STS) algorithms versus implicit schemes with Krylov solvers for integrating parabolic operators in thermodynamic MHD models of the solar corona. Specifically, we compare the second-order Runge-Kutta Legendre (RKL2) STS method with the implicit backward Euler scheme computed using the preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) solver with both a point-Jacobi and a non-overlapping domain decomposition ILU0 preconditioner. The algorithms are used to integrate anisotropic Spitzer thermal conduction and artificial kinematic viscosity at time-steps much larger than classic explicit stability criteria allow. A key component of the comparison is the use of an established MHD model (MAS) to compute a real-world simulation on a large HPC cluster. Special attention is placed on the parallel scaling of the algorithms. It is shown that, for a specific problem and model, the RKL2 method is comparable or surpasses the implicit method with PCG solvers in performance and scaling, but suffers from some accuracy limitations. These limitations, and the applicability of RKL methods are briefly discussed.

  9. Universal steps in quantum dynamics with time-dependent potential-energy surfaces: Beyond the Born-Oppenheimer picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albareda, Guillermo; Abedi, Ali; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rubio, Angel

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown [G. Albareda et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 083003 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.083003 that within the conditional decomposition approach to the coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, the electron-nuclear wave function can be exactly decomposed into an ensemble of nuclear wave packets effectively governed by nuclear conditional time-dependent potential-energy surfaces (C-TDPESs). Employing a one-dimensional model system, we show that for strong nonadiabatic couplings the nuclear C-TDPESs exhibit steps that bridge piecewise adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential-energy surfaces. The nature of these steps is identified as an effect of electron-nuclear correlation. Furthermore, a direct comparison with similar discontinuities recently reported in the context of the exact factorization framework allows us to draw conclusions about the universality of these discontinuities, viz., they are inherent to all nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics approaches based on (exact) time-dependent potential-energy surfaces.

  10. Effect of different air-drying time on the microleakage of single-step self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horieh Moosavi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three different air-drying times on microleakage of three self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Class I cavities were prepared for 108 extracted sound human premolars. The teeth were divided into three main groups based on three different adhesives: Opti Bond All in One (OBAO, Clearfil S3 Bond (CSB, Bond Force (BF. Each main group divided into three subgroups regarding the air-drying time: without application of air stream, following the manufacturer's instruction, for 10 sec more than manufacturer's instruction. After completion of restorations, specimens were thermocycled and then connected to a fluid filtration system to evaluate microleakage. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey-test (α = 0.05. Results The microleakage of all adhesives decreased when the air-drying time increased from 0 sec to manufacturer's instruction (p < 0.001. The microleakage of BF reached its lowest values after increasing the drying time to 10 sec more than the manufacturer's instruction (p < 0.001. Microleakage of OBAO and CSB was significantly lower compared to BF in all three drying time (p < 0.001. Conclusions Increasing in air-drying time of adhesive layer in one-step self-etch adhesives caused reduction of microleakage, but the amount of this reduction may be dependent on the adhesive components of self-etch adhesives.

  11. Discrete-Time Local Value Iteration Adaptive Dynamic Programming: Admissibility and Termination Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qinglai; Liu, Derong; Lin, Qiao

    2016-08-03

    In this paper, a novel local value iteration adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm is developed to solve infinite horizon optimal control problems for discrete-time nonlinear systems. The focuses of this paper are to study admissibility properties and the termination criteria of discrete-time local value iteration ADP algorithms. In the discrete-time local value iteration ADP algorithm, the iterative value functions and the iterative control laws are both updated in a given subset of the state space in each iteration, instead of the whole state space. For the first time, admissibility properties of iterative control laws are analyzed for the local value iteration ADP algorithm. New termination criteria are established, which terminate the iterative local ADP algorithm with an admissible approximate optimal control law. Finally, simulation results are given to illustrate the performance of the developed algorithm.

  12. Prostate cancer detection with real-time elastography using a bi-plane transducer: comparison with step section radical prostatectomy pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunkai; Chen, Yaqing; Qi, Tingyue; Jiang, Jun; Qi, Jun; Yu, Yongjiang; Yao, Xiaohong; Guan, Wenbin

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate elastography using a bi-plane transducer for localizing prostate cancer (PCa) in patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy (RP), in comparison with step section pathological analysis. Fifty-six consecutive PCa patients underwent real-time elastography examination with a bi-plane transducer before RP. Transverse elastographic images were obtained from the apex to the base by slightly compressing and releasing the prostate tissue using the probe. The diagnostic performance of elastography was evaluated in correlation with step section RP histopathology. In 56 PCa patients, gray-scale ultrasonography detected at least one lesion in 36 patients, whereas elastography detected at least one lesion in 53 patients (P = 0.001). The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of elastography in depicting tumor lesions were 67.6, 89.5 and 82.7 %, respectively. The detection rate of a PCa lesion with elastography was best in the left posterior region, followed by the right posterior region. Elastography was more sensitive in detecting PCa lesions with higher Gleason scores, diameter >5 mm and extracapsular extension. The additional use of elastography with the bi-plane transducer can improve PCa detection rate by providing more information about tissue stiffness within the prostate gland.

  13. In "Step" with HIV Vaccines? A Content Analysis of Local Recruitment Campaigns for an International HIV Vaccine Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Paula M; Macias, Wendy; Chan, Kayshin; Harding, Ashley C

    2009-01-01

    During the past two decades of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, several recruitment campaigns were designed to generate community involvement in preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials. These efforts utilized a blend of advertising and marketing strategies mixed with public relations and community education approaches to attract potential study participants to clinical trials (integrated marketing communications). Although more than 30,000 persons worldwide have participated in preventive HIV vaccine studies, no systematic analysis of recruitment campaigns exists. This content analysis study was conducted to examine several United States and Canadian recruitment campaigns for one of the largest-scale HIV vaccine trials to date (the "Step Study"). This study examined persuasive features consistent with the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) including message content, personal relevance of HIV/AIDS and vaccine research, intended audiences, information sources, and other contextual features. The results indicated variation in messages and communication approaches with gay men more exclusively targeted in these regions. Racial/ethnic representations also differed by campaign. Most of the materials promote affective evaluation of the information through heuristic cueing. Implications for subsequent campaigns and research directions are discussed.

  14. Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase catalyzing the final step of noscapine biosynthesis is localized to laticifers in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid noscapine involves a purported dehydrogenation of the narcotinehemiacetal keto moiety. A short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR), designated noscapine synthase (NOS), that catalyzes dehydrogenation of narcotinehemiacetal to noscapine was identified in opium poppy and functionally characterized. The NOS gene was isolated using an integrated transcript and metabolite profiling strategy and subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli. Noscapine synthase is highly divergent from other characterized members of the NADPH-dependent SDR superfamily involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism, and it exhibits exclusive substrate specificity for narcotinehemiacetal. Kinetic analyses showed that NOS exhibits higher catalytic efficiency with NAD+ as the cofactor compared with NADP+. Suppression of NOS transcript levels in opium poppy plants subjected to virus-induced gene silencing resulted in a corresponding reduction in the accumulation of noscapine and an increase in narcotinehemiacetal levels in the latex. Noscapine and NOS transcripts were detected in all opium poppy organs, but both were most abundant in stems. Unlike other putative biosynthetic genes clustered in the opium poppy genome, and their corresponding proteins, NOS transcripts and the cognate enzyme were abundant in latex, indicating that noscapine metabolism is completed in a distinct cell type compared with the rest of the pathway.

  15. Magnetic Local Time dependency in modeling of the Earth radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Damien; Maget, Vincent; Bourdarie, Sébastien; Rolland, Guy

    2017-04-01

    For many years, ONERA has been at the forefront of the modeling of the Earth radiation belts thanks to the Salammbô model, which accurately reproduces their dynamics over a time scale of the particles' drift period. This implies that we implicitly assume an homogeneous repartition of the trapped particles along a given drift shell. However, radiation belts are inhomogeneous in Magnetic Local Time (MLT). So, we need to take this new coordinate into account to model rigorously the dynamical structures, particularly induced during a geomagnetic storm. For this purpose, we are working on both the numerical resolution of the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation included in the model and on the MLT dependency of physic-based processes acting in the Earth radiation belts. The aim of this talk is first to present the 4D-equation used and the different steps we used to build Salammbô 4D model before focusing on physical processes taken into account in the Salammbô code, specially transport due to convection electric field. Firstly, we will briefly introduce the Salammbô 4D code developped by talking about its numerical scheme and physic-based processes modeled. Then, we will focus our attention on the impact of the outer boundary condition (localisation and spectrum) at lower L∗ shell by comparing modeling performed with geosynchronous data from LANL-GEO satellites. Finally, we will discuss the prime importance of the convection electric field to the radial and drift transport of low energy particles around the Earth.

  16. The necessity for a time local dimension in systems with time-varying attractors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Særmark, Knud H; Ashkenazy, Y; Levitan, J;

    1997-01-01

    We show that a simple non-linear system for ordinary differential equations may possess a time-varying attractor dimension. This indicates that it is infeasible to characterize EEG and MEG time series with a single time global dimension. We suggest another measure for the description of non...

  17. Ezrin expression in rectal cancer predicts time to development of local recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jörgren, Fredrik; Nilbert, Mef; Rambech, Eva

    2012-01-01

    : Immunohistochemical expression of ezrin was analysed in 104 primary rectal cancers from patients who developed local recurrences despite being treated with R0 major abdominal surgery. Time to local recurrence and distant metastasis as well as 5-year overall and cancer-specific survival were used as end points...

  18. Reconstructed Task Orientation and Local Time Governance in Compulsory Schools: The Swedish Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlund, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a five-year trial period without a set timetable for compulsory school education in 79 municipalities was concluded in Sweden. The overall idea of the trial was to facilitate local participation, local time governance and flexible learning. Within the pilot trial, each individual pupil's school activities were supposed to be designed to…

  19. Underwater Localization by combining Time-of-Flight and Direction-of-Arrival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleunen, van Wouter A.P.; Blom, Koen C.H.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Kokkeler, André B.J.; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Smit, Gerard J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a combined ToF and DoA localization approach suitable for shallow underwater monitoring applications such as harbor monitoring. Our localization approach combines one-way ranging and DoA estimation to calculate both position and time-synchronization of the blind-node. We wil

  20. Scheduled MAC in Beacon Overlay Networks for Underwater Localization and Time-Synchronization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kleunen, W.A.P.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we introduce a MAC protocol designed for underwater localization and time-synchronisation. The MAC protocol assumes a network of static reference nodes and allows blind nodes to be localized by listening-only to the beacon messages. Such a system is known to be very scalable. We show

  1. Characterizing Time Irreversibility in Disordered Fermionic Systems by the Effect of Local Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardhan, Shreya; De Tomasi, Giuseppe; Heyl, Markus; Heller, Eric J.; Pollmann, Frank

    2017-07-01

    We study the effects of local perturbations on the dynamics of disordered fermionic systems in order to characterize time irreversibility. We focus on three different systems: the noninteracting Anderson and Aubry-André-Harper (AAH) models and the interacting spinless disordered t -V chain. First, we consider the effect on the full many-body wave functions by measuring the Loschmidt echo (LE). We show that in the extended or ergodic phase the LE decays exponentially fast with time, while in the localized phase the decay is algebraic. We demonstrate that the exponent of the decay of the LE in the localized phase diverges proportionally to the single-particle localization length as we approach the metal-insulator transition in the AAH model. Second, we probe different phases of disordered systems by studying the time expectation value of local observables evolved with two Hamiltonians that differ by a spatially local perturbation. Remarkably, we find that many-body localized systems could lose memory of the initial state in the long-time limit, in contrast to the noninteracting localized phase where some memory is always preserved.

  2. Stepped mirrored structures for generating true time delays in stationary optical delay line proof-of-principle experiments for application to optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansz, Paul Vernon; Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Conventional time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) relies on the detection of an interference pattern generated by the interference of backscattered light from the sample and a reference Optical Delay Line (ODL). By referencing the sample interference with the scan depth of the ODL, constructive interference indicates depth in the sample of a reflecting structure. Conventional ODLs used in time domain OCT require some physical movement of a mirror to scan a given depth range. This movement results in instrument degradation. Also in some situations it is necessary to have no moving parts. Stationary ODLs (SODLs) include dual Reflective Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) systems (Type I) and single Transmissive SLM with match-arrayed-waveguide systems (Type II). In this paper, the method of fabrication and characterisation of a number of Stepped Mirrored Structures (SMS) is presented. These structures are intended for later use in proof-of-principle experiments that demonstrate Type II SODL: a six step, 2 mm step depth macro-SMS, an eight step 150 um deep micro-SMS with glue between steps, and a six step 150 um deep micro-SMS with no glue between steps. These SMS are characterized in terms of their fabrication, step alignment and step height increment precision. The degree of alignment of each step was verified using half of a bulk Michelson interferometer. Step height was gauged using a pair of vernier callipers measuring each individual step. A change in notch frequency using an in-fibre Mach-Zhender interferometer was used to gauge the average step height and the result compared to the vernier calliper results. The best aligned SMS was the micro-SMS prepared by method B with no glue between steps. It demonstrated a 95% confidence interval variation of 1% in reflected intensity, with the least variation in intensity within steps. This SMS also had the least absolute variation in step height increment: less than 8 um. Though less variation would be ideal, for

  3. REPRESENTATION OF ADDITIVE FUNCTIONALS AND LOCAL TIMES FOR JUMP MARKOV PROCESSES AND THEIR FUNCTIONAL LIMIT THEOREM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋义文; 刘禄勤

    2003-01-01

    The representation of additive functionals and local times for jump Markovprocesses are obtained. The results of uniformly functional moderate deviation and theirapplications to birth-death processes are also presented.

  4. Localization Operators and an Uncertainty Principle for the Discrete Short Time Fourier Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Localization operators in the discrete setting are used to obtain information on a signal f from the knowledge on the support of its short time Fourier transform. In particular, the extremal functions of the uncertainty principle for the discrete short time Fourier transform are characterized and their connection with functions that generate a time-frequency basis is studied.

  5. The local autocorrelation time in thin film and semi-infinite model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1984-05-01

    The nearest-neighbour Ising model of a film in which exchange couplings in surface layers can differ from exchange couplings in other layers is considered. The dependence of the local autocorrelation time on distances to surfaces of the film, temperature and surface exchange couplings is discussed. The behaviour of the local autocorrelation time in a three-dimensional semi-infinite model is obtained assuming that the thickness of the film tends to infinity.

  6. Local regularity for time-dependent tug-of-war games with varying probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Mikko; Ruosteenoja, Eero

    2016-07-01

    We study local regularity properties of value functions of time-dependent tug-of-war games. For games with constant probabilities we get local Lipschitz continuity. For more general games with probabilities depending on space and time we obtain Hölder and Harnack estimates. The games have a connection to the normalized p (x , t)-parabolic equation ut = Δu + (p (x , t) - 2) Δ∞Nu.

  7. Time of drug elimination in chronic drug abusers. Case study of 52 patients in a "low-step" detoxification ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, A; Hake, J; Meissner, C; Rohwer, J; Friedrich, H J; Oehmichen, M

    2001-06-15

    The elimination time of illicit drugs and their metabolites is of both clinical and forensic interest. In order to determine the elimination time for various drugs and their metabolites we recruited 52 volunteers in a protected, low-step detoxification program. Blood samples were taken from each volunteer for the first 7 days, daily, urine sample for the first 3 weeks, daily. Urine was analyzed using a fluorescence-polarization immunoassay (FPIA) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), serum using GC/MS. The elimination times of the drugs and/or their metabolites in urine and serum as well as the tolerance intervals/confidence intervals were determined. Due to the sometimes extremely high initial concentrations and low cut-off values, a few of the volunteers had markedly longer elimination times than those described in the literature. The cut-off values were as follows: barbiturates II (200ng/ml), cannabinoids (20ng/ml), cocaine metabolites (300ng/ml), opiates (200ng/ml). GC/MS detected the following maximum elimination times: total morphine in urine up to 270.3h, total morphine and free morphine in serum up to 121.3h, monoacetylmorphine in urine up to 34.5h, 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in urine up to 433.5h, THC-COOH in serum up to 74.3h, total codeine in urine up to 123h, free codeine in urine up to 97.5h, total codeine in serum up to 29h, free codeine in serum up to 6.3h, total dihydrocodeine (DHC) in urine up to 314.8h, free DHC in urine up to 273.3h, total and free DHC in serum up to 50.1h. Cocaine and its metabolites were largely undetectable in the present study.

  8. Using a two-step matrix solution to reduce the run time in KULL's magnetic diffusion package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, T A; Kolev, T V

    2010-12-17

    Recently a Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) package has been added to the KULL code. In order to be compatible with the underlying hydrodynamics algorithm, a new sub-zonal magnetics discretization was developed that supports arbitrary polygonal and polyhedral zones. This flexibility comes at the cost of many more unknowns per zone - approximately ten times more for a hexahedral mesh. We can eliminate some (or all, depending on the dimensionality) of the extra unknowns from the global matrix during assembly by using a Schur complement approach. This trades expensive global work for cache-friendly local work, while still allowing solution for the full system. Significant improvements in the solution time are observed for several test problems.

  9. Real-Time Multi-Target Localization from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Liu, Jinghong; Zhou, Qianfei

    2016-12-25

    In order to improve the reconnaissance efficiency of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) electro-optical stabilized imaging systems, a real-time multi-target localization scheme based on an UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging system is proposed. First, a target location model is studied. Then, the geodetic coordinates of multi-targets are calculated using the homogeneous coordinate transformation. On the basis of this, two methods which can improve the accuracy of the multi-target localization are proposed: (1) the real-time zoom lens distortion correction method; (2) a recursive least squares (RLS) filtering method based on UAV dead reckoning. The multi-target localization error model is established using Monte Carlo theory. In an actual flight, the UAV flight altitude is 1140 m. The multi-target localization results are within the range of allowable error. After we use a lens distortion correction method in a single image, the circular error probability (CEP) of the multi-target localization is reduced by 7%, and 50 targets can be located at the same time. The RLS algorithm can adaptively estimate the location data based on multiple images. Compared with multi-target localization based on a single image, CEP of the multi-target localization using RLS is reduced by 25%. The proposed method can be implemented on a small circuit board to operate in real time. This research is expected to significantly benefit small UAVs which need multi-target geo-location functions.

  10. Real-Time Multi-Target Localization from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the reconnaissance efficiency of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging systems, a real-time multi-target localization scheme based on an UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging system is proposed. First, a target location model is studied. Then, the geodetic coordinates of multi-targets are calculated using the homogeneous coordinate transformation. On the basis of this, two methods which can improve the accuracy of the multi-target localization are proposed: (1 the real-time zoom lens distortion correction method; (2 a recursive least squares (RLS filtering method based on UAV dead reckoning. The multi-target localization error model is established using Monte Carlo theory. In an actual flight, the UAV flight altitude is 1140 m. The multi-target localization results are within the range of allowable error. After we use a lens distortion correction method in a single image, the circular error probability (CEP of the multi-target localization is reduced by 7%, and 50 targets can be located at the same time. The RLS algorithm can adaptively estimate the location data based on multiple images. Compared with multi-target localization based on a single image, CEP of the multi-target localization using RLS is reduced by 25%. The proposed method can be implemented on a small circuit board to operate in real time. This research is expected to significantly benefit small UAVs which need multi-target geo-location functions.

  11. Oscillatory dynamics of vasoconstriction and vasodilation identified by time-localized phase coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, L W; McClintock, P V E; Stefanovska, A [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Vuksanovic, V, E-mail: aneta@lancaster.ac.uk [Institute of Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2011-06-21

    We apply wavelet-based time-localized phase coherence to investigate the relationship between blood flow and skin temperature, and between blood flow and instantaneous heart rate (IHR), during vasoconstriction and vasodilation provoked by local cooling or heating of the skin. A temperature-controlled metal plate ({approx}10 cm{sup 2}) placed on the volar side of the left arm was used to provide the heating and cooling. Beneath the plate, the blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry and the adjacent skin temperature by a thermistor. Two 1 h datasets were collected from each of the ten subjects. In each case a 30 min basal recording was followed by a step change in plate temperature, to either 24 deg. C or 42 deg. C. The IHR was derived from simultaneously recorded ECG. We confirm the changes in the energy and frequency of blood flow oscillations during cooling and heating reported earlier. That is, during cooling, there was a significant decrease in the average frequency of myogenic blood flow oscillations (p < 0.05) and the myogenic spectral peak became more prominent. During heating, there was a significant (p < 0.05) general increase in spectral energy, associated with vasodilation, except in the myogenic interval. Weak phase coherence between temperature and blood flow was observed for unperturbed skin, but it increased in all frequency intervals as a result of heating. It was not significantly affected by cooling. We also show that significant (p < 0.05) phase coherence exists between blood flow and IHR in the respiratory and myogenic frequency intervals. Cooling did not affect this phase coherence in any of the frequency intervals, whereas heating enhanced the phase coherence in the respiratory and myogenic intervals. This can be explained by the reduction in vascular resistance produced by heating, a process where myogenic mechanisms play a key role. We conclude that the mechanisms of vasodilation and vasoconstriction, in response to temperature

  12. Continuous Time Random Walks for Non-Local Radial Solute Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Dentz, Marco; Borgne, Tanguy le

    2016-01-01

    This paper derives and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneou...

  13. Development of real-time diagnostics and feedback algorithms for JET in view of the next step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murari, A [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padua (Italy); Joffrin, E [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Felton, R [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Assoc., Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Mazon, D [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Zabeo, L [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Assoc., Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Albanese, R [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, Univ. Mediterranea RC, Loc. Feo di Vito, I-89060, RC (Italy); Arena, P [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, Univ. di Catania (Italy); Ambrosino, G [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, Univ. Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Naples (Italy); Ariola, M [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, Univ. Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Barana, O [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padua (Italy); Bruno, M [Assoc. Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, Univ. di Catania (Italy); Laborde, L [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Moreau, D [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Piccolo, F [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Assoc., Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sartori, F [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Assoc., Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Crisanti, F [Associazone EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati (Italy); Luna, E de la [Associacion EURATOM CIEMAT para Fusion, Avenida Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, J [Associacion EURATOM CIEMAT para Fusion, Avenida Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-03-01

    Real-time control of many plasma parameters will be an essential aspect in the development of reliable high performance operation of next step tokamaks. The main prerequisites for any feedback scheme are the precise real-time determination of the quantities to be controlled, requiring top quality and highly reliable diagnostics, and the availability of robust control algorithms. A new set of real-time diagnostics was recently implemented on JET to prove the feasibility of determining, with high accuracy and time resolution, the most important plasma quantities. Some of the signals now routinely provided in real time at JET are: (i) the internal inductance and the main confinement quantities obtained by calculating the Shafranov integrals from the pick-up coils with 2 ms time resolution; (ii) the electron temperature profile, from electron cyclotron emission every 10 ms; (iii) the ion temperature and plasma toroidal velocity profiles, from charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, provided every 50 ms; and (iv) the safety factor profile, derived from the inversion of the polarimetric line integrals every 2 ms. With regard to feedback algorithms, new model-based controllers were developed to allow a more robust control of several plasma parameters. With these new tools, several real-time schemes were implemented, among which the most significant is the simultaneous control of the safety factor and the plasma pressure profiles using the additional heating systems (LH, NBI, ICRH) as actuators. The control strategy adopted in this case consists of a multi-variable model-based technique, which was implemented as a truncated singular value decomposition of an integral operator. This approach is considered essential for systems like tokamak machines, characterized by a strong mutual dependence of the various parameters and the distributed nature of the quantities, the plasma profiles, to be controlled. First encouraging results were also obtained using non

  14. Global and Local Color Time Scales to Encode Timeline Events in Ion Trajectories for Glassies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sharif

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glassy compounds lead directly to high ionic conductivity. Ionic conductivity generates ion trajectories. However, these trajectories have been represented by two-dimensional graph in order to visualize the timeline events in ion trajectories. This study addresses this problem by encoding the timeline events in ion trajectories with global and local color scales. Two time scales have been introduced namely Global Color Time Scale and Local Color Time Scale. The rainbow color has been chosen to represent global time scale meanwhile solid color has been used to generate local time scale. Based on evaluation, these techniques are successful in representing timeline events in ion trajectories for understanding the complicated heterogeneous movement of ion trajectories.

  15. Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals differences between early and late M intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödig, C; Chizhov, I; Weidlich, O; Siebert, F

    1999-01-01

    In this report, from time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared investigations from 15 ns to 160 ms, we provide evidence for the subsequent rise of three different M states that differ in their structures. The first state rises with approximately 3 microseconds to only a small percentage. Its structure as judged from amide I/II bands differs in small but well-defined aspects from the L state. The next M state, which appears in approximately 40 microseconds, has almost all of the characteristics of the "late" M state, i.e., it differs considerably from the first one. Here, the L left arrow over right arrow M equilibrium is shifted toward M, although some percentage of L still persists. In the last M state (rise time approximately 130 microseconds), the equilibrium is shifted toward full deprotonation of the Schiff base, and only small additional structural changes take place. In addition to these results obtained for unbuffered conditions or at pH 7, experiments performed at lower and higher pH are presented. These results are discussed in terms of the molecular changes postulated to occur in the M intermediate to allow the shift of the L/M equilibrium toward M and possibly to regulate the change of the accessibility of the Schiff base necessary for effective proton pumping. PMID:10233083

  16. Efficient statistical significance approximation for local similarity analysis of high-throughput time series data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li C; Ai, Dongmei; Cram, Jacob; Fuhrman, Jed A; Sun, Fengzhu

    2013-01-15

    Local similarity analysis of biological time series data helps elucidate the varying dynamics of biological systems. However, its applications to large scale high-throughput data are limited by slow permutation procedures for statistical significance evaluation. We developed a theoretical approach to approximate the statistical significance of local similarity analysis based on the approximate tail distribution of the maximum partial sum of independent identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. Simulations show that the derived formula approximates the tail distribution reasonably well (starting at time points > 10 with no delay and > 20 with delay) and provides P-values comparable with those from permutations. The new approach enables efficient calculation of statistical significance for pairwise local similarity analysis, making possible all-to-all local association studies otherwise prohibitive. As a demonstration, local similarity analysis of human microbiome time series shows that core operational taxonomic units (OTUs) are highly synergetic and some of the associations are body-site specific across samples. The new approach is implemented in our eLSA package, which now provides pipelines for faster local similarity analysis of time series data. The tool is freely available from eLSA's website: http://meta.usc.edu/softs/lsa. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. fsun@usc.edu.

  17. Local Stable and Unstable Manifolds and Their Control in Nonautonomous Finite-Time Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that stable and unstable manifolds strongly influence fluid motion in unsteady flows. These emanate from hyperbolic trajectories, with the structures moving nonautonomously in time. The local directions of emanation at each instance in time is the focus of this article. Within a nearly autonomous setting, it is shown that these time-varying directions can be characterised through the accumulated effect of velocity shear. Connections to Oseledets spaces and projection operators in exponential dichotomies are established. Availability of data for both infinite- and finite-time intervals is considered. With microfluidic flow control in mind, a methodology for manipulating these directions in any prescribed time-varying fashion by applying a local velocity shear is developed. The results are verified for both smoothly and discontinuously time-varying directions using finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  18. Exposing local symmetries in distorted driven lattices via time-averaged invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, T.; Morfonios, C. V.; Diakonos, F. K.; Schmelcher, P.

    2016-05-01

    Time-averaged two-point currents are derived and shown to be spatially invariant within domains of local translation or inversion symmetry for arbitrary time-periodic quantum systems in one dimension. These currents are shown to provide a valuable tool for detecting deformations of a spatial symmetry in static and driven lattices. In the static case the invariance of the two-point currents is related to the presence of time-reversal invariance and/or probability current conservation. The obtained insights into the wave functions are further exploited for a symmetry-based convergence check which is applicable for globally broken but locally retained potential symmetries.

  19. Exposing local symmetries in distorted driven lattices via time-averaged invariants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, T; Morfonios, C V; Diakonos, F K; Schmelcher, P

    2016-05-01

    Time-averaged two-point currents are derived and shown to be spatially invariant within domains of local translation or inversion symmetry for arbitrary time-periodic quantum systems in one dimension. These currents are shown to provide a valuable tool for detecting deformations of a spatial symmetry in static and driven lattices. In the static case the invariance of the two-point currents is related to the presence of time-reversal invariance and/or probability current conservation. The obtained insights into the wave functions are further exploited for a symmetry-based convergence check which is applicable for globally broken but locally retained potential symmetries.

  20. Sequential and parallel local search for the time-constrained travelling salesman problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A.P. Kindervater (Gerard); J.K. Lenstra; M.W.P. Savelsbergh (Martin)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractLocal search has proven to be an effective solution approach for the traveling salesman problem. We consider variants of the TSP in which each city is to be visited within one or more given time windows. The travel times are symmetric and satisfy the triangle inequality; therobjective is

  1. The Interplay between Localized and Propagating Plasmonic Excitations Tracked in Space and Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Christoph; Leißner, Till; Evlyukhin, Andrey;

    2014-01-01

    ultrashort surface plasmon polariton wave packets and plasmonic nanoantennas is monitored on subfemtosecond time scales. The data reveal real-time insights into dispersion and localization of electromagnetic fields as governed by the elementary modes determining the functionality of plasmonic operation units....

  2. An algebraic approach to local observability at an initial state for discrete-time polynomial systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawano, Yu; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider local observability at an initial state for discrete-time autonomous polynomial systems. When testing for observability, for discrete-time nonlinear systems, a condition based on the inverse function theorem is commonly used. However, it is a sufficient condition. In this

  3. Linking Search Space Structure, Run-Time Dynamics, and Problem Difficulty: A Step Toward Demystifying Tabu Search

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, A E; Whitley, L D; 10.1613/jair.1576

    2011-01-01

    Tabu search is one of the most effective heuristics for locating high-quality solutions to a diverse array of NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems. Despite the widespread success of tabu search, researchers have a poor understanding of many key theoretical aspects of this algorithm, including models of the high-level run-time dynamics and identification of those search space features that influence problem difficulty. We consider these questions in the context of the job-shop scheduling problem (JSP), a domain where tabu search algorithms have been shown to be remarkably effective. Previously, we demonstrated that the mean distance between random local optima and the nearest optimal solution is highly correlated with problem difficulty for a well-known tabu search algorithm for the JSP introduced by Taillard. In this paper, we discuss various shortcomings of this measure and develop a new model of problem difficulty that corrects these deficiencies. We show that Taillards algorithm can be modeled with ...

  4. A Two-Phase Time Synchronization-Free Localization Algorithm for Underwater Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junhai; Fan, Liying

    2017-03-30

    Underwater Sensor Networks (UWSNs) can enable a broad range of applications such as resource monitoring, disaster prevention, and navigation-assistance. Sensor nodes location in UWSNs is an especially relevant topic. Global Positioning System (GPS) information is not suitable for use in UWSNs because of the underwater propagation problems. Hence, some localization algorithms based on the precise time synchronization between sensor nodes that have been proposed for UWSNs are not feasible. In this paper, we propose a localization algorithm called Two-Phase Time Synchronization-Free Localization Algorithm (TP-TSFLA). TP-TSFLA contains two phases, namely, range-based estimation phase and range-free evaluation phase. In the first phase, we address a time synchronization-free localization scheme based on the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm to obtain the coordinates of the unknown sensor nodes. In the second phase, we propose a Circle-based Range-Free Localization Algorithm (CRFLA) to locate the unlocalized sensor nodes which cannot obtain the location information through the first phase. In the second phase, sensor nodes which are localized in the first phase act as the new anchor nodes to help realize localization. Hence, in this algorithm, we use a small number of mobile beacons to help obtain the location information without any other anchor nodes. Besides, to improve the precision of the range-free method, an extension of CRFLA achieved by designing a coordinate adjustment scheme is updated. The simulation results show that TP-TSFLA can achieve a relative high localization ratio without time synchronization.

  5. Intersection local times of independent Brownian motions as generalized white noise functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Albeverio, Sergio; Oliveira, Maria João; Streit, Ludwig

    2001-01-01

    The original publication is available at http://www.springerlink.com/content/14jtbl19nh37ggtx/fulltext.pdf A "chaos expansion" of the intersection local time functional of two independent Brownian motions in Rd is given. The expansion is in terms of normal products of white noise (corresponding to multiple Wiener integrals). As a consequence of the local structure of the normal products, the kernel functions in the expansion are explicitly given and exhibit clearly the dimension depende...

  6. A two-step real-time PCR assay for quantitation and genotyping of human parvovirus 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen, E; Lahtinen, A; Eis-Hübinger, A M; Lappalainen, M; Hedman, K; Söderlund-Venermo, M

    2014-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) of the family Parvoviridae was discovered in a plasma sample of a patient with an undiagnosed acute infection in 2005. Currently, three PARV4 genotypes have been identified, however, with an unknown clinical significance. Interestingly, these genotypes seem to differ in epidemiology. In Northern Europe, USA and Asia, genotypes 1 and 2 have been found to occur mainly in persons with a history of injecting drug use or other parenteral exposure. In contrast, genotype 3 appears to be endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where it infects children and adults without such risk behaviour. In this study, a novel straightforward and cost-efficient molecular assay for both quantitation and genotyping of PARV4 DNA was developed. The two-step method first applies a single-probe pan-PARV4 qPCR for screening and quantitation of this relatively rare virus, and subsequently, only the positive samples undergo a real-time PCR-based multi-probe genotyping. The new qPCR-GT method is highly sensitive and specific regardless of the genotype, and thus being suitable for studying the clinical impact and occurrence of the different PARV4 genotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Local time-decay of solutions to Schroedinger equations with time-periodic potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Galtbayar, A; Yajima, K

    2002-01-01

    Let $H(t)=-\\Delta+V(t,x)$ be a time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger operator on $L^2(\\R^3)$. We assume that $V(t,x)$ is $2\\pi$--periodic in time and decays sufficiently rapidly in space. Let $U(t,0)$ be the associated propagator. For $u_0$ belonging to the continuous spectral subspace of $L^2(\\R^3)$ for the Floquet operator $U(2\\pi, 0)$, we study the behavior of $U(t,0)u_0$ as $t\\to\\infty$ in the topology of $x$-weighted spaces, in the form of asymptotic expansions. Generically the leading term is $t^{-3/2}B_1u_0$. Here $B_1$ is a finite rank operator mapping functions of $x$ to functions of $t$ and $x$, periodic in $t$. If $n\\in\\Z$ is an eigenvalue, or a threshold resonance of the corresponding Floquet Hamiltonian $-i\\pa_t + H(t)$, the leading behavior is $t^{-1/2}B_0u_0$. The point spectral subspace for $U(2\\pi, 0)$ is finite dimensional. If $U(2\\pi, 0)\\phi_j = e^{-i2\\pi\\l_j }\\phi_j$, then $U(t, 0)\\phi_j$ represents a quasi-periodic solution.

  8. Dynamical localization in chaotic systems: spectral statistics and localization measure in the kicked rotator as a paradigm for time-dependent and time-independent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Thanos; Robnik, Marko

    2013-06-01

    We study the kicked rotator in the classically fully chaotic regime using Izrailev's N-dimensional model for various N≤4000, which in the limit N→∞ tends to the quantized kicked rotator. We do treat not only the case K=5, as studied previously, but also many different values of the classical kick parameter 5≤K≤35 and many different values of the quantum parameter kε[5,60]. We describe the features of dynamical localization of chaotic eigenstates as a paradigm for other both time-periodic and time-independent (autonomous) fully chaotic or/and mixed-type Hamilton systems. We generalize the scaling variable Λ=l(∞)/N to the case of anomalous diffusion in the classical phase space by deriving the localization length l(∞) for the case of generalized classical diffusion. We greatly improve the accuracy and statistical significance of the numerical calculations, giving rise to the following conclusions: (1) The level-spacing distribution of the eigenphases (or quasienergies) is very well described by the Brody distribution, systematically better than by other proposed models, for various Brody exponents β(BR). (2) We study the eigenfunctions of the Floquet operator and characterize their localization properties using the information entropy measure, which after normalization is given by β(loc) in the interval [0,1]. The level repulsion parameters β(BR) and β(loc) are almost linearly related, close to the identity line. (3) We show the existence of a scaling law between β(loc) and the relative localization length Λ, now including the regimes of anomalous diffusion. The above findings are important also for chaotic eigenstates in time-independent systems [Batistić and Robnik, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 43, 215101 (2010); arXiv:1302.7174 (2013)], where the Brody distribution is confirmed to a very high degree of precision for dynamically localized chaotic eigenstates, even in the mixed-type systems (after separation of regular and chaotic eigenstates).

  9. Real-time multi-step-ahead water level forecasting by recurrent neural networks for urban flood control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fi-John; Chen, Pin-An; Lu, Ying-Ray; Huang, Eric; Chang, Kai-Yao

    2014-09-01

    Urban flood control is a crucial task, which commonly faces fast rising peak flows resulting from urbanization. To mitigate future flood damages, it is imperative to construct an on-line accurate model to forecast inundation levels during flood periods. The Yu-Cheng Pumping Station located in Taipei City of Taiwan is selected as the study area. Firstly, historical hydrologic data are fully explored by statistical techniques to identify the time span of rainfall affecting the rise of the water level in the floodwater storage pond (FSP) at the pumping station. Secondly, effective factors (rainfall stations) that significantly affect the FSP water level are extracted by the Gamma test (GT). Thirdly, one static artificial neural network (ANN) (backpropagation neural network-BPNN) and two dynamic ANNs (Elman neural network-Elman NN; nonlinear autoregressive network with exogenous inputs-NARX network) are used to construct multi-step-ahead FSP water level forecast models through two scenarios, in which scenario I adopts rainfall and FSP water level data as model inputs while scenario II adopts only rainfall data as model inputs. The results demonstrate that the GT can efficiently identify the effective rainfall stations as important inputs to the three ANNs; the recurrent connections from the output layer (NARX network) impose more effects on the output than those of the hidden layer (Elman NN) do; and the NARX network performs the best in real-time forecasting. The NARX network produces coefficients of efficiency within 0.9-0.7 (scenario I) and 0.7-0.5 (scenario II) in the testing stages for 10-60-min-ahead forecasts accordingly. This study suggests that the proposed NARX models can be valuable and beneficial to the government authority for urban flood control.

  10. Multi-Wavelength Laser Transmitter for the Two-Step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Li, Steven X.; Fahey, Molly E.; Grubisic, Andrej; Farcy, Benjamin J.; Uckert, Kyle; Li, Xiang; Getty, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Missions to diverse Outer Solar System bodies will require investigations that can detect a wide range of organics in complex mixtures, determine the structure of selected molecules, and provide powerful insights into their origin and evolution. Previous studies from remote spectroscopy of the Outer Solar System showed a diverse population of macromolecular species that are likely to include aromatic and conjugated hydrocarbons with varying degrees of methylation and nitrile incorporation. In situ exploration of Titan's upper atmosphere via mass and plasma spectrometry has revealed a complex mixture of organics. Similar material is expected on the Ice Giants, their moons, and other Outer Solar System bodies, where it may subsequently be deposited onto surface ices. It is evident that the detection of organics on other planetary surfaces provides insight into the chemical and geological evolution of a Solar System body of interest and can inform our understanding of its potential habitability. We have developed a prototype two-step laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument by exploiting the resonance-enhanced desorption of analyte. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the L2MS to detect hydrocarbons in organically-doped analog minerals, including cryogenic Ocean World-relevant ices and mixtures. The L2MS instrument operates by generating a neutral plume of desorbed analyte with an IR desorption laser pulse, followed at a delay by a ultraviolet (UV) laser pulse, ionizing the plume. Desorption of the analyte, including trace organic species, may be enhanced by selecting the wavelength of the IR desorption laser to coincide with IR absorption features associated with vibration transitions of minerals or organic functional groups. In this effort, a preliminary laser developed for the instrument uses a breadboard mid-infrared (MIR) desorption laser operating at a discrete 3.475 µm wavelength, and a breadboard UV

  11. Indoor Localization of a Quadrotor Based on WSN: A Real-Time Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Rullan-Lara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A real‐time localization algorithm is presented in this paper. The algorithm presented here uses an extended Kalman filter and is based on Time Difference Of Arrivals (TDOA measurements of radio signal. The position and velocity of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV are successfully estimated in closed‐loop in real‐ time, both in hover and path following flights. Relatively small position errors obtained from the experiments prove the good performance of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Indoor Localization of a Quadrotor Based on WSN: A Real-Time Application

    OpenAIRE

    Jose L. Rullan-Lara; Guillaume Sanahuja; Rogelio Lozano; Sergio Salazar; Ramon Garcia-Hernandez; Ruz-Hernandez, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    A real‐time localization algorithm is presented in this paper. The algorithm presented here uses an extended Kalman filter and is based on Time Difference Of Arrivals (TDOA) measurements of radio signal. The position and velocity of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are successfully estimated in closed‐loop in real‐ time, both in hover and path following flights. Relatively small position errors obtained from the experiments prove the good performance of the proposed algorithm.

  13. Indoor Localization of a Quadrotor Based on WSN: A Real-Time Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Rullan-Lara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A real-time localization algorithm is presented in this paper. The algorithm presented here uses an extended Kalman filter and is based on Time Difference Of Arrivals (TDOA measurements of radio signal. The position and velocity of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV are successfully estimated in closed-loop in real-time, both in hover and path following flights. Relatively small position errors obtained from the experiments prove the good performance of the proposed algorithm.

  14. Characterizing many-body localization by out-of-time-ordered correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-Qiang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2017-02-01

    The out-of-time-ordered (OTO) correlation is a key quantity for quantifying quantum chaoticity and has been recently used in the investigation of quantum holography. Here we use it to study and characterize many-body localization (MBL). We find that a long-time logarithmic variation of the OTO correlation occurs in the MBL phase but is absent in the Anderson localized and ergodic phases. We extract a localization length in the MBL phase, which depends logarithmically on interaction and diverges at a critical interaction. Furthermore, the infinite-time "thermal" fluctuation of the OTO correlation is zero (finite) in the ergodic (MBL) phase and thus can be considered as an order parameter for the ergodic-MBL transition, through which the transition can be identified and characterized. Specifically, the critical point and the related critical exponents can be calculated.

  15. Small-time scale network traffic prediction based on a local support vector machine regression model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Qing-Fang; Chen Yue-Hui; Peng Yu-Hua

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we apply the nonlinear time series analysis method to small-time scale traffic measurement data. The prediction-based method is used to determine the embedding dimension of the traffic data. Based on the reconstructed phase space, the local support vector machine prediction method is used to predict the traffic measurement data, and the BIC-based neighbouring point selection method is used to choose the number of the nearest neighbouring points for the local support vector machine regression model. The experimental results show that the local support vector machine prediction method whose neighbouring points are optimized can effectively predict the small-time scale traffic measurement data and can reproduce the statistical features of real traffic measurements.

  16. New prediction of chaotic time series based on local Lyapunov exponent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yong

    2013-01-01

    A new method of predicting chaotic time series is presented based on a local Lyapunov exponent,by quantitatively measuring the exponential rate of separation or attraction of two infinitely close trajectories in state space.After reconstructing state space from one-dimensional chaotic time series,neighboring multiple-state vectors of the predicting point are selected to deduce the prediction formula by using the definition of the local Lyapunov exponent.Numerical simulations are carried out to test its effectiveness and verify its higher precision over two older methods.The effects of the number of referential state vectors and added noise on forecasting accuracy are also studied numerically.

  17. Multi-step constant-current charging method for electric vehicle, valve-regulated, lead/acid batteries during night time for load-levelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeya, Tomohiko; Mita, Yuichi; Ishihara, Kaoru [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Sawada, Nobuyuki [Hokkaido Electric Power, Sapporo (Japan); Takagi, Sakae; Murakami, Jun-ichi [Tohoku Electric Power, Sendai (Japan); Kobayashi, Kazuyuki [Tokyo Electric Power, Yokohama (Japan); Sakabe, Tetsuya [Chubu Electric Power, Nagoya (Japan); Kousaka, Eiichi [Hokuriku Electric Power, Toyama (Japan); Yoshioka, Haruki [The Kansai Electric Power, Osaka (Japan); Kato, Satoru [The Chugoku Electric Power, Hiroshima (Japan); Yamashita, Masanori [Shikoku Research Inst., Takamatsu (Japan); Narisoko, Hayato [The Okinawa Electric Power, Naha (Japan); Nishiyama, Kazuo [The Central Electric Power Council, Tokyo (Japan); Adachi, Kazuyuki [Kyushu Electric Power, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    For the popularization of electric vehicles (EVs), the conditions for charging EV batteries with available current patterns should allow complete charging in a short time, i.e., less than 5 to 8 h. Therefore, in this study, a new charging condition is investigated for the EV valve-regulated lead/acid battery system, which should allow complete charging of EV battery systems with multi-step constant currents in a much shorter time with longer cycle life and higher energy efficiency compared with two-step constant-current charging. Although a high magnitude of the first current in the two-step constant-current method prolongs cycle life by suppressing the softening of positive active material, too large a charging current magnitude degrades cells due to excess internal evolution of heat. A charging current magnitude of approximately 0.5 C is expected to prolong cycle life further. Three-step charging could also increase the magnitude of charging current in the first step without shortening cycle life. Four-or six-step constant-current methods could shorten the charging time to less than 5 h, as well as yield higher energy efficiency and enhanced cycle life of over 400 cycles compared with two-step charging with the first step current of 0.5 C. Investigation of the degradation mechanism of the batteries revealed that the conditions of multi-step constant-current charging suppressed softening of positive active material and sulfation of negative active material, but, unfortunately, advanced the corrosion of the grids in the positive plates. By adopting improved grids and cooling of the battery system, the multistep constant-current method may enhance the cycle life. (orig.)

  18. An adaptive time step scheme for a system of stochastic differential equations with multiple multiplicative noise: chemical Langevin equation, a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Vassilios; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2008-01-07

    Models involving stochastic differential equations (SDEs) play a prominent role in a wide range of applications where systems are not at the thermodynamic limit, for example, biological population dynamics. Therefore there is a need for numerical schemes that are capable of accurately and efficiently integrating systems of SDEs. In this work we introduce a variable size step algorithm and apply it to systems of stiff SDEs with multiple multiplicative noise. The algorithm is validated using a subclass of SDEs called chemical Langevin equations that appear in the description of dilute chemical kinetics models, with important applications mainly in biology. Three representative examples are used to test and report on the behavior of the proposed scheme. We demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages over fixed time step integration schemes of the proposed method, showing that the adaptive time step method is considerably more stable than fixed step methods with no excessive additional computational overhead.

  19. Evolution of localized states in Lieb lattices under time-dependent magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, J. D.; Maceira, I. A.; Dias, R. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the slow time evolution of localized states of the open-boundary Lieb lattice when a magnetic flux is applied perpendicularly to the lattice and increased linearly in time. In this system, Dirac cones periodically disappear, reappear, and touch the flat band as the flux increases. We show that the slow time evolution of a localized state in this system is analogous to that of a zero-energy state in a three-level system whose energy levels intersect periodically and that this evolution can be mapped into a classical precession motion with a precession axis that rotates as times evolves. Beginning with a localized state of the Lieb lattice, as the magnetic flux is increased linearly and slowly, the evolving state precesses around a state with a small itinerant component and the amplitude of its localized component oscillates around a constant value (below but close to 1), except at multiples of the flux quantum where it may vary sharply. This behavior reflects the existence of an electric field (generated by the time-dependent magnetic field) which breaks the C4 symmetry of the constant flux Hamiltonian.

  20. Effect of wave-function localization on the time delay in photoemission from surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.-H.; Thumm, U. [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We investigate streaking time delays in the photoemission from a solid model surface as a function of the degree of localization of the initial-state wave functions. We consider a one-dimensional slab with lattice constant a{sub latt} of attractive Gaussian-shaped core potentials of width {sigma}. The parameter {sigma}/a{sub latt} thus controls the overlap between adjacent core potentials and localization of the electronic eigenfunctions on the lattice points. Small values of {sigma}/a{sub latt}<<1 yield lattice eigenfunctions that consist of localized atomic wave functions modulated by a ''Bloch-envelope'' function, while the eigenfunctions become delocalized for larger values of {sigma}/a{sub latt} > or approx 0.4. By numerically solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we calculate photoemission spectra from which we deduce a characteristic bimodal shape of the band-averaged photoemission time delay: as the slab eigenfunctions become increasingly delocalized, the time delay quickly decreases near {sigma}/a{sub latt}=0.3 from relatively large values below {sigma}/a{sub latt}{approx}0.2 to much smaller delays above {sigma}/a{sub latt}{approx}0.4. This change in wave-function localization facilitates the interpretation of a recently measured apparent relative time delay between the photoemission from core and conduction-band levels of a tungsten surface.

  1. Time and Frequency Localized Pulse Shape for Resolution Enhancement in STFT-BOTDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linqing Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-Time Fourier Transform-Brillouin Optical Time-Domain Reflectometry (STFT-BOTDR implements STFT over the full frequency spectrum to measure the distributed temperature and strain along the optic fiber, providing new research advances in dynamic distributed sensing. The spatial and frequency resolution of the dynamic sensing are limited by the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR and the Time-Frequency (T-F localization of the input pulse shape. T-F localization is fundamentally important for the communication system, which suppresses interchannel interference (ICI and intersymbol interference (ISI to improve the transmission quality in multicarrier modulation (MCM. This paper demonstrates that the T-F localized input pulse shape can enhance the SNR and the spatial and frequency resolution in STFT-BOTDR. Simulation and experiments of T-F localized different pulses shapes are conducted to compare the limitation of the system resolution. The result indicates that rectangular pulse should be selected to optimize the spatial resolution and Lorentzian pulse could be chosen to optimize the frequency resolution, while Gaussian shape pulse can be used in general applications for its balanced performance in both spatial and frequency resolution. Meanwhile, T-F localization is proved to be useful in the pulse shape selection for system resolution optimization.

  2. Development and validation of a local time stepping-based PaSR solver for combustion and radiation modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Ivarsson, Anders; Haider, Sajjad

    2013-01-01

    is henceforth addressed as radiationReactingLTSFoam (rareLTSFoam). A performance benchmarking exercise is here carried out to evaluate the effect of each LTS parameter on calculation stability, results accuracy and computational runtime. The model validation uses two test cases. The first test case presents...... library in the edcSimpleFoam solver which was introduced during the 6th OpenFOAM workshop is modified and coupled with the current solver. One of the main amendments made is the integration of soot radiation submodel since this is significant in rich flames where soot particles are formed. The new solver...

  3. Using RFID and accelerometer-embedded tracers to measure probabilities of bed load transport, step lengths, and rest times in a mountain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinde, Lindsay; Johnson, Joel P. L.

    2015-09-01

    We present new measurements of bed load tracer transport in a mountain stream over several snowmelt seasons. Cumulative displacements were measured using passive tracers, which consisted of gravel and cobbles embedded with radio frequency identification tags. The timing of bed load motion during 11 transporting events was quantified with active tracers, i.e., accelerometer-embedded cobbles. Probabilities of cobble transport increased with discharge above a threshold, and exhibited slight to moderate hysteresis during snowmelt hydrographs. Dividing cumulative displacements by the number of movements recorded by each active tracer constrained average step lengths. Average step lengths increased with discharge, and distributions of average step lengths and cumulative displacements were thin tailed. Distributions of rest times followed heavy-tailed power law scaling. Rest time scaling varied somewhat with discharge and with the degree to which tracers were incorporated into the streambed. The combination of thin-tailed displacement distributions and heavy-tailed rest time distributions predict superdiffusive dispersion.

  4. Real time network traffic monitoring for wireless local area networks based on compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza

    2017-05-01

    A wireless local area network (WLAN) is an important type of wireless networks which connotes different wireless nodes in a local area network. WLANs suffer from important problems such as network load balancing, large amount of energy, and load of sampling. This paper presents a new networking traffic approach based on Compressed Sensing (CS) for improving the quality of WLANs. The proposed architecture allows reducing Data Delay Probability (DDP) to 15%, which is a good record for WLANs. The proposed architecture is increased Data Throughput (DT) to 22 % and Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio to 17 %, which provide a good background for establishing high qualified local area networks. This architecture enables continuous data acquisition and compression of WLAN's signals that are suitable for a variety of other wireless networking applications. At the transmitter side of each wireless node, an analog-CS framework is applied at the sensing step before analog to digital converter in order to generate the compressed version of the input signal. At the receiver side of wireless node, a reconstruction algorithm is applied in order to reconstruct the original signals from the compressed signals with high probability and enough accuracy. The proposed algorithm out-performs existing algorithms by achieving a good level of Quality of Service (QoS). This ability allows reducing 15 % of Bit Error Rate (BER) at each wireless node.

  5. Impact localization on composite structures using time difference and MUSIC approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yongteng; Xiang, Jiawei

    2017-05-01

    1-D uniform linear array (ULA) has the shortcoming of the half-plane mirror effect, which does not allow discriminating between a target placed above the array and a target placed below the array. This paper presents time difference (TD) and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) based omni-directional impact localization on a large stiffened composite structure using improved linear array, which is able to perform omni-directional 360° localization. This array contains 2M+3 PZT sensors, where 2M+1 PZT sensors are arranged as a uniform linear array, and the other two PZT sensors are placed above and below the array. Firstly, the arrival times of impact signals observed by the other two sensors are determined using the wavelet transform. Compared with each other, the direction range of impact source can be decided in general, 0°to 180° or 180°to 360°. And then, two dimensional multiple signal classification (2D-MUSIC) based spatial spectrum formula using the uniform linear array is applied for impact localization by the general direction range. When the arrival times of impact signals observed by upper PZT is equal to that of lower PZT, the direction can be located in x axis (0°or 180°). And time difference based MUSIC method is present to locate impact position. To verify the proposed approach, the proposed approach is applied to a composite structure. The localization results are in good agreement with the actual impact occurring positions.

  6. Local time and Tanaka formula for a Volterra-type multifractional Gaussian process

    CERN Document Server

    Boufoussi, Brahim; Marty, Renaud; 10.3150/10-BEJ261

    2010-01-01

    The stochastic calculus for Gaussian processes is applied to obtain a Tanaka formula for a Volterra-type multifractional Gaussian process. The existence and regularity properties of the local time of this process are obtained by means of Berman's Fourier analytic approach.

  7. Constraint Programming based Local Search for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

    OpenAIRE

    Sala Reixach, Joan

    2012-01-01

    El projecte es centra en el "Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows". Explora i testeja un mètode basat en una formulació del problema en termes de programació de restriccions. Implementa un mètode de cerca local amb la capacitat de fer grans moviments anomenat "Large Neighbourhood Search".

  8. Noise-correlation-time-mediated localization in random nonlinear dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, J L; De la Rubia, F J; Cabrera, Juan L.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of the residence times density function for different nonlinear dynamical systems with limit cycle behavior and perturbed parametrically with a colored noise. We present evidence that underlying the stochastic resonancelike behavior with the noise correlation time, there is an effect of optimal localization of the system trajectories in the phase space. This phenomenon is observed in systems with different nonlinearities, suggesting a degree of universality.

  9. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinya [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Rauchenstein, Lynn T. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Carlson, Thomas J. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on received measurements from sensors is an important research area that is attracting much research interest. In this paper, we present localization algorithms using time of arrivals (TOA) and time difference of arrivals (TDOA) to achieve high accuracy under line-of-sight conditions. The circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) location systems both use nonlinear equations that relate the locations of the sensors and tracked objects. These nonlinear equations can develop accuracy challenges because of the existence of measurement errors and efficiency challenges that lead to high computational burdens. Least squares-based and maximum likelihood-based algorithms have become the most popular categories of location estimators. We also summarize the advantages and disadvantages of various positioning algorithms. By improving measurement techniques and localization algorithms, localization applications can be extended into the signal-processing-related domains of radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.

  10. Canadian children's and youth's pedometer-determined steps/day, parent-reported TV watching time, and overweight/obesity: The CANPLAY Surveillance Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Cora L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examines associations between pedometer-determined steps/day and parent-reported child's Body Mass Index (BMI and time typically spent watching television between school and dinner. Methods Young people (aged 5-19 years were recruited through their parents by random digit dialling and mailed a data collection package. Information on height and weight and time spent watching television between school and dinner on a typical school day was collected from parents. In total, 5949 boys and 5709 girls reported daily steps. BMI was categorized as overweight or obese using Cole's cut points. Participants wore pedometers for 7 days and logged daily steps. The odds of being overweight and obese by steps/day and parent-reported time spent television watching were estimated using logistic regression for complex samples. Results Girls had a lower median steps/day (10682 versus 11059 for boys and also a narrower variation in steps/day (interquartile range, 4410 versus 5309 for boys. 11% of children aged 5-19 years were classified as obese; 17% of boys and girls were overweight. Both boys and girls watched, on average, Discussion Television viewing is the more prominent factor in terms of predicting overweight, and it contributes to obesity, but steps/day attenuates the association between television viewing and obesity, and therefore can be considered protective against obesity. In addition to replacing opportunities for active alternative behaviours, exposure to television might also impact body weight by promoting excess energy intake. Conclusions In this large nationally representative sample, pedometer-determined steps/day was associated with reduced odds of being obese (but not overweight whereas each parent-reported hour spent watching television between school and dinner increased the odds of both overweight and obesity.

  11. Three-dimensional localization of low activity gamma-ray sources in real-time scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Manish K., E-mail: mksrkf@mst.edu; Alajo, Ayodeji B.; Lee, Hyoung K.

    2016-03-21

    Radioactive source localization plays an important role in tracking radiation threats in homeland security tasks. Its real-time application requires computationally efficient and reasonably accurate algorithms even with limited data to support detection with minimum uncertainty. This paper describes a statistic-based grid-refinement method for backtracing the position of a gamma-ray source in a three-dimensional domain in real-time. The developed algorithm used measurements from various known detector positions to localize the source. This algorithm is based on an inverse-square relationship between source intensity at a detector and the distance from the source to the detector. The domain discretization was developed and implemented in MATLAB. The algorithm was tested and verified from simulation results of an ideal case of a point source in non-attenuating medium. Subsequently, an experimental validation of the algorithm was performed to determine the suitability of deploying this scheme in real-time scenarios. Using the measurements from five known detector positions and for a measurement time of 3 min, the source position was estimated with an accuracy of approximately 53 cm. The accuracy improved and stabilized to approximately 25 cm for higher measurement times. It was concluded that the error in source localization was primarily due to detection uncertainties. In verification and experimental validation of the algorithm, the distance between {sup 137}Cs source and any detector position was between 0.84 m and 1.77 m. The results were also compared with the least squares method. Since the discretization algorithm was validated with a weak source, it is expected that it can localize the source of higher activity in real-time. It is believed that for the same physical placement of source and detectors, a source of approximate activity 0.61–0.92 mCi can be localized in real-time with 1 s of measurement time and same accuracy. The accuracy and computational

  12. Least-squares reverse time migration with local Radon-based preconditioning

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2017-03-08

    Least-squares migration (LSM) can produce images with better balanced amplitudes and fewer artifacts than standard migration. The conventional objective function used for LSM minimizes the L2-norm of the data residual between the predicted and the observed data. However, for field-data applications in which the recorded data are noisy and undersampled, the conventional formulation of LSM fails to provide the desired uplift in the quality of the inverted image. We have developed a leastsquares reverse time migration (LSRTM) method using local Radon-based preconditioning to overcome the low signal-tonoise ratio (S/N) problem of noisy or severely undersampled data. A high-resolution local Radon transform of the reflectivity is used, and sparseness constraints are imposed on the inverted reflectivity in the local Radon domain. The sparseness constraint is that the inverted reflectivity is sparse in the Radon domain and each location of the subsurface is represented by a limited number of geologic dips. The forward and the inverse mapping of the reflectivity to the local Radon domain and vice versa is done through 3D Fourier-based discrete Radon transform operators. The weights for the preconditioning are chosen to be varying locally based on the relative amplitudes of the local dips or assigned using quantile measures. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data validate the effectiveness of our approach in producing images with good S/N and fewer aliasing artifacts when compared with standard RTM or standard LSRTM.

  13. Three-dimensional Sound Source Localization Using Inter-channel Time Difference Trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmoon Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sound source localization is one of the basic and essential techniques for intelligent robots in terms of human-robot interaction and has been utilized in various engineering fields. This paper suggests a new localization method using an inter-channel time difference trajectory, which is a new localization cue for efficient 3-D localization. As one of the ways to realize the proposed cue, a two-channel rotating array is employed. Two microphones are attached on the left and right sides of the spherical head. One microphone is in a circular motion on the right side, while the other is fixed on the left side. According to the rotating motion of the array, the (source direction-dependent characteristics of the trajectories are analysed using the Ray-Tracing formula extended for 3-D models. In simulation, the synthesized signals generated by the fixed and rotating microphone signal models were used as the output signals of the two microphones. The simulation showed that the localization performance is strongly dependent on the azimuthal position of a source, which is caused by the asymmetry of the trajectory amplitude. Additionally, the experimental results of the two experiments carried out in the room environment demonstrated that the proposed system can localize a Gaussian noise source and a voice source in 3-D space.

  14. NEAR-FIELD SOURCE LOCALIZATION METHOD AND APPLICATION USING THE TIME REVERSAL MIRROR TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yongqing; Jiang Yulei; Liu Zhanya

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop the acoustic keyboard for Personal Computer (PC),it is necessary to seek high-precision near-field source localization algorithm for identifying the keyboard characters.First of all,the focusing property of Time Reversal Mirror (TRM) is introduced,and then a mathematical model of microphone array receiving typing sound is established according to the realization of acoustic keyboard from which the TRM localization algorithm is carried out.The results through computer simulation show that the localization Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) performance of the algorithm can reach 10-3,which demonstrates that the algorithm possesses a high accuracy for the actual near-field acoustic source localization,with potential of developing the computer acoustic keyboard.Furthermore,for the purpose of testing its effect on actual near-field source localization,we organize three experiments for acoustic keyboard characters localization.The experiment results show that the positioning error of TRM algorithm is less than 1 cm within a provided acoustic keyboard region.This will provide theoretical guidance for the further research of computer acoustic keyboard.

  15. Epidemic spreading behavior with time delay on local-world evolving networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An improved susceptible-infected-susceptible(SIS)model in the local-world evolving network model is presented to study the epidemic spreading behavior with time delay,which is added into the infected phase.The local-world evolving model displays a transition from the exponential network to the scale-free network with respect to the degree distribution.Two typical delay regimes,i.e.,uniform and degree-dependent delays are incorporated into the SIS epidemic model to investigate the epidemic infection processes in the local-world network model.The results indicate that the infection delay will promote the epidemic outbreaks,increase the prevalence and reduce the critical threshold of epidemic spreading.It is also found that local-world size M will considerably influence the epidemic spreading behavior with time delay in the local-world network through large-scale numerical simulations.Simulation results are also of relevance to fight epidemic outbreaks.

  16. Simplified Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion and Emission Rates of Jet-A and Methane Fuel With and Without Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2005-01-01

    A simplified kinetic scheme for Jet-A, and methane fuels with water injection was developed to be used in numerical combustion codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC) or even simple FORTRAN codes. The two time step method is either an initial time averaged value (step one) or an instantaneous value (step two). The switch is based on the water concentration in moles/cc of 1x10(exp -20). The results presented here results in a correlation that gives the chemical kinetic time as two separate functions. This two time step method is used as opposed to a one step time averaged method previously developed to determine the chemical kinetic time with increased accuracy. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times for smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, initial water to fuel mass ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step, to be used with higher water concentrations, gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of instantaneous fuel and water mole concentration, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations would then be compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting rates of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. Chemical kinetic time equations for fuel, carbon monoxide and NOx are obtained for Jet-A fuel and methane with and without water injection to water mass loadings of 2/1 water to fuel. A similar correlation was also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium concentrations of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide as functions of overall equivalence ratio, water to fuel mass ratio, pressure and temperature (T3). The temperature of the gas entering

  17. Local Stability of AIDS Epidemic Model Through Treatment and Vertical Transmission with Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novi W, Cascarilla; Lestari, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to explain stability of the spread of AIDS through treatment and vertical transmission model. Human with HIV need a time to positively suffer AIDS. The existence of a time, human with HIV until positively suffer AIDS can be delayed for a time so that the model acquired is the model with time delay. The model form is a nonlinear differential equation with time delay, SIPTA (susceptible-infected-pre AIDS-treatment-AIDS). Based on SIPTA model analysis results the disease free equilibrium point and the endemic equilibrium point. The disease free equilibrium point with and without time delay are local asymptotically stable if the basic reproduction number is less than one. The endemic equilibrium point will be local asymptotically stable if the time delay is less than the critical value of delay, unstable if the time delay is more than the critical value of delay, and bifurcation occurs if the time delay is equal to the critical value of delay.

  18. Class II integrase mutants with changes in putative nuclear localization signals are primarily blocked at a postnuclear entry step of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Richard; Limón, Ana; Devroe, Eric; Silver, Pamela A; Cherepanov, Peter; Engelman, Alan

    2004-12-01

    Integrase has been implicated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import. Integrase analyses, however, can be complicated by the pleiotropic nature of mutations: whereas class I mutants are integration defective, class II mutants display additional assembly and/or reverse transcription defects. We previously determined that HIV-1(V165A), originally reported as defective for nuclear import, was a class II mutant. Here we analyzed mutants containing changes in other putative nuclear localization signals, including (186)KRK(188)/(211)KELQKQITK(219) and Cys-130. Previous work established HIV-1(K186Q), HIV-1(Q214L/Q216L), and HIV-1(C130G) as replication defective, but phenotypic classification was unclear and nuclear import in nondividing cells was not addressed. Consistent with previous reports, most of the bipartite mutants studied here were replication defective. These mutants as well as HIV-1(V165A) synthesized reduced cDNA levels, but a normal fraction of mutant cDNA localized to dividing and nondividing cell nuclei. Somewhat surprisingly, recombinant class II mutant proteins were catalytically active, and class II Vpr-integrase fusion proteins efficiently complemented class I mutant virus. Since a class I Vpr-integrase mutant efficiently complemented class II mutant viruses under conditions in which class II Vpr-integrases failed to function, we conclude that classes I and II define two distinct complementation groups and suggest that class II mutants are primarily defective at a postnuclear entry step of HIV-1 replication. HIV-1(C130G) was also defective for reverse transcription, but Vpr-integrase(C130G) did not efficiently complement class I mutant HIV-1. Since HIV-1(C130A) grew like the wild type, we conclude that Cys-130 is not essential for replication and speculate that perturbation of integrase structure contributed to the pleiotropic HIV-1(C130G) phenotype.

  19. ChromAlign: A two-step algorithmic procedure for time alignment of three-dimensional LC-MS chromatographic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadygov, Rovshan G; Maroto, Fernando Martin; Hühmer, Andreas F R

    2006-12-15

    We present an algorithmic approach to align three-dimensional chromatographic surfaces of LC-MS data of complex mixture samples. The approach consists of two steps. In the first step, we prealign chromatographic profiles: two-dimensional projections of chromatographic surfaces. This is accomplished by correlation analysis using fast Fourier transforms. In this step, a temporal offset that maximizes the overlap and dot product between two chromatographic profiles is determined. In the second step, the algorithm generates correlation matrix elements between full mass scans of the reference and sample chromatographic surfaces. The temporal offset from the first step indicates a range of the mass scans that are possibly correlated, then the correlation matrix is calculated only for these mass scans. The correlation matrix carries information on highly correlated scans, but it does not itself determine the scan or time alignment. Alignment is determined as a path in the correlation matrix that maximizes the sum of the correlation matrix elements. The computational complexity of the optimal path generation problem is reduced by the use of dynamic programming. The program produces time-aligned surfaces. The use of the temporal offset from the first step in the second step reduces the computation time for generating the correlation matrix and speeds up the process. The algorithm has been implemented in a program, ChromAlign, developed in C++ language for the .NET2 environment in WINDOWS XP. In this work, we demonstrate the applications of ChromAlign to alignment of LC-MS surfaces of several datasets: a mixture of known proteins, samples from digests of surface proteins of T-cells, and samples prepared from digests of cerebrospinal fluid. ChromAlign accurately aligns the LC-MS surfaces we studied. In these examples, we discuss various aspects of the alignment by ChromAlign, such as constant time axis shifts and warping of chromatographic surfaces.

  20. New Reduced Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion and Emission Rates of Jet-A and Methane Fuel With and Without Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2004-01-01

    A simplified kinetic scheme for Jet-A, and methane fuels with water injection was developed to be used in numerical combustion codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC) or even simple FORTRAN codes that are being developed at Glenn. The two time step method is either an initial time averaged value (step one) or an instantaneous value (step two). The switch is based on the water concentration in moles/cc of 1x10(exp -20). The results presented here results in a correlation that gives the chemical kinetic time as two separate functions. This two step method is used as opposed to a one step time averaged method previously developed to determine the chemical kinetic time with increased accuracy. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times for smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, initial water to fuel mass ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step, to be used with higher water concentrations, gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of instantaneous fuel and water mole concentration, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations would then be compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates were then used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. Chemical kinetic time equations for fuel, carbon monoxide and NOx were obtained for Jet-A fuel and methane with and without water injection to water mass loadings of 2/1 water to fuel. A similar correlation was also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium concentrations of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide as functions of overall equivalence ratio, water to fuel mass ratio, pressure and temperature (T3

  1. Gait analysis of slope walking: a study on step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura,Kenji

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination was made of step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure during up- and downslope walking in 17 healthy men between the ages of 19 and 34 using a force plate. Slope inclinations were set at 3, 6, 9 and 12 degrees. At 12 degrees, walking speed, the product of step length and cadence, decreased significantly (p less than 0.01 in both up- and downslope walking. The most conspicuous phenomenon in upslope walking was in cadence. The steeper the slope, the smaller was the cadence. The most conspicuous phenomenon in downslope walking was in step length. The steeper the slope, the shorter was the step length.

  2. Gait analysis of slope walking: a study on step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K; Tokuhiro, A; Takechi, H

    1991-06-01

    Determination was made of step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure during up- and downslope walking in 17 healthy men between the ages of 19 and 34 using a force plate. Slope inclinations were set at 3, 6, 9 and 12 degrees. At 12 degrees, walking speed, the product of step length and cadence, decreased significantly (p less than 0.01) in both up- and downslope walking. The most conspicuous phenomenon in upslope walking was in cadence. The steeper the slope, the smaller was the cadence. The most conspicuous phenomenon in downslope walking was in step length. The steeper the slope, the shorter was the step length.

  3. A RF time domain approach for electric arcs detection and localization systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacu, Daniela; Tamas, Razvan; Petrescu, Teodor; Paun, Mirel; Anchidin, Liliana; Algiu, Madalina

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we propose a new method for detection and localization of electric arcs by using two ultra-wide band (UWB) antennas together with data processing in the time-domain. The source of electric arcs is localized by computing an average on the inter-correlation functions of the signals received on two channels. By calculating the path length difference to the antennas, the direction of the electric arcs is then found. The novelty of the method consists in the spatial averaging in order to reduce the incertitude caused by the finite sampling rate.

  4. Local Exponential Methods: a domain decomposition approach to exponential time integration of PDEs

    CERN Document Server

    Bonaventura, Luca

    2015-01-01

    A local approach to the time integration of PDEs by exponential methods is proposed, motivated by theoretical estimates by A.Iserles on the decay of off-diagonal terms in the exponentials of sparse matrices. An overlapping domain decomposition technique is outlined, that allows to replace the computation of a global exponential matrix by a number of independent and easily parallelizable local problems. Advantages and potential problems of the proposed technique are discussed. Numerical experiments on simple, yet relevant model problems show that the resulting method allows to increase computational efficiency with respect to standard implementations of exponential methods.

  5. Vacuum Domain Walls in D-dimensions Local and Global Space-Time Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Cvetic, M; Cvetic, Mirjam; Wang, Jing

    2000-01-01

    We study local and global gravitational effects of (D-2)-brane configurations (domain-walls) in the vacuum of D-dimensional space-time. We focus on infinitely thin vacuum domain walls with arbitrary cosmological constants on either side of the wall. In the comoving frame of the wall we derive a general metric Ansatz, consistent with the homogeneity and isotropy of the space-time intrinsic to the wall, and employ Israel's matching conditions at the wall. The space-time, intrinsic to the wall, is that of (D-1)-dimensional Freedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe (with k=-1,0,1) which has a (local) description as either anti-deSitter, Minkowski or deSitter space-time. For each of these geometries, we provide a systematic classification of the local and global space-time structure transverse to the walls, for those with both positive and negative tension; they fall into different classes according to the values of their energy density relative to that of the extreme (superysmmetric) configurations. We find tha...

  6. On the local integrability of almost-product structures defined by space-time metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Delphenich, D H

    2016-01-01

    The splitting of the tangent bundle of space-time into temporal and spatial sub-bundles defines an almost-product structure. In particular, any space-time metric can be locally expressed in time-orthogonal form, in such a way that whether or not that almost-product structure is locally generated by a coordinate chart is a matter of the integrability of the Pfaff equation that the temporal 1-form of that expression for the metric defines. When one applies that analysis to the known exact solutions to the Einstein field equations, one finds that many of the common ones are completely-integrable, although some of the physically-interesting ones are not.

  7. Local existence in retarded time under a weak decay on complete null cones

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Junbin

    2015-01-01

    In the previous paper \\cite{L-Z}, for a characteristic problem with not necessarily small initial data given on a complete null cone decaying like that in the work \\cite{Ch-K} of the stability of Minkowski spacetime by Christodoulou and Klainerman, we proved the local existence in retarded time, which means the solution to the vacuum Einstein equations exists in a uniform future neighborhood, while the global existence in retarded time is the weak cosmic censorship conjecture. In this paper, we prove that the local existence in retarded time still holds when the data is assumed to decay slower, like that in Bieri's work \\cite{Bie} on the extension to the stability of Minkowski spacetime. Such decay guarantees the existence of the limit of the Hawking mass on the initial null cone, when approaching to infinity, in an optimal way.

  8. Multivariate time delay analysis based local KPCA fault prognosis approach for nonlinear processes☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Xu; Ying Liu; Qunxiong Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Currently, some fault prognosis technology occasionally has relatively unsatisfied performance especially for in-cipient faults in nonlinear processes duo to their large time delay and complex internal connection. To overcome this deficiency, multivariate time delay analysis is incorporated into the high sensitive local kernel principal com-ponent analysis. In this approach, mutual information estimation and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) are separately used to acquire the correlation degree and time delay of the process variables. Moreover, in order to achieve prediction, time series prediction by back propagation (BP) network is applied whose input is multivar-iate correlated time series other than the original time series. Then the multivariate time delayed series and future values obtained by time series prediction are combined to construct the input of local kernel principal component analysis (LKPCA) model for incipient fault prognosis. The new method has been exemplified in a sim-ple nonlinear process and the complicated Tennessee Eastman (TE) benchmark process. The results indicate that the new method has superiority in the fault prognosis sensitivity over other traditional fault prognosis methods. © 2016 The Chemical Industry and Engineering Society of China, and Chemical Industry Press. Al rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating the timing of former glacier expansions in the Tian Shan: A key step towards robust spatial correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomdin, R.; Stroeven, A. P.; Harbor, J. M.; Lifton, N. A.; Heyman, J.; Gribenski, N.; Petrakov, D. A.; Caffee, M. W.; Ivanov, M. N.; Hättestrand, C.; Rogozhina, I.; Usubaliev, R.

    2016-12-01

    The timing of past glaciation across the Tian Shan provides a proxy for past climate change in this critical area. Correlating glacial stages across the region is difficult but cosmogenic exposure ages have considerable potential. A drawback is the large observed scatter in 10Be surface exposure data. To quantify the robustness of the dating, we compile, recalculate, and perform statistical analyses on sets of 10Be surface exposure ages from 25 moraines, consisting of 114 new and previously published ages. We assess boulder age scatter by dividing boulder groups into quality classes and rejecting boulder groups of poor quality. This allows us to distinguish and correlate robustly dated glacier limits, resulting in a more conservative chronology than advanced in previous publications. Our analysis shows that only one regional glacial stage can be reliably correlated across the Tian Shan, with glacier expansions occurring between 15 and 28 ka during marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 2. However, there are examples of older more extensive indicators of glacial stages between MIS 3 and MIS 6. Paleoglacier extent during MIS 2 was mainly restricted to valley glaciation. Local deviations occur: in the central Kyrgyz Tian Shan paleoglaciers were more extensive and we propose that the topographic context explains this pattern. Correlation between glacial stages prior to late MIS 2 is less reliable, because of the low number of samples and/or the poor resolution of the dating. With the current resolution and spatial coverage of robustly-dated glacier limits we advise that paleoclimatic implications for the Tian Shan glacial chronology beyond MIS 2 are speculative and that continued work toward robust glacial chronologies is needed to resolve questions regarding drivers of past glaciation in the Tian Shan and Central Asia.

  10. Elastic scattering dynamics of cavity polaritons: Evidence for time-energy uncertainty and polariton localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2002-01-01

    The directional dynamics of the resonant Rayleigh scattering from a semiconductor microcavity is investigated. When optically exciting the lower polariton branch, the strong dispersion results in a directional emission on a ring. The coherent emission ring shows a reduction of its angular width...... for increasing time after excitation, giving direct evidence for the time-energy uncertainty in the dynamics of the scattering by disorder. The ring width converges with time to a finite value, a direct measure of an intrinsic momentum broadening of the polariton states localized by multiple disorder scattering....

  11. The analysis of space time structure in QCD vacuum, I: localization vs global behavior in local observables and Dirac eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Ivan

    2005-03-01

    The structure of QCD vacuum can be studied from first principles using lattice-regularized theory. This line of research entered a qualitatively new phase recently, wherein the space-time structure (at least for some quantities) can be directly observed in configurations dominating the QCD path integral, i.e., without any subjective processing of typical configurations. This approach to QCD vacuum structure does not rely on any proposed picture of QCD vacuum but rather attempts to characterize this structure in a model-independent manner, so that a coherent physical picture of the vacuum can emerge when such unbiased numerical information accumulates to a sufficient degree. An important part of this program is to develop a set of suitable quantitative characteristics describing the space-time structure in a meaningful and physically relevant manner. One of the basic pertinent issues here is whether QCD vacuum dynamics can be understood in terms of localized vacuum objects, or whether such objects behave as inherently global entities. The first direct studies of vacuum structure strongly support the latter. In this paper, we develop a formal framework which allows to answer this question in a quantitative manner. We discuss in detail how to apply this approach to Dirac eigenmodes and to basic scalar and pseudoscalar composites of gauge fields (action density and topological charge density). The approach is illustrated numerically on overlap Dirac zero modes and near-zero modes. This illustrative data provides direct quantitative evidence supporting our earlier arguments for the global nature of QCD Dirac eigenmodes.

  12. Is the local linearity of space-time inherited from the linearity of probabilities?

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Markus P; Hoehn, Philipp A

    2016-01-01

    The appearance of linear spaces, describing physical quantities by vectors and tensors, is ubiquitous in all of physics, from classical mechanics to the modern notion of local Lorentz invariance. However, as natural as this seems to the physicist, most computer scientists would argue that something like a "local linear tangent space" is not very typical and in fact a quite surprising property of any conceivable world or algorithm. In this paper, we take the perspective of the computer scientist seriously, and ask whether there could be any inherently information-theoretic reason to expect this notion of linearity to appear in physics. We give a series of simple arguments, spanning quantum information theory, group representation theory, and renormalization in quantum gravity, that supports a surprising thesis: namely, that the local linearity of space-time might ultimately be a consequence of the linearity of probabilities. While our arguments involve a fair amount of speculation, they have the virtue of bein...

  13. Real-time image dehazing using local adaptive neighborhoods and dark-channel-prior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, Jesus A.; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.; Kober, Vitaly; Hernandez, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    A real-time algorithm for single image dehazing is presented. The algorithm is based on calculation of local neighborhoods of a hazed image inside a moving window. The local neighborhoods are constructed by computing rank-order statistics. Next the dark-channel-prior approach is applied to the local neighborhoods to estimate the transmission function of the scene. By using the suggested approach there is no need for applying a refining algorithm to the estimated transmission such as the soft matting algorithm. To achieve high-rate signal processing the proposed algorithm is implemented exploiting massive parallelism on a graphics processing unit (GPU). Computer simulation results are carried out to test the performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of dehazing efficiency and speed of processing. These tests are performed using several synthetic and real images. The obtained results are analyzed and compared with those obtained with existing dehazing algorithms.

  14. Single step therapy for abscess foci localized at different parts of the body using trocar type catheter: Results of two year-experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Özbek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to emphasize the feasibility and cost effectiveness of trocar type catheter in percutaneous abscess drainage under imaging guidance and to determine the clinical efficacy of the method.Materials and methods: From June 2008 to December 2010, 48 patients who were referred to interventional radiology unit, in order to undergo percutaneous abscess drainage. All was data including age, the organ or the part of the body where the abscess was localized and size of abscess were recorded. Forty-two (87% patients underwent drainage with ultrasonographic guidance, while 6 (13% underwent with computed tomography guidance. One pediatric patient underwent systemic sedation anesthesia (with remiphentanyl and midazolam and the rest of the patient with local anesthesia (with prilocain hydrochlorid. Catheterization procedure with which abscess drainage was done accepted as technically successful.Results: Imaging guided percutaneous abscess drainage procedures were performed with trocar type catheter to localized abscesses in different organs or systems in 48 patients (25 men, 23 women, mean age 52 years, range 2-82 years. Technical success was 100% in all cases. No patient had a complication during the procedure. Time to extraction of percutaneous catheter after drainage procedure was 5-28 days (mean 11.2 days. There was no recurrence except for a case, in which an abscess at the splenectomy site was successfully drained.Conclusion: Percutaneous drainage with imaging guidance using the trocar type catheter should be preferred because of its feasibility, cost-effectiveness, and reduced rate of complications in treating abscesses, which localized at different organ systems.

  15. Upper tails of self-intersection local times of random walks: survey of proof techniques

    CERN Document Server

    König, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The asymptotics of the probability that the self-intersection local time of a random walk on $\\Z^d$ exceeds its expectation by a large amount is a fascinating subject because of its relation to some models from Statistical Mechanics, to large-deviation theory and variational analysis and because of the variety of the effects that can be observed. However, the proof of the upper bound is notoriously difficult and requires various sophisticated techniques. We survey some heuristics and some recently elaborated techniques and results. This is an extended summary of a talk held on the CIRM-conference on {\\it Excess self-intersection local times, and related topics} in Luminy, 6-10 Dec., 2010.

  16. Exponential moments of self-intersection local times of stable random walks in subcritical dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Castell, Fabienne; Mélot, Clothilde

    2012-01-01

    Let $(X_t, t \\geq 0)$ be an $\\alpha$-stable random walk with values in $\\Z^d$. Let $l_t(x) = \\int_0^t \\delta_x(X_s) ds$ be its local time. For $p>1$, not necessarily integer, $I_t = \\sum_x l_t^p(x)$ is the so-called $p$-fold self- intersection local time of the random walk. When $p(d -\\alpha) < d$, we derive precise logarithmic asymptotics of the probability $P(I_t \\geq r_t)$ for all scales $r_t \\gg \\E(I_t)$. Our result extends previous works by Chen, Li and Rosen 2005, Becker and K\\"onig 2010, and Laurent 2012.

  17. Citizen earthquake alert using near real time PGA estimation from a local array combining a variety of accelerometric instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Nikolaos S.; Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Kalogeras, Ioannis; Sokos, Efthimios; Tselentis, G.-Akis

    2017-04-01

    It is of a great importance to assess rapidly the intensity of a felt event in a highly populated environment. Rapid and reliable information plays a key role to decision making responses, by performing correctly the first steps after a felt ground shaking. Thus, it is important to accurately respond to urgent societal demand using reliable information. A strong motion array is under deployment and trial operation in the area of Patras, Greece. It combines: (a) standard accelerometric stations operated by the National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Geodynamics (NOA), (b) QCN-type USB MEMS acceleration sensors deployed in schools and (c) P-alert MEMS acceleration devices deployed in public sector buildings as well as in private dwellings. The array intends to cover the whole city of Patras and the populated suburbs. All instruments are operating in near real time and they are linked to a combined Earthworm - SeisComP3 server at NOA, Athens. Rapid intensity estimation can be also performed by the P-alert accelerometers locally, but the performance of a near real time intensity estimation system is under operation at NOA. The procedure is based on observing the maximum PGA value at each instrument and empirically estimate the corresponding intensity. The values are also fed to a SeisComP3 based ShakeMap procedure that is served at NOA and uses the scwfparam module of SeisComP3. Earthquake activity has been recorded so far from the western Corinth Gulf, the Ionian Islands and Achaia-Elia area, western Peloponnesus. The first phase involves correlation tests of collocated instruments and assessment of their performance to low intensity as well as to strongly felt events in the Patras city area. Steps of expanding the array are also under consideration, in order to cover the wider area of northwestern Peloponnesus and Ionian islands.

  18. Energy decay of a variable-coefficient wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent localized damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiong Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the energy decay for the Cauchy problem of the wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent and space-dependent damping. The damping is localized in a bounded domain and near infinity, and the principal part of the wave equation has a variable-coefficient. We apply the multiplier method for variable-coefficient equations, and obtain an energy decay that depends on the property of the coefficient of the damping term.

  19. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Qian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half.

  20. Locally Rotationally Symmetric Bianchi Type-I Model with Time Varying (A) Term

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.K.Tiwari; Navin Kumar Jha

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type-Ⅰ cosmological model for stiff matter and a vacuum solution with a cosmological term proportional to R~(-m) (R is the scale factor and m is a positive constant).The cosmological term decreases with time.We obtain that for both the cases the present universe is accelerating with a large fraction of cosmological density in the form of a cosmological term.

  1. Investigation of S3-2 satellite data for local time variation of energetic electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbe, S.; Sheldon, W. R.; Benbrook, J. R.; Bering, E. A.; Vampola, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Data on precipitating electrons from the S3-2 satellite were investigated for local time variation at four L = 4 stations in the southern hemisphere. The equatorial pitch angles of electrons mirroring at 100 km, assumed to be the edge of the bounce loss cone, are calculated for L = 4 using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field for the epoch of the S3-2 data, along with the variation in mirror altitude per degree of equatorial pitch angle. The largest obstacle to the investigation was uneven sampling in terms of local time for all of the stations. However, this situation was improved upon by the use of S3-2 measurements at the conjugate locations of the four stations which provided additional data on electrons in the southern hemisphere bounce loss cone. Evidence for an effect of the dawn-to-dusk geoelectric field was found at two of the stations, Halley Bay and Siple, in the form of a minimum in electron precipitation at dusk. However, the present study does not completely resolve the question of local time modulation of electron precipitation at L = 4 in the southern hemisphere. Furthermore, while the average precipitation was lowest at the Kerguelen site, as would be expected on the basis of drift loss cone (DLC) theories, the intensity at that site exceeds the level that is expected on the basis of these DLC theories.

  2. Characterization of olive oil volatiles by multi-step direct thermal desorption-comprehensive gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry using a programmed temperature vaporizing injector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, S.; Kaal, E.; Janssen, H.-G.; van Platerink, C.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of a versatile system for multi-step direct thermal desorption (DTD) coupled to comprehensive gas chromatography (GC × GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF-MS) detection is studied. As an application the system is used for the characterization of fresh versus aged olive oi

  3. Using a Three-Step Decoding Strategy with Constant Time Delay to Teach Word Reading to Students with Mild and Moderate Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker Cohen, Elisabeth; Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Alberto, Paul; Fredrick, Laura D.

    2008-01-01

    The use of a three-step decoding strategy with constant time delay for teaching decoding and word reading to students with mild and moderate mental retardation was investigated in this study. A multiple probe design was used to examine the percentage of words correctly decoded and read as well as the percentage of sounds correctly decoded. The…

  4. Loschmidt echo in many-spin systems: contrasting time scales of local and global measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangara, Pablo R; Bendersky, Denise; Levstein, Patricia R; Pastawski, Horacio M

    2016-06-13

    A local excitation in a quantum many-spin system evolves deterministically. A time-reversal procedure, involving the inversion of the signs of every energy and interaction, should produce the excitation revival. This idea, experimentally coined in nuclear magnetic resonance, embodies the concept of the Loschmidt echo (LE). While such an implementation involves a single spin autocorrelation M(1,1), i.e. a local LE, theoretical efforts have focused on the study of the recovery probability of a complete many-body state, referred to here as global or many-body LE MMB Here, we analyse the relation between these magnitudes, with regard to their characteristic time scales and their dependence on the number of spins N We show that the global LE can be understood, to some extent, as the simultaneous occurrence of N independent local LEs, i.e. MMB∼(M(1,1))(N/4) This extensive hypothesis is exact for very short times and confirmed numerically beyond such a regime. Furthermore, we discuss a general picture of the decay of M1,1 as a consequence of the interplay between the time scale that characterizes the reversible interactions (T(2)) and that of the perturbation (τ(Σ)). Our analysis suggests that the short-time decay, characterized by the time scale τ(Σ), is greatly enhanced by the complex processes that occur beyond T(2) This would ultimately lead to the experimentally observed T(3), which was found to be roughly independent of τ(Σ) but closely tied to T(2).

  5. SU-E-T-23: A Novel Two-Step Optimization Scheme for Tandem and Ovoid (T and O) HDR Brachytherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, M; Todor, D [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Fields, E [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method allowing fast, true volumetric optimization of T and O HDR treatments and to quantify its benefits. Materials and Methods: 27 CT planning datasets and treatment plans from six consecutive cervical cancer patients treated with 4–5 intracavitary T and O insertions were used. Initial treatment plans were created with a goal of covering high risk (HR)-CTV with D90 > 90% and minimizing D2cc to rectum, bladder and sigmoid with manual optimization, approved and delivered. For the second step, each case was re-planned adding a new structure, created from the 100% prescription isodose line of the manually optimized plan to the existent physician delineated HR-CTV, rectum, bladder and sigmoid. New, more rigorous DVH constraints for the critical OARs were used for the optimization. D90 for the HR-CTV and D2cc for OARs were evaluated in both plans. Results: Two-step optimized plans had consistently smaller D2cc's for all three OARs while preserving good D90s for HR-CTV. On plans with “excellent” CTV coverage, average D90 of 96% (range 91–102), sigmoid D2cc was reduced on average by 37% (range 16–73), bladder by 28% (range 20–47) and rectum by 27% (range 15–45). Similar reductions were obtained on plans with “good” coverage, with an average D90 of 93% (range 90–99). For plans with inferior coverage, average D90 of 81%, an increase in coverage to 87% was achieved concurrently with D2cc reductions of 31%, 18% and 11% for sigmoid, bladder and rectum. Conclusions: A two-step DVH-based optimization can be added with minimal planning time increase, but with the potential of dramatic and systematic reductions of D2cc for OARs and in some cases with concurrent increases in target dose coverage. These single-fraction modifications would be magnified over the course of 4–5 intracavitary insertions and may have real clinical implications in terms of decreasing both acute and late toxicity.

  6. Transplantation of Local Nets and Geometric Modular Action on Robertson-Walker Space-Times

    CERN Document Server

    Buchholz, D; Summers, S J; Buchholz, Detlev; Mund, Jens; Summers, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    A novel method of transplanting algebras of observables from de Sitter space to a large class of Robertson-Walker space-times is exhibited. It allows one to establish the existence of an abundance of local nets on these spaces which comply with a recently proposed condition of geometric modular action. The corresponding modular symmetry groups appearing in these examples also satisfy a condition of modular stability, which has been suggested as a substitute for the requirement of positivity of the energy in Minkowski space. Moreover, they exemplify the conjecture that the modular symmetry groups are generically larger than the isometry and conformal groups of the underlying space-times.

  7. Performance of the Mean-Timer algorithm for DT Local Reconstruction and muon time measurement.

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Mean-Timer algorithm has been recently implemented as default for the local reconstruction within the CMS Drift Tubes (DT), for muons that appear to be out-of-time (OOT) or lack measured hits on one of the two space projections. Besides improving the spatial resoluton for OOT muons, this method allows a precise time measurement that can be used to tag OOT muons, in order either to reject them (e.g. as a result of OOT Pile Up) or to select them for exotic physical analyses.

  8. Localization of a noisy broadband surface target using time differences of multipath arrivals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbie, John; Siderius, Martin; McCargar, Reid; Allen, John S; Pusey, Grant

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies [Tiemann et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 2355-2365 (2006)] have reported the localization of marine mammals in 3-D from their clicks using multipath arrivals. Bathymetric variations were advantageously used to predict multipath arrival times with a raytracer. These arrivals are directly discernible from the time series for impulsive sources, such as whale clicks, but extension of the method to continuous broadband sources presents additional complications. By pulse compressing noise emitted from a small boat using two hydrophones, the hyperbolic direct-arrival ambiguity can be refined in both range and bearing. Acoustic-derived results are validated with target GPS measurements.

  9. Local identifiability for two and three-compartment pharmacokinetic models with time-lags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, J A; De Biasi, J; Plusquellec, Y; Houin, G

    1998-06-01

    In this paper, we show that time-lags between compartments in a 2 and 3 compartment pharmacokinetic model may be taken into account but that separate identification for model parameters and for time-lags would not be suitable. Furthermore, it may happen that a time-lag model is locally identifiable while the corresponding model without delay is not. For two-compartment delayed models, with only one observation, it is not necessary to have two different inputs contrary to the case without time-lag. Both the Laplace transformation and a Jacobian matrix are used in an identifiability study. For all two-compartment models we have investigated which kind of parameters or lags are identifiable from amount (Q) or concentration (C) measures.

  10. Iterated local search algorithm for solving the orienteering problem with soft time windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghezzaf, Brahim; Fahim, Hassan El

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the orienteering problem with time windows (OPTW) and the impact of relaxing the time windows on the profit collected by the vehicle. The way of relaxing time windows adopted in the orienteering problem with soft time windows (OPSTW) that we study in this research is a late service relaxation that allows linearly penalized late services to customers. We solve this problem heuristically by considering a hybrid iterated local search. The results of the computational study show that the proposed approach is able to achieve promising solutions on the OPTW test instances available in the literature, one new best solution is found. On the newly generated test instances of the OPSTW, the results show that the profit collected by the OPSTW is better than the profit collected by the OPTW.

  11. Space-Time Localization of Plasma Turbulence Using Multiple Spacecraft Radio Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, John W.; Estabrook, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Space weather is described as the variability of solar wind plasma that can disturb satellites and systems and affect human space exploration. Accurate prediction requires information of the heliosphere inside the orbit of the Earth. However, for predictions using remote sensing, one needs not only plane-of-sky position but also range information the third spatial dimension to show the distance to the plasma disturbances and thus when they might propagate or co-rotate to create disturbances at the orbit of the Earth. Appropriately processed radio signals from spacecraft having communications lines-of-sight passing through the inner heliosphere can be used for this spacetime localization of plasma disturbances. The solar plasma has an electron density- and radio-wavelength-dependent index of refraction. An approximately monochromatic wave propagating through a thin layer of plasma turbulence causes a geometrical-optics phase shift proportional to the electron density at the point of passage, the radio wavelength, and the thickness of the layer. This phase shift is the same for a wave propagating either up or down through the layer at the point of passage. This attribute can be used for space-time localization of plasma irregularities. The transfer function of plasma irregularities to the observed time series depends on the Doppler tracking mode. When spacecraft observations are in the two-way mode (downlink radio signal phase-locked to an uplink radio transmission), plasma fluctuations have a two-pulse response in the Doppler. In the two-way mode, the Doppler time series y2(t) is the difference between the frequency of the downlink signal received and the frequency of a ground reference oscillator. A plasma blob localized at a distance x along the line of sight perturbs the phase on both the up and down link, giving rise to two events in the two-way tracking time series separated by a time lag depending the blob s distance from the Earth: T2-2x/c, where T2 is the

  12. Neural-Fuzzy Digital Strategy of Continuous-Time Nonlinear Systems Using Adaptive Prediction and Random-Local-Optimization Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ren Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A tracking problem, time-delay, uncertainty and stability analysis of a predictive control system are considered. The predictive control design is based on the input and output of neural plant model (NPM, and a recursive fuzzy predictive tracker has scaling factors which limit the value zone of measured data and cause the tuned parameters to converge to obtain a robust control performance. To improve the further control performance, the proposed random-local-optimization design (RLO for a model/controller uses offline initialization to obtain a near global optimal model/controller. Other issues are the considerations of modeling error, input-delay, sampling distortion, cost, greater flexibility, and highly reliable digital products of the model-based controller for the continuous-time (CT nonlinear system. They are solved by a recommended two-stage control design with the first-stage (offline RLO and second-stage (online adaptive steps. A theorizing method is then put forward to replace the sensitivity calculation, which reduces the calculation of Jacobin matrices of the back-propagation (BP method. Finally, the feedforward input of reference signals helps the digital fuzzy controller improve the control performance, and the technique works to control the CT systems precisely.

  13. Time-distance domain transformation for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin metallic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram; Packo, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Emission used in Non-Destructive Testing is focused on analysis of elastic waves propagating in mechanical structures. Then any information carried by generated acoustic waves, further recorded by a set of transducers, allow to determine integrity of these structures. It is clear that material properties and geometry strongly impacts the result. In this paper a method for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin plates is presented. The approach is based on the Time-Distance Domain Transform, that is a wavenumber-frequency mapping technique for precise event localization. The major advantage of the technique is dispersion compensation through a phase-shifting of investigated waveforms in order to acquire the most accurate output, allowing for source-sensor distance estimation using a single transducer. The accuracy and robustness of the above process are also investigated. This includes the study of Young's modulus value and numerical parameters influence on damage detection. By merging the Time-Distance Domain Transform with an optimal distance selection technique, an identification-localization algorithm is achieved. The method is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. The latter involves both laboratory and large scale industrial tests.

  14. Is the local linearity of space-time inherited from the linearity of probabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus P.; Carrozza, Sylvain; Höhn, Philipp A.

    2017-02-01

    The appearance of linear spaces, describing physical quantities by vectors and tensors, is ubiquitous in all of physics, from classical mechanics to the modern notion of local Lorentz invariance. However, as natural as this seems to the physicist, most computer scientists would argue that something like a ‘local linear tangent space’ is not very typical and in fact a quite surprising property of any conceivable world or algorithm. In this paper, we take the perspective of the computer scientist seriously, and ask whether there could be any inherently information-theoretic reason to expect this notion of linearity to appear in physics. We give a series of simple arguments, spanning quantum information theory, group representation theory, and renormalization in quantum gravity, that supports a surprising thesis: namely, that the local linearity of space-time might ultimately be a consequence of the linearity of probabilities. While our arguments involve a fair amount of speculation, they have the virtue of being independent of any detailed assumptions on quantum gravity, and they are in harmony with several independent recent ideas on emergent space-time in high-energy physics.

  15. Simplified Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydorgen/Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2005-01-01

    A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two-time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (> 1 x 10(exp -20) moles/cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/air fuel and for the H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA s Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T4) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T3). High values of the regression coefficient R2 are obtained.

  16. Summary of Simplified Two Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydrogen/Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, C. John; Molnar, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (greater than l x 10(exp -20)) moles per cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T(sub 4)). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/Air fuel and for H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T(sub 4)) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T(sub 3)). High values of the regression coefficient R squared are obtained.

  17. Warped $AdS_6\\times S^2$ in Type IIB supergravity I: Local solutions

    CERN Document Server

    D'Hoker, Eric; Karch, Andreas; Uhlemann, Christoph F

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the existence of solutions with 16 residual supersymmetries to Type IIB supergravity on a space-time of the form $AdS_6 \\times S^2$ warped over a two-dimensional Riemann surface $\\Sigma$. The $SO(2,5) \\times SO(3)$ isometry extends to invariance under the exceptional Lie superalgebra $F(4)$. In the present paper, we construct the general Ansatz compatible with these symmetries, derive the corresponding reduced BPS equations, and obtain their complete local solution in terms of two locally holomorphic functions ${\\cal A}_\\pm$ on $\\Sigma$, subject to certain positivity and regularity conditions. Globally, $({\\cal A}_+, {\\cal A}_-)$ are allowed to be multiple-valued on $\\Sigma$ and be holomorphic sections of a holomorphic bundle over $\\Sigma$ with structure group contained in $SU(1,1) \\times { C}$. Globally regular solutions are expected to provide the near-horizon geometry of $(p,q)$ 5-brane and 7-brane webs which are holographic duals to five-dimensional conformal field theories. A preliminary a...

  18. Real-time realizations of the Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, V.; Arrowsmith, S.; Hofstetter, A.; Nippress, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization method (BISL), introduced by Mordak et al. (2010) and upgraded by Marcillo et al. (2014) is destined for the accurate estimation of the atmospheric event origin at local, regional and global scales by the seismic and infrasonic networks and arrays. The BISL is based on probabilistic models of the source-station infrasonic signal propagation time, picking time and azimuth estimate merged with a prior knowledge about celerity distribution. It requires at each hypothetical source location, integration of the product of the corresponding source-station likelihood functions multiplied by a prior probability density function of celerity over the multivariate parameter space. The present BISL realization is generally time-consuming procedure based on numerical integration. The computational scheme proposed simplifies the target function so that integrals are taken exactly and are represented via standard functions. This makes the procedure much faster and realizable in real-time without practical loss of accuracy. The procedure executed as PYTHON-FORTRAN code demonstrates high performance on a set of the model and real data.

  19. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on measurements obtained from sensors (i.e., receivers) is an important research area that is attracting much interest. In this paper, we review several representative localization algorithms that use time of arrivals (TOAs) and time difference of arrivals (TDOAs) to achieve high signal source position estimation accuracy when a transmitter is in the line-of-sight of a receiver. Circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) position estimation approaches both use nonlinear equations that relate the known locations of receivers and unknown locations of transmitters. Estimation of the location of transmitters using the standard nonlinear equations may not be very accurate because of receiver location errors, receiver measurement errors, and computational efficiency challenges that result in high computational burdens. Least squares and maximum likelihood based algorithms have become the most popular computational approaches to transmitter location estimation. In this paper, we summarize the computational characteristics and position estimation accuracies of various positioning algorithms. By improving methods for estimating the time-of-arrival of transmissions at receivers and transmitter location estimation algorithms, transmitter location estimation may be applied across a range of applications and technologies such as radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.

  20. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-01-01

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A.F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Stratman-Scuseria-Frisch atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1-naphthyl)-methyl)-anthracene and 4-((2-naphthyl)-methyl)-benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that are not accessible using simple density difference analysis.

  1. The Local Group as a time machine: studying the high-redshift Universe with nearby galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Johnson, Benjamin D; Bullock, James S; Conroy, Charlie; Fitts, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We infer the UV luminosities of Local Group galaxies at early cosmic times ($z \\sim 2$ and $z \\sim 7$) by combining stellar population synthesis modeling with star formation histories derived from deep color-magnitude diagrams constructed from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. Our analysis provides a basis for understanding high-$z$ galaxies - including those that may be unobservable even with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - in the context of familiar, well-studied objects in the very low-$z$ Universe. We find that, at the epoch of reionization, all Local Group dwarfs were less luminous than the faintest galaxies detectable in deep HST observations of blank fields. We predict that JWST will observe $z \\sim 7$ progenitors of galaxies similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud today; however, the HST Frontier Fields initiative may already be observing such galaxies, highlighting the power of gravitational lensing. Consensus reionization models require an extrapolation of the observed blank-field lum...

  2. Particle swarm optimization and its application in MEG source localization using single time sliced data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Juan; Liu, Chenglian; Guo, Yongning

    2014-10-01

    The estimation of neural active sources from the magnetoencephalography (MEG) data is a very critical issue for both clinical neurology and brain functions research. A widely accepted source-modeling technique for MEG involves calculating a set of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs). Depth in the brain is one of difficulties in MEG source localization. Particle swarm optimization(PSO) is widely used to solve various optimization problems. In this paper we discuss its ability and robustness to find the global optimum in different depths of the brain when using single equivalent current dipole (sECD) model and single time sliced data. The results show that PSO is an effective global optimization to MEG source localization when given one dipole in different depths.

  3. Locally parity-time-symmetric and globally parity-symmetric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, W. W.; Herrero, R.; Botey, M.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a class of systems holding parity-time (PT ) symmetry locally, whereas being globally P symmetric. The potential, U =U (|r |) , fulfills PT symmetry with respect to periodically distributed points r0:U (| r0+r |) =U*(| r0-r |) being r0≠0 . We show that such systems hold unusual properties arising from the merging of the two different symmetries, leading to a strong field localization and enhancement at the double-symmetry center, r =0 , when the coupling of outward to inward propagating waves is favored. We explore such general potentials in one and two dimensions, which could have actual realizations combining gain-loss and index modulations in nanophotonic structures. In particular, we show how to render a broad aperture vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser into a bright and narrow beam source, as a direct application.

  4. Cerebellar potentiation and learning a whisker-based object localization task with a time response window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Negah; Owens, Cullen B; Bosman, Laurens W J; Spanke, Jochen K; Lindeman, Sander; Gong, Wei; Potters, Jan-Willem; Romano, Vincenzo; Voges, Kai; Moscato, Letizia; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Negrello, Mario; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2014-01-29

    Whisker-based object localization requires activation and plasticity of somatosensory and motor cortex. These parts of the cerebral cortex receive strong projections from the cerebellum via the thalamus, but it is unclear whether and to what extent cerebellar processing may contribute to such a sensorimotor task. Here, we subjected knock-out mice, which suffer from impaired intrinsic plasticity in their Purkinje cells and long-term potentiation at their parallel fiber-to-Purkinje cell synapses (L7-PP2B), to an object localization task with a time response window (RW). Water-deprived animals had to learn to localize an object with their whiskers, and based upon this location they were trained to lick within a particular period ("go" trial) or refrain from licking ("no-go" trial). L7-PP2B mice were not ataxic and showed proper basic motor performance during whisking and licking, but were severely impaired in learning this task compared with wild-type littermates. Significantly fewer L7-PP2B mice were able to learn the task at long RWs. Those L7-PP2B mice that eventually learned the task made unstable progress, were significantly slower in learning, and showed deficiencies in temporal tuning. These differences became greater as the RW became narrower. Trained wild-type mice, but not L7-PP2B mice, showed a net increase in simple spikes and complex spikes of their Purkinje cells during the task. We conclude that cerebellar processing, and potentiation in particular, can contribute to learning a whisker-based object localization task when timing is relevant. This study points toward a relevant role of cerebellum-cerebrum interaction in a sophisticated cognitive task requiring strict temporal processing.

  5. Penrose's quasi-local mass for asymptotically anti-de Sitter space-times

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Penrose's quasi-local mass construction is carried through for two-surfaces at infinity in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space-times. A modification of the Witten argument is given to prove a positivity property of the resulting conserved quantities. [This work formed part of Ron Kelly's Oxford D.Phil. thesis, and the first person pronoun refers to him. It appeared in hand-written form as `Asymptotically anti-de Sitter space-times' in Twistor Newsletter 20 (1985) pp11-23 (available at http://people.maths.ox.ac.uk/lmason/Tn/TN1-25), but is appearing type-set for the first time here. Footnotes marked ${\\bf{PT}}$ have been added for this version by Paul Tod, in the hope of making this work available to a wider audience.

  6. Large deviations for the local times of a random walk among random conductances

    CERN Document Server

    König, Wolfgang; Wolff, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    We derive an annealed large deviation principle for the normalised local times of a continuous-time random walk among random conductances in a finite domain in $\\Z^d$ in the spirit of Donsker-Varadhan \\cite{DV75}. We work in the interesting case that the conductances may assume arbitrarily small values. Thus, the underlying picture of the principle is a joint strategy of small values of the conductances and large holding times of the walk. The speed and the rate function of our principle are explicit in terms of the lower tails of the conductance distribution. As an application, we identify the logarithmic asymptotics of the lower tails of the principal eigenvalue of the randomly perturbed negative Laplace operator in the domain.

  7. Short-Time Elasticity of Polymer Melts: Tobolsky Conjecture and Heterogeneous Local Stiffness

    CERN Document Server

    Bernini, S

    2016-01-01

    An extended Molecular-Dynamics study of the short-time "glassy" elasticity exhibited by a polymer melt of linear fully-flexible chains above the glass transition is presented. The focus is on the infinite-frequency shear modulus $G_\\infty$ manifested in the picosecond time scale and the relaxed plateau $G_p$ reached at later times and terminated by the structural relaxation. The local stiffness of the interactions with the first neighbours of each monomer exhibits marked distribution with average value given by $G_\\infty$. In particular, the neighbourhood of the end monomers of each chain are softer than the inner monomers, so that $G_\\infty$ increases with the chain length. $G_p$ is not affected by the chain length and is largely set by the non-bonding interactions, thus confirming for polymer melts the conjecture formulated by Tobolsky for glassy polymers.

  8. Local Effect of Space-Time Expansion ---- How Galaxies Form and Evolve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian Liang; Hua, He Yu

    2016-09-01

    generalize gravitational theory of central field to the expanding space-time, and realize the unification of structure of big scope space-time and physical phenomena of small scope, and reasonably and systematically explain gravitational anomalies of solar system such as extra receding rate of lunar orbit, the increase of astronomical unit, the secular change of day length, the earth's expansion as well as the extra acceleration of artificial aerocrafts and so on, which cannot be treated by current knowledge. Besides, it is disclosed that galaxies form from continued growth but not the assemblage of existent matter after big bang, new matter continuously creates in the interior of celestial bodies, celestial bodies, galaxies and space simultaneously enlarge at the same proportion, and it is the local effect of space-time expansion that determines formation and evolution of galaxies.

  9. A novel enterovirus and parechovirus multiplex one-step real-time PCR-validation and clinical experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. C. Y.; Bottiger, B.; Midgley, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    and human parechovirus type 3 had a similar seasonal pattern with a peak during the summer and autumn. Human parechovirus type 3 was almost invariably found in children less than 4 months of age. In conclusion, a multiplex assay was developed allowing simultaneous detection of 2 viruses, which can cause......As the number of new enteroviruses and human parechoviruses seems ever growing, the necessity for updated diagnostics is relevant. We have updated an enterovirus assay and combined it with a previously published assay for human parechovirus resulting in a multiplex one-step RT-PCR assay....... The multiplex assay was validated by analysing the sensitivity and specificity of the assay compared to the respective monoplex assays, and a good concordance was found. Furthermore, the enterovirus assay was able to detect 42 reference strains from all 4 species, and an additional 9 genotypes during panel...

  10. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Riccardo; Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni; Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Riboldi, Marco; Ciocca, Mario; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido

    2015-05-01

    External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring during ocular radiotherapy treatments. The

  11. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Via, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.via@polimi.it; Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133 (Italy); Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Ciocca, Mario [CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133, Italy and CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100, Italy and European Institute of Oncology, Milano 20141 (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Methods: Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Results: Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. Conclusions: A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring

  12. Implementation of time-resolved step-scan fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy using a kHz repetition rate pump laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magana, Donny; Parul, Dzmitry; Dyer, R Brian; Shreve, Andrew P

    2011-05-01

    Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy has been shown to be invaluable for studying excited-state structures and dynamics in both biological and inorganic systems. Despite the established utility of this method, technical challenges continue to limit the data quality and more wide ranging applications. A critical problem has been the low laser repetition rate and interferometer stepping rate (both are typically 10 Hz) used for data acquisition. Here we demonstrate significant improvement in the quality of time-resolved spectra through the use of a kHz repetition rate laser to achieve kHz excitation and data collection rates while stepping the spectrometer at 200 Hz. We have studied the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state of Ru(bipyridine)(3)Cl(2) in deuterated acetonitrile to test and optimize high repetition rate data collection. Comparison of different interferometer stepping rates reveals an optimum rate of 200 Hz due to minimization of long-term baseline drift. With the improved collection efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio, better assignments of the MLCT excited-state bands can be made. Using optimized parameters, carbonmonoxy myoglobin in deuterated buffer is also studied by observing the infrared signatures of carbon monoxide photolysis upon excitation of the heme. We conclude from these studies that a substantial increase in performance of ss-FT-IR instrumentation is achieved by coupling commercial infrared benches with kHz repetition rate lasers.

  13. Large deviations for self-intersection local times in subcritical dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Clément

    2010-01-01

    Let $(X_t,t\\geq 0)$ be a random walk on $\\mathbb{Z}^d$. Let $ l_t(x)= \\int_0^t \\delta_x(X_s)ds$ be the local time at site $x$ and $ I_t= \\sum\\limits_{x\\in\\mathbb{Z}^d} l_t(x)^p $ the p-fold self-intersection local time (SILT). Becker and K\\"onig have recently proved a large deviations principle for $I_t$ for all $(p,d)\\in\\mathbb{R}^d\\times\\mathbb{Z}^d$ such that $p(d-2)<2$. We extend these results to a broader scale of deviations and to the whole subcritical domain $p(d-2)

  14. Effective real-time vehicle tracking using discriminative sparse coding on local patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, XiangJun; Ye, Feiyue; Ruan, Yaduan; Chen, Qimei

    2016-01-01

    A visual tracking framework that provides an object detector and tracker, which focuses on effective and efficient visual tracking in surveillance of real-world intelligent transport system applications, is proposed. The framework casts the tracking task as problems of object detection, feature representation, and classification, which is different from appearance model-matching approaches. Through a feature representation of discriminative sparse coding on local patches called DSCLP, which trains a dictionary on local clustered patches sampled from both positive and negative datasets, the discriminative power and robustness has been improved remarkably, which makes our method more robust to a complex realistic setting with all kinds of degraded image quality. Moreover, by catching objects through one-time background subtraction, along with offline dictionary training, computation time is dramatically reduced, which enables our framework to achieve real-time tracking performance even in a high-definition sequence with heavy traffic. Experiment results show that our work outperforms some state-of-the-art methods in terms of speed, accuracy, and robustness and exhibits increased robustness in a complex real-world scenario with degraded image quality caused by vehicle occlusion, image blur of rain or fog, and change in viewpoint or scale.

  15. Relationship of edge localized mode burst times with divertor flux loop signal phase in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, S. C., E-mail: S.C.Chapman@warwick.ac.uk [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany); Dendy, R. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Todd, T. N.; Webster, A. J.; Morris, J. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Watkins, N. W. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany); Centre for the Analysis of Time Series, London School of Economics, London (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering and Innovation, Open University, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom); Calderon, F. A. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    A phase relationship is identified between sequential edge localized modes (ELMs) occurrence times in a set of H-mode tokamak plasmas to the voltage measured in full flux azimuthal loops in the divertor region. We focus on plasmas in the Joint European Torus where a steady H-mode is sustained over several seconds, during which ELMs are observed in the Be II emission at the divertor. The ELMs analysed arise from intrinsic ELMing, in that there is no deliberate intent to control the ELMing process by external means. We use ELM timings derived from the Be II signal to perform direct time domain analysis of the full flux loop VLD2 and VLD3 signals, which provide a high cadence global measurement proportional to the voltage induced by changes in poloidal magnetic flux. Specifically, we examine how the time interval between pairs of successive ELMs is linked to the time-evolving phase of the full flux loop signals. Each ELM produces a clear early pulse in the full flux loop signals, whose peak time is used to condition our analysis. The arrival time of the following ELM, relative to this pulse, is found to fall into one of two categories: (i) prompt ELMs, which are directly paced by the initial response seen in the flux loop signals; and (ii) all other ELMs, which occur after the initial response of the full flux loop signals has decayed in amplitude. The times at which ELMs in category (ii) occur, relative to the first ELM of the pair, are clustered at times when the instantaneous phase of the full flux loop signal is close to its value at the time of the first ELM.

  16. Real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tatsuhiro; Tamura, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Since social media started getting more attention from users on the Internet, social media has been one of the most important information source in the world. Especially, with the increasing popularity of social media, data posted on social media sites are rapidly becoming collective intelligence, which is a term used to refer to new media that is displacing traditional media. In this paper, we focus on geotagged tweets on the Twitter site. These geotagged tweets are referred to as georeferenced documents because they include not only a short text message, but also the documents' posting time and location. Many researchers have been tackling the development of new data mining techniques for georeferenced documents to identify and analyze emergency topics, such as natural disasters, weather, diseases, and other incidents. In particular, the utilization of geotagged tweets to identify and analyze natural disasters has received much attention from administrative agencies recently because some case studies have achieved compelling results. In this paper, we propose a novel real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics. The aim of our new application is to provide new platforms that can identify and analyze the localities of emergency topics. The proposed application is composed of three core computational intelligence techniques: the Naive Bayes classifier technique, the spatiotemporal clustering technique, and the burst detection technique. Moreover, we have implemented two types of application interface: a Web application interface and an android application interface. To evaluate the proposed application, we have implemented a real-time weather observation system embedded the proposed application. we used actual crawling geotagged tweets posted on the Twitter site. The weather observation system successfully detected bursty local areas related to observed emergency weather topics.

  17. Element analysis: a wavelet-based method for analysing time-localized events in noisy time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Jonathan M.

    2017-04-01

    A method is derived for the quantitative analysis of signals that are composed of superpositions of isolated, time-localized `events'. Here, these events are taken to be well represented as rescaled and phase-rotated versions of generalized Morse wavelets, a broad family of continuous analytic functions. Analysing a signal composed of replicates of such a function using another Morse wavelet allows one to directly estimate the properties of events from the values of the wavelet transform at its own maxima. The distribution of events in general power-law noise is determined in order to establish significance based on an expected false detection rate. Finally, an expression for an event's `region of influence' within the wavelet transform permits the formation of a criterion for rejecting spurious maxima due to numerical artefacts or other unsuitable events. Signals can then be reconstructed based on a small number of isolated points on the time/scale plane. This method, termed element analysis, is applied to the identification of long-lived eddy structures in ocean currents as observed by along-track measurements of sea surface elevation from satellite altimetry.

  18. Deconvolution of acoustic emissions for source localization using time reverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocur, Georg Karl

    2017-01-01

    Impact experiments on small-scale slabs made of concrete and aluminum were carried out. Wave motion radiated from the epicenter of the impact was recorded as voltage signals by resonant piezoelectric transducers. Numerical simulations of the elastic wave propagation are performed to simulate the physical experiments. The Hertz theory of contact is applied to estimate the force impulse, which is subsequently used for the numerical simulation. Displacements at the transducer positions are calculated numerically. A deconvolution function is obtained by comparing the physical (voltage signal) and the numerical (calculated displacement) experiments. Acoustic emission signals due to pencil-lead breaks are recorded, deconvolved and applied for localization using time reverse modeling.

  19. Application of empirical mode decomposition with local linear quantile regression in financial time series forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Abobaker M; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Altaher, Alsaidi M

    2014-01-01

    This paper mainly forecasts the daily closing price of stock markets. We propose a two-stage technique that combines the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) with nonparametric methods of local linear quantile (LLQ). We use the proposed technique, EMD-LLQ, to forecast two stock index time series. Detailed experiments are implemented for the proposed method, in which EMD-LPQ, EMD, and Holt-Winter methods are compared. The proposed EMD-LPQ model is determined to be superior to the EMD and Holt-Winter methods in predicting the stock closing prices.

  20. Local times for solutions of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and the inviscid limit

    CERN Document Server

    Shirikyan, Armen

    2010-01-01

    We consider the behaviour of the distribution for stationary solutions of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation perturbed by a random force. It was proved earlier that if the random force is proportional to the square root of the viscosity, then the family of stationary measures possesses an accumulation point as the viscosity goes to zero. We show that if $\\mu$ is such point, then the distributions of the L^2 norm and of the energy possess a density with respect to the Lebesgue measure. The proofs are based on It\\^o's formula and some properties of local time for semimartingales.

  1. Moller Energy-Momentum Prescription for a Locally Rotationally Symmetric Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Aydogdu, O

    2006-01-01

    The energy distribution in the Locally Rotationally Symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type II space-time is obtained by considering the Moller energy-momentum definition in both Einstein's theory of general relativity and teleparallel theory of relativity. The energy distribution which includes both the matter and gravitational field is found to be zero in both of these different gravitation theories. This result agrees with previous works of Cooperstock and Israelit, Rosen, Johri et al., Banerjee and Sen, Vargas, and Aydogdu and Salti. Our result that the total energy of the universe is zero supports the view points of Albrow and Tryon.

  2. Non-Markovian Quantum Evolution: Time-Local Generators and Memory Kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Należyty, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we provide a basic introduction to the topic of quantum non-Markovian evolution presenting both time-local and memory kernel approach to the evolution of open quantum systems. We start with the standard notion of a classical Markovian stochastic process and generalize it to classical Markovian stochastic evolution which in turn becomes a starting point of the quantum setting. Our approach is based on the notion of P-divisible, CP-divisible maps and their refinements to k-divisible maps. Basic methods enabling one to detect non-Markovianity of the quantum evolution are also presented. Our analysis is illustrated by several simple examples.

  3. Magnetic local time dependence of geomagnetic disturbances contributing to the AU and AL indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomita, S; Nose´, M; Iyemori, T;

    2010-01-01

    The Auroral Electrojet (AE) indices, which are composed of four indices (AU, AL, AE, and AO), are calculated from the geomagnetic field data obtained at 12 geomagnetic observatories that are located in geomagnetic latitude (GMLAT) of 61.7°-70°. The indices have been widely used to study magnetic...... activity in the auroral zone. In the present study, we examine magnetic local time (MLT) dependence of geomagnetic field variations contributing to the AU and AL indices. We use 1-min geomagnetic field data obtained in 2003. It is found that both AU and AL indices have two ranges of MLT (AU: 15:00-22:00MLT...

  4. Application of Empirical Mode Decomposition with Local Linear Quantile Regression in Financial Time Series Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abobaker M. Jaber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly forecasts the daily closing price of stock markets. We propose a two-stage technique that combines the empirical mode decomposition (EMD with nonparametric methods of local linear quantile (LLQ. We use the proposed technique, EMD-LLQ, to forecast two stock index time series. Detailed experiments are implemented for the proposed method, in which EMD-LPQ, EMD, and Holt-Winter methods are compared. The proposed EMD-LPQ model is determined to be superior to the EMD and Holt-Winter methods in predicting the stock closing prices.

  5. Analysis of local ionospheric time varying characteristics with singular value decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jakob Anders; Knudsen, Per; Jensen, Anna B. O.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a time series from 1999 to 2007 of absolute total electron content (TEC) values has been computed and analyzed using singular value decomposition (SVD). The data set has been computed using a Kalman Filter and is based on dual frequency GPS data from three reference stations...... filter processing making it more robust, but can also be used as starting values in the initialization phase in case of gaps in the data stream. Furthermore, the models can be used to detect variations from the normal local ionospheric activity....

  6. Local terahertz field enhancement for time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozina, M.; /SLAC; Pancaldi, M.; /CIC nanoGUNE /Stockholm U.; Bernhard, C.; /Fribourg U.; Driel, T.van; Glownia, J.M.; /SLAC; Marsik, P.; /Fribourg U.; Radovic, M.; Vaz, C.A.F.; /PLS, SLS; Zhu, D.; /SLAC; Bonetti, S.; /Stockholm U.; Staub, U.; /PLS, SLS; Hoffmann, M.C.; /SLAC

    2017-02-20

    We report local field strength enhancement of single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses in an ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment. We show that patterning the sample with gold microstructures increases the THz field without changing the THz pulse shape or drastically affecting the quality of the x-ray diffraction pattern. We find a five-fold increase in THz-induced x-ray diffraction intensity change in the presence of microstructures on a SrTiO3 thin-film sample.

  7. Fatigue damage localization using time-domain features extracted from nonlinear Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing; Lu, Ye; Cheng, Li

    2014-03-01

    Nonlinear guided waves are sensitive to small-scale fatigue damage that may hardly be identified by traditional techniques. A characterization method for fatigue damage is established based on nonlinear Lamb waves in conjunction with the use of a piezoelectric sensor network. Theories on nonlinear Lamb waves for damage detection are first introduced briefly. Then, the ineffectiveness of using pure frequency-domain information of nonlinear wave signals for locating damage is discussed. With a revisit to traditional gross-damage localization techniques based on the time of flight, the idea of using temporal signal features of nonlinear Lamb waves to locate fatigue damage is introduced. This process involves a time-frequency analysis that enables the damage-induced nonlinear signal features, which are either undiscernible in the original time history or uninformative in the frequency spectrum, to be revealed. Subsequently, a finite element modeling technique is employed, accounting for various sources of nonlinearities in a fatigued medium. A piezoelectric sensor network is configured to actively generate and acquire probing Lamb waves that involve damageinduced nonlinear features. A probability-based diagnostic imaging algorithm is further proposed, presenting results in diagnostic images intuitively. The approach is experimentally verified on a fatigue-damaged aluminum plate, showing reasonably good accuracy. Compared to existing nonlinear ultrasonics-based inspection techniques, this approach uses a permanently attached sensor network that well accommodates automated online health monitoring; more significantly, it utilizes time-domain information of higher-order harmonics from time-frequency analysis, and demonstrates a great potential for quantitative characterization of small-scale damage with improved localization accuracy.

  8. Real-time network traffic classification technique for wireless local area networks based on compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza

    2017-05-01

    Network traffic or data traffic in a Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) is the amount of network packets moving across a wireless network from each wireless node to another wireless node, which provide the load of sampling in a wireless network. WLAN's Network traffic is the main component for network traffic measurement, network traffic control and simulation. Traffic classification technique is an essential tool for improving the Quality of Service (QoS) in different wireless networks in the complex applications such as local area networks, wireless local area networks, wireless personal area networks, wireless metropolitan area networks, and wide area networks. Network traffic classification is also an essential component in the products for QoS control in different wireless network systems and applications. Classifying network traffic in a WLAN allows to see what kinds of traffic we have in each part of the network, organize the various kinds of network traffic in each path into different classes in each path, and generate network traffic matrix in order to Identify and organize network traffic which is an important key for improving the QoS feature. To achieve effective network traffic classification, Real-time Network Traffic Classification (RNTC) algorithm for WLANs based on Compressed Sensing (CS) is presented in this paper. The fundamental goal of this algorithm is to solve difficult wireless network management problems. The proposed architecture allows reducing False Detection Rate (FDR) to 25% and Packet Delay (PD) to 15 %. The proposed architecture is also increased 10 % accuracy of wireless transmission, which provides a good background for establishing high quality wireless local area networks.

  9. Box tomography: localized imaging of remote targets buried in an unknown medium, a step forward for understanding key structures in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    We discuss an application of tomographic methods to the imaging of localized geological structures buried inside the Earth, where neither seismic sources nor receivers are necessarily present. We call this `box tomography'. The essential difference between box-tomography and standard tomographic methods is that the numerical modelling (i.e. the ray tracing in traveltime tomography and the wave propagation in waveform tomography or full waveform inversion) is completely confined within the small box-region imaged. Thus, box tomography is a lot more efficient than global tomography (i.e. where we invert for the velocity in the larger volume that encompasses all the sources and receivers), for imaging localized objects. The principal difficulty in the box tomography problem comes from the medium outside the box-region imaged, that masks the target structure. In the data recorded at the surface, the information carried by the waves about the target structure is mixed with that about the surrounding medium. The main focus of this paper is to evaluate how well box tomography can extract useful information to produce accurate images of remote buried objects, especially in the difficult situation where the velocity distribution above the target structure is not known a priori. We implemented traveltime box tomography, where first arrival times are inverted using ray theory, and, waveform box tomography or full waveform box inversion, where seismograms are inverted using either scattering integrals or adjoint methods. Whatever the method employed, we found that, in the simple situation where the velocity structure is known around the target region, box-tomography is faster and more accurate than global tomography. Most importantly, through examples and simple analysis, we show that box-tomography can produce accurate images of localized structures even though the velocity distribution is not a priori known around the box-region imaged. In the last section of this paper, we

  10. The supplementary motor area contributes to the timing of the anticipatory postural adjustment during step initiation in participants with and without Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Jesse V.; Lou, Jau-Shin; Kraakevik, Jeff A.; Fay B. Horak

    2009-01-01

    The supplementary motor area is thought to contribute to the generation of anticipatory postural adjustments (which act to stabilize supporting body segments prior to movement), but its precise role remains unclear. In addition, participants with Parkinson’s disease (PD) exhibit impaired function of the supplementary motor area as well as decreased amplitudes and altered timing of the anticipatory postural adjustment during step initiation, but the contribution of the supplementary motor area...

  11. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  12. Neighbourhood selection for local modelling and prediction of hydrological time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, A. W.; Li, W. K.; Xu, P.

    2002-02-01

    The prediction of a time series using the dynamical systems approach requires the knowledge of three parameters; the time delay, the embedding dimension and the number of nearest neighbours. In this paper, a new criterion, based on the generalized degrees of freedom, for the selection of the number of nearest neighbours needed for a better local model for time series prediction is presented. The validity of the proposed method is examined using time series, which are known to be chaotic under certain initial conditions (Lorenz map, Henon map and Logistic map), and real hydro meteorological time series (discharge data from Chao Phraya river in Thailand, Mekong river in Thailand and Laos, and sea surface temperature anomaly data). The predicted results are compared with observations, and with similar predictions obtained by using arbitrarily fixed numbers of neighbours. The results indicate superior predictive capability as measured by the mean square errors and coefficients of variation by the proposed approach when compared with the traditional approach of using a fixed number of neighbours.

  13. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  14. Robotic Mapping and Localization with Real-Time Dense Stereo on Reconfigurable Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kalomiros

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A reconfigurable architecture for dense stereo is presented as an observation framework for a real-time implementation of the simultaneous localization and mapping problem in robotics. The reconfigurable sensor detects point features from stereo image pairs to use at the measurement update stage of the procedure. The main hardware blocks are a dense depth stereo accelerator, a left and right image corner detector, and a stage performing left-right consistency check. For the stereo-processor stage, we have implemented and tested a global-matching component based on a maximum-likelihood dynamic programming technique. The system includes a Nios II processor for data control and a USB 2.0 interface for host communication. Remote control is used to guide a vehicle equipped with a stereo head in an indoor environment. The FastSLAM Bayesian algorithm is applied in order to track and update observations and the robot path in real time. The system is assessed using real scene depth detection and public reference data sets. The paper also reports resource usage and a comparison of mapping and localization results with ground truth.

  15. Real-time Image-based 6-DOF Localization in Large-Scale Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Hyon; Cohen, Michael; Uyttendaele, Matt

    2012-01-01

    We present a real-time approach for image-based localization within large scenes that have been reconstructed offline using structure from motion (Sfm). From monocular video, our method continuously computes a precise 6-DOF camera pose, by efficiently tracking natural features and matching them to 3D points in the Sfm point cloud. Our main contribution lies in efficiently interleaving a fast keypoint tracker that uses inexpensive binary feature descriptors with a new approach for direct 2D-to-3D matching. The 2D-to-3D matching avoids the need for online extraction of scale-invariant features. Instead, offline we construct an indexed database containing multiple DAISY descriptors per 3D point extracted at multiple scales. The key to the efficiency of our method lies in invoking DAISY descriptor extraction and matching sparingly during localization, and in distributing this computation over a window of successive frames. This enables the algorithm to run in real-time, without fluctuations in the latency over lo...

  16. Large deviations for self-intersection local times of stable random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Clément

    2010-01-01

    Let $(X_t,t\\geq 0)$ be a random walk on $\\mathbb{Z}^d$. Let $ l_T(x)= \\int_0^T \\delta_x(X_s)ds$ the local time at the state $x$ and $ I_T= \\sum\\limits_{x\\in\\mathbb{Z}^d} l_T(x)^q $ the q-fold self-intersection local time (SILT). In \\cite{Castell} Castell proves a large deviations principle for the SILT of the simple random walk in the critical case $q(d-2)=d$. In the supercritical case $q(d-2)>d$, Chen and M\\"orters obtain in \\cite{ChenMorters} a large deviations principle for the intersection of $q$ independent random walks, and Asselah obtains in \\cite{Asselah5} a large deviations principle for the SILT with $q=2$. We extend these results to an $\\alpha$-stable process (i.e. $\\alpha\\in]0,2]$) in the case where $q(d-\\alpha)\\geq d$.

  17. Weak localization of light in ZnO nanorods in space and time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascheck, Manfred; Schmidt, Slawa; Silies, Martin; Lienau, Christoph [Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet, Oldenburg (Germany); Leipold, David; Runge, Erich [Technische Universitaet, Ilmenau (Germany); Yatsui, Takashi; Kitamura, Kokoro; Ohtsu, Motoichi [University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    An array of ZnO nanorods is used to directly visualize the weak localization of light in both space and time. Ultrashort laser pulses from a Ti:Sapphire oscillator with a pulse duration of 6 fs are focused to their diffraction-limit of 1 {mu}m{sup 2} onto the ZnO nanorod array using an all-reflective Cassegrain objective. The generated SH emission is collected in reflection geometry and detected as a function of the lateral position of the laser focus. Pronounced intensity fluctuations on a sub-{mu}m scale due to the multiple random scattering inside the nanoneedle array are taken as the spatial hallmark of weak the localization of light. By varying the delay between the phase-stabilized pair of laser pulses from a dispersion-balanced Michelson interferometer, interferometric frequency-resolved autocorrelation (IFRAC) traces are measured. By analyzing these traces in the frequency domain, the dephasing time and therewith the temporal evolution of the electric field within the ZnO array could be deduced.

  18. Global meta-analysis reveals no net change in local-scale plant biodiversity over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellend, Mark; Baeten, Lander; Myers-Smith, Isla H; Elmendorf, Sarah C; Beauséjour, Robin; Brown, Carissa D; De Frenne, Pieter; Verheyen, Kris; Wipf, Sonja

    2013-11-26

    Global biodiversity is in decline. This is of concern for aesthetic and ethical reasons, but possibly also for practical reasons, as suggested by experimental studies, mostly with plants, showing that biodiversity reductions in small study plots can lead to compromised ecosystem function. However, inferring that ecosystem functions will decline due to biodiversity loss in the real world rests on the untested assumption that such loss is actually occurring at these small scales in nature. Using a global database of 168 published studies and >16,000 nonexperimental, local-scale vegetation plots, we show that mean temporal change in species diversity over periods of 5-261 y is not different from zero, with increases at least as likely as declines over time. Sites influenced primarily by plant species' invasions showed a tendency for declines in species richness, whereas sites undergoing postdisturbance succession showed increases in richness over time. Other distinctions among studies had little influence on temporal richness trends. Although maximizing diversity is likely important for maintaining ecosystem function in intensely managed systems such as restored grasslands or tree plantations, the clear lack of any general tendency for plant biodiversity to decline at small scales in nature directly contradicts the key assumption linking experimental results to ecosystem function as a motivation for biodiversity conservation in nature. How often real world changes in the diversity and composition of plant communities at the local scale cause ecosystem function to deteriorate, or actually to improve, remains unknown and is in critical need of further study.

  19. Time will tell: community acceptability of HIV vaccine research before and after the “Step Study” vaccine discontinuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M Frew

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Paula M Frew1,2,3,4, Mark J Mulligan1,2,3, Su-I Hou5, Kayshin Chan3, Carlos del Rio1,2,3,61Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 2Emory Center for AIDS Research, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 3The Hope Clinic of the Emory Vaccine Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA; 4Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 5Department of Health Promotion and Behavior, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA; 6Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USAObjective: This study examines whether men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM and transgender (TG persons’ attitudes, beliefs, and risk perceptions toward human immunodeficiency virus (HIV vaccine research have been altered as a result of the negative findings from a phase 2B HIV vaccine study.Design: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among MSM and TG persons (N = 176 recruited from community settings in Atlanta from 2007 to 2008. The first group was recruited during an active phase 2B HIV vaccine trial in which a candidate vaccine was being evaluated (the “Step Study”, and the second group was recruited after product futility was widely reported in the media.Methods: Descriptive statistics, t tests, and chi-square tests were conducted to ascertain differences between the groups, and ordinal logistic regressions examined the influences of the above-mentioned factors on a critical outcome, future HIV vaccine study participation. The ordinal regression outcomes evaluated the influences on disinclination, neutrality, and inclination to study participation.Results: Behavioral outcomes such as future recruitment, event attendance, study promotion, and community mobilization did not reveal any differences in participants’ intentions between the groups. However, we observed

  20. Application of Wavelet Packet De-noising in Time-Frequency Analysis of the Local Wave Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-kun; MA Xiao-jiang; WANG Zhen; ZHU Hong

    2003-01-01

    The local wave method is a very good time-frequency method for nonstationary vibration signal analysis. But the interfering noise has a big influence on the accuracy of time-frequency analysis. The wavelet packet de-noising method can eliminate the interference of noise and improve the signal-noise-ratio. This paper uses the local wave method to decompose the de-noising signal and perform a time-frequency analysis. We can get better characteristics. Finally, an example of wavelet packet de-noising and a local wave time-frequency spectrum application of diesel engine surface vibration signal is put forward.

  1. Dynamical Constants and Time Universals: A First Step toward a Metrical Definition of Ordered and Abnormal Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Mark A.; du Bois, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    From the point of view of the cognitive dynamicist the organization of brain circuitry into assemblies defined by their synchrony at particular (and precise) oscillation frequencies is important for the correct correlation of all independent cortical responses to the different aspects of a given complex thought or object. From the point of view of anyone operating complex mechanical systems, i.e., those comprising independent components that are required to interact precisely in time, it follows that the precise timing of such a system is essential – not only essential but measurable, and scalable. It must also be reliable over observations to bring about consistent behavior, whatever that behavior is. The catastrophic consequence of an absence of such precision, for instance that required to govern the interference engine in many automobiles, is indicative of how important timing is for the function of dynamical systems at all levels of operation. The dynamics and temporal considerations combined indicate that it is necessary to consider the operating characteristic of any dynamical, cognitive brain system in terms, superficially at least, of oscillation frequencies. These may, themselves, be forensic of an underlying time-related taxonomy. Currently there are only two sets of relevant and necessarily systematic observations in this field: one of these reports the precise dynamical structure of the perceptual systems engaged in dynamical binding across form and time; the second, derived both empirically from perceptual performance data, as well as obtained from theoretical models, demonstrates a timing taxonomy related to a fundamental operator referred to as the time quantum. In this contribution both sets of theory and observations are reviewed and compared for their predictive consistency. Conclusions about direct comparability are discussed for both theories of cognitive dynamics and time quantum models. Finally, a brief review of some experimental data

  2. Real-time tests of multiple genome alterations take the first steps into the clinic: a learning example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerratana, Lorenzo; De Maglio, Giovanna; De Pellegrin, Alessandro; Follador, Alessandro; Rihawi, Karim; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Puglisi, Fabio; Fasola, Gianpiero

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization is increasingly changing clinical practice, in both diagnosis and treatment. BRAF is a proto-oncogene that is mutated in ~2%–4% of lung cancers, but the incidence rises to 40%–45% among papillary thyroid cancers. Furthermore, BRAF is a promising target in lung cancer treatment. The present case study covers both the challenges of molecular differential diagnosis and the perspectives opened by targeted therapy by discussing the history of a 78-year-old female affected by a papillary histotype carcinoma with BRAF mutation associated with both thyroid and lung localizations. A differential diagnosis was possible as a consequence of a multidisciplinary approach including an in-depth molecular characterization. Based on this molecular feature, the patient was successfully treated with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib after the failure of treatment with standard regimen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case of non-small-cell lung cancer with metastasis to thyroid and with BRAF V600E mutation. PMID:27621653

  3. Real-time tests of multiple genome alterations take the first steps into the clinic: a learning example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerratana L

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Gerratana,1,2 Giovanna De Maglio,3 Alessandro De Pellegrin,3 Alessandro Follador,1 Karim Rihawi,1,2 Stefano Pizzolitto,3 Fabio Puglisi,1,2 Gianpiero Fasola1 1Department of Oncology, University Hospital of Udine, 2Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, 3Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Udine, Udine, Italy Abstract: Molecular characterization is increasingly changing clinical practice, in both diagnosis and treatment. BRAF is a proto-oncogene that is mutated in ~2%–4% of lung cancers, but the incidence rises to 40%–45% among papillary thyroid cancers. Furthermore, BRAF is a promising target in lung cancer treatment. The present case study covers both the challenges of molecular differential diagnosis and the perspectives opened by targeted therapy by discussing the history of a 78-year-old female affected by a papillary histotype carcinoma with BRAF mutation associated with both thyroid and lung localizations. A differential diagnosis was possible as a consequence of a multidisciplinary approach including an in-depth molecular characterization. Based on this molecular feature, the patient was successfully treated with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib after the failure of treatment with standard regimen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case of non-small-cell lung cancer with metastasis to thyroid and with BRAF V600E mutation. Keywords: BRAF mutation, molecular diagnosis, target therapy

  4. Improving the safety of health information technology requires shared responsibility: It is time we all step up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, Dean F; Belmont, Elisabeth; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-14

    In 2011, an Institute of Medicine report on health information technology (IT) and patient safety highlighted that building health-IT for safer use is a shared responsibility between key stakeholders including: "vendors, care providers, healthcare organizations, health-IT departments, and public and private agencies". Use of electronic health records (EHRs) involves all these stakeholders, but they often have conflicting priorities and requirements. Since 2011, the concept of shared responsibility has gained little traction and EHR developers and users continue to attribute the substantial, long list of problems to each other. In this article, we discuss how these key stakeholders have complementary roles in improving EHR safety and must share responsibility to improve the current state of EHR use. We use real-world safety examples and outline a comprehensive shared responsibility approach to help guide development of future rules, regulations, and standards for EHR usability, interoperability and security as outlined in the 21st Century Cures Act. This approach clearly defines the responsibilities of each party and helps create appropriate measures for success. National and international policymakers must facilitate the local organizational and socio-political climate to stimulate the adoption of shared responsibility principles. When all major stakeholders are sharing responsibility, we will be more likely to usher in a new age of progress and innovation related to health IT. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jin Lim

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Methods: Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5 min for 60 min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Results: Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6 ± 12.9 min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2 ± 13.9 min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. Conclusion: We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

  6. A time-localized response of wave growth process under turbulent winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ge

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Very short time series (with lengths of approximately 40 s or 5~7 wave periods of wind velocity fluctuations and wave elevation were recorded simultaneously and investigated using the wavelet bispectral analysis. Rapid changes in the wave and wind spectra were detected, which were found to be intimately related to significant energy transfers through transient quadratic wind-wave and wave-wave interactions. A possible pattern of energy exchange between the wind and wave fields was further deduced. In particular, the generation and variation of the strong wave-induced perturbation velocity in the wind can be explained by the strengthening and diminishing of the associated quadratic interactions, which cannot be unveiled by linear theories. On small time scales, the wave-wave quadratic interactions were as active and effective in transferring energy as the wind-wave interactions. The results also showed that the wind turbulence was occasionally effective in transferring energy between the wind and the wave fields, so that the background turbulence in the wind cannot be completely neglected. Although these effects are all possibly significant over short times, the time-localized growth of the wave spectrum may not considerably affect the long-term process of wave development.

  7. Floor Covering and Surface Identification for Assistive Mobile Robotic Real-Time Room Localization Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gillham

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Assistive robotic applications require systems capable of interaction in the human world, a workspace which is highly dynamic and not always predictable. Mobile assistive devices face the additional and complex problem of when and if intervention should occur; therefore before any trajectory assistance is given, the robotic device must know where it is in real-time, without unnecessary disruption or delay to the user requirements. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel robust method for determining room identification from floor features in a real-time computational frame for autonomous and assistive robotics in the human environment. We utilize two inexpensive sensors: an optical mouse sensor for straightforward and rapid, texture or pattern sampling, and a four color photodiode light sensor for fast color determination. We show how data relating floor texture and color obtained from typical dynamic human environments, using these two sensors, compares favorably with data obtained from a standard webcam. We show that suitable data can be extracted from these two sensors at a rate 16 times faster than a standard webcam, and that these data are in a form which can be rapidly processed using readily available classification techniques, suitable for real-time system application. We achieved a 95% correct classification accuracy identifying 133 rooms’ flooring from 35 classes, suitable for fast coarse global room localization application, boundary crossing detection, and additionally some degree of surface type identification.

  8. ns-μs Time-Resolved Step-Scan FTIR of ba3 Oxidoreductase from Thermus thermophilus: Protonic Connectivity of w941-w946-w927

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaides, Antonis; Soulimane, Tewfik; Varotsis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved step-scan FTIR spectroscopy has been employed to probe the dynamics of the ba3 oxidoreductase from Thermus thermophilus in the ns-μs time range and in the pH/pD 6–9 range. The data revealed a pH/pD sensitivity of the D372 residue and of the ring-A propionate of heme a3. Based on the observed transient changes a model in which the protonic connectivity of w941-w946-927 to the D372 and the ring-A propionate of heme a3 is described. PMID:27690021

  9. Hydrograph structure informed calibration in the frequency domain with time localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasamy, K.; Belmont, P.

    2015-12-01

    Complex models with large number of parameters are commonly used to estimate sediment yields and predict changes in sediment loads as a result of changes in management or conservation practice at large watershed (>2000 km2) scales. As sediment yield is a strongly non-linear function that responds to channel (peak or mean) velocity or flow depth, it is critical to accurately represent flows. The process of calibration in such models (e.g., SWAT) generally involves the adjustment of several parameters to obtain better estimates of goodness of fit metrics such as Nash Sutcliff Efficiency (NSE). However, such indicators only provide a global view of model performance, potentially obscuring accuracy of the timing or magnitude of specific flows of interest. We describe an approach for streamflow calibration that will greatly reduce the black-box nature of calibration, when response from a parameter adjustment is not clearly known. Fourier Transform or the Short Term Fourier Transform could be used to characterize model performance in the frequency domain as well, however, the ambiguity of a Fourier transform with regards to time localization renders its implementation in a model calibration setting rather useless. Brief and sudden changes (e.g. stream flow peaks) in signals carry the most interesting information from parameter adjustments, which are completely lost in the transform without time localization. Wavelet transform captures the frequency component in the signal without compromising time and is applied to contrast changes in signal response to parameter adjustments. Here we employ the mother wavelet called the Mexican hat wavelet and apply a Continuous Wavelet Transform to understand the signal in the frequency domain. Further, with the use of the cross-wavelet spectrum we examine the relationship between the two signals (prior or post parameter adjustment) in the time-scale plane (e.g., lower scales correspond to higher frequencies). The non-stationarity of

  10. Hybrid High-Fidelity Modeling of Radar Scenarios Using Atemporal, Discrete-Event, and Time-Step Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    computational power. Such simplifications can produce misleading results. For example, Radar Cross Section (RCS) effects in response to time-varying...and corresponding limitations of computational power. Such simplifications can produce misleading results. For example, Radar Cross Section (RCS...135 xvi Figure 6.1 The RCS of F-16 Falcon fighter model which is simulated by CST Studio software with signal frequency = 8 GHz. In (a), the RCS of

  11. A one-step real-time multiplex PCR for screening Y-chromosomal microdeletions without downstream amplicon size analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Kozina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Y-chromosomal microdeletions (YCMD are one of the major genetic causes for non-obstructive azoospermia. Genetic testing for YCMD by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR is an established method for quick and robust screening of deletions in the AZF regions of the Y-chromosome. Multiplex PCRs have the advantage of including a control gene in every reaction and significantly reducing the number of reactions needed to screen the relevant genomic markers. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The widely established "EAA/EMQN best practice guidelines for molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions (2004" were used as a basis for designing a real-time multiplex PCR system, in which the YCMD can simply be identified by their melting points. For this reason, some AZF primers were substituted by primers for regions in their genomic proximity, and the ZFX/ZFY control primer was exchanged by the AMELX/AMELY control primer. Furthermore, we substituted the classical SybrGreen I dye by the novel and high-performing DNA-binding dye EvaGreen™ and put substantial effort in titrating the primer combinations in respect to optimal melting peak separation and peak size. SIGNIFICANCE: With these changes, we were able to develop a platform-independent and robust real-time based multiplex PCR, which makes the need for amplicon identification by electrophoretic sizing expendable. By using an open-source system for real-time PCR analysis, we further demonstrate the applicability of automated melting point and YCMD detection.

  12. The arresting phase determines the total healing time of a locally irradiated skin wound in swine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping; ZHOU Yuan-guo; ZHANG En; LIU Xia; LIU Jian-zhong; LIU Ping; PENG Yan; XIONG Ren-ping; CHEN Xing-yu; ZHAO Yan

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Radiation is an important cause of delayed wound healing,and there still exist many questions regarding the patterns and mechanisms of wound healing.This study investigated the characteristics of wound healing after varying doses of local radiation and explored possible causes of the delay in healing caused by radiation.Methods:A full-thickness dorsal longitudinal skin tissue,2 cm in diameter,was excised after local irradiation on one side of the back of swine,and the other side was wounded as a control.The size of the wound area was recorded every two days after injury.Pathological changes,proliferating cell nuclear antigen(PCNA,immunohistochemistry)and apoptosis levels(TUNEL assay)were measured at different time points after wounding.Results:The course of wound healing can be divided into four phases,namely:the arresting phase,the healing priming phase,the fast healing phase,and the healed phase.Although the total wound healing time was closely correlated to the dose of irradiation(R2=0.9758),it was more dependent on the length of the arresting phase(R2=0.9903)because once the arresting phase ended,the wound healed at a similar speed regardless of radiation doses.Pathological analysis showed that compared with the control side there were more necrotic tissues,slower epithelial crawling,as well as fewer blood vessels and cellular components in the irradiated side at the arresting phase,while other phases revealed no significant difference concerning these measurements.Immunohistochemistry showed that the irradiated wounds had significantly less PCNA-positive and more TUNEL-positive labeling of cells in the arresting phase than in other phases.Moreover,the changes were positively related to the radiation doses,but there was no obvious difference in cell proliferation or apoptosis among the healing priming phase,fast healing phase or healed phase,whether on the control side or on the irradiated side.Conclusions:After local irradiation,the length of the

  13. Detection and localization of continuous gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays: the role of pulsar terms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xingjiang; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Yanjun; Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D; Hobbs, George; Manchester, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    A pulsar timing array is a Galactic-scale detector of nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs). Its target signals contain two components: the `Earth term' and the `pulsar term' corresponding to GWs incident on the Earth and pulsar respectively. In this work we present a Frequentist method for the detection and localization of continuous waves that takes into account the pulsar term and is significantly faster than existing methods. We investigate the role of pulsar terms by comparing a full-signal search with an Earth-term-only search for non-evolving black hole binaries. By applying the method to synthetic data sets, we find that (i) a full-signal search can slightly improve the detection probability (by about five percent); (ii) sky localization is biased if only Earth terms are searched for and the inclusion of pulsar terms is critical to remove such a bias; (iii) in the case of strong detections (with signal-to-noise ratio $\\gtrsim$ 30), it may be possible to improve pulsar distance estimation through GW meas...

  14. Gas flushing through hyper-acidic crater lakes: the next steps within a reframed monitoring time window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouwet, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    Tracking variations in the chemical composition, water temperature and pH of brines from peak-activity crater lakes is the most obvious way to forecast phreatic activity. Volcano monitoring intrinsically implies a time window of observation that should be synchronised with the kinetics of magmatic processes, such as degassing and magma intrusion. To decipher "how much time ago" a variation in degassing regime actually occurred before eventually being detected in a crater lake is key, and depends on the lake water residence time. The above reasoning assumes that gas is preserved as anions in the lake water (SO4, Cl, F anions), in other words, that scrubbing of acid gases is complete and irreversible. Less is true. Recent work has confirmed, by direct MultiGas measurement from evaporative plumes, that even the strongest acid in liquid medium (i.e. SO2) degasses from hyper-acidic crater lakes. The less strong acid HCl has long been recognised as being more volatile than hydrophyle in extremely acidic solutions (pH near 0), through a long-term steady increase in SO4/Cl ratios in the vigorously evaporating crater lake of Poás volcano. We now know that acidic gases flush through hyper-acidic crater lake brines, but we don't know to which extend (completely or partially?), and with which speed. The chemical composition hence only reflects a transient phase of the gas flushing through the lake. In terms of volcanic surveillance this brings the advantage that the monitoring time window is definitely shorter than defined by the water chemistry, but yet, we do not know how much shorter. Empirical experiments by Capaccioni et al. (in press) have tried to tackle this kinetic problem for HCl degassing from a "lab-lake" on the short-term (2 days). With this state of the art in mind, two new monitoring strategies can be proposed to seek for precursory signals of phreatic eruptions from crater lakes: (1) Tracking variations in gas compositions, fluxes and ratios between species in

  15. Using a "time machine" to test for local adaptation of aquatic microbes to temporal and spatial environmental variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jeremy W; Harder, Lawrence D

    2015-01-01

    Local adaptation occurs when different environments are dominated by different specialist genotypes, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions and relatively unfit under other conditions. Analogously, ecological species sorting occurs when different environments are dominated by different competing species, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions. The simplest theory predicts that spatial, but not temporal, environmental variation selects for local adaptation (or generates species sorting), but this prediction is difficult to test. Although organisms can be reciprocally transplanted among sites, doing so among times seems implausible. Here, we describe a reciprocal transplant experiment testing for local adaptation or species sorting of lake bacteria in response to both temporal and spatial variation in water chemistry. The experiment used a -80°C freezer as a "time machine." Bacterial isolates and water samples were frozen for later use, allowing transplantation of older isolates "forward in time" and newer isolates "backward in time." Surprisingly, local maladaptation predominated over local adaptation in both space and time. Such local maladaptation may indicate that adaptation, or the analogous species sorting process, fails to keep pace with temporal fluctuations in water chemistry. This hypothesis could be tested with more finely resolved temporal data.

  16. Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry to Elucidate Organic Diversity in Planetary Surface Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cornish, Timothy; Li, Xiang; Floyd, Melissa; Arevalo, Ricardo Jr.; Cook, Jamie Elsila; Callahan, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF-MS) holds promise to be a low-mass, compact in situ analytical capability for future landed missions to planetary surfaces. The ability to analyze a solid sample for both mineralogical and preserved organic content with laser ionization could be compelling as part of a scientific mission pay-load that must be prepared for unanticipated discoveries. Targeted missions for this instrument capability include Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and small icy bodies, such as asteroids and comets.

  17. Effect of tumor dose, volume and overall treatment time on local control after radiochemotherapy including MRI guided brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Sturdza, Alina;

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Currently, there is no consensus on dose prescription in image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) in locally advanced cervical cancer. The purpose of this study was to provide evidence based recommendations for tumor dose prescription based on results from a multi......-center patient series (retroEMBRACE). Materials and methods This study analyzed 488 locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy combined with IGABT. Brachytherapy contouring and reporting was according to ICRU/GEC-ESTRO recommendations. The Cox Proportional...... Hazards model was applied to analyze the effect on local control of dose-volume metrics as well as overall treatment time (OTT), dose rate, chemotherapy, and tumor histology. Results With a median follow up of 46 months, 43 local failures were observed. Dose (D90) to the High Risk Clinical Target Volume...

  18. Microsoft Office professional 2010 step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Joyce; Frye, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    Teach yourself exactly what you need to know about using Office Professional 2010-one step at a time! With STEP BY STEP, you build and practice new skills hands-on, at your own pace. Covering Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Excel, Access, Publisher, and OneNote, this book will help you learn the core features and capabilities needed to: Create attractive documents, publications, and spreadsheetsManage your e-mail, calendar, meetings, and communicationsPut your business data to workDevelop and deliver great presentationsOrganize your ideas and notes in one placeConnect, share, and accom

  19. Detection of Citrus leprosis virus C using specific primers and TaqMan probe in one-step real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Nandlal; Wei, G; Govindarajulu, A; Roy, Avijit; Li, Wenbin; Picton, Deric D; Nakhla, M K; Levy, L; Brlansky, R H

    2015-11-01

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C), a causal agent of the leprosis disease in citrus, is mostly present in the South and Central America and spreading toward the North America. To enable better diagnosis and inhibit the further spread of this re-emerging virus a quantitative (q) real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay is needed for early detection of CiLV-C when the virus is present in low titer in citrus leprosis samples. Using the genomic sequence of CiLV-C, specific primers and probe were designed and synthesized to amplify a 73 nt amplicon from the movement protein (MP) gene. A standard curve of the 73 nt amplicon MP gene was developed using known 10(10)-10(1) copies of in vitro synthesized RNA transcript to estimate the copy number of RNA transcript in the citrus leprosis samples. The one-step qRT-PCR detection assays for CiLV-C were determined to be 1000 times more sensitive when compared to the one-step conventional reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) CiLV-C detection method. To evaluate the quality of the total RNA extracts, NADH dehydrogenase gene specific primers (nad5) and probe were included in reactions as an internal control. The one-step qRT-PCR specificity was successfully validated by testing for the presence of CiLV-C in the total RNA extracts of the citrus leprosis samples collected from Belize, Costa Rica, Mexico and Panama. Implementation of the one-step qRT-PCR assays for CiLV-C diagnosis should assist regulatory agencies in surveillance activities to monitor the distribution pattern of CiLV-C in countries where it is present and to prevent further dissemination into citrus growing countries where there is no report of CiLV-C presence.

  20. Seven steps of alternating electron and proton transfer in photosystem II water oxidation traced by time-resolved photothermal beam deflection at improved sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2015-02-12

    The intricate orchestration of electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) at the Mn4CaOn-cluster of photosystem II (PSII) is mechanistically pivotal but clearly insufficiently understood. Preparations of PSII membrane particles were investigated using a kinetically competent and sensitive method, photothermal beam deflection (PBD), to monitor apparent volume changes of the PSII protein. Driven by nanosecond laser flashes, the PSII was synchronously stepped through its water-oxidation cycle involving four (semi)stable states (S0, S1, S2, and S3) and minimally three additional transiently formed intermediates. The PBD approach was optimized as compared to our previous experiments, resulting in superior signal quality and resolution of more reaction steps. Now seven transitions were detected and attributed, according to the H/D-exchange, temperature, and pH effects on their time constants, to ET or PT events. The ET steps oxidizing the Mn4CaOn cluster in the S2 → S3 and S0 → S1 transitions, a biphasic PT prior to the O2-evolving reaction, as well as the reoxidation of the primary quinone acceptor (QA(-)) at the PSII acceptor side were detected for the first time by PBD. The associated volume changes involve (i) initial formation of charged groups resulting in contraction assignable to electrostriction, (ii) volume contraction explainable by reduced metal-ligand distances upon manganese oxidation, and (iii) charge-compensating proton removal resulting in volume expansion due to electrostriction reversal. These results support a reaction cycle of water oxidation exhibiting alternate ET and PT steps. An extended kinetic scheme for the O2-evolving S3 ⇒ S0 transition is proposed, which includes crucial structural and protonic events.

  1. Photo-activated ionic gelation of alginate hydrogel: real-time rheological monitoring of the two-step crosslinking mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Alina K; Bonino, Christopher A; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Khan, Saad A

    2014-07-21

    We examine the gelation of alginate undergoing ionic crosslinking upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation using in situ dynamic rheology. Hydrogels are formed by combining alginate with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles and a photoacid generator (PAG). The PAG is photolyzed upon UV irradiation, resulting in the release of free calcium ions for ionic crosslinking. The viscous and elastic moduli during gelation are monitored as a function of the UV irradiation intensity, exposure time, alginate concentration, and the ratio between alginate and calcium carbonate. Gel time decreases as irradiation intensity increases because a larger concentration of PAG is photolyzed. Interestingly, dark curing, the continuing growth of microstructure in the absence of UV light, is observed. In some instances, the sample transitions from a solution to a gel during the dark curing phase. Additionally, when exposed to constant UV irradiation after the dark curing phase, samples reach the same plateau modulus as samples exposed to constant UV without dark curing, implying that dark curing does not affect the gelation mechanism. We believe the presence of dark curing is the result of the acidic environment persisting within the sample, allowing CaCO3 to dissociate, thereby releasing free Ca(2+) ions capable of binding with the available appropriate ionic blocks of the polymer chains. The growth of microstructure is then detected if the activation barrier has been crossed to release sufficient calcium ions. In this regard, we calculate a value of 30 J that represents the activation energy required to initiate gelation.

  2. Occupation and Local Times for Skew Brownian Motion with Applications to Dispersion Across an Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Appuhamillage, Thilanka; Thomann, Enrique; Waymire, Edward; Wood, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Advective skew dispersion is a natural Markov process defined by a diffusion with drift across an interface of jump discontinuity in a piecewise constant diffusion coefficient. In the absence of drift, this process may be represented as a function of $\\alpha$-skew Brownian motion for a uniquely determined value of $\\alpha=\\alpha^*$; see Ramirez et al. (2006). In the present paper, the analysis is extended to the case of nonzero drift. A determination of the (joint) distributions of key functionals of standard skew Brownian motion together with some associated probabilistic semigroup and local time theory is given for these purposes. An application to the dispersion of a solute concentration across an interface is provided that explains certain symmetries and asymmetries in recently reported laboratory experiments conducted at Lawrence-Livermore Berkeley Labs by Berkowitz et al. (2009).

  3. The Local-time variations of Lunar Prospector epithermal-neutron data

    CERN Document Server

    Teodoro, L F A; Eke, V E; Elphic, R E; Feldman, W C; Maurice, S; Siegler, M A; Paige, D A

    2015-01-01

    We assess local-time variations of epithermal-neutron count rates measured by the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer. We investigate the nature of these variations and find no evidence to support the idea that such variations are caused by diurnal variations of hydrogen concentration across the lunar surface. Rather we find an anticorrelation between instrumental temperature and epithermal-neutron count rate. We have also found that the measured counts are dependent on the temperatures of the top decimeters of the lunar subsurface as constrained by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment temperature measurements. Finally, we have made the first measurement of the effective leakage depth for epithermal-neutrons of ~20 cm.

  4. Real-time feedback control for high-intensity focused ultrasound system using localized motion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Azuma, Takashi; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is one of the noninvasive treatment for tumors. Visualizing the treated area inside the human body is necessary to control the HIFU exposure. Localized motion imaging (LMI) using ultrasound to induce and detect tissue deformation is one technique to detect a change in tissue stiffness caused by thermal coagulation. In experiments with porcine liver, LMI has shown to detect deformation with less than 20% accuracy. We have developed a prototype feedback control system using real-time LMI. In this system, coagulation size was measured every 1 s and controlled to correspond to a targeted size. The typical size error was reduced to 14% from 35%. LMI displacements in normal and coagulated tissues were sufficiently different to discriminate between coagulated areas and noncoagulated ones after HIFU sonication and to visualize treated areas after HIFU treatment.

  5. Global Auroral Energy Deposition during Substorm Onset Compared with Local Time and Solar Wind IMF Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The global images made by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) aboard the IASTP/Polar Satellite are used to derive the global auroral energy deposited in the ionosphere resulting from electron precipitation. During a substorm onset, the energy deposited and its location in local time are compared to the solar wind IMF conditions. Previously, insitu measurements of low orbiting satellites have made precipitating particle measurements along the spacecraft track and global images of the auroral zone, without the ability to quantify energy parameters, have been available. However, usage of the high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution of consecutive UVI images enables quantitative measurement of the energy deposited in the ionosphere not previously available on a global scale. Data over an extended period beginning in January 1997 will be presented.

  6. Localization Framework for Real-Time UAV Autonomous Landing: An On-Ground Deployed Visual Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weiwei; Hu, Tianjiang; Zhang, Daibing; Shen, Lincheng; Zhang, Jianwei

    2017-06-19

    [-5]One of the greatest challenges for fixed-wing unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) is safe landing. Hereafter, an on-ground deployed visual approach is developed in this paper. This approach is definitely suitable for landing within the global navigation satellite system (GNSS)-denied environments. As for applications, the deployed guidance system makes full use of the ground computing resource and feedbacks the aircraft's real-time localization to its on-board autopilot. Under such circumstances, a separate long baseline stereo architecture is proposed to possess an extendable baseline and wide-angle field of view (FOV) against the traditional fixed baseline schemes. Furthermore, accuracy evaluation of the new type of architecture is conducted by theoretical modeling and computational analysis. Dataset-driven experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed approach.

  7. Local temperature fine-tunes the timing of spring migration in birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttrup, Anders P.; Rainio, Kalle; Coppack, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    breeding area. Local temperature was the best single predictor of phenology with the highest explanatory power achieved in combination with NAO. Furthermore, early individuals are more affected by climatic variation compared to individuals on later passage, indicating that climatic change affects subsets......Evidence for climate-driven phenological changes is rapidly increasing at all trophic levels. Our current poor knowledge of the detailed control of bird migration from the level of genes and hormonal control to direct physiological and behavioral responses hampers our ability to understand...... and predict consequences of climatic change for migratory birds. In order to better understand migration phenology and adaptation in environmental changes, we here assess the scale at which weather affects timing of spring migration in passerine birds. We use three commonly used proxies of spring...

  8. TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY FOR THE LOCALIZATION OF ELECTRICAL FAULTS IN THE INSTRUMENTATION OF THE LHC STRING MAGNETS A Study Case of Voltage Tap, Temperature, and Pressure Transducer Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Komorowski, P

    1999-01-01

    Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is one of the most powerful methods used to analyze the integrity of the signal propagating in a transmission line. The method is based on the principle that the wave propagating in the line is reflected at the locations where the impedance of the line changes. The fault points, joints, branches, junctions, abrupt cross-section changes, etc., cause such reflections. The reflectometry technique involves the excitation of the circuit under test with either a fast edge step function or a well-defined impulse confined in time and frequency domains, and thereafter detection of the amplitude and time of the reflections. Both variants of the method were successfully applied to localize open circuit faults in the voltage tap connections, pressure transducers, and temperature sensing carbon gages circuits of the LHC String Dipole Magnet MB2 and Short Straight Section Quadrupole.

  9. Accounting for local meteorological effects in the ozone time-series of Lovozero (Kola Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Tarasova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between local meteorological conditions and the surface ozone variability was studied by means of statistical modeling, using ozone and meteorological parameters measured at Lovozero (250 m a.s.l., 68.5°N, 35.0°E, Kola Peninsula for the period of 1999-2000. The regression model of daily mean ozone concentrations on such meteorological parameters as temperature, relative humidity and wind speed explains up to 70% of day-to-day ozone variability in terms of meteorological condition changes, if the seasonal cycle is also considered. A regression model was created for separated time scales of the variables. Short-term, synoptical and seasonal components are separated by means of Kolmogorov-Zurbenko filtering. The synoptical scale variations were chosen as the most informative from the point of their mutual relation with meteorological parameters. Almost 40% of surface ozone variations in time periods of 11-60 days can be explained by the regression model on separated scales that is 30% more efficient than ozone residuals usage. Quantitative and qualitative estimations of the relations between surface ozone and meteorological predictors let us preliminarily conclude that at the Lovozero site surface ozone variability is governed mainly by dynamical processes of various time scale rather than photochemistry, especially during the cold season.

  10. The Timing for Neuronal Maturation in the Adult Hippocampus Is Modulated by Local Network Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, Verónica C.; Davies-Sala, M. Georgina; Espósito, M. Soledad; Mongiat, Lucas A.; Trinchero, Mariela F.; Schinder, Alejandro F.

    2013-01-01

    The adult hippocampus continuously generates new cohorts of immature neurons with increased excitability and plasticity. The window for the expression of those unique properties in each cohort is determined by the time required to acquire a mature neuronal phenotype. Here, we show that local network activity regulates the rate of maturation of adult-born neurons along the septotemporal axis of the hippocampus. Confocal microscopy and patch-clamp recordings were combined to assess marker expression, morphological development, and functional properties in retrovirally labeled neurons over time. The septal dentate gyrus displayed higher levels of basal network activity and faster rates of newborn neuron maturation than the temporal region. Voluntary exercise enhanced network activity only in the temporal region and, in turn, accelerated neuronal development. Finally, neurons developing within a highly active environment exhibited a delayed maturation when their intrinsic electrical activity was reduced by the cell-autonomous overexpression of Kir2.1, an inward-rectifying potassium channel. Our findings reveal a novel type of activity-dependent plasticity acting on the timing of neuronal maturation and functional integration of newly generated neurons along the longitudinal axis of the adult hippocampus. PMID:21613484

  11. Time domain localization technique with sparsity constraint for imaging acoustic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padois, Thomas; Doutres, Olivier; Sgard, Franck; Berry, Alain

    2017-09-01

    This paper addresses source localization technique in time domain for broadband acoustic sources. The objective is to accurately and quickly detect the position and amplitude of noise sources in workplaces in order to propose adequate noise control options and prevent workers hearing loss or safety risk. First, the generalized cross correlation associated with a spherical microphone array is used to generate an initial noise source map. Then a linear inverse problem is defined to improve this initial map. Commonly, the linear inverse problem is solved with an l2 -regularization. In this study, two sparsity constraints are used to solve the inverse problem, the orthogonal matching pursuit and the truncated Newton interior-point method. Synthetic data are used to highlight the performances of the technique. High resolution imaging is achieved for various acoustic sources configurations. Moreover, the amplitudes of the acoustic sources are correctly estimated. A comparison of computation times shows that the technique is compatible with quasi real-time generation of noise source maps. Finally, the technique is tested with real data.

  12. CFD simulation of local and global mixing time in an agitated tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangchao; Xu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The Issue of mixing efficiency in agitated tanks has drawn serious concern in many industrial processes. The turbulence model is very critical to predicting mixing process in agitated tanks. On the basis of computational fluid dynamics(CFD) software package Fluent 6.2, the mixing characteristics in a tank agitated by dual six-blade-Rushton-turbines(6-DT) are predicted using the detached eddy simulation(DES) method. A sliding mesh(SM) approach is adopted to solve the rotation of the impeller. The simulated flow patterns and liquid velocities in the agitated tank are verified by experimental data in the literature. The simulation results indicate that the DES method can obtain more flow details than Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes(RANS) model. Local and global mixing time in the agitated tank is predicted by solving a tracer concentration scalar transport equation. The simulated results show that feeding points have great influence on mixing process and mixing time. Mixing efficiency is the highest for the feeding point at location of midway of the two impellers. Two methods are used to determine global mixing time and get close result. Dimensionless global mixing time remains unchanged with increasing of impeller speed. Parallel, merging and diverging flow pattern form in the agitated tank, respectively, by changing the impeller spacing and clearance of lower impeller from the bottom of the tank. The global mixing time is the shortest for the merging flow, followed by diverging flow, and the longest for parallel flow. The research presents helpful references for design, optimization and scale-up of agitated tanks with multi-impeller.

  13. Time-stepping techniques to enable the simulation of bursting behavior in a physiologically realistic computational islet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuvis, Samuel; Gobbert, Matthias K; Peercy, Bradford E

    2015-05-01

    Physiologically realistic simulations of computational islets of beta cells require the long-time solution of several thousands of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs), resulting from the combination of several ODEs in each cell and realistic numbers of several hundreds of cells in an islet. For a reliable and accurate solution of complex nonlinear models up to the desired final times on the scale of several bursting periods, an appropriate ODE solver designed for stiff problems is eventually a necessity, since other solvers may not be able to handle the problem or are exceedingly inefficient. But stiff solvers are potentially significantly harder to use, since their algorithms require at least an approximation of the Jacobian matrix. For sophisticated models, systems of several complex ODEs in each cell, it is practically unworkable to differentiate these intricate nonlinear systems analytically and to manually program the resulting Jacobian matrix in computer code. This paper demonstrates that automatic differentiation can be used to obtain code for the Jacobian directly from code for the ODE system, which allows a full accounting for the sophisticated model equations. This technique is also feasible in source-code languages Fortran and C, and the conclusions apply to a wide range of systems of coupled, nonlinear reaction equations. However, when we combine an appropriately supplied Jacobian with slightly modified memory management in the ODE solver, simulations on the realistic scale of one thousand cells in the islet become possible that are several orders of magnitude faster than the original solver in the software Matlab, a language that is particularly user friendly for programming complicated model equations. We use the efficient simulator to analyze electrical bursting and show non-monotonic average burst period between fast and slow cells for increasing coupling strengths. We also find that interestingly, the arrangement of the connected fast

  14. The design of a real-time formative evaluation of the implementation process of lifestyle interventions at two worksites using a 7-step strategy (BRAVO@Work).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierenga, Debbie; Engbers, Luuk H; van Empelen, Pepijn; Hildebrandt, Vincent H; van Mechelen, Willem

    2012-08-07

    Worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs) offer an attractive opportunity to improve the lifestyle of employees. Nevertheless, broad scale and successful implementation of WHPPs in daily practice often fails. In the present study, called BRAVO@Work, a 7-step implementation strategy was used to develop, implement and embed a WHPP in two different worksites with a focus on multiple lifestyle interventions.This article describes the design and framework for the formative evaluation of this 7-step strategy under real-time conditions by an embedded scientist with the purpose to gain insight into whether this this 7-step strategy is a useful and effective implementation strategy. Furthermore, we aim to gain insight into factors that either facilitate or hamper the implementation process, the quality of the implemented lifestyle interventions and the degree of adoption, implementation and continuation of these interventions. This study is a formative evaluation within two different worksites with an embedded scientist on site to continuously monitor the implementation process. Each worksite (i.e. a University of Applied Sciences and an Academic Hospital) will assign a participating faculty or a department, to implement a WHPP focusing on lifestyle interventions using the 7-step strategy. The primary focus will be to describe the natural course of development, implementation and maintenance of a WHPP by studying [a] the use and adherence to the 7-step strategy, [b] barriers and facilitators that influence the natural course of adoption, implementation and maintenance, and [c] the implementation process of the lifestyle interventions. All data will be collected using qualitative (i.e. real-time monitoring and semi-structured interviews) and quantitative methods (i.e. process evaluation questionnaires) applying data triangulation. Except for the real-time monitoring, the data collection will take place at baseline and after 6, 12 and 18 months. This is one of the few

  15. The design of a real-time formative evaluation of the implementation process of lifestyle interventions at two worksites using a 7-step strategy (BRAVO@Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wierenga Debbie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs offer an attractive opportunity to improve the lifestyle of employees. Nevertheless, broad scale and successful implementation of WHPPs in daily practice often fails. In the present study, called BRAVO@Work, a 7-step implementation strategy was used to develop, implement and embed a WHPP in two different worksites with a focus on multiple lifestyle interventions. This article describes the design and framework for the formative evaluation of this 7-step strategy under real-time conditions by an embedded scientist with the purpose to gain insight into whether this this 7-step strategy is a useful and effective implementation strategy. Furthermore, we aim to gain insight into factors that either facilitate or hamper the implementation process, the quality of the implemented lifestyle interventions and the degree of adoption, implementation and continuation of these interventions. Methods and design This study is a formative evaluation within two different worksites with an embedded scientist on site to continuously monitor the implementation process. Each worksite (i.e. a University of Applied Sciences and an Academic Hospital will assign a participating faculty or a department, to implement a WHPP focusing on lifestyle interventions using the 7-step strategy. The primary focus will be to describe the natural course of development, implementation and maintenance of a WHPP by studying [a] the use and adherence to the 7-step strategy, [b] barriers and facilitators that influence the natural course of adoption, implementation and maintenance, and [c] the implementation process of the lifestyle interventions. All data will be collected using qualitative (i.e. real-time monitoring and semi-structured interviews and quantitative methods (i.e. process evaluation questionnaires applying data triangulation. Except for the real-time monitoring, the data collection will take place at baseline and

  16. Think Local-Act Local: Is It Time to Slow Down the Accelerated Move to Global Marketing?

    OpenAIRE

    Schuiling, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    In view of the accelerated move of great corporations towards global marketing, the strategic changes of such companies raise interesting questions. Is marketing globalization reaching its limits after years of implementation? Is it time for companies to rethink their strategies and move back, like Coca-Cola, to a multi-domestic marketing approach?

  17. Establishment of one-step SYBR green-based real time-PCR assay for rapid detection and quantification of chikungunya virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phui San; Ng, Mary Mah Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2010-01-21

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus and one of the prevalent re-emerging arbovirus in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa, and Central and South America. It produces a spectrum of illness ranging from inapparent infection to moderate febrile illness as well as severe arthralgia or arthritis affecting multiple joints. In this study, a quantitative, one-step real-time SYBR Green-based RT-PCR system for the non-structural protein 2 (nsP2) of CHIKV that can quantify a wide range of viral RNA concentrations was developed. Comparisons between the conventional semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay, immunofluorescence detection method and the one-step SYBR Green-based RT-PCR assay in the detection of CHIKV infection revealed much rapid and increase sensitivity of the latter method. Furthermore, this newly developed assay was validated by in vitro experiments in which ribavirin, a well-known RNA virus inhibitor, showed a dose-dependent inhibition of virus replication on cells that was assessed by viral infectivity and viral RNA production. Our results demonstrate the potential of this newly developed one-step SYBR Green I-based RT-PCR assay may be a useful tool in rapid detection of CHIKV and monitoring the extent of viral replication possibly in patients' samples.

  18. Establishment of one-step SYBR green-based real time-PCR assay for rapid detection and quantification of chikungunya virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Justin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne alphavirus and one of the prevalent re-emerging arbovirus in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa, and Central and South America. It produces a spectrum of illness ranging from inapparent infection to moderate febrile illness as well as severe arthralgia or arthritis affecting multiple joints. In this study, a quantitative, one-step real-time SYBR Green-based RT-PCR system for the non-structural protein 2 (nsP2 of CHIKV that can quantify a wide range of viral RNA concentrations was developed. Comparisons between the conventional semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay, immunofluorescence detection method and the one-step SYBR Green-based RT-PCR assay in the detection of CHIKV infection revealed much rapid and increase sensitivity of the latter method. Furthermore, this newly developed assay was validated by in vitro experiments in which ribavirin, a well-known RNA virus inhibitor, showed a dose-dependent inhibition of virus replication on cells that was assessed by viral infectivity and viral RNA production. Our results demonstrate the potential of this newly developed one-step SYBR Green I-based RT-PCR assay may be a useful tool in rapid detection of CHIKV and monitoring the extent of viral replication possibly in patients' samples.

  19. Space-Time Localization of Inner Heliospheric Plasma Turbulence Using Multiple Spacecraft Radio Links

    CERN Document Server

    Richie-Halford, Adam C; Tortora, Paolo; Armstrong, John W; Asmar, Sami W; Woo, Richard; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw; 10.1029/2009SW000499

    2010-01-01

    Radio remote sensing of the heliosphere using spacecraft radio signals has been used to study the near-sun plasma in and out of the ecliptic, close to the sun, and on spatial and temporal scales not accessible with other techniques. Studies of space-time variations in the inner solar wind are particularly timely because of the desire to understand and predict space weather, which can disturb satellites and systems at 1AU and affect human space exploration. Here we demonstrate proof-of-concept of a new radio science application for spacecraft radio science links. The differing transfer functions of plasma irregularities to spacecraft radio up- and downlinks can be exploited to localize plasma scattering along the line of sight. We demonstrate the utility of this idea using Cassini radio data taken in 2001-2002. Under favorable circumstances we demonstrate how this technique, unlike other remote sensing methods, can determine center-of-scattering position to within a few thousandths of an AU and thickness of sc...

  20. An innovative application of time-domain spectroscopy on localized surface plasmon resonance sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Chi; Chang, Ying-Feng; Wang, Huai-Yi; Lin, Yu-Xen; Kuo, Chien-Cheng; Annie Ho, Ja-An; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Su, Li-Chen

    2017-03-01

    White-light scanning interferometry (WLSI) is often used to study the surface profiles and properties of thin films because the strength of the technique lies in its ability to provide fast and high resolution measurements. An innovative attempt is made in this paper to apply WLSI as a time-domain spectroscopic system for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing. A WLSI-based spectrometer is constructed with a breadboard of WLSI in combination with a spectral centroid algorithm for noise reduction and performance improvement. Experimentally, the WLSI-based spectrometer exhibits a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.2 × 10-3 refractive index units (RIU), which is better than that obtained with a conventional UV-Vis spectrometer, by resolving the LSPR peak shift. Finally, the bio-applicability of the proposed spectrometer was investigated using the rs242557 tau gene, an Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease biomarker. The LOD was calculated as 15 pM. These results demonstrate that the proposed WLSI-based spectrometer could become a sensitive time-domain spectroscopic biosensing platform.

  1. Metallicity gradients in Local Universe galaxies: time evolution and effects of radial migration

    CERN Document Server

    Magrini, L; Stanghellini, L; Casasola, V; Galli, D

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of the shape of radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies has recently improved. Conversely, the understanding of their time evolution is more complex, since it requires analysis of stellar populations with different ages, or systematic studies of galaxies at different redshifts. In the Local Universe, Hii regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important tools to investigate it. We present an in-depth study of all nearby spiral galaxies (M33, M31, NGC300, and M81) with direct-method nebular abundances of both populations. For the first time, we also evaluate the radial migration of PN populations. We analyse Hii region and PN properties to: determine whether oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past interstellar medium (ISM) composition; homogenise the published datasets; estimate the migration of the oldest stellar populations; determine the overall chemical enrichment and slope evolution. We confirm that oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for the past ISM metallicity. We find that PN gr...

  2. Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization of Ultra-Cold Atoms by Manipulation of Time-Reversal Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspect, Alain

    In the early 1980's, observation of a magneto-resistance anomaly in metallic thin films was attributed to the phenomenon of weak localization of electrons and to time-reversal symmetry breaking due to a magnetic field acting upon charged particles. We have observed weak localization of ultra-cold atoms in a 2D configuration, placed in a disordered potential created by a laser speckle. In order to manipulate time-reversal symmetry with our neutral atoms, we take advantage of the slow evolution of our system, and we observe the suppression and revival of weak localization when time reversal symmetry is cancelled and reestablished. References: K. Muller, J. Richard, V. V. Volchkov, V. Denechaud, P. Bouyer, A. Aspect, and V. Josse, ''Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization through Control of Time-Reversal Symmetry,'' Physical Review Letters 114 (20) (2015) and references in. Work supported by the ERC Avanced Grant Quantatop.

  3. Time-resolved spectral characterization of ring cavity surface emitting and ridge-type distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers by step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Markus; Genner, Andreas; Schwarzer, Clemens; Mujagic, Elvis; Strasser, Gottfried; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-02-10

    We present the time-resolved comparison of pulsed 2nd order ring cavity surface emitting (RCSE) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) and pulsed 1st order ridge-type distributed feedback (DFB) QCLs using a step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Laser devices were part of QCL arrays and fabricated from the same laser material. Required grating periods were adjusted to account for the grating order. The step-scan technique provided a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm(-1) and a time resolution of 2 ns. As a result, it was possible to gain information about the tuning behavior and potential mode-hops of the investigated lasers. Different cavity-lengths were compared, including 0.9 mm and 3.2 mm long ridge-type and 0.97 mm (circumference) ring-type cavities. RCSE QCLs were found to have improved emission properties in terms of line-stability, tuning rate and maximum emission time compared to ridge-type lasers.

  4. Multi-time-step ahead daily and hourly intermittent reservoir inflow prediction by artificial intelligent techniques using lumped and distributed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothiprakash, V.; Magar, R. B.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryIn this study, artificial intelligent (AI) techniques such as artificial neural network (ANN), Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and Linear genetic programming (LGP) are used to predict daily and hourly multi-time-step ahead intermittent reservoir inflow. To illustrate the applicability of AI techniques, intermittent Koyna river watershed in Maharashtra, India is chosen as a case study. Based on the observed daily and hourly rainfall and reservoir inflow various types of time-series, cause-effect and combined models are developed with lumped and distributed input data. Further, the model performance was evaluated using various performance criteria. From the results, it is found that the performances of LGP models are found to be superior to ANN and ANFIS models especially in predicting the peak inflows for both daily and hourly time-step. A detailed comparison of the overall performance indicated that the combined input model (combination of rainfall and inflow) performed better in both lumped and distributed input data modelling. It was observed that the lumped input data models performed slightly better because; apart from reducing the noise in the data, the better techniques and their training approach, appropriate selection of network architecture, required inputs, and also training-testing ratios of the data set. The slight poor performance of distributed data is due to large variations and lesser number of observed values.

  5. Split-step finite-difference time-domain method with perfectly matched layers for efficient analysis of two-dimensional photonic crystals with anisotropic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Tan, Eng Leong; Chen, Zhi Ning

    2012-02-01

    This Letter presents a split-step (SS) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the efficient analysis of two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystals (PhCs) with anisotropic media. The proposed SS FDTD method is formulated with perfectly matched layer boundary conditions and caters for inhomogeneous anisotropic media. Furthermore, the proposed method is derived using the efficient SS1 splitting formulas with simpler right-hand sides that are more efficient and easier to implement. A 2-D PhC cavity with anisotropic media is used as an example to validate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  6. An application of the time-step topological model for three-phase transformer no-load current calculation considering hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrander, Claes; Mousavi, Seyed Ali; Engdahl, G. öran

    2017-02-01

    In many transformer applications, it is necessary to have a core magnetization model that takes into account both magnetic and electrical effects. This becomes particularly important in three-phase transformers, where the zero-sequence impedance is generally high, and therefore affects the magnetization very strongly. In this paper, we demonstrate a time-step topological simulation method that uses a lumped-element approach to accurately model both the electrical and magnetic circuits. The simulation method is independent of the used hysteresis model. In this paper, a hysteresis model based on the first-order reversal-curve has been used.

  7. Local activation time sampling density for atrial tachycardia contact mapping: how much is enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven E; Harrison, James L; Chubb, Henry; Whitaker, John; Kiedrowicz, Radek; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Cooklin, Michael; Wright, Matthew; Niederer, Steven; O'Neill, Mark D

    2017-04-03

    Local activation time (LAT) mapping forms the cornerstone of atrial tachycardia diagnosis. Although anatomic and positional accuracy of electroanatomic mapping (EAM) systems have been validated, the effect of electrode sampling density on LAT map reconstruction is not known. Here, we study the effect of chamber geometry and activation complexity on optimal LAT sampling density using a combined in silico and in vivo approach. In vivo 21 atrial tachycardia maps were studied in three groups: (1) focal activation, (2) macro-re-entry, and (3) localized re-entry. In silico activation was simulated on a 4×4cm atrial monolayer, sampled randomly at 0.25-10 points/cm2 and used to re-interpolate LAT maps. Activation patterns were studied in the geometrically simple porcine right atrium (RA) and complex human left atrium (LA). Activation complexity was introduced into the porcine RA by incomplete inter-caval linear ablation. In all cases, optimal sampling density was defined as the highest density resulting in minimal further error reduction in the re-interpolated maps. Optimal sampling densities for LA tachycardias were 0.67 ± 0.17 points/cm2 (focal activation), 1.05 ± 0.32 points/cm2 (macro-re-entry) and 1.23 ± 0.26 points/cm2 (localized re-entry), P = 0.0031. Increasing activation complexity was associated with increased optimal sampling density both in silico (focal activation 1.09 ± 0.14 points/cm2; re-entry 1.44 ± 0.49 points/cm2; spiral-wave 1.50 ± 0.34 points/cm2, P density (0.61 ± 0.22 points/cm2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.34 points/cm2, P = 0.0015). Optimal sampling densities can be identified to maximize diagnostic yield of LAT maps. Greater sampling density is required to correctly reveal complex activation and represent activation across complex geometries. Overall, the optimal sampling density for LAT map interpolation defined in this study was ∼1.0-1.5 points/cm2.

  8. Step by step: Revisiting step tolling in the bottleneck model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindsey, C.R.; Berg, van den V.A.C.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    In most dynamic traffic congestion models, congestion tolls must vary continuously over time to achieve the full optimum. This is also the case in Vickrey's (1969) 'bottleneck model'. To date, the closest approximations of this ideal in practice have so-called 'step tolls', in which the toll takes o

  9. Time and frequency-dependent modulation of local field potential synchronization by deep brain stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton B McCracken

    Full Text Available High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP, the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson's disease (PD. We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective, low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR, ventroanterior thalamus (VA, primary motor cortex (M1, and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic

  10. Modelling of human low frequency sound localization acuity demonstrates dominance of spatial variation of interaural time difference and suggests uniform just-noticeable differences in interaural time difference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna C G Smith

    Full Text Available Sound source localization is critical to animal survival and for identification of auditory objects. We investigated the acuity with which humans localize low frequency, pure tone sounds using timing differences between the ears. These small differences in time, known as interaural time differences or ITDs, are identified in a manner that allows localization acuity of around 1° at the midline. Acuity, a relative measure of localization ability, displays a non-linear variation as sound sources are positioned more laterally. All species studied localize sounds best at the midline and progressively worse as the sound is located out towards the side. To understand why sound localization displays this variation with azimuthal angle, we took a first-principles, systemic, analytical approach to model localization acuity. We calculated how ITDs vary with sound frequency, head size and sound source location for humans. This allowed us to model ITD variation for previously published experimental acuity data and determine the distribution of just-noticeable differences in ITD. Our results suggest that the best-fit model is one whereby just-noticeable differences in ITDs are identified with uniform or close to uniform sensitivity across the physiological range. We discuss how our results have several implications for neural ITD processing in different species as well as development of the auditory system.

  11. A method for detecting crack wave arrival time and crack localization in a tunnel by using moving window technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Chul; Park, Tae Jin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Source localization in a dispersive medium has been carried out based on the time-of-arrival-differences (TOADs) method: a triangulation method and a circle intersection technique. Recent signal processing advances have led to calculation TOAD using a joint time-frequency analysis of the signal, where a short-time Fourier transform(STFT) and wavelet transform can be included as popular algorithms. The time-frequency analysis method is able to provide various information and more reliable results such as seismic-attenuation estimation, dispersive characteristics, a wave mode analysis, and temporal energy distribution of signals compared with previous methods. These algorithms, however, have their own limitations for signal processing. In this paper, the effective use of proposed algorithm in detecting crack wave arrival time and source localization in rock masses suggest that the evaluation and real-time monitoring on the intensity of damages related to the tunnels or other underground facilities is possible. Calculation of variances resulted from moving windows as a function of their size differentiates the signature from noise and from crack signal, which lead us to determine the crack wave arrival time. Then, the source localization is determined to be where the variance of crack wave velocities from real and virtual crack localization becomes a minimum. To validate our algorithm, we have performed experiments at the tunnel, which resulted in successful determination of the wave arrival time and crack localization.

  12. Compact Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for in Situ Analyses of Aromatic Organics on Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie; Brickerhoff, William; Cornish, Timothy; Ecelberger, Scott; Floyd, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE A miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been adapted to demonstrate two-step laser desorption-ionization (LOI) in a compact instrument package for enhanced organics detection. Two-step LDI decouples the desorption and ionization processes, relative to traditional laser ionization-desorption, in order to produce low-fragmentation conditions for complex organic analytes. Tuning UV ionization laser energy allowed control ofthe degree of fragmentation, which may enable better identification of constituent species. METHODS A reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer prototype measuring 20 cm in length was adapted to a two-laser configuration, with IR (1064 nm) desorption followed by UV (266 nm) postionization. A relatively low ion extraction voltage of 5 kV was applied at the sample inlet. Instrument capabilities and performance were demonstrated with analysis of a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, representing a class of compounds important to the fields of Earth and planetary science. RESULTS L2MS analysis of a model PAH standard, pyrene, has been demonstrated, including parent mass identification and the onset o(tunable fragmentation as a function of ionizing laser energy. Mass resolution m/llm = 380 at full width at half-maximum was achieved which is notable for gas-phase ionization of desorbed neutrals in a highly-compact mass analyzer. CONCLUSIONS Achieving two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) in a highly-miniature instrument enables a powerful approach to the detection and characterization of aromatic organics in remote terrestrial and planetary applications. Tunable detection of parent and fragment ions with high mass resolution, diagnostic of molecular structure, is possible on such a compact L2MS instrument. Selectivity of L2MS against low-mass inorganic salt interferences is a key advantage when working with unprocessed, natural samples, and a mechanism for the observed selectivity is presented.

  13. Time Resolved Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements of the Instabilities Downstream of a Backward-Facing Step in a Swept-Wing Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Jenna L.; Yao, Chung-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TRPIV) measurements are performed down-stream of a swept backward-facing step, with a height of 49% of the boundary-layer thickness. The results agree well qualitatively with previously reported hotwire measurements, though the amplitudes of the fluctuating components measured using TRPIV are higher. Nonetheless, the low-amplitude instabilities in the flow are fairly well resolved using TR- PIV. Proper orthogonal decomposition is used to study the development of the traveling cross flow and Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) instabilities downstream of the step and to study how they interact to form the large velocity spikes that ultimately lead to transition. A secondary mode within the traveling cross flow frequency band develops with a wavelength close to that of the stationary cross flow instability, so that at a certain point in the phase, it causes an increase in the spanwise modulation initially caused by the stationary cross flow mode. This increased modulation leads to an increase in the amplitude of the TS mode, which, itself, is highly modulated through interactions with the stationary cross flow. When the traveling cross flow and TS modes align in time and space, the large velocity spikes occur. Thus, these three instabilities, which are individually of low amplitude when the spikes start to occur (U'rms/Ue <0.03), interact and combine to cause a large flow disturbance that eventually leads to transition.

  14. Development of a highly sensitive real-time one step RT-PCR combined complementary locked primer technology and conjugated minor groove binder probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sunhwa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus (EV infections are commonly associated with encephalitis and meningitis. Detection of enteroviral RNA in clinical specimens has been demonstrated to improve the management of patients, by ruling out other causes of disease. Method To develop a sensitive and reliable assay for routine laboratory diagnosis, we developed a real-time one step reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay with minor groove binder probes and primers modified with complementary locked primer technology (TMC-PCR. We checked the sensitivity of the developed assay by comparing it to a previously published TaqMan probe real-time one-step RT-PCR (TTN-PCR procedure using enteroviral isolates, Enterovirus Proficiency panels from Quality Control on Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD-2007, and clinical specimens from patients with suspected EV infections. Results One hundred clinical specimens from 158 suspected viral meningitis cases were determined to be positive by the TMC-PCR assay (63.29%, whereas only 60 were found to be positive by the TTN-PCR assay (37.97%. The positive and negative agreements between the TMC-PCR and TTN-PCR assays were 100% and 59.2%, respectively. Conclusion This data suggest that the TMC-PCR assay may be suitable for routine diagnostic screening from patient suspected EV infection.

  15. A new and inexpensive non-bit-for-bit solution reproducibility test based on time step convergence (TSC1.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Hui; Zhang, Kai; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Chen, Xingyuan; Edwards, Jim

    2017-02-03

    A test procedure is proposed for identifying numerically significant solution changes in evolution equations used in atmospheric models. The test issues a fail signal when any code modifications or computing environment changes lead to solution differences that exceed the known time step sensitivity of the reference model. Initial evidence is provided using the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 5.3 that the proposed procedure can be used to distinguish rounding-level solution changes from impacts of compiler optimization or parameter perturbation, which are known to cause substantial differences in the simulated climate. The test is not exhaustive since it does not detect issues associated with diagnostic calculations that do not feedback to the model state variables. Nevertheless, it provides a practical and objective way to assess the significance of solution changes. The short simulation length implies low computational cost. The independence between ensemble members allows for parallel execution of all simulations, thus facilitating fast turnaround. The new method is simple to implement since it does not require any code modifications. We expect that the same methodology can be used for any geophysical model to which the concept of time step  convergence is applicable.

  16. One Step at a Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    East Asia economic integration should start with free trade among ASEAN, China, Japan and South Korea Should East Asia pursue economic integration through the East Asia Free Trade Area (EAFTA) or the Comprehensive Economic Partnership

  17. One Step at a Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiber, Barbara

    Intended for parents of handicapped infants and young children, the booklet provides guidelines for child rearing and suggests additional resources. The booklet stresses that the handicapped child needs what every child needs, that home is where a baby starts learning, the importance of getting a thorough evaluation if the parent suspects…

  18. Teleseismic attenuation, time delays, and raypath bending, and local reflected phases at Uturuncu volcano, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, A. K.; McNutt, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    A set of 13 teleseismic earthquakes sourced to the NW (4, Japan Subduction Zone), SE (5, South Sandwich Subduction Zone), and SW (4, Kermadec-Tonga Subduction Zones) was studied to determine how wave propagation was affected by a presumed magma body beneath Uturuncu. The number of events is small but the events have good signal-to-noise ratios and very similar waveforms for each event so that reliable measurements could be made of arrival times and amplitudes. Attenuation of amplitudes occurs in a NW-SE trend beneath the volcano, 14 by 33 km, with calculated values of quality factor Qas low as 1.7, suggesting strong seismic attenuation. Relative time delays (between the theoretical and observed travel times) of up to 0.8 sec were also observed. The pattern of attenuation and relative time delays together showed four trends: fast and not attenuated (normal crust), slow and attenuated (partial melt), fast and attenuated (likely high fracture density), and slow but not attenuated (possible deep low Vp structure). Results suggest partial melt as high as 16-60% in a region of low Bouguer gravity, high Vp/Vs, persistent seismicity, and overlapping a locus of uplift. Realistically, percent partial melt values above 30% are unlikely and therefore, to account for this, the anomaly would need to have a greater thickness along the raypath for the stations showing 30% or more, thus giving a mean partial melt zone thickness of 24.7 km for an assumed uniform percent partial melt value of 20%. Additionally, there is evidence of reflected phases from some local earthquakes interacting with the top of the mid-crustal magma body. These can be used to reduce depth uncertainty in earthquake locations as well as to determine parameters of the magma body itself, such as determining whether the contact with the country rock is sharp or gradual, resolving the presence and direction of anisotropy, and estimating whether the surface of the magma body is flat or irregular.

  19. Restoring axonal localization and transport of transmembrane receptors to promote repair within the injured CNS: a critical step in CNS regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey H Forbes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Each neuronal subtype is distinct in how it develops, responds to environmental cues, and whether it is capable of mounting a regenerative response following injury. Although the adult central nervous system (CNS does not regenerate, several experimental interventions have been trialled with successful albeit limited instances of axonal repair. We highlight here some of these approaches including extracellular matrix (ECM modification, cellular grafting, gene therapy-induced replacement of proteins, as well as application of biomaterials. We also review the recent report demonstrating the failure of axonal localization and transport of growth-promoting receptors within certain classes of mature neurons. More specifically, we discuss an inability of integrin receptors to localize within the axonal compartment of mature motor neurons such as in the corticospinal and rubrospinal tracts, whereas in immature neurons of those pathways and in mature sensory tracts such as in the optic nerve and dorsal column pathways these receptors readily localize within axons. Furthermore we assert that this failure of axonal localization contributes to the intrinsic inability of axonal regeneration. We conclude by highlighting the necessity for both combined therapies as well as a targeted approach specific to both age and neuronal subtype will be required to induce substantial CNS repair.

  20. Real time magma transport imaging and earthquake localization using seismic amplitude ratio analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taisne, B.; Brenguier, F.; Nercessian, A.; Beauducel, F.; Smith, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic amplitude ratio analysis (SARA) has been used successfully to track the sub-surface migration of magma prior to an eruption at Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Réunion. The methodology is based on the temporal analysis of the seismic amplitude ratio between different pairs of stations, along with a model of seismic wave attenuation. This method has already highlighted the complexity of magma migration in the shallower part of the volcanic edifice during a seismic crisis using continuous records. We will see that this method can also be applied to the localization of individual earthquakes triggered by monitoring systems, prior to human intervention such as phase picking. As examples, the analysis is performed on two kinds of seismic events observed at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat during the last 15 years, namely: Hybrids events and Volcano-Tectonic earthquakes. Finally, we present the implementation of a fully automatic SARA method for monitoring of Piton de la Fournaise volcano using continuous data in real-time.

  1. The tail effect in gravitational radiation-reaction: time non-locality and renormalization group evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Galley, Chad R; Porto, Rafael A; Ross, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We use the effective field theory (EFT) framework to calculate the tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction, which enters at 4PN order in the dynamics of a binary system. The computation entails a subtle interplay between the near (or potential) and far (or radiation) zones. In particular, we find that the tail contribution to the effective action is non-local in time, and features both a dissipative and a `conservative' term. The latter includes a logarithmic ultraviolet divergence, which we show cancels against an infrared singularity found in the (conservative) near zone. The origin of this behavior in the long-distance EFT is due to the point-particle limit --shrinking the binary to a point-- which transforms a would-be infrared singularity into an ultraviolet divergence. This is a common occurrence in an EFT approach, which furthermore allows us to use renormalization group (RG) techniques to resum the resulting logarithmic contributions. We then derive the RG evolution for the binding potential a...

  2. The time-dependence of compaction localization in a porous sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, M. J.; Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Meredith, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Compaction bands in sandstone are laterally-extensive planar deformation features that are characterized by lower porosity and permeability than the surrounding host rock. As a result, this form of localization has important implications for both strain partitioning and fluid flow in the Earth's upper crust. To better understand the time-dependency of compaction band growth, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (initial porosity = 0.24) under constant stress (creep) conditions in the compactant regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the compactant regime, manifest as compaction bands. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterized by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain rate to shear failure, compaction creep is characterized by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain rate. The global decrease in the rates of axial strain, acoustic emission energy, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated at intervals by higher rate excursions, interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased. However, the inelastic strain associated with the growth of a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude (from 10-8 to 10-5 s-1). We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate (from both creep and constant strain rate experiments), the characteristics (geometry, thickness) of the compaction bands remain essentially the same. Several lines of evidence, notably the similarity between the differential stress dependence of creep strain rate in the dilatant and compactant regimes, suggest that, as for dilatant creep, subcritical stress corrosion cracking is the mechanism responsible for

  3. Development of a rapid detection method to detect tdh gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus using 2-step ultrarapid real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Hee; Kim, Il-Wook; Lee, Dong-Woo; Yoo, Mi-Sun; Han, Sang-Hoon; Yoon, Byoung-Su

    2011-01-01

    Thermostable direct hemolysin encoded by tdh gene has been considered an important virulence factor in pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Two-step ultrarapid real-time polymerase chain reaction (URRT PCR) with a microchip was devised to detect V. parahaemolyticus carrying tdh gene. This novel method has a 6-μL reaction volume and extremely reduces running time since one cycle can be completed in 10 s or less. Consequently, 35 cycles of URRT PCR was successfully able to detect up to 100 fg (18 copies) of genomic DNA from pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus carrying tdh gene in 6 min. These results indicate that this method is at present the most rapid detection method for tdh gene and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus.

  4. A Straightforward Convergence Method for ICCG Simulation of Multiloop and Time-Stepping FE Model of Synchronous Generators with Simultaneous AC and Rectified DC Connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanming Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Now electric machines integrate with power electronics to form inseparable systems in lots of applications for high performance. For such systems, two kinds of nonlinearities, the magnetic nonlinearity of iron core and the circuit nonlinearity caused by power electronics devices, coexist at the same time, which makes simulation time-consuming. In this paper, the multiloop model combined with FE model of AC-DC synchronous generators, as one example of electric machine with power electronics system, is set up. FE method is applied for magnetic nonlinearity and variable-step variable-topology simulation method is applied for circuit nonlinearity. In order to improve the simulation speed, the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient (ICCG method is used to solve the state equation. However, when power electronics device switches off, the convergence difficulty occurs. So a straightforward approach to achieve convergence of simulation is proposed. At last, the simulation results are compared with the experiments.

  5. Development of a two-step SYBR Green I based real time RT-PCR assay for detecting and quantifying peste des petits ruminants virus in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abera, Tsegalem; Thangavelu, Ardhanary

    2014-12-01

    A two-step SYBR Green I based real time RT-PCR targeting the matrix (M) gene of Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) was developed. The specificity of the assay was assessed against viral nucleic acid extracted from a range of animal viruses of clinical and structural similarities to PPRV including canine distemper virus, measles virus, bluetongue virus and Newcastle disease virus. But none of the viruses and no template control showed an amplification signal. Sensitivity of the same assay was assessed based on plasmid DNA copy number and with respect to infectivity titre. The lower detection limit achieved was 2.88 plasmid DNA copies/μl with corresponding Ct value of 35.93. Based on tissue culture infectivity titre the lower detection limits were 0.0001TCID50/ml and 1TCID50/ml for the SYBR green I based real time RT-PCR and conventional RT-PCR, respectively. The calculated coefficient of variations values for intra- and inter-assay variability were low, ranging from 0.21% to 1.83% and 0.44% to 1.97%, respectively. The performance of newly developed assay was evaluated on a total of 36 clinical samples suspected of PPR and compared with conventional RT-PCR. The SYBR Green I based real time RT-PCR assay detected PPRV in 32 (88.8%) of clinical samples compared to 19 (52.7%) by conventional RT-PCR. Thus, the two-step SYBR Green I based real time RT-PCR assay targeting the M gene of PPRV reported in this study was highly sensitive, specific and reproducible for detection and quantitation of PPRV nucleic acids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Two Years of California's Local Control Funding Formula: Time to Reaffirm the Grand Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppich, Julia E.; Humphrey, Daniel C.; Marsh, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    California ended 40 years of reliance on categorical funding for schools when Governor Jerry Brown signed the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) into law on July 1, 2013. LCFF intends to enhance services for high-needs students through new flexibility, targeted student funding, and local accountability. Two years into LCFF implementation,…

  7. Effect of time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy on local recurrence-free survival in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The concentration of capecitabine peaks at 1–2 hours after administration. We therefore assumed that proper timing of capecitabine administration and radiotherapy would maximize radiosensitization and influence survival among patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 223 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiation, followed by surgery from January 2002 to May 2006. All patients underwent pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) and received capecitabine twice daily at 12-hour intervals (1,650 mg/m2/day). Patients were divided into two groups according to the time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy. Patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy were classified as Group A (n = 109); all others were classified as Group B (n = 114). The median follow-up period was 72 months (range, 7 to 149 months). Although Group A had a significantly higher rate of good responses (44% vs. 25%; p = 0.005), the 5-year local recurrence-free survival rates of 93% in Group A and 97% in Group B did not differ significantly (p = 0.519). The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were also comparable between the groups. Despite the better pathological response in Group A, the time interval between capecitabine and radiotherapy administration did not have a significant effect on survivals. Further evaluations are needed to clarify the interaction of these treatment modalities.

  8. Locally covariant quantum field theory and the problem of formulating the same physics in all space-times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewster, Christopher J

    2015-08-06

    The framework of locally covariant quantum field theory is discussed, motivated in part using 'ignorance principles'. It is shown how theories can be represented by suitable functors, so that physical equivalence of theories may be expressed via natural isomorphisms between the corresponding functors. The inhomogeneous scalar field is used to illustrate the ideas. It is argued that there are two reasonable definitions of the local physical content associated with a locally covariant theory; when these coincide, the theory is said to be dynamically local. The status of the dynamical locality condition is reviewed, as are its applications in relation to (i) the foundational question of what it means for a theory to represent the same physics in different space-times and (ii) a no-go result on the existence of natural states.

  9. Applicability on verified equations of Hargreaves at different time steps%不同时间步长的Hargreaves公式修正式适用性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌; 付强; 王敏; 雷呈瑞

    2011-01-01

    为比较不同时间步长的Hargreaves公式修正式的适用性,利用哈尔滨市气象台48年的逐日气象数据,应用Penman-Monteith公式和Hargreaves公式计算了哈尔滨市参考作物蒸发蒸腾量(ET0)的日、旬、月值,基于两公式计算的ET0数据,采纳FAO推荐的方法建立了Hargreaves公式修正式模型,通过分析模型的判定系数及计算结果探讨不同时间步长Hargreaves公式修正式的适用性.结果表明,利用历年逐日、逐旬、逐月ET0值建立的Hargreaves公式修正式计算精度不是很高,而利用ET0多年平均值建立的Hargreaves公式修正式计算精度相对较高,但在同一时间步长或不同时同步长之间,不宜互换应用Hargreaves公式修正式.%Compare several verified Hargreaves equations and their applicability at different time steps, the daily, ten-day and monthly values of reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) were calculated with Penman-monteith equation and Hargreaves equation, based on 48-year daily meteorological data of Harbin. Hargreaves equations were verified with FAO methodologies using ET0 values calculated from the two equations, and their applicability was analyzed according to the coefficients of determination and calculated results of the verified equations of Hargreaves. The research results showed that verified with the values of daily, ten-day and monthly ET0, the calculating accuracy of Hargreaves equation was not high, while the calculating accuracy of Hargreaves equations was high, verified with the values of daily, ten-day and monthly average ET0, and it was unfavorable to replace these verified Hargreaves equations at the same time steps or among different time steps.

  10. Development of novel triplex single-step real-time PCR assay for detection of Hepatitis Virus B and C simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Shantanu; Jain, Amita; Jain, Bhawana

    2016-05-01

    Multiplex RT-PCR assays are widely used tools for detection of hepatitis viruses, but none of them provide quality check of sample. In the present study we developed a single-step triplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) with sample quality check, by using β-actin as housekeeping gene. The primers and probes were self-designed and assay was standardized. Assay was also destined to quantitate copy numbers of HBV and HCV. This novel assay was sensitive, specific, and reproducible for detection of HBV and HCV in serum/plasma. The assay also detected all genotypes of HBV and HCV. The detection limit was 60 IU/mL for HBV and 20 IU/mL for HCV. This assay is the first assay developed on single-step platform for nucleic acid detection of HBV and HCV with an extra edge over all other assays by providing inbuilt check for quality of sample.

  11. A New Quaternion-Based Kalman Filter for Real-Time Attitude Estimation Using the Two-Step Geometrically-Intuitive Correction Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kaiqiang; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shen, Chong; Bi, Yu; Zheng, Tao; Liu, Jun

    2017-09-19

    In order to reduce the computational complexity, and improve the pitch/roll estimation accuracy of the low-cost attitude heading reference system (AHRS) under conditions of magnetic-distortion, a novel linear Kalman filter, suitable for nonlinear attitude estimation, is proposed in this paper. The new algorithm is the combination of two-step geometrically-intuitive correction (TGIC) and the Kalman filter. In the proposed algorithm, the sequential two-step geometrically-intuitive correction scheme is used to make the current estimation of pitch/roll immune to magnetic distortion. Meanwhile, the TGIC produces a computed quaternion input for the Kalman filter, which avoids the linearization error of measurement equations and reduces the computational complexity. Several experiments have been carried out to validate the performance of the filter design. The results demonstrate that the mean time consumption and the root mean square error (RMSE) of pitch/roll estimation under magnetic disturbances are reduced by 45.9% and 33.8%, respectively, when compared with a standard filter. In addition, the proposed filter is applicable for attitude estimation under various dynamic conditions.

  12. Control in the Rate-Determining Step Provides a Promising Strategy To Develop New Catalysts for CO2 Hydrogenation: A Local Pair Natural Orbital Coupled Cluster Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Neese, Frank; Ye, Shengfa

    2015-08-03

    The development of efficient catalysts with base metals for CO2 hydrogenation has always been a major thrust of interest. A series of experimental and theoretical work has revealed that the catalytic cycle typically involves two key steps, namely, base-promoted heterolytic H2 splitting and hydride transfer to CO2, either of which can be the rate-determining step (RDS) of the entire reaction. To explore the determining factor for the nature of RDS, we present herein a comparative mechanistic investigation on CO2 hydrogenation mediated by [M(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](n+) (M = Fe(II), Ru(II), and Co(III); PP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)phosphine) type complexes. In order to construct reliable free energy profiles, we used highly correlated wave function based ab initio methods of the coupled cluster type alongside the standard density functional theory. Our calculations demonstrate that the hydricity of the metal-hydride intermediate generated by H2 splitting dictates the nature of the RDS for the Fe(II) and Co(III) systems, while the RDS for the Ru(II) catalyst appears to be ambiguous. CO2 hydrogenation catalyzed by the Fe(II) complex that possesses moderate hydricity traverses an H2-splitting RDS, whereas the RDS for the high-hydricity Co(III) species is found to be the hydride transfer. Thus, our findings suggest that hydricity can be used as a practical guide in future catalyst design. Enhancing the electron-accepting ability of low-hydricity catalysts is likely to improve their catalytic performance, while increasing the electron-donating ability of high-hydricity complexes may speed up CO2 conversion. Moreover, we also established the active roles of base NEt3 in directing the heterolytic H2 splitting and assisting product release through the formation of an acid-base complex.

  13. Asymmetric continuous-time neural networks without local traps for solving constraint satisfaction problems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botond Molnár

    Full Text Available There has been a long history of using neural networks for combinatorial optimization and constraint satisfaction problems. Symmetric Hopfield networks and similar approaches use steepest descent dynamics, and they always converge to the closest local minimum of the energy landscape. For finding global minima additional parameter-sensitive techniques are used, such as classical simulated annealing or the so-called chaotic simulated annealing, which induces chaotic dynamics by addition of extra terms to the energy landscape. Here we show that asymmetric continuous-time neural networks can solve constraint satisfaction problems without getting trapped in non-solution attractors. We concentrate on a model solving Boolean satisfiability (k-SAT, which is a quintessential NP-complete problem. There is a one-to-one correspondence between the stable fixed points of the neural network and the k-SAT solutions and we present numerical evidence that limit cycles may also be avoided by appropriately choosing the parameters of the model. This optimal parameter region is fairly independent of the size and hardness of instances, this way parameters can be chosen independently of the properties of problems and no tuning is required during the dynamical process. The model is similar to cellular neural networks already used in CNN computers. On an analog device solving a SAT problem would take a single operation: the connection weights are determined by the k-SAT instance and starting from any initial condition the system searches until finding a solution. In this new approach transient chaotic behavior appears as a natural consequence of optimization hardness and not as an externally induced effect.

  14. The Impact of Local Acquisition Time on the Accuracy of Microwave Surface Soil Moisture Retrievals over the Contiguous United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangni Lei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-derived soil moisture products have become an important data source for the study of land surface processes and related applications. For satellites with sun-synchronous orbits, these products are typically derived separately for ascending and descending overpasses with different local acquisition times. Moreover, diurnal variations in land surface conditions, and the extent to which they are accurately characterized in retrieval algorithms, lead to distinct systematic and random error characteristics in ascending versus descending soil moisture products. Here, we apply two independent evaluation techniques (triple collocation and direct comparison against sparse ground-based observations to quantify (correlation-based accuracy differences in satellite-derived surface soil moisture acquired at different local acquisition times. The orbits from different satellites are separated into two overpass categories: AM (12:00 a.m. to 11:59 a.m. Local Solar Time and PM (12:00 p.m. to 11:59 p.m. Local Solar Time. Results demonstrate how patterns in the accuracy of AM versus PM retrieval products obtained from a variety of active and passive microwave satellite sensors vary according to land cover and across satellite products with different local acquisition times.

  15. Infinite-time average of local fields in an integrable quantum field theory after a quantum quench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussardo, G

    2013-09-06

    The infinite-time average of the expectation values of local fields of any interacting quantum theory after a global quench process are key quantities for matching theoretical and experimental results. For quantum integrable field theories, we show that they can be obtained by an ensemble average that employs a particular limit of the form factors of local fields and quantities extracted by the generalized Bethe ansatz.

  16. Extended Kalman Filter for Real Time Indoor Localization by Fusing WiFi and Smartphone Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-An Deng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Indoor localization systems using WiFi received signal strength (RSS or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR both have their limitations, such as the RSS fluctuation and the accumulative error of PDR. To exploit their complementary strengths, most existing approaches fuse both systems by a particle filter. However, the particle filter is unsuitable for real time localization on resource-limited smartphones, since it is rather time-consuming and computationally expensive. On the other hand, the light computation fusion approaches including Kalman filter and its variants are inapplicable, since an explicit RSS-location measurement equation and the related noise statistics are unavailable. This paper proposes a novel data fusion framework by using an extended Kalman filter (EKF to integrate WiFi localization with PDR. To make EKF applicable, we develop a measurement model based on kernel density estimation, which enables accurate WiFi localization and adaptive measurement noise statistics estimation. For the PDR system, we design another EKF based on quaternions for heading estimation by fusing gyroscopes and accelerometers. Experimental results show that the proposed EKF based data fusion approach achieves significant localization accuracy improvement over using WiFi localization or PDR systems alone. Compared with a particle filter, the proposed approach achieves comparable localization accuracy, while it incurs much less computational complexity.

  17. IMPROVED LOCALLY CONFORMAL FINITE-DIFFERENCE TIME-DOMAIN METHOD FOR EDGE INCLINED SLOTS IN A FINITE WALL THICKNESS WAVEGUIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Long; Zhang Yu; Liang Changhong

    2004-01-01

    An Improved Locally Conformal Finite-Difference Time-Domain (ILC-FDTD) method is presented in this paper, which is used to analyze the edge inclined slots penetrating adjacent broadwalls of a finite wall thickness waveguide. ILC-FDTD not only removes the instability of the original locally conformal FDTD algorithm, but also improves the computational accuracy by locally modifying magnetic field update equations and the virtual iterative electric fields according to the complexity of the slot fringe fields. The mutual coupling between two edge inclined slots can also be analyzed by ILC-FDTD effectively.

  18. Development of a One-Step Immunocapture Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for Detection of Tobacco Mosaic Virus in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Guang Yang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV causes significant losses in many economically important crops. Contaminated soils may play roles as reservoirs and sources of transmission for TMV. In this study we report the development of an immunocapture real-time RT-PCR (IC-real-time RT-PCR assay for direct detection of TMV in soils without RNA isolation. A series of TMV infected leaf sap dilutions of 1:101, 1:102, 1:103, 1:104, 1:105 and 1:106 (w/v, g/mL were added to one gram of soil. The reactivity of DAS-ELISA and conventional RT-PCR was in the range of 1:102 and 1:103 dilution in TMV-infested soils, respectively. Meanwhile, the detection limit of IC-real-time RT-PCR sensitivity was up to 1:106 dilution. However, in plant sap infected by TMV, both IC-real-time RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR were up to 1:106 dilution, DAS-ELISA could detect at least 1:103 dilution. IC-real-time RT-PCR method can use either plant sample extracts or cultivated soils, and show higher sensitivity than RT-PCR and DAS-ELISA for detection of TMV in soils. Therefore, the proposed IC-real-time RT-PCR assay provides an alternative for quick and very sensitive detection of TMV in soils, with the advantage of not requiring a concentration or RNA purification steps while still allowing detection of TMV for disease control.

  19. Research applications of night-time aerial photography, from local to global scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, J.; Sadler, J.

    2012-12-01

    not be useful as a consistent predictor of built density, but that some form of collinearity should still be expected in studies that employ built density gradients. The collection of digital color night photography from the International Space Station (ISS) presents an opportunity to rapidly map artificial lighting at a medium resolution and large extent, but radiance calibrated data do not yet exist. We therefore used our ground surveys and aerial night photographs of London to reclassify pixels within an ISS image of SE England to represent upward radiant flux. In addition, we were able to explore whether the estimated radiance values for each pixel resulted from a few bright light sources or multiple dim lamps, raising the possibility of improved estimates of lighting character based on prior probability models. Given the global step-change underway in artificial lighting and the high demand for data on urban systems, our results suggest that a suite of complimentary lighting measurement techniques that includes night-time aerial photography would be beneficial.

  20. Effects of Storage Time on the Quality of Local Chicken Meat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research has focused on evaluating meat quality from the local/indigenous ... meat. Cooking loss and meat tenderness were determined for these samples. ..... producing lactic acid as the end product which .... Limited. Final Report, April 2012.