WorldWideScience

Sample records for local gut immune

  1. A role for intestinal alkaline phosphatase in the maintenance of local gut immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, K.T.; Malo, M.; Beasley-Topliffe, L.K.; Poelstra, K.; Millan, J.; Mostafa, G.; Alam, S.; Ramasamy, S.; Warren, H.; Hohmann, E.; Hodin, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) is a gut mucosal defense factor known to dephosphorylate lipopolysaccharide (LPS); however, the role of IAP in the gut response to luminal bacteria remains undefined. We investigated immune responses of wildtype (WT) and IAP-knockout (IAP-KO

  2. Mammalian gut immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Chassaing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a "love-hate relationship." Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases.

  3. The role of probiotics and prebiotics in inducing gut immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vieira, Angélica T; Teixeira, Mauro M; Martins, Flaviano S

    2013-01-01

    .... Nutrients that affect gut immunity and strategies that restore a healthy gut microbial community by affecting the microbial composition are being developed as new therapeutic approaches to treat...

  4. Fish gut-liver immunity during homeostasis or inflammation revealed by integrative transcriptome and proteome studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Yu-Long; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Wang, Ya-Li; Cheng, Ying-Yin; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-11-01

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue, connected with liver via bile and blood, constructs a local immune environment of both defense and tolerance. The gut-liver immunity has been well-studied in mammals, yet in fish remains largely unknown, even though enteritis as well as liver and gallbladder syndrome emerged as a limitation in aquaculture. In this study, we performed integrative bioinformatic analysis for both transcriptomic (gut and liver) and proteomic (intestinal mucus and bile) data, in both healthy and infected tilapias. We found more categories of immune transcripts in gut than liver, as well as more adaptive immune in gut meanwhile more innate in liver. Interestingly reduced differential immune transcripts between gut and liver upon inflammation were also revealed. In addition, more immune proteins in bile than intestinal mucus were identified. And bile probably providing immune effectors to intestinal mucus upon inflammation was deduced. Specifically, many key immune transcripts in gut or liver as well as key immune proteins in mucus or bile were demonstrated. Accordingly, we proposed a hypothesized profile of fish gut-liver immunity, during either homeostasis or inflammation. Current data suggested that fish gut and liver may collaborate immunologically while keep homeostasis using own strategies, including potential unique mechanisms.

  5. Probiotics promote gut health through stimulation of epithelial innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnini, Cristiano; Saeed, Rubina; Bamias, Giorgos; Arseneau, Kristen O; Pizarro, Theresa T; Cominelli, Fabio

    2010-01-05

    Probiotic formulations are widely available and have a variety of proposed beneficial effects, including promotion of gut health. The mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria in the intestine are still unclear but are generally attributed to an antiinflammatory effect. Here, we demonstrate that the multiple probiotic formulation VSL#3 prevents the onset of intestinal inflammation by local stimulation of epithelial innate immune responses (i.e., increased production of epithelial-derived TNF-alpha and restoration of epithelial barrier function in vivo). We also demonstrate that probiotic bacteria stimulate epithelial production of TNF-alpha and activate NF-kappaB in vitro. Our results support the hypothesis that probiotics promote gut health through stimulation, rather than suppression, of the innate immune system. Furthermore, our findings provide the perspective that defects in innate immunity may play a critical role in the pathogenesis and progression of intestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD.

  7. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases.

  8. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23378635

  9. Mucosal immunity in the gut: the non-vertebrate perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Erick; Galindo-Villegas, Jorge; Mulero, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Much is now known about the vertebrate mechanisms involved in mucosal immunity, and the requirement of commensal microbiota at mucosal surfaces for the proper functioning of the immune system. In comparison, very little is known about the mechanisms of immunity at the barrier epithelia of non-vertebrate organisms. The purpose of this review is to summarize key experimental evidence illustrating how non-vertebrate immune mechanisms at barrier epithelia compare to those of higher vertebrates, using the gut as a model organ. Not only effector mechanisms of gut immunity are similar between vertebrates and non-vertebrates, but it also seems that the proper functioning of non-vertebrate gut defense mechanisms requires the presence of a resident microbiota. As more information becomes available, it will be possible to obtain a more accurate picture of how mucosal immunity has evolved, and how it adapts to the organisms' life styles.

  10. The role of probiotics and prebiotics in inducing gut immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Angélica T; Teixeira, Mauro M; Martins, Flaviano S

    2013-12-12

    The gut immune system is influenced by many factors, including dietary components and commensal bacteria. Nutrients that affect gut immunity and strategies that restore a healthy gut microbial community by affecting the microbial composition are being developed as new therapeutic approaches to treat several inflammatory diseases. Although probiotics (live microorganisms) and prebiotics (food components) have shown promise as treatments for several diseases in both clinical and animal studies, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the direct and indirect effects on the gut immune response will facilitate better and possibly more efficient therapy for diseases. In this review, we will first describe the concept of prebiotics, probiotics, and symbiotics and cover the most recently well-established scientific findings regarding the direct and indirect mechanisms by which these dietary approaches can influence gut immunity. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of diet, the microbiota, and the gut immune system. Second, we will highlight recent results from our group, which suggest a new dietary manipulation that includes the use of nutrient products (organic selenium and Lithothamnium muelleri) and probiotics (Saccharomyces boulardii UFMG 905 and Bifidobacterium sp.) that can stimulate and manipulate the gut immune response, inducing intestinal homeostasis. Furthermore, the purpose of this review is to discuss and translate all of this knowledge into therapeutic strategies and into treatment for extra-intestinal compartment pathologies. We will conclude by discussing perspectives and molecular advances regarding the use of prebiotics or probiotics as new therapeutic strategies that manipulate the microbial composition and the gut immune responses of the host.

  11. Brain-gut axis and mucosal immunity: a perspective on mucosal psychoneuroimmunology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    The role of the brain-gut axis has traditionally been investigated in relation to intestinal motility, secretion, and vascularity. More recently, the concept of brain-gut dialogue has extended to the relationship between the nervous system and mucosal immune function. There is compelling evidence for a reciprocal or bi-directional communication between the immune system and the neuroendocrine system. This is mediated, in part, by shared ligands (chemical messengers) and receptors that are common to the immune and nervous systems. Although the concept of psychoneuroimmunology and neuroimmune cross-talk has been studied primarily in the context of the systemic immune system, it is likely to have special significance in the gut. The mucosal immune system is anatomically, functionally, and operationally distinct from the systemic immune system and is subject to independent regulatory signals. Furthermore, the intestinal mucosal immune system operates in a local milieu that depends on a dense innervation for its integrity, with juxtaposition of neuroendocrine cells and mucosal immune cells. An overview of evidence for the biologic plausibility of a brain-gut-immune axis is presented and its potential relevance to mucosal inflammatory disorders is discussed.

  12. Gut microbiota, immunity and disease: a complex relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele M Kosiewicz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Our immune system has evolved to recognize and eradicate pathogenic microbes. However, we have a symbiotic relationship with multiple species of bacteria that occupy the gut and comprise the natural commensal flora or microbiota. The microbiota is critically important for the breakdown of nutrients, and also assists in preventing colonization by potentially pathogenic bacteria. In addition, the gut commensal bacteria appears to be critical for the development of an optimally functioning immune system. Various studies have shown that individual species of the microbiota can induce very different types of immune cells (e.g., Th17 cells, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and responses, suggesting that the composition of the microbiota can have an important influence on the immune response. Although the microbiota resides in the gut, it appears to have a significant impact on the systemic immune response. Indeed, specific gut commensal bacteria have been shown to affect disease development in organs other than the gut, and depending on the species, have been found to have a wide range of effects on diseases from induction and exacerbation to inhibition and protection. In this review, we will focus on the role that the gut microbiota plays in the development and progression of inflammatory/autoimmune disease, and we will also touch upon its role in allergy and cancer.

  13. Policing of gut microbiota by the adaptive immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollé, Laurent; Tran, Hao Q; Etienne-Mesmin, Lucie; Chassaing, Benoit

    2016-02-12

    The intestinal microbiota is a large and diverse microbial community that inhabits the intestine, containing about 100 trillion bacteria of 500-1000 distinct species that, collectively, provide benefits to the host. The human gut microbiota composition is determined by a myriad of factors, among them genetic and environmental, including diet and medication. The microbiota contributes to nutrient absorption and maturation of the immune system. As reciprocity, the host immune system plays a central role in shaping the composition and localization of the intestinal microbiota. Secretory immunoglobulins A (sIgAs), component of the adaptive immune system, are important player in the protection of epithelium, and are known to have an important impact on the regulation of microbiota composition. A recent study published in Immunity by Fransen and colleagues aimed to mechanistically decipher the interrelationship between sIgA and microbiota diversity/composition. This commentary will discuss these important new findings, as well as how future therapies can ultimately benefit from such discovery.

  14. Neural regulation of innate and adaptive immunity in the gut

    OpenAIRE

    Dhawan, S.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates the role of neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), in modulating the innate and adaptive immune function in the intestine, during physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Furthermore, this thesis attempts to advance our current understanding of the gut-brain immune axis, also known as the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, coined largely due to the cholinergic nature of the vagus nerve.

  15. Nutritional components regulate the gut immune system and its association with intestinal immune disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The gut is equipped with a unique immune system for maintaining immunological homeostasis, and its functional immune disruption can result in the development of immune diseases such as food allergy and intestinal inflammation. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that nutritional components play an important role in the regulation of gut immune responses and also in the development of intestinal immune diseases. In this review, we focus on the immunological functions of lipids, vitamins, and nucleotides in the regulation of the intestinal immune system and as potential targets for the control of intestinal immune diseases.

  16. Immune regulation in gut and cord : opportunities for directing the immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roock, S.

    2012-01-01

    The gut is an important organ for the immune system. Microbes and immune cells interact directly or via epithelial cells. Both TH17 and Treg cells mature in this environment. The composition of the microbiota has an important influence on the immune homeostasis. Influencing the immune system via the

  17. Immune regulation in gut and cord : opportunities for directing the immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roock, S.

    2012-01-01

    The gut is an important organ for the immune system. Microbes and immune cells interact directly or via epithelial cells. Both TH17 and Treg cells mature in this environment. The composition of the microbiota has an important influence on the immune homeostasis. Influencing the immune system via the

  18. The gut microbiota as a modulator of innate immunity during melioidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; Birnie, Emma; Weehuizen, Tassili A.F.; Scicluna, Brendon P.; Belzer, Clara; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Roelofs, Joris J.T.H.; Vos, de Alex F.; Poll, van der Tom; Budding, Andries E.; Wiersinga, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Melioidosis, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an emerging cause of pneumonia-derived sepsis in the tropics. The gut microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognized as a protective mediator in host defenses against systemic

  19. [Influence of natural gut flora on immune response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzępa, Anna; Szczepanik, Marian

    2013-08-29

    Our intestines are habitat for trillions of microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses and eukaryotes, known as microbiota. They are indispensable for our well-being due to their metabolic activities. Microbiota digests complex plant polysaccharides, which are normally unprocessed by humans; as well it retrieves other essential nutrients. It is well established that microbiota is crucial for proper development of intestinal as well systemic immune compartments. Recent results indicate that composition of natural gut flora is responsible for shaping of immune response. Alerted bacterial profile, known as dysbiosis precedes development of allergy in children. Many autoimmune conditions are associated with shift in intestinal bacterial profile. Apart of direct association between gut flora and systemic immune compartment little is known about the mechanisms by which microbiota exerts its immunoregulatory function. At the moment several bacterial strains as well some bacterial products were recognized as immunomodulators. This review describes the composition of normal gut flora as well disease-associated microbiota. It deals with unique mechanisms, found in GALT, that favor induction of tolerance towards orally administrated antigens as well discriminate between commensal and pathogens to minimize induction of inflammatory response. Further, the review tries to establish the connection between microbiota and systemic immune response. Finally the factors that modulate the composition of our gut flora are described.

  20. The role of the adaptive immune system in regulation of gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Lucia M; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Maruya, Mikako; Fagarasan, Sidonia

    2014-07-01

    The gut nourishes rich bacterial communities that affect profoundly the functions of the immune system. The relationship between gut microbiota and the immune system is one of reciprocity. The microbiota contributes to nutrient processing and the development, maturation, and function of the immune system. Conversely, the immune system, particularly the adaptive immune system, plays a key role in shaping the repertoire of gut microbiota. The fitness of host immune system is reflected in the gut microbiota, and deficiencies in either innate or adaptive immunity impact on diversity and structures of bacterial communities in the gut. Here, we discuss the mechanisms that underlie this reciprocity and emphasize how the adaptive immune system via immunoglobulins (i.e. IgA) contributes to diversification and balance of gut microbiota required for immune homeostasis.

  1. Gut Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Messina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, first found in bone marrow (BM, are the structural architects of all organs, participating in most biological functions. MSCs possess tissue-specific signatures that allow their discrimination according to their origin and location. Among their multiple functions, MSCs closely interact with immune cells, orchestrating their activity to maintain overall homeostasis. The phenotype of tissue MSCs residing in the bowel overlaps with myofibroblasts, lining the bottom walls of intestinal crypts (pericryptal or interspersed within intestinal submucosa (intercryptal. In Crohn’s disease, intestinal MSCs are tightly stacked in a chronic inflammatory milieu, which causes their enforced expression of Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The absence of Class II MHC is a hallmark for immune-modulator and tolerogenic properties of normal MSCs and, vice versa, the expression of HLA-DR is peculiar to antigen presenting cells, that is, immune-activator cells. Interferon gamma (IFNγ is responsible for induction of Class II MHC expression on intestinal MSCs. The reversal of myofibroblasts/MSCs from an immune-modulator to an activator phenotype in Crohn’s disease results in the formation of a fibrotic tube subverting the intestinal structure. Epithelial metaplastic areas in this context can progress to dysplasia and cancer.

  2. Gut Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Valeria; Buccione, Carla; Marotta, Giulia; Ziccheddu, Giovanna; Signore, Michele; Mattia, Gianfranco; Puglisi, Rossella; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Biancone, Livia

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), first found in bone marrow (BM), are the structural architects of all organs, participating in most biological functions. MSCs possess tissue-specific signatures that allow their discrimination according to their origin and location. Among their multiple functions, MSCs closely interact with immune cells, orchestrating their activity to maintain overall homeostasis. The phenotype of tissue MSCs residing in the bowel overlaps with myofibroblasts, lining the bottom walls of intestinal crypts (pericryptal) or interspersed within intestinal submucosa (intercryptal). In Crohn's disease, intestinal MSCs are tightly stacked in a chronic inflammatory milieu, which causes their enforced expression of Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The absence of Class II MHC is a hallmark for immune-modulator and tolerogenic properties of normal MSCs and, vice versa, the expression of HLA-DR is peculiar to antigen presenting cells, that is, immune-activator cells. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is responsible for induction of Class II MHC expression on intestinal MSCs. The reversal of myofibroblasts/MSCs from an immune-modulator to an activator phenotype in Crohn's disease results in the formation of a fibrotic tube subverting the intestinal structure. Epithelial metaplastic areas in this context can progress to dysplasia and cancer. PMID:28337224

  3. Early Development of the Gut Microbiota and Immune Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pilar Francino

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the increase in human microbiome research brought about by the rapidly evolving “omic” technologies has established that the balance among the microbial groups present in the human gut, and their multipronged interactions with the host, are crucial for health. On the other hand, epidemiological and experimental support has also grown for the ‘early programming hypothesis’, according to which factors that act in utero and early in life program the risks for adverse health outcomes later on. The microbiota of the gut develops during infancy, in close interaction with immune development, and with extensive variability across individuals. It follows that the specific process of gut colonization and the microbe-host interactions established in an individual during this period have the potential to represent main determinants of life-long propensity to immune disease. Although much remains to be learnt on the progression of events by which the gut microbiota becomes established and initiates its intimate relationships with the host, and on the long-term repercussions of this process, recent works have advanced significatively in this direction.

  4. Interplay Between Diet, Gut Microbiota, Immune Cells and Energy Metabolism in Obesity Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos

    Obesity and associated metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes are major causes of morbidity and mortality globally. A major contributor to development of the obesity pandemic has been the increasing intake of energy dense diets, consisting of dietary fats combined with high......-grade inflammation contributing to development of insulin resistance and obesity. Dietary habits are linked to changes in the gut bacterial composition (gut microbiota) which is central to host inflammatory response and metabolism in the development of obesity and associated metabolic disorders. Thus, detailed...... investigation of the interactions between the diet, gut microbiota and development of inflammation is necessary to understand development of obesity. For this, it is important to understand the regulation of the local immune system of fat and other tissues important for regulation of systemic metabolism...

  5. Inflammation and Immunity in Radiation Damage to the Gut Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès François

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema was observed on the skin of the first patients treated with radiation therapy. It is in particular to reduce this erythema, one feature of tissue inflammation, that prescribed dose to the tumor site started to be fractionated. It is now well known that radiation exposure of normal tissues generates a sustained and apparently uncontrolled inflammatory process. Radiation-induced inflammation is always observed, often described, sometimes partly explained, but still today far from being completely understood. The thing with the gut and especially the gut mucosa is that it is at the frontier between the external milieu and the organism, is in contact with a plethora of commensal and foreign antigens, possesses a dense-associated lymphoid tissue, and is particularly radiation sensitive because of a high mucosal turnover rate. All these characteristics make the gut mucosa a strong responsive organ in terms of radiation-induced immunoinflammation. This paper will focus on what has been observed in the normal gut and what remains to be done concerning the immunoinflammatory response following localized radiation exposure.

  6. Adaptive immunity against gut microbiota enhances apoE-mediated immune regulation and reduces atherosclerosis and western-diet-related inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Diego; Ferrarese, Roberto; Foglieni, Chiara; Esposito, Antonio; Canu, Tamara; Perani, Laura; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Visconti, Laura; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo

    2016-07-07

    Common features of immune-metabolic and inflammatory diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases are an altered gut microbiota composition and a systemic pro-inflammatory state. We demonstrate that active immunization against the outer membrane protein of bacteria present in the gut enhances local and systemic immune control via apoE-mediated immune-modulation. Reduction of western-diet-associated inflammation was obtained for more than eighteen weeks after immunization. Immunized mice had reduced serum cytokine levels, reduced insulin and fasting glucose concentrations; and gene expression in both liver and visceral adipose tissue confirmed a reduced inflammatory steady-state after immunization. Moreover, both gut and atherosclerotic plaques of immunized mice showed reduced inflammatory cells and an increased M2 macrophage fraction. These results suggest that adaptive responses directed against microbes present in our microbiota have systemic beneficial consequences and demonstrate the key role of apoE in this mechanism that could be exploited to treat immune-metabolic diseases.

  7. 健脾止泻颗粒对脾虚泄泻患儿消化吸收与 肠道局部免疫功能的影响%Effect of Jianpi Zhixie Granule on Digestion and Absorption Function and Immunity Function of Local Gut of Diarrhea Children with Spleen Deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永辉

    2001-01-01

    观察脾虚泄泻患儿消化吸收与肠道局部免疫功能以及健脾止泻颗粒的作用机制。方法:对64例脾虚泄泻患儿用健脾止泻颗粒治疗,检测其治疗前后的唾液淀粉酶活性、尿D-木糖排泄率及大便SIgA,并与30例正常儿进行对照观察。结果:脾虚泄泻患儿消化吸收与肠道局部免疫功能低下,经治疗后,上述指标明显好转。结论:健脾止泻颗粒具有促进脾虚泄泻患儿消化吸收功能和提高肠道局部免疫功能的作用。%To observe the digestion and absorption function and the immunity function of the local gut of the diarrhea children with spleen deficiency and the action mechanism of Jianpi Zhixie granule.Metheods:The salivary amylase activity,urine D-xylose excretion rate and stool SIgA of 64 diarrhea children with spleen deficiency were tested before and after treatment by Jianpi Zhixie granule.Results:The digestion and absorption function and the immunity function of the local gut of the diarrhea children with spleen deficiency were lower than the normal group(30 health children).The above indices were increased markedly after treatment.Conclusion:Jianpi Zhixie granule has the functions of promoting the digestion and absorption function of the diarrhea children with spleen deficiency and improving the immunity function of the local gut.

  8. Aberrant interaction of the gut immune system with environmental factors in the development of food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-05-01

    The gastrointestinal immune system is a major component of the mucosal barrier, which maintains an immunologic homeostasis between the host and the harsh environment of the gut. This homeostasis is achieved by immunologic quiescence, and its dysregulation is thought to result from the development of immune diseases such as food allergies. Recent findings have revealed versatile pathways in the development of intestinal allergies to certain food antigens. In this review, we summarize the regulatory and quiescence mechanisms in the gut immune system and describe aberrant interactions between the host immune system and the gut environment in the development of food allergies.

  9. Intestinal barrier and gut microbiota: Shaping our immune responses throughout life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiishi, Tatiana; Fenero, Camila Ideli Morales; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2017-09-06

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is considered the largest immunological organ in the body having a central role in regulating immune homeostasis. Contrary to earlier belief, the intestinal epithelial barrier is not a static physical barrier but rather strongly interacts with the gut microbiome and cells of the immune system. This intense communication between epithelial cells, immune cells and microbiome will shape specific immune responses to antigens, balancing tolerance and effector immune functions. Recent studies indicate that composition of the gut microbiome affects immune system development and modulates immune mediators, which in turn affect the intestinal barrier. Moreover, dysbiosis may favor intestinal barrier disruption and could be related to increased susceptibility to certain diseases. This review will be focused on the development of the intestinal barrier and its function in host immune defense and how gut microbiome composition throughout life can affect this role.

  10. The gut microbiota as a modulator of innate immunity during melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankelma, Jacqueline M; Birnie, Emma; Weehuizen, Tassili A F; Scicluna, Brendon P; Belzer, Clara; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Roelofs, Joris J T H; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom; Budding, Andries E; Wiersinga, W Joost

    2017-04-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an emerging cause of pneumonia-derived sepsis in the tropics. The gut microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognized as a protective mediator in host defenses against systemic infection. Here, we aimed to characterize the composition and function of the intestinal microbiota during experimental melioidosis. C57BL/6 mice were infected intranasally with B. pseudomallei and sacrificed at different time points to assess bacterial loads and inflammation. In selected experiments, the gut microbiota was disrupted with broad-spectrum antibiotics prior to inoculation. Fecal bacterial composition was analyzed by means of IS-pro, a 16S-23S interspacer region-based profiling method. A marked shift in fecal bacterial composition was seen in all mice during systemic B. pseudomallei infection with a strong increase in Proteobacteria and decrease in Actinobacteria, with an increase in bacterial diversity. We found enhanced early dissemination of B. pseudomallei and systemic inflammation during experimental melioidosis in microbiota-disrupted mice compared with controls. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling of the lung identified several genes that were differentially expressed between mice with a normal or disrupted intestinal microbiota. Genes involved in acute phase signaling, including macrophage-related signaling pathways were significantly elevated in microbiota disrupted mice. Compared with controls, alveolar macrophages derived from antibiotic pretreated mice showed a diminished capacity to phagocytose B. pseudomallei. This might in part explain the observed protective effect of the gut microbiota in the host defense against pneumonia-derived melioidosis. Taken together, these data identify the gut microbiota as a potential modulator of innate immunity during B. pseudomallei infection.

  11. Inside Out: HIV, the Gut Microbiome, and the Mucosal Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jay; Williams, Brett; Frank, Daniel; Dillon, Stephanie M; Wilson, Cara C; Landay, Alan L

    2017-01-15

    The components of the human gut microbiome have been found to influence a broad array of pathologic conditions ranging from heart disease to diabetes and even to cancer. HIV infection upsets the delicate balance in the normal host-microbe interaction both through alterations in the taxonomic composition of gut microbial communities as well as through disruption of the normal host response mechanisms. In this article we review the current methods of gut microbiome analysis and the resulting data regarding how HIV infection might change the balance of commensal bacteria in the gut. Additionally, we cover the various effects gut microbes have on host immune homeostasis and the preliminary but intriguing data on how HIV disrupts those mechanisms. Finally, we briefly describe some of the important biomolecules produced by gut microbiota and the role that they may play in maintaining host immune homeostasis with and without HIV infection.

  12. Does the Gut Microbiota Influence Immunity and Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis Pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk-Sowa, Monika; Madej, Paulina; Michlicka, Wirginia; Dobrakowski, Pawel

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Evaluation of the impact of gut microflora on the pathophysiology of MS. Results. The etiopathogenesis of MS is not fully known. Gut microbiota may be of a great importance in the pathogenesis of MS, since recent findings suggest that substitutions of certain microbial population in the gut can lead to proinflammatory state, which can lead to MS in humans. In contrast, other commensal bacteria and their antigenic products may protect against inflammation within the central nervous system. The type of intestinal flora is affected by antibiotics, stress, or diet. The effects on MS through the intestinal microflora can also be achieved by antibiotic therapy and Lactobacillus. EAE, as an animal model of MS, indicates a strong influence of the gut microbiota on the immune system and shows that disturbances in gut physiology may contribute to the development of MS. Conclusions. The relationship between the central nervous system, the immune system, and the gut microbiota relates to the influence of microorganisms in the development of MS. A possible interaction between gut microbiota and the immune system can be perceived through regulation by the endocannabinoid system. It may offer an opportunity to understand the interaction comprised in the gut-immune-brain axis. PMID:28316999

  13. Functions of innate immune cells and commensal bacteria in gut homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal immune system remains unresponsive to beneficial microbes and dietary antigens while activating pro-inflammatory responses against pathogens for host defence. In intestinal mucosa, abnormal activation of innate immunity, which directs adaptive immune responses, causes the onset and/or progression of inflammatory bowel diseases. Thus, innate immunity is finely regulated in the gut. Multiple innate immune cell subsets have been identified in both murine and human intestinal lamina propria. Some innate immune cells play a key role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis by preventing inappropriate adaptive immune responses while others are associated with the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation through development of Th1 and Th17 cells. In addition, intestinal microbiota and their metabolites contribute to the regulation of innate/adaptive immune responses. Accordingly, perturbation of microbiota composition can trigger intestinal inflammation by driving inappropriate immune responses.

  14. Food allergens and mucosal immune systems with special reference to recognition of food allergens by gut-associated lymphoid tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Kaminogawa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy, triggered by an aberrant immune response elicited by orally ingested food allergens, is generated through a complicated mechanism because the allergen interacts with the mucosal immune system (the gut- associated lymphoid tissue, GALT and the resulting immune response affects the generation of allergy. This review will describe the process by which antigens or allergens are recognized by the GALT and the characteristic immune responses induced thereafter. Orally administered antigens induce distinct immune responses in the Peyer's patches, lamina propria and the intestinal epithelium. In addition to these local immune responses in the gut, ingested antigens are known to affect systemic immunity. These may induce a suppressed state of systemic immune responsiveness, which is called oral tolerance, or in some cases they may elicit a systemic IgE antibody response which may lead to allergic reactions. Information on the regions on food allergens recognized by T cells and IgE antibodies is important in understanding the fates of food allergens after being recognized by the GALT. The structure of T and B cell epitopes on food allergens and the possibility of modulation of allergic reactions by amino-acid substituted analogs of allergen- derived peptides will also be discussed.

  15. Gut microbiota and immune crosstalk in metabolic disease

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gut microbiota is considered as a major regulator of metabolic disease. This reconciles the notion of metabolic inflammation and the epidemic development of the disease. In addition to evidence showing that a specific gut microbiota characterizes patients with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hepatic steatosis, the mechanisms causal to the disease could be related to the translocation of microbiota from the gut to the tissues, inducing inflammation. The mechanisms regulating such a p...

  16. Interplay Between Diet, Gut Microbiota, Immune Cells and Energy Metabolism in Obesity Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos

    Obesity and associated metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes are major causes of morbidity and mortality globally. A major contributor to development of the obesity pandemic has been the increasing intake of energy dense diets, consisting of dietary fats combined with high-glycemic carbohyd......Obesity and associated metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes are major causes of morbidity and mortality globally. A major contributor to development of the obesity pandemic has been the increasing intake of energy dense diets, consisting of dietary fats combined with high...... investigation of the interactions between the diet, gut microbiota and development of inflammation is necessary to understand development of obesity. For this, it is important to understand the regulation of the local immune system of fat and other tissues important for regulation of systemic metabolism...... and lipid metabolism, and is associated with alterations in the gut microbiota and immune cell profile in adipose tissue. We also demonstrate that moderate weight gain on a high-fat/high-sucrose diet based on safflower oil, one of the most rich sources of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids can results...

  17. Gut microbiome and immunity: possible role in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul N Goldwater

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiome influences the development of the immune system of young mammals; the establishment of a normal gut microbiome is thought to be important for the health of the infant during its early development. As the role of bacteria in the causation of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS is backed by strong evidence, the balance between host immunity and potential bacterial pathogens is likely to be pivotal. Bacterial colonisation of the infant colon is influenced by age, mode of delivery, diet, environment, and antibiotic exposure. The gut microbiome influences several systems including gut integrity and development of the immune system; therefore, gut microflora could be important in protection against bacteria and/or their toxins identified in SIDS infants. The aims of the review are to explore 1 the role of the gut microbiome in relation to the developmentally critical period in which most SIDS cases occur; 2 the concept of an abnormal gut microbiome causing inflammation resulting in transit of bacteria from the lumen into the bloodstream; and 3 clinical, physiological, pathological and microbiological evidence for bacteraemia leading to the final events in SIDS pathogenesis.

  18. Gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Balercia, Giancarlo; Barrea, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The gut regulates glucose and energy homeostasis; thus, the presence of ingested nutrients into the gut activates sensing mechanisms that affect both glucose homeostasis and regulate food intake. Increasing evidence suggest that gut may also play a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes...

  19. Infection with diverse immune-modulating poxviruses elicits different compositional shifts in the mouse gut microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernáez, Bruno; Rastrojo, Alberto; Alcamí, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    It is often not possible to demonstrate causality within the context of gut microbiota dysbiosis-linked diseases. Thus, we need a better understanding of the mechanisms whereby an altered host immunophysiology shapes its resident microbiota. In this regard, immune-modulating poxvirus strains and mutants could differentially alter gut mucosal immunity in the context of a natural immune response, providing a controlled natural in vivo setting to deepen our understanding of the immune determinants of microbiome composition. This study represents a proof-of-concept that the use of an existing collection of different immune-modulating poxviruses may represent an innovative tool in gut microbiome research. To this end, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and RNAseq transcriptome profiling were employed as proxies for microbiota composition and gut immunophysiological status in the analysis of caecal samples from control mice and mice infected with various poxvirus types. Our results show that different poxvirus species and mutants elicit different shifts in the mice mucosa-associated microbiota and, in some instances, significant concomitant shifts in gut transcriptome profiles, thus providing an initial validation to the proposed model. PMID:28282449

  20. Immunometabolism of obesity and diabetes: microbiota link compartmentalized immunity in the gut to metabolic tissue inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Joseph B; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-12-01

    The bacteria that inhabit us have emerged as factors linking immunity and metabolism. Changes in our microbiota can modify obesity and the immune underpinnings of metabolic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes. Obesity coincides with a low-level systemic inflammation, which also manifests within metabolic tissues such as adipose tissue and liver. This metabolic inflammation can promote insulin resistance and dysglycaemia. However, the obesity and metabolic disease-related immune responses that are compartmentalized in the intestinal environment do not necessarily parallel the inflammatory status of metabolic tissues that control blood glucose. In fact, a permissive immune environment in the gut can exacerbate metabolic tissue inflammation. Unravelling these discordant immune responses in different parts of the body and establishing a connection between nutrients, immunity and the microbiota in the gut is a complex challenge. Recent evidence positions the relationship between host gut barrier function, intestinal T cell responses and specific microbes at the crossroads of obesity and inflammation in metabolic disease. A key problem to be addressed is understanding how metabolite, immune or bacterial signals from the gut are relayed and transferred into systemic or metabolic tissue inflammation that can impair insulin action preceding Type 2 diabetes.

  1. The Impact of Gut Microbiota on Gender-Specific Differences in Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Floris; van Beek, Adriaan A.; Borghuis, Theo; Meijer, Ben; Hugenholtz, Floor; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa; Savelkoul, Huub F.; de Jonge, Marien I.; Faas, Marijke M.; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Smidt, Hauke; El Aidy, Sahar; de Vos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Males and females are known to have gender-specific differences in their immune system and gut microbiota composition. Whether these differences in gut microbiota composition are a cause or consequence of differences in the immune system is not known. To investigate this issue, gut microbiota from conventional males or females was transferred to germ-free (GF) animals of the same or opposing gender. We demonstrate that microbiota-independent gender differences in immunity are already present in GF mice. In particular, type I interferon signaling was enhanced in the intestine of GF females. Presumably, due to these immune differences bacterial groups, such as Alistipes, Rikenella, and Porphyromonadaceae, known to expand in the absence of innate immune defense mechanism were overrepresented in the male microbiota. The presence of these bacterial groups was associated with induction of weight loss, inflammation, and DNA damage upon transfer of the male microbiota to female GF recipients. In summary, our data suggest that microbiota-independent gender differences in the immune system select a gender-specific gut microbiota composition, which in turn further contributes to gender differences in the immune system. PMID:28713378

  2. Patterns of early gut colonization shape future immune responses of the host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Hartmann Friis Hansen

    Full Text Available The most important trigger for immune system development is the exposure to microbial components immediately after birth. Moreover, targeted manipulation of the microbiota can be used to change host susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases. Our aim was to analyze how differences in early gut colonization patterns change the composition of the resident microbiota and future immune system reactivity. Germ-free (GF mice were either inoculated by single oral gavage of caecal content or let colonized by co-housing with specific pathogen-free (SPF mice at different time points in the postnatal period. The microbiota composition was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for 16S rRNA gene followed by principal component analysis. Furthermore, immune functions and cytokine concentrations were analyzed using flow cytometry, ELISA or multiplex bead assay. We found that a single oral inoculation of GF mice at three weeks of age permanently changed the gut microbiota composition, which was not possible to achieve at one week of age. Interestingly, the ex-GF mice inoculated at three weeks of age were also the only mice with an increased pro-inflammatory immune response. In contrast, the composition of the gut microbiota of ex-GF mice that were co-housed with SPF mice at different time points was similar to the gut microbiota in the barrier maintained SPF mice. The existence of a short GF postnatal period permanently changed levels of systemic regulatory T cells, NK and NKT cells, and cytokine production. In conclusion, a time window exists that enables the artificial colonization of GF mice by a single oral dose of caecal content, which may modify the future immune phenotype of the host. Moreover, delayed microbial colonization of the gut causes permanent changes in the immune system.

  3. Enteric immunity, the gut microbiome, and sepsis: Rethinking the germ theory of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Badovinac, Vladimir P; Griffith, Thomas S

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a poorly understood syndrome of systemic inflammation responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths every year. The integrity of the gut epithelium and competence of adaptive immune responses are notoriously compromised during sepsis, and the prevalent assumption in the scientific and medical community is that intestinal commensals have a detrimental role in the systemic inflammation and susceptibility to nosocomial infections seen in critically ill, septic patients. However, breakthroughs in the last decade provide strong credence to the idea that our mucosal microbiome plays an essential role in adaptive immunity, where a human host and its prokaryotic colonists seem to exist in a carefully negotiated armistice with compromises and benefits that go both ways. In this review, we re-examine the notion that intestinal contents are the driving force of critical illness. An overview of the interaction between the microbiome and the immune system is provided, with a special focus on the impact of commensals in priming and the careful balance between normal intestinal flora and pathogenic organisms residing in the gut microbiome. Based on the data in hand, we hypothesize that sepsis induces imbalances in microbial populations residing in the gut, along with compromises in epithelial integrity. As a result, normal antigen sampling becomes impaired, and proliferative cues are intermixed with inhibitory signals. This situates the microbiome, the gut, and its complex immune network of cells and bacteria, at the center of aberrant immune responses during and after sepsis.

  4. Pili-like proteins of Akkermansia muciniphila modulate host immune responses and gut barrier function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunanen, Justus; Meijerink, Marjolein; Pietilä, Taija E.; Kainulainen, Veera; Klievink, Judith; Huuskonen, Laura; Aalvink, Steven; Skurnik, Mikael; Boeren, Sjef; Satokari, Reetta; Mercenier, Annick; Palva, Airi; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Gut barrier function is key in maintaining a balanced response between the host and its microbiome. The microbiota can modulate changes in gut barrier as well as metabolic and inflammatory responses. This highly complex system involves numerous microbiota-derived factors. The gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila is positively correlated with a lean phenotype, reduced body weight gain, amelioration of metabolic responses and restoration of gut barrier function by modulation of mucus layer thickness. However, the molecular mechanisms behind its metabolic and immunological regulatory properties are unexplored. Herein, we identify a highly abundant outer membrane pili-like protein of A. muciniphila MucT that is directly involved in immune regulation and enhancement of trans-epithelial resistance. The purified Amuc_1100 protein and enrichments containing all its associated proteins induced production of specific cytokines through activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4. This mainly leads to high levels of IL-10 similar to those induced by the other beneficial immune suppressive microorganisms such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. Together these results indicate that outer membrane protein composition and particularly the newly identified highly abundant pili-like protein Amuc_1100 of A. muciniphila are involved in host immunological homeostasis at the gut mucosa, and improvement of gut barrier function. PMID:28249045

  5. Microbial-gut interactions in health and disease. Mucosal immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheson, David W K; Luccioli, Stefano

    2004-04-01

    The host gastrointestinal tract is exposed to countless numbers of foreign antigens and has embedded a unique and complex network of immunological and non-immunological mechanisms, often termed the gastrointestinal 'mucosal barrier', to protect the host from potentially harmful pathogens while at the same time 'tolerating' other resident microbes to allow absorption and utilization of nutrients. Of the many important roles of this barrier, it is the distinct responsibility of the mucosal immune system to sample and discriminate between harmful and beneficial antigens and to prevent entry of food-borne pathogens through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This system comprises an immunological network termed the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) that consists of unique arrangements of B cells, T cells and phagocytes which sample luminal antigens through specialized epithelia termed the follicle associated epithelia (FAE) and orchestrate co-ordinated molecular responses between immune cells and other components of the mucosal barrier. Certain pathogens have developed ways to bypass and/or withstand defence by the mucosal immune system to establish disease in the host. Some 'opportunistic' pathogens (such as Clostridium difficile) take advantage of host or other factors (diet, stress, antibiotic use) which may alter or weaken the response of the immune system. Other pathogens have developed mechanisms for invading gastrointestinal epithelium and evading phagocytosis/destruction by immune system defences. Once cellular invasion occurs, host responses are activated to limit local mucosal damage and repel the foreign influence. Some pathogens (Shigella spp, parasites and viruses) primarily establish localized disease while others (Salmonella, Yersinia, Listeria) use the lymphatic system to enter organs or the bloodstream and cause more systemic illness. In some cases, pathogens (Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella typhi) colonize the GI tract or associated lymphoid

  6. Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to gut and immune function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) to draft guidance on scientific requirements for health claims related to gut and immune function. This guidance has been drawn from scientific opinions of the NDA Panel on such health...

  7. Environmentally-acquired bacteria influence microbial diversity and natural innate immune responses at gut surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Imke E; Schmidt, Bettina; Stokes, Christopher R; Lewis, Marie; Bailey, Mick; Aminov, Rustam I; Prosser, James I; Gill, Bhupinder P; Pluske, John R; Mayer, Claus-Dieter; Musk, Corran C; Kelly, Denise

    2009-11-20

    Early microbial colonization of the gut reduces the incidence of infectious, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Recent population studies reveal that childhood hygiene is a significant risk factor for development of inflammatory bowel disease, thereby reinforcing the hygiene hypothesis and the potential importance of microbial colonization during early life. The extent to which early-life environment impacts on microbial diversity of the adult gut and subsequent immune processes has not been comprehensively investigated thus far. We addressed this important question using the pig as a model to evaluate the impact of early-life environment on microbe/host gut interactions during development. Genetically-related piglets were housed in either indoor or outdoor environments or in experimental isolators. Analysis of over 3,000 16S rRNA sequences revealed major differences in mucosa-adherent microbial diversity in the ileum of adult pigs attributable to differences in early-life environment. Pigs housed in a natural outdoor environment showed a dominance of Firmicutes, in particular Lactobacillus, whereas animals housed in a hygienic indoor environment had reduced Lactobacillus and higher numbers of potentially pathogenic phylotypes. Our analysis revealed a strong negative correlation between the abundance of Firmicutes and pathogenic bacterial populations in the gut. These differences were exaggerated in animals housed in experimental isolators. Affymetrix microarray technology and Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction revealed significant gut-specific gene responses also related to early-life environment. Significantly, indoor-housed pigs displayed increased expression of Type 1 interferon genes, Major Histocompatibility Complex class I and several chemokines. Gene Ontology and pathway analysis further confirmed these results. Early-life environment significantly affects both microbial composition of the adult gut and mucosal innate immune function. We observed that a

  8. Environmentally-acquired bacteria influence microbial diversity and natural innate immune responses at gut surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pluske John R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early microbial colonization of the gut reduces the incidence of infectious, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Recent population studies reveal that childhood hygiene is a significant risk factor for development of inflammatory bowel disease, thereby reinforcing the hygiene hypothesis and the potential importance of microbial colonization during early life. The extent to which early-life environment impacts on microbial diversity of the adult gut and subsequent immune processes has not been comprehensively investigated thus far. We addressed this important question using the pig as a model to evaluate the impact of early-life environment on microbe/host gut interactions during development. Results Genetically-related piglets were housed in either indoor or outdoor environments or in experimental isolators. Analysis of over 3,000 16S rRNA sequences revealed major differences in mucosa-adherent microbial diversity in the ileum of adult pigs attributable to differences in early-life environment. Pigs housed in a natural outdoor environment showed a dominance of Firmicutes, in particular Lactobacillus, whereas animals housed in a hygienic indoor environment had reduced Lactobacillus and higher numbers of potentially pathogenic phylotypes. Our analysis revealed a strong negative correlation between the abundance of Firmicutes and pathogenic bacterial populations in the gut. These differences were exaggerated in animals housed in experimental isolators. Affymetrix microarray technology and Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction revealed significant gut-specific gene responses also related to early-life environment. Significantly, indoor-housed pigs displayed increased expression of Type 1 interferon genes, Major Histocompatibility Complex class I and several chemokines. Gene Ontology and pathway analysis further confirmed these results. Conclusion Early-life environment significantly affects both microbial composition of the adult

  9. Interplay between intestinal alkaline phosphatase, diet, gut microbes and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estaki, Mehrbod; DeCoffe, Daniella; Gibson, Deanna L

    2014-11-14

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) plays an essential role in intestinal homeostasis and health through interactions with the resident microbiota, diet and the gut. IAP's role in the intestine is to dephosphorylate toxic microbial ligands such as lipopolysaccharides, unmethylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides and flagellin as well as extracellular nucleotides such as uridine diphosphate. IAP's ability to detoxify these ligands is essential in protecting the host from sepsis during acute inflammation and chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. Also important in these complications is IAP's ability to regulate the microbial ecosystem by forming a complex relationship between microbiota, diet and the intestinal mucosal surface. Evidence reveals that diet alters IAP expression and activity and this in turn can influence the gut microbiota and homeostasis. IAP's ability to maintain a healthy gastrointestinal tract has accelerated research on its potential use as a therapeutic agent against a multitude of diseases. Exogenous IAP has been shown to have beneficial effects when administered during ulcerative colitis, coronary bypass surgery and sepsis. There are currently a handful of human clinical trials underway investigating the effects of exogenous IAP during sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis and heart surgery. In light of these findings IAP has been marked as a novel agent to help treat a variety of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. The purpose of this review is to highlight the essential characteristics of IAP in protection and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis while addressing the intricate interplay between IAP, diet, microbiota and the intestinal epithelium.

  10. Patterns of Early-Life Gut Microbial Colonization during Human Immune Development: An Ecological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Laforest-Lapointe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in gut microbial colonization during early life have been reported in infants that later developed asthma, allergies, type 1 diabetes, as well as in inflammatory bowel disease patients, previous to disease flares. Mechanistic studies in animal models have established that microbial alterations influence disease pathogenesis via changes in immune system maturation. Strong evidence points to the presence of a window of opportunity in early life, during which changes in gut microbial colonization can result in immune dysregulation that predisposes susceptible hosts to disease. Although the ecological patterns of microbial succession in the first year of life have been partly defined in specific human cohorts, the taxonomic and functional features, and diversity thresholds that characterize these microbial alterations are, for the most part, unknown. In this review, we summarize the most important links between the temporal mosaics of gut microbial colonization and the age-dependent immune functions that rely on them. We also highlight the importance of applying ecology theory to design studies that explore the interactions between this complex ecosystem and the host immune system. Focusing research efforts on understanding the importance of temporally structured patterns of diversity, keystone groups, and inter-kingdom microbial interactions for ecosystem functions has great potential to enable the development of biologically sound interventions aimed at maintaining and/or improving immune system development and preventing disease.

  11. Neural regulation of innate and adaptive immunity in the gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhawan, S.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates the role of neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), in modulating the innate and adaptive immune function in the intestine, during physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Furthermore, this thesis attempts to advance our current understanding o

  12. Neural regulation of innate and adaptive immunity in the gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhawan, S.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates the role of neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), in modulating the innate and adaptive immune function in the intestine, during physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Furthermore, this thesis attempts to advance our current understanding

  13. Patterns of early gut colonization shape future immune responses of the host

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Kverka, Miloslav

    2012-01-01

    colonization patterns change the composition of the resident microbiota and future immune system reactivity. Germ-free (GF) mice were either inoculated by single oral gavage of caecal content or let colonized by co-housing with specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice at different time points in the postnatal period...... of the gut microbiota of ex-GF mice that were co-housed with SPF mice at different time points was similar to the gut microbiota in the barrier maintained SPF mice. The existence of a short GF postnatal period permanently changed levels of systemic regulatory T cells, NK and NKT cells, and cytokine...

  14. Restricting microbial exposure in early life negates the immune benefits associated with gut colonization in environments of high microbial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Imke E; Schmidt, Bettina; Lewis, Marie; Delday, Margaret; Stokes, Christopher R; Bailey, Mick; Aminov, Rustam I; Gill, Bhupinder P; Pluske, John R; Mayer, Claus-Dieter; Kelly, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Acquisition of the intestinal microbiota in early life corresponds with the development of the mucosal immune system. Recent work on caesarean-delivered infants revealed that early microbial composition is influenced by birthing method and environment. Furthermore, we have confirmed that early-life environment strongly influences both the adult gut microbiota and development of the gut immune system. Here, we address the impact of limiting microbial exposure after initial colonization on the development of adult gut immunity. Piglets were born in indoor or outdoor rearing units, allowing natural colonization in the immediate period after birth, prior to transfer to high-health status isolators. Strikingly, gut closure and morphological development were strongly affected by isolator-rearing, independent of indoor or outdoor origins of piglets. Isolator-reared animals showed extensive vacuolation and disorganization of the gut epithelium, inferring that normal gut closure requires maturation factors present in maternal milk. Although morphological maturation and gut closure were delayed in isolator-reared animals, these hard-wired events occurred later in development. Type I IFN, IL-22, IL-23 and Th17 pathways were increased in indoor-isolator compared to outdoor-isolator animals during early life, indicating greater immune activation in pigs originating from indoor environments reflecting differences in the early microbiota. This difference was less apparent later in development due to enhanced immune activation and convergence of the microbiota in all isolator-reared animals. This correlated with elevation of Type I IFN pathways in both groups, although T cell pathways were still more affected in indoor-reared animals. Environmental factors, in particular microbial exposure, influence expression of a large number of immune-related genes. However, the homeostatic effects of microbial colonization in outdoor environments require sustained microbial exposure

  15. Restricting microbial exposure in early life negates the immune benefits associated with gut colonization in environments of high microbial diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke E Mulder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquisition of the intestinal microbiota in early life corresponds with the development of the mucosal immune system. Recent work on caesarean-delivered infants revealed that early microbial composition is influenced by birthing method and environment. Furthermore, we have confirmed that early-life environment strongly influences both the adult gut microbiota and development of the gut immune system. Here, we address the impact of limiting microbial exposure after initial colonization on the development of adult gut immunity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Piglets were born in indoor or outdoor rearing units, allowing natural colonization in the immediate period after birth, prior to transfer to high-health status isolators. Strikingly, gut closure and morphological development were strongly affected by isolator-rearing, independent of indoor or outdoor origins of piglets. Isolator-reared animals showed extensive vacuolation and disorganization of the gut epithelium, inferring that normal gut closure requires maturation factors present in maternal milk. Although morphological maturation and gut closure were delayed in isolator-reared animals, these hard-wired events occurred later in development. Type I IFN, IL-22, IL-23 and Th17 pathways were increased in indoor-isolator compared to outdoor-isolator animals during early life, indicating greater immune activation in pigs originating from indoor environments reflecting differences in the early microbiota. This difference was less apparent later in development due to enhanced immune activation and convergence of the microbiota in all isolator-reared animals. This correlated with elevation of Type I IFN pathways in both groups, although T cell pathways were still more affected in indoor-reared animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Environmental factors, in particular microbial exposure, influence expression of a large number of immune-related genes. However, the homeostatic effects of

  16. Practical starter pig amino acid requirements in relation to immunity, gut health and growth performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bob Goodband; Mike Tokach; Steve Dritz; Joel DeRouchey; Jason Woodworth

    2014-01-01

    Immune system activation begins a host of physiological responses. Infectious agents are recognized by monocytes and macrophages which in turn stimulate cytokine production. It is the hormone-like factors called cytokines that orchestrate the immune response. The classic responses observed with immune system activation and cytokine production include:anorexia, fever, lethargy, recruitment of other immune cells, and phagocytosis. While production of immune system components is known to require some amino acids, increases in amino acid requirements are more than offset by the associated decrease in protein accretion and increased muscle protein degradation that also accompanies immune system activation. However, the biggest impact of cytokine production is a decrease in feed intake. Therefore, as feed intake decreases, the energy needed to drive protein synthesis is also decreased. This suggests that diets should still be formulated on a similar calorie:lysine ratio as those formulated for non-immune challenged pigs. The evidence is sparse or equivocal for increasing nutrient requirements during an immune chal enge. Nutritionists and swine producers should resist the pressure to alter the diet, limit feed, or add expensive feed additives during an immune chal enge. While immune stimulation does not necessitate changes in diet formulation, when pigs are challenged with non-pathogenic diarrhea there are potential advantages on gut health with the increased use of crystal ine amino acids rather than intact protein sources (i.e., soybean meal). This is because reducing crude protein decreases the quantity of fermentable protein entering the large intestine, which lowers post weaning diarrhea. It also lowers the requirement for expensive specialty protein sources or other protein sources such as soybean meal that present immunological chal enges to the gut. The objective of this review is two-fold. The first is to discuss immunity by nutrition interactions, or lack

  17. A novel ex vivo rat infection model to study protective immunity against Fasciola hepatica at the gut level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milligen, van F.J.; Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Gaasenbeek, C.P.H.; Bokhout, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    We describe an ex vivo rat infection model to study protective immunity against Fasciola hepatica at the gut level. An exact number of newly excysted juveniles (NEJs) was injected into a gut segment with an intact blood supply and which was still attached to a live anaesthetized rat. NEJs that penet

  18. Mining the human gut microbiota for effector strains that shape the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Philip P; Faith, Jeremiah J; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2014-06-19

    The gut microbiota codevelops with the immune system beginning at birth. Mining the microbiota for bacterial strains responsible for shaping the structure and dynamic operations of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system represents a formidable combinatorial problem but one that needs to be overcome to advance mechanistic understanding of microbial community and immune system coregulation and to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that promote health. Here, we discuss a scalable, less biased approach for identifying effector strains in complex microbial communities that impact immune function. The approach begins by identifying uncultured human fecal microbiota samples that transmit immune phenotypes to germ-free mice. Clonally arrayed sequenced collections of bacterial strains are constructed from representative donor microbiota. If the collection transmits phenotypes, effector strains are identified by testing randomly generated subsets with overlapping membership in individually housed germ-free animals. Detailed mechanistic studies of effector strain-host interactions can then be performed.

  19. The immune system of the gut and potential adverse effects of oral nanocarriers on its function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Őrfi, Erik; Szebeni, János

    2016-11-15

    There is substantial effort in modern pharmacotherapy to use nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems (nDDS) for improving the oral absorption of drugs. An often neglected circumstance regarding this approach is that the gut is a major part of the immune system that may be vulnerable for immune-cell toxicity, or mediate humoral immune response against various components of nDDS, recognized as foreign. This review recapitulates the structure and function of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), i.e., the enteral section of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) and reminds how virus-like nDDS may potentially induce immunogenicity just as attenuated or killed viruses do in oral vaccines. Furthermore, we present examples for immune toxicities of emulsifiers and polymer-containing micelles, manifested in complement activation-related pseudoallergy (CARPA). A major message of the review is that early testing of immunogenicity or other adverse immune effects of nDDS in appropriate test systems or models may be prudent to recognize the risk of rare immune problems that may surface in late-stage clinical trials or after marketing of nDDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Gut Microbiota Promotes Obesity-Associated Liver Cancer through PGE2-Mediated Suppression of Antitumor Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Tze Mun; Kamachi, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Shin; Kanda, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuriko; Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Iwama, Atsushi; Koga, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Ozawa, Takayuki; Nakamura, Masaru; Kumagai, Miho; Watashi, Koichi; Taketo, Makoto M; Aoki, Tomohiro; Narumiya, Shuh; Oshima, Masanobu; Arita, Makoto; Hara, Eiji; Ohtani, Naoko

    2017-05-01

    Obesity increases the risk of cancers, including hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). However, the precise molecular mechanisms through which obesity promotes HCC development are still unclear. Recent studies have shown that gut microbiota may influence liver diseases by transferring its metabolites and components. Here, we show that the hepatic translocation of obesity-induced lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a Gram-positive gut microbial component, promotes HCC development by creating a tumor-promoting microenvironment. LTA enhances the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) collaboratively with an obesity-induced gut microbial metabolite, deoxycholic acid, to upregulate the expression of SASP factors and COX2 through Toll-like receptor 2. Interestingly, COX2-mediated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production suppresses the antitumor immunity through a PTGER4 receptor, thereby contributing to HCC progression. Moreover, COX2 overexpression and excess PGE2 production were detected in HSCs in human HCCs with noncirrhotic, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), indicating that a similar mechanism could function in humans.Significance: We showed the importance of the gut-liver axis in obesity-associated HCC. The gut microbiota-driven COX2 pathway produced the lipid mediator PGE2 in senescent HSCs in the tumor microenvironment, which plays a pivotal role in suppressing antitumor immunity, suggesting that PGE2 and its receptor may be novel therapeutic targets for noncirrhotic NASH-associated HCC. Cancer Discov; 7(5); 522-38. ©2017 AACR.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 443. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis: A robust model to study mucosal immune responses in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, Ekaterina P; Halperin, Sydney; Gubernatorova, Ekaterina O; Macho-Fernandez, Elise; Spencer, Cody M; Tumanov, Alexei V

    2015-06-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a natural mouse pathogen which reproducibly infects mice and causes intestinal disease. The C. rodentium model of infection is very useful for investigating host-pathogen immune interactions in the gut, and can also be used to understand the pathogenesis of several important human intestinal disorders, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, dysbiosis and colon tumorigenesis. Both innate and adaptive immune responses play a critical role in protection against C. rodentium. Here, we summarize the role of immune components in protection against C. rodentium and describe techniques for the analysis of innate and adaptive mucosal immune responses, including setting up the infection, analysis of colonic hyperplasia and bacterial dissemination, evaluation of antibody responses, and purification and analysis of intestinal epithelial and lymphoid cells.

  2. Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kyu Yeon Hur; Myung-Shik Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays critical physiological roles in the energy extraction and in the control of local or systemic immunity. Gut microbiota and its disturbance also appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases including metabolic disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, cancer, etc. In the metabolic point of view, gut microbiota can modulate lipid accumulation, lipopolysaccharide content and the production of short-chain fatty acids that affect food intake, inflammatory tone, or...

  3. [Local immune tolerance mechanisms in kidney cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patard, Jean-Jacques; Bouet, Françoise; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Lobel, Bernard; Catros-Quemener, Véronique; Guillé, François

    2002-04-01

    Many arguments suggest that renal tumours are immunogenic. However, the immune cells present around or within the tumour are unable to induce tumour rejection and the results of immunotherapy in metastatic renal cancer remain disappointing regardless of the protocols used. The objective of this study was to review the main mechanisms by which a renal tumour can escape immune destruction. These mechanisms can concern: tumour antigens, antigen-presenting molecules on the cell surface or defects of the cell machinery leading to the preparation of these molecules. Defects may also concern intercellular communications, especially adhesion and co-stimulation molecules. The immune cells present may also be defective, presenting qualitative or quantitative deficits, abnormalities of the T receptor, defect of cytokine production and these defects may concern both effector cells and antigen-presenting cells. The capacity of tumour cells to release anergic substances, i.e. substances which paralyze the immune system, also constitutes another very powerful immunosuppressive mechanism. These substances are cytokines, especially TGF-b. This anergy can also be mediated by intercellular contacts between tumour cells and lymphocytes, especially via the Fas system. It is important to study these mechanisms for several reasons: 1/Understanding of anergy mechanisms in order to discover new therapeutic targets or to short-circuit these mechanisms in vitro; 2/Definition of an "immune phenotype" of the tumour which should be evaluated as a prognostic marker both for survival after radical surgery of localized tumours as a prognostic factor for response to immunotherapy in metastatic forms.

  4. Is it time to target gut dysbiosis and immune dysfunction in the therapy of hepatic encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawcross, Debbie L

    2015-05-01

    The development of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in a patient with cirrhosis confers a damning prognosis with a 1-year mortality approaching 64%. This complex neuropsychiatric syndrome arises as a consequence of a dysfunctional gut-liver-brain axis. HE has been largely neglected over the past 30 years, with the reliance on therapies aimed at lowering ammonia production or increasing metabolism following the seminal observation that the hepatic urea cycle is the major mammalian ammonia detoxification pathway and is key in the pathogenesis of HE. The relationship with ammonia is more clear-cut in acute liver failure; but in cirrhosis, it has become apparent that inflammation is a key driver and that a disrupted microbiome resulting in gut dysbiosis, bacterial overgrowth and translocation, systemic endotoxemia and immune dysfunction may be more important drivers. Therefore, it is important to re-focus our efforts into developing therapies that modulate the disrupted microbiome or alleviating its downstream consequences.

  5. Mode of Delivery Shapes Gut Colonization Pattern and Modulates Regulatory Immunity in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H. F. Hansen, Camilla; S. F. Andersen, Line; Krych, Łukasz

    2014-01-01

    Delivery mode has been associated with long-term changes in gut microbiota composition and more recently also with changes in the immune system. This has further been suggested to link Cesarean section (C-section) with an increased risk for development of immune-mediated diseases such as type 1...... electrophoresis profiles was evident in adult mice. However, the adult C-section-born mice had lower proportions of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, tolerogenic CD103(+) dendritic cells, and less Il10 gene expression in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens. This demonstrates long-term systemic effect on the regulatory...... and priming of regulatory immune system in mice, and mode of delivery strongly influences this....

  6. Crosstalk between B lymphocytes, microbiota and the intestinal epithelium governs immunity versus metabolism in the gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulzhenko, Natalia; Morgun, Andrey; Hsiao, William; Battle, Michele; Yao, Michael; Gavrilova, Oksana; Orandle, Marlene; Mayer, Lloyd; Macpherson, Andrew J; McCoy, Kathy D; Fraser-Liggett, Claire; Matzinger, Polly

    2014-01-01

    Using a systems biology approach, we discovered and dissected a three-way interaction between the immune system, the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota. We found that, in the absence of B cells, or of IgA, and in the presence of the microbiota, the intestinal epithelium launches its own protective mechanisms, upregulating interferon-inducible immune response pathways and simultaneously repressing Gata4-related metabolic functions. This shift in intestinal function leads to lipid malabsorption and decreased deposition of body fat. Network analysis revealed the presence of two interconnected epithelial-cell gene networks, one governing lipid metabolism and another regulating immunity, that were inversely expressed. Gene expression patterns in gut biopsies from individuals with common variable immunodeficiency or with HIV that also have intestinal malabsorption were very similar to those of the B cell–deficient mice, providing a possible explanation for a longstanding enigmatic association between immunodeficiency and defective lipid absorption in humans. PMID:22101768

  7. Where genes meet environment-integrating the role of gut luminal contents, immunity and pancreas in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Fraser W; Pound, Lynley D; Patrick, Christopher; Eberhard, Chandra E; Crookshank, Jennifer A

    2017-01-01

    The rise in new cases of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in genetically susceptible individuals over the past half century has been attributed to numerous environmental "triggers" or promoters such as enteroviruses, diet, and most recently, gut bacteria. No single cause has been identified in humans, likely because there are several pathways by which one can develop T1D. There is renewed attention to the role of the gut and its immune system in T1D pathogenesis based largely on recent animal studies demonstrating that altering the gut microbiota affects diabetes incidence. Although T1D patients display dysbiosis in the gut microbiome, it is unclear whether this is cause or effect. The heart of this question involves several moving parts including numerous risk genes, diet, viruses, gut microbiota, timing, and loss of immune tolerance to β-cells. Most clinical trials have addressed only one aspect of this puzzle using some form of immune suppression, without much success. The key location where our genes meet and deal with the environment is the gastrointestinal tract. The influence of all of its major contents, including microbes, diet, and immune system, must be understood as part of the integrative biology of T1D before we can develop durable means of preventing, treating, or curing this disease. In the present review, we expand our previous gut-centric model based on recent developments in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Differences in HIV Burden and Immune Activation within the Gut of HIV+ Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukl, Steven; Gianella, Sara; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Epling, Lorrie; Li, Qingsheng; Duan, Lijie; Choi, Alex L. M.; Girling, Valerie; Ho, Terence; Li, Peilin; Fujimoto, Katsuya; Lampiris, Harry; Hare, C. Bradley; Pandori, Mark; Haase, Ashley T.; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Fischer, Marek; Shergill, Amandeep; McQuaid, Kenneth; Havlir, Diane V.; Wong, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    Background The gut is a major reservoir for HIV in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We hypothesized that distinct immune environments within the gut may support varying levels of HIV. Methods In 8 HIV-1+ adults on ART with CD4>200 and plasma VL<40, levels of HIV and T-cell activation were measured in blood and endoscopic biopsies from the duodenum, ileum, right colon, and rectum. Results HIV DNA and RNA per CD4+T-cell were higher in all four gut sites compared to blood. HIV DNA increased from the duodenum to the rectum, while the median HIV RNA peaked in the ileum. HIV DNA correlated positively with T-cell activation in the PBMC but negatively with T-cell activation in the gut. Multiply-spliced RNA was infrequently detected in gut, and unspliced RNA/DNA ratios were lower in the colon and rectum relative to PBMC, reflecting paradoxically low HIV transcription given the higher T-cell activation in the gut. Conclusions HIV DNA and RNA are both concentrated in the gut, but the inverse relationship between HIV DNA and T-cell activation in the gut and the paradoxically low levels of HIV expression in the large bowel suggest that different processes drive HIV persistence in the blood and gut. PMID:20939732

  9. Gut-Colonizing Bacteria Promote C. elegans Innate Immunity by Producing Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xiao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many commensal bacteria in the gut are beneficial to the host immune system, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unclear. Using culture-independent Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we show that bacterial diversity in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans, the free-living nematode, is distinct from that in soil. Of these bacteria, Bacillus subtilis is the most prominent species in the worm gut. We demonstrate that B. subtilis confers worm resistance to infection by pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, and Enterococcus faecalis, by producing nitric oxide (NO. Deletion of the nos gene, which encodes an NO synthase, reduces the protective effect. NO promotes innate immune responses to P. aeruginosa PA14 by activating a conserved p38 mitogen protein kinase (MAPK in C. elegans. Our work provides an example of antagonism of commensal bacteria against pathogens and illustrates the importance of commensal bacteria in host immunity.

  10. Massive wavefunctions, proton decay and FCNCs in local F-theory GUTs

    CERN Document Server

    Camara, Pablo G; Palti, Eran

    2011-01-01

    We study the coupling of MSSM fields to heavy modes through cubic superpotential interactions in F-theory SU(5) GUTs. The couplings are calculated by integrating the overlap of two massless and one massive wavefunctions. The overlap integral receives contributions from only a small patch around a point of symmetry enhancement thereby allowing the wavefunctions to be determined locally on flat space, drastically simplifying the calculation. The cubic coupling between two MSSM fields and one of the massive coloured Higgs triplets present in SU(5) GUTs is calculated using a local eight-dimensional SO(12) gauge theory. We find that for the most natural regions of local parameter space the coupling to the triplet is comparable to or stronger than in minimal four-dimensional GUTs thereby, for those regions, reaffirming or strengthening constraints from dimension-five proton decay. We also identify possible regions in local parameter space where the couplings to the lightest generations are substantially suppressed ...

  11. Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to gut and immune function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) to draft guidance on scientific requirements for health claims related to gut and immune function. This guidance has been drawn from scientific opinions of the NDA Panel on such health...... claims. Thus, this guidance document represents the views of the NDA Panel based on the experience gained to date with the evaluation of health claims in these areas. It is not intended that the document will include an exhaustive list of beneficial effects and studies/outcome measures which...

  12. Influence of Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745on the gut-associated immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, Heike; Bischoff, Stephan C

    2016-01-01

    Background The probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745 (also known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae HANSEN CBS 5926; in the following S. boulardii) has proven its effectiveness in preventive and therapeutic treatment of many gastrointestinal diseases, especially diseases associated with acute diarrhea. In particular, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, traveller’s diarrhea, as well as acute diarrhea due to common viral and bacterial infections in children and adults. Aim The aim of this review is to summarize the experimental studies elucidating the molecular and immunological mechanisms by which these clinically proven effects are archived, with an emphasis on the gut-associated immune system. The main focus is laid on anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory action of S. boulardii involved in bacterial or enterotoxin-mediated diarrhea and inflammation. An attempt is made to differentiate between the effects associated with cellular versus soluble factors and between prophylactic and therapeutic effects. Methods A literature search was performed in PubMed/PubMed Central for the effects of S. boulardii on the gut-associated immune system (focus acute diarrhea). Results and conclusion S. boulardii exhibits its positive effect by the direct effects on pathogens or their toxins as well as by influencing the host’s infection-induced signaling cascades and its innate and adaptive immune system. The combination of these mechanisms results in a reduction of the pathogens’ ability for adhesion or colonization and an attenuation of the overreacting inflammatory immune response. Thereby, the integrity of the intestinal epithelial cell layer is preserved or restored, and the diarrheic leakage of fluids into the intestinal lumen is attenuated. PMID:27695355

  13. Influence of Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745 on the gut-associated immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stier H

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Heike Stier,1 Stephan C Bischoff2 1analyze & realize GmbH, Berlin, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany Background: The probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745 (also known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae HANSEN CBS 5926; in the following S. boulardii has proven its effectiveness in preventive and therapeutic treatment of many gastrointestinal diseases, especially diseases associated with acute diarrhea. In particular, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, traveller’s diarrhea, as well as acute diarrhea due to common viral and bacterial infections in children and adults.Aim: The aim of this review is to summarize the experimental studies elucidating the molecular and immunological mechanisms by which these clinically proven effects are archived, with an emphasis on the gut-associated immune system. The main focus is laid on anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory action of S. boulardii involved in bacterial or enterotoxin-mediated diarrhea and inflammation. An attempt is made to differentiate between the effects associated with cellular versus soluble factors and between prophylactic and therapeutic effects.Methods: A literature search was performed in PubMed/PubMed Central for the effects of S. boulardii on the gut-associated immune system (focus acute diarrhea. Results and conclusion: S. boulardii exhibits its positive effect by the direct effects on pathogens or their toxins as well as by influencing the host’s infection-induced signaling cascades and its innate and adaptive immune system. The combination of these mechanisms results in a reduction of the pathogens’ ability for adhesion or colonization and an attenuation of the overreacting inflammatory immune response. Thereby, the integrity of the intestinal epithelial cell layer is preserved or restored, and the diarrheic leakage of fluids into the intestinal lumen is attenuated. Keywords: mode of action

  14. Resistance to Innate Immunity Contributes to Colonization of the Insect Gut by Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun C Earl

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague, is typically a zoonotic vector-borne disease of wild rodents. Bacterial biofilm formation in the proventriculus of the flea contributes to chronic infection of fleas and facilitates efficient disease transmission. However prior to biofilm formation, ingested bacteria must survive within the flea midgut, and yet little is known about vector-pathogen interactions that are required for flea gut colonization. Here we establish a Drosophila melanogaster model system to gain insight into Y. pestis colonization of the insect vector. We show that Y. pestis establishes a stable infection in the anterior midgut of fly larvae, and we used this model system to study the roles of genes involved in biofilm production and/or resistance to gut immunity stressors. We find that PhoP and GmhA both contribute to colonization and resistance to antimicrobial peptides in flies, and furthermore, the data suggest biofilm formation may afford protection against antimicrobial peptides. Production of reactive oxygen species in the fly gut, as in fleas, also serves to limit bacterial infection, and OxyR mediates Y. pestis survival in both insect models. Overall, our data establish the fruit fly as an informative model to elucidate the relationship between Y. pestis and its flea vector.

  15. Impact of dietary fibers on nutrient management and detoxification organs: gut, liver, and kidneys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased dietary fiber (DF) intake elicits a wide range of physiological effects, not just locally in the gut, but systemically. Dietary fibers can greatly alter the gut milieu by impacting the gut microbiome, which in turn influences the gut barrier, gastrointestinal immune and endocrine response...

  16. Intradermal delivery of recombinant vaccinia virus vector DIs induces gut-mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, N; Kanekiyo, M; Hagiwara, Y; Okamura, T; Someya, K; Matsuo, K; Ami, Y; Sato, S; Yamamoto, N; Honda, M

    2010-08-01

    Antigen-specific mucosal immunity is generally induced by the stimulation of inductive mucosal sites. In this study, we found that the replication-deficient vaccinia virus vector, DIs, generates antigen-specific mucosal immunity and systemic responses. Following intradermal injection of recombinant DIs expressing simian immunodeficiency virus gag (rDIsSIVgag), we observed increased levels of SIV p27-specific IgA and IgG antibodies in faecal extracts and plasma samples, and antibody-forming cells in the intestinal mucosa and spleen of C57BL/6 mice. Antibodies against p27 were not detected in nasal washes, saliva, and vaginal washes. The enhanced mucosal and systemic immunity persisted for 1 year of observation. Induction of Gag-specific IFN-gamma spot-forming CD8(+) T cells in the spleen, small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, and submandibular lymph nodes was observed in the intradermally injected mice. Heat-inactivated rDIsSIVgag rarely induced antigen-specific humoral and T-helper immunity. Moreover, rDIsSIVgag was detected in MHC class II IA antigen-positive (IA(+)) cells at the injection site. Consequently, intradermal delivery of rDIs effectively induces antigen-specific humoral and cellular immunity in gut-mucosal tissues of mice. Our data suggest that intradermal injection of an rDIs vaccine may be useful against mucosally transmitted pathogens.

  17. Influence of early gut microbiota on the maturation of childhood mucosal and systemic immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Y M; Tomicic, S; Lundberg, A; Böttcher, M F; Björkstén, B; Sverremark-Ekström, E; Jenmalm, M C

    2009-12-01

    Among sensitized infants, those with high, as compared with low levels, of salivary secretory IgA (SIgA) are less likely to develop allergic symptoms. Also, early colonization with certain gut microbiota, e.g. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium species, might be associated with less allergy development. Although animal and in vitro studies emphasize the role of the commensal gut microbiota in the development of the immune system, the influence of the gut microbiota on immune development in infants is unclear. To assess whether early colonization with certain gut microbiota species associates with mucosal and systemic immune responses i.e. salivary SIgA and the spontaneous Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 mRNA expression and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine/chemokine responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Fecal samples were collected at 1 week, 1 month and 2 months after birth from 64 Swedish infants, followed prospectively up to 5 years of age. Bacterial DNA was analysed with real-time PCR using primers binding to Clostridium difficile, four species of bifidobacteria, two lactobacilli groups and Bacteroides fragilis. Saliva was collected at age 6 and 12 months and at 2 and 5 years and SIgA was measured with ELISA. The PBMCs, collected 12 months after birth, were analysed for TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression with real-time PCR. Further, the PBMCs were stimulated with LPS, and cytokine/chemokine responses were measured with Luminex. The number of Bifidobacterium species in the early fecal samples correlated significantly with the total levels of salivary SIgA at 6 months. Early colonization with Bifidobacterium species, lactobacilli groups or C. difficile did not influence TLR2 and TLR4 expression in PBMCs. However, PBMCs from infants colonized early with high amounts of Bacteroides fragilis expressed lower levels of TLR4 mRNA spontaneously. Furthermore, LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, e.g. IL-6 and CCL4 (MIP

  18. Prebiotics modulate immune responses in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhana, Vijaya; Broadway, Mary M; Bruce, Matthew P; Lowenthal, John W; Geier, Mark S; Hughes, Robert J; Bean, Andrew G D

    2009-07-01

    The recent European Union ban on the prophylactic use of in-feed antibiotics has escalated the search for alternatives for use within the poultry industry. When evaluating the efficacy of potential antibiotic alternatives on bird health and productivity, it is important to analyze the competence of the immune cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), because it is routinely involved in the surveillance of colonizing microbes as well as in interacting with the ingested feed antigens. Therefore, we studied the effect of the prebiotics mannan-oligosaccharide (MOS) and fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) on the phenotypic and functional competence of immune cells in cecal tonsil (CT), which is a major GALT. Day-old Cobb 500 male broilers were randomized to 4 groups. Control chickens were fed the basal diet only. Chickens in experimental groups received 0.05 g/kg zinc bacitracin or 5 g/kg of either FOS or MOS in addition to basal diet. At the end of 25 d, our comparison of the experimental groups with controls revealed that the addition of prebiotics to diet resulted in a significant reduction in the proportion of B cells and in mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes in CT. Furthermore, FOS treatment significantly enhanced the IgM and IgG antibody titers in plasma. These findings emphasize the need for the analyses of the gut immune function following treatment with novel feed additives. The knowledge obtained from such analyses may aid in understanding the mechanisms underlying the immune competence of the birds, which needs consideration when selecting and optimizing new feed additives instead of antibiotics for poultry production.

  19. Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Yeon Hur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota plays critical physiological roles in the energy extraction and in the control of local or systemic immunity. Gut microbiota and its disturbance also appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases including metabolic disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, cancer, etc. In the metabolic point of view, gut microbiota can modulate lipid accumulation, lipopolysaccharide content and the production of short-chain fatty acids that affect food intake, inflammatory tone, or insulin signaling. Several strategies have been developed to change gut microbiota such as prebiotics, probiotics, certain antidiabetic drugs or fecal microbiota transplantation, which have diverse effects on body metabolism and on the development of metabolic disorders.

  20. LOCAL IMMUNITY PATTERNS IN PURULENT WOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Shmagel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to determine the microbial pattern and a significance of local pustular immune factors for the progression of local pyogenic infection in surgical patients. To these purpose, specific infectious pathogens were identified and scored by means of conventional microbiological methods in the patients with pyogenic inflammatory diseases of skin and subcutaneous fat tissues. The numbers of purulent leukocytes were determined in the pustular exudates, and concentrations of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-8, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-1ra, IgM, IgG, and IgA were measured in the samples, using enzyme immunoassay techniques. Appropriate parameters of effluents obtained from "clean" (non-infected surgical lesions were taken as сontrols. It has been shown that Staphylococcus aureus plays a leading role in etiology of bacterial infections in our patients. The amounts of blood cells in pustular samples showed a direct and significant correlation with number of viable microorganisms derived from the effluent. Purulent wound exudates were characterized by high IL-1β and IL-8 concentrations, along with relatively low TNFα levels, as compared with "clean" wounds. Mean amounts of IgG in the pustular contents of dissected lesions proved to be five-fold higher that IgG levels in sterile incisions. As compared with young individuals, the elderly persons are characterized by lesser TNFα production, as well as by more active IL-8 synthesis in the areas of bacterial inflammation. The indexes of local immunity show sufficient differences between the areas of suppurative inflammation and sterile wound lesions.

  1. Massive wavefunctions, proton decay and FCNCs in local F-theory GUTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cámara, Pablo G.; Dudas, Emilian; Palti, Eran

    2011-12-01

    We study the coupling of MSSM fields to heavy modes through cubic superpotential interactions in F-theory SU(5) GUTs. The couplings are calculated by integrating the overlap of two massless and one massive wavefunctions. The overlap integral receives contributions from only a small patch around a point of symmetry enhancement thereby allowing the wavefunctions to be determined locally on flat space, drastically simplifying the calculation. The cubic coupling between two MSSM fields and one of the massive coloured Higgs triplets present in SU(5) GUTs is calculated using a local eight-dimensional SO(12) gauge theory. We find that for the most natural regions of local parameter space the coupling to the triplet is comparable to or stronger than in minimal four-dimensional GUTs thereby, for those regions, reaffirming or strengthening constraints from dimension-five proton decay. We also identify possible regions in local parameter space where the couplings to the lightest generations are substantially suppressed compared to minimal four-dimensional GUTs. We further apply our results and techniques to study other phenomenologically important operators arising from coupling to heavy modes. In particular we calculate within a toy model flavour non-universal soft masses induced by integrating out heavy modes which lead to FCNCs.

  2. Human immune compartment comparisons: Optimization of proliferative assays for blood and gut T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dock, Jeffrey; Hultin, Lance; Hultin, Patricia; Elliot, Julie; Yang, Otto O; Anton, Peter A; Jamieson, Beth D; Effros, Rita B

    2017-03-21

    The accumulation of peripheral blood late-differentiated memory CD8 T cells with features of replicative (cellular) senescence, including inability to proliferate in vitro, has been extensively studied. Importantly, the abundance of these cells is directly correlated with increased morbidity and mortality in older persons. Of note, peripheral blood contains only 2% of the total body lymphocyte population. By contrast, the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is the most extensive lymphoid organ, housing up to 60% of total body lymphocytes, but has never been assessed with respect to senescence profiles. We report here the development of a method for measuring and comparing proliferative capacity of peripheral blood and gut colorectal mucosa-derived CD8 T cells. The protocol involves a 5-day culture of mononuclear leukocyte populations, from blood and gut colorectal mucosa respectively, labeled with 5-(and 6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and stimulated with anti-CD2/3/28-linked microbeads. Variables tested and optimized as part of the protocol development include: mode of T cell stimulation, CFSE concentration, inclusion of a second proliferation marker, BrdU, culture duration, initial culture concentration, and inclusion of autologous irradiated feeder cells. Moving forward, this protocol demonstrates a significant advance in the ability of researchers to study compartment-specific differences of in vitro proliferative dynamics of CD8 T cells, as an indicator of replicative senescence and immunological aging. The study's two main novel contributions are (1) Optimization and adaptation of standard proliferative dynamics blood T cell protocols for T cells within the mucosal immune system. (2) Introduction of the novel technique of combining CFSE and BrdU staining to do so.

  3. Gut response induced by weaning in piglet features marked changes in immune and inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomba, Lorenzo; Minuti, Andrea; Moisá, Sonia J; Trevisi, Erminio; Eufemi, Elisa; Lizier, Michela; Chegdani, Fatima; Lucchini, Franco; Rzepus, Marcin; Prandini, Aldo; Rossi, Filippo; Mazza, Raffaele; Bertoni, Giuseppe; Loor, Juan J; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    At weaning, piglets are exposed to many stressors, such as separation from the sow, mixing with other litters, end of lactational immunity, and a change in their environment and gut microbiota. The sudden change of feeding regime after weaning causes morphological and histological changes in the small intestine which are critical for the immature digestive system. Sixteen female piglets were studied to assess the effect of sorbic acid supplementation on the small intestine tissue transcriptome. At weaning day (T0, piglet age 28 days), four piglets were sacrificed and ileal tissue samples collected. The remaining 12 piglets were weighed and randomly assigned to different postweaning (T5, piglet age 33 days) diets. Diet A (n = 6) contained 5 g/kg of sorbic acid. In diet B (n = 6), the organic acids were replaced by barley flour. Total RNA was isolated and then hybridized to CombiMatrix CustomArray™ 90-K platform microarrays, screening about 30 K genes. Even though diet had no detectable effect on the transcriptome during the first 5 days after weaning, results highlighted some of the response mechanisms to the stress of weaning occurring in the piglet gut. A total of 205 differentially expressed genes were used for functional analysis using the bioinformatics tools BLAST2GO, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis 8.0, and Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that apoptosis, RIG-I-like, and NOD-like receptor signaling were altered as a result of weaning. Interferons and caspases gene families were the most activated after weaning in response to piglets to multiple stressors. Results suggest that immune and inflammatory responses were activated and likely are a cause of small intestine atrophy as revealed by a decrease in villus height and villus/crypt ratio.

  4. Immune-Modulatory Genomic Properties Differentiate Gut Microbiotas of Infants with and without Eczema

    KAUST Repository

    Yap, Gaik Chin

    2015-10-14

    TCAAGCTTGA motifs (4.2 copies per 1 million genome sequence) than other Bifidobacterium genomes and was significantly overrepresented (P < 0.05) in the healthy communities. Conclusions: Our results report distinct immune-modulatory genomic properties of gut microbiotas in healthy infants as compared to children with eczema and provide new insights into potential roles of gut microbiotas in affecting human immune homeostasis.

  5. Systems Modeling of Interactions between Mucosal Immunity and the Gut Microbiome during Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Andrew; Viladomiu, Monica; Hontecillas, Raquel; Abedi, Vida; Philipson, Casandra; Hoops, Stefan; Howard, Brad; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are associated with the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and result in an exuberant inflammatory response, leading to nosocomial diarrhea, colitis and even death. To better understand the dynamics of mucosal immunity during C. difficile infection from initiation through expansion to resolution, we built a computational model of the mucosal immune response to the bacterium. The model was calibrated using data from a mouse model of C. difficile infection. The model demonstrates a crucial role of T helper 17 (Th17) effector responses in the colonic lamina propria and luminal commensal bacteria populations in the clearance of C. difficile and colonic pathology, whereas regulatory T (Treg) cells responses are associated with the recovery phase. In addition, the production of anti-microbial peptides by inflamed epithelial cells and activated neutrophils in response to C. difficile infection inhibit the re-growth of beneficial commensal bacterial species. Computational simulations suggest that the removal of neutrophil and epithelial cell derived anti-microbial inhibitions, separately and together, on commensal bacterial regrowth promote recovery and minimize colonic inflammatory pathology. Simulation results predict a decrease in colonic inflammatory markers, such as neutrophilic influx and Th17 cells in the colonic lamina propria, and length of infection with accelerated commensal bacteria re-growth through altered anti-microbial inhibition. Computational modeling provides novel insights on the therapeutic value of repopulating the colonic microbiome and inducing regulatory mucosal immune responses during C. difficile infection. Thus, modeling mucosal immunity-gut microbiota interactions has the potential to guide the development of targeted fecal transplantation therapies in the context of precision medicine interventions.

  6. Systems Modeling of Interactions between Mucosal Immunity and the Gut Microbiome during Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Leber

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infections are associated with the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and result in an exuberant inflammatory response, leading to nosocomial diarrhea, colitis and even death. To better understand the dynamics of mucosal immunity during C. difficile infection from initiation through expansion to resolution, we built a computational model of the mucosal immune response to the bacterium. The model was calibrated using data from a mouse model of C. difficile infection. The model demonstrates a crucial role of T helper 17 (Th17 effector responses in the colonic lamina propria and luminal commensal bacteria populations in the clearance of C. difficile and colonic pathology, whereas regulatory T (Treg cells responses are associated with the recovery phase. In addition, the production of anti-microbial peptides by inflamed epithelial cells and activated neutrophils in response to C. difficile infection inhibit the re-growth of beneficial commensal bacterial species. Computational simulations suggest that the removal of neutrophil and epithelial cell derived anti-microbial inhibitions, separately and together, on commensal bacterial regrowth promote recovery and minimize colonic inflammatory pathology. Simulation results predict a decrease in colonic inflammatory markers, such as neutrophilic influx and Th17 cells in the colonic lamina propria, and length of infection with accelerated commensal bacteria re-growth through altered anti-microbial inhibition. Computational modeling provides novel insights on the therapeutic value of repopulating the colonic microbiome and inducing regulatory mucosal immune responses during C. difficile infection. Thus, modeling mucosal immunity-gut microbiota interactions has the potential to guide the development of targeted fecal transplantation therapies in the context of precision medicine interventions.

  7. Epithelial barrier: an interface for the cross-communication between gut flora and immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshiyuki; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Large numbers of environmental antigens, including commensal bacteria and food-derived antigens, constitutively interact with the epithelial layer of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Commensal bacteria peacefully cohabit with the host GI tract and exert multiple beneficial or destructive effects on their host. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) constitute the first physical and immunological protective wall against invasive pathogens and a cohabitation niche for commensal bacteria. As the physiological homeostasis of IECs is maintained by multiple biological processes such as apoptosis, autophagy, and the handling of endoplasmic reticulum stress, the aberrant kinetics of these biological events, which have genetic and environmental causes, leads to the development of host intestinal pathogenesis such as inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, IECs recognize and interact with commensal bacteria and give instructions to mucosal immune cells to initiate an immunological balance between active and quiescent conditions, eventually establishing intestinal homeostasis. The mucosal immune system regulates the homeostasis of gut microbiota by producing immunological molecules such as secretory immunoglobulin A, the production of which is mediated by IECs. IECs therefore play a central role in the creation and maintenance of a physiologically and immunologically stable intestinal environment.

  8. Effects of glutamine supplementation on innate immune response in rats with gut-derived sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sung-Ling; Lai, Yu-Ni; Shang, Huey-Fang; Lin, Ming-Tsan; Chen, Wei-Jao

    2004-03-01

    The present study examined the effect of glutamine (Gln)-enriched diets before sepsis or Gln-containing total parenteral nutrition (TPN) after sepsis, or both, on the phagocytic activity and blood lymphocyte subpopulation in rats with gut-derived sepsis. Rats were assigned to a control group or one of four experimental groups. The control group and groups 1 and 2 were fed a semipurified diet; groups 3 and 4 had part of casein replaced by Gln. After feeding the diets for 10 d, sepsis was induced by caecal ligation and puncture (CLP); TPN was maintained for 3 d after CLP. The control group and groups 1 and 3 were infused with conventional TPN and groups 2 and 4 were supplemented with Gln in the TPN solution. All rats were killed 3 d after CLP or sham operation to examine their immune responses. The results showed that compared with the control group, the phagocytic activities of peritoneal macrophages were enhanced in groups 3 and 4, but not in groups 1 and 2. The proportion of CD3+ cells in group 1 was significantly lower (Psepsis. However, parenteral Gln administration after caecal ligation and puncture had no favourable effects on modulating immune response in septic rats.

  9. Nutritional modulation of the gut microbiota and immune system in preterm neonates susceptible to necrotizing enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggers, Richard H.; Siggers, Jayda; Thymann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    (particularly colostrum) protects against disease. Hence, the transition from parenteral to enteral nutrition shortly after birth plays a pivotal role to secure gut growth, digestive maturation and an appropriate response to bacterial colonization in the sensitive gut of preterm neonates....

  10. Different Th17 immunity in gut, liver, and adipose tissues during obesity: the role of diet, genetics, and microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Joseph F; Denou, Emmanuel; Foley, Kevin P; Khan, Waliul I; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Microbes modify immunometabolism responses linking obesity and type 2 diabetes. Immunity helps maintain a host-microbe symbiosis, but inflammation can promote insulin resistance in tissues that control blood glucose. We were interested in compartmentalization of immune responses during obesity and show here that feeding mice an obesity-causing high-fat diet (HFD) decreased a marker of neutrophil activation and cytokines related to Th17 responses in the gut. A HFD decreased IL-17 and IL-21/22 in the ileum and colon, respectively. A HFD increased IL-17, IL-21/22 and other related Th17 responses in the liver. At the whole tissue level, there is divergence in gut and metabolic tissue Th17 cytokines during diet-induced obesity. Deletion of the bacterial peptidoglycan sensor NOD2 had relatively minor effects on these immune responses. We propose a model where diet-induced obesity promotes a permissive gut immune environment and sets the stage for host genetics to contribute to dysbiosis-driven metabolic tissue inflammation.

  11. Atractylodis macrocephalae Koidz. polysaccharides enhance both serum IgG response and gut mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Sakwiwatkul, Kedsirin; Zhang, Cenrong; Wang, Yueming; Zhai, Lijuan; Hu, Songhua

    2013-01-02

    Fifty-six mice were randomly divided into four groups with 14 mice in each. Two groups were subcutaneously injected twice with a foot-and-mouth disease vaccine with 2-week intervals; each of them had been orally administered 0.89% saline or Atractylodis macrocephalae Koidz. polysaccharides (RAMPS) 0.05 g for 4 days before immunization. The rest were not immunized but treated in the same way. One-week after the primary and two weeks after the booster immunization, half in each group were sacrificed to measure serum IgG and the parameters for the intestinal mucosal immunity. Results indicated that oral administration of RAMPS increased both serum specific IgG response and intestinal mucosal immunity as shown by elevated total sIgA, mRNA expression of TGF-β, IL-6, TNF-α, IgA(+) cells and intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes in duodenum. It is suggested that increased serum IgG response may be associated with enhanced local mucosal immunity by oral administration of RAMPS.

  12. Trypanosome infection establishment in the tsetse fly gut is influenced by microbiome-regulated host immune barriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Weiss

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies (Glossina spp. vector pathogenic African trypanosomes, which cause sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in domesticated animals. Additionally, tsetse harbors 3 maternally transmitted endosymbiotic bacteria that modulate their host's physiology. Tsetse is highly resistant to infection with trypanosomes, and this phenotype depends on multiple physiological factors at the time of challenge. These factors include host age, density of maternally-derived trypanolytic effector molecules present in the gut, and symbiont status during development. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms that result in tsetse's resistance to trypanosomes. We found that following parasite challenge, young susceptible tsetse present a highly attenuated immune response. In contrast, mature refractory flies express higher levels of genes associated with humoral (attacin and pgrp-lb and epithelial (inducible nitric oxide synthase and dual oxidase immunity. Additionally, we discovered that tsetse must harbor its endogenous microbiome during intrauterine larval development in order to present a parasite refractory phenotype during adulthood. Interestingly, mature aposymbiotic flies (Gmm(Apo present a strong immune response earlier in the infection process than do WT flies that harbor symbiotic bacteria throughout their entire lifecycle. However, this early response fails to confer significant resistance to trypanosomes. Gmm(Apo adults present a structurally compromised peritrophic matrix (PM, which lines the fly midgut and serves as a physical barrier that separates luminal contents from immune responsive epithelial cells. We propose that the early immune response we observe in Gmm(Apo flies following parasite challenge results from the premature exposure of gut epithelia to parasite-derived immunogens in the absence of a robust PM. Thus, tsetse's PM appears to regulate the timing of host immune induction following parasite challenge. Our results

  13. Milk fermentation products of L. helveticus R389 activate calcineurin as a signal to promote gut mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perdigón Gabriela

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Fermented milks containing probiotic bacteria are a way of delivering bioactive constituents to targets in the gastrointestinal tract. We reported previously that the fermentation of milk at constant pH 6 by L. helveticus R389 increased its content of peptide fractions, and the oral administration of the non-bacterial fraction (FMSpH6 to mice increased total secretory IgA in the intestinal lumen and enhanced the number of IgA and various cytokines producing cells as well as the secretion of IL-6 by small intestine epithelial cells. We also demonstrated that this FMSpH6 was effective for the prevention of Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice. In this work, we studied in mice the impact of the oral administration of the supernatant of milk fermented by L. helveticus R389 on the gut physiology by measuring parameters such as calcium channels and E-cadherin expression, the activation of the biological signal calcineurin and mast and goblet cells, as a way to determine some mechanisms involved in the immunomodulating effects of the milk fermentation products, observed in previous studies. We analyzed the impact of the supernatant of milk fermented by L. helveticus R389 at pH6-controlled on the expression of calcineurin and on the reinforcement of the ephitelial barrier, measuring parameters such as calcium channels and E-cadherin expression and in the reinforcement of the non-specific immunity determining mast cells and goblet cells associated to the gut. Results We observed an enhanced expression of TRPV6 channels in the duodenum, indicating an improved capacity for dietary Ca2+ uptake. We demonstrated an enhanced expression of calcineurin in the small intestine, able to upregulate immune parameters such as IL-2 and TNF production, with an increase in the number of these cytokines secreting cells. We determined an increase in the number of mucosal mast cells and goblet cells, which would mean an improved state of mucosal surveillance

  14. Bacteroides fragilis type VI secretion systems use novel effector and immunity proteins to antagonize human gut Bacteroidales species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Comstock, Laurie E

    2016-03-29

    Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are multiprotein complexes best studied in Gram-negative pathogens where they have been shown to inhibit or kill prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and are often important for virulence. We recently showed that T6SS loci are also widespread in symbiotic human gut bacteria of the order Bacteroidales, and that these T6SS loci segregate into three distinct genetic architectures (GA). GA1 and GA2 loci are present on conserved integrative conjugative elements (ICE) and are transferred and shared among diverse human gut Bacteroidales species. GA3 loci are not contained on conserved ICE and are confined to Bacteroides fragilis Unlike GA1 and GA2 T6SS loci, most GA3 loci do not encode identifiable effector and immunity proteins. Here, we studied GA3 T6SSs and show that they antagonize most human gut Bacteroidales strains analyzed, except for B. fragilis strains with the same T6SS locus. A combination of mutation analyses,trans-protection analyses, and in vitro competition assays, allowed us to identify novel effector and immunity proteins of GA3 loci. These proteins are not orthologous to known proteins, do not contain identified motifs, and most have numerous predicted transmembrane domains. Because the genes encoding effector and immunity proteins are contained in two variable regions of GA3 loci, GA3 T6SSs of the species B. fragilis are likely the source of numerous novel effector and immunity proteins. Importantly, we show that the GA3 T6SS of strain 638R is functional in the mammalian gut and provides a competitive advantage to this organism.

  15. Gut barrier structure, mucosal immunity and intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tincati, Camilla; Douek, Daniel C; Marchetti, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, extensive work has been carried out in the field of microbial translocation in HIV infection, ranging from studies on its clinical significance to investigations on its pathogenic features. In the present work, we review the most recent findings on this phenomenon, focusing on the predictive role of microbial translocation in HIV-related morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms by which it arises and potential therapeutic approaches. From a clinical perspective, current work has shown that markers of microbial translocation may be useful in predicting clinical events in untreated HIV infection, while conflicting data exist on their role in cART-experienced subjects, possibly due to the inclusion of extremely varied patient populations in cohort studies. Results from studies addressing the pathogenesis of microbial translocation have improved our knowledge of the damage of the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier occurring in HIV infection. However, the extent to which mucosal impairment translates directly to increased gastrointestinal permeability remains an open issue. In this respect, novel work has established a role for IL-17 and IL-22-secreting T cell populations in limiting microbial translocation and systemic T-cell activation/inflammation, thus representing a possible target of immune-therapeutic interventions shown to be promising in the animal model. Further, recent reports have not only confirmed the presence of a dysbiotic intestinal community in the course of HIV infection but have also shown that it may be linked to mucosal damage, microbial translocation and peripheral immune activation. Importantly, technical advances have also shed light on the metabolic activity of gut microbes, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches to correct the function, as well as the composition, of the gastrointestinal microbiota.

  16. SELECTIVE MANIPULATION OF THE GUT MICROBIOTA IMPROVES IMMUNE STATUS IN VERTEBRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eMontalban-Arques

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available All animals develop in association with complex microbial communities. It is now well established that commensal microbiota is essential for the correct functionality of each organ in the host. Particularly, the commensal gastro-intestinal microbiota (CGIM is a key factor for development, immunity and nutrient conversion, rendering them bio-available for various uses. Thus, nutritional inputs generate a positive loop in maintaining host health and are essential in shaping the composition of the CGIM communities. Probiotics, which are live exogenous microorganisms, selectively provided to the host, are a promising concept for manipulating the microbiota and thus for increasing the host health status. Nevertheless, most mechanisms induced by probiotics to fortify the immune system are still a matter of debate. Alternatively, prebiotics, which are non-digestible food ingredients, can favor the growth of specific target groups of CGIM. Several metabolites are produced by the CGIM, one of the most important are the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, which emerge from the fermentation of complex carbohydrates. SCFAs have been recognized as key players in triggering beneficial effects elicited by simple diffusion and by specific receptors present thus far only in epithelial cells of higher vertebrates at different GI locations. However, both strategies have shown to provide resistance against pathogens during periods of high stress. In fish, knowledge about the action of pro- and prebiotics and SCFAs is still limited. Thus, in this review, we briefly summarize the mechanisms described on this topic for higher vertebrates and discuss why many of them may operate in the fish gut representing a model for different mucosal tissues.

  17. Immune response to gut Escherichia coli and susceptibility to adjuvant arthritis in the rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević-Jovanović, Vesna; Miletić, Tatjana; Stanojević, Stanislava; Mitić, Katarina; Dimitrijević, Mirjana

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the humoral immune response to antigens of predominant gut aerobic bacterial strains (i.e. Escherichia coli) over the course of adjuvant arthritis and oil-induced arthritis in two inbred rat strains: Dark Agouti (DA) and Albino Oxford (AO). We report the presence of antibodies specific to proteins of E. coli in molecular weight range between 20-30 kDa in sera of diseased DA rats, and the absence of these antibodies in the sera of AO rats. In DA rats, CFA and IFA provoked a stronger antibody response to E. coli, especially of the IgG2b antibody class. Intramuscular administration of E. coli preceding the adjuvant arthritis induction had no effect on the development and course of disease, as well as on the activation of T cells in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. Higher serum levels of natural and induced IgA antibodies, combined with a higher CD3+CD26+ cell percentage were found in AO rats. The observed correlation between the serologic response to commensal flora and rats' genetic background as a defining factor for arthritis susceptibility may contribute to the process of creating a favorable (or less favorable) milieu for arthritis development.

  18. Effects of cyclophosphamide on immune system and gut microbiota in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Xuewu

    2015-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is the most commonly used drug in autoimmune disease, cancer, blood and marrow transplantation. Recent data revealed that therapy efficacy of CP is gut microbiota-dependent. So, it is very important to understand how CP affects intestinal microbiota and immune function. In this study, the effects of CP on mice immuno-activity were firstly evaluated, then, the fecal microbiota from normal and CP-treated mice was compared, and the characteristic bacterial diversity and compositions were identified, using 454 pyrosequencing technology. The results showed that CP reduced the diversity and shifted the fecal microbiota composition. Specifically, CP treatment decreased the proportion of Bacteroidetes while increased the proportion of Firmictutes in the microbial community. Most importantly, specific microbiota signatures belonging to Bacteroides acidifaciens, Streptococcaceae and Alistipes were also identified, which would provide new insight into the efficacy and side effects in clinical usage of CP. This should be helpful for further demonstration of CP's action mechanism, development of personalized therapy strategies, and prediction of potential side effects related to various treatment regimens of CP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Local Immune Response to Upper Urinary Tract Infections in Children▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kantele, Anu; Palkola, Nina; Arvilommi, Heikki; Honkinen, Olli; Jahnukainen, Timo; Mertsola, Jussi; Kantele, Jussi M.

    2008-01-01

    Vaccines are needed against urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children, as episodes of pyelonephritis (PN) may cause renal scarring. Local immune mechanisms are regarded to confer protection, yet they have been poorly characterized for children. This study explores the local immune response in children by looking for newly activated pathogen-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC), expected to appear transiently in the circulation as a response to UTI. Urinary tract-originating ASC specific ...

  20. Regulation by gut bacertia of immune response, Bacillus thuringiensis susceptibility and hemolin expression in Plodia interpunctella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) is an important stored grain insect pest worldwide, and the first lepidopteran with reported resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Since gut bacteria may affect Bt insecticidal activity, we determined whether P. interpunctella lacking gut enterobacteria had...

  1. Effects of Antibiotic Use on the Microbiota of the Gut and Associated Alterations of Immunity and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pilar Francino

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The excessively widespread use of antibiotics has created many threats. A well-known problem is the increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics, which has clearly become a worldwide challenge to the effective control of infections by many pathogens. But, beyond affecting the pathogenic agents for which it is intended, antibiotic treatment also affects the mutualistic communities of microbes that inhabit the human body. As they inhibit susceptible organisms and select for resistant ones, antibiotics can have strong immediate effects on the composition of these communities, such as the proliferation of resistant opportunists that can cause accute disease. Furthermore, antibiotic-induced microbiota alterations are also likely to have more insidious effects on long-term health. In the case of the gut microbiota, this community interacts with many crucial aspects of human biology, including the regulation of immune and metabolic homeostasis, in the gut and beyond. It follows that antibiotic treatments bear the risk of altering these basic equilibria. Here, we review the growing literature on the effects of antibiotic use on gut microbiota composition and function, and their consequences for immunity, metabolism, and health.

  2. Modulation of immunity and inflammatory gene expression in the gut, in inflammatory diseases of the gut and in the liver by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza-Diaz, Julio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Angel

    2014-11-14

    The potential for the positive manipulation of the gut microbiome through the introduction of beneficial microbes, as also known as probiotics, is currently an active area of investigation. The FAO/WHO define probiotics as live microorganisms that confer a health benefit to the host when administered in adequate amounts. However, dead bacteria and bacterial molecular components may also exhibit probiotic properties. The results of clinical studies have demonstrated the clinical potential of probiotics in many pathologies, such as allergic diseases, diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and viral infection. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial effects of probiotics, most of which involve gene expression regulation in specific tissues, particularly the intestine and liver. Therefore, the modulation of gene expression mediated by probiotics is an important issue that warrants further investigation. In the present paper, we performed a systematic review of the probiotic-mediated modulation of gene expression that is associated with the immune system and inflammation. Between January 1990 to February 2014, PubMed was searched for articles that were published in English using the MeSH terms "probiotics" and "gene expression" combined with "intestines", "liver", "enterocytes", "antigen-presenting cells", "dendritic cells", "immune system", and "inflammation". Two hundred and five original articles matching these criteria were initially selected, although only those articles that included specific gene expression results (77) were later considered for this review and separated into three major topics: the regulation of immunity and inflammatory gene expression in the gut, in inflammatory diseases of the gut and in the liver. Particular strains of Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli, Escherichia coli, Propionibacterium, Bacillus and Saccharomyces influence the gene expression of mucins, Toll-like receptors, caspases, nuclear factor-κB, and interleukins

  3. Effect of calf starter feeding on gut microbial diversity and expression of genes involved in host immune responses and tight junctions in dairy calves during weaning transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmuthuge, Nilusha; Li, Meiju; Goonewardene, Laksiri A; Oba, Masahito; Guan, L Luo

    2013-05-01

    Calf starters are usually offered to dairy calves to facilitate the weaning process, however, the effect of solid feed consumption on gut health has not been well studied. This study aimed to investigate the effect of calf starter feeding on the gut bacterial community and mucosal immune functions in dairy calves during weaning transition. Mucosal tissue and digesta samples were collected from rumen, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon upon slaughtering of calves (n=8) after feeding the experimental diets [milk replacer (MR) or milk replacer + calf starter (MR+S)] for 6 wk. Expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 10 was downregulated along the gut, whereas TLR2 in colon and TLR6 along the gut were upregulated in MR+S-fed calves compared with MR-fed calves. Ileal TLR9 and TLR10 showed higher expression compared with the other regions regardless of the diet. Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 demonstrated a diet- and gut-regional dependent expression pattern, whereas β-defensin did not. The diet and gut region also affected the expression of tight junction-regulating genes claudin 4 and occludin. Bacterial diversity tended to be different between the 2 diets, whereas the bacterial density was different among gut regions and sample type. The present study revealed that changes in bacterial diversity, expression of genes encoding host mucosal immune responses, and barrier functions were associated with the MR+S diet, and suggests that solid feed consumption may alter gut microbiome and host mucosal functions during weaning transition.

  4. Immunocytochemical identification and localization of APUD cells in the gut of seven stomachless teleost fishes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Sheng Pan; Zhi Ping Fang; Ya Xin Zhao

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the cell types, localization,distribution density and morphology of APUD cells in the intestinal mucosa of stomachless teleost fishes.METHOD By using the peroxidaseantiperoxidase complex ( PAP )immunocytochemical staining technique the identification, localization and morphology of immunoreactive (IR) endocrine cells seattered in the intestinal mucosa of grass carp ( Cyenopharyngodon idellus ), black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus ) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio ) were investigated with 20 kinds of antisera prepared against mammalian peptide hormones of APUD cells, and likewise by using avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC)method those of silver carp ( Hypophthalmichthys molitrix ), bighead (Aristichthys nobilis ), silver crucian carp (Carassius gibelio ) and bluntnose black bream ( Megalobrama amblyocephala ) were also studied with 5 different antisera. The replacement of the first antiserum by phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was employed as a control. IR endocrine cells were counted with a square-mesh ocular micrometer from 10 fields selected randomly in every section of each part of the intestine specimen. The average number of IR endocrine cells per mm2 was counted to quantify their distribution density.RESULT Gastrin (GAS)-, Gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP)-, glucagon (GLU)-, glucagon-like immunoreactants ( GLI )-, bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP)-, leucine-enkephalin (ENK)-and substance P (SP)-IR endocrine cells were found in the gut of grass carp, black carp and common carp, and somatostatin ( SOM )-IR endocrine cells were only seen in common carp.GAS-, GIP- and GLU-IR endocrine cells were found in the intestinal mucosa of silver carp,bighead, silver crucian carp and bluntnose black bream. Most of IR endocrine cells had the higher distribution density in the foregut and midgut,and were longer in shape. They had a long apical cytoplasmic process extended to the gut lumen and a basal process extended to adjacent cells or basement membrane and

  5. The cereal type in feed influences gut wall morphology and intestinal immune cell infiltration in broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teirlynck, Emma; Friis-Holm, Lotte Bjerrum; Eeckhaut, Venessa

    2009-01-01

    In broiler chickens a diet where the major cereal types are wheat, rye and/or barley has a lower digestibility compared with a diet in which maize is the major cereal type In the present study, the effects of two different dietary cereal types, maize v. wheat/rye on host factors (inflammation...... and gut integrity) and gut microbiota composition were studied In addition, the effects of low-dose Zn-bacitracin supplementation were examined Broilers given a wheat/rye-based diet showed more villus fusion, a thinner tunica muscularis, more T-lymphocyte infiltration, higher amount of immune cell...... aggregates in the muscosa, more and larger goblet cells and ore apoptosis of epithelial cells in the mucosa than those given a maize-based diet Adding Zn-bacitracin generally reversed these alterations The microbiota composition was analysed by the use of terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism...

  6. Preterm Birth Reduces Nutrient Absorption With Limited Effect on Immune Gene Expression and Gut Colonization in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette V; Cilieborg, Malene S.; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The primary risk factors for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) are preterm birth, enteral feeding, and gut colonization. It is unclear whether feeding and colonization induce excessive expression of immune genes that lead to NEC. Using a pig model, we hypothesized that reduced gestational age would...... upregulate immune-related genes and cause bacterial imbalance after birth. Preterm (85%-92% gestation, n = 53) and near-term (95%-99% gestation, n = 69) pigs were delivered by cesarean section and euthanized at birth or after 2 days of infant formula or bovine colostrum feeding. At birth, preterm delivery...... relative to near-term birth. After 2 days of formula feeding, NEC incidence was increased in preterm versus near-term pigs (47% vs 0%-13%). A total of 6 of the 30 genes related to immunity (TLR2, IL1B, and IL8), permeability (CLDN3, and OCLN), and absorption (SGLT) decreased in preterm pigs without...

  7. Preterm Birth Reduces Nutrient Absorption With Limited Effect on Immune Gene Expression and Gut Colonization in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette V; Cilieborg, Malene S.; Skovgaard, Kerstin;

    2015-01-01

    The primary risk factors for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) are preterm birth, enteral feeding, and gut colonization. It is unclear whether feeding and colonization induce excessive expression of immune genes that lead to NEC. Using a pig model, we hypothesized that reduced gestational age would...... upregulate immune-related genes and cause bacterial imbalance after birth. Preterm (85%-92% gestation, n = 53) and near-term (95%-99% gestation, n = 69) pigs were delivered by cesarean section and euthanized at birth or after 2 days of infant formula or bovine colostrum feeding. At birth, preterm delivery...... reduced 5 of 30 intestinal genes related to nutrient absorption and innate immunity, relative to near-term pigs, whereas 2 genes were upregulated. Preterm birth also reduced ex vivo intestinal glucose and leucine uptake (40%-50%), but failed to increase cytokine secretions from intestinal explants...

  8. Limited clonal relatedness between gut IgA plasma cells and memory B cells after oral immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemark, Mats; Hazanov, Helena; Strömberg, Anneli; Komban, Rathan; Holmqvist, Joel; Köster, Sofia; Mattsson, Johan; Sikora, Per; Mehr, Ramit; Lycke, Nils Y

    2016-09-06

    Understanding how memory B cells are induced and relate to long-lived plasma cells is important for vaccine development. Immunity to oral vaccines has been considered short-lived because of a poor ability to develop IgA B-cell memory. Here we demonstrate that long-lived mucosal IgA memory is readily achieved by oral but not systemic immunization in mouse models with NP hapten conjugated with cholera toxin and transfer of B1-8(high)/GFP(+) NP-specific B cells. Unexpectedly, memory B cells are poorly related to long-lived plasma cells and less affinity-matured. They are α4β7-integrin(+)CD73(+)PD-L2(+)CD80(+) and at systemic sites mostly IgM(+), while 80% are IgA(+) in Peyer's patches. On reactivation, most memory B cells in Peyer's patches are GL7(-), but expand in germinal centres and acquire higher affinity and more mutations, demonstrating strong clonal selection. CCR9 expression is found only in Peyer's patches and appears critical for gut homing. Thus, gut mucosal memory possesses unique features not seen after systemic immunization.

  9. Influence of galacto-oligosaccharide mixture (B-GOS) on gut microbiota, immune parameters and metabonomics in elderly persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulevic, Jelena; Juric, Aleksandra; Walton, Gemma E; Claus, Sandrine P; Tzortzis, George; Toward, Ruth E; Gibson, Glenn R

    2015-08-28

    It is recognised that ageing induces various changes to the human colonic microbiota. Most relevant is a reduction in bifidobacteria, which is a health-positive genus. Prebiotics, such as galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), are dietary ingredients that selectively fortify beneficial gut microbial groups. Therefore, they have the potential to reverse the age-related decline in bifidobacteria and modulate associated health parameters. We assessed the effect of GOS mixture (Bimuno (B-GOS)) on gut microbiota, markers of immune function and metabolites in forty elderly (age 65-80 years) volunteers in a randomised, double-blind, placebo (maltodextrin)-controlled, cross-over study. The intervention periods consisted of 10 weeks with daily doses of 5·5 g/d with a 4-week washout period in between. Blood and faecal samples were collected for the analyses of faecal bacterial populations and immune and metabolic biomarkers. B-GOS consumption led to significant increases in bacteroides and bifidobacteria, the latter correlating with increased lactic acid in faecal waters. Higher IL-10, IL-8, natural killer cell activity and C-reactive protein and lower IL-1β were also observed. Administration of B-GOS to elderly volunteers may be useful in positively affecting the microbiota and some markers of immune function associated with ageing.

  10. Recognition of bacterial plant pathogens: local, systemic and transgenerational immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Elizabeth; Yadeta, Koste A; Coaker, Gitta

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial pathogens can cause multiple plant diseases and plants rely on their innate immune system to recognize and actively respond to these microbes. The plant innate immune system comprises extracellular pattern recognition receptors that recognize conserved microbial patterns and intracellular nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins that recognize specific bacterial effectors delivered into host cells. Plants lack the adaptive immune branch present in animals, but still afford flexibility to pathogen attack through systemic and transgenerational resistance. Here, we focus on current research in plant immune responses against bacterial pathogens. Recent studies shed light onto the activation and inactivation of pattern recognition receptors and systemic acquired resistance. New research has also uncovered additional layers of complexity surrounding NLR immune receptor activation, cooperation and sub-cellular localizations. Taken together, these recent advances bring us closer to understanding the web of molecular interactions responsible for coordinating defense responses and ultimately resistance.

  11. The spleen in local and systemic regulation of immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Pittet, Mikael J

    2013-11-14

    The spleen is the main filter for blood-borne pathogens and antigens, as well as a key organ for iron metabolism and erythrocyte homeostasis. Also, immune and hematopoietic functions have been recently unveiled for the mouse spleen, suggesting additional roles for this secondary lymphoid organ. Here we discuss the integration of the spleen in the regulation of immune responses locally and in the whole body and present the relevance of findings for our understanding of inflammatory and degenerative diseases and their treatments. We consider whether equivalent activities in humans are known, as well as initial therapeutic attempts to target the spleen for modulating innate and adaptive immunity.

  12. Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue: A Key Tissue Inside the Mucosal Immune System of Hens Immunized with Escherichia coli F4

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    Maria F. Peralta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin Y (IgY is the predominant antibody found in hen’s (Gallus domesticus egg yolk. This antibody, developed against several microorganisms in hen egg yolk, has been successfully used as an alternative to immunoglobulins from mammals for use in immunodiagnostics and immunotherapy. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E.coli F4 is the main etiological agent associated with swine neonatal diarrhea, and it causes notable economic losses in swine production. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between humoral immune response and the activation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT in laying hens intramuscularly immunized with E. coli F4. Adult laying Shaver hens were immunized with a bacterin based on an inactivated lysate E. coli F4 strain that was originally isolated from neonatal piglet diarrhea, following a recommended schedule. The percentage of B lymphocytes in blood and spleen homogenates was determined by flow cytometry. Villi histomorphometry and the size of germinal centers (GC activated in GALT and the spleen were measured in histological samples either stained with hematoxylin/eosin or through immunofluorescence. Antibody and isotype-specific antibodies in serum and egg yolk were measured using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Secretory and serum immunoglobulin A (IgA were measured by ELISA tests. Laying hen with intramuscular immunization with E. coli F4 lysate, activated both mucosal and systemic protection. Mucosal protection was provided through B lymphocytes, and most of them were activated on Peyer’s patches and esophageal tonsils, in GALT. Furthermore, increased B lymphocyte number in the lamina propria of the gut, and increased intraepithelial plasmatic cell number, produced high levels of mucosal IgA. Activated B lymphocytes interacted with absorptive cells, immune cells, and microbiota in the gut, producing signals that were translated into a powerful physical defense by

  13. Disease Severity and Immune Activity Relate to Distinct Interkingdom Gut Microbiome States in Ethnically Distinct Ulcerative Colitis Patients

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    Jordan S. Mar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Significant gut microbiota heterogeneity exists among ulcerative colitis (UC patients, though the clinical implications of this variance are unknown. We hypothesized that ethnically distinct UC patients exhibit discrete gut microbiotas with unique metabolic programming that differentially influence immune activity and clinical status. Using parallel 16S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer 2 sequencing of fecal samples (UC, 30; healthy, 13, we corroborated previous observations of UC-associated bacterial diversity depletion and demonstrated significant Saccharomycetales expansion as characteristic of UC gut dysbiosis. Furthermore, we identified four distinct microbial community states (MCSs within our cohort, confirmed their existence in an independent UC cohort, and demonstrated their coassociation with both patient ethnicity and disease severity. Each MCS was uniquely enriched for specific amino acid, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism pathways and exhibited significant luminal enrichment of the metabolic products of these pathways. Using a novel ex vivo human dendritic cell and T-cell coculture assay, we showed that exposure to fecal water from UC patients caused significant Th2 skewing in CD4+ T-cell populations compared to that of healthy participants. In addition, fecal water from patients in whom their MCS was associated with the highest level of disease severity induced the most dramatic Th2 skewing. Combined with future investigations, these observations could lead to the identification of highly resolved UC subsets based on defined microbial gradients or discrete microbial features that may be exploited for the development of novel, more effective therapies.

  14. Microbiota-host interactions in irritable bowel syndrome: epithelial barrier, immune regulation and brain-gut interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Niall P; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Brint, Elizabeth

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, sometimes debilitating, gastrointestinal disorder worldwide. While altered gut motility and sensation, as well as aberrant brain perception of visceral events, are thought to contribute to the genesis of symptoms in IBS, a search for an underlying aetiology has, to date, proven unsuccessful. Recently, attention has been focused on the microbiota as a possible factor in the pathogenesis of IBS. Prompted by a number of clinical observations, such as the recognition of the de novo development of IBS following enteric infections, as well as descriptions of changes in colonic bacterial populations in IBS and supported by clinical responses to interventions, such as antibiotics and probiotics, that modify the microbiota, various approaches have been taken to investigating the microbiota-host response in IBS, as well as in animal models thereof. From such studies a considerable body of evidence has accumulated to indicate the activation or upregulation of both factors involved in bacterial engagement with the host as well host defence mechanisms against bacteria. Alterations in gut barrier function, occurring in response, or in parallel, to changes in the microbiota, have also been widely described and can be seen to play a pivotal role in generating and sustaining host immune responses both within and beyond the gut. In this manner a plausible hypothesis, based on an altered microbiota and/or an aberrant host response, for the pathogenesis, of at least some instances of IBS, can be generated.

  15. Reciprocal immune benefit based on complementary production of antibiotics by the leech Hirudo verbana and its gut symbiont Aeromonas veronii.

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    Tasiemski, Aurélie; Massol, François; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Roger, Emmanuel; Rodet, Franck; Fournier, Isabelle; Thomas, Frédéric; Salzet, Michel

    2015-12-04

    The medicinal leech has established a long-term mutualistic association with Aeromonas veronii, a versatile bacterium which can also display free-living waterborne and fish- or human-pathogenic lifestyles. Here, we investigated the role of antibiotics in the dynamics of interaction between the leech and its gut symbiont Aeromonas. By combining biochemical and molecular approaches, we isolated and identified for the first time the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the leech digestive tract and by its symbiont Aeromonas. Immunohistochemistry data and PCR analyses evidenced that leech AMP genes are induced in the gut epithelial cells when Aeromonas load is low (starved animals), while repressed when Aeromonas abundance is the highest (post blood feeding). The asynchronous production of AMPs by both partners suggests that these antibiotic substances (i) provide them with reciprocal protection against invasive bacteria and (ii) contribute to the unusual simplicity of the gut microflora of the leech. This immune benefit substantially reinforces the evidence of an evolutionarily stable association between H. verbana and A. veronii. Altogether these data may provide insights into the processes making the association with an Aeromonas species in the digestive tract either deleterious or beneficial.

  16. Defensins, lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A: microbe-binding biomolecules that contribute to mucosal immunity in the human gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2017-02-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors - enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A - that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes.

  17. Role of gut microbiota in the modulation of atherosclerosis-associated immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry A Chistiakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and metabolic abnormalities are linked to each other. At present, pathogenic inflammatory response was recognized as a major player in metabolic diseases. In humans, intestinal microflora could significantly influence the development of metabolic diseases including atherosclerosis. Commensal bacteria were shown to activate inflammatory pathways through altering lipid metabolism in adipocytes, macrophages, and vascular cells, inducing insulin resistance, and producing trimethylamine-N-oxide. However, gut microbiota could also play the atheroprotective role associated with anthocyanin metabolism and administration of probiotics and their components. Here, we review the mechanisms by which the gut microbiota may influence atherogenesis.

  18. Prebiotics effect on immune and hepatic oxidative status and gut morphology of white sea bream (Diplodus sargus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Inês; Couto, Ana; Machado, Marina; Castro, Carolina; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Oliva-Teles, Aires; Enes, Paula

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of short-chain fructooligosaccharides (scFOS), xylooligosaccharides (XOS) and galactooligosaccharides (GOS) on immune and hepatic oxidative status, and gut morphology of white sea bream juveniles. Four diets were formulated: a control diet with fish meal (FM) and plant feedstuffs (PF) (30FM:70PF) and three test diets similar to the control but supplemented with 1% of scFOS, XOS or GOS. Dietary prebiotic incorporation did not affect total blood cell counts, hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood indices or differential white blood cell counts. Fish fed GOS had lower ACH50 and nitric oxide than fish fed control diet. XOS enhanced immune status through the increase in alternative complement pathway (ACH50), lysozyme and total immunoglobulin. The higher activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in fish fed FOS compared to the other dietary groups was the only related antioxidant enzyme affected by prebiotics in the liver. GOS ameliorated the precocious adverse effects of PF based diet on gut histomorphology, as denoted by the lower incidence of histological alterations in fish fed GOS for 15 days. In conclusion, XOS and GOS at 1% might have potential to be used as prebiotics in white sea bream juveniles.

  19. An antimicrobial protein of the gut symbiont Bacteroides fragilis with a MACPF domain of host immune proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Coyne, Michael J; Comstock, Laurie E

    2014-12-01

    Bacteroidales are the most abundant Gram-negative bacteria of the human intestinal microbiota comprising more than half of the bacteria in many individuals. Some of the factors that these bacteria use to establish and maintain themselves in this ecosystem are beginning to be identified. However, ecological competition, especially interference competition where one organism directly harms another, is largely unexplored. To begin to understand the relevance of this ecological principle as it applies to these abundant gut bacteria and factors that may promote such competition, we screened Bacteroides fragilis for the production of antimicrobial molecules. We found that the production of extracellularly secreted antimicrobial molecules is widespread in this species. The first identified molecule, described in this manuscript, contains a membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain present in host immune molecules that kill bacteria and virally infected cells by pore formation, and mutations affecting key residues of this domain abrogated its activity. This antimicrobial molecule, termed BSAP-1, is secreted from the cell in outer membrane vesicles and no additional proteins are required for its secretion, processing or immunity of the producing cell. This study provides the first insight into secreted molecules that promote competitive interference among Bacteroidales strains of the human gut. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Differences in host breed and diet influence colonization by Campylobacter jejuni and induction of local immune responses in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zifeng; Willer, Thomas; Pielsticker, Colin; Gerzova, Lenka; Rychlik, Ivan; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Chickens are regarded as the main reservoir for human campylobacteriosis. Little is known about the interaction between Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and chickens. This interaction may be influenced by the stage of maturation of the immune system, developing gut microbiota composition and other factors including breed and diet. Our aim was to investigate the impact of breed, and diet on C. jejuni colonization and host immune responses in chickens. Birds were inoculated with 10(4) colony forming units (CFU) of C. jejuni or diluent at one (Exp. 1) or 22 (Exp. 2) days post hatch. We compared local immune cell subpopulations, cytokine expression levels, and gut microbiota composition between broiler-type (BT) and layer-type (LT) birds fed with either commercial broiler feed (bf) or layer feed (lf). Lower colonization rates were observed in the older age group independent of breed and diet. Independent of breed, birds fed with bf showed higher CFU of C. jejuni compared to lf-fed groups. Campylobacter jejuni-inoculation had a significant effect on lymphocyte numbers and cytokine expression levels in BT birds independent of feeding strategy (p breeds. Diet and breed influenced C. jejuni colonization, immune responses and microbiota composition to a different extent comparing between LT and BT birds. The mechanisms behind these differences have to be elucidated further. Our results suggest that selection for more resistant breeds in combination with adapted feeding strategies may help to reduce Campylobacter colonization levels in commercial poultry in the future.

  1. Colonization with Helicobacter is concomitant with modified gut microbiota and drastic failure of the immune control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majlessi, L; Sayes, F; Bureau, J-F; Pawlik, A; Michel, V; Jouvion, G; Huerre, M; Severgnini, M; Consolandi, C; Peano, C; Brosch, R; Touati, E; Leclerc, C

    2017-09-01

    Epidemiological and experimental observations suggest that chronic microbial colonization can impact the immune control of other unrelated pathogens contracted in a concomitant or sequential manner. Possible interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and persistence of other bacteria have scarcely been investigated. Here we demonstrated that natural colonization of the digestive tract with Helicobacter hepaticus in mice is concomitant with modification of the gut microbiota, subclinical inflammation, and drastic impairment of immune control of the growth of subsequently administered M. tuberculosis, which results in severe lung tissue injury. Our results provided insights upon the fact that this prior H. hepaticus colonization leads to failures in the mechanisms that could prevent the otherwise balanced cross-talk between M. tuberculosis and the immune system. Such disequilibrium ultimately leads to the inhibition of control of mycobacterial growth, outbreak of inflammation, and lung pathology. Among the dysregulated immune signatures, we noticed a correlation between the detrimental lung injury and the accumulation of activated T-lymphocytes. Our findings suggest that the impact of prior Helicobacter spp. colonization and subsequent M. tuberculosis parasitism might be greater than previously thought, which is a key point given that both species are among the most frequent invasive bacteria in human populations.

  2. The Gut-Liver-Lung Axis. Modulation of the Innate Immune Response and Its Possible Role in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert P; Hopkins, Raewyn J; Marsland, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that a diet high in fiber is associated with better lung function and reduced risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The mechanism for this benefit remains unknown, but, as fiber is not absorbed by the gut, this finding suggests that the gut may play an active role in pathogenic pathways underlying COPD. There is a growing awareness that aberrant activity of the innate immune system, characterized by increased neutrophil and macrophage activation, may contribute to the development or progression of COPD. Innate immunity is modulated in large part by the liver, where hepatic cells function in immune surveillance of the portal circulation, as well as providing a rich source of systemic inflammatory cytokines and immune mediators (notably, IL-6 and C-reactive protein). We believe that the beneficial effect of dietary fiber on lung function is through modulation of innate immunity and subsequent attenuation of the pulmonary response to inflammatory stimuli, most apparent in current or former smokers. We propose that the "gut-liver-lung axis" may play a modifying role in the pathogenesis of COPD. In this review, we summarize lines of evidence that include animal models, large prospective observational studies, and clinical trials, supporting the hypothesis that the gut-liver-lung axis plays an integral part in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of COPD.

  3. Dysbiosis gut microbiota associated with inflammation and impaired mucosal immune function in intestine of humans with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weiwei; Wu, Na; Wang, Xuemei; Chi, Yujing; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Qiu, Xinyun; Hu, Ying; Li, Jing; Liu, Yulan

    2015-02-03

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has recently been considered to be under the influence of the gut microbiota, which might exert toxic effects on the human host after intestinal absorption and delivery to the liver via the portal vein. In this study, the composition of the gut microbiota in NAFLD patients and healthy subjects was determined via 16S ribosomal RNA Illumina next-generation sequencing. Among those taxa displaying greater than 0.1% average abundance in all samples, five genera, including Alistipes and Prevotella, were significantly more abundant in the gut microbiota of healthy subjects compared to NAFLD patients. Alternatively, Escherichia, Anaerobacter, Lactobacillus and Streptococcus were increased in the gut microbiota of NAFLD patients compared to healthy subjects. In addition, decreased numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and increased levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ were detected in the NAFLD group compared to the healthy group. Furthermore, irregularly arranged microvilli and widened tight junctions were observed in the gut mucosa of the NAFLD patients via transmission electron microscopy. We postulate that aside from dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, gut microbiota-mediated inflammation of the intestinal mucosa and the related impairment in mucosal immune function play an important role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

  4. Impact of a probiotic fermented milk in the gut ecosystem and in the systemic immunity using a non-severe protein-energy-malnutrition model in mice

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    Carmuega Esteban

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition affects the immune response, causing a decrease of defence mechanisms and making the host more susceptible to infections. Probiotics can reconstitute the intestinal mucosa and stimulate local and systemic immunity. The aim of this work was evaluate the effects of a probiotic fermented milk as a complement of a re-nutrition diet, on the recovery of the intestinal barrier, and mucosal and systemic immune functions in a murine model of non-severe protein-energy-malnutrition. Its potential protection against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium infection was also analyzed. Methods Mice were undernourished and divided into 3 groups according to the dietary supplement received during re-nutrition (milk, probiotic fermented milk or its bacterial free supernatant and compared to well-nourished and malnourished mice. They were sacrificed previous to the re-nutrition and 5 days post re-nutrition. The phagocytic activity of macrophages from spleen and peritoneum and the changes in the intestinal histology and microbiota were evaluated. Different immune cell populations and cytokine productions were analyzed in the small intestine tissues. The effect of the re-nutrition supplements on the systemic immunity using OVA antigen and against an infection with S. Typhimurium was also studied. Results Probiotic fermented milk was the most effective re-nutrition diet that improved the intestinal microbiota. Its administration also increased the number of IgA+ cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. The production of different cytokine (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12 by these cells and the phagocytic activity in peritoneum and spleen was also increased. This re-nutrition diet also stimulated the systemic immune response against OVA antigen which was diminished after the malnutrition period and also improved the host response against S. Typhimurium, decreasing the spread of pathogenic bacteria to the liver and the spleen. The

  5. Effects of Lactobacillus casei and Enterococcus faecalis on growth performance, immune function and gut microbiota of suckling piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoqi; Zhu, Qun; Chang, Juan; Yin, Qingqiang; Song, Andong; Li, Zhentian; Wang, Erzhu; Lu, Fushan

    2017-04-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of orally administrated Lactobacillus casei and Enterococcus faecalis on performance, immune function and gut microbiota of suckling piglets. Neonatal piglets (n = 120) were randomly assigned to 4 groups, with 30 suckling piglets in each group. The piglets were from 15 litters, one male and one female piglet were selected for each group in each litter. The Control group was administrated with normal saline, the other groups with L. casei or E. faecalis or a combination of L. casei and E. faecalis at a ratio of 3:1. Each piglet was orally administrated with 1, 2, 3 and 4 ml probiotics or normal saline at the age of 1, 7, 14 and 21 d, respectively. The piglets were weaned at the age of 21 d. The results showed that compared with the Control group, the average daily gain of piglets administrated with probiotics was significantly increased, and the diarrhoea rate and mortality were significantly decreased (p < 0.05). After supplementation of the combined probiotics, the protease activity in stomach, duodenum and colon was increased and in all supplemented groups, the immunoglobulin A concentration in plasma was significantly higher (p < 0.05). The combined probiotics significantly increased villus length and the expression level of transforming growth factor-β in the jejunum (p < 0.05) but decreased the expression level of the jejunal tumour necrosis factor-α (p < 0.05). In addition, probiotics could regulate gut microbiota and increase microbial similarity coefficients for keeping piglet gut microbiota stable.

  6. High protective efficacy of rice bran against human rotavirus diarrhea via enhancing probiotic growth, gut barrier function, and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingdong; Twitchell, Erica; Li, Guohua; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Kocher, Jacob; Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Yuan, Lijuan

    2015-10-13

    Previously, we showed that rice bran (RB) was able to reduce human rotavirus (HRV) diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Here, we investigated its effect on the growth of diarrhea-reducing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle (EcN), and the resulting effects on HRV diarrhea, gut epithelial health, permeability and innate immune responses during virulent HRV challenge. On 3, 5, and 7 days of age pigs were inoculated with 2 × 10(4) colony-forming-units LGG+EcN to initiate colonization. Daily RB supplementation (replacing 10% calorie intake) was started at 5 days of age and continued until euthanasia. A subset of pigs in each group was challenged orally with 10(5) focus-forming-units of virulent HRV at 33 days of age. RB completely prevented HRV diarrhea in LGG+EcN colonized pigs. RB significantly promoted the growth of both probiotic strains in the gut (~5 logs) and increased the body-weight-gain at 4-5 weeks of age compared to non-RB group. After HRV challenge, RB-fed pigs had significantly lower ileal mitotic index and villus width, and significantly increased intestinal IFN-γ and total IgA levels compared to non-RB group. Therefore, RB plus LGG+EcN colonization may represent a highly effective therapeutic approach against HRV and potentially a variety of other diarrhea-inducing enteric pathogens.

  7. Steroidogenesis in the skin: implications for local immune functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej; Zbytek, Blazej; Nikolakis, Georgios; Manna, Pulak R; Skobowiat, Cezary; Zmijewski, Michal; Li, Wei; Janjetovic, Zorica; Postlethwaite, Arnold; Zouboulis, Christos C; Tuckey, Robert C

    2013-09-01

    The skin has developed a hierarchy of systems that encompasses the skin immune and local steroidogenic activities in order to protect the body against the external environment and biological factors and to maintain local homeostasis. Most recently it has been established that skin cells contain the entire biochemical apparatus necessary for production of glucocorticoids, androgens and estrogens either from precursors of systemic origin or, alternatively, through the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone and its subsequent transformation to biologically active steroids. Examples of these products are corticosterone, cortisol, testosterone, dihydrotesterone and estradiol. Their local production can be regulated by locally produced corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or cytokines. Furthermore the production of glucocorticoids is affected by ultraviolet B radiation. The level of production and nature of the final steroid products are dependent on the cell type or cutaneous compartment, e.g., epidermis, dermis, adnexal structures or adipose tissue. Locally produced glucocorticoids, androgens and estrogens affect functions of the epidermis and adnexal structures as well as local immune activity. Malfunction of these steroidogenic activities can lead to inflammatory disorders or autoimmune diseases. The cutaneous steroidogenic system can also have systemic effects, which are emphasized by significant skin contribution to circulating androgens and/or estrogens. Furthermore, local activity of CYP11A1 can produce novel 7Δ-steroids and secosteroids that are biologically active. Therefore, modulation of local steroidogenic activity may serve as a new therapeutic approach for treatment of inflammatory disorders, autoimmune processes or other skin disorders. In conclusion, the skin can be defined as an independent steroidogenic organ, whose activity can affect its functions and the development of local or systemic inflammatory or

  8. Coevolution of yeast mannan digestion: Convergence of the civilized human diet, distal gut microbiome, and host immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, D Wade; Martens, Eric C; Gilbert, Harry J; Cuskin, Fiona; Lowe, Elisabeth C

    2015-01-01

    The complex carbohydrates accessible to the distal gut microbiota (DGM) are key drivers in determining the structure of this ecosystem. Typically, plant cell wall polysaccharides and recalcitrant starch (i.e. dietary fiber), in addition to host glycans are considered the primary nutrients for the DGM; however, we recently demonstrated that α-mannans, highly branched polysaccharides that decorate the surface of yeast, are also nutrients for several members of Bacteroides spp. This relationship suggests that the advent of yeast in contemporary food technologies and the colonization of the intestine by endogenous fungi have roles in microbiome structure and function. Here we discuss the process of yeast mannan metabolism, and the intersection between various sources of intestinal fungi and their roles in recognition by the host innate immune system.

  9. Population viscosity suppresses disease emergence by preserving local herd immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reluga, Timothy C; Shim, Eunha

    2014-12-01

    Animal reservoirs for infectious diseases pose ongoing risks to human populations. In this theory of zoonoses, the introduction event that starts an epidemic is assumed to be independent of all preceding events. However, introductions are often concentrated in communities that bridge the ecological interfaces between reservoirs and the general population. In this paper, we explore how the risks of disease emergence are altered by the aggregation of introduction events within bridge communities. In viscous bridge communities, repeated introductions can elevate the local prevalence of immunity. This local herd immunity can form a barrier reducing the opportunities for disease emergence. In some situations, reducing exposure rates counterintuitively increases the emergence hazards because of off-setting reductions in local immunity. Increases in population mixing can also increase emergence hazards, even when average contact rates are conserved. Our theory of bridge communities may help guide prevention and explain historical emergence events, where disruption of stable economic, political or demographic processes reduced population viscosity at ecological interfaces.

  10. Effect of maternal probiotic intervention on HPA axis, immunity and gut microbiota in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Barouei

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine whether maternal probiotic intervention influences the alterations in the brain-immune-gut axis induced by neonatal maternal separation (MS and/or restraint stress in adulthood (AS in Wistar rats. DESIGN: Dams had free access to drinking water supplemented with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis BB-12® (3 × 10(9 CFU/mL and Propionibacterium jensenii 702 (8.0 × 10(8 CFU/mL from 10 days before conception until postnatal day (PND 22 (weaning day, or to control ad lib water. Offspring were subjected to MS from PND 2 to 14 or left undisturbed. From PND 83 to 85, animals underwent 30 min/day AS, or were left undisturbed as controls. On PND 24 and 86, blood samples were collected for corticosterone, ACTH and IgA measurement. Colonic contents were analysed for the composition of microflora and luminal IgA levels. RESULTS: Exposure to MS significantly increased ACTH levels and neonatal fecal counts of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, E. coli, enterococci and clostridia, but reduced plasma IgA levels compared with non-MS animals. Animals exposed to AS exhibited significantly increased ACTH and corticosterone levels, decreased aerobic bacteria and bifidobacteria, and increased Bacteroides and E. coli counts compared to non-AS animals. MS coupled with AS induced significantly decreased anaerobes and clostridia compared with the non-stress adult controls. Maternal probiotic intervention significantly increased neonatal corticosterone levels which persisted until at least week 12 in females only, and also resulted in elevated adult ACTH levels and altered neonatal microflora comparable to that of MS. However, it improved plasma IgA responses, increased enterococci and clostridia in MS adults, increased luminal IgA levels, and restored anaerobes, bifidobacteria and E. coli to normal in adults. CONCLUSION: Maternal probiotic intervention induced activation of neonatal stress pathways and an imbalance in gut microflora. Importantly

  11. The gut microbiome shapes intestinal immune responses during health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, June L.; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.

    2013-01-01

    Immunologic dysregulation is the cause of many non-infectious human diseases such as autoimmunity, allergy and cancer. The gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of interaction between the host immune system and microorganisms, both symbiotic and pathogenic. Here we discuss findings which indicate that developmental aspects of the adaptive immune system are influenced by intestinal bacterial colonization. We also highlight the molecular pathways that mediate host–symbiont interactions that regulate proper immune function. Finally, we present recent evidence to support an emerging concept whereby disturbances in the bacterial microbiota result in immunological dysregulation that may underlie disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. Perhaps the mammalian immune system which appears designed to control microbes is, in fact, controlled by the microbes themselves. PMID:19343057

  12. Understanding gut-immune interactions in management of acute infectious diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, P; Hall, V

    2012-11-01

    This article discusses the role that immunity plays in the risk of diarrhoea and the potential role for probiotics in the management of acute infectious diarrhoea in older people, including antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea.

  13. Regulation of the gut microbiota by the mucosal immune system in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Inohara, Naohiro

    2014-09-01

    The benefits of commensal bacteria to the health of the host have been well documented, such as providing stimulation to potentiate host immune responses, generation of useful metabolites, and direct competition with pathogens. However, the ability of the host immune system to control the microbiota remains less well understood. Recent microbiota analyses in mouse models have revealed detailed structures and diversities of microbiota at different sites of the digestive tract in mouse populations. The contradictory findings of previous studies on the role of host immune responses in overall microbiota composition are likely attributable to the high β-diversity in mouse populations as well as technical limitations of the methods to analyze microbiota. The host employs multiple systems to strictly regulate their interactions with the microbiota. A spatial segregation between the host and microbiota is achieved with the mucosal epithelium, which is further fortified with a mucus layer on the luminal side and Paneth cells that produce antimicrobial peptides. When commensal bacteria or pathogens breach the epithelial barrier and translocate to peripheral tissues, the host immune system is activated to eliminate them. Defective segregation and tissue elimination of commensals result in exaggerated inflammatory responses and possibly death of the host. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of mouse microbiota, its common features with human microbiota, the technologies utilized to analyze microbiota, and finally the challenges faced to delineate the role of host immune responses in the composition of the luminal microbiota.

  14. Another armament in gut immunity: lymphotoxin-mediated crosstalk between innate lymphoid and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spits, H

    2011-07-21

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are novel players in innate immunity. Tumanov et al. (Tumanov et al., 2011) demonstrate that crosstalk between ILCs and dendritic cells involving membrane-bound lymphotoxin in ILCs and its receptor is critical for protection against colitogenic bacteria.

  15. Another Armament in Gut Immunity: Lymphotoxin-Mediated Crosstalk between Innate Lymphoid and Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Spits

    2011-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are novel players in innate immunity. Tumanov et al. (Tumanov et al., 2011) demonstrate that crosstalk between ILCs and dendritic cells involving membrane-bound lymphotoxin in ILCs and its receptor is critical for protection against colitogenic bacteria

  16. CD4+ lymphoid tissue inducer cells promote innate immunity in the gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Elloso, M. Merle; Fouser, Lynette A.; Artis, David

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Fetal CD4+ lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells play a critical role in the development of lymphoid-tissues. Recent studies identified that LTi cells persist in adults and are related to a heterogeneous population of innate lymphoid cells that have been implicated in inflammatory responses. However, whether LTi cells contribute to protective immunity remains poorly defined. We demonstrate that following infection with Citrobacter rodentium, CD4+ LTi cells were a dominant source of interleukin-22 (IL-22) early during infection. Infection-induced CD4+ LTi cell responses were IL-23-dependent, and ablation of IL-23 impaired innate immunity. Further, depletion of CD4+ LTi cells abrogated infection-induced expression of IL-22 and anti-microbial peptides, resulting in exacerbated host mortality. LTi cells were also found to be essential for host protective immunity in lymphocyte-replete hosts. Collectively these data demonstrate that adult CD4+ LTi cells are a critical source of IL-22 and identify a previously unrecognized function for CD4+ LTi cells in promoting innate immunity in the intestine. PMID:21194981

  17. Vasoactive intestinal peptide is a local mediator in a gut-brain neural axis activating intestinal gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vadder, F; Plessier, F; Gautier-Stein, A; Mithieux, G

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN) promotes metabolic benefits through activation of a gut-brain neural axis. However, the local mediator activating gluconeogenic genes in the enterocytes remains unknown. We show that (i) vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) signaling through VPAC1 receptor activates the intestinal glucose-6-phosphatase gene in vivo, (ii) the activation of IGN by propionate is counteracted by VPAC1 antagonism, and (iii) VIP-positive intrinsic neurons in the submucosal plexus are increased under the action of propionate. These data support the role of VIP as a local neuromodulator released by intrinsic enteric neurons and responsible for the induction of IGN through a VPAC1 receptor-dependent mechanism in enterocytes.

  18. Depletion of Gut Microbiota Protects against Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emal, D.; Rampanelli, E.; Stroo, I.; Butter, L.M.; Teske, G.J.; Claessen, N.; Stokman, G.; Florquin, S.; Leemans, J.C.; Dessing, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    An accumulating body of evidence shows that gut microbiota fulfill an important role in health and disease by modulating local and systemic immunity. The importance of the microbiome in the development of kidney disease, however, is largely unknown. To study this concept, we depleted gut microbiota

  19. A local immunization strategy for networks with overlapping community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavian, Fatemeh; Salehi, Mostafa; Teimouri, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Since full coverage treatment is not feasible due to limited resources, we need to utilize an immunization strategy to effectively distribute the available vaccines. On the other hand, the structure of contact network among people has a significant impact on epidemics of infectious diseases (such as SARS and influenza) in a population. Therefore, network-based immunization strategies aim to reduce the spreading rate by removing the vaccinated nodes from contact network. Such strategies try to identify more important nodes in epidemics spreading over a network. In this paper, we address the effect of overlapping nodes among communities on epidemics spreading. The proposed strategy is an optimized random-walk based selection of these nodes. The whole process is local, i.e. it requires contact network information in the level of nodes. Thus, it is applicable to large-scale and unknown networks in which the global methods usually are unrealizable. Our simulation results on different synthetic and real networks show that the proposed method outperforms the existing local methods in most cases. In particular, for networks with strong community structures, high overlapping membership of nodes or small size communities, the proposed method shows better performance.

  20. Protection to Fasciola hepatica in the gut mucosa of immune rats is associated with infiltrates of eosinophils, IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies around the parasites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milligen, van F.J.; Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Hendriks, I.M.; Gaasenbeek, C.P.H.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the immune effector mechanisms that underlie protection against F. hepatica in the gut wall of immune rats, using (immuno)histochemistry. In the lamina propria of immune Wistar rats, four weeks after oral infection, frequencies of IgE-positive cells, eosinophils and mucosal mast cell

  1. Impact of Kefir Derived Lactobacillus kefiri on the Mucosal Immune Response and Gut Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasi, P.; Racedo, S. M.; Jacquot, C.; Romanin, D. E.; Serradell, M. A.; Urdaci, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of the impact of probiotics on host health could help to understand how they can be used in the prevention of diseases. On the basis of our previous studies and in vitro assays on PBMC and Caco-2 ccl20:luc reporter system presented in this work, the strain Lactobacillus kefiri CIDCA 8348 was selected and administrated to healthy Swiss mice daily for 21 days. The probiotic treatment increased IgA in feces and reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators in Peyer Patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, where it also increased IL-10. In ileum IL-10, CXCL-1 and mucin 6 genes were upregulated; meanwhile in colon mucin 4 was induced whereas IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-1β genes were downregulated. Moreover, ileum and colon explants showed the anti-inflammatory effect of L. kefiri since the LPS-induced increment of IL-6 and GM-CSF levels in control mice was significantly attenuated in L. kefiri treated mice. Regarding fecal microbiota, DGGE profiles allowed differentiation of experimental groups in two separated clusters. Quantitative PCR analysis of different bacterial groups revealed only significant changes in Lactobacillus population. In conclusion, L. kefiri is a good candidate to be used in gut inflammatory disorders. PMID:25811034

  2. Impact of Kefir Derived Lactobacillus kefiri on the Mucosal Immune Response and Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Carasi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the impact of probiotics on host health could help to understand how they can be used in the prevention of diseases. On the basis of our previous studies and in vitro assays on PBMC and Caco-2 ccl20:luc reporter system presented in this work, the strain Lactobacillus kefiri CIDCA 8348 was selected and administrated to healthy Swiss mice daily for 21 days. The probiotic treatment increased IgA in feces and reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators in Peyer Patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, where it also increased IL-10. In ileum IL-10, CXCL-1 and mucin 6 genes were upregulated; meanwhile in colon mucin 4 was induced whereas IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-1β genes were downregulated. Moreover, ileum and colon explants showed the anti-inflammatory effect of L. kefiri since the LPS-induced increment of IL-6 and GM-CSF levels in control mice was significantly attenuated in L. kefiri treated mice. Regarding fecal microbiota, DGGE profiles allowed differentiation of experimental groups in two separated clusters. Quantitative PCR analysis of different bacterial groups revealed only significant changes in Lactobacillus population. In conclusion, L. kefiri is a good candidate to be used in gut inflammatory disorders.

  3. Role of Vitamin D in the Hygiene Hypothesis: The Interplay between Vitamin D, Vitamin D Receptors, Gut Microbiota, and Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Allison; Mach, Núria

    2016-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis postulates that higher levels of cleanliness and improper exposure to microorganisms early in childhood could disturb the intestinal microbiome resulting in abnormal immune responses. Recently, more attention has been put on how a lack of sun exposure and consequently vitamin D deficiency could lead to less immune tolerance and aberrant immune responses. Moreover, vitamin D receptor (VDR) function has been positioned to be a critical aspect of immune response and gut homeostasis. Therefore, this review focuses on the role that the interaction between vitamin D, VDR function, and gut microbiome might have on autoimmune diseases in the context of the hygiene hypothesis. Literature shows that there is a high correlation between vitamin D deficiency, VDR dysfunction, gut microbiota composition, and autoimmune diseases. The biologically active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, serves as the primary ligand for VDRs, which have been shown to play a fundamental role in reducing autoimmune disease symptoms. Although the biological functions of VDR, the effects of its genetic variants, and the effects of epigenetic profiles in its promoter region are largely unknown in humans, studies in murine models are increasingly demonstrating that VDRs play a crucial role in attenuating autoimmune disease symptoms by regulating autophagy and the production of antimicrobial peptides, such cathelicidin and β-defensin, which are responsible for modifying the intestinal microbiota to a healthier composition. Remarkably, evidence shows that hormonal compounds and byproducts of the microbiota such as secondary bile acids might also activate VDR. Therefore, understanding the interaction between VDR and gut microbiota is of the utmost importance toward understanding the rise in autoimmune diseases in Western countries. We have gained insights on how the VDR functions affects inflammation, autophagy, and microbiota composition that could lead to the development of

  4. [State of local immunity in patients with chronic generalized parodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, D V; Schmagel; Mozgovaia, L A; Beliaeva, O V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was the determination of the state of local immunity in periodontal complex in patients with chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP). 96 individuals were examined (mean age 43.6+/-1.2 years). All the patients were divided into 2 groups: basic group with CGP patients (76 persons) and comparative group - individuals with intact periodontium (20 persons). To evaluate local immunity in dentogingival fluids the determination of concentrations of IgG, IgM, and IgA immunoglobulins has been used, as well as TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, INF-gamma, IL-1ra, IL-10, and IL-4 cytokines, and also factors controlling the state of bone tissue, namely, osteoprotegerine (OPG), and RANK-ligand. In gingival fluid of CGP patients the increase in both pro-, and anti-inflammatory mediators with indication to Th2-deviation (decrease of INF-gamma level and elevation of IL-4 level) was observed. CGP patients exhibited in their periodontal complex marked increase of IgG, IgM, and IgA concentrations that apparently evidenced to the consequence of local polyclonal activation of B-lymphocytes. Gingival fluid of CGP patients showed the elevation of RANKL, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 levels, and the decrease in OPG concentration that could be the reason for osteoclast activation and subsequent destruction of bone tissue. In case of CGP in the zone of periodontium developed inflammation that is characterized by elevated level of IL-8 and predominance of neutrophil number over the quantity of other types of leukocytes.

  5. 肠道微生态系统与肠黏膜免疫关系研究进展%Correlation of gut microflora and intestinal mucosal immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪南(综述); 湛先保(审校)

    2014-01-01

    Gut microflora , an important part in maintaining the intestinal homeostasis , can participate in the development of intestinal mucosal immune system , promote the synthesis of secreted IgA ( sIgA) and interact with intestinal immune cells .Gut micro-flora also plays a significant role in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases , irritable bowel syndrome , pediatric allergic disea-ses and other disorders .This paper reviews the advances about the correlation of gut microflora and intestinal mucosal immunity .%肠道微生态系统参与肠黏膜免疫系统的发育,促进肠黏膜分泌型免疫球蛋白A(secreted IgA, sIgA)的合成,并与肠黏膜免疫细胞相互调节,是维持肠道稳态的重要机制,在炎症性肠病、肠易激综合征、小儿过敏性疾病等疾患的发生发展中发挥重要的作用。文中对肠道微生态系统与肠黏膜免疫功能关系的进展作一综述。

  6. Manipulation of the gut microbiota in C57BL/6 mice changes glucose tolerancewithout affecting weight development and gut mucosal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gunilla Veslemöy; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Hufeldt, Majbritt Ravn;

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans and mice are under the influence of the composition of the gut microbiota (GM). It was previously demonstrated that treating Lepob mice with antibiotics improved glucose tolerance. However, wild type C57BL/6J mice may also exhibit plas...

  7. Localizing transcripts to single cells suggests an important role of uncultured deltaproteobacteria in the termite gut hydrogen economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Adam Z; Zhang, Xinning; Lucey, Kaitlyn S; Ottesen, Elizabeth A; Trivedi, Vikas; Choi, Harry M T; Pierce, Niles A; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2013-10-01

    Identifying microbes responsible for particular environmental functions is challenging, given that most environments contain an uncultivated microbial diversity. Here we combined approaches to identify bacteria expressing genes relevant to catabolite flow and to locate these genes within their environment, in this case the gut of a "lower," wood-feeding termite. First, environmental transcriptomics revealed that 2 of the 23 formate dehydrogenase (FDH) genes known in the system accounted for slightly more than one-half of environmental transcripts. FDH is an essential enzyme of H2 metabolism that is ultimately important for the assimilation of lignocellulose-derived energy by the insect. Second, single-cell PCR analysis revealed that two different bacterial types expressed these two transcripts. The most commonly transcribed FDH in situ is encoded by a previously unappreciated deltaproteobacterium, whereas the other FDH is spirochetal. Third, PCR analysis of fractionated gut contents demonstrated that these bacteria reside in different spatial niches; the spirochete is free-swimming, whereas the deltaproteobacterium associates with particulates. Fourth, the deltaproteobacteria expressing FDH were localized to protozoa via hybridization chain reaction-FISH, an approach for multiplexed, spatial mapping of mRNA and rRNA targets. These results underscore the importance of making direct vs. inference-based gene-species associations, and have implications in higher termites, the most successful termite lineage, in which protozoa have been lost from the gut community. Contrary to expectations, in higher termites, FDH genes related to those from the protozoan symbiont dominate, whereas most others were absent, suggesting that a successful gene variant can persist and flourish after a gut perturbation alters a major environmental niche.

  8. Metagenomic Shotgun Sequencing and Unbiased Metabolomic Profiling Identify Specific Human Gut Microbiota and Metabolites Associated with Immune Checkpoint Therapy Efficacy in Melanoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur E. Frankel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This is the first prospective study of the effects of human gut microbiota and metabolites on immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICT response in metastatic melanoma patients. Whereas many melanoma patients exhibit profound response to ICT, there are fewer options for patients failing ICT—particularly with BRAF-wild-type disease. In preclinical studies, specific gut microbiota promotes regression of melanoma in mice. We therefore conducted a study of the effects of pretreatment gut microbiota and metabolites on ICT Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors response in 39 metastatic melanoma patients treated with ipilimumab, nivolumab, ipilimumab plus nivolumab (IN, or pembrolizumab (P. IN yielded 67% responses and 8% stable disease; P achieved 23% responses and 23% stable disease. ICT responders for all types of therapies were enriched for Bacteroides caccae. Among IN responders, the gut microbiome was enriched for Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bacteroides thetaiotamicron, and Holdemania filiformis. Among P responders, the microbiome was enriched for Dorea formicogenerans. Unbiased shotgun metabolomics revealed high levels of anacardic acid in ICT responders. Based on these pilot studies, both additional confirmatory clinical studies and preclinical testing of these bacterial species and metabolites are warranted to confirm their ICT enhancing activity.

  9. Local induction of immunosuppressive CD8+ T cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Fleissner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In contrast to intestinal CD4(+ regulatory T cells (T(regs, the generation and function of immunomodulatory intestinal CD8(+ T cells is less well defined. To dissect the immunologic mechanisms of CD8(+ T cell function in the mucosa, reactivity against hemagglutinin (HA expressed in intestinal epithelial cells of mice bearing a MHC class-I-restricted T-cell-receptor specific for HA was studied. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HA-specific CD8(+ T cells were isolated from gut-associated tissues and phenotypically and functionally characterized for the expression of Foxp3(+ and their suppressive capacity. We demonstrate that intestinal HA expression led to peripheral induction of HA-specific CD8(+Foxp3(+ T cells. Antigen-experienced CD8(+ T cells in this transgenic mouse model suppressed the proliferation of CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells in vitro. Gene expression analysis of suppressive HA-specific CD8(+ T cells revealed a specific up-regulation of CD103, Nrp1, Tnfrsf9 and Pdcd1, molecules also expressed on CD4(+ T(reg subsets. Finally, gut-associated dendritic cells were able to induce HA-specific CD8(+Foxp3(+ T cells. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that gut specific antigen presentation is sufficient to induce CD8(+ T(regsin vivo which may maintain intestinal homeostasis by down-modulating effector functions of T cells.

  10. Immunomodulation by Gut Microbiota: Role of Toll-Like Receptor Expressed by T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagrazia Valentini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A close relationship exists between gut microbiota and immune responses. An imbalance of this relationship can determine local and systemic immune diseases. In fact the immune system plays an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis with the microbiota that normally resides in the gut, while, at the same time, the gut microbiota influences the immune system, modulating number and function of effector and regulatory T cells. To achieve this aim, mutual regulation between immune system and microbiota is achieved through several mechanisms, including the engagement of toll-like receptors (TLRs, pathogen-specific receptors expressed on numerous cell types. TLRs are able to recognize ligands from commensal or pathogen microbiota to maintain the tolerance or trigger the immune response. In this review, we summarize the latest evidences about the role of TLRs expressed in adaptive T cells, to understand how the immune system promotes intestinal homeostasis, fights invasion by pathogens, and is modulated by the intestinal microbiota.

  11. Gut Microbiota and Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Vaarala, Outi

    2012-01-01

    The gut immune system has a key role in the development of autoimmune diabetes, and factors that control the gut immune system are also regulators of beta-cell autoimmunity. Gut microbiota modulate the function of the gut immune system by their effect on the innate immune system, such as the intestinal epithelial cells and dendritic cells, and on the adaptive immune system, in particular intestinal T cells. Due to the immunological link between gut and pancreas, e.g. the shared lymphocyte hom...

  12. Inhibition of rat gut reperfusion injury with an agent developed for the mouse. Evidence that amplification of injury by innate immunity is conserved between two animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, Jalil; Ahmadi-Yazdi, Cyrus; Sheu, Eric G; Oakes, Sean M; Moore, Francis D

    2010-06-01

    Murine reperfusion injury follows binding of specific IgM natural antibodies to neo-antigens exposed in ischemic tissue. Peptides that mimic the site of antibody binding in the injury prevent IgM binding when administered intravenously before reperfusion. To determine whether this pathogenic sequence is restricted to mice, we have tested the ability of the peptide to prevent reperfusion injury in a dissimilar species, the rat. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 40 min of mesenteric ischemia followed by 180 min of reperfusion. The peptide mimic was administered intravenously prior to reperfusion. Gut injury was quantified using a scoring system based on the hematoxylin-and-eosin section. (125)I-labeled albumin was used to assess local (gut) and remote (lung) injury. The macroscopic appearance of bowel from peptide-treated animals was less edematous and hemorrhagic. Microscopic analysis showed a significantly reduced injury score in peptide-treated animals. Permeability data indicated a significant reduction in local and remote injury in peptide-treated animals. The data demonstrate attenuation of rat gut microvillus injury, of gut edema, and of remote injury following mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion due to administration of an intravenous peptide mimic of a murine ischemia neo-antigen, indicating a second species uses a similar ischemia neo-antigen and corresponding natural antibody specificity to amplify reperfusion injury to the point of necrosis. This mechanism of inflammation is potentially applicable to higher species.

  13. Evidences for vagus nerve in maintenance of immune balance and transmission of immune information from gut to brain in STM-infected rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Wang; Bai-Ren Wang; Xi-Jing Zhang; Zhen Xu; Yu-Qiang Ding; Gong Ju

    2002-01-01

    .05). In addition, subdiagphragmstic vagotomyitself also decreased the percentages of CD8 ± T cells (from28 % ±3.0 % to21 % +5.9 %, P<0.05) and MIFs of CD4+(from6.6±0.6to4.9±1.0, P<0.05) andCD8+ Tcells(from2.9±0.39 to1.4± 0.34, P<0.05). Both of themmanifested the important role of vagus nerve in transmittingimmune information from gut to brain and maintaining theimmune balance of the organism.CONCLUSION: Vagus nerve does involve in transmittingabdominal immune information into the brain in STMinfection condition and play an important role inmaintenance of the immune balance of the organism.

  14. Effect of the administration of a fermented milk containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 on intestinal microbiota and gut associated immune cells of nursing mice and after weaning until immune maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmuega Esteban

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial colonization of the intestine after birth is an important step for the development of the gut immune system. The acquisition of passive immunity through breast-feeding may influence the pattern of bacterial colonization in the newborn. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the administration of a probiotic fermented milk (PFM containing yogurt starter cultures and the probiotic bacteria strain Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 to mothers during nursing or their offspring, on the intestinal bacterial population and on parameters of the gut immune system. Results Fifteen mice of each group were sacrificed at ages 12, 21, 28 and 45 days. Large intestines were taken for determination of intestinal microbiota, and small intestines for the study of secretory-IgA (S-IgA in fluid and the study of IgA+ cells, macrophages, dendritic cells and goblet cells on tissue samples. The consumption of the PFM either by the mother during nursing or by the offspring after weaning modified the development of bifidobacteria population in the large intestine of the mice. These modifications were accompanied with a decrease of enterobacteria population. The administration of this PFM to the mothers improved their own immune system and this also affected their offspring. Offspring from mice that received PFM increased S-IgA in intestinal fluids, which mainly originated from their mother's immune system. A decrease in the number of macrophages, dendritic cells and IgA+ cells during the suckling period in offspring fed with PFM was observed; this could be related with the improvement of the immunity of the mothers, which passively protect their babies. At day 45, the mice reach maturity of their own immune system and the effects of the PFM was the stimulation of their mucosal immunity. Conclusion The present work shows the beneficial effect of the administration of a PFM not only to the mothers during the suckling period but also to

  15. An improved local immunization strategy for scale-free networks with a high degree of clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lingling; Jiang, Guoping; Song, Yurong; Song, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The design of immunization strategies is an extremely important issue for disease or computer virus control and prevention. In this paper, we propose an improved local immunization strategy based on node's clustering which was seldom considered in the existing immunization strategies. The main aim of the proposed strategy is to iteratively immunize the node which has a high connectivity and a low clustering coefficient. To validate the effectiveness of our strategy, we compare it with two typical local immunization strategies on both real and artificial networks with a high degree of clustering. Simulations on these networks demonstrate that the performance of our strategy is superior to that of two typical strategies. The proposed strategy can be regarded as a compromise between computational complexity and immune effect, which can be widely applied in scale-free networks of high clustering, such as social network, technological networks and so on. In addition, this study provides useful hints for designing optimal immunization strategy for specific network.

  16. Neurotransmitters and putative neuromodulators in the gut of Anguilla anguilla (L.. Localizations in the enteric nervous and endocrine systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Veggetti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The gut of silver eels (Anguilla anguilla L. was investigated in order to describe both the cholinergic and adrenergic intramural innervations, and the localization of possible accessory neuromediators. Histochemical reactions for the demonstration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form-(NADPH-diaphorase and acetylcholinesterese (AChEase were performed, as well as the immunohistochemical testing of tyrosine hydroxylase, met-enkephalin, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, bombesin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, neuropeptide Y (NPY, somatostatin, cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8, serotonin, cholineacetyltransferase. The results evidenced a different pattern in comparison with other vertebrates, namely mammals, and with other fish. Both NADPH-diaphorase and AChEase activities were histochemically detected all along the gut in the myenteric plexus, the inner musculature and the propria-submucosa. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was observed in the intestinal tract only, both in the myenteric plexus and in the inner musculature. Several neuropeptides (metenkephalin, CGRP, bombesin, substance P, VIP, NPY, somatostatin were, in addition, detected in the intramural innervation; some of them also in epithelial cells of the diffuse endocrine system (met-enkephalin, substance P, NPY, somatostatin. Serotonin was only present in endocrine cells. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was present in localizations to those of similar NADPHdiaphorase- reactivity, and in the same nerve bundles in which substance P- and CGRP-likeimmunoreactivities were detectable in the intestinal tract. In addition, NADPH-diaphorase-reactive neurons showed an anatomical relationship with AChEase-reactive nerve terminals, and a similar relationship existed between the latter and substance P-like immunoreactivity.

  17. Gut Microbiota-brain Axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xing Wang; Yu-Ping Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To systematically review the updated information about the gut microbiota-brain axis.Data Sources:All articles about gut microbiota-brain axis published up to July 18,2016,were identified through a literature search on PubMed,ScienceDirect,and Web of Science,with the keywords of"gut microbiota","gut-brain axis",and "neuroscience".Study Selection:All relevant articles on gut microbiota and gut-brain axis were included and carefully reviewed,with no limitation of study design.Results:It is well-recognized that gut microbiota affects the brain's physiological,behavioral,and cognitive functions although its precise mechanism has not yet been fully understood.Gut microbiota-brain axis may include gut microbiota and their metabolic products,enteric nervous system,sympathetic and parasympathetic branches within the autonomic nervous system,neural-immune system,neuroendocrine system,and central nervous system.Moreover,there may be five communication routes between gut microbiota and brain,including the gut-brain's neural network,neuroendocrine-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis,gut immune system,some neurotransmitters and neural regulators synthesized by gut bacteria,and barrier paths including intestinal mucosal barrier and blood-brain barrier.The microbiome is used to define the composition and functional characteristics of gut microbiota,and metagenomics is an appropriate technique to characterize gut microbiota.Conclusions:Gut microbiota-brain axis refers to a bidirectional information network between the gut microbiota and the brain,which may provide a new way to protect the brain in the near future.

  18. Gut Microbiota-brain Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Xing; Wang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the updated information about the gut microbiota-brain axis. Data Sources: All articles about gut microbiota-brain axis published up to July 18, 2016, were identified through a literature search on PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science, with the keywords of “gut microbiota”, “gut-brain axis”, and “neuroscience”. Study Selection: All relevant articles on gut microbiota and gut-brain axis were included and carefully reviewed, with no limitation of study design. Results: It is well-recognized that gut microbiota affects the brain's physiological, behavioral, and cognitive functions although its precise mechanism has not yet been fully understood. Gut microbiota-brain axis may include gut microbiota and their metabolic products, enteric nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic branches within the autonomic nervous system, neural-immune system, neuroendocrine system, and central nervous system. Moreover, there may be five communication routes between gut microbiota and brain, including the gut-brain's neural network, neuroendocrine-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, gut immune system, some neurotransmitters and neural regulators synthesized by gut bacteria, and barrier paths including intestinal mucosal barrier and blood-brain barrier. The microbiome is used to define the composition and functional characteristics of gut microbiota, and metagenomics is an appropriate technique to characterize gut microbiota. Conclusions: Gut microbiota-brain axis refers to a bidirectional information network between the gut microbiota and the brain, which may provide a new way to protect the brain in the near future. PMID:27647198

  19. Milk- and solid-feeding practices and daycare attendance are associated with differences in bacterial diversity, predominant communities, and metabolic and immune function of the infant gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Thompson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of the infant intestinal microbiome in response to dietary and other exposures may shape long-term metabolic and immune function. We examined differences in the community structure and function of the intestinal microbiome between four feeding groups, exclusively breastfed infants before introduction of solid foods (EBF, non-exclusively breastfed infants before introduction of solid foods (non-EBF, EBF infants after introduction of solid foods (EBF+S, and non-EBF infants after introduction of solid foods (non-EBF+S, and tested whether out-of-home daycare attendance was associated with differences in relative abundance of gut bacteria. Bacterial 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was performed on 49 stool samples collected longitudinally from a cohort of 9 infants (5 male, 4 female. PICRUSt metabolic inference analysis was used to identify metabolic impacts of feeding practices on the infant gut microbiome. Sequencing data identified significant differences across groups defined by feeding and daycare attendance. Non-EBF and daycare-attending infants had higher diversity and species richness than EBF and non-daycare attending infants. The gut microbiome of EBF infants showed increased proportions of Bifidobacterium and lower abundance of Bacteroidetes and Clostridiales than non-EBF infants. PICRUSt analysis indicated that introduction of solid foods had a marginal impact on the microbiome of EBF infants (24 enzymes overrepresented in EBF+S infants. In contrast, over 200 bacterial gene categories were overrepresented in non-EBF+S compared to non-EBF infants including several bacterial methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP involved in signal transduction. The identified differences between EBF and non-EBF infants suggest that breast milk may provide the gut microbiome with a greater plasticity (despite having a lower phylogenetic diversity that eases the transition into solid foods.

  20. Milk- and solid-feeding practices and daycare attendance are associated with differences in bacterial diversity, predominant communities, and metabolic and immune function of the infant gut microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amanda L; Monteagudo-Mera, Andrea; Cadenas, Maria B; Lampl, Michelle L; Azcarate-Peril, M A

    2015-01-01

    The development of the infant intestinal microbiome in response to dietary and other exposures may shape long-term metabolic and immune function. We examined differences in the community structure and function of the intestinal microbiome between four feeding groups, exclusively breastfed infants before introduction of solid foods (EBF), non-exclusively breastfed infants before introduction of solid foods (non-EBF), EBF infants after introduction of solid foods (EBF+S), and non-EBF infants after introduction of solid foods (non-EBF+S), and tested whether out-of-home daycare attendance was associated with differences in relative abundance of gut bacteria. Bacterial 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was performed on 49 stool samples collected longitudinally from a cohort of 9 infants (5 male, 4 female). PICRUSt metabolic inference analysis was used to identify metabolic impacts of feeding practices on the infant gut microbiome. Sequencing data identified significant differences across groups defined by feeding and daycare attendance. Non-EBF and daycare-attending infants had higher diversity and species richness than EBF and non-daycare attending infants. The gut microbiome of EBF infants showed increased proportions of Bifidobacterium and lower abundance of Bacteroidetes and Clostridiales than non-EBF infants. PICRUSt analysis indicated that introduction of solid foods had a marginal impact on the microbiome of EBF infants (24 enzymes overrepresented in EBF+S infants). In contrast, over 200 bacterial gene categories were overrepresented in non-EBF+S compared to non-EBF infants including several bacterial methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP) involved in signal transduction. The identified differences between EBF and non-EBF infants suggest that breast milk may provide the gut microbiome with a greater plasticity (despite having a lower phylogenetic diversity) that eases the transition into solid foods.

  1. The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuijt, T.J.; Lankelma, J.M.; Scicluna, B.P.; Melo, e F.S.; Roelofs, J.J.; Boer, de J.D.; Hoogendijk, A.J.; Beer, de R.; Vos, de A.; Belzer, C.; Vos, de W.M.; Poll, van der T.; Wiersinga, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia,

  2. The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuijt, T.J.; Lankelma, J.M.; Scicluna, B.P.; Melo, e F.S.; Roelofs, J.J.; Boer, de J.D.; Hoogendijk, A.J.; Beer, de R.; Vos, de A.; Belzer, C.; Vos, de W.M.; Poll, van der T.; Wiersinga, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia,

  3. Gastric cancer progression associated with local humoral immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Yolanda, López-Vidal; Sergio, Ponce-de-León; Hugo, Esquivel-Solís; Isabel, Amieva-Fernández Rosa; Rafael, Barreto-Zúñiga; Aldo, Torre-Delgadillo; Gonzalo, Castillo-Rojas

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the association between H. pylori and gastric cancer has been well described, the alterations studies are scarce in the humoral immune response in specific anatomical areas of stomach and during the stages of gastric cancer. The aim in this study was to determine the influence of humoral immune responses against H. pylori infection on gastric carcinoma. Methods We selected 16 gastric cancer cases and approximately one matched control per case at the National Institute of M...

  4. 肠道微生物对宿主免疫系统的调节及其可能机制%Regulation of Host Immune System by Gut Microbiota and Its Possible Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王珊珊; 王佳堃; 刘建新

    2015-01-01

    动物肠道是一个开放的生态系统,栖息着大量的微生物,这些微生物与宿主免疫系统之间协同进化,在维持肠道稳态方面发挥着重要的作用。建立和维持肠道微生物与宿主免疫系统之间有益的相互作用是保障机体健康的关键。为此,本文综述了肠道微生物区系的组成及影响因素、肠道微生物促进宿主免疫系统的发育及调节机体免疫系统的可能机制。%An animal gut is an open ecological system that is colonized by large numbers and variety of micro-organisms. The microbiota has coevolved relationship with the host immune system and plays an important role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Establishing and maintaining beneficial interactions between gut microbio-ta and host immunity are key requirements for host health. Therefore, this article reviewed the composition of gut microbiota, the development of the host immune system under regulation of gut microbes and the possible mechanisms of gut microbiota regulating immune system.

  5. Gut health in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the gastrointestinal tract is frequently described simply as "the gut," it is actually made up of (1) an epithelium; (2) a diverse and robust immune arm, which contains most of the immune cells in the body; and (3) the commensal bacteria, which contain more cells than are present in the ent...

  6. Specific inulin-type fructan fibers protect against autoimmune diabetes by modulating gut immunity, barrier function, and microbiota homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Kang; Chen, Hao; Faas, Marijke M; de Haan, Bart J; Li, Jiahong; Xiao, Ping; Zhang, Hao; Diana, Julien; de Vos, Paul; Sun, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Scope: Dietary fibers capable of modifying gut barrier and microbiota homeostasis affect the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here, we aim to compare modulatory effects of inulin-type fructans (ITFs), natural soluble dietary fibers with different degrees of fermentability from chicory root, on

  7. Specific inulin-type fructan fibers protect against autoimmune diabetes by modulating gut immunity, barrier function, and microbiota homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Kang; Chen, Hao; Faas, Marijke M; de Haan, Bart J; Li, Jiahong; Xiao, Ping; Zhang, Hao; Diana, Julien; de Vos, Paul; Sun, Jia

    Scope: Dietary fibers capable of modifying gut barrier and microbiota homeostasis affect the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here, we aim to compare modulatory effects of inulin-type fructans (ITFs), natural soluble dietary fibers with different degrees of fermentability from chicory root, on

  8. Substituting whole grains for refined grains in a 6-wk randomized trial has a modest effect on gut microbiota and immune and inflammatory markers of healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Sally M; Meydani, Mohsen; Barnett, Junaidah B; Goldin, Barry; Kane, Anne; Rasmussen, Helen; Brown, Carrie; Vangay, Pajau; Knights, Dan; Jonnalagadda, Satya; Koecher, Katie; Karl, J Philip; Thomas, Michael; Dolnikowski, Gregory; Li, Lijun; Saltzman, Edward; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2017-03-01

    Background: Observational studies suggest an inverse association between whole-grain (WG) consumption and inflammation. However, evidence from interventional studies is limited, and few studies have included measurements of cell-mediated immunity.Objective: We assessed the effects of diets rich in WGs compared with refined grains (RGs) on immune and inflammatory responses, gut microbiota, and microbial products in healthy adults while maintaining subject body weights.Design: After a 2-wk provided-food run-in period of consuming a Western-style diet, 49 men and 32 postmenopausal women [age range: 40-65 y, body mass index (in kg/m(2)) <35] were assigned to consume 1 of 2 provided-food weight-maintenance diets for 6 wk.Results: Compared with the RG group, the WG group had increased plasma total alkyresorcinols (a measure of WG intake) (P < 0.0001), stool weight (P < 0.0001), stool frequency (P = 0.02), and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) producer Lachnospira [false-discovery rate (FDR)-corrected P = 0.25] but decreased pro-inflammatory Enterobacteriaceae (FDR-corrected P = 0.25). Changes in stool acetate (P = 0.02) and total SCFAs (P = 0.05) were higher in the WG group than in the RG group. A positive association was shown between Lachnospira and acetate (FDR-corrected P = 0.002) or butyrate (FDR-corrected P = 0.005). We also showed that there was a higher percentage of terminal effector memory T cells (P = 0.03) and LPS-stimulated ex vivo production of tumor necrosis factor-α (P = 0.04) in the WG group than in the RG group, which were positively associated with plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations.Conclusion: The short-term consumption of WGs in a weight-maintenance diet increases stool weight and frequency and has modest positive effects on gut microbiota, SCFAs, effector memory T cells, and the acute innate immune response and no effect on other markers of cell-mediated immunity or systemic and gut inflammation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as

  9. Sampling locality is more detectable than taxonomy or ecology in the gut microbiota of the brood-parasitic Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hird, Sarah M; Carstens, Bryan C; Cardiff, Steven W; Dittmann, Donna L; Brumfield, Robb T

    2014-01-01

    Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater) are the most widespread avian brood parasite in North America, laying their eggs in the nests of approximately 250 host species that raise the cowbird nestlings as their own. It is currently unknown how these heterospecific hosts influence the cowbird gut microbiota relative to other factors, such as the local environment and genetics. We test a Nature Hypothesis (positing the importance of cowbird genetics) and a Nurture Hypothesis (where the host parents are most influential to cowbird gut microbiota) using the V6 region of 16S rRNA as a microbial fingerprint of the gut from 32 cowbird samples and 16 potential hosts from nine species. We test additional hypotheses regarding the influence of the local environment and age of the birds. We found no evidence for the Nature Hypothesis and little support for the Nurture Hypothesis. Cowbird gut microbiota did not form a clade, but neither did members of the host species. Rather, the physical location, diet and age of the bird, whether cowbird or host, were the most significant categorical variables. Thus, passerine gut microbiota may be most strongly influenced by environmental factors. To put this variation in a broader context, we compared the bird data to a fecal microbiota dataset of 38 mammal species and 22 insect species. Insects were always the most variable; on some axes, we found more variation within cowbirds than across all mammals. Taken together, passerine gut microbiota may be more variable and environmentally determined than other taxonomic groups examined to date.

  10. Sampling locality is more detectable than taxonomy or ecology in the gut microbiota of the brood-parasitic Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Hird

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater are the most widespread avian brood parasite in North America, laying their eggs in the nests of approximately 250 host species that raise the cowbird nestlings as their own. It is currently unknown how these heterospecific hosts influence the cowbird gut microbiota relative to other factors, such as the local environment and genetics. We test a Nature Hypothesis (positing the importance of cowbird genetics and a Nurture Hypothesis (where the host parents are most influential to cowbird gut microbiota using the V6 region of 16S rRNA as a microbial fingerprint of the gut from 32 cowbird samples and 16 potential hosts from nine species. We test additional hypotheses regarding the influence of the local environment and age of the birds. We found no evidence for the Nature Hypothesis and little support for the Nurture Hypothesis. Cowbird gut microbiota did not form a clade, but neither did members of the host species. Rather, the physical location, diet and age of the bird, whether cowbird or host, were the most significant categorical variables. Thus, passerine gut microbiota may be most strongly influenced by environmental factors. To put this variation in a broader context, we compared the bird data to a fecal microbiota dataset of 38 mammal species and 22 insect species. Insects were always the most variable; on some axes, we found more variation within cowbirds than across all mammals. Taken together, passerine gut microbiota may be more variable and environmentally determined than other taxonomic groups examined to date.

  11. [Hepon, promoter of local immunity in the complex therapy of dysfunctional microflora in bowel disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, A I; Ruchkina, I N

    2003-01-01

    The promoter of local immunity Heponum contributes to the restoration of eubiosis and normalization of showings of the immune status in patients with post-infection IBS. It is recommended to include Heponum in the complex therapy of chronic bowels diseases with the purpose of the restoration of normal microbiocenosis.

  12. Quasispecies tropism and compartmentalization in gut and peripheral blood during early and chronic phases of HIV-1 infection: possible correlation with immune activation markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozera, G; Abbate, I; Vlassi, C; Giombini, E; Lionetti, R; Selleri, M; Zaccaro, P; Bartolini, B; Corpolongo, A; D'Offizi, G; Baiocchini, A; Del Nonno, F; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2014-03-01

    HIV quasispecies was analysed in plasma and proviral genomes hosted by duodenal mucosa and peripheral blood cells (PBMC) from patients with early or chronic infection, with respect to viral heterogeneity, tropism compartmentalization and extent of immune activation. Seventeen HIV-1-infected combined antiretroviral therapy naive patients were enrolled (11 early infection and six chronic infection). V3 and nef genomic regions were analysed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Sequences were used to infer co-receptor usage and to construct phylogenetic trees. As markers of immune activation, plasma sCD14 and soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor II (sTNFRII) levels were measured. Median diversity of HIV RNA was lower in patients with early infection versus chronic infection patients. Overall, direct correlation was observed between V3 diversity and X4 frequency; V3 diversity of HIV RNA was inversely correlated with CD4 T-cell count; median sCD14 and sTNFRII values were similar in early and chronic patients, but X4 frequency of HIV RNA was directly correlated with plasma sCD14. The proportion of patients harbouring X4 variants and median intra-patient X4 frequency of proviral genomes tended to be higher in chronic infection than early infection patients. More pronounced compartmentalization of proviral quasispecies in gut compared with PBMC samples was observed in patients with early infection compared with chronic patients. The loss of gut/PBMC compartmentalization in more advanced stages of HIV infection was confirmed by longitudinal observation. More studies are needed to understand the pathogenetic significance of early HIV quasispecies compartmentalization and progressive intermixing of viral variants in subsequent phases of the infection, as well as the role of immune activation in tropism switch.

  13. The Integrated Impact of Diet On Human Immune Response, the Gut Microbiota, and Nutritional Status During Adaptation to a Spaceflight Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, G. L.; Zwart, S. R.; Young, M.; Kloeris, V.; Crucian, B.; Smith, S. M.; Lorenzi, H.

    2017-01-01

    Spaceflight impacts human physiology, including well documented immune system dysregulation. Diet, immune function, and the microbiome are interlinked, but diet is the only one of these factors that we have the ability to easily, and significantly, alter on Earth or during flight. As we understand dietary impacts on physiology more thoroughly, we may then improve the spaceflight diet to improve crew health and potentially reduce flight-associated physiological alterations. It is expected that increasing the consumption of fruits and vegetables and bioactive compounds (e.g.,omega-3 fatty acids, lycopene, flavonoids) and therefore enhancing overall nutritional intake from the nominal shelf-stable, fully-processed space food system could serve as a countermeasure to improve human immunological profiles, the taxonomic profile of the gut microbiota, and nutritional status, especially where currently dysregulated during spaceflight. This interdisciplinary study will determine the effect of the current shelf-stable spaceflight diet compared to an "enhanced" shelf-stable spaceflight diet (25% more foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, lycopene, flavonoids, fruits, and vegetables). The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) 2017 missions, consisting of closed chamber confinement, realistic mission simulation, in a high-fidelity mock space vehicle, will serve as a platform to replicate mission stressors and the dysregulated physiology observed in astronauts. Biosampling of crew members will occur at selected intervals, with complete dietary tracking. Outcome measures will include immune markers (e.g., peripheral leukocyte distribution, inflammatory cytokine profiles, T cell function), the taxonomic and metatranscriptomic profile of the gut microbiome, and nutritional status biomarkers and metabolites. Data collection will also include complete dietary tracking. Statistical evaluations will determine physiological and biochemical shifts in relation to nutrient in take and

  14. The Integrated Impact of Diet on Human Immune Response, the Gut Microbiota, and Nutritional Status During Adaptation to a Spaceflight Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, G. L.; Zwart, S. R.; Young, M.; Kloeris, V.; Crucian, B.; Smith, S. M.; Lorenzi, H.

    2018-01-01

    Spaceflight impacts human physiology, including well documented immune system dysregulation. Diet, immune function, and the microbiome are interlinked, but diet is the only one of these factors that we have the ability to easily, and significantly, alter on Earth or during flight. As we understand dietary impacts on physiology more thoroughly, we may then improve the spaceflight diet to improve crew health and potentially reduce spaceflight-associated physiological alterations. It is expected that increasing the consumption of fruits and vegetables and bioactive compounds (e.g., omega-3 fatty acids, lycopene, flavonoids) and therefore enhancing overall nutritional intake from the nominal shelf-stable, fully-processed space food system could serve as a countermeasure to improve human immunological profiles, the taxonomic profile of the gut microbiota, and nutritional status, especially where currently dysregulated during spaceflight. This interdisciplinary study will determine the effect of the current shelf-stable spaceflight diet compared to an "enhanced" shelf-stable spaceflight diet (25% more foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, lycopene, flavonoids, and more fruits, and vegetables in general). The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) 2017 missions, consisting of four 45-day missions with closed chamber confinement and realistic mission simulation in a high-fidelity mock space vehicle, will serve as a platform to replicate mission stressors and the effects on crew biochemistry, immunology, and the gut microbiome. Bio sampling of crewmembers is scheduled for selected intervals pre- and in-mission. Data collection also includes dietary intake recording. Outcome measures will include immune markers (e.g., peripheral leukocyte distribution, inflammatory cytokine profiles, T cell function), the taxonomic and metatranscriptomic profile of the gut microbiome, and nutritional status biomarkers and metabolites. Statistical evaluations will determine physiological

  15. Reciprocal immune benefit based on complementary production of antibiotics by the leech Hirudo verbana and its gut symbiont Aeromonas veronii

    OpenAIRE

    Aurélie Tasiemski; François Massol; Virginie Cuvillier-Hot; Céline Boidin-Wichlacz; Emmanuel Roger; Franck Rodet; Isabelle Fournier; Frédéric Thomas; Michel Salzet

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The medicinal leech has established a long-term mutualistic association with Aeromonas veronii, a versatile bacterium which can also display free-living waterborne and fish-or human-pathogenic lifestyles. Here, we investigated the role of antibiotics in the dynamics of interaction between the leech and its gut symbiont Aeromonas. By combining biochemical and molecular approaches, we isolated and identified for the first time the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced b...

  16. Regulatory T-cell depletion in the gut caused by integrin β7 deficiency exacerbates DSS colitis by evoking aberrant innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H L; Zheng, Y J; Pan, Y D; Xie, C; Sun, H; Zhang, Y H; Yuan, M Y; Song, B L; Chen, J F

    2016-03-01

    Integrin α4β7 controls lymphocyte trafficking into the gut and has essential roles in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The α4β7-blocking antibody vedolizumab is approved for IBD treatment; however, high dose of vedolizumab aggravates colitis in a small percentage of patients. Herein, we show that integrin β7 deficiency results in colonic regulatory T (Treg) cell depletion and exacerbates dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis by evoking aberrant innate immunity. In DSS-treated β7-deficient mice, the loss of colonic Treg cells induces excessive macrophage infiltration in the colon via upregulation of colonic epithelial intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and increases proinflammatory cytokine expression, thereby exacerbating DSS-induced colitis. Moreover, reconstitution of the colonic Treg cell population in β7-deficient mice suppresses aberrant innate immune response in the colon and attenuates DSS colitis. Thus, integrin α4β7 is essential for suppression of DSS colitis as it regulates the colonic Treg cell population and innate immunity.

  17. Partial Enteral Nutrition Preserves Elements of Gut Barrier Function, Including Innate Immunity, Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (IAP) Level, and Intestinal Microbiota in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiao; Bi, Jingcheng; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-08-03

    Lack of enteral nutrition (EN) during parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to higher incidence of infection because of gut barrier dysfunction. However, the effects of partial EN on intestina linnate immunity, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and microbiota remain unclear. The mice were randomized into six groups to receive either standard chow or isocaloric and isonitrogenous nutritional support with variable partial EN to PN ratios. Five days later, the mice were sacrificed and tissue samples were collected. Bacterial translocation, the levels of lysozyme, mucin 2 (MUC2), and IAP were analyzed. The composition of intestinal microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Compared with chow, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) resulted in a dysfunctional mucosal barrier, as evidenced by increased bacterial translocation (p microbiota (p intestinal microbiota.

  18. TCDD modulation of gut microbiome correlated with liver and immune toxicity in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefever, Daniel E; Xu, Joella; Chen, Yingjia; Huang, Guannan; Tamas, Nagy; Guo, Tai L

    2016-08-01

    An increasing body of evidence has shown the important role of the gut microbiome in mediating toxicity following environmental contaminant exposure. The goal of this study was to determine if the adverse metabolic effects of chronic 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure would be sufficient to exacerbate hyperglycemia, and to further determine if these outcomes were attributable to the gut microbiota alteration. Adult male CD-1 mice were exposed to TCDD (6μg/kg body weight biweekly) by gavage and injected (i.p.) with STZ (4×50mg/kg body weight) to induced hyperglycemia. 16S rRNA sequencing was used to characterize the changes in the microbiome community composition. Glucose monitoring, flow cytometry, histopathology, and organ characterization were performed to determine the deleterious phenotypic changes of TCDD exposure. Chronic TCDD treatment did not appear to exacerbate STZ-induced hyperglycemia as blood glucose levels were slightly reduced in the TCDD treated mice; however, polydipsia and polyphagia were observed. Importantly, TCDD exposure caused a dramatic change in microbiota structure, as characterized at the phylum level by increasing Firmicutes and decreasing Bacteroidetes while at the family level most notably by increasing Lactobacillaceae and Desulfovibrionaceae, and decreasing Prevotellaceae and ACK M1. The changes in microbiota were further found to be broadly associated with phenotypic changes seen from chronic TCDD treatment. In particular, the phylum level Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes ratio negatively correlated with both liver weight and liver pathology, and positively associated with %CD3(+)NK(+) T cells, a key mediator of host-microbial interactions. Collectively, these findings suggest that the dysregulated gut microbiome may contribute to the deleterious effects (e.g., liver toxicity) seen with TCDD exposure.

  19. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Constance Franz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived, which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health.

  20. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG enhanced Th1 cellular immunity but did not affect antibody responses in a human gut microbiota transplanted neonatal gnotobiotic pig model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wen

    Full Text Available This study aims to establish a human gut microbiota (HGM transplanted gnotobiotic (Gn pig model of human rotavirus (HRV infection and diarrhea, and to verify the dose-effects of probiotics on HRV vaccine-induced immune responses. Our previous studies using the Gn pig model found that probiotics dose-dependently regulated both T cell and B cell immune responses induced by rotavirus vaccines. We generated the HGM transplanted neonatal Gn pigs through daily feeding of neonatal human fecal suspension to germ-free pigs for 3 days starting at 12 hours after birth. We found that attenuated HRV (AttHRV vaccination conferred similar overall protection against rotavirus diarrhea and virus shedding in Gn pigs and HGM transplanted Gn pigs. HGM promoted the development of the neonatal immune system, as evidenced by the significantly enhanced IFN-γ producing T cell responses and reduction of regulatory T cells and their cytokine production in the AttHRV-vaccinated pigs. The higher dose Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG feeding (14 doses, up to 109 colony-forming-unit [CFU]/dose effectively increased the LGG counts in the HGM Gn pig intestinal contents and significantly enhanced HRV-specific IFN-γ producing T cell responses to the AttHRV vaccine. Lower dose LGG (9 doses, up to 106 CFU/dose was ineffective. Neither doses of LGG significantly improved the protection rate, HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers in serum, or IgA antibody titers in intestinal contents compared to the AttHRV vaccine alone, suggesting that an even higher dose of LGG is needed to overcome the influence of the microbiota to achieve the immunostimulatory effect in the HGM pigs. This study demonstrated that HGM Gn pig is an applicable animal model for studying immune responses to rotavirus vaccines and can be used for studying interventions (i.e., probiotics and prebiotics that may enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines through improving the gut microbiota.

  1. Tamibarotene modulates the local immune response in experimental periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Wang, Linyuan; Liu, Dixin; Lin, Xiaoping

    2014-12-01

    Tamibarotene (Am80), a synthetic retinoic acid receptor (RAR), is an agonist with high specificity for RARα and RARβ. Retinoid agonists have been shown to inhibit Th17 cell polarization and to enhance forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression during the course of inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the previously unrecognized role of Am80 in regulating the immune responses of periodontitis within the oral microenvironment. The experimental model of periodontitis in mice was induced by oral infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) W83. Our results indicated that Am80 effectively suppressed alveolar bone resorption induced by P. gingivalis W83 and decreased the number of osteoclasts. We clarified that these effects were closely associated with the reduced percentage of CD4(+) retinoid-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt(+) cells and increased the percentage of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells in the gingival tissues, cervical lymph nodes (CLNs), and spleen. Furthermore, in P. gingivalis-infected mice, Am80 down-regulated mRNA expression levels of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa beta ligand (RANKL), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-6, and IL-1β. Simultaneously, Am80 up-regulated expression levels of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in gingival tissues and the CLNs. Our results suggest that Am80 could protect against periodontal bone resorption, primarily through the modulation of immune responses in the oral microenvironment, and demonstrate the potential of Am80 as a novel clinical strategy for preventing periodontitis.

  2. Factors of Innate and Adaptive Local Immunity in Children with Primary Deficiencies of Antibody Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Chernyshova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In 40 children with various types of primary immunodeficiencies (PID of antibody formation we examined factors of local immunity in saliva. It is found that in the saliva of children with PID of antibody formation in comparison with immunocompetent children the concentration of factors of adaptive immunity is significantly reduced. Lack of adaptive immunity in the PID of antibody formation to some extent is compensated by increased concentrations of innate immune factors on the mucous membranes — the free Sc, as well as lactoferrin in selective immunodeficiency of IgA. At PID of antibody formation we observed increased TNF-α level in the saliva, which may indicate the persistence of local inflammation on the membranes of the respiratory tract.

  3. Ultrastructural localization of highly variable 185/333 immune response proteins in the coelomocytes of the sea urchin, Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Birch, Debra; Nair, Sham V; Raftos, David A

    2011-11-01

    The 185/333 proteins of sea urchins represent a family of highly variable immune response molecules with unknown functions. In this study, we show that 185/333 proteins are expressed by three cell types: amoebocytes, colourless spherule cells and gut-associated amoebocytes. A sub-population of amoebocytes express 185/333 proteins on the membranes of vesicles emanating from the trans-Golgi and which later fuse with the plasma membranes of the cells. The previously uncharacterized gut-associated amoebocytes also show a high level of 185/333 protein expression on their internal vesicles and plasma membranes. Colourless spherule cells contain 185/333 proteins within large spherules (specialized intracellular vesicles). In the presence of bacteria and yeast, the ultrastucture of colourless spherule cells changes and 185/333 proteins disappear. In contrast, 185/333 proteins were not found in the phagosomes of coelomocytes. The 185/333-positive gut amoebocytes were often associated with anuclear bodies, which appeared to incorporate material of microbial origin that was surrounded by 185/333 proteins. The association between 185/333 proteins on gut amoebocytes and anuclear bodies suggests that these proteins may be involved in the phagocytosis of microbes in the gut epithelium.

  4. Oral Immunization with a Recombinant Lactococcus lactis-Expressing HIV-1 Antigen on Group A Streptococcus Pilus Induces Strong Mucosal Immunity in the Gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Jones, Andrew; Quigley, Bernard R; Scott, June R; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-11-15

    The induction of a potent humoral and cellular immune response in mucosal tissue is important for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. Most of the current HIV vaccines under development use the i.m. route for immunization, which is relatively poor in generating potent and long-lived mucosal immune responses. In this article, we explore the ability of an oral vaccination with a probiotic organism, Lactococcus lactis, to elicit HIV-specific immune responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments of BALB/c mice. We expressed the HIV-1 Gag-p24 on the tip of the T3 pilus of Streptococcus pyogenes as a fusion to the Cpa protein (LL-Gag). After four monthly LL-Gag oral immunizations, we observed strong Gag-specific IgG and IgA responses in serum, feces, and vaginal secretions. However, the Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses in the blood were at or below our detection limit. After an i.m. modified vaccinia Ankara/Gag boost, we observed robust Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses both in systemic and in mucosal tissues, including intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes of the small intestine, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Consistent with strong immunogenicity, the LL-Gag induced activation of CD11c(+) CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches after oral immunization. Our results demonstrate that oral immunization with L. lactis expressing an Ag on the tip of the group A Streptococcus pilus serves as an excellent vaccine platform to induce strong mucosal humoral and cellular immunity against HIV.

  5. The local immune response in ulcerative lesions of Buruli disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiszewski, A E; Becerril, E; Aguilar, L D; Kader, I T A; Myers, W; Portaels, F; Hernàndez Pando, R

    2006-01-01

    Buruli disease (BU) is a progressive necrotic and ulcerative disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU is considered the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. Three clinical stages of the cutaneous lesions have been described in BU: pre-ulcerative, ulcerative and healed lesions. In this study we used immunohistochemistry and automated morphometry to determine the percentage of macrophages and of CD4/CD8 lymphocytes and their expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Expression of these cytokines was correlated with the inflammatory response evaluated by histopathology. All the studied BU ulcerative cases showed extensive necrosis and chronic inflammation. The most important feature was the presence or absence of granulomas co-existing with a mixed pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. When granulomas were present significantly higher expression of IFN-γ was seen, whereas in ulcerative lesions without granulomas there was increased expression of IL-10 and significantly higher bacillary counts. These features correlated with the chronicity of the lesions; longer-lasting lesions showed granulomas. Thus, granulomas were absent from relatively early ulcerative lesions, which contained more bacilli and little IFN-γ, suggesting that at this stage of the disease strong suppression of the protective cellular immune response facilitates proliferation of bacilli. PMID:16487243

  6. The Challenges in Measuring Local Immunization Coverage: A Statewide Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Elizabeth; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Duchin, Jeffrey; DeHart, M Patricia; Opel, Douglas

    2016-05-01

    There are many forms of existing immunization surveillance in the United States and Washington state, but all are limited in their ability to provide timely identification of clusters of unimmunized individuals and assess the risk of vaccine-preventable diseases. This article aims to: (1) describe challenges to measuring immunization coverage at a local level in the United States using Washington State as a case study; and (2) propose improvements to existing surveillance systems that address the challenges identified.

  7. Hormonal signaling in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Clémence D; Zadeh-Tahmasebi, Melika; Rasmussen, Brittany A; Duca, Frank A; Lam, Tony K T

    2014-04-25

    The gut is anatomically positioned to play a critical role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, providing negative feedback via nutrient sensing and local hormonal signaling. Gut hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), are released following a meal and act on local receptors to regulate glycemia via a neuronal gut-brain axis. Additionally, jejunal nutrient sensing and leptin action are demonstrated to suppress glucose production, and both are required for the rapid antidiabetic effect of duodenal jejunal bypass surgery. Strategies aimed at targeting local gut hormonal signaling pathways may prove to be efficacious therapeutic options to improve glucose control in diabetes.

  8. Hormonal Signaling in the Gut*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Clémence D.; Zadeh-Tahmasebi, Melika; Rasmussen, Brittany A.; Duca, Frank A.; Lam, Tony K. T.

    2014-01-01

    The gut is anatomically positioned to play a critical role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, providing negative feedback via nutrient sensing and local hormonal signaling. Gut hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), are released following a meal and act on local receptors to regulate glycemia via a neuronal gut-brain axis. Additionally, jejunal nutrient sensing and leptin action are demonstrated to suppress glucose production, and both are required for the rapid antidiabetic effect of duodenal jejunal bypass surgery. Strategies aimed at targeting local gut hormonal signaling pathways may prove to be efficacious therapeutic options to improve glucose control in diabetes. PMID:24577102

  9. Local and systemic immune response in pigs during subclinical and clinical swine influenza infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska-Mól, M; Kwit, K; Markowska-Daniel, I; Kowalski, C; Pejsak, Z

    2014-10-01

    Local and systemic immune responses in pigs intranasally (IN) and intratracheally (IT) inoculated with swine influenza virus (SIV) were studied. No clinical signs were observed in IN-inoculated pigs, while IT-inoculated pigs developed typical signs of influenza. Significantly higher titres of specific antibodies and changes of haematological parameters were found only in IT-inoculated pigs. Because positive correlations between viral titre, local cytokine concentration, and lung pathology have been observed, we hypothesise that both viral load and the local secretion of cytokines play a role in the induction of lung lesions. It could be that a higher replication of SIV stimulates immune cells to secrete higher amounts of cytokines. The results of the present study indicate that pathogenesis of SIV is dependent on both, the damage caused to the lung parenchyma directly by virus, and the effects on the cells of the host's immune system.

  10. Immune Modulation and Stereotactic Radiation: Improving Local and Abscopal Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New and innovative treatment strategies for cancer patients in the fields of immunotherapy and radiotherapy are rapidly developing in parallel. Among the most promising preclinical treatment approaches is combining immunotherapy with radiotherapy where early data suggest synergistic effects in several tumor model systems. These studies demonstrate that radiation combined with immunotherapy can result in superior efficacy for local tumor control. More alluring is the emergence of data suggesting an equally profound systemic response also known as “abscopal” effects with the combination of radiation and certain immunotherapies. Studies addressing optimal radiation dose, fractionation, and modality to be used in combination with immunotherapy still require further exploration. However, recent anecdotal clinical reports combining stereotactic or hypofractionated radiation regimens with immunotherapy have resulted in dramatic sustained clinical responses, both local and abscopal. Technologic advances in clinical radiation therapy has made it possible to deliver hypofractionated regimens anywhere in the body using stereotactic radiation techniques, facilitating further clinical investigations. Thus, stereotactic radiation in combination with immunotherapy agents represents an exciting and potentially fruitful new space for improving cancer therapeutic responses.

  11. The gut microbiota in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine; Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Pedersen, Oluf

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of the gut microbiota has intensified within the past decade with the introduction of cultivation-independent methods. By investigation of the gut bacterial genes, our understanding of the compositional and functional capability of the gut microbiome has increased. It is now widel...... strategies to prevent or treat type 2 diabetes....... recognized that the gut microbiota has profound effect on host metabolism and recently changes in the gut microbiota have been associated with type 2 diabetes. Animal models and human studies have linked changes in the gut microbiota to the induction of low-grade inflammation, altered immune response...

  12. GUTs without guts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato-Rivera, B.; Schellekens, A. N.

    2014-06-01

    The structure of a Standard Model family is derived in a class of brane models with a U(M)×U(N) factor, from two mildly anthropic requirements: a massless photon and a universe that does not turn into a plasma of massless charged particles. If we choose M=3 and N=2, the only option is shown to be the Standard Model with an undetermined number of families. We do not assume the U(1) embedding, charge quantization, family repetition, nor the fermion representations; all of these features are derived, assuming a doublet Higgs. With a slightly stronger assumption even the Higgs representation is determined. We also consider a more general class, requiring an asymptotically free strong SU(M) (with M⩾3) interaction from the first factor and an electromagnetic U(1) embedded in both factors. We allow Higgs symmetry breaking of the U(N)×U(1) flavor group by at most one Higgs boson in any representation, combined with any allowed chiral symmetry breaking by SU(M). For M=3 there is a large number of solutions with an unbroken U(1). In all of these, “quarks” have third-integral charges and color singlets have integer charges in comparison to leptons. Hence Standard Model charge quantization holds for any N. Only for N=2 these models allow an SU(5) GUT extension, but this extension offers no advantages whatsoever for understanding the Standard Model; it only causes complications, such as the doublet-triplet splitting problem. Although all these models have a massless photon, all except the Standard Model are ruled out by the second anthropic requirement. In this class of brane models the Standard Model is realized as a GUT with its intestines removed, to keep only the good parts: a GUT without guts.

  13. Reshaping the gut microbiota at an early age: functional impact on obesity risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoto, R; Collado, M C; Salminen, S; Isolauri, E

    2013-01-01

    Overweight and obesity can currently be considered a major threat to human health and well-being. Recent scientific advances point to an aberrant compositional development of the gut microbiota and low-grade inflammation as contributing factors, in conjunction with excessive energy intake. A high-fat/energy diet alters the gut microbiota composition, which reciprocally engenders excessive energy harvesting and storage. Further, microbial imbalance increases gut permeability, leading to metabolic endotoxemia, inflammation and insulin resistance. Local intestinal immunologic homeostasis is achieved by tolerogenic immune responses to microbial antigens. In the context of amelioration of insulin sensitivity and decreased adiposity, the potential of gut microbiota modulation with specific probiotics and prebiotics lies in the normalization of aberrant microbiota, improved gut barrier function and creation of an anti-inflammatory milieu. This would suggest a role for probiotic/prebiotic interventions in the search for preventive and therapeutic applications in weight management.

  14. Global efficiency of local immunization on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Dubé, Louis J

    2012-01-01

    Epidemics occur in all shapes and forms: infections propagating in our sparse sexual networks, information spreading through our much denser social interactions, or viruses circulating on the Internet. With the advent of large databases and efficient analysis algorithms, these processes can be better predicted and controlled. In this study, we use different characteristics of network organization to identify the influential spreaders in networks of diverse nature. We propose a local measure of node influence based on the network's community structure which is easily estimated in real systems and frequently outperforms the usual measure of a node's importance. More importantly, through an extensive study spanning 17 empirical networks and 2 epidemic models, we formulate a readily applicable approach which proves efficient even though different networks and different diseases require different strategies.This research is expected to guide efforts regarding public health policies, computer network security and t...

  15. Modulation of immunity and gut microbiota after dietary administration of alginate encapsulated Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 to gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Héctor; Guardiola, Francisco A; Tapia-Paniagua, Silvana Teresa; Cuesta, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Balebona, M Carmen; Moriñigo, M Ángel; Esteban, M Ángeles

    2015-08-01

    The potential benefits of probiotics when administering to fish could improve aquaculture production. The objective of this study was to examine the modulation of immune status and gut microbiota of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) specimens by a probiotic when administered encapsulated. Commercial diet was enriched with Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 (SpPdp11, at a concentration of 10(8) cfu g(-1)) before being encapsulated in calcium alginate beads. Fish were fed non-supplemented (control) or supplemented diet for 4 weeks. After 1, 2 and 4 weeks the main humoral and cellular immune parameters were determined. Furthermore, gene expression profile of five immune relevant genes (il1β, bd, mhcIIα, ighm and tcrβ) was studied by qPCR in head kidney. On the other hand, intestinal microbiota of fish was analysed at 7 and 30 days by DGGE. Results demonstrated that administration of alginate encapsulated SpPdp11 has immunostimulant properties on humoral parameters (IgM level and serum peroxidase activity). Although no immunostimulant effects were detected on leucocyte activities, significant increases were detected in the level of mRNA of head-kidney leucocytes for mhcIIα and tcrβ after 4 weeks of feeding the encapsulated-probiotic diet. The administration of SpPdp11 encapsulated in alginate beads produced important changes in the DGGE patterns corresponding to the intestinal microbiota. Predominant bands related to lactic acid bacteria, such as Lactococcus and Lactobacillus strains, were sequenced from the DGGE patterns of fish fed the probiotic diet, whereas they were not sequenced from fish receiving the control diet. The convenience or not of probiotic encapsulation is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Localizer with high occlusion immunity using diffraction optics

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    Ditto, Thomas D.; Farges, Jacques

    2004-10-01

    The chromatic method of diffraction range finding can be exploited to construct a 3D localizer that tracks the position of a pointer, a 3-D scanner or a robotic end-effecter. A spectrogram is made using a diffraction grating as the primary objective of an optical system that tracks a broad band emitter such as a tungsten filament or white L.E.D. Image processing on the resulting spectra transforms the spectrogram at the input to distance and displacement at the output. The behavior conforms to geometric optics following the Diffraction Equation. This novel technique has unique features. For example, the number of samples increases with target distance, reversing the loss of resolution as a function of distance that is endemic to triangulation. The plurality of samples also can overcome occlusion liability common to time-of-flight range finders, since multiple paths exist between emitter and sensor. The grating can be made from inexpensive embossed plastic, and a wave length sensor can be constructed from garden variety color cameras. The method is robust at a grazing exodus angles that allow for a compact configuration of the receiver. In this paper we disclose the theory of operation including a mathematical model, and we demonstrate the method empirically.

  17. Segmented filamentous bacteria are potent stimuli of a physiologically normal state of the murine gut mucosal immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talham, GL; Jiang, HQ; Bos, NA; Cebra, JJ

    1999-01-01

    Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are autochthonous bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tracts of many species, including humans. We studied the effect of SFB on the mucosal immune system by monoassociating formerly germfree C3H/HeN mice with SEE. At various time points during 190 days of coloniza

  18. Divergence of gut permeability and mucosal immune gene expression in two gluten-associated conditions: celiac disease and gluten sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Pasquale

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten. Gluten-sensitive individuals (GS cannot tolerate gluten and may develop gastrointestinal symptoms similar to those in CD, but the overall clinical picture is generally less severe and is not accompanied by the concurrence of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies or autoimmune comorbidities. By studying and comparing mucosal expression of genes associated with intestinal barrier function, as well as innate and adaptive immunity in CD compared with GS, we sought to better understand the similarities and differences between these two gluten-associated disorders. Methods CD, GS and healthy, gluten-tolerant individuals were enrolled in this study. Intestinal permeability was evaluated using a lactulose and mannitol probe, and mucosal biopsy specimens were collected to study the expression of genes involved in barrier function and immunity. Results Unlike CD, GS is not associated with increased intestinal permeability. In fact, this was significantly reduced in GS compared with controls (P = 0.0308, paralleled by significantly increased expression of claudin (CLDN 4 (P = 0.0286. Relative to controls, adaptive immunity markers interleukin (IL-6 (P = 0.0124 and IL-21 (P = 0.0572 were expressed at higher levels in CD but not in GS, while expression of the innate immunity marker Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 was increased in GS but not in CD (P = 0.0295. Finally, expression of the T-regulatory cell marker FOXP3 was significantly reduced in GS relative to controls (P = 0.0325 and CD patients (P = 0.0293. Conclusions This study shows that the two gluten-associated disorders, CD and GS, are different clinical entities, and it contributes to the characterization of GS as a condition associated with prevalent gluten-induced activation of innate, rather than adaptive, immune responses in the absence of detectable changes in mucosal barrier function.

  19. The gut microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Giovanni C

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery and use of the microscope in the 17(th) century, we know that we host trillions of micro-organisms mostly in the form of bacteria indwelling the "barrier organs" skin, gut, and airways. They exert regulatory functions, are in a continuous dialogue with the intestinal epithelia, influence energy handling, produce nutrients, and may cause diabetes and obesity. The human microbiome has developed by modulating or avoiding inflammatory responses; the host senses bacterial presence through cell surface sensors (the Toll-like receptors) as well as by refining mucous barriers as passive defense mechanisms. The cell density and composition of the microbiome are variable and multifactored. The way of delivery establishes the type of initial flora; use of antibiotics is another factor; diet composition after weaning will shape the adult's microbiome composition, depending on the subject's life-style. Short-chain fatty acids participate in the favoring action exerted by microbiome in the pathogenesis of type-2 diabetes and obesity. Clinical observation has pinpointed a sharp rise of various dysimmune conditions in the last decades, including IBD and rheumatoid arthritis, changes that outweigh the input of simple heritability. It is nowadays proposed that the microbiome, incapable to keep up with the changes of our life-style and feeding sources in the past few decades might have contributed to these immune imbalances, finding itself inadequate to handle the changed gut environment. Another pathway to pathology is the rise of directly pathogenic phyla within a given microbiome: growth of adherent E. coli, of C. concisus, and of C. jejuni, might be examples of causes of local enteropathy, whereas the genus Prevotella copri is now suspected to be linked to rise of arthritic disorders. Inflammasomes are required to shape a non colitogenic flora. Treatment of IBD and infectious enteritides by the use of fecal transplant is warranted by this knowledge.

  20. Antiviral immunity of Anopheles gambiae is highly compartmentalized, with distinct roles for RNA interference and gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carissimo, Guillaume; Pondeville, Emilie; McFarlane, Melanie; Dietrich, Isabelle; Mitri, Christian; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Antoniewski, Christophe; Bourgouin, Catherine; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Kohl, Alain; Vernick, Kenneth D

    2015-01-13

    Arboviruses are transmitted by mosquitoes and other arthropods to humans and animals. The risk associated with these viruses is increasing worldwide, including new emergence in Europe and the Americas. Anopheline mosquitoes are vectors of human malaria but are believed to transmit one known arbovirus, o'nyong-nyong virus, whereas Aedes mosquitoes transmit many. Anopheles interactions with viruses have been little studied, and the initial antiviral response in the midgut has not been examined. Here, we determine the antiviral immune pathways of the Anopheles gambiae midgut, the initial site of viral infection after an infective blood meal. We compare them with the responses of the post-midgut systemic compartment, which is the site of the subsequent disseminated viral infection. Normal viral infection of the midgut requires bacterial flora and is inhibited by the activities of immune deficiency (Imd), JAK/STAT, and Leu-rich repeat immune factors. We show that the exogenous siRNA pathway, thought of as the canonical mosquito antiviral pathway, plays no detectable role in antiviral defense in the midgut but only protects later in the systemic compartment. These results alter the prevailing antiviral paradigm by describing distinct protective mechanisms in different body compartments and infection stages. Importantly, the presence of the midgut bacterial flora is required for full viral infectivity to Anopheles, in contrast to malaria infection, where the presence of the midgut bacterial flora is required for protection against infection. Thus, the enteric flora controls a reciprocal protection tradeoff in the vector for resistance to different human pathogens.

  1. Local immune system in oviduct physiology and pathophysiology: attack or tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marey, M A; Yousef, M S; Kowsar, R; Hambruch, N; Shimizu, T; Pfarrer, C; Miyamoto, A

    2016-07-01

    The local immune system in the oviduct has a unique ability to deal with pathogens, allogeneic spermatozoa, and the semi-allogeneic embryo. To achieve this, it seems likely that the oviduct possesses an efficient and strictly controlled immune system that maintains optimal conditions for fertilization and early embryo development. The presence of a proper sperm and/or embryo-oviduct interaction begs the question of whether the local immune system in the oviduct exerts beneficial or deleterious effects on sperm and early embryo; support or attack?. A series of studies has revealed that bovine oviduct epithelial cells (BOECs) are influenced by preovulatory levels of Estradiol-17β, progesterone, and LH to maintain an immunologic homeostasis in bovine oviduct, via inhibition of proinflammatory responses that are detrimental to allogenic sperm. Under pathologic conditions, the mucosal immune system initiates the inflammatory response to the infection; the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at low concentrations induces a proinflammatory response with increased expression of TLR-4, PTGS2, IL-1β, NFκB1, and TNFα, resulting in tissue damage. At higher concentrations, however, LPS induces a set of anti-inflammatory genes (TLR-2, IL-4, IL-10, and PTGES) that may initiate a tissue repair. This response of BOECs is accompanied by the secretion of acute phase protein, suggesting that BOECs react to LPS with a typical acute proinflammatory response. Under physiological conditions, polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are existent in the oviductal fluid during preovulatory period in the bovine. Interestingly, the bovine oviduct downregulates sperm phagocytosis by PMN via prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) action. In addition, the angiotensin-endothelin-PGE2 system controlling oviduct contraction may fine-tune the PMN phagocytic behavior to sperm in the oviduct. Importantly, a physiological range of PGE2 supplies anti-inflammatory balance in BOEC. Our recent results show that the sperm

  2. Gut microbiota-related complications in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Such, José; Sanz, Yolanda; Francés, Rubén

    2014-11-14

    Gut microbiota plays an important role in cirrhosis. The liver is constantly challenged with commensal bacteria and their products arriving through the portal vein in the so-called gut-liver axis. Bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen through the intestinal wall and to mesenteric lymph nodes is facilitated by intestinal bacterial overgrowth, impairment in the permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, and deficiencies in local host immune defences. Deranged clearance of endogenous bacteria from portal and systemic circulation turns the gut into the major source of bacterial-related complications. Liver function may therefore be affected by alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota and a role for commensal flora has been evidenced in the pathogenesis of several complications arising in end-stage liver disease such as hepatic encephalopathy, splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The use of antibiotics is the main therapeutic pipeline in the management of these bacteria-related complications. However, other strategies aimed at preserving intestinal homeostasis through the use of pre-, pro- or symbiotic formulations are being studied in the last years. In this review, the role of intestinal microbiota in the development of the most frequent complications arising in cirrhosis and the different clinical and experimental studies conducted to prevent or improve these complications by modifying the gut microbiota composition are summarized.

  3. Gut Microbiota and Allergic Disease. New Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Susan V

    2016-03-01

    The rapid rise in childhood allergies (atopy) in Westernized nations has implicated associated environmental exposures and lifestyles as primary drivers of disease development. Culture-based microbiological studies indicate that atopy has demonstrable ties to altered gut microbial colonization in very early life. Infants who exhibit more severe multisensitization to food- or aero-allergens have a significantly higher risk of subsequently developing asthma in childhood. Hence an emerging hypothesis posits that environment- or lifestyle-driven aberrancies in the early-life gut microbiome composition and by extension, microbial function, represent a key mediator of childhood allergic asthma. Animal studies support this hypothesis. Environmental microbial exposures epidemiologically associated with allergy protection in humans confer protection against airway allergy in mice. In addition, gut microbiome-derived short-chain fatty acids produced from a high-fiber diet have been shown to protect against allergy via modulation of both local and remote mucosal immunity as well as hematopoietic antigen-presenting cell populations. Here we review key data supporting the concept of a gut-airway axis and its critical role in childhood atopy.

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 protects against bacterial translocation, preserves gut barrier integrity and stimulates the immune system in a murine intestinal obstruction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generoso, Simone V; Viana, Mirelle; Santos, Rosana; Martins, Flaviano S; Machado, José A N; Arantes, Rosa M E; Nicoli, Jacques R; Correia, Maria I T D; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2010-06-01

    Probiotic is a preparation containing microorganisms that confers beneficial effect to the host. This work assessed whether oral treatment with viable or heat-killed yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 prevents bacterial translocation (BT), intestinal barrier integrity, and stimulates the immunity, in a murine intestinal obstruction (IO) model. Four groups of mice were used: mice undergoing only laparotomy (CTL), undergoing intestinal obstruction (IO) and undergoing intestinal obstruction after previous treatment with viable or heat-killed yeast. BT, determined as uptake of (99m)Tc-E. coli in blood, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen and lungs, was significantly higher in IO group than in CTL group. Treatments with both yeasts reduced BT in blood and all organs investigated. The treatment with both yeasts also reduced intestinal permeability as determined by blood uptake of (99m)Tc-DTPA. Immunological data demonstrated that both treatments were able to significantly increase IL-10 levels, but only viable yeast had the same effect on sIgA levels. Intestinal lesions were more severe in IO group when compared to CTL and yeasts groups. Concluding, both viable and heat-killed cells of yeast prevent BT, probably by immunomodulation and by maintaining gut barrier integrity. Only the stimulation of IgA production seems to depend on the yeast viability.

  5. Evaluation of Aloe vera and synbiotic as antibiotic growth promoter substitutions on performance, gut morphology, immune responses and blood constitutes of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghi Shokri, Ali; Ghasemi, Hossein A; Taherpour, Kamran

    2017-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation with Aloe vera (AV) powder and synbiotic as growth promoter agents on performance, gut morphology, immune responses, hematology and serum biochemistry in broilers. A total of 240-day-old male broiler chicks (Ross 308) were randomly assigned to six treatments with four replicates. Birds were offered either a corn-soybean meal basal diet (control) or the basal diet supplemented with 200 mg/kg virginiamycin (VM), 1 g/kg synbiotic (Syn), 2.5 g/kg AV (AV1), 5.0 g/kg AV (AV2) or 7.5 g/kg AV (AV3). Chickens fed any of the diets, except diet AV1, exhibited better feed conversion ratios at the 14-28 day period and higher average daily gain and duodenal villus height/crypt depth ratio at 42 days than those fed the control diet. Synbiotic supplementation caused a marked increase in the serum antibody titer against infectious bursal disease and infectious bronchitis vaccines. Feeding diet AV3 significantly increased red blood cell count and hemoglobin concentration, and decreased serum triglyceride level compared to the control group. The results suggested that dietary inclusion of 5 and 7.5 g/kg AV, similar with synbiotic supplementation, can be applied as effective alternatives to in-feed antibiotics for broiler diets.

  6. Protein deprivation causes reversible impariment of mucosal immune response to cholera toxoid/toxin in rat gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, W S; Pierce, N F

    1979-09-06

    Scretory antibodies may be the major defence against mucosal infections, especially those due to viruses and non-invasive pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and toxinogenic Escherichia coli. The high incidence of mucosal infections in malnourished protein-deficient children may result from defective antibody production, but evidence for this is conflicting. We report here that protein deficiency markedly impairs the mucosal immune reponse to cholera toxiod/toxin (CT), a protein antigen, in rats and that this impairment is rapidly reversed by refeeding.

  7. Location of tumor affects local and distant immune cell type and number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Jonathan A; Khattar, Vinayak; Ashton, Reading; Lee, Carnellia; Siegal, Gene P; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2017-03-01

    Tumors comprise heterogeneous populations of cells, including immune infiltrates that polarize during growth and metastasis. Our preclinical studies on breast cancer (BCa) identified functional differences in myeloid-derived suppressor cells based on tumor microenvironment (TME), prompting variations in host immune response to tumor growth, and dissemination based on tissue type. In order to understand if such variations existed among other immune cells, and if such alteration occurs in response to tumor growth at the primary site or due to bone dissemination, we characterized immune cells, examining localized growth and in the tibia. In addition, immune cells from the spleen were examined from animals of both tumor locations by flow cytometry. The study demonstrates that location of tumor, and not simply the tumor itself, has a definitive role in regulating immune effectors. Among all immune cells characterized, macrophages were decreased and myeloid dendritic cell were increased in both tumor locations. This difference was more evident in subcutaneous tumors. Additionally, spleens from mice with subcutaneous tumors contained greater increases in both macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells than in mice with bone tumors. Furthermore, in subcutaneous tumors there was an increase in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell numbers, which was also observed in their spleens. These data indicate that alterations in tumor-reactive immune cells are more pronounced at the primary site, and exert a similar change at the major secondary lymphoid organ than in the bone TME. These findings could provide translational insight into designing therapeutic strategies that account for location of metastatic foci.

  8. Location of tumor affects local and distant immune cell type and number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Jonathan A.; Khattar, Vinayak; Ashton, Reading; Lee, Carnellia; Siegal, Gene P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Tumors comprise heterogeneous populations of cells, including immune infiltrates that polarize during growth and metastasis. Our preclinical studies on breast cancer (BCa) identified functional differences in myeloid‐derived suppressor cells based on tumor microenvironment (TME), prompting variations in host immune response to tumor growth, and dissemination based on tissue type. Methods In order to understand if such variations existed among other immune cells, and if such alteration occurs in response to tumor growth at the primary site or due to bone dissemination, we characterized immune cells, examining localized growth and in the tibia. In addition, immune cells from the spleen were examined from animals of both tumor locations by flow cytometry. Results The study demonstrates that location of tumor, and not simply the tumor itself, has a definitive role in regulating immune effectors. Among all immune cells characterized, macrophages were decreased and myeloid dendritic cell were increased in both tumor locations. This difference was more evident in subcutaneous tumors. Additionally, spleens from mice with subcutaneous tumors contained greater increases in both macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells than in mice with bone tumors. Furthermore, in subcutaneous tumors there was an increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T‐cell numbers, which was also observed in their spleens. Conclusions These data indicate that alterations in tumor‐reactive immune cells are more pronounced at the primary site, and exert a similar change at the major secondary lymphoid organ than in the bone TME. These findings could provide translational insight into designing therapeutic strategies that account for location of metastatic foci. PMID:28250928

  9. Salmonella adhesion, invasion and cellular immune responses are differentially affected by iron concentrations in a combined in vitro gut fermentation-cell model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dostal, Alexandra; Gagnon, Mélanie; Chassard, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; O'Mahony, Liam; Lacroix, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    .... enterica Typhimurium with intestinal cells under different iron concentrations encountered in the gut lumen during iron deficiency and supplementation using an in vitro colonic fermentation system...

  10. Role of probiotics and functional foods in health: gut immune stimulation by two probiotic strains and a potential probiotic yoghurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado Galdeano, Carolina; Novotny Nuñez, Ivanna; Carmuega, Esteban; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Perdigón, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous reports that show the benefits on the health attributed to the probiotic consumptions. Most of the studies were performed using animal models and only some of them were validated in controlled human trials. The present review is divided in two sections. In the first section we describe how the probiotic microorganisms can interact with the intestinal epithelial cells that are the first line of cell in the mucosal site, focusing in the studies of two probiotic strains: Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 (actually Lactobacillus paracasei CNCMI-1518) and Lactobacillus casei CRL 431. Then we describe same beneficial effects attributed to probiotic administration and the administration of fermented milks containing these microorganisms or potential probiotic yoghurt, principally on the immune system and on the intestinal barrier in different experimental mouse models like enteropathogenic infection, malnutrition, cancer and intestinal inflammation.

  11. Branched Fatty Acid Esters of Hydroxy Fatty Acids (FAHFAs) Protect against Colitis by Regulating Gut Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M; Castoldi, Angela; Aryal, Pratik; Yee, Eric U; Vickers, Christopher; Parnas, Oren; Donaldson, Cynthia J; Saghatelian, Alan; Kahn, Barbara B

    2016-10-14

    We recently discovered a structurally novel class of endogenous lipids, branched palmitic acid esters of hydroxy stearic acids (PAHSAs), with beneficial metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects. We tested whether PAHSAs protect against colitis, which is a chronic inflammatory disease driven predominantly by defects in the innate mucosal barrier and adaptive immune system. There is an unmet clinical need for safe and well tolerated oral therapeutics with direct anti-inflammatory effects. Wild-type mice were pretreated orally with vehicle or 5-PAHSA (10 mg/kg) and 9-PAHSA (5 mg/kg) once daily for 3 days, followed by 10 days of either 0% or 2% dextran sulfate sodium water with continued vehicle or PAHSA treatment. The colon was collected for histopathology, gene expression, and flow cytometry. Intestinal crypt fractions were prepared for ex vivo bactericidal assays. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pretreated with vehicle or PAHSA and splenic CD4(+) T cells from syngeneic mice were co-cultured to assess antigen presentation and T cell activation in response to LPS. PAHSA treatment prevented weight loss, improved colitis scores (stool consistency, hematochezia, and mouse appearance), and augmented intestinal crypt Paneth cell bactericidal potency via a mechanism that may involve GPR120. In vitro, PAHSAs attenuated dendritic cell activation and subsequent T cell proliferation and Th1 polarization. The anti-inflammatory effects of PAHSAs in vivo resulted in reduced colonic T cell activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression. These anti-inflammatory effects appear to be partially GPR120-dependent. We conclude that PAHSA treatment regulates innate and adaptive immune responses to prevent mucosal damage and protect against colitis. Thus, PAHSAs may be a novel treatment for colitis and related inflammation-driven diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Loss of TIMP-1 immune expression and tumor recurrence in localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Thalita dos Reis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Overexpression of MMPs has been related to biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. TIMP1 and TIMP2 are controllers of MMPs and the aim of this study is to evaluate the expression levels of MMPs and their regulators using immunohistochemistry in tissue microarray of localized prostate cancer (PC. Materials and Methods: Immune-expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, TIMP1, TIMP-2, MMP-14 and IL8, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in radical prostatectomy specimens of 40 patients with localized PC who underwent surgery between September 1997 and February 2000. Protein expression was considered as categorical variables, negative or positive. The results of the immune-expression were correlated to Gleason score (GS, pathological stage (TNM, pre-operatory PSA serum levels and biochemical recurrence in a mean follow up period of 92.5 months. Results: The loss of TIMP1 immune-expression was related to biochemical recurrence. When TIMP1 was negative, 56.3% patients recurred versus 22.2% of those whose TIMP1 was positive (p=0.042. MMP-9, MMP-2, IL8 and MMP-14 were positive in the majority of PC. TIMP-2 was negative in all cases. Conclusion: Negative immune-expression of TIMP1 is correlated with biochemical recurrence in patients with PC possibly by failing to control MMP-9, an important MMP related to cancer progression.

  13. Local Th17/IgA immunity correlate with protection against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Christensen, Dennis; Hansen, Lasse Bøllehuus; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andersen, Peter; Dietrich, Jes

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is responsible for a wide array of infections. Respiratory transmission via droplets is the most common mode of transmission but it may also infect the host via other routes such as lesions in the skin. To advance the development of a future vaccine against GAS, it is therefore important to investigate how protective immunity is related to the route of vaccine administration. To explore this, we examined whether a parenterally administered anti-GAS vaccine could protect against an intranasal GAS infection or if this would require locally primed immunity. We foundd that a parenteral CAF01 adjuvanted GAS vaccine offered no protection against intranasal infection despite inducing strong systemic Th1/Th17/IgG immunity that efficiently protected against an intraperitoneal GAS infection. However, the same vaccine administered via the intranasal route was able to induce protection against repeated intranasal GAS infections in a murine challenge model. The lack of intranasal protection induced by the parenteral vaccine correlated with a reduced mucosal recall response at the site of infection. Taken together, our results demonstrate that locally primed immunity is important for the defense against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

  14. Immune evolutionary algorithms with domain knowledge for simultaneous localization and mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei-yi; CAI Zi-xing

    2006-01-01

    Immune evolutionary algorithms with domain knowledge were presented to solve the problem of simultaneous localization and mapping for a mobile robot in unknown environments. Two operators with domain knowledge were designed in algorithms, where the feature of parallel line segments without the problem of data association was used to construct a vaccination operator, and the characters of convex vertices in polygonal obstacle were extended to develop a pulling operator of key point grid. The experimental results of a real mobile robot show that the computational expensiveness of algorithms designed is less than other evolutionary algorithms for simultaneous localization and mapping and the maps obtained are very accurate. Because immune evolutionary algorithms with domain knowledge have some advantages, the convergence rate of designed algorithms is about 44 % higher than those of other algorithms.

  15. LOCAL IMMUNITY BY TISSUE-RESIDENT CD8+ MEMORY T CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eGebhardt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial infection primes a CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response that gives rise to a long-lived population of circulating memory cells able to provide protection against systemic reinfection. Despite this, effective CD8+ T cell surveillance of barrier tissues such as skin and mucosa typically wanes with time, resulting in limited T cell-mediated protection in these peripheral tissues. However, recent evidence suggests that a specialized subset of CD103+ memory T cells can permanently lodge and persist in peripheral tissues, and that these cells can compensate for the loss of peripheral immune surveillance by circulating memory T cells. Here, we review evolving concepts regarding the generation and long-term persistence of these tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM in epithelial and neuronal tissues. We further discuss the role of TRM cells in local infection control and their contribution to localized immune phenomena, in both mice and humans.

  16. Possible Implication of Local Immune Response in Darier's Disease: An Immunohistochemical Characterization of Lesional Inflammatory Infiltrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelia Miracco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immunity is considered to be normal in Darier's Disease (DD, an inherited skin disorder complicated by skin infections. To date, there are no investigations on the local inflammatory infiltrate in DD skin lesions. In this immunohistochemical study we characterized and quantified it, making comparisons with two other inflammatory skin disorders, that is, pemphigus vulgaris (PV and lichen ruber planus (LRP, and with the normal skin (NSk. We found a significant (<.05 decrease of CD1a+ Langerhans cells (LCs in DD, compared to PV, LRP, and NSk, and of CD123+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs, compared to PV and LRP. We hypothesize that the genetic damage of keratinocytes might result in a loss of some subsets of dendritic cells and, consequently, in an impaired local immune response, which might worsen the infections that inevitably occur in this disease.

  17. AVIDITY EVALUATION OF LOCAL IgA ANTIBODIES IN PERSONS IMMUNIZED WITH LIVE INFLUENZA VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Donina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. At present, immunogenicity evaluation of influenza vaccines is performed by quantitative assessment of increased serum antibodies. It was, however, shown that the degree of human defense against influenza is mostly related to their qualitative characteristics, i.e., avidity (functional activity. Leading role of local immunity is demonstrated in protection against influenza. Such immunity is mediated by IgA antibodies from mucosal airways. Meanwhile, the avidity issues for local antibodies still remain open.In present study, an attempt was undertaken to evaluate post-vaccination local immunological memory for influenza A virus, according to IgA antibodies from upper respiratory secretions. Two techniques were used to evaluate antibody avidity, that were previously applied for studying this phenomenon with serum imunoglobulins, i.e., a dynamic test (measurement of antigen-antibody reaction rates, and a test with urea, a chaotropic agent (avidity is determined as a strength of antigen-antibody complex. A total of 202 persons (18 to 20 years old were enrolled into the study.With both tests, a broad range of individual avidity values was observed for the antibodies. A significant cohort (up to 30 per cent of persons immunized with live influenza vaccine, showed sharply increased avidity of secretory IgA antibodies by both methods, along with accumulation of these immunoglobulins after vaccination. A reverse relationship is revealed between avidity levels of these antibodies before vaccination, and increase of this parameter post-immunization. The data present convincing arguments for specific renewal of local humoral immunological memory, as induced by live influenza vaccine. The study substantiates a necessity for application of the both tests in parallel, when determining avidity of secretory IgA antibodies. (Med. Immunol., vol. 10, N 4-5, pp 423-430.

  18. Gut microbiota and allogeneic transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weilin; Xu, Shaoyan; Ren, Zhigang; Jiang, Jianwen; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-08-23

    The latest high-throughput sequencing technologies show that there are more than 1000 types of microbiota in the human gut. These microbes are not only important to maintain human health, but also closely related to the occurrence and development of various diseases. With the development of transplantation technologies, allogeneic transplantation has become an effective therapy for a variety of end-stage diseases. However, complications after transplantation still restrict its further development. Post-transplantation complications are closely associated with a host's immune system. There is also an interaction between a person's gut microbiota and immune system. Recently, animal and human studies have shown that gut microbial populations and diversity are altered after allogeneic transplantations, such as liver transplantation (LT), small bowel transplantation (SBT), kidney transplantation (KT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HTCT). Moreover, when complications, such as infection, rejection and graft versus host disease (GVHD) occur, gut microbial populations and diversity present a significant dysbiosis. Several animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that taking probiotics and prebiotics can effectively regulate gut microbiota and reduce the incidence of complications after transplantation. However, the role of intestinal decontamination in allogeneic transplantation is controversial. This paper reviews gut microbial status after transplantation and its relationship with complications. The role of intervention methods, including antibiotics, probiotics and prebiotics, in complications after transplantation are also discussed. Further research in this new field needs to determine the definite relationship between gut microbial dysbiosis and complications after transplantation. Additionally, further research examining gut microbial intervention methods to ameliorate complications after transplantation is warranted. A better understanding of the

  19. Cellular and humoral local immune responses in sheep experimentally infected with Oestrus ovis (Diptera: Oestridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabouret, Guillaume; Lacroux, Caroline; Andreoletti, Olivier; Bergeaud, Jean Paul; Hailu-Tolosa, Yacob; Hoste, Hervé; Prevot, Françoise; Grisez, Christelle; Dorchies, Philippe; Jacquiet, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Cellular and humoral local responses were investigated following repetitive artificial Oestrus ovis infections in lambs. The presence of larvae induced a huge local recruitment of either leucocytes (T and B lymphocytes, macrophages) or granulocytes (eosinophils, mast cells and globule leucocytes). This cellular response was more pronounced in the ethmoid and sinus (development sites of second and third instar larvae) than in the septum or turbinates where first instar larvae migrate. Infected lambs produced Oestrus ovis specific IgG and IgA antibodies in their mucus. This local humoral response was mainly directed against larval salivary gland antigens and not against larval digestive tract antigens. Compared to the control animals, the sinusal mucosa of infected animals was extremely thickened and the epithelium exhibited hyperplasia, metaplasia and eosinophilic exocytosis. The possible roles of these local immune responses in the regulation of O. ovis larvae populations in sheep are discussed.

  20. Gut microbiota and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi

    2012-01-01

    The gut immune system has a key role in the development of autoimmune diabetes, and factors that control the gut immune system are also regulators of beta-cell autoimmunity. Gut microbiota modulate the function of the gut immune system by their effect on the innate immune system, such as the intestinal epithelial cells and dendritic cells, and on the adaptive immune system, in particular intestinal T cells. Due to the immunological link between gut and pancreas, e.g. the shared lymphocyte homing receptors, the immunological changes in the gut are reflected in the pancreas. According to animal studies, changes in gut microbiota alter the development of autoimmune diabetes. This has been demonstrated by antibiotics that induce changes in the gut microbiota. Furthermore, gut-colonizing microbes may modify the incidence of autoimmune diabetes in animal models. Deficient toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, mediating microbial stimulus in immune cells, prevents autoimmune diabetes, which appears to be dependent on alterations in the intestinal microbiota. Although few studies have been conducted in humans, recent studies suggest that the abundance of Bacteroides and lack of butyrate-producing bacteria in fecal microbiota are associated with beta-cell autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. It is possible that altered gut microbiota are associated with immunological aberrancies in type 1 diabetes. The changes in gut microbiota could lead to alterations in the gut immune system, such as increased gut permeability, small intestinal inflammation, and impaired tolerance to food antigens, all of which are observed in type 1 diabetes. Poor fitness of gut microbiota could explain why children who develop type 1 diabetes are prone to enterovirus infections, and do not develop tolerance to cow milk antigens. These candidate risk factors of type 1 diabetes may imply an increased risk of type 1 diabetes due to the presence of gut microbiota that do not support health. Despite the complex

  1. Comorbidity between depression and inflammatory bowel disease explained by immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress; tryptophan catabolite; and gut-brain pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Subero, Marta; Anderson, George; Kanchanatawan, Buranee; Berk, Michael; Maes, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The nature of depression has recently been reconceptualized, being conceived as the clinical expression of activated immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways, including tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT), autoimmune, and gut-brain pathways. IO&NS pathways are similarly integral to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The increased depression prevalence in IBD associates with a lower quality of life and increased morbidity in IBD, highlighting the role of depression in modulating the pathophysiology of IBD.This review covers data within such a wider conceptualization that better explains the heightened co-occurrence of IBD and depression. Common IO&NS underpinning between both disorders is evidenced by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, eg, interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 trans-signalling; Th-1- and Th-17-like responses; neopterin and soluble IL-2 receptor levels; positive acute phase reactants (haptoglobin and C-reactive protein); lowered levels of negative acute phase reactants (albumin, transferrin, zinc) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β); increased O&NS with damage to lipids, proteinsm and DNA; increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and inducible NO synthase; lowered plasma tryptophan but increased TRYCAT levels; autoimmune responses; and increased bacterial translocation. As such, heightened IO&NS processes in depression overlap with the biological underpinnings of IBD, potentially explaining their increased co-occurrence. This supports the perspective that there is a spectrum of IO&NS disorders that includes depression, both as an emergent comorbidity and as a contributor to IO&NS processes. Such a frame of reference has treatment implications for IBD when "comorbid" with depression.

  2. Cholecystokinin in white sea bream: molecular cloning, regional expression, and immunohistochemical localization in the gut after feeding and fasting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Micale

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK, secreted by the midgut, plays a key role in digestive physiology of vertebrates including teleosts, by stimulating pancreatic secretion, gut motility, and gallbladder contraction, as well as by delaying gastric emptying. Moreover, CCK is involved in the regulation of food intake and satiation. Secretion of CCK by the hindgut is controversial, and its biological activity remains to be elucidated. The present paper addresses the regional distribution of intestinal CCK in the white sea bream, Diplodus sargus, as well as the possible involvement of hindgut CCK in digestive processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Full-lengths mRNAs encoding two CCK isoforms (CCK-1 and CCK-2 were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. CCK gene and protein expression levels in the different gut segments were measured 3 h and 72 h after feeding, by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Moreover, endocrine CCK cells were immunoistochemically detected. Fasting induced a significant decrease in CCK-2 in all intestinal segments, including the hindgut. On the other hand, no significant difference was induced by fasting on hindgut CCK-1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrated two CCK isoforms in the hindgut of D.sargus, one of which (CCK-2 may be involved in the feedback control of uncompleted digestive processes. On the other hand, a functional role alternative to regulation of digestive processes may be inferred for D.sargus CCK-1, since its expression was unaffected by feeding or fasting.

  3. Targeted Local Immunization in Scale-Free Peer-to-Peer Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Li Huang; Fu-Tai Zou; Fan-Yuan Ma

    2007-01-01

    The power-law node degree distributions of peer-to-peer overlay networks make them extremely robust torandom failures whereas highly vulnerable under intentional targeted attacks. To enhance attack survivability of these net-works, DeepCure, a novel heuristic immunization strategy, is proposed to conduct decentralized but targeted immunization.Different from existing strategies, DeepCure identifies immunization targets as not only the highly-connected nodes butalso the nodes with high availability and/or high link load, with the aim of injecting immunization information into justright targets to cure. To better trade off the cost and the efficiency, DeepCure deliberately select these targets from 2-1ocalneighborhood, as well as topologically-remote but semantically-close friends if needed. To remedy the weakness of existingstrategies in case of sudden epidemic outbreak, DeepCure is also coupled with a local-hub oriented rate throttling mechanismto enforce proactive rate control. Extensive simulation results show that DeepCure outperforms its competitors, producingan arresting increase of the network attack tolerance, at a lower price of eliminating viruses or malicious attacks.

  4. IFN-λ: A New Inducer of Local Immunity against Cancer and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasfar, Ahmed; Zloza, Andrew; de la Torre, Andrew; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.

    2016-01-01

    IFN-λ is the newly established type III IFN with unique immunomodulatory functions. In contrast to the IFN-α/β family and to some extent IFN-γ, IFN-λ is apparently acting in specific areas of the body to activate resident immune cells and induces a local immunity, instrumental in preventing particular infections and also keeping transformed cells under control. Mucosal areas of lung and gastrointestinal tracts are now under scrutiny to elucidate the immune mechanisms triggered by IFN-λ and leading to viral protection. New evidence also indicates the crucial role of IFN-λ in promoting innate immunity in solid cancer models. Based on its unique biological activities among the IFN system, new immunotherapeutic approaches are now emerging for the treatment of cancer, infection, and autoimmune diseases. In the present review, we highlight the recent advances of IFN-λ immunomodulatory functions. We also discuss the perspectives of IFN-λ as a therapeutic agent. PMID:28018361

  5. Mycobacterium ulcerans Triggers T-Cell Immunity followed by Local and Regional but Not Systemic Immunosuppression▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Alexandra G.; Cruz, Andrea; Martins, Teresa G.; Torrado, Egídio; Saraiva, Margarida; Pereira, Daniela R.; Meyers, Wayne M.; Portaels, Françoise; Silva, Manuel T.; Castro, António G.; Pedrosa, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a neglected infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and is characterized by necrotic cutaneous lesions induced by the exotoxin mycolactone. Despite evidence of Th1-mediated protective immunity, M. ulcerans infection has been associated with systemic immunosuppression. We show that early during mouse infection with either mycolactone-positive or negative strains, pathogen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing T cells developed in the draining lymph node (DLN). CD4+ cells migrated to the infection foci, but progressive infection with virulent M. ulcerans led to the local depletion of recruited cells. Moreover, dissemination of virulent M. ulcerans to the DLN was accompanied by extensive DLN apoptotic cytopathology, leading to depletion of CD4+ T cells and abrogation of IFN-γ expression. Advanced footpad infection with virulent M. ulcerans did not induce increased susceptibility to systemic coinfection by Listeria monocytogenes. These results show that infection with M. ulcerans efficiently triggers a mycobacterium-specific T-cell response in the DLN and that progression of infection with highly virulent M. ulcerans leads to a local and regional suppression of that immune response, but without induction of systemic immunosuppression. These results suggest that prophylactic and/or therapeutic interventions to prevent dissemination of M. ulcerans to DLN during the early phase of infection would contribute for the maintenance of protective immunity and disease control. PMID:20974825

  6. Gut Microbiota and Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Giovanni; Di Biase, Anna Rita; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Ravaioli, Federico; Scaioli, Eleonora; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence regarding celiac disease has increasingly shown the role of innate immunity in triggering the immune response by stimulating the adaptive immune response and by mucosal damage. The interaction between the gut microbiota and the mucosal wall is mediated by the same receptors which can activate innate immunity. Thus, changes in gut microbiota may lead to activation of this inflammatory pathway. This paper is a review of the current knowledge regarding the relationship between celiac disease and gut microbiota. In fact, patients with celiac disease have a reduction in beneficial species and an increase in those potentially pathogenic as compared to healthy subjects. This dysbiosis is reduced, but might still remain, after a gluten-free diet. Thus, gut microbiota could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, as described by studies which link dysbiosis with the inflammatory milieu in celiac patients. The use of probiotics seems to reduce the inflammatory response and restore a normal proportion of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Additional evidence is needed in order to better understand the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and the clinical impact and therapeutic use of probiotics in this setting.

  7. Association of HIV Status With Local Immune Response to Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Implications for Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Kaunitz, Genevieve J; Cottrell, Tricia R; Succaria, Farah; McMiller, Tracee L; Ascierto, Maria L; Esandrio, Jessica; Xu, Haiying; Ogurtsova, Aleksandra; Cornish, Toby; Lipson, Evan J; Topalian, Suzanne L; Engels, Eric A; Taube, Janis M

    2017-07-01

    The programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway play an important immunosuppressive role in cancer and chronic viral infection, and have been effectively targeted in cancer therapy. Anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is associated with both human papillomavirus and HIV infection. To date, patients with HIV have been excluded from most trials of immune checkpoint blocking agents, such as anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1, because it was assumed that their antitumor immunity was compromised compared with immunocompetent patients. To compare the local tumor immune microenvironment (TME) in anal SCCs from HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. Anal SCC tumor specimens derived from the AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource (National Cancer Institute) and Johns Hopkins Hospital included specimens. Tumors were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis for immune checkpoints (PD-L1, PD-1, LAG-3) and immune cell (IC) subsets (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68). Expression profiling for immune-related genes was performed on select HIV-positive and HIV-negative cases in PD-L1+ tumor areas associated with ICs. Programmed death-ligand 1 expression on tumor cells and ICs, PD-L1 patterns (adaptive vs constitutive), degree of IC infiltration, quantified densities of IC subsets, and gene expression profiles in anal SCCs from HIV-positive vs HIV-negative patients. Approximately half of 40 tumor specimens from 23 HIV-positive and 17 HIV-negative patients (29 men and 11 women; mean [SD] age, 51 [9.9] years) demonstrated tumor cell PD-L1 expression, regardless of HIV status. Median IC densities were not significantly decreased in HIV-associated tumors for any cellular subset studied. Both adaptive (IC-associated) and constitutive PD-L1 expression patterns were observed. Immune cell PD-L1 expression correlated with increasing intensity of IC infiltration (r = 0.52; 95% CI, 0.26-0.78; P anal SCCs (fold change, 12.69; P anal SCC. These findings demonstrate an immune

  8. Cryotherapy with concurrent CpG oligonucleotide treatment controls local tumor recurrence and modulates Her2/neu immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Jesse J.; Gibson, Heather M.; Littrup, Peter J.; Reyes, Joyce D.; Cher, Michael L.; Takashima, Akira; Wei, Wei-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous cryoablation is a minimally invasive procedure for tumor destruction, which can potentially initiate or amplify antitumor immunity through the release of tumor-associated antigens. However, clinically efficacious immunity is lacking and regional recurrences are a limiting factor relative to surgical excision. To understand the mechanism of immune activation by cryoablation, comprehensive analyses of innate immunity and Her2/neu humoral and cellular immunity following cryoablation with or without peritumoral CpG injection was conducted using two Her2/neu+ tumor systems in wild type, neu-tolerant, and SCID mice. Cryoablation of neu+ TUBO tumor in BALB/c mice resulted in systemic immune priming, but not in neu-tolerant BALB NeuT mice. Cryoablation of human Her2+ D2F2/E2 tumor enabled the functionality of tumor-induced immunity but secondary tumors were refractory to anti-tumor immunity if rechallenge occurred during the resolution phase of the cryoablated tumor. A step-wise increase in local recurrence was observed in wild type, neu-tolerant, and SCID mice indicating a role of adaptive immunity in controlling residual tumor foci. Importantly, local recurrences were eliminated or greatly reduced in wild type, neu tolerant and SCID mice when CpG was incorporated in the cryoablation regimen, showing significant local control by innate immunity. For long-term protection, however, adaptive immunity was required because most SCID mice eventually succumbed to local tumor recurrence even with combined cryoablation and CpG treatment. This improved understanding of the mechanisms by which cryoablation affects innate and adaptive immunity will help guide appropriate combination of therapeutic interventions to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25092895

  9. Dominant effects of the diet on the microbiome and the local and systemic immune response in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jot Hui Ooi

    Full Text Available Outside the nutrition community the effects of diet on immune-mediated diseases and experimental outcomes have not been appreciated. Investigators that study immune-mediated diseases and/or the microbiome have overlooked the potential of diet to impact disease phenotype. We aimed to determine the effects of diet on the bacterial microbiota and immune-mediated diseases. Three different laboratory diets were fed to wild-type mice for 2 weeks and resulted in three distinct susceptibilities to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis. Examination of the fecal microbiota demonstrated a diet-mediated effect on the bacteria found there. Broad-spectrum antibiotics disturbed the gut microbiome and partially eliminated the diet-mediated changes in DSS susceptibility. Dietary changes 2 days after DSS treatment were protective and suggested that the diet-mediated effect occurred quickly. There were no diet-mediated effects on DSS susceptibility in germ-free mice. In addition, the diet-mediated effects were evident in a gastrointestinal infection model (Citrobacter rodentium and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Taken together, our study demonstrates a dominant effect of diet on immune-mediated diseases that act rapidly by changing the microbiota. These findings highlight the potential of using dietary manipulation to control the microbiome and prevent/treat immune-mediated disease.

  10. Intestinal barrier function and the brain-gut axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Carmen; Vicario, María; Pigrau, Marc; Lobo, Beatriz; Santos, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The luminal-mucosal interface of the intestinal tract is the first relevant location where microorganism-derived antigens and all other potentially immunogenic particles face the scrutiny of the powerful mammalian immune system. Upon regular functioning conditions, the intestinal barrier is able to effectively prevent most environmental and external antigens to interact openly with the numerous and versatile elements that compose the mucosal-associated immune system. This evolutionary super system is capable of processing an astonishing amount of antigens and non-immunogenic particles, approximately 100 tons in one individual lifetime, only considering food-derived components. Most important, to develop oral tolerance and proper active immune responses needed to prevent disease and inflammation, this giant immunogenic load has to be managed in a way that physiological inflammatory balance is constantly preserved. Adequate functioning of the intestinal barrier involves local and distant regulatory networks integrating the so-called brain-gut axis. Along this complex axis both brain and gut structures participate in the processing and execution of response signals to external and internal changes coming from the digestive tract, using multidirectional pathways to communicate. Dysfunction of brain-gut axis facilitates malfunctioning of the intestinal barrier, and vice versa, increasing the risk of uncontrolled immunological reactions that may trigger mucosal and brain low-grade inflammation, a putative first step to the initiation of more permanent gut disorders. In this chapter, we describe the structure, function and interactions of intestinal barrier, microbiota and brain-gut axis in both healthy and pathological conditions.

  11. Gut feeling is electric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familoni, Jide

    2011-06-01

    Although "gut feeling" is a cliché in English parlance, there are neuro-physiological basis for registration of emotions in the gut. Control of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract is by an integration of neuro-hormonal factors from the local myogenic to the central nervous system. Gastric contractile activity, which is responsible for the motor properties of the stomach, is regulated by this integrated complex. Signatures of the activity include gastric electrical activity (GEA) and bowel sounds. GEA has two distinct components: a high-frequency spike activity or post depolarization potential termed the electrical response activity superimposed on a lower frequency, rhythmic depolarization termed the control activity. These signatures are measured in the clinic with contact sensors and well understood for diagnosis of gut dysmotility. Can these signatures be measured at standoff and employed for purposes of biometrics, malintent and wellness assessment?

  12. Epithelial cells prime the immune response to an array of gut-derived commensals towards a tolerogenic phenotype through distinct actions of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and transforming growth factor-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    maintenance of the gut immune homeostasis. Here we report novel crosstalk mechanisms between the human enterocyte cell line, Caco2, and underlying human monocyte-derived DC in a transwell model where Gram-positive (G+) commensals prevent Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4)-dependent Escherichia coli...... of maturation markers, interleukin (IL)-12p70, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha when matured with G+ and Gram-negative (G-) commensals, while IL-10 production is enhanced in DC upon encountering G+ commensals and reduced upon encountering G- bacteria. The Caco2 SM-induced tolerogenic phenotype is also seen...

  13. The local immune response in the mammary gland of the sow following infusion of a protein antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, M A; Watson, D L

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of the local immune response in the udder of the sow following infusion of a soluble antigen. Four mammary glands of each of four pregnant sows were infused with ferritin prepartum. Samples of blood, colostrum, and milk were collected during the following lactation; animals were slaughtered and mammary tissue removed for immunohistology. Blood, colostrum, milk, and mammary tissues were similarly collected from nonimmunized (control) sows. Colostral and milk whey from immunized sows contained higher levels of immunoglobulins than whey from control sows. There was an increase in numbers of IgA-containing plasma cells and total lymphoid cells in mammary tissue of immunized sows compared with controls. The results suggested that the local immune response was at least as great in non-infused glands as infused glands of immunized sows.

  14. Effective innate and adaptive anti-melanoma immunity through localized TLR-7/8 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manisha; Khong, Hiep; Dai, Zhimin; Huang, Xue-Fei; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Zachary A.; Vasilakos, John P.; Hwu, Patrick; Overwijk, Willem W.

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral immune activation can induce local and systemic anti-tumor immunity. Imiquimod is a cream-formulated, TLR-7 agonist that is FDA-approved for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers, but has limited activity against melanoma. We studied the anti-tumor activity and mechanism of action of a novel, injectable, tissue-retained TLR 7/8 agonist, 3M-052, which avoids systemic distribution. Intratumoral administration of 3M-052 generated systemic anti-tumor immunity, and suppressed both injected and distant, uninjected wild-type B16.F10 melanomas. Treated tumors showed increased level of CCL2 chemokines and infiltration of M1 phenotype-shifted macrophages, which could kill tumor cells directly through production of nitric oxide and CCL2, was essential for the anti-tumor activity of 3M-052. CD8+ T cells, B cells, Type I IFN, IFN-γ, and pDC were contributed to efficient tumor suppression whereas perforin, NK cells and CD4 T cells were not required. Finally, 3M-052 therapy potentiated checkpoint blockade therapy with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies, even when checkpoint blockade alone was ineffective. Our findings suggest that intratumoral treatment with 3M-052 is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer and establish a rational strategy and mechanistic understanding for combination therapy with intratumoral, tissue-retained TLR7/8 agonist and checkpoint blockade in metastatic cancer. PMID:25252955

  15. Molecular and genetic properties of tumors associated with local immune cytolytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Michael S.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Wu, Catherine J.; Getz, Gad; Hacohen, Nir

    2015-01-01

    Summary How the genomic landscape of a tumor shapes and is shaped by anti-tumor immunity has not been systematically explored. Using large-scale genomic datasets of solid tissue tumor biopsies, we quantified the cytolytic activity of the local immune infiltrate and identified associated properties across 18 tumor types. The number of predicted MHC Class I-associated neoantigens was correlated with cytolytic activity and was lower than expected in colorectal and other tumors, suggesting immune-mediated elimination. We identified recurrently mutated genes that showed positive association with cytolytic activity, including beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), HLA-A, -B and -C and Caspase 8 (CASP8), highlighting loss of antigen presentation and blockade of extrinsic apoptosis as key strategies of resistance to cytolytic activity. Genetic amplifications were also associated with high cytolytic activity, including immunosuppressive factors such as PDL1/2 and ALOX12B/15B. Our genetic findings thus provide evidence for immunoediting in tumors and uncover mechanisms of tumor-intrinsic resistance to cytolytic activity. PMID:25594174

  16. Gut microbiota and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festi, Davide; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Marasco, Giovanni; Taddia, Martina; Colecchia, Antonio

    2014-11-21

    Gut microbiota exerts a significant role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, as confirmed by studies conducted both on humans and animal models. Gut microbial composition and functions are strongly influenced by diet. This complex intestinal "superorganism" seems to affect host metabolic balance modulating energy absorption, gut motility, appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as hepatic fatty storage. An impairment of the fine balance between gut microbes and host's immune system could culminate in the intestinal translocation of bacterial fragments and the development of "metabolic endotoxemia", leading to systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. Diet induced weight-loss and bariatric surgery promote significant changes of gut microbial composition, that seem to affect the success, or the inefficacy, of treatment strategies. Manipulation of gut microbiota through the administration of prebiotics or probiotics could reduce intestinal low grade inflammation and improve gut barrier integrity, thus, ameliorating metabolic balance and promoting weight loss. However, further evidence is needed to better understand their clinical impact and therapeutic use.

  17. Extra-adrenal glucocorticoid synthesis: immune regulation and aspects on local organ homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talabér, Gergely; Jondal, Mikael; Okret, Sam

    2013-11-05

    Systemic glucocorticoids (GCs) mainly originate from de novo synthesis in the adrenal cortex under the control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis. However, research during the last 1-2 decades has revealed that additional organs express the necessary enzymes and have the capacity for de novo synthesis of biologically active GCs. This includes the thymus, intestine, skin and the brain. Recent research has also revealed that locally synthesized GCs most likely act in a paracrine or autocrine manner and have significant physiological roles in local homeostasis, cell development and immune cell activation. In this review, we summarize the nature, regulation and known physiological roles of extra-adrenal GC synthesis. We specifically focus on the thymus in which GC production (by both developing thymocytes and epithelial cells) has a role in the maintenance of proper immunological function.

  18. An influx of macrophages is the predominant local immune response in ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, C; Norval, M; De Las Heras, M; Gonzalez, L; Sharp, J M; Woods, G M

    2005-07-15

    Infection with a retrovirus, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), causes ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA). The excess production of surfactant proteins by alveolar tumour cells results in increased production of pulmonary fluid, which is characteristically expelled through the nostrils of affected sheep. The immune response to JSRV and the tumour is poorly understood: no JSRV-specific circulating antibodies or T cells have been detected to date. The aim of the present study was to obtain phenotypic evidence for a local immune response in OPA lungs. Specific-pathogen free lambs were infected intratracheally with JSRV. When clinical signs of OPA were apparent, the lungs were removed at necropsy and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on lung sections using a panel of mouse anti-sheep mAbs. No influx of dendritic cells, B cells, CD4, CD8 or gammadelta T cells was seen in the neoplastic nodules or in their periphery. MHC Class II-positive cells were found intratumourally, peritumourally and in the surrounding alveolar lumina. In the tumours, many of these cells were shown to be fibroblasts and the remainder were likely to be mature macrophages. In the alveolar lumen, the MHC Class II-positive cells were CD14-positive and expressed high levels of IFN-gamma. They appeared to be immature monocytes or macrophages which then differentiated to become CD14-negative as they reached the periphery of the tumours. A high level of MHC Class I expression was detected on a range of cells in the OPA lungs but the tumour nodules themselves contained no MHC Class I-positive cells. On the basis of these findings, it is proposed that the lack of an effective immune response in OPA could result from a mechanism of peripheral tolerance in which the activity of the invading macrophages is suppressed by the local environment, possibly as a consequence of the inhibitory properties of the surfactant proteins.

  19. Evaluation of local immune response to Fasciola hepatica experimental infection in the liver and hepatic lymph nodes of goats immunized with Sm14 vaccine antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo E Mendes

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Protection against Fasciola hepatica in goats immunized with a synthetic recombinant antigen from Schistosoma mansoni fatty acid-binding protein 14 (rSm14 was investigated by assessing worm burdens, serum levels of hepatic enzymes, faecal egg count and hepatic damage, which was evaluated using gross and microscopic morphometric observation. The nature of the local immune response was assessed by examining the distribution of CD2+, CD4+, CD8+ and γ´+ T lymphocytes along with IgG+, IL-4+ and IFN-γ+ cells in the liver and hepatic lymph nodes (HLN. The goats used consisted of group 1 (unimmunized and uninfected, group 2 [infected control - immunized with Quillaia A (Quil A] and group 3 (immunized with rSm14 in Quil A and infected, each containing seven animals. Immunization with rSm14 in Quil A adjuvant induced a reduction in gross hepatic lesions of 56.6% (p < 0.001 and reduced hepatic and HLN infiltration of CD2+, CD4+, CD8+ and γ´+ T lymphocytes as well as IL-4+ and IFN-γ+ cells (p < 0.05. This is the first report of caprine immunization against F. hepatica using a complete rSm14 molecule derived from S. mansoni. Immunization reduced hepatic damage and local inflammatory infiltration into the liver and HLN. However, considering that Quil A is not the preferential/first choice adjuvant for Sm14 immunization, further studies will be undertaken using the monophosphoryl lipid A-based family of adjuvants during clinical trials to facilitate anti-Fasciolavaccine development.

  20. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920630 Effects of the spleen on immunestate of patients with gastric cancer.QIUDengbo (仇登波), et al. Dept General Surg,Union Hosp, Tongji Med Univ, Wuhan, 430022.Natl Med J China 1992; 72(6): 334-337. For analysing the effects of the spleen on im-mune state of gastric cancer patients.T-lym-

  1. Characterization of immune cells and cytokine localization in the rat utero-placental unit mid- to late gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Daniel R; Raha, Sandeep; Holloway, Alison C; Yockell-Lelièvre, Julien; Tayade, Chandrakant; Gruslin, Andrée

    2015-08-01

    The success of pregnancy is dependent on the precise regulation of the immune response within the utero-placental environment. Rats are beginning to be widely used as a model for human immune-related pregnancy complications. However, our knowledge of immune cells and cytokine localization in the rat utero-placental tissue is limited. The current study aimed to localize the immune cell populations, including uterine natural killer (uNK) cells, neutrophils, and macrophages within the rat utero-placental unit at two crucial gestational ages, gestational days 15.5 and 18.5. In addition, we characterized the distribution of the cytokines TNFα, IFNγ, and IL-10 in the utero-placental regions at both the above-mentioned gestational ages. Our study has demonstrated co-localization TNFα and IFNγ with uNK cells in perivascular regions of the rat mesometrial triangle at both gestational ages. Neutrophils and IL-10-positive cells were localized at the maternal-fetal interface and in the spiral artery lumen of the rat mesometrial triangle at both gestational ages. TNFα and IL-10 demonstrated a temporal change in the localization from GD15.5 to GD18.5, which coincides with the leading edge of trophoblast invasion into the mesometrial triangle. The current study furthers our knowledge of the localization of uterine immune cells and relevant cytokines, and provides a base from which to research the function of these immune cells and cytokines during rat pregnancy as a model to study human immune-related pregnancy complications.

  2. The Gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Pedersen, Jens; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob

    2017-01-01

    In this communication we discuss the role of the gut for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Gastric emptying rates importantly determine postprandial glucose excursions and regulate postprandial secretion of the incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP...

  3. Microecology and local immune and nonspecific defensive proteins depending on different nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvaeva, I B; Orlova, N G; Borovik, T E; Veselova, O L

    1987-01-01

    Breast-feeding is of high importance for the development of intestinal eubiosis. Before beginning with breast-feeding the coprofiltrates of newborns lack of IgA. Following the first feeding IgA concentration in the faeces sharply increases (up to 200 mg/100 g faeces). Comparable high values can be found in the coprofiltrates of breast-fed sick prematures. In the coprofiltrates of artificially fed healthy newborns and sick prematures no IgA is provable, within the first two weeks of age. Afterwards both the frequency of its evidence and its concentration gradually rise. This can be regarded as a sign of an increasing local production of immune proteins. Starting with the second year of life, only, the values of all the immunoglobulins fall again. It happens a microbial degradation. Increased concentrations of immunoglobulins in the coprofiltrates of children over 3 years must be evaluated as a sign of subclinical dysbacteriosis.

  4. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth performance and local innate immune response of broiler chickens challenged with Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, M; Rogiewicz, A; McMillan, E; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Patterson, R; Slominski, B A

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of yeast-derived products on growth performance, gut lesion score, intestinal population of Clostridium perfringens, and local innate immunity of broiler chickens challenged with C. perfringens. One-day-old broiler chickens were randomly assigned to eight dietary treatments providing six replicate pens of 55 birds each per treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of Control diets without and with C. perfringens challenge, and diets containing bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD, 55 g/tonne), nucleotides (150 g/tonne), yeast cell wall (YCW, 300 g/tonne), and a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus (1 kg/tonne) fed to chickens challenged with C. perfringens. Diets containing 10% distillers dried grains with solubles without and with C. perfringens challenge were also used. Birds were orally challenged with C. perfringens (10(8) colony-forming units (cfu)/bird) on day 14. On day 21, intestinal samples were collected for gene expression analysis. Pathogen challenge significantly (P intestinal lesion scores were observed for challenged birds except the BMD-containing diet. Over the entire trial (1-35 days), no difference in growth performance was observed except the BMD diet which improved FCR over the Control, challenged group. Birds receiving nucleotides showed increased expression of toll-like receptors and cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-18 compared to the Control, challenged group. Expression of macrophage mannose receptor and IL-18 was upregulated in birds receiving YCW. Increased expression of cytokines and receptors involved in innate immunity in broilers receiving nucleotides and YCW suggests the immunomodulatory properties of these products under pathogen challenge conditions.

  5. Gut microbiome and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Rezaie, Peyman; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Mobarhan, Majid Ghayour; Ferns, Gordon A

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome contributes approximately 2kg of the whole body weight, and recent studies suggest that gut microbiota has a profound effect on human metabolism, potentially contributing to several features of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is defined by a clustering of metabolic disorders that include central adiposity with visceral fat accumulation, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia and non-optimal blood pressure levels. Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that around 20-25 percent of the world's adult population has metabolic syndrome. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the existing data linking gut microbiome with metabolic syndrome. Existing evidence from studies both in animals and humans support a link between gut microbiome and various components of metabolic syndrome. Possible pathways include involvement with energy homeostasis and metabolic processes, modulation of inflammatory signaling pathways, interferences with the immune system, and interference with the renin-angiotensin system. Modification of gut microbiota via prebiotics, probiotics or other dietary interventions has provided evidence to support a possible beneficial effect of interventions targeting gut microbiota modulation to treat components or complications of metabolic syndrome.

  6. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida Elin Maria; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R;

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu...... (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months...

  7. Co-administration of inactivated avian influenza virus with CpG or rIL-2 strongly enhances the local immune response after intranasal immunization in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaowen, Zhang; Qinghua, Yu; Xiaofei, Zhang; Qian, Yang

    2009-09-18

    Intranasal delivery of vaccines is the most effective means of inducing effective immunity in the upper respiratory tract as well as other mucosal lymphoid tissues. To evaluate the effects of the H5N2 inactivated virus with adjuvant, 120 one-day-old chicks were intranasal immunized with the H5N2 inactivated virus respectively mixed with adjuvant CpG or recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2). The local immunocompetent cells on the respiratory tract were detected. The results showed that the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), CD3(+) T lymphocytes and mast cells in respiratory tract increased significantly respectively and the number of IgA and IgG secreting cells increased significantly after immunization. However, there was no significant change in the immunocompetent cells of the animals administrated H5N2 inactivated virus alone compared to the control group. Our results indicated that intranasal administration of H5N2 inactivated virus with adjuvant CpG or rIL-2 could be beneficial to the local immune response in the respiratory tract.

  8. Effect of diabetic state on co-localization of substance P and serotonin in the gut in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Spangeus, A.; Forsgren, Sture; El-Salhy, M.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the numbers of serotonin- and substance P-immunoreactive (IR) cells occur in severa1 animal models of diabetes. It is not known, however, whether these changes are a result of actual ceii loss or are caused by modified gene expression in ceíls showing co-localization of serotonin and substance P. The pattern of mono- and co-expression of serotonin, as well as of substance P, was therefore investigated in gastrointestinal endocrine cells from animal m...

  9. A study of the localized humoral immune response to implicated microorganisms in juvenile periodontitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    A study was undertaken using an in vitro explant culture system to determine the presence of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM) in the supernatant fluids (SF) of disease gingival tissue explant cultures. Studies were also undertaken to determine if the de novo biosynthesis of {sup 14}C-immunoglobulins could be observed in the explant cultures of diseased tissues from juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Radiolabeled proteins were detected in the SF and immunodiffusion studies using goat antihuman gamma, alpha or mu chain serum revealed the presence of IgG and IgA but no IgM present in the SF of the JP gingival tissue explant cultures. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma chain serum with Staph protein A isolated IgG fractions of the SF, followed by autoradiography of the IgG precipitation lines demonstrated the biosynthesis of IgG by the JP gingival tissue explant cultures. The serological studies suggested that local immune response in JP was to a polymicrobic infection. The SF of JP showed significantly higher levels of antibody reactivity to B. intermedius, C. ochracea, E. nodatum and P. micros as compared to healthy tissues. The local antibody response to the microorganisms tested differed from that observed in the sera of the patients.

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome, gut microbiota and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Beom Jae; Bak, Young-Tae

    2011-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a complex disorder characterized by abdominal symptoms including chronic abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. The etiology of IBS is multifactorial, as abnormal gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, disturbed neural function of the brain-gut axis and an abnormal autonomic nervous system are all implicated in disease progression. Based on recent experimental and clinical studies, it has been suggested that additional etiological factors including low-grade inflammation, altered gut microbiota and alteration in the gut immune system play important roles in the pathogenesis of IBS. Therefore, therapeutic restoration of altered intestinal microbiota may be an ideal treatment for IBS. Probiotics are live organisms that are believed to cause no harm and result in health benefits for the host. Clinical efficacy of probiotics has been shown in the treatment or prevention of some gastrointestinal inflammation-associated disorders including traveler's diarrhea, antibiotics-associated diarrhea, pouchitis of the restorative ileal pouch and necrotizing enterocolitis. The molecular mechanisms, as cause of IBS pathogenesis, affected by altered gut microbiota and gut inflammation-immunity are reviewed. The effect of probiotics on the gut inflammation-immune systems and the results from clinical trials of probiotics for the treatment of IBS are also summarized.

  11. Prevention of siderophore- mediated gut-derived sepsis due to P. aeruginosa can be achieved without iron provision by maintaining local phosphate abundance: role of pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdes Svetlana

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During extreme physiological stress, the intestinal tract can be transformed into a harsh environment characterized by regio- spatial alterations in oxygen, pH, and phosphate concentration. When the human intestine is exposed to extreme medical interventions, the normal flora becomes replaced by pathogenic species whose virulence can be triggered by various physico-chemical cues leading to lethal sepsis. We previously demonstrated that phosphate depletion develops in the mouse intestine following surgical injury and triggers intestinal P. aeruginosa to express a lethal phenotype that can be prevented by oral phosphate ([Pi] supplementation. Results In this study we examined the role of pH in the protective effect of [Pi] supplementation as it has been shown to be increased in the distal gut following surgical injury. Surgically injured mice drinking 25 mM [Pi] at pH 7.5 and intestinally inoculated with P. aeruginosa had increased mortality compared to mice drinking 25 mM [Pi] at pH 6.0 (p C. elegans. Transcriptional analysis of P. aeruginosa demonstrated enhanced expression of various genes involved in media alkalization at pH 6.0 and a global increase in the expression of all iron-related genes at pH 7.5. Maintaining the pH at 6.0 via phosphate supplementation led to significant attenuation of iron-related genes as demonstrated by microarray and confirmed by QRT-PCR analyses. Conclusion Taken together, these data demonstrate that increase in pH in distal intestine of physiologically stressed host colonized by P. aeruginosa can lead to the expression of siderophore-related virulence in bacteria that can be prevented without providing iron by maintaining local phosphate abundance at pH 6.0. This finding is particularly important as provision of exogenous iron has been shown to have untoward effects when administered to critically ill and septic patients. Given that phosphate, pH, and iron are near universal cues that dictate

  12. T-cell death following immune activation is mediated by mitochondria-localized SARM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvam, P; Singh, L P; Selvarajan, V; Chng, W J; Ng, S B; Tan, N S; Ho, B; Chen, J; Ding, J L

    2013-03-01

    Following acute-phase infection, activated T cells are terminated to achieve immune homeostasis, failure of which results in lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases. We report that sterile α- and heat armadillo-motif-containing protein (SARM), the most conserved Toll-like receptors adaptor, is proapoptotic during T-cell immune response. SARM expression is significantly reduced in natural killer (NK)/T lymphoma patients compared with healthy individuals, suggesting that decreased SARM supports NK/T-cell proliferation. T cells knocked down of SARM survived and proliferated more significantly compared with wild-type T cells following influenza infection in vivo. During activation of cytotoxic T cells, the SARM level fell before rising, correlating inversely with cell proliferation and subsequent T-cell clearance. SARM knockdown rescued T cells from both activation- and neglect-induced cell deaths. The mitochondria-localized SARM triggers intrinsic apoptosis by generating reactive oxygen species and depolarizing the mitochondrial potential. The proapoptotic function is attributable to the C-terminal sterile alpha motif and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domains. Mechanistically, SARM mediates intrinsic apoptosis via B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family members. SARM suppresses B cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and downregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, which are cell survival effectors. Overexpression of Bcl-xL and double knockout of Bcl-2 associated X protein and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer substantially reduced SARM-induced apoptosis. Collectively, we have shown how T-cell death following infection is mediated by SARM-induced intrinsic apoptosis, which is crucial for T-cell homeostasis.

  13. Gut inflammation and microbiome in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeerdoss, Jayakanthan; Sandhya, Pulukool; Danda, Debashish

    2016-04-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is chronic inflammatory disease involving joints and the spine. Bowel inflammation is common in SpA, which may be classified as acute or chronic. Chronic gut inflammation is most common in SpA patients with axial involvement as compared to those presenting with peripheral involvement alone. The pathogenesis of gut inflammation in SpA could be explained by two factors-over-activation of immunological cells and altered gut microbiome. This is exemplified by SpA animal models, namely HLA-B27-expressing transgenic animals and SKG mice models. Immunological mechanisms include homing of activated T cells from gut into synovium, excess pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion by immune cells such as IL-23 and genetic variations in immunological genes. The evidence for role of gut microbiome in SpA is gradually emerging. Recently, metagenomic study of gut microbiome by sequencing of microbial nucleic acids has enabled identification of new microbial taxa and their functions in gut of patients with SpA. In SpA, the gut microbiome could emerge as diagnostic and prognostic marker of disease. Modulation of gut microbiome is slated to have therapeutic potential as well.

  14. Prime-boost strategies in mucosal immunization affect local IgA production and the type of Th response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eFiorino

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Combinations of different delivery routes for priming and boosting represent vaccination strategies that can modulate magnitude, quality, and localization of the immune response. A murine model was used to study T cell clonal expansion following nasal or subcutaneous priming, and secondary immune responses after boosting by either homologous or heterologous routes. T cell primary activation was studied by using the adoptive transfer model of ovalbumin-specific transgenic CD4+ T cells. Both nasal and subcutaneous immunization efficiently elicited, in the respective draining lymph nodes, primary clonal expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that disseminated towards distal lymph nodes (mesenteric and iliac and the spleen. After boosting, a very high serum IgG response was induced in all groups independent of the combination of immunization routes used, while significant levels of local IgA were detected only in mice boosted by the nasal route. Mucosal priming drove a stronger Th1 polarization than the systemic route, as shown by serum IgG subclass analysis. IFN-gamma production was observed in splenocytes of all groups, while prime-boost vaccine combinations that included the mucosal route, yielded higher levels of IL-17. Memory lymphocytes were identified in both spleen and draining lymph nodes in all immunized mice, with the highest number of IL-2 producing cells detected in mice primed and boosted by the nasal route. This work shows the critical role of immunization routes in modulating quality and localization of immune responses, in prime-boost vaccine strategies.

  15. Enhancement of local species richness in tundra by seed dispersal through guts of muskox and barnacle goose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Hans Henrik; Lundgren, Rebekka; Philipp, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    The potential contribution of vertebrate-mediated seed rain to the maintenance of plant community richness in a High Arctic ecosystem was investigated. We analyzed viable seed content in dung of the four numerically most important terrestrial vertebrates in Northeast Greenland - muskox (Ovibos...... moschatus), barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis), Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) and Arctic hare (Lepus arcticus). High numbers of plant propagules were found in the dung of muskox and barnacle goose. Seeds of many plant species were found in the faeces of one vertebrate species only. Propagule composition...... indices), and dung deposition, especially by muskox, often brought new species to the receiving community. The results suggest that endozoochorous propagule dispersal in the Arctic has a great potential in the generation and maintenance of local species richness, albeit being little specialized...

  16. Gut-Brain Axis: The Role of Gut Microbiota in Psychiatric Disorders

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    Alper Evrensel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota is essential to human health, playing a major and important role in the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. There is significant evidence linking gut microbiota and metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes and neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autism, anxiety, depression. New studies show microbiota can activate immune system, neural pathways and central nervous system signaling systems, including commensal, probiotic and pathogenic microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract. This microorganisms are capable of producing and delivering neuroactive substances such as gamma-aminobutyric acid and serotonin, which act on the gut-brain axis. Preclinical evaluation in rodents suggests that certain probiotics possess antidepressant or anxiolytic activity. Effects may be mediated via the vagus nerve, spinal cord, immune system or neuroendocrine systems. Here we review recent literature that examines the impact of gut microbiota on the brain, behavior and psychiatric disorders.

  17. Proteflazid® and local immunity in diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpesvirus and mixed urogenital infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Vjacheslav; Chernyshov, Viktor; Grynevych, Oleksandr; Benyuk, Vasil; Kornatskaya, Alla; Shalko, Miroslava; Usevich, Igor; Revenko, Oleg; Shepetko, Maxim; Solomakha, Ludmila

    2017-03-21

    Reporting of clinical trials results for Proteflazid® in the drug formulation suppositories and vaginal swabs soaked in the solution of the drug to the local immunity of the female reproductive tract. The aim of study was to examine the state of local immunity in the reproductive tract of women with sexually transmitted diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpes viruses (Type 1, 2) and mixed infection (herpes viruses + chlamydia). The trials involved 216 women with viral sexually transmitted diseases: Cervical Dysplasia associated with papillomavirus infection (HPV) (Group 1); Herpes genitalis type 1 (HSV- 1) and type 2 (HSV-1) (Group 2); mixed infection - HSV-1, HSV-2 and chlamydia (Group 3). Treatment results have confirmed that Proteflazid® contributes to sustainable performance improvement of basic factors of local immunity - sIgA, lysozyme and complement component C3 in the cervical mucus for all three groups of women. Proteflazid® enhances level of local immunity markers (sIgA, lysozyme, C3 complement component) and improves their ratios. Also it intensifies anticontagious activity of mucosal protection and female reproductive system as whole, during treatment diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpesvirus and mixed urogenital infections (herpesvirus and chlamydia).

  18. Orexigenic hormone ghrelin attenuates local and remote organ injury after intestinal ischemia-reperfusion.

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    Rongqian Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gut ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury is a serious condition in intensive care patients. Activation of immune cells adjacent to the huge endothelial cell surface area of the intestinal microvasculature produces initially local and then systemic inflammatory responses. Stimulation of the vagus nerve can rapidly attenuate systemic inflammatory responses through inhibiting the activation of macrophages and endothelial cells. Ghrelin, a novel orexigenic hormone, is produced predominately in the gastrointestinal system. Ghrelin receptors are expressed at a high density in the dorsal vagal complex of the brain stem. In this study, we investigated the regulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway by the novel gastrointestinal hormone, ghrelin, after gut I/R. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gut ischemia was induced by placing a microvascular clip across the superior mesenteric artery for 90 min in male adult rats. Our results showed that ghrelin levels were significantly reduced after gut I/R and that ghrelin administration inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine release, reduced neutrophil infiltration, ameliorated intestinal barrier dysfunction, attenuated organ injury, and improved survival after gut I/R. Administration of a specific ghrelin receptor antagonist worsened gut I/R-induced organ injury and mortality. To determine whether ghrelin's beneficial effects after gut I/R require the intact vagus nerve, vagotomy was performed in sham and gut I/R animals immediately prior to the induction of gut ischemia. Our result showed that vagotomy completely eliminated ghrelin's beneficial effect after gut I/R. To further confirm that ghrelin's beneficial effects after gut I/R are mediated through the central nervous system, intracerebroventricular administration of ghrelin was performed at the beginning of reperfusion after 90-min gut ischemia. Our result showed that intracerebroventricular injection of ghrelin also protected the rats from gut I

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF SYSTEMIC AND LOCAL IMMUNITY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC TONSILLITIS

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    Kolyada T.І

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Palatine tonsils are the most significant cluster of lymphadenoid tissue of throat. Performing a protective function they are very prone to acute and chronic inflammation and thus they are a source of chronic infection in the body. Therefore the problem of chronic tonsillitis (CT requires a serious attention. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is one of the important factors that could significantly complicate the course of chronic tonsillitis. RA is a chronic immune inflammatory disease that progressively affects connective tissue mostly of the peripheral joints and it has a wide range of extra-articular manifestations. The aim of our study was to explore the dynamics of immunologic indicators during the active disease and convalescence in patients with various severity of chronic tonsillitis, including tonsillitis complicated with RA, and to define indicators of local and systemic immunity for further improvement of tactics of immune correction in the complex treatment. Material and methods. 41 patients with various forms of chronic tonsillitis in active period of disease observed during the study. Patients were divided into the following groups: 19 persons with the compensate form of CT, 15 persons with the decompensate form of CT, 9 persons with the decompensate form of CT complicated with RA in remission stage. The control group consisted of 15 apparently healthy persons. Average age of the observed persons was 34.4 ± 0.8 years. Concentrations of serum immunoglobulins sIgA, IgA, IgM, IgG were determined by the method of radial immunodiffusion by Manchini. Levels of Ig Е, IL-4 and IFN – γ in the blood serum of patients were evaluated using ELISA test systems of "Vector-best". The detection of circulating immune complexes (CIC was performed by the method based on a selective precipitation of antigen complexes in 3.5% solution of polyethylene glycol (PEG with subsequent photometric determination of density of the precipitate. In peripheral blood

  20. Human genetic variation and the gut microbiome in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrew Brantley; Tolonen, Andrew C; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2017-08-21

    Taxonomic and functional changes to the composition of the gut microbiome have been implicated in multiple human diseases. Recent microbiome genome-wide association studies reveal that variants in many human genes involved in immunity and gut architecture are associated with an altered composition of the gut microbiome. Although many factors can affect the microbial organisms residing in the gut, a number of recent findings support the hypothesis that certain host genetic variants predispose an individual towards microbiome dysbiosis. This condition, in which the normal microbiome population structure is disturbed, is a key feature in disorders of metabolism and immunity.

  1. Pulmonary tuberculosis in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus): histologic lesions with correlation to local immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolfi, J A; Terio, K A; Miller, M; Junecko, B F; Reinhart, T

    2015-05-01

    Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is an important health concern for Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), no studies have evaluated the associated local immune responses or histologic lesions. In primates including humans, latent tuberculosis is distinguished by well-organized granulomas with TH1 cytokine expression, whereas active disease is characterized by poorly organized inflammation and local imbalance in TH1/TH2 cytokines. This study examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung samples from 5 tuberculosis-negative and 9 tuberculosis-positive Asian elephants. Lesions were assessed by light microscopy, and lymphoid infiltrates were characterized by CD3 and CD20 immunolabeling. Expression of TH1 (interferon [IFN]-γ, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) and TH2 (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor [TGF]-β) cytokines was determined using in situ hybridization. In 6 of 9 samples, inflammation was similar to the pattern of primate active disease with low to moderate numbers of lymphocytes, most of which were CD20 positive. In 1 sample, inflammation was most similar to latent tuberculosis in primates with numerous CD3-positive lymphocytes. Expression of IFN-γ was detected in 3 of 8 tuberculosis-positive samples. Expression of TNF-α was detected in 3 of 8 positive samples, including the one with latent morphology. Low-level expression of IL-4 was present in 4 of 8 positive samples. Only single positive samples displayed expression of IL-10 and TGF-β. Tuberculosis-negative samples generally lacked cytokine expression. Results showed heterogeneity in lesions of elephant tuberculosis similar to those of latent and active disease in primates, with variable expression of both TH1 and TH2 cytokines.

  2. Sublingual immunization with a subunit influenza vaccine elicits comparable systemic immune response as intramuscular immunization, but also induces local IgA and TH17 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallorini, Simona; Taccone, Marianna; Bonci, Alessandra; Nardelli, Filomena; Casini, Daniele; Bonificio, Amanda; Kommareddy, Sushma; Bertholet, Sylvie; O'Hagan, Derek T; Baudner, Barbara C

    2014-04-25

    Influenza is a vaccine-preventable disease that remains a major health problem world-wide. Needle and syringe are still the primary delivery devices, and injection of liquid vaccine into the muscle is still the primary route of immunization. Vaccines could be more convenient and effective if they were delivered by the mucosal route. Elicitation of systemic and mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses, such as pathogen neutralizing antibodies (including mucosal IgA at the site of pathogen entry) and CD4(+) T-helper cells (especially the Th17 subset), have a critical role in vaccine-mediated protection. In the current study, a sublingual subunit influenza vaccine formulated with or without mucosal adjuvant was evaluated for systemic and mucosal immunogenicity and compared to intranasal and intramuscular vaccination. Sublingual administration of adjuvanted influenza vaccine elicited comparable antibody titers to those elicited by intramuscular immunization with conventional influenza vaccine. Furthermore, influenza-specific Th17 cells or neutralizing mucosal IgA were detected exclusively after mucosal immunization.

  3. Bovine colostrum improves neonatal growth, digestive function, and gut immunity relative to donor human milk and infant formula in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine Ostenfeldt; Martin, Lena; Østergaard, Mette Viberg

    2016-01-01

    permeability, relative to DM and IF pigs (P Relative to IF pigs, BC pigs also had lower density of mucosa-associated bacteria and of some putative pathogens in colon, together with higher intestinal villi, mucosal mass, brush-border enzyme activities, colonic short chain fatty acid levels......Mother's own milk is the optimal first diet for preterm infants, but donor human milk (DM) or infant formula (IF) is used when supply is limited. We hypothesized that a gradual introduction of bovine colostrum (BC) or DM improves gut maturation, relative to IF during the first 11 days after preterm...

  4. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  5. LOCAL AND SYSTEMIC IMMUNE MECHANISMS OF CHRONIC INFLAMMATION IN THE PATIENTS WITH MILD BRONCHIAL ASTHMA

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    L. V. Ryabova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A study of leukocyte regulation system in a remission stage of bronchial asthma (BA patients included following tests: CD-typing of lymphocytes, investigations in humoral and phagocytic mechanisms of immunity, evaluation of bronchoalveolar lavage characteristics, measurements of spontaneous production of IL-4, IL-1β, IL-10 and IFNγ cytokines in whole blood supernates and bronchoalveolar lavage, as compared with control samples. The first group represented mild-stage, mixed-type BA patients (both allergy- and infection-dependent, being in remission state. The second (control group consisted of sixteen conditionally healthy patients.The results have shown that, even at early stages of BA development, some components of chronic inflammatory process are formed. They could be characterized as accumulation of different inflammatory cells, i.e., eosinophils, neutrophils, alveolar macrophages and monocytes at the local level. In parallel, some changes in T-, B-subpopulations and phagocytic compartment occur at systemic level. All these events comprise a basis for changes in type and quantity of the cytokines produced. It was established that the profile of cytokine secretion in peripheral blood is identical to the cytokine secretion profile in lung tissue.

  6. Local IL-23 Expression in Murine Vaginal Candidiasis and Its Relationship with Infection and Immune Status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan; TAN Zhijian; LIU Zhixiang; XIA Dechao; LI Jiawen

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal IL-23 and its role in experimental murine vaginal candidiasis and its relationship with infection and immune status, immuno-competent (group A) and immuno-suppressed (group B) murine models of vaginal candidiasis were established in estrogentreated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls (group C). The level of IL-23 p19 mRNA in murine vaginal tissue was determined by RT-PCR. Significantly increased levels of IL23p19mRNA were observed on the 4th, the 7th and 14th day after inoculation in immuno-competent group when compared with that in control group (P<0.01, P<0.05), However, significant increase of IL-23 p19mRNA were only observed on the 7th day and the 14th day after inoculatuon in immuno-suppressed groups (P<0.05). On the 4th and 7th day, the levels of IL-23 p19mRNA were significantly increased in immuno-competent group than those in immuno-suppressed group (P <0.05). Local IL-23 may play a role in the pathogenesis of murine vaginal candidiasis and has a protective function during infection. Low vaginal IL-23 level may correlate with the increased susceptibility to Candida albicans in immuno-suppressed group.

  7. Gut microbiota and hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Radha K

    2013-06-01

    There is a strong relationship between liver and gut; while the portal venous system receives blood from the gut, and its contents may affect liver functions, liver in turn, affects intestinal functions through bile secretion. There is robust evidence that the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is linked to alterations in gut microbiota and their by-products such as ammonia, indoles, oxindoles, endotoxins, etc. In the setting of intestinal barrier and immune dysfunction, these by-products are involved in the pathogenesis of complications of liver cirrhosis including HE and systemic inflammation plays an important role. Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics may exhibit efficacy in the treatment of HE by modulating the gut flora. They improve derangement in flora by decreasing the counts of pathogenic bacteria and thus improving the endotoxemia, HE and the liver disease. Current evidence suggest that the trials evaluating the role of probiotics in the treatment of HE are of not high quality and all trials had high risk of bias and high risk of random errors. Therefore, the use of probiotics for patients with HE cannot be currently recommended. Further RCTs are required. This review summarizes the main literature findings about the relationships between gut flora and HE, both in terms of the pathogenesis and the treatment of HE.

  8. Combining 'omics and microscopy to visualize interactions between the Asian citrus psyllid vector and the Huanglongbing pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in the insect gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Angela; Fattah-Hosseini, Somayeh; Saha, Surya; Johnson, Richard; Warwick, EricaRose; Sturgeon, Kasie; Mueller, Lukas; MacCoss, Michael J; Shatters, Robert G; Cilia Heck, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening disease, is an economically devastating bacterial disease of citrus. It is associated with infection by the gram-negative bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). CLas is transmitted by Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). For insect transmission to occur, CLas must be ingested during feeding on infected phloem sap and cross the gut barrier to gain entry into the insect vector. To investigate the effects of CLas exposure at the gut-pathogen interface, we performed RNAseq and mass spectrometry-based proteomics to analyze the transcriptome and proteome, respectively, of ACP gut tissue. CLas exposure resulted in changes in pathways involving the TCA cycle, iron metabolism, insecticide resistance and the insect's immune system. We identified 83 long non-coding RNAs that are responsive to CLas, two of which appear to be specific to the ACP. Proteomics analysis also enabled us to determine that Wolbachia, a symbiont of the ACP, undergoes proteome regulation when CLas is present. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed that Wolbachia and CLas inhabit the same ACP gut cells, but do not co-localize within those cells. Wolbachia cells are prevalent throughout the gut epithelial cell cytoplasm, and Wolbachia titer is more variable in the guts of CLas exposed insects. CLas is detected on the luminal membrane, in puncta within the gut epithelial cell cytoplasm, along actin filaments in the gut visceral muscles, and rarely, in association with gut cell nuclei. Our study provides a snapshot of how the psyllid gut copes with CLas exposure and provides information on pathways and proteins for targeted disruption of CLas-vector interactions at the gut interface.

  9. How our gut microbes influence our behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2013-05-01

    It is well established that gut bacteria help to maintain a healthy intestine by providing nutrients and guarding against pathogens. Recent evidence however suggests that their actions reach beyond the gut, as they appear to influence various aspects of host physiology, ranging from the regulation of food intake to behaviour and mood. Bacteria and their metabolites can interact with the host via routes involving the immune, nervous and endocrine system. © 2013 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  10. Effect of dietary supplementation of acidic calcium sulfate (Vitoxal) on growth, survival, immune response, and gut microbiota of the pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary acidifiers have been recognized as beneficial in animal production including aquacultural production of fish where they confer such benefits as improved feed utilization, growth, and resistance to pathogenic organisms. If improvements in growth and immune responses by acidifier supplementat...

  11. Co-adjuvant effects of retinoic acid and IL-15 induce inflammatory immunity to dietary antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under physiological conditions the gut-associated lymphoid tissues not only prevent the induction of a local inflammatory immune response, but also induce systemic tolerance to fed antigens. A notable exception is coeliac disease, where genetically susceptible individuals expressing human leukocyte...

  12. 胃肠外科患者的肠道免疫与营养支持治疗%Gut immunity and nutrition support therapy of patients in gastrointestinal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新颖; 黎介寿

    2014-01-01

    The patients in gastrointestinal surgery are always accompanied with malnutrition. Parenteral nutrition is the main support method for patients with intestinal dysfunction. The normal intestinal mucosal immune system can protect against bacteria in the gut. Parenteral nutrition without enteral stimulation injures of the intestinal mucosal immunity and increases the risk of infection. It is very important to protect intestinal mucosal barrier by nutrition support therapy.%胃肠外科患者常伴有营养不良,肠外营养是肠功能障碍者的主要营养方式。正常肠道黏膜免疫系统能有效防御肠道细菌,而缺乏肠内营养刺激的肠外营养会导致肠道黏膜免疫损伤,增加感染风险,通过营养支持治疗保护肠道黏膜屏障十分重要。

  13. [Gut microbiota: Description, role and pathophysiologic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, C; Quévrain, E

    2016-06-01

    The human gut contains 10(14) bacteria and many other micro-organisms such as Archaea, viruses and fungi. Studying the gut microbiota showed how this entity participates to gut physiology and beyond this to human health, as a real "hidden organ". In this review, we aimed to bring information about gut microbiota, its structure, its roles and its implication in human pathology. After bacterial colonization in infant, intestinal microbial composition is unique for each individual although more than 95% can be assigned to four major phyla. The use of culture independent methods and more recently the development of high throughput sequencing allowed to depict precisely gut microbiota structure and diversity as well as its alteration in diseases. Gut microbiota is implicated in the maturation of the host immune system and in many fundamental metabolic pathways including sugars and proteins fermentation and metabolism of bile acids and xenobiotics. Imbalance of gut microbial populations or dysbiosis has important functional consequences and is implicated in many digestive diseases (inflammatory bowel diseases, colorectal cancer, etc.) but also in obesity and autism. These observations have led to a surge of studies exploring therapeutics which aims to restore gut microbiota equilibrium such as probiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation. But recent research also investigates biological activity of microbial products which could lead to interesting therapeutics leads. Copyright © 2015 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Linking the Gut Microbial Ecosystem with the Environment: Does Gut Health Depend on Where We Live?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishat Tasnim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Global comparisons reveal a decrease in gut microbiota diversity attributed to Western diets, lifestyle practices such as caesarian section, antibiotic use and formula-feeding of infants, and sanitation of the living environment. While gut microbial diversity is decreasing, the prevalence of chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, obesity, allergies and asthma is on the rise in Westernized societies. Since the immune system development is influenced by microbial components, early microbial colonization may be a key factor in determining disease susceptibility patterns later in life. Evidence indicates that the gut microbiota is vertically transmitted from the mother and this affects offspring immunity. However, the role of the external environment in gut microbiome and immune development is poorly understood. Studies show that growing up in microbe-rich environments, such as traditional farms, can have protective health effects on children. These health-effects may be ablated due to changes in the human lifestyle, diet, living environment and environmental biodiversity as a result of urbanization. Importantly, if early-life exposure to environmental microbes increases gut microbiota diversity by influencing patterns of gut microbial assembly, then soil biodiversity loss due to land-use changes such as urbanization could be a public health threat. Here, we summarize key questions in environmental health research and discuss some of the challenges that have hindered progress toward a better understanding of the role of the environment on gut microbiome development.

  15. Diet effects in gut microbiome and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; He, Xianzhi; Huang, Jinhai

    2014-04-01

    The 100 trillion microbes in human gut coevolve with the host and exert significant influences on human health. The gut microbial composition presents dynamic changes correlated with various factors including host genotypes, age, and external environment. Effective manipulation of the gut microbiota through diets (both long-term and short-term diet patterns), probiotics and/or prebiotics, and antibiotics has been proved being potential to prevent from metabolic disorders such as obesity in many studies. The dietary regulation exerts influences on microbial metabolism and host immune functions through several pathways, of which may include selectively bacterial fermentation of nutrients, lower intestinal barrier function, overexpression of genes associated with disorders, and disruptions to both innate and adaptive immunity. Discoveries in the interrelationship between diet, intestinal microbiome, and body immune system provide us novel perceptions to the specific action mechanisms and will promote the development of therapeutic approaches for obesity. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Immune Adjuvant Activity of Pre-Resectional Radiofrequency Ablation Protects against Local and Systemic Recurrence in Aggressive Murine Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumito Ito

    Full Text Available While surgical resection is a cornerstone of cancer treatment, local and distant recurrences continue to adversely affect outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Evidence that an alternative debulking strategy involving radiofrequency ablation (RFA induces antitumor immunity prompted the current investigation of the efficacy of performing RFA prior to surgical resection (pre-resectional RFA in a preclinical mouse model.Therapeutic efficacy and systemic immune responses were assessed following pre-resectional RFA treatment of murine CT26 colon adenocarcinoma.Treatment with pre-resectional RFA significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival compared to sham surgery, RFA, or resection alone. Mice in the pre-resectional RFA group that achieved a complete response demonstrated durable antitumor immunity upon tumor re-challenge. Failure to achieve a therapeutic benefit in immunodeficient mice confirmed that tumor control by pre-resectional RFA depends on an intact adaptive immune response rather than changes in physical parameters that make ablated tumors more amenable to a complete surgical excision. RFA causes a marked increase in intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration, thus substantially enhancing the ratio of CD8+ effector T cells: FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Importantly, pre-resectional RFA significantly increases the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment and tumor-draining lymph node but had no impact on infiltration by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, M1 macrophages or M2 macrophages at tumor sites or in peripheral lymphoid organs (i.e., spleen. Finally, pre-resectional RFA of primary tumors delayed growth of distant tumors through a mechanism that depends on systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity.Improved survival and antitumor systemic immunity elicited by pre-resectional RFA support the translational potential of this neoadjuvant treatment for cancer patients with

  17. Genotype-by-Environment Interactions and Adaptation to Local Temperature Affect Immunity and Fecundity in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Brian P.; Flores, Heather A.; Lorigan, James G.; Yourth, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    Natural populations of most organisms harbor substantial genetic variation for resistance to infection. The continued existence of such variation is unexpected under simple evolutionary models that either posit direct and continuous natural selection on the immune system or an evolved life history “balance” between immunity and other fitness traits in a constant environment. However, both local adaptation to heterogeneous environments and genotype-by-environment interactions can maintain genetic variation in a species. In this study, we test Drosophila melanogaster genotypes sampled from tropical Africa, temperate northeastern North America, and semi-tropical southeastern North America for resistance to bacterial infection and fecundity at three different environmental temperatures. Environmental temperature had absolute effects on all traits, but there were also marked genotype-by-environment interactions that may limit the global efficiency of natural selection on both traits. African flies performed more poorly than North American flies in both immunity and fecundity at the lowest temperature, but not at the higher temperatures, suggesting that the African population is maladapted to low temperature. In contrast, there was no evidence for clinal variation driven by thermal adaptation within North America for either trait. Resistance to infection and reproductive success were generally uncorrelated across genotypes, so this study finds no evidence for a fitness tradeoff between immunity and fecundity under the conditions tested. Both local adaptation to geographically heterogeneous environments and genotype-by-environment interactions may explain the persistence of genetic variation for resistance to infection in natural populations. PMID:18369474

  18. Mothers’ Characteristics and Immunization Status of Under-Five Children in Ojo Local Government Area, Lagos State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lekan Oyefara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Immunization is a key element of public health, a pre-requisite to social and economic development, and a crucial element that enables every child to reach his or her full physical and intellectual potential. It is a prevention against various child killer diseases such as tuberculosis (Bacillus Calmette Gurine [BCG], tetanus, whooping cough, diphtheria, poliomyelitis, hepatitis B, yellow fever, and measles. The main objective of this study is to examine the relationships between household characteristics, social mobilization, and immunization status of under-5 children in Lagos metropolis, Nigeria. To achieve this objective, a non-experimental research design was adopted. The research method utilized in the design is cross-sectional survey. The sampled study location is Ojo local government area of Lagos State. A total of 265 respondents were randomly sampled for the survey using multistage random sampling technique. Generated data were analyzed using univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical techniques. The findings of the study reveal significant relationship between women’s level of education and full immunization of their children. Specifically, 38.9% of women without any formal education had fully immunized their children compared with 86.9% of women with secondary education. In addition, 90.9% of women who assessed themselves to be average on wealth assessment compared with 45.3% of the poor had fully immunized their children. On the basis of the study’s findings, there is a need for a holistic approach that will involve all social classes and communities on child immunization to have 100% immunization coverage and minimal child morbidity and mortality in all areas of the city.

  19. Yogurt and gut function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolfsson, Oskar; Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Russell, Robert M

    2004-08-01

    In recent years, numerous studies have been published on the health effects of yogurt and the bacterial cultures used in the production of yogurt. In the United States, these lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) include Lactobacillus and Streptococcus species. The benefits of yogurt and LAB on gastrointestinal health have been investigated in animal models and, occasionally, in human subjects. Some studies using yogurt, individual LAB species, or both showed promising health benefits for certain gastrointestinal conditions, including lactose intolerance, constipation, diarrheal diseases, colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, and allergies. Patients with any of these conditions could possibly benefit from the consumption of yogurt. The benefits of yogurt consumption to gastrointestinal function are most likely due to effects mediated through the gut microflora, bowel transit, and enhancement of gastrointestinal innate and adaptive immune responses. Although substantial evidence currently exists to support a beneficial effect of yogurt consumption on gastrointestinal health, there is inconsistency in reported results, which may be due to differences in the strains of LAB used, in routes of administration, or in investigational procedures or to the lack of objective definition of "gut health." Further well-designed, controlled human studies of adequate duration are needed to confirm or extend these findings.

  20. The Gut-Brain Axis: The Missing Link in Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Evrensel, Alper; Ceylan, Mehmet Emin

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota is essential to human health and the immune system and plays a major role in the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Based on evidence, the gut microbiota is associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autistic disorders, anxiety disorders and major depressive disorders. In the past few years, neuroscientific research has shown the importance of the microbiota in the deve...

  1. Impact of sleep restriction on local immune response and skin barrier restoration with and without 'multi-nutrient' nutrition intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tracey J; Wilson, Marques A; Karl, J Philip; Orr, Jeb; Smith, Carl D; Cooper, Adam D; Heaton, Kristin J; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J

    2017-09-14

    Systemic immune function is impaired by sleep restriction. However, the impact of sleep restriction on local immune responses, and to what extent any impairment can be mitigated by nutritional supplementation is unknown. We assessed the effect of 72-h sleep restriction (2-h nightly sleep) on local immune function and skin barrier restoration of an experimental wound, and determined the influence of habitual protein intake (1.5 g·kg(-1)·d(-1)) supplemented with arginine, glutamine, zinc sulfate, vitamin C, vitamin D3 and omega-3 fatty acids compared to lower protein intake (0.8 g·kg(-1)·d(-1)) without supplemental nutrients on these outcomes. Wounds were created in healthy adults by removing the top layer of ≤ 8 forearm blisters induced via suction, after adequate sleep (AS) or 48-h of a 72-h sleep restriction period (SR; 2-h nightly sleep). A subset of participants undergoing sleep restriction received supplemental nutrients during and after sleep restriction (SR+). Wound fluid was serially sampled 48-hpost-blistering to assess local cytokine responses. The IL-8 response of wound fluid was higher for AS compared to SR (area-under-the-curve (log10), 5.1±0.2 and 4.9±0.2 pg·mL(-1), respectively (P=0.03); and, both IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations were higher for SR+ compared to SR (pnutrition may mitigate some decrements in local immune responses, without detectable effects on wound healing rate. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  2. Gut Microbiota-Induced Immunoglobulin G Controls Systemic Infection by Symbiotic Bacteria and Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Melody Y; Cisalpino, Daniel; Varadarajan, Saranyaraajan; Hellman, Judith; Warren, H Shaw; Cascalho, Marilia; Inohara, Naohiro; Núñez, Gabriel

    2016-03-15

    The gut microbiota is compartmentalized in the intestinal lumen and induces local immune responses, but it remains unknown whether the gut microbiota can induce systemic response and contribute to systemic immunity. We report that selective gut symbiotic gram-negative bacteria were able to disseminate systemically to induce immunoglobulin G (IgG) response, which primarily targeted gram-negative bacterial antigens and conferred protection against systemic infections by E. coli and Salmonella by directly coating bacteria to promote killing by phagocytes. T cells and Toll-like receptor 4 on B cells were important in the generation of microbiota-specific IgG. We identified murein lipoprotein (MLP), a highly conserved gram-negative outer membrane protein, as a major antigen that induced systemic IgG homeostatically in both mice and humans. Administration of anti-MLP IgG conferred crucial protection against systemic Salmonella infection. Thus, our findings reveal an important function for the gut microbiota in combating systemic infection through the induction of protective IgG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of dietary supplementation of a commercial prebiotic Previda on survival, growth, immune responses and gut microbiota of pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 35-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate growth, bacterial populations of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and immune responses of Litopenaeus vannamei fed diets containing the commercial prebiotic PrevidaTM. Four diets were formulated to contain Previda at 0, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, or 1.6% by we...

  4. Effects of dietary supplementation of a commercial prebiotic on survival, growth, immune responses, and gut microbiota of the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 35-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate growth, bacterial populations of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and immune responses of Litopenaeus vannamei fed diets containing the commercial prebiotic PrevidaTM. Four diets were formulated to contain Previda at 0, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, or 1.6% by wei...

  5. Substituting whole grains for refined grains in a 6-wk randomized trial has a modest effect on gut microbiota and immune and inflammatory markers of healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Observational studies suggest an inverse association between whole-grain (WG) consumption and inflammation. However, evidence from interventional studies is limited, and few studies have included measurements of cell-mediated immunity. Objective: We assessed the effects of diets rich in ...

  6. Pathogen-Specific Local Immune Fingerprints Diagnose Bacterial Infection in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chan-Yu; Roberts, Gareth W.; Kift-Morgan, Ann; Donovan, Kieron L.; Topley, Nicholas; Eberl, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of bacterial infection is crucial for effective and targeted treatment, yet routine microbiological identification is inefficient and often delayed to an extent that makes it clinically unhelpful. The immune system is capable of a rapid, sensitive and specific detection of a broad spectrum of microbes, which has been optimized over millions of years of evolution. A patient's early immune response is therefore likely to provide far better insight into the true nat...

  7. Burn-injury affects gut-associated lymphoid tissues derived CD4+ T cells☆

    OpenAIRE

    Fazal, Nadeem; Shelip, Alla; Alzahrani, Alhusain J.

    2013-01-01

    After scald burn-injury, the intestinal immune system responds to maintain immune balance. In this regard CD4+T cells in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissues (GALT), like mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) respond to avoid immune suppression following major injury such as burn. Therefore, we hypothesized that the gut CD4+T cells become dysfunctional and turn the immune homeostasis towards depression of CD4+ T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. In the current study we show ...

  8. Targeting gut microbiota as a possible therapy for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Canxia; Shan, Yujuan; Song, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of diabetes has increased rapidly across the entire world in the last 2 decades. Accumulating evidence suggests that gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Several studies have demonstrated that patients with diabetes are characterized by a moderate degree of gut microbial dysbiosis. However, there are still substantial controversies regarding altered composition of the gut microbiota and the underlying mechanisms by which gut microbiota interact with the body's metabolism. The purpose of this review is to define the association between gut microbiota and diabetes. In doing so an electronic search of studies published in English from January 2004 to the November 2014 in the National Library of Medicine, including the original studies that addressed the effects of gut microbiota on diabetes, energy metabolism, inflammation, the immune system, gut permeability and insulin resistance, was performed. Herein, we discuss the possible mechanisms by which the gut microbiota are involved in the development of diabetes, including energy metabolism, inflammation, the innate immune system, and the bowel function of the intestinal barrier. The compositional changes in the gut microbiota in type 2 and type 1 diabetes are also discussed. Moreover, we introduce the new findings of fecal transplantation, and use of probiotics and prebiotics as new treatment strategies for diabetes. Future research should be focused on defining the primary species of the gut microbiota and their exact roles in diabetes, potentially increasing the possibility of fecal transplants as a therapeutic strategy for diabetes.

  9. The role of gut microbiota in human metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieze, A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis supports the hypothesis that gut microbiota can be viewed as an ‘exteriorised organ’ that contributes to energy metabolism and the modulation of our immune system. Following Koch’s postulates, it has now been shown that gut microbiota are associated with metabolic disease and that these

  10. The role of gut microbiota in human metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieze, A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis supports the hypothesis that gut microbiota can be viewed as an ‘exteriorised organ’ that contributes to energy metabolism and the modulation of our immune system. Following Koch’s postulates, it has now been shown that gut microbiota are associated with metabolic disease and that these

  11. Relationship between gut microbiota and development of T cell associated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiewicz, Michele M; Dryden, Gerald W; Chhabra, Anita; Alard, Pascale

    2014-11-17

    The interplay between the immune response and the gut microbiota is complex. Although it is well-established that the gut microbiota is essential for the proper development of the immune system, recent evidence indicates that the cells of the immune system also influence the composition of the gut microbiota. This interaction can have important consequences for the development of inflammatory diseases, including autoimmune diseases and allergy, and the specific mechanisms by which the gut commensals drive the development of different types of immune responses are beginning to be understood. Furthermore, sex hormones are now thought to play a novel role in this complex relationship, and collaborate with both the gut microbiota and immune system to influence the development of autoimmune disease. In this review, we will focus on recent studies that have transformed our understanding of the importance of the gut microbiota in inflammatory responses.

  12. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  13. Enhancement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung clearance after local immunization with a temperature-sensitive mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordelli, D O; Cerquetti, M C; Hooke, A M; Bellanti, J A

    1983-01-01

    We investigated the capacity of the temperature-sensitive mutant strain A/10/25 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ts-Psa) to induce enhancement of lung defenses against wild type P. aeruginosa (wt-Psa). Mice of the DBA/2J inbred strain were immunized by aerosolization with a single dose of 2 x 10(5) to 4 x 10(5) CFU of ts-Psa and were challenged 7, 14, and 21 days later with wt-Psa. The uncleared bacteria ratio was determined 4 h after aerosol exposure; significant enhancement in lung clearance of wt-Psa (P less than 0.01) was evident as early as 7 days after immunization and detectable for at least 21 days. Aerosol immunization with Staphylococcus aureus did not enhance lung clearance of wt-Psa; however, slight but significant enhancement in S. aureus clearance was observed in mice immunized 7 days before with ts-Psa. No enhancement of S. aureus clearance was seen in ts-Psa immunized animals after 14 and 21 days. Analysis of the cell composition of lung lavage fluids revealed a transient cell response characterized by rapid increase in the absolute number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, followed later by an increase in alveolar macrophages. The characteristics of lung lavages returned to base-line values 6 days after aerosol immunization, and a second exposure to a ts-Psa aerosol produced a response of similar magnitude and quality. We conclude that aerosol immunization with a temperature-sensitive mutant of P. aeruginosa enhances specific pulmonary defense mechanisms against the parental pathogen in mice. PMID:6404822

  14. Bronchoalveolar lavage is an ideal tool in evaluation of local immune response of pigs vaccinated with Pasteurella multocida bacterin vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiney George

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL technique in evaluating the local immune response of pig immunized with Pasteurella multocida bacterin vaccine. Materials and Methods: Weaned piglets were immunized with formalin-inactivated P52 strain of P. multocida bacterin and evaluated for pulmonary immune response in BAL fluid. BAL was performed before vaccination and at different post vaccination days. The BAL fluid was assayed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study the development of P. multocida specific antibody isotypes and also evaluated for different cell populations using standard protocol. Results: The average recovery percentage of BAL fluid varies from 58.33 to 61.33 in vaccinated and control group of piglets. The BAL fluid of vaccinated pigs showed increase in antibody titer up to 60th days post vaccination (8.98±0.33, IgG being the predominant isotype reached maximum titer of 6.12±0.20 on 45th days post vaccination, followed by IgM and a meager concentration of IgA could be detected. An increased concentration of the lymphocyte population and induction of plasma cells was detected in the BAL fluid of vaccinated pigs. Conclusion: Though intranasal vaccination with P. multocida plain bacterin vaccine could not provoke a strong immune response, but is promising as lymphocyte population was increased and plasma cells were detected. BAL can be performed repeatedly up to 3/4 months of age in pigs to study pulmonary immune response without affecting their health.

  15. Infection dynamic of symbiotic bacteria in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum gut and host immune response at the early steps in the infection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renoz, François; Noël, Christine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Foray, Vincent; Hance, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its obligatory symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum can harbor several facultative bacterial symbionts which can be mutualistic in the context of various ecological interactions. Belonging to a genus where many members have been described as pathogen in invertebrates, Serratia symbiotica is one of the most common facultative partners found in aphids. The recent discovery of strains able to grow outside their host allowed us to simulate environmental acquisition of symbiotic bacteria by aphids. Here, we performed an experiment to characterize the A. pisum response to the ingestion of the free-living S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T in comparison to the ingestion of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens Db11 at the early steps in the infection process. We found that, while S. marcescens Db11 killed the aphids within a few days, S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not affect host survival and colonized the whole digestive tract within a few days. Gene expression analysis of immune genes suggests that S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not trigger an immune reaction, while S. marcescens Db11 did, and supports the hypothesis of a fine-tuning of the host immune response set-up for fighting pathogens while maintaining mutualistic partners. Our results also suggest that the lysosomal system and the JNK pathway are possibly involved in the regulation of invasive bacteria in aphids and that the activation of the JNK pathway is IMD-independent in the pea aphid.

  16. Infection dynamic of symbiotic bacteria in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum gut and host immune response at the early steps in the infection process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Renoz

    Full Text Available In addition to its obligatory symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum can harbor several facultative bacterial symbionts which can be mutualistic in the context of various ecological interactions. Belonging to a genus where many members have been described as pathogen in invertebrates, Serratia symbiotica is one of the most common facultative partners found in aphids. The recent discovery of strains able to grow outside their host allowed us to simulate environmental acquisition of symbiotic bacteria by aphids. Here, we performed an experiment to characterize the A. pisum response to the ingestion of the free-living S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T in comparison to the ingestion of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens Db11 at the early steps in the infection process. We found that, while S. marcescens Db11 killed the aphids within a few days, S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not affect host survival and colonized the whole digestive tract within a few days. Gene expression analysis of immune genes suggests that S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not trigger an immune reaction, while S. marcescens Db11 did, and supports the hypothesis of a fine-tuning of the host immune response set-up for fighting pathogens while maintaining mutualistic partners. Our results also suggest that the lysosomal system and the JNK pathway are possibly involved in the regulation of invasive bacteria in aphids and that the activation of the JNK pathway is IMD-independent in the pea aphid.

  17. Do environmental factors influence the development of the gut microbiome in young birds?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, Mauritia; Falcao Salles, Joana; Both, C; Groothuis, Ton; Tieleman, Bernadine

    Symbiotic relationships between hosts and microbiomes are often vital to the host. E.g., gut microbes are important for host physiology and host development (e.g., gut morphology, organ development and function, and the immune system). Young animals may acquire gut microbiota via several pathways:

  18. Rapidly expanding knowledge on the role of the gut microbiome in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cenit, M. C.; Matzaraki, V.; Tigchelaar-Feenstra, E. F.; Zhernakova, A.

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is colonized by a wide diversity of micro-organisms, which are now known to play a key role in the human host by regulating metabolic functions and immune homeostasis. Many studies have indicated that the genomes of our gut microbiota, known as the gut microbiome or our "other genome"

  19. Gut ecosystem: how microbes help us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, R; Miquel, S; Ulmer, J; Langella, P; Bermúdez-Humarán, L G

    2014-09-01

    The human gut houses one of the most complex and abundant ecosystems composed of up to 1013-1014 microorganisms. Although the anthropocentric concept of life has concealed the function of microorganisms inside us, the important role of gut bacterial community in human health is well recognised today. Moreover, different microorganims, which are commonly present in a large diversity of food products, transit through our gut every day adding in some cases a beneficial effect to our health (probiotics). This crosstalk is concentrated mainly in the intestinal epithelium, where microbes provide the host with essential nutrients and modulation of the immune system. Furthermore, microorganisms also display antimicrobial activities maintaining a gut ecosystem stable. This review summarises some of the recent findings on the interaction of both commensal and probiotic bacteria with each other and with the host. The aim is to highlight the cooperative status found in healthy individuals as well as the importance of this crosstalk in the maintenance of human homeostasis.

  20. Palmitoylation of the immunity related GTPase, Irgm1: impact on membrane localization and ability to promote mitochondrial fission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C Henry

    Full Text Available The Immunity-Related GTPases (IRG are a family of large GTPases that mediate innate immune responses. Irgm1 is particularly critical for immunity to bacteria and protozoa, and for inflammatory homeostasis in the intestine. Although precise functions for Irgm1 have not been identified, prior studies have suggested roles in autophagy/mitophagy, phagosome remodeling, cell motility, and regulating the activity of other IRG proteins. These functions ostensibly hinge on the ability of Irgm1 to localize to intracellular membranes, such as those of the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria. Previously, it has been shown that an amphipathic helix, the αK helix, in the C-terminal portion of the protein partially mediates membrane binding. However, in absence of αK, there is still substantial binding of Irgm1 to cellular membranes, suggesting the presence of other membrane binding motifs. In the current work, an additional membrane localization motif was found in the form of palmitoylation at a cluster of cysteines near the αK. An Irgm1 mutant possessing alanine to cysteine substitutions at these amino acids demonstrated little residual palmitoylation, yet it displayed only a small decrease in localization to the Golgi and mitochondria. In contrast, a mutant containing the palmitoylation mutations in combination with mutations disrupting the amphipathic character of the αK displayed a complete loss of apparent localization to the Golgi and mitochondria, as well as an overall loss of association with cellular membranes in general. Additionally, Irgm1 was found to promote mitochondrial fission, and this function was undermined in Irgm1 mutants lacking the palmitoylation domain, and to a greater extent in those lacking the αK, or the αK and palmitoylation domains combined. Our data suggest that palmitoylation together with the αK helix firmly anchor Irgm1 in the Golgi and mitochondria, thus facilitating function of the protein.

  1. Beyond the gut bacterial microbiota: The gut virome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columpsi, Paola; Sacchi, Paolo; Zuccaro, Valentina; Cima, Serena; Sarda, Cristina; Mariani, Marcello; Gori, Andrea; Bruno, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is colonized with a highly different population of bacterial, viral, ad fungal species; viruses are reported to be dominant. The composition of gut virome is closely related to dietary habits and surrounding environment. Host and their intestinal microbes live in a dynamic equilibrium and viruses stimulate a low degree of immune responses without causing symptoms (host tolerance). However, intestinal phages could lead to a rupture of eubiosis and may contribute to the shift from health to disease in humans and animals. Viral nucleic acids and other products of lysis of bacteria serve as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and could trigger specific inflammatory modulations. At the same time, phages could elicit innate antiviral immune responses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) operated as innate antiviral immune sensors and their activation triggers signaling cascades that lead to inflammatory response. J. Med. Virol. 88:1467-1472, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cell Based Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy (AIET after Radiotherapy in a Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumana Premkumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is the primary form of treatment in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. However for residual disease in the form of the persistent lymph nodes, surgery or chemotherapy is recommended. As surgery is not acceptable by every patient and chemotherapy has associated side effects, we hereby report the positive outcome of in vitro expanded natural killer cell and activated T lymphocyte based autologous immune enhancement therapy (AIET for the residual lymphadenopathy in a patient with locally advanced cervical cancer after radiation. After six transfusions of AIET, there was complete resolution of residual lymph nodes and there was no evidence of local lesion. The patient also reported improvement in quality of life. As AIET has been reported as the least toxic among the available therapies for cancer, combining AIET with conventional forms of therapy in similar patients might not only improve the outcome but may also help the patients achieve a good quality of life.

  3. Food components and the Immune System: from tonic agents to allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Caetano Faria

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa is the major site of contact with antigens, and it lodges the largest lymphoid tissue in the body. In physiological conditions, microbiota and dietary antigens are the natural sources of stimulation for the gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT and for the immune system as a whole. Germ free models have provided some insights on the immunological role of gut antigens. However, most of the GALT is not located in the large intestine, where gut microbiota is prominent. It is concentrated in the small intestine where protein absorption takes place. In this review, we will address the involvement of food components in the development and the function of the immune system. Studies in mice have already shown that dietary proteins are critical elements for the developmental shift of the immature neonatal immune profile into a fully developed immune system. The immunological effects of other food components (such as vitamins and lipids will also be addressed. Most of the cells in the GALT are activated and local proinflammatory mediators are abundant. Regulatory elements are known to provide a delicate yet robust balance that keeps the gut homeostasis at check. Usually antigenic contact in the gut induces two major immune responses, oral tolerance and production of secretory IgA. However, under pathological conditions mucosal homeostasis is disturbed resulting in inflammatory reactions such as food hypersensitivity. Food allergy development depends on many factors such as genetic predisposition, biochemical features of allergens and a growing array of environmental elements. Neuroimmune interactions are also implicated in food allergy and they are examples of the high complexity of the phenomenon. Recent findings on the gut circuits triggered by food components will be reviewed to show that, far beyond their role as nutrients, they are critical players in the operation of immune system in health and disease.

  4. Diet and microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease: The gut in disharmony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapozo, Davy C M; Bernardazzi, Claudio; de Souza, Heitor Siffert Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of the gut shapes both the local and the systemic immune response and is implicated in the modulation of immunity in both healthy and disease states. Recently, quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the gut microbiota have been detected in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, reinforcing the hypothesis of dysbiosis as a relevant mechanism underlying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis. Humans and microbes have co-existed and co-evolved for a long time in a mutually beneficial symbiotic association essential for maintaining homeostasis. However, the microbiome is dynamic, changing with age and in response to environmental modifications. Among such environmental factors, food and alimentary habits, progressively altered in modern societies, appear to be critical modulators of the microbiota, contributing to or co-participating in dysbiosis. In addition, food constituents such as micronutrients are important regulators of mucosal immunity, with direct or indirect effects on the gut microbiota. Moreover, food constituents have recently been shown to modulate epigenetic mechanisms, which can result in increased risk for the development and progression of IBD. Therefore, it is likely that a better understanding of the role of different food components in intestinal homeostasis and the resident microbiota will be essential for unravelling the complex molecular basis of the epigenetic, genetic and environment interactions underlying IBD pathogenesis as well as for offering dietary interventions with minimal side effects. PMID:28405140

  5. 运动、谷氨酰胺与肠道免疫研究进展%On the research progress of exercise,glutamine and gut immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海军

    2011-01-01

    综述了谷氨酰胺的生理作用及补充谷氨酰胺对运动后肠道免疫功能变化的影响,为进一步研究运动性免疫抑制提供理论依据。%This paper summarizes the physiological function of glutamine and the effect of supplement glutamine on immune function after exercise,and provides some theoretical basis for the future research of Exercise-induced Immunosuppressant.

  6. Liver restores immune homeostasis after local inflammation despite the presence of autoreactive T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie Béland

    Full Text Available The liver must keep equilibrium between immune tolerance and immunity in order to protect itself from pathogens while maintaining tolerance to food antigens. An imbalance between these two states could result in an inflammatory liver disease. The aims of this study were to identify factors responsible for a break of tolerance and characterize the subsequent restoration of liver immune homeostasis. A pro-inflammatory environment was created in the liver by the co-administration of TLR ligands CpG and Poly(I:C in presence or absence of activated liver-specific autoreactive CD8(+ T cells. Regardless of autoreactive CD8(+ T cells, mice injected with CpG and Poly(I:C showed elevated serum ALT levels and a transient liver inflammation. Both CpG/Poly(I:C and autoreactive CD8(+T cells induced expression of TLR9 and INF-γ by the liver, and an up-regulation of homing and adhesion molecules CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL16, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Transferred CFSE-labeled autoreactive CD8(+ T cells, in presence of TLR3 and 9 ligands, were recruited by the liver and spleen and proliferated. This population then contracted by apoptosis through intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Up-regulation of FasL and PD-L1 in the liver was observed. In conclusion, TLR-mediated activation of the innate immune system results in a pro-inflammatory environment that promotes the recruitment of lymphocytes resulting in bystander hepatitis. Despite this pro-inflammatory environment, the presence of autoreactive CD8(+ T cells is not sufficient to sustain an autoimmune response against the liver and immune homeostasis is rapidly restored through the apoptosis of T cells.

  7. Mucosal immunity and the microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    By definition, the mucosal immune system is responsible for interfacing with the outside world, specifically responding to external threats, of which pathogenic microbes represent a primary challenge. However, it has become apparent that the human host possesses a numerically vast and taxonomically diverse resident microbiota, predominantly in the gut, and also in the airway, genitourinary tract, and skin. The microbiota is generally considered symbiotic, and has been implicated in the regulation of cellular growth, restitution after injury, maintenance of barrier function, and importantly, in the induction, development, and modulation of immune responses. The mucosal immune system uses diverse mechanisms that protect the host from overt pathogens, but necessarily has coevolved to monitor, nurture, and exploit the normal microbiota. As a whole, mucosal immunity encompasses adaptive immune regulation that can involve systemic processes, local tissue-based innate and inflammatory events, intrinsic defenses, and highly conserved cell autonomous cytoprotective responses. Interestingly, specific taxa within the normal microbiota have been implicated in roles shaping specific adaptive, innate, and cell autonomous responses. Taken together, the normal microbiota exerts profound effects on the mucosal immune system, and likely plays key roles in human physiology and disease.

  8. Effect of intestinal autochthonous probiotics isolated from the gut of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) on immune response and growth of A. japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Cheng; Liu, Jia-Yan; Fei, Shi-Zhou; Zhang, Chao; Chang, Ya-Qing; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2014-06-01

    The study isolated 224 bacteria from the intestine of Apostichopus japonicus, then selected and identified three of the bacteria (HS1, HS7, and HS10) which demonstrated amylase, lipase, and protease production capacity as candidate probiotics for sea cucumbers. The three potential probiotics showed no pathogenicity both in hemolytic assays on sheep blood agar plates and after immersing sea cucumbers in a suspension of the bacteria. To reveal the effects of these three potential probiotics on the innate immunity of sea cucumbers, total coelomocyte counts, respiratory burst activity, superoxide dismutase activity, lysozyme activity, acid phosphatase activity, and phagocytic activity by coelomocytes were examined after feeding with four different diets for up to 28 days. Also the specific growth rate and survival rate were investigated after a 60-day feeding trial. Sea cucumbers were fed with 4 diets: one control, three diets supplemented with 1 × 10(9) cell g(-1) of HS1, HS7, and HS10 for 28-60 days. Results showed that sea cucumbers fed diets containing HS1, HS7, and HS10 had led to an enhanced cellular and humoral immune response, notably higher total coelomocytes counts, respiratory burst activity, lysozyme activity, acid phosphatase activity, and phagocytic activity, as recorded during the four weeks of probiotics administration. On the other hand, the survival rate among dietary treatments ranged from 90.71 to 97.97% with significant improvement (P probiotics in A. japonicus.

  9. The Gut-Lung Axis in Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, Benjamin J; Trompette, Aurélien; Gollwitzer, Eva S

    2015-11-01

    Host-microorganism interactions shape local cell functionality, immune responses, and can influence disease development. Evidence indicates that the impact of host-microbe interactions reaches far beyond the local environment, thus influencing responses in peripheral tissues. There is a vital cross-talk between the mucosal tissues of our body, as exemplified by intestinal complications during respiratory disease and vice versa. Although, mechanistically, this phenomenon remains poorly defined, the existence of the gut-lung axis and its implications in both health and disease could be profoundly important for both disease etiology and treatment. In this review, we highlight how changes in the intestinal microenvironment, with a particular focus on the intestinal microbiota, impact upon respiratory disease.

  10. Tail gut cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G Mallikarjuna; Haricharan, P; Ramanujacharyulu, S; Reddy, K Lakshmi

    2002-01-01

    The tail gut is a blind extension of the hindgut into the tail fold just distal to the cloacal membrane. Remnants of this structure may form tail gut cyst. We report a 14-year-old girl with tail gut cyst that presented as acute abdomen. The patient recovered after cyst excision.

  11. Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    research is to assess the efficacy of augmenting immune responses to breast cancer through the use of magneto-rheological fluid (MRF), suspensions of...poly(NIPAAm) onto silica nanoparticles using ATRP has been investigated by [5, 6]. In the present work, MRFs were synthesized from suspensions of...of Iron-Based Nanofluids ”, International Journal of Modern Physics B, Vol. 21, pp. 4774 – 4781, 2007 18. J. P. Jakubovics, “Magnetism and Magnetic

  12. Local communication among mucosal immune cells in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Mulder, Chris J; Mearin, M Luisa; Koning, Frits

    2015-05-01

    In patients with celiac disease, gluten consumption causes inflammation of the duodenum, and, to a lesser extent, the proximal jejunum. Immune-dominant gluten peptides are modified by the enzyme TG2, leading to their high-affinity binding to HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 molecules, present in people with a predisposition to celiac disease. Gluten peptide-loaded HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 molecules are recognized by highly conserved receptors on CD4(+) T cells in the lamina propria. B cells specific for TG2 and modified gluten peptides are also abundant in the lamina propria of patients with celiac disease. In the epithelium, interleukin-15 activates intraepithelial lymphocytes that promote destruction of epithelial cells. However, it is not clear how the immune responses in the lamina propria and the epithelium, separated by a basement membrane, are linked. We review the immune processes that occur in the lamina propria and their potential effects on epithelial pathology in celiac disease.

  13. Local and distant recurrences in rectal cancer patients are predicted by the nonspecific immune response; specific immune response has only a systemic effect - a histopathological and immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulder-Stapel Adri

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasion and metastasis is a complex process governed by the interaction of genetically altered tumor cells and the immunological and inflammatory host reponse. Specific T-cells directed against tumor cells and the nonspecific inflammatory reaction due to tissue damage, cooperate against invasive tumor cells in order to prevent recurrences. Data concerning involvement of individual cell types are readily available but little is known about the coordinate interactions between both forms of immune response. Patients and methods The presence of inflammatory infiltrate and eosinophils was determined in 1530 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma from a multicenter trial. We selected 160 patients to analyze this inflammatory infiltrate in more detail using immunohistochemistry. The association with the development of local and distant relapses was determined using univariate and multivariate log rank testing. Results Patients with an extensive inflammatory infiltrate around the tumor had lower recurrence rates (3.4% versus 6.9%, p = 0.03, showing the importance of host response against tumor cells. In particular, peritumoral mast cells prevent local and distant recurrence (44% versus 15%, p = 0.007 and 86% versus 21%, p Conclusions We showed that next to properties of tumor cells, the amount and type of inflammation is also relevant in the control of rectal cancer. Knowledge of the factors involved may lead to new approaches in the management of rectal cancer.

  14. Neuropeptides and the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter; Farzi, Aitak

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators both within the nervous system and between neurons and other cell types. Neuropeptides such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, somatostatin and corticotropin-releasing factor are also likely to play a role in the bidirectional gut-brain communication. In this capacity they may influence the activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota and its interaction with the gut-brain axis. Current efforts in elucidating the implication of neuropeptides in the microbiota-gut-brain axis address four information carriers from the gut to the brain (vagal and spinal afferent neurons; immune mediators such as cytokines; gut hormones; gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) and four information carriers from the central nervous system to the gut (sympathetic efferent neurons; parasympathetic efferent neurons; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal medulla; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal cortex). Apart from operating as neurotransmitters, many biologically active peptides also function as gut hormones. Given that neuropeptides and gut hormones target the same cell membrane receptors (typically G protein-coupled receptors), the two messenger roles often converge in the same or similar biological implications. This is exemplified by NPY and peptide YY (PYY), two members of the PP-fold peptide family. While PYY is almost exclusively expressed by enteroendocrine cells, NPY is found at all levels of the gut-brain and brain-gut axis. The function of PYY-releasing enteroendocrine cells is directly influenced by short chain fatty acids generated by the intestinal microbiota from indigestible fibre, while NPY may control the impact of the gut microbiota on inflammatory processes, pain, brain function and behaviour. Although the impact of neuropeptides on the interaction between the gut microbiota and brain awaits to be analysed, biologically active peptides

  15. Molecular Insight into Gut Microbiota and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohao; He, Bing; Liu, Jin; Feng, Hui; Ma, Yinghui; Li, Defang; Guo, Baosheng; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Wang, Luyao; Tian, Jing; Zhu, Hailong; Xiao, Lianbo; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-03-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorder. Gut microbiota play an important role in the etiology of RA. With the considerable progress made in next-generation sequencing techniques, the identified gut microbiota difference between RA patients and healthy individuals provides an updated overview of the association between gut microbiota and RA. We reviewed the reported correlation and underlying molecular mechanisms among gut microbiota, the immune system, and RA. It has become known that gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of RA via multiple molecular mechanisms. The progressive understanding of the dynamic interaction between gut microbiota and their host will help in establishing a highly individualized management for each RA patient, and achieve a better efficacy in clinical practice, or even discovering new drugs for RA.

  16. TU-CD-303-03: Localized Radiation Can Induce Systemic Anti-Cancer Immune and Non-Immune Responses and How We Might Utilize It

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M. [National Institutes of Health (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation also initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the essence of

  17. Local Expression of Vaginal Th1 and Th2 Cytokines in Murine Vaginal Candidiasis under Different Immunity Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanjuan CHEN; Shaohua LI; Yan WU; Zhixiang LIU; Jiawen LI

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal Th1 and Th2 cytokines in rats with experimental vaginal candidiasis under different immune conditions, ICR murine vaginal candidiasis model was established and immno-suppressed murine models of vaginal cadidiasis were established in estrogen-treated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls. The mRNA level of Th1(IL-2)/Th2 (IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β1) cytokines in murine vaginal tissues was determined by RT-PCR.The cykotine in local tissues was increased to different extent under normal immune condition. IL-2mRNA was increased during early stage of infection, while IL-10 was increased transiently during late stage of infection. TGF-β1 production was found to be increased persistently. At same time, the expression of IL-2 mRNA was suppressed in immno-suppressed group, and the level of IL-4, IL-10,and TGF-β1 were higher than the normal immunity group to different degree during infection. The high level of IL-2 mRNA during early stage of infection was associated with clearance of mucosal Candidia albicans (C. albicans), and its expression suppressed leading to decreased clearance of mucosal C. albican in immuno-suppression. The over-expression of IL-4 and IL-10 could significantly enhance the susceptibility to C. albicans infection in mice.

  18. [Changes of local resistance of oral cavity and humoral immunity among workers of metallurgical and chemical production during parodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobakhidze, M V; Dzhashi, L M; Chelidze, L N; Gogebashvili, N V

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the data of immunological investigations of 142 workers of metallurgical (melting shops of Zestaphoni's Farroalloy Plant) and chemical (electrolytic shops of manganese and dioxide manganese of Farroalloy Plant and "Azoti") production it was found that during parodontitis among studied contingent local resistance of mouth cavity and humoral immunity are changed, the compound of lysozyme and amylase in saliva is lowered, in the layers of saliva and blood is revealed the misbalance of immunoglobulin's system. First of all was established, that during parodontitis among the studied workers autoimmune processes are developed directed against the I-st type collagen and the tissue of gum. Changes of local and common homeostasis as well as the changes of intensity of autoimmune process are in direct correlation with the severity of parodontitis and the pollution of production environment with the spray of manganese dioxide.

  19. Gut microbiota promote hematopoiesis to control bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Arya; Yáñez, Alberto; Price, Jeremy G; Chow, Andrew; Merad, Miriam; Goodridge, Helen S; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2014-03-12

    The commensal microbiota impacts specific immune cell populations and their functions at peripheral sites, such as gut mucosal tissues. However, it remains unknown whether gut microbiota control immunity through regulation of hematopoiesis at primary immune sites. We reveal that germ-free mice display reduced proportions and differentiation potential of specific myeloid cell progenitors of both yolk sac and bone marrow origin. Homeostatic innate immune defects may lead to impaired early responses to pathogens. Indeed, following systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes, germ-free and oral-antibiotic-treated mice display increased pathogen burden and acute death. Recolonization of germ-free mice with a complex microbiota restores defects in myelopoiesis and resistance to Listeria. These findings reveal that gut bacteria direct innate immune cell development via promoting hematopoiesis, contributing to our appreciation of the deep evolutionary connection between mammals and their microbiota.

  20. Contribution of Gut Bacteria to Liver Pathobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gakuhei Son

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests a strong interaction between the gut microbiota and health and disease. The interactions of the gut microbiota and the liver have only recently been investigated in detail. Receiving approximately 70% of its blood supply from the intestinal venous outflow, the liver represents the first line of defense against gut-derived antigens and is equipped with a broad array of immune cells (i.e., macrophages, lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells to accomplish this function. In the setting of tissue injury, whereby the liver is otherwise damaged (e.g., viral infection, toxin exposure, ischemic tissue damage, etc., these same immune cell populations and their interactions with the infiltrating gut bacteria likely contribute to and promote these pathologies. The following paper will highlight recent studies investigating the relationship between the gut microbiota, liver biology, and pathobiology. Defining these connections will likely provide new targets for therapy or prevention of a wide variety of acute and chronic liver pathologies.

  1. Gut microbiome, gut function, and probiotics: Implications for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajela, Neerja; Ramakrishna, B S; Nair, G Balakrish; Abraham, Philip; Gopalan, Sarath; Ganguly, Nirmal K

    2015-03-01

    New insights from a rapidly developing field of research have ushered in a new era of understanding of the complexity of host-microbe interactions within the human body. The paradigm shift from culturing to metagenomics has provided an insight into the complex diversity of the microbial species that we harbor, revealing the fact that we are in fact more microbes than human cells. The largest consortium of these microbes resides in the gut and is called the gut microbiota. This new science has expanded the ability to document shifts in microbial populations to an unparalleled degree. It is now understood that signals from the microbiota provide trophic, nutritional, metabolic, and protective effects for the development and maintenance of the host digestive, immune, and neuroendocrine system. Evidence linking changes in the gut microbiota to gastrointestinal and extraintestinal disorders like irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, diabetes, and celiac disease have begun to emerge recently. Probiotics act through diverse mechanisms positively affecting the composition and/or function of the commensal microbiota and alter host immunological responses. Well-controlled intervention trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis provide convincing evidence for the benefit of probiotics in prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal as well as extraintestinal disorders.

  2. Nutrigenomics and gut health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Shelling, Andrew N; Lauren, Denis; Heyes, Julian A; McNabb, Warren C

    2007-09-01

    Recognition of the interplay between genes and diet in development of disease and for maintenance of optimal metabolism has led to nutrigenomic or nutrigenetic approaches to personalising or individualising nutrition, with the potential of preventing, delaying, or reducing the symptoms of chronic diseases. Some of the development work has focussed on cardiovascular disease or type II diabetes mellitus, where various groups have identified potential diet-gene interactions. However, the available studies also emphasise the exponential increase in numbers of subjects necessary to recruit for clinical evaluation if we are to successfully provide informative high-dimensional datasets of genetic, nutrient, metabolomic (clinical), and other variables. There is also a significant bioinformatics challenge to analyze these. To add to the complexity, many of the pioneering studies had assumed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were the main source of human variability, but an increasing evidence base suggests the importance of more subtle gene regulatory mechanisms, including copy number variants. As an example, the risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is associated with the inheritance of a number of contributory SNPs as well as with copy number variants of certain other genes. The variant forms of genes often result in disruptions to bacterial homeostasis mechanisms or to signal transduction of the intestinal epithelial cell of the host, and thereby to altered intestinal barrier function, and/or adaptive immune responses. The human gut microbiota is altered in individuals suffering from disorders such as IBD, and probiotic or prebiotic therapies or elemental diets may be beneficial to a high proportion of individuals through modifying the gut microbiota, and also modulating immune responses. New putative foods or dietary therapies may be identified through novel tissue culture screens, followed by further testing with in vivo animal models of human disease. A

  3. The human gut microbiota and undernutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jeffrey I; Dewey, Kathryn G; Mills, David A; Medzhitov, Ruslan M

    2012-06-06

    Childhood malnutrition is a global health problem that cannot be attributed to food insecurity alone. The gut microbiota may contribute to this devastating health disorder. In this Perspective, we call for the application of tools and concepts emerging from studies of the human gut microbiota to better understand the nutritional needs of infants and children and the role of the microbiota in the pathogenesis and treatment of undernutrition. This effort will require elucidation of the interrelationships between breast milk composition and the development of the microbiota and immune system in the context of the maternal-infant dyad.

  4. EFFECTS OF IVIG TREATMENT UPON LOCAL AND GENERAL IMMUNITY STATE IN THE PATIENTS WITH ACUTE EPIGLOTTITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Savchenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This study has shown that intravenous normal human immunoglobulin (IVIG, when included into combined therapy of acute epiglottitis, exerts positive effect upon clinical course of the disease and contributes to normalisation of immune status. Due to IVIG therapy, an increase in IgA and sIgA concentrations is observed in laryngopharynx secretions. Amounts and affinity of serum antibodies to common bacterial antigenic determinant are increased in blood, as well as opsonizing properties of blood serum. Moreover, a higher phagocytic and bactericidal activity of neutrophils is observed with such treatment. Inflammatory as well as degenerative and destructive processes in epiglottis seem to be preventable under the influence of IVIG therapy.

  5. Corneal Fibroblasts as Sentinel Cells and Local Immune Modulators in Infectious Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Fukuda

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The cornea serves as a barrier to protect the eye against external insults including microbial pathogens and antigens. Bacterial infection of the cornea often results in corneal melting and scarring that can lead to severe visual impairment. Not only live bacteria but also their components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS of Gram-negative bacteria contribute to the development of inflammation and subsequent corneal damage in infectious keratitis. We describe the important role played by corneal stromal fibroblasts (activated keratocytes as sentinel cells, immune modulators, and effector cells in infectious keratitis. Corneal fibroblasts sense bacterial infection through Toll-like receptor (TLR–mediated detection of a complex of LPS with soluble cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14 and LPS binding protein present in tear fluid. The cells then initiate innate immune responses including the expression of chemokines and adhesion molecules that promote the recruitment of inflammatory cells necessary for elimination of the infecting bacteria. Infiltrated neutrophils are activated by corneal stromal collagen and release mediators that stimulate the production of pro–matrix metalloproteinases by corneal fibroblasts. Elastase produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa activates these released metalloproteinases, resulting in the degradation of stromal collagen. The modulation of corneal fibroblast activation and of the interaction of these cells with inflammatory cells and bacteria is thus important to minimize corneal scarring during treatment of infectious keratitis. Pharmacological agents that are able to restrain such activities of corneal fibroblasts without allowing bacterial growth represent a potential novel treatment option for prevention of excessive scarring and tissue destruction in the cornea.

  6. Brain-gut-microbiota axis in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulak, Agata; Bonaz, Bruno

    2015-10-07

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by alpha-synucleinopathy that affects all levels of the brain-gut axis including the central, autonomic, and enteric nervous systems. Recently, it has been recognized that the brain-gut axis interactions are significantly modulated by the gut microbiota via immunological, neuroendocrine, and direct neural mechanisms. Dysregulation of the brain-gut-microbiota axis in PD may be associated with gastrointestinal manifestations frequently preceding motor symptoms, as well as with the pathogenesis of PD itself, supporting the hypothesis that the pathological process is spread from the gut to the brain. Excessive stimulation of the innate immune system resulting from gut dysbiosis and/or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased intestinal permeability may induce systemic inflammation, while activation of enteric neurons and enteric glial cells may contribute to the initiation of alpha-synuclein misfolding. Additionally, the adaptive immune system may be disturbed by bacterial proteins cross-reacting with human antigens. A better understanding of the brain-gut-microbiota axis interactions should bring a new insight in the pathophysiology of PD and permit an earlier diagnosis with a focus on peripheral biomarkers within the enteric nervous system. Novel therapeutic options aimed at modifying the gut microbiota composition and enhancing the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in PD patients could influence the initial step of the following cascade of neurodegeneration in PD.

  7. Effects of stocking density on growth performance, carcass yield, and immune status of a local chicken breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, H B; Lu, J; Zou, J M; Wang, Q; Shi, S R

    2012-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of stocking density on growth performance, carcass yield, and immune status of a local chicken breed. In total, 840 one-day-old male Suqin yellow chickens were placed into 4-m(2) cages in groups of 50 (low), 70 (medium), or 90 (high) birds. Each treatment was represented by 4 replicates (cages). The cages measured 2.84 × 1.42 m; half of the area of the cage (2 m(2)) was used from 1 to 28 d and the whole cage was used from 29 to 42 d. Stocking densities were 25, 35, and 45 birds/m(2) from 1 to 28 d and 12.5, 17.5, and 22.5 birds/m(2) from 29 to 42 d (low, medium, and high, respectively). Final production (live bird mass after fasting) per unit area was 14.46, 19.46, and 24.23 kg/m(2), respectively, at 42 d of age. Several immune parameters were evaluated, and the growth performance, carcass yield, and meat quality were determined. Body weight at 28 and 42 d of age was significantly reduced as the stocking density increased (P 0.05). The thigh yield of chickens in the medium-density group improved significantly (P 0.05) by the stocking density, but pH values increased slightly as density increased. No significant difference was noted in the immunological parameters, but the blood total protein and potassium were significantly affected by stocking density (P < 0.05). The findings of this study suggest that increasing the stocking density advantageously affected feed/gain and decreased the final BW, whereas no evidence was found that stocking density caused changes in any of the measured immune parameters.

  8. Gut microbiota and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a complex bacterial community called the gut microbiota. This microbiota is specific to each individual despite the existence of several bacterial species shared by the majority of adults. The influence of the gut microbiota in human health and disease has been revealed in the recent years. Particularly, the use of germ-free animals and microbiota transplant showed that the gut microbiota may play a causal role in the development of obesity and associated metabolic disorders, and lead to identification of several mechanisms. In humans, differences in microbiota composition, functional genes and metabolic activities are observed between obese and lean individuals suggesting a contribution of the gut microbiota to these phenotypes. Finally, the evidence linking gut bacteria to host metabolism could allow the development of new therapeutic strategies based on gut microbiota modulation to treat or prevent obesity.

  9. Epithelial Histone Deacetylase 3 Instructs Intestinal Immunity by Coordinating Local Lymphocyte Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Navabi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal tissues are constantly in direct contact with diverse beneficial and pathogenic microbes, highlighting the need for orchestrating complex microbial signals to sustain effective host defense. Here, we show an essential role for intestinal epithelial cell expression of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3 in responding to pathogenic microbes and activating protective innate immunity. Mice lacking HDAC3 in intestinal epithelial cells were more susceptible to Citrobacter rodentium when under tonic stimulation by the commensal microbiota. This impaired host defense reflected significantly decreased IFNγ production by intraepithelial CD8+ T cells early during infection. Further, HDAC3 was necessary for infection-induced epithelial expression of the IFNγ-inducing factor IL-18, and administration of IL-18 restored IFNγ activity to resident CD8+ T cells and reduced infection. Thus, HDAC3 mediates communication between intestinal epithelial cells and resident lymphocytes, revealing that epithelial priming by an epigenetic modifier may direct mucosal regulation of host defense against pathogenic microbes.

  10. Porcine models for the study of local and systemic regulation of innate immune factors in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard

    the number of animals to be used in a trial to obtain statistical power. For the gene regulation analysis, two platforms for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) were employed: The Rotor-Gene Q instrument and the microfluidics-based high-throughput Bio-Mark. For the serum protein concentrations analysis several...... enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used on the blood. In the clones, both cloning and obesity changed the response of the innate immune genes in the tissues and in the blood, as fewer genes were differentially regulated in the clones and in the obese, than in the controls and lean pigs...... in gene expression in the tissues as nine genes in the liver (out of 35), 12 genes in the VAT, 11 in the RPAT and eight genes in the neck SAT (out of 33) were significantly differentially regulated in the obese Göttingen minipigs compared to lean. Three genes were differentially expressed in all three...

  11. Childhood immunization rates in rural Intibucá, Honduras: an analysis of a local database tool and community health center records for assessing and improving vaccine coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yuan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccines are highly effective at preventing infectious diseases in children, and prevention is especially important in resource-limited countries where treatment is difficult to access. In Honduras, the World Health Organization (WHO reports very high immunization rates in children. To determine whether or not these estimates accurately depict the immunization coverage in non-urban regions of the country, we compared the WHO data to immunization rates obtained from a local database tool and community health center records in rural Intibucá, Honduras. Methods We used data from two sources to comprehensively evaluate immunization rates in the area: 1 census data from a local database and 2 immunization data collected at health centers. We compared these rates using logistic regression, and we compared them to publicly available WHO-reported estimates using confidence interval inclusion. Results We found that mean immunization rates for each vaccine were high (range 84.4 to 98.8 percent, but rates recorded at the health centers were significantly higher than those reported from the census data (p≤0.001. Combining the results from both databases, the mean rates of four out of five vaccines were less than WHO-reported rates (p p=0.03. The rates by individual vaccine were similar across townships (p >0.05, except for diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis vaccine (p=0.02 and oral polio vaccine (p Conclusions Immunization rates in Honduras were high across data sources, though most of the rates recorded in rural Honduras were less than WHO-reported rates. Despite geographical difficulties and barriers to access, the local database and Honduran community health workers have developed a thorough system for ensuring that children receive their immunizations on time. The successful integration of community health workers and a database within the Honduran decentralized health system may serve as a model for other immunization programs in

  12. Attenuation fluctuations and local dermal reflectivity are indicators of immune cell infiltrate and epidermal hyperplasia in skin inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Wang, Yun; Choudhury, Niloy; Levitz, David; Swanzey, Emily; Lagowski, James; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Jacques, Steven

    2012-02-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease resulting from genetic and environmental alterations of cutaneous immune responses responsible for skin homeostasis. While numerous therapeutic targets involved in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have been identified, the in vivo dynamics of psoriasis remains under investigated. To elucidate the spatial-temporal morphological evolution of psoriasis we undertook in vivo time course focus-tracked optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to non-invasively document dermal alterations due to immune cell infiltration and epidermal hyperplasia in an Imiquimod (IMQ) induced model of psoriasis-like inflammation in DBA2/C57Bl6 hybrid mice. Quantitative appraisal of dermal architectural changes was achieved through a three parameter fit of OCT axial scans in the dermis of the form A(z) = ρ exp(-mu;z +ɛ(z)). Ensemble averaging of the fit parameters over 2000 axial scans per mouse in each treatment arm revealed that the local dermal reflectivity ρ, decreased significantly in response to 6 day IMQ treatment (p = 0.0001), as did the standard deviation of the attenuation fluctuation std(ɛ(z)), (p = 0.04), in comparison to cream controls and day 1 treatments. No significant changes were observed in the average dermal attenuation rate, μ. Our results suggest these label-free OCT-based metrics can be deployed to investigate new therapeutic targets in animal models as well as aid in clinical staging of psoriasis in conjunction with the psoriasis area and severity index.

  13. Flavored Orbifold GUT

    CERN Document Server

    Adulpravitchai, Adisorn

    2010-01-01

    Orbifold grand unified theories (GUTs) solve several problems in GUT model building. Therefore, it is intriguing to investigate similar constructions in the flavor context. In this letter, we propose that a flavor symmetry might emerge due to orbifold compactification and be simultaneously broken by boundary conditions of the orbifold. The combination of the orbifold parities in gauge and flavor space determines the zero modes. We demonstrate the construction in a 6d supersymmetric (SUSY) SO(10)\\times S_4 orbifold GUT model.

  14. The influence of site of antigen deposition on the local immune response in the mammary gland of the ewe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, D L

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to compare the local antibody responses in mammary glands of ewes immunized by infusion of antigen (killed Brucella abortus) into the lactiferous sinuses (trans-epithelial presentation of antigen) or injection into the mammary tissue near the supramammary lymph node (interstitial presentation of antigen). Although both methods of antigen presentation resulted in similar antibody levels in blood, infusion of antigen into the lactiferous sinus resulted in significantly higher levels of agglutinating antibody in milk whey than did injection of antigen. When within-animal comparisons were made, infusion of antigen was also significantly superior to injection of antigen in terms of levels of non-agglutinating antibody in milk as determined by Coomb's antiglobulin assays. Evidence from immunoglobulin estimations in milk whey suggested that any elevation in concentrations of immunoglobulins (including IgA) in milk from ewes, which had received injections of antigen into mammary tissue, was associated with chronic inflammatory damage to these glands.

  15. Systemic and local immune responses in sheep after Neospora caninum experimental infection at early, mid and late gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz-Solís, David; Benavides, Julio; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Horcajo, Pilar; Castaño, Pablo; del Carmen Ferreras, María; Jiménez-Pelayo, Laura; Collantes-Fernández, Esther; Ferre, Ignacio; Hemphill, Andrew; Pérez, Valentín; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-06

    Besides its importance in cattle, Neospora caninum may also pose a high risk as abortifacient for small ruminants. We have recently demonstrated that the outcome of experimental infection of pregnant sheep with 10(6) Nc-Spain7 tachyzoites is strongly dependent on the time of gestation. In the current study, we assessed peripheral and local immune response in those animals. Serological analysis revealed earlier and higher IFN-γ and IgG responses in ewes infected at early (G1) and mid (G2) gestation, when abortion occurred. IL-4 was not detected in sera from any sheep. Inflammatory infiltrates in the placenta mainly consisted of CD8+ and, to a lesser extent, CD4+ T cells and macrophages (CD163+). The infiltrate was more intense in sheep infected at mid-gestation. In the foetal mesenchyme, mostly free tachyzoites were found in animals infected at G1, while those infected in G2 displayed predominantly particulate antigen, and parasitophorous vacuoles were detected in sheep infected at G3. A similar pattern of placental cytokine mRNA expression was found in all groups, displaying a strengthened upregulation of IFN-γ and IL-4 and milder increases of TNF-α and IL-10, reminiscent of a mixed Th1 and Th2 response. IL-12 and IL-6 were only slightly upregulated in G2, and TGF-β was downregulated in G1 and G2, suggestive of limited T regulatory (Treg) cell activity. No significant expression of TLR2 or TLR4 could be detected. In summary, this study confirms the pivotal role of systemic and local immune responses at different times of gestation during N. caninum infection in sheep.

  16. Local and regional re-establishment of cellular immunity during curative antibiotherapy of murine Mycobacterium ulcerans infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa G Martins

    several months after lesion sterilization. This RS regimen prevented DLN destruction, allowing the rapid re-establishment of local and regional cell mediated immune responses associated with macrophage activation. Therefore it is likely that this re-establishment of protective cellular immunity synergizes with antibiotherapy.

  17. Local and Regional Re-Establishment of Cellular Immunity during Curative Antibiotherapy of Murine Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Teresa G.; Gama, José B.; Fraga, Alexandra G.; Saraiva, Margarida; Silva, Manuel T.; Castro, António G.; Pedrosa, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    lesion sterilization. This RS regimen prevented DLN destruction, allowing the rapid re-establishment of local and regional cell mediated immune responses associated with macrophage activation. Therefore it is likely that this re-establishment of protective cellular immunity synergizes with antibiotherapy. PMID:22393444

  18. A tick gut protein with fibronectin III domains aids Borrelia burgdorferi congregation to the gut during transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanya Narasimhan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi transmission to the vertebrate host commences with growth of the spirochete in the tick gut and migration from the gut to the salivary glands. This complex process, involving intimate interactions of the spirochete with the gut epithelium, is pivotal to transmission. We utilized a yeast surface display library of tick gut proteins to perform a global screen for tick gut proteins that might interact with Borrelia membrane proteins. A putative fibronectin type III domain-containing tick gut protein (Ixofin3D was most frequently identified from this screen and prioritized for further analysis. Immunization against Ixofin3D and RNA interference-mediated reduction in expression of Ixofin3D resulted in decreased spirochete burden in tick salivary glands and in the murine host. Microscopic examination showed decreased aggregation of spirochetes on the gut epithelium concomitant with reduced expression of Ixofin3D. Our observations suggest that the interaction between Borrelia and Ixofin3D facilitates spirochete congregation to the gut during transmission, and provides a "molecular exit" direction for spirochete egress from the gut.

  19. A tick gut protein with fibronectin III domains aids Borrelia burgdorferi congregation to the gut during transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Sukanya; Coumou, Jeroen; Schuijt, Tim J; Boder, Eric; Hovius, Joppe W; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi transmission to the vertebrate host commences with growth of the spirochete in the tick gut and migration from the gut to the salivary glands. This complex process, involving intimate interactions of the spirochete with the gut epithelium, is pivotal to transmission. We utilized a yeast surface display library of tick gut proteins to perform a global screen for tick gut proteins that might interact with Borrelia membrane proteins. A putative fibronectin type III domain-containing tick gut protein (Ixofin3D) was most frequently identified from this screen and prioritized for further analysis. Immunization against Ixofin3D and RNA interference-mediated reduction in expression of Ixofin3D resulted in decreased spirochete burden in tick salivary glands and in the murine host. Microscopic examination showed decreased aggregation of spirochetes on the gut epithelium concomitant with reduced expression of Ixofin3D. Our observations suggest that the interaction between Borrelia and Ixofin3D facilitates spirochete congregation to the gut during transmission, and provides a "molecular exit" direction for spirochete egress from the gut.

  20. A tick gut protein with fibronectin III domains aids Borrelia burgdorferi congregation to the gut during transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanya Narasimhan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi transmission to the vertebrate host commences with growth of the spirochete in the tick gut and migration from the gut to the salivary glands. This complex process, involving intimate interactions of the spirochete with the gut epithelium, is pivotal to transmission. We utilized a yeast surface display library of tick gut proteins to perform a global screen for tick gut proteins that might interact with Borrelia membrane proteins. A putative fibronectin type III domain-containing tick gut protein (Ixofin3D was most frequently identified from this screen and prioritized for further analysis. Immunization against Ixofin3D and RNA interference-mediated reduction in expression of Ixofin3D resulted in decreased spirochete burden in tick salivary glands and in the murine host. Microscopic examination showed decreased aggregation of spirochetes on the gut epithelium concomitant with reduced expression of Ixofin3D. Our observations suggest that the interaction between Borrelia and Ixofin3D facilitates spirochete congregation to the gut during transmission, and provides a "molecular exit" direction for spirochete egress from the gut.

  1. Preliminary comparison of different immune and production components in local and imported Saanen goats reared under a sub-tropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Elie K; Itani, Houssam H; Sleiman, Fawwak T; Saade, Maya F; Harakeh, Steve; Nour, Afif M Abdel; Shaib, Houssam A

    2012-01-01

    Three objectives were included in this research work. The first objective compared different immune components in healthy mature males, mature females, and female kids of local and imported Saanen goats, reared under a sub-tropical environment. The significantly differing immune components were the blood monocyte percent, blood CD8 count, and the total white blood cell count. The second objective compared the performance of Saanen versus local does. The means of the milk yield and prolificacy of the imported Saanen does were significantly higher than those of the local does (pblood cells (c-RBC). The HA titers showed a significant seroconversion only in imported Saanen (pdifferences in blood immune components and responses to antigens in the compared goats on protection potential against prevalent diseases in the sub-tropical zone of the eastern Mediterranean countries is discussed.

  2. Potential applications of gut microbiota to control human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umu, Ozgün Candan Onarman; Oostindjer, Marije; Pope, Phillip B; Svihus, Birger; Egelandsdal, Bjørg; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2013-11-01

    The microorganisms living in our gut have been a black box to us for a long time. However, with the recent advances in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies, it is now possible to assess virtually all microorganisms in our gut including non-culturable ones. With the use of powerful bioinformatics tools to deal with multivariate analyses of huge amounts of data from metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metabolomics, we now start to gain some important insights into these tiny gut inhabitants. Our knowledge is increasing about who they are, to some extent, what they do and how they affect our health. Gut microbiota have a broad spectrum of possible effects on health, from preventing serious diseases, improving immune system and gut health to stimulating the brain centers responsible for appetite and food intake control. Further, we may be on the verge of being capable of manipulating the gut microbiota by diet control to possibly improve our health. Diets consisting of different components that are fermentable by microbiota are substrates for different kinds of microbes in the gut. Thus, diet control can be used to favor the growth of some selected gut inhabitants. Nowadays, the gut microbiota is taken into account as a separate organ in human body and their activities and metabolites in gut have many physiological and neurological effects. In this mini-review, we discuss the diversity of gut microbiota, the technologies used to assess them, factors that affect microbial composition and metabolites that affect human physiology, and their potential applications in satiety control via the gut-brain axis.

  3. Chronic stress impairs the local immune response during cutaneous repair in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata, L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus, Ana Patrícia; Anjos, Liliana; Cardoso, João R; Power, Deborah M

    2017-07-01

    Scale removal in fish triggers a damage-repair program to re-establish the lost epidermis and scale and an associated local immune response. In mammals, chronic stress is known to delay wound healing and to modulate the cutaneous stress axis, but this is unstudied in teleost fish the most successful extant vertebrates. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that chronic stress impairs cutaneous repair in teleost fish as a consequence of suppression of the immune response. The hypothesis was tested by removing the scales and damaging the skin on one side of the body of fish previously exposed for 4 weeks to a chronic crowding stress and then evaluating cutaneous repair for 1 week. Scale removal caused the loss of the epidermis although at 3days it was re-established. At this stage the basement membrane was significantly thicker (p=0.038) and the hypodermis was significantly thinner (p=0.016) in the regenerating skin of stressed fish relative to the control fish. At 3days, stressed fish also had a significantly lower plasma osmolality (p=0.015) than control fish indicative of reduced barrier function. Chronic stress caused a significant down-regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor (gr) in skin before damage (time 0, p=0.005) and of star at 3 and 7days (p<0.05) after regeneration relative to control fish. In regenerating skin key transcripts of cutaneous repair, pcna, colivα1 and mmp9, and the inflammatory response, tgfβ1, csf-1r, mpo and crtac2, were down-regulated (p<0.05) by chronic stress. Irrespective of chronic stress and in contrast to intact skin many hyper pigmented masses, putative melanomacrophages, infiltrated the epidermis of regenerating skin. This study reveals that chronic stress suppresses the local immune response to scale removal and impairs the expression of key transcripts of wound healing. Elements of the stress axis were identified and modulated by chronic stress during cutaneous repair in gilthead seabream skin. Copyright

  4. Characterization of the Localized Immune Response in the Respiratory Tract of Ferrets following Infection with Influenza A and B Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Louise A.; Rockman, Steve; Borg, Kathryn; Guarnaccia, Teagan; Reading, Patrick; Mosse, Jennifer; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The burden of infection with seasonal influenza viruses is significant. Each year is typically characterized by the dominance of one (sub)type or lineage of influenza A or B virus, respectively. The incidence of disease varies annually, and while this may be attributed to a particular virus strain or subtype, the impacts of prior immunity, population differences, and variations in clinical assessment are also important. To improve our understanding of the impacts of seasonal influenza viruses, we directly compared clinical symptoms, virus shedding, and expression of cytokines, chemokines, and immune mediators in the upper respiratory tract (URT) of ferrets infected with contemporary A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), or influenza B virus. Gene expression in the lower respiratory tract (LRT) was also assessed. Clinical symptoms were minimal. Overall cytokine/chemokine profiles in the URT were consistent in pattern and magnitude between animals infected with influenza A and B viruses, and peak expression levels of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, alpha interferon (IFN-α), IFN-β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNAs correlated with peak levels of viral shedding. MCP1 and IFN-γ were expressed after the virus peak. Granzymes A and B and IL-10 reached peak expression as the virus was cleared and seroconversion was detected. Cytokine/chemokine gene expression in the LRT following A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection reflected the observations seen for the URT but was delayed 2 or 3 days, as was virus replication. These data indicate that disease severities and localized immune responses following infection with seasonal influenza A and B viruses are similar, suggesting that other factors are likely to modulate the incidence and impact of seasonal influenza. IMPORTANCE Both influenza A and B viruses cocirculate in the human population, and annual influenza seasons are typically dominated by an influenza A virus subtype or an influenza B virus lineage

  5. 小儿皮下感染局部免疫的临床观察%A Clinical Observation on Local Immunity in Subcutaneous Infection among Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金哲

    1987-01-01

    本文利用大量的临床资料分析了不同年龄组之间,同一年龄组不同患儿之间,同一机体不同部位,以及同一感染的不同阶段对感染的免疫反应的不同表现,从病理和免疫发生等方面提出了新的假说,对临康治疗有一定指导意义.%Based on a 30-year clinical observation on the local pathological changes in the subcutaneous infection among children of different ages, the author raised a hypothesis as the following: 1.. The development of the local immunity to staphylococci is in stages similar to that of ana-phylaxis and desensitization reaction to T.A.T. (tetanus anti-toxin) injection.Different stage likes to appear in different age group. The new-borns may have a very low antigen-antibody reaction, give rise a nypoergic local pathology, like that of the neonatae phlegmon of the back of a newborn .Infants react too extensively to staphylococci, presenting as a wide spreading induration of the neck, anaphylactic or hyperergic reaction, like in the infantile sub-maxillary cellulitis. As the children grown up, they will react normally to a usual-dosage sta-phylococcal contamination forming a localized abscess or showing mild or even no clinical inflammation i.e., desensitization and effective immunity formation.2. The natural course of the development of local, immunity includes: no immunity reaction, hypersensitivity, stable and effective immunity, and gradual fading off of the immunity unless subsequent provocation. 3. Among children of the same age group, different local pathology under different special immunological condition could be observed.

  6. Modulation of Gut Microbiota in Pathological States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulan Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The human microbiota is an aggregate of microorganisms residing in the human body, mostly in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Our gut microbiota evolves with us and plays a pivotal role in human health and disease. In recent years, the microbiota has gained increasing attention due to its impact on host metabolism, physiology, and immune system development, but also because the perturbation of the microbiota may result in a number of diseases. The gut microbiota may be linked to malignancies such as gastric cancer and colorectal cancer. It may also be linked to disorders such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD; obesity and diabetes, which are characterized as “lifestyle diseases” of the industrialized world; coronary heart disease; and neurological disorders. Although the revolution in molecular technologies has provided us with the necessary tools to study the gut microbiota more accurately, we need to elucidate the relationships between the gut microbiota and several human pathologies more precisely, as understanding the impact that the microbiota plays in various diseases is fundamental for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Therefore, the aim of this review is to provide the reader with an updated overview of the importance of the gut microbiota for human health and the potential to manipulate gut microbial composition for purposes such as the treatment of antibiotic-resistant Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infections. The concept of altering the gut community by microbial intervention in an effort to improve health is currently in its infancy. However, the therapeutic implications appear to be very great. Thus, the removal of harmful organisms and the enrichment of beneficial microbes may protect our health, and such efforts will pave the way for the development of more rational treatment options in the future.

  7. Evaluation of hepatic changes and local and systemic immune responses in goats immunized with recombinant Peroxiredoxin (Prx) and challenged with Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Ricardo E; Pérez-Ecija, Rafael A; Zafra, Rafael; Buffoni, Leandro; Martínez-Moreno, Alvaro; Dalton, John P; Mulcahy, Grace; Pérez, José

    2010-04-01

    Protection against Fasciola hepatica in goats immunized with Peroxiredoxin (Prx) was assessed. The experimental trial consisted of three groups of seven animals; group 1 were unimmunized and uninfected, group 2 were immunized with adjuvant only and group 3 were immunized with recombinant Prx in adjuvant (immunized and infected). Immunization with Prx in Quil A adjuvant, group 3, induced a reduction in fluke burden of 33.04% when compared to adjuvant control, group 2, although this difference was not significant. The hepatic gross and microscopical morphometric study revealed lower damage in the Prx-immunized compared to group 2 (pPrx-immunized group exhibited reduced infiltration of CD4(+), CD8(+), IFN-gamma(+) and TCR(+) (pPrx serum IgG in group 3 showed a significant increase at the 4th week after challenge infection compared with group 2 (pPrx of F. hepatica. The study shows that this vaccine significantly reduces hepatic damage and encourages further studies to improve the vaccine efficacy.

  8. Impact of gut microbiota on diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandino, G; Inturri, R; Lazzara, F; Di Rosa, M; Malaguarnera, L

    2016-11-01

    Various functions of the gut are regulated by sophisticated interactions among its functional elements, including the gut microbiota. These microorganisms play a crucial role in gastrointestinal mucosa permeability. They control the fermentation and absorption of dietary polysaccharides to produce short-chain fatty acids, which may explain their importance in the regulation of fat accumulation and the subsequent development of obesity-related diseases, suggesting that they are a crucial mediator of obesity and its consequences. In addition, gut bacteria play a crucial role in the host immune system, modulation of inflammatory processes, extraction of energy from the host diet and alterations of human gene expression. Dietary modulation of the human colonic microbiota has been shown to confer a number of health benefits to the host. Simple therapeutic strategies targeted at attenuating the progression of chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance are urgently required to prevent or slow the development of diabetes in susceptible individuals. The main objective of this review is to address the pathogenic association between gut microbiota and diabetes, and to explore any novel related therapeutic targets. New insights into the role of the gut microbiota in diabetes could lead to the development of integrated strategies using probiotics to prevent and treat these metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Introduction to the human gut microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thursby, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract harbours a complex and dynamic population of microorganisms, the gut microbiota, which exert a marked influence on the host during homeostasis and disease. Multiple factors contribute to the establishment of the human gut microbiota during infancy. Diet is considered as one of the main drivers in shaping the gut microbiota across the life time. Intestinal bacteria play a crucial role in maintaining immune and metabolic homeostasis and protecting against pathogens. Altered gut bacterial composition (dysbiosis) has been associated with the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases and infections. The interpretation of these studies relies on a better understanding of inter-individual variations, heterogeneity of bacterial communities along and across the GI tract, functional redundancy and the need to distinguish cause from effect in states of dysbiosis. This review summarises our current understanding of the development and composition of the human GI microbiota, and its impact on gut integrity and host health, underlying the need for mechanistic studies focusing on host–microbe interactions. PMID:28512250

  10. Prebiotics and gut microbiota in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourabedin, Mohsen; Zhao, Xin

    2015-08-01

    Prebiotics are non-digestible feed ingredients that are metabolized by specific members of intestinal microbiota and provide health benefits for the host. Fermentable oligosaccharides are best known prebiotics that have received increasing attention in poultry production. They act through diverse mechanisms, such as providing nutrients, preventing pathogen adhesion to host cells, interacting with host immune systems and affecting gut morphological structure, all presumably through modulation of intestinal microbiota. Currently, fructooligosaccharides, inulin and mannanoligosaccharides have shown promising results while other prebiotic candidates such as xylooligosaccharides are still at an early development stage. Despite a growing body of evidence reporting health benefits of prebiotics in chickens, very limited studies have been conducted to directly link health improvements to prebiotic-dependent changes in the gut microbiota. This article visits the current knowledge of the chicken gastrointestinal microbiota and reviews most recent publications related to the roles played by prebiotics in modulation of the gut microbiota and immune functions. Progress in this field will help us better understand how the gut microbiota contributes to poultry health and productivity, and support the development of new prebiotic products as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics.

  11. Mathematical Model of an Innate Immune Response to Cutaneous Wound in the Presence of Local Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiko, Guennadi; Cross, Karen; Douplik, Alexandre

    We developed a 2D multi-agent stochastic model of interaction between cellular debris, bacteria and neutrophils in the surface cutaneous wound with local hypoxia. Bacteria, which grow logistically with a maximum carrying capacity, and debris are phagocytosed by neutrophils with probability determined by the partial pressure of oxygen in the tissue, pO 2  = 4-400 mmHg, according to the Michaelis-Menten equation with K m  = 40 mmHg. The influx of new neutrophils depends linearly (k = 0.05-0.2) on the amount of (a) platelets and (b) neutrophils, which are in contact with bacteria or debris. Each activated neutrophil can accomplish a certain amount of phagocytosis, n max  = 5-20, during its lifespan, T = 1-5 days. The universe of outcomes consists of (a) bacteria clearance (high k and n max ), (b) infection is not cleared by neutrophils (low k and nmax), and (c) intermittent (quasiperiodic) bursts of inflammation. In the absence of infection, phagocytosis stops within 48 h. We found that pO 2 alone did not change the type of outcome, but affects the number of recruited neutrophils and inflammation duration (in the absence of infection by up to 10 and 5 %, respectively).

  12. Probiotics and gut health: A special focus on liver diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Gratz, Silvia Wilson; Mykkanen, Hannu; El-Nezami, Hani S.

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have well-established beneficial effects in the management of diarrhoeal diseases. Newer evidence suggests that probiotics have the potential to reduce the risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal bacterial overgrowth after gut surgery. In liver health, the main benefits of probiotics might occur through preventing the production and/or uptake of lipopolysaccharides in the gut, and therefore reducing levels of low-grade inflammation. Specific immune sti...

  13. Articulations entre réponses locale et systémique dans les défenses antibactériennes de la Drosophile

    OpenAIRE

    Gendrin, Mathilde

    2010-01-01

    An immune system protects organisms against infections. During my PhD,I have focused on the local immune responses of Drosophila and on their links with the systemic immune response. The systemic response is induced in the fat body by the presence of bacteria in the body cavity while the local response is initiated when bacteria accumulate within an epithelial tissue. Some local gut infections however have been shown to also induce systemic responses in the absence of bacteria in the body cav...

  14. Gut barrier in health and disease: focus on childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, D; Ianiro, G; Vanella, G; Bibbò, S; Bruno, G; Simeone, G; Mele, G

    2015-01-01

    The gut barrier is a functional unit, organized as a multi-layer system, made up of two main components: a physical barrier surface, which prevents bacterial adhesion and regulates paracellular diffusion to the host tissues, and a deep functional barrier, that is able to discriminate between pathogens and commensal microorganisms, organizing the immune tolerance and the immune response to pathogens. Other mechanisms, such as gastric juice and pancreatic enzymes (which both have antibacterial properties) participate in the luminal integrity of the gut barrier. From the outer layer to the inner layer, the physical barrier is composed of gut microbiota (that competes with pathogens to gain space and energy resources, processes the molecules necessary to mucosal integrity and modulates the immunological activity of deep barrier), mucus (which separates the intraluminal content from more internal layers and contains antimicrobial products and secretory IgA), epithelial cells (which form a physical and immunological barrier) and the innate and adaptive immune cells forming the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (which is responsible for antigen sampling and immune responses). Disruption of the gut barrier has been associated with many gastrointestinal diseases, but also with extra-intestinal pathological condition, such as type 1 diabetes mellitus, allergic diseases or autism spectrum disorders. The maintenance of a healthy intestinal barrier is therefore of paramount importance in children, for both health and economic reasons. Many drugs or compounds used in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders act through the restoration of a normal intestinal permeability. Several studies have highlighted the role of probiotics in the modulation and reduction of intestinal permeability, considering the strong influence of gut microbiota in the modulation of the function and structure of gut barrier, but also on the immune response of the host. To date, available weapons for the

  15. Associations between micronutrient intakes and gut microbiota in a group of adults with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Krause, Lutz; Somerset, Shawn

    2017-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) involves chronic inflammation and oxidative stress affecting mainly the respiratory and digestive systems. Survival rates for CF have improved with advances in treatment including nutritional interventions such as micronutrient supplementation. Diet can modulate gut microbiota in the general population with consequences on local and systemic immunity, and inflammation. The gut microbiota appears disrupted and may associate with pulmonary status in CF. This study investigated associations between micronutrient intakes and gut microbiota variations in a group of adults with CF. Faecal microbiota of sixteen free-living adults with CF was profiled by 16ss rDNA sequencing on the GS-FLX platform. Associations were tested between UniFrac distances of faecal microbiota and time-corresponding micronutrient intakes. Associations between relative abundances of bacterial taxa and micronutrient intakes (those showing significant associations with UniFrac distances) were examined by Spearman correlation. Unweighted UniFrac distances were associated with intakes of potassium and antioxidant vitamins C, E and beta-carotene equivalents, whereas weighted UniFrac distances were associated with antioxidant vitamins riboflavin, niacin equivalents, beta-carotene equivalents and vitamin A equivalents. Intakes of beta-carotene equivalents, vitamin C, vitamin E, niacin equivalents and riboflavin correlated negatively with Bacteroides and/or its corresponding higher level taxa. Intakes of beta-carotene equivalents and vitamin E also positively correlated with Firmicutes and specific taxa belonging to Firmicutes. Some micronutrients, particularly antioxidant vitamins, correlated with gut microbiota variations in the studied cohort. Further research is required to clarify whether antioxidant vitamin intakes can influence CF gut microbiota and potential clinical/therapeutic implications in CF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and

  16. The Gut-Brain Axis: The Missing Link in Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrensel, Alper; Ceylan, Mehmet Emin

    2015-12-31

    The gut microbiota is essential to human health and the immune system and plays a major role in the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Based on evidence, the gut microbiota is associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autistic disorders, anxiety disorders and major depressive disorders. In the past few years, neuroscientific research has shown the importance of the microbiota in the development of brain systems. Recent studies showed that the microbiota could activate the immune and central nervous systems, including commensal and pathogenic microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract. Gut microorganisms are capable of producing and delivering neuroactive substances such as serotonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid, which act on the gut-brain axis. Preclinical research in rodents suggested that certain probiotics have antidepressant and anxiolytic activities. Effects may be mediated via the immune system or neuroendocrine systems. Herein, we present the latest literature examining the effects of the gut microbiota on depression.

  17. Gut microbiota biomodulators, when the stork comes by the scalpel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniello, Vito Leonardo; Colasanto, Angela; Cristofori, Fernanda; Diaferio, Lucia; Ficele, Laura; Lieggi, Maria Serena; Santoiemma, Valentina; Francavilla, Ruggiero

    2015-12-07

    The microbial communities that reside in the human gut (microbiota) and their impact on human health and disease are nowadays one of the most exciting new areas of research. A well-balanced microbial intestinal colonization in early postnatal life is necessary for the development of appropriate innate and adaptive immune responses and to establish immune homeostasis later in life. Although the composition and functional characteristics of a 'healthy' gut microbiota remain to be elucidated, perturbations in the microbial colonization of an infant's gastrointestinal tract have been associated with an increased risk of short- and long-term immunologically mediated diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that gut microbiota biomodulators, such as probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, and postbiotics may support disease prevention in infants who tend to have a delayed and/or aberrant initial colonization with reduced microbiota diversity (delivery by caesarean section, premature delivery, and excessive use of perinatal antibiotics). Under these dysbiosis conditions probiotics could act as 'surrogate' colonizers to prevent immune-mediated diseases. This review focuses on the influence of delivery mode on the colonization of the infant gastro-intestinal tract. In particular, it examines the manipulation of the gut microbiota composition through the use of gut microbiota biomodulators, in the management of aberrant initial gut colonization and subsequent consequences for the health of the offspring.

  18. Pulmonary immunization of guinea pigs with diphtheria CRM-197 antigen as nanoparticle aggregate dry powders enhance local and systemic immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttil, Pavan; Pulliam, Brian; Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Fallon, John Kevin; Wang, Chenchen; Hickey, Anthony James; Edwards, David A

    2010-12-01

    This study establishes the immune response elicited in guinea pigs after pulmonary and parenteral immunizations with diphtheria CRM-197 antigen (CrmAg). Several spray-dried powders of formalin-treated/untreated CrmAg nanoaggregates with L-leucine were delivered to the lungs of guinea pigs. A control group consisting of alum with adsorbed CrmAg in saline was administered by intramuscular injection. Animals received three doses of powder vaccines containing 20 or 40 μg of CrmAg. The serum IgG titers were measured for 16 weeks after the initial immunization; IgA titers were measured at the time of sacrifice in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid. Further, toxin neutralization tests in naïve guinea pigs were performed for a few select serum samples. Histopathology of the lung tissues was conducted to evaluate inflammation or injury to the lung tissues. While the highest titer of serum IgG antibody was observed in guinea pigs immunized by the intramuscular route, those animals immunized with dry powder formulation by the pulmonary route, and without the adjuvant alum, exhibited high IgA titers. A pulmonary administered dry powder, compared to parenteral immunization, conferred complete protection in the toxin neutralization test. Mild inflammation was observed in lung tissues of animals receiving dry powder vaccines by the pulmonary route. Thus, administering novel CrmAg as dry powders to the lungs may be able to overcome some of the disadvantages observed with the existing diphtheria vaccine which is administered by the parenteral route. In addition, these powders will have the advantage of eliciting a high mucosal immune response in the lungs without using traditional adjuvants.

  19. Gut microbial markers are associated with diabetes onset, regulatory imbalance, and IFN-γ level in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krych, Lukasz; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Hansen, Axel Kornerup;

    2015-01-01

    between the early gut microbiota and immune parameters of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice in order to select alleged bacterial markers of T1D. Gut microbial composition in feces was analyzed with 454/FLX Titanium (Roche) pyro-sequencing and correlated with diabetes onset age and immune cell populations...

  20. Monitoring of local CD8 β-expressing cell populations during Eimeria tenella infection of naïve and immune chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wattrang, Eva; Thebo, Per; Lunden, Anna;

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to monitor abundance and activation of local CD8β-expressing T-cell populations during Eimeria tenella infections of naïve chickens and chickens immune by previous infections. Chickens were infected with E. tenella up to three times. Caecal T-cell receptor (TCR) γ...

  1. Gut Microbiota as Potential Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Cow’s Milk Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Berni Canani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cow’s milk allergy (CMA continues to be a growing health concern for infants living in Western countries. The long-term prognosis for the majority of affected infants is good, with about 80% naturally acquiring tolerance by the age of four years. However, recent studies suggest that the natural history of CMA is changing, with an increasing persistence until later ages. The pathogenesis of CMA, as well as oral tolerance, is complex and not completely known, although numerous studies implicate gut-associated immunity and enteric microflora, and it has been suggested that an altered composition of intestinal microflora results in an unbalanced local and systemic immune response to food allergens. In addition, there are qualitative and quantitative differences in the composition of gut microbiota between patients affected by CMA and healthy infants. These findings prompt the concept that specific beneficial bacteria from the human intestinal microflora, designated probiotics, could restore intestinal homeostasis and prevent or alleviate allergy, at least in part by interacting with the intestinal immune cells. The aim of this paper is to review what is currently known about the use of probiotics as dietary supplements in CMA.

  2. Probiotics normalize the gut-brain-microbiota axis in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carli J; Emge, Jacob R; Berzins, Katrina; Lung, Lydia; Khamishon, Rebecca; Shah, Paarth; Rodrigues, David M; Sousa, Andrew J; Reardon, Colin; Sherman, Philip M; Barrett, Kim E; Gareau, Mélanie G

    2014-10-15

    The gut-brain-microbiota axis is increasingly recognized as an important regulator of intestinal physiology. Exposure to psychological stress causes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and causes altered intestinal barrier function, intestinal dysbiosis, and behavioral changes. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether the effects of psychological stress on intestinal physiology and behavior, including anxiety and memory, are mediated by the adaptive immune system. Furthermore, we wanted to determine whether treatment with probiotics would normalize these effects. Here we demonstrate that B and T cell-deficient Rag1(-/-) mice displayed altered baseline behaviors, including memory and anxiety, accompanied by an overactive HPA axis, increased intestinal secretory state, dysbiosis, and decreased hippocampal c-Fos expression. Both local (intestinal physiology and microbiota) and central (behavioral and hippocampal c-Fos) changes were normalized by pretreatment with probiotics, indicating an overall benefit on health conferred by changes in the microbiota, independent of lymphocytes. Taken together, these findings indicate a role for adaptive immune cells in maintaining normal intestinal and brain health in mice and show that probiotics can overcome this immune-mediated deficit in the gut-brain-microbiota axis. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. HIV-induced alteration in gut microbiota: driving factors, consequences, and effects of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozupone, Catherine A; Rhodes, Matthew E; Neff, Charles P; Fontenot, Andrew P; Campbell, Thomas B; Palmer, Brent E

    2014-07-01

    Consistent with an important role for adaptive immunity in modulating interactions between intestinal bacteria and host, dramatic alteration in the composition of gut microbes during chronic HIV infection was recently reported by ourselves and independently by four other research groups. Here we evaluate our results in the context of these other studies and delve into the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Although gut microbiota of HIV-positive individuals on ART usually does not resemble that of HIV-negative individuals, the degree to which ART restores health-associated prevalence varies across bacterial taxa. Finally, we discuss potential drivers and health consequences of gut microbiota alterations. We propose that understanding the mechanism of HIV-associated gut microbiota changes will elucidate the role of adaptive immunity in shaping gut microbiota composition, and lay the foundation for therapeutics targeting the microbiota to attenuate HIV disease progression and reduce the risk of gut-linked disease in people with HIV.

  4. Poststroke DNA immunization against neurite growth inhibitors is beneficial to the recovery from local cerebral ischemia in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingbao Zhu; Jasmine Lee; Jill Wong; Wan Loo Tan; Zhongtang Feng; Tinghua Wang; Zhicheng Xiao; Ivan Ng

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibitory signals, i.e. neurite growth inhibitors (NGIs), presenting on central nervous system (CNS) myelin have been shown to play a crucial role in inhibiting lesioned axonal sprouting and leading to less functional recovery. Vaccines targeting NGIs may provide multifactorial protection against brain insults by overcoming the inhibitory effects of these NGIs and boosting the body's immune repair mechanisms.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of poststroke DNA immunization against NGIs on the rehabilitation for sensorimotor function of rat models of local cerebral ischemia.DESIGN: Completely randomized grouping design, and controlled experiment.SETTING: Brain Injury Research Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, National Neuroscience Institute,Singapore.MATERIALS: Sixty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ranging in age from 45 to 120 days and in weight from 180 to 250 grams were provided by Animal Center of Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine,National University of Singapore. pcDNA3.1(+)-neurite growth inhibitors (pcDNA-NGls) a gift was provided by Dr. Xiao from Department of Clinical Research, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore.METHODS: The experiment was carried out at Brain Injury Research Laboratory, Department of rats were randomized into 3 groups: pcDNA-NGIs group (group A), pcDNA3.1 (+) group (group B) and model group (group C), with 20 rats in each group. Left focal cerebral ischemia (FCI) was permanently induced through middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with the assistance of an operating microscope.Successful MCAO was determined by a 20% decrease to baseline in the ipsilateral cerebral blood flow. 100 μg of pcDNA-NGIs eluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was intramuscularly injected into the tibial muscle once a week after MCAO for 6 weeks in group A. As control, pcDNA3.1 (+) was also administrated severity score (mNSS), a composite of motor, sensory, reflex and balance tests, was used to test the sensorimotor deficit. The

  5. Dynamic gut microbiome across life history of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available The mosquito gut represents an ecosystem that accommodates a complex, intimately associated microbiome. It is increasingly clear that the gut microbiome influences a wide variety of host traits, such as fitness and immunity. Understanding the microbial community structure and its dynamics across mosquito life is a prerequisite for comprehending the symbiotic relationship between the mosquito and its gut microbial residents. Here we characterized gut bacterial communities across larvae, pupae and adults of Anopheles gambiae reared in semi-natural habitats in Kenya by pyrosequencing bacterial 16S rRNA fragments. Immatures and adults showed distinctive gut community structures. Photosynthetic Cyanobacteria were predominant in the larval and pupal guts while Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes dominated the adult guts, with core taxa of Enterobacteriaceae and Flavobacteriaceae. At the adult stage, diet regime (sugar meal and blood meal significantly affects the microbial structure. Intriguingly, blood meals drastically reduced the community diversity and favored enteric bacteria. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that the enriched enteric bacteria possess large genetic redox capacity of coping with oxidative and nitrosative stresses that are associated with the catabolism of blood meal, suggesting a beneficial role in maintaining gut redox homeostasis. Interestingly, gut community structure was similar in the adult stage between the field and laboratory mosquitoes, indicating that mosquito gut is a selective eco-environment for its microbiome. This comprehensive gut metatgenomic profile suggests a concerted symbiotic genetic association between gut inhabitants and host.

  6. Effect of Fibre Level and Fibre Source on Gut Morphology and Micro-environment in Local (Mong Cai and Exotic (Landrace×Yorkshire Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. B. Ngoc

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of genotype, fibre level and fibre source on gut morphology, environment and microflora was studied using 18 Mong Cai (MC and 18 Landrace×Yorkshire (LY pigs, aged around 60 d. The diets were based on maize, rice bran, soybean meal, fish meal and soybean oil, and cassava residue (CR or brewer’s grain (BG as fibrous ingredient sources in the high-fibre diets (HF. A low-fibre diet (LF, containing around 200 g NDF/kg dry matter (DM, was formulated without CR and BG as feed ingredients. The HF diets (HF-CR and HF-BG were formulated to contain around 270 g NDF/kg DM. The experiment was arranged according to a 2×3 factorial completely randomized design with six replications, and lasted 30 d. Crypt density in ileum was lowest (p<0.05 and villus height in jejunum and ileum were the greatest (p<0.05 in pigs fed diet HF-BG. Villus width in ileum was greatest in pigs fed diets HF-CR and HF-BG (p<0.05. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB counts in stomach were greatest (p<0.05 and E. coli counts in ileum and colon were lowest (p<0.05 in pigs fed diet HF-CR. The concentration of total organic acids in ileum, caecum and colon were greatest (p<0.05, and pH in ileum and colon were lowest (p<0.05 in pigs fed diet HF-CR. Crypt density in ileum was lowest, and villus height in ileum and villus width in jejunum and ileum was greatest in LY pigs (p<0.05. LAB counts in stomach and ileum were greatest, and E. coli counts in ileum were lowest in MC pigs (p<0.05. The concentration of total organic acids in ileum, caecum and colon were greatest (p<0.05 and pH lowest (p<0.05 in MC pigs.

  7. Continuous infusion of proinflammatory cytokines into the brain to study brain cytokine induced local and systemic immune effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöning, B; Elepfandt, P; Lanksch, W R; Volk, H D; Woiciechowsky, C

    1999-07-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are produced in the brain after various kinds of insult (ischemia, trauma, infection). In this process interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha are most important. These cytokines are key mediators of inflammation. Furthermore, these cytokines can act as neurotransmitters and develop direct effects on the central nervous system (CNS) including fever, sleep and stimulation of the neuroendocrine as well as sympathetic nervous system. Moreover, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha may also be involved in brain repair and regenerating processes. However, most of the data about the role of cytokines in the brain have been obtained from either in vitro studies or bolus injections into the brain parenchyma or cerebroventricular system. On the other hand, it is known that cytokines are released continuously into the brain after a cerebral insult over a period of 24 to 48 h. In order to further complete the knowledge about the interactions between neural and immune cells to overcome the primary insult and initiate repair and regeneration in the CNS, a new animal model of local inflammation reaction was established using chronic intracerebral infusion of rat recombinant cytokines.

  8. Study on the immune function in local mucosa post newcastile disease vaccination of chicken infected with chicken anemia virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Chickens were infected with CAV at one-day-old and 8 days later, the infected and uninfected chickens were vaccinated with La Sota vaccine. At 7\\, 14\\, 28 days post vaccination, the number of T cells and IgG, IgM and IgA antibody producing cells in Harderian gland and cecal tonsil, the content of IgG, IgM and IgA in tear, trachea fluid, intestinal fluid and bile as well as the hemoagglutination inhibition (HI) titer in tear and bile were detected. The results showed that the number of T cells and IgG, IgM and IgA antibody producing cells in Harderian gland and cecal consil, the content of IgG, IgM and IgA in tear, trachea fluid, intestinal fluid and bile as well as the HI titer in tear and bile post ND vaccination of CAV infected chickens were decreased significantly than those of uninfected vaccinated chickens. These indicated that the immune response function was markedly weakened in local mucosa of digestive and respiratory tract post ND vaccination of CAV-infected chickens.

  9. Exercise Attenuates PCB-Induced Changes in the Mouse Gut Microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: The gut microbiome, a dynamic bacterial community that interacts with the host, is integral to human health because it regulates energy metabolism and immune functions. The gut microbiome may also play a role in risks from environmental toxicants. Objectives: We investigated the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and exercise on the composition and structure of the gut microbiome in mice. Methods: After mice exercised voluntarily for 5 weeks, they were treated by oral gav...

  10. Gut microbiota: the next-gen frontier in preventive and therapeutic medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder eNagpal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Our gut harbors an extremely diverse collection of trillions of microbes that, besides degrading the complex dietary constituents, execute numerous activities vital for our metabolism and immune health. Although the importance of gut microbiota in maintaining digestive health has long been believed, its close correlation with numerous chronic ailments has recently been exposed, thanks to the innovative mechanistic studies on the compositional and functional aspects of gut microbial communities using germ-free or humanized animal models. Since a myriad of mysteries about the precise structures and functions of gut microbial communities in specific health situations still remains to be explicated, the emerging field of gut microbiota remains a foremost objective of research for microbiologists, computational biologists, clinicians, nutritionalists etc. Nevertheless, it is only after a comprehensive understanding of the structure, density and function of the gut microbiota that the new therapeutic targets could be captured and utilized for a healthier gut as well as overall wellbeing.

  11. The Second Brain: Is the Gut Microbiota a Link Between Obesity and Central Nervous System Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2016-03-01

    The gut-brain axis is a bi-directional integrated system composed by immune, endocrine, and neuronal components by which the gap between the gut microbiota and the brain is significantly impacted. An increasing number of different gut microbial species are now postulated to regulate brain function in health and disease. The westernized diet is hypothesized to be the cause of the current obesity levels in many countries, a major socio-economical health problem. Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggest that the gut microbiota is responsible for significant immunologic, neuronal, and endocrine changes that lead to obesity. We hypothesize that the gut microbiota, and changes associated with diet, affect the gut-brain axis and may possibly contribute to the development of mental illness. In this review, we discuss the links between diet, gut dysbiosis, obesity, and immunologic and neurologic diseases that impact brain function and behavior.

  12. Search for GUT monopoles at Super-Kamiokande

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K., E-mail: ueno@suketto.icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, Univ. of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    GUT monopole-induced neutrinos from the Sun have been searched for using a 50000 ton water Cherenkov detector, Super-Kamiokande. The greatly improved limit on the monopole flux in the local universe is shown.

  13. Deletion of the Toll-Like Receptor 5 Gene Per Se Does Not Determine the Gut Microbiome Profile That Induces Metabolic Syndrome: Environment Trumps Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Hartmann, Riley; Tun, Hein Min; Elson, Charles O; Khafipour, Ehsan; Garvey, W Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, emerging evidence has linked alterations in the gut microbial composition to a wide range of diseases including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the major mediators for the interactions between gut microbiota and host innate immune system, which is involved in the localization and structuring of host gut microbiota. A previous study found that TLR5 deficient mice (TLR5KO1) had altered gut microbial composition which led to the development of metabolic syndrome including hyperlipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance and increased adiposity. In the current study, a second TLR5-deficient mouse model was studied (TLR5KO2). TLR5 deficient mice did not manifest metabolic abnormalities related to the metabolic syndrome compared with littermate controls maintained on normal chow or after feeding a high fat diet. Analysis of the gut microbial composition of littermate TLR5KO2 and wild type mice revealed no significant difference in the overall microbiota structure between genotypes. However, the TLR5KO2 microbiota was distinctly different from that previously reported for TLR5KO1 mice with metabolic syndrome. We conclude that an altered composition of the microbiota in a given environment can result in metabolic syndrome, but it is not a consequence of TLR5 deficiency per se.

  14. GUT FERMENTATION SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    AFRICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. JANUARY 2014 ISBN ... documented case of Gut Fermentation Syndrome verified with glucose and .... cerevisiae in Bone Marrow Transplant. Patients,” Journal of ...

  15. NKp46+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Dampen Vaginal CD8 T Cell Responses following Local Immunization with a Cholera Toxin-Based Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luci, Carmelo; Bekri, Selma; Bihl, Franck; Pini, Jonathan; Bourdely, Pierre; Nouhen, Kelly; Malgogne, Angélique; Walzer, Thierry; Braud, Véronique M; Anjuère, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune cells work in concert to generate efficient protection at mucosal surface. Vaginal mucosa is an epithelial tissue that contains innate and adaptive immune effector cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that vaginal administration of Cholera toxin -based vaccines generate antigen-specific CD8 T cells through the stimulation of local dendritic cells (DC). Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a group of lymphocytes localized in epithelial tissues that have important immune functions against pathogens and in tissue homeostasis. Their contribution to vaccine-induced mucosal T cell responses is an important issue for the design of protective vaccines. We report here that the vaginal mucosa contains a heterogeneous population of NKp46+ ILC that includes conventional NK cells and ILC1-like cells. We show that vaginal NKp46+ ILC dampen vaccine-induced CD8 T cell responses generated after local immunization. Indeed, in vivo depletion of NKp46+ ILC with anti-NK1.1 antibody or NKG2D blockade increases the magnitude of vaginal OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, such treatments also increase the number of DC in the vagina. NKG2D ligands being expressed by vaginal DC but not by CD8 T cells, these results support that NKp46+ ILC limit mucosal CD8 T cell responses indirectly through the NKG2D-dependent elimination of vaginal DC. Our data reveal an unappreciated role of NKp46+ ILC in the regulation of mucosal CD8 T cell responses.

  16. NKp46+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Dampen Vaginal CD8 T Cell Responses following Local Immunization with a Cholera Toxin-Based Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luci, Carmelo; Bekri, Selma; Bihl, Franck; Pini, Jonathan; Bourdely, Pierre; Nouhen, Kelly; Malgogne, Angélique; Walzer, Thierry; Braud, Véronique M.; Anjuère, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune cells work in concert to generate efficient protection at mucosal surface. Vaginal mucosa is an epithelial tissue that contains innate and adaptive immune effector cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that vaginal administration of Cholera toxin -based vaccines generate antigen-specific CD8 T cells through the stimulation of local dendritic cells (DC). Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a group of lymphocytes localized in epithelial tissues that have important immune functions against pathogens and in tissue homeostasis. Their contribution to vaccine-induced mucosal T cell responses is an important issue for the design of protective vaccines. We report here that the vaginal mucosa contains a heterogeneous population of NKp46+ ILC that includes conventional NK cells and ILC1-like cells. We show that vaginal NKp46+ ILC dampen vaccine-induced CD8 T cell responses generated after local immunization. Indeed, in vivo depletion of NKp46+ ILC with anti-NK1.1 antibody or NKG2D blockade increases the magnitude of vaginal OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, such treatments also increase the number of DC in the vagina. NKG2D ligands being expressed by vaginal DC but not by CD8 T cells, these results support that NKp46+ ILC limit mucosal CD8 T cell responses indirectly through the NKG2D-dependent elimination of vaginal DC. Our data reveal an unappreciated role of NKp46+ ILC in the regulation of mucosal CD8 T cell responses. PMID:26630176

  17. Effect of local immunization of the mammary gland on phagocytosis and intracellular kill of Staphylococcus aureus by polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, A J; Paape, M J; Pearson, R E; Williams, W F

    1980-09-01

    Four cows in the latter part of their 2nd, 3rd, or 4th lactations were immunized by multiple intramammary infusions of heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus in 2 quarters. The direct bactericidal effects of milk whey from the immunized and control quarters, before and after immunization, and the ability of these whey to support phagocytosis and intracellular kill were determined by incubating live S aureus with polymorphonuclear neutrophils isolated from milk. Immunoglobulins (Ig) were determined by single radial immunodiffusion. One immunized and 1 control quarter in each cow were challenge exposed with live S aureus and the courses of the infections were determined for 2 weeks. There were significant cow differences in all Ig classes and in percentage of phagocytosis. Immunization resulted in a significant increase in IgA, IgG2, and IgM in the immunized quarters. Whey collected from immunized quarters supported phagocytosis of S aureus by isolated milk polymorphonuclear neutrophils significantly greater than did whey from control quarters. Extracellular live S aureus in the incubation medium was decreased by 59% in whey collected after immunization from immunized quarters. This decrease in extracellular S aureus was associated with a concomitant increase in total intracellular S aureus. However, intracellular live organisms showed no change. This lack of change indicated that the additional S aureus that were phagocytosed were killed. Direct bactericidal effects of whey were not observed. Intracellular live S aureus was not significantly correlated with any of the variables measured.

  18. Effects of local immunization with glucosyltransferase fractions from Streptococcus mutans on dental caries in hamsters caused by homologous and heterologous serotypes of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D J; Taubman, M A; Ebersole, J L

    1978-09-01

    Seven serotypes of Streptococcus mutans have been identified. The biochemical, genetic, and serological characteristics of these serotypes have indicated that certain serotypes are quite similar, whereas others are quite distinct. The effect of local immunization with glucosyltransferase (GTF) enzymes from serotypes a, c, or g on infection and disease caused by homologous or heterologous cariogenic S. mutans is reported. Organisms with either similar (a and g) or different (c and g) biochemical and serological characteristics were selected for heterologous challenge. NIH white hamsters were injected four times at weekly intervals with GTF prepared by 6 M guanidine-hydrochloride elution from water-insoluble glucan of serotypes a, c, or g, which resulted in enzyme (homologous) inhibitory activity in sera and salivas. After infection of GTF-immunized and sham-immunized groups of hamsters with cariogenic S. mutans of the same serotype as the injected antigen (homologous infection) or with S. mutans of a different serotype from the injected antigen (heterologous infection), the numbers of streptomycin-labeled S. mutans, caries, and lesions were determined. Immunization with GTF preparations from each of the three serotypes resulted in statistically significant reductions in the extent of infection and disease and number of lesions caused by infections with homologous cariogenic S. mutans. Statistically significant reductions in these three parameters were also observed in groups immunized with enzyme from serotype a (strain E49) and challenged with cariogenic serotype g (strain 6715) organisms; or immunized with enzyme from serotype c (strain Ingbritt) and challenged with cariogenic serotype g (strain 6715) organisms; or immunized with enzyme from serotype g (strain 6715) and challenged with cariogenic serotype c (strain Ingbritt) organisms. These studies suggest that soluble antigen preparations containing GTF from one serotype may elicit a protective immune response

  19. The potential link between gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, John; Allen, Katrina; Collier, Fiona; Tang, Mimi L K; Ward, Alister C; Vuillermin, Peter

    2013-12-16

    There has been a dramatic rise in the prevalence of IgE-mediated food allergy over recent decades, particularly among infants and young children. The cause of this increase is unknown but one putative factor is a change in the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy. The coevolution of the human gastrointestinal tract and commensal microbiota has resulted in a symbiotic relationship in which gut microbiota play a vital role in early life immune development and function, as well as maintenance of gut wall epithelial integrity. Since IgE mediated food allergy is associated with immune dysregulation and impaired gut epithelial integrity there is substantial interest in the potential link between gut microbiota and food allergy. Although the exact link between gut microbiota and food allergy is yet to be established in humans, recent experimental evidence suggests that specific patterns of gut microbiota colonization may influence the risk and manifestations of food allergy. An understanding of the relationship between gut microbiota and food allergy has the potential to inform both the prevention and treatment of food allergy. In this paper we review the theory and evidence linking gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life. We then consider the implications and challenges for future research, including the techniques of measuring and analyzing gut microbiota, and the types of studies required to advance knowledge in the field.

  20. The Potential Link between Gut Microbiota and IgE-Mediated Food Allergy in Early Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Molloy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been a dramatic rise in the prevalence of IgE-mediated food allergy over recent decades, particularly among infants and young children. The cause of this increase is unknown but one putative factor is a change in the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy. The coevolution of the human gastrointestinal tract and commensal microbiota has resulted in a symbiotic relationship in which gut microbiota play a vital role in early life immune development and function, as well as maintenance of gut wall epithelial integrity. Since IgE mediated food allergy is associated with immune dysregulation and impaired gut epithelial integrity there is substantial interest in the potential link between gut microbiota and food allergy. Although the exact link between gut microbiota and food allergy is yet to be established in humans, recent experimental evidence suggests that specific patterns of gut microbiota colonization may influence the risk and manifestations of food allergy. An understanding of the relationship between gut microbiota and food allergy has the potential to inform both the prevention and treatment of food allergy. In this paper we review the theory and evidence linking gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life. We then consider the implications and challenges for future research, including the techniques of measuring and analyzing gut microbiota, and the types of studies required to advance knowledge in the field.

  1. The microbiota-gut-brain axis in gastrointestinal disorders: stressed bugs, stressed brain or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Giada; Collins, Stephen M; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2014-07-15

    The gut-brain axis is the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain, which occurs through multiple pathways that include hormonal, neural and immune mediators. The signals along this axis can originate in the gut, the brain or both, with the objective of maintaining normal gut function and appropriate behaviour. In recent years, the study of gut microbiota has become one of the most important areas in biomedical research. Attention has focused on the role of gut microbiota in determining normal gut physiology and immunity and, more recently, on its role as modulator of host behaviour ('microbiota-gut-brain axis'). We therefore review the literature on the role of gut microbiota in gut homeostasis and link it with mechanisms that could influence behaviour. We discuss the association of dysbiosis with disease, with particular focus on functional bowel disorders and their relationship to psychological stress. This is of particular interest because exposure to stressors has long been known to increase susceptibility to and severity of gastrointestinal diseases. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  2. Two distinct metacommunities characterize the gut microbiota in Crohn's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Qing; Gao, Yuan; Jie, Zhuye

    2017-01-01

    The inflammatory intestinal disorder Crohn's disease (CD) has become a health challenge worldwide. The gut microbiota closely interacts with the host immune system, but its functional impact in CD is unclear. Except for studies on a small number of CD patients, analyses of the gut microbiota in CD...

  3. The metabolic role of the gut microbiota in health and rheumatic disease: mechanisms and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Abramson, S.B.; Scher, J.U.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the gut microbiome in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune disease is now well established. The human gut microbiome is currently being studied as a potential modulator of the immune response in rheumatic disorders. However, the vastness and complexity of this host-microorganism

  4. Kynurenine pathway metabolism and the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, P J; Cryan, J F; Dinan, T G; Clarke, G

    2017-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the gut microbiota influences not only gastrointestinal physiology but also central nervous system (CNS) function by modulating signalling pathways of the microbiota-gut-brain axis. Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underpinning the influence exerted by the gut microbiota on brain function and behaviour has become a key research priority. Microbial regulation of tryptophan metabolism has become a focal point in this regard, with dual emphasis on the regulation of serotonin synthesis and the control of kynurenine pathway metabolism. Here, we focus in detail on the latter pathway and begin by outlining the structural and functional dynamics of the gut microbiota and the signalling pathways of the brain-gut axis. We summarise preclinical and clinical investigations demonstrating that the gut microbiota influences CNS physiology, anxiety, depression, social behaviour, cognition and visceral pain. Pertinent studies are drawn from neurogastroenterology demonstrating the importance of tryptophan and its metabolites in CNS and gastrointestinal function. We outline how kynurenine pathway metabolism may be regulated by microbial control of neuroendocrine function and components of the immune system. Finally, preclinical evidence demonstrating direct and indirect mechanisms by which the gut microbiota can regulate tryptophan availability for kynurenine pathway metabolism, with downstream effects on CNS function, is reviewed. Targeting the gut microbiota represents a tractable target to modulate kynurenine pathway metabolism. Efforts to develop this approach will markedly increase our understanding of how the gut microbiota shapes brain and behaviour and provide new insights towards successful translation of microbiota-gut-brain axis research from bench to bedside. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'.

  5. Gut Melatonin in Vertebrates: Chronobiology and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin, following discovery in the bovine pineal gland, has been detected in several extra-pineal sources including gastrointestinal tract or gut. Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) is the key regulator of its biosynthesis. Melatonin in pineal is rhythmically produced with a nocturnal peak in synchronization with environmental light-dark cycle. A recent study on carp reported first that melatonin levels and intensity of a ~23 kDa AANAT protein in each gut segment also exhibit significant daily variations but, unlike pineal, show a peak at midday in all seasons. Extensive experimental studies ruled out direct role of light-dark conditions in determining temporal pattern of gut melatoninergic system in carp, and opened up possible role of environmental non-photic cue(s) as its synchronizer. Based on mammalian findings, physiological significance of gut-derived melatonin also appears unique because its actions at local levels sharing paracrine and/or autocrine functions have been emphasized. The purpose of this mini review is to summarize the existing data on the chronobiology and physiology of gut melatonin and to emphasize their relation with the same hormone derived in the pineal in vertebrates including fish.

  6. Gut Melatonin in Vertebrates: Chronobiology and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Saumen Kumar Maitra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, following discovery in the bovine pineal gland, has been detected in several extra-pineal sources including gastrointestinal tract or gut. Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT is the key regulator of its biosynthesis. Melatonin in pineal is rhythmically produced with a nocturnal peak in synchronization with environmental light-dark cycle. A recent study on carp reported first that melatonin levels and intensity of a ~23kDa AANAT protein in each gut segment also exhibit significant daily variations but, unlike pineal, show a peak at midday in all seasons. Extensive experimental studies ruled out direct role of light-dark conditions in determining temporal pattern of gut melatoninergic system in carp, and opened up possible role of environmental non-photic cue(s as its synchronizer. Based on mammalian findings, physiological significance of gut derived melatonin also appears unique because its actions at local levels sharing paracrine and/or autocrine functions have been emphasized. The purpose of this mini-review is to summarize existing data on the chronobiology and physiology of gut melatonin and to emphasize their relation with the same hormone derived in the pineal in vertebrates including fish.

  7. Gut Microbiota and Lifestyle Interventions in NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Houghton

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The human digestive system harbors a diverse and complex community of microorganisms that work in a symbiotic fashion with the host, contributing to metabolism, immune response and intestinal architecture. However, disruption of a stable and diverse community, termed “dysbiosis”, has been shown to have a profound impact upon health and disease. Emerging data demonstrate dysbiosis of the gut microbiota to be linked with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Although the exact mechanism(s remain unknown, inflammation, damage to the intestinal membrane, and translocation of bacteria have all been suggested. Lifestyle intervention is undoubtedly effective at improving NAFLD, however, not all patients respond to these in the same manner. Furthermore, studies investigating the effects of lifestyle interventions on the gut microbiota in NAFLD patients are lacking. A deeper understanding of how different aspects of lifestyle (diet/nutrition/exercise affect the host–microbiome interaction may allow for a more tailored approach to lifestyle intervention. With gut microbiota representing a key element of personalized medicine and nutrition, we review the effects of lifestyle interventions (diet and physical activity/exercise on gut microbiota and how this impacts upon NAFLD prognosis.

  8. Does the gut microbiota trigger Hashimoto's thyroiditis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kouki; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an organ-specific autoimmune disease in which both genetic predisposition and environmental factors serve as the trigger of the disease. A growing body of evidence suggests involvement of viral infection in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. However, not only pathogenic microorganisms but also non-pathogenic commensal microorganisms induce proinflammatory or regulatory immune responses within the host. In accordance, series of studies indicate a critical role of intestinal commensal microbiota in the development of autoimmune diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. In contrast, the role of the gut and indigenous microorganisms in Hashimoto's thyroiditis has received little attention. Whereas activation of innate pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors and disturbed intestinal epithelial barrier may contribute to thyroiditis development, only a few studies have addressed a link between the gut and Hashimoto's thyroiditis and provided just indirect and weak evidence for such a link. Despite this unsatisfactory situation, we here focus on the possible interaction between the gut and thyroid autoimmunity. Further studies are clearly needed to test the hypothesis that the gut commensal microflora represents an important environmental factor triggering Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  9. Gut Microbiota and Lifestyle Interventions in NAFLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, David; Stewart, Christopher J; Day, Christopher P; Trenell, Michael

    2016-03-25

    The human digestive system harbors a diverse and complex community of microorganisms that work in a symbiotic fashion with the host, contributing to metabolism, immune response and intestinal architecture. However, disruption of a stable and diverse community, termed "dysbiosis", has been shown to have a profound impact upon health and disease. Emerging data demonstrate dysbiosis of the gut microbiota to be linked with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Although the exact mechanism(s) remain unknown, inflammation, damage to the intestinal membrane, and translocation of bacteria have all been suggested. Lifestyle intervention is undoubtedly effective at improving NAFLD, however, not all patients respond to these in the same manner. Furthermore, studies investigating the effects of lifestyle interventions on the gut microbiota in NAFLD patients are lacking. A deeper understanding of how different aspects of lifestyle (diet/nutrition/exercise) affect the host-microbiome interaction may allow for a more tailored approach to lifestyle intervention. With gut microbiota representing a key element of personalized medicine and nutrition, we review the effects of lifestyle interventions (diet and physical activity/exercise) on gut microbiota and how this impacts upon NAFLD prognosis.

  10. Gut Microbiota and Lifestyle Interventions in NAFLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, David; Stewart, Christopher J.; Day, Christopher P.; Trenell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The human digestive system harbors a diverse and complex community of microorganisms that work in a symbiotic fashion with the host, contributing to metabolism, immune response and intestinal architecture. However, disruption of a stable and diverse community, termed “dysbiosis”, has been shown to have a profound impact upon health and disease. Emerging data demonstrate dysbiosis of the gut microbiota to be linked with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Although the exact mechanism(s) remain unknown, inflammation, damage to the intestinal membrane, and translocation of bacteria have all been suggested. Lifestyle intervention is undoubtedly effective at improving NAFLD, however, not all patients respond to these in the same manner. Furthermore, studies investigating the effects of lifestyle interventions on the gut microbiota in NAFLD patients are lacking. A deeper understanding of how different aspects of lifestyle (diet/nutrition/exercise) affect the host–microbiome interaction may allow for a more tailored approach to lifestyle intervention. With gut microbiota representing a key element of personalized medicine and nutrition, we review the effects of lifestyle interventions (diet and physical activity/exercise) on gut microbiota and how this impacts upon NAFLD prognosis. PMID:27023533

  11. Gut microbiota controls adipose tissue expansion, gut barrier and glucose metabolism: novel insights into molecular targets and interventions using prebiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, L; Neyrinck, A M; Delzenne, N M; Knauf, C; Cani, P D

    2014-03-01

    Crosstalk between organs is crucial for controlling numerous homeostatic systems (e.g. energy balance, glucose metabolism and immunity). Several pathological conditions, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are characterised by a loss of or excessive inter-organ communication that contributes to the development of disease. Recently, we and others have identified several mechanisms linking the gut microbiota with the development of obesity and associated disorders (e.g. insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis). Among these, we described the concept of metabolic endotoxaemia (increase in plasma lipopolysaccharide levels) as one of the triggering factors leading to the development of metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance. Growing evidence suggests that gut microbes contribute to the onset of low-grade inflammation characterising these metabolic disorders via mechanisms associated with gut barrier dysfunctions. We have demonstrated that enteroendocrine cells (producing glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-2) and the endocannabinoid system control gut permeability and metabolic endotoxaemia. Recently, we hypothesised that specific metabolic dysregulations occurring at the level of numerous organs (e.g. gut, adipose tissue, muscles, liver and brain) rely from gut microbiota modifications. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms linking gut permeability, adipose tissue metabolism, and glucose homeostasis, and recent findings that show interactions between the gut microbiota, the endocannabinoid system and the apelinergic system. These specific systems are discussed in the context of the gut-to-peripheral organ axis (intestine, adipose tissue and brain) and impacts on metabolic regulation. In the present review, we also briefly describe the impact of a variety of non-digestible nutrients (i.e. inulin-type fructans, arabinoxylans, chitin glucans and polyphenols). Their effects on the composition of the gut microbiota and

  12. Effects of gluten-free, dairy-free diet on childhood nephrotic syndrome and gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uy, Natalie; Graf, Lauren; Lemley, Kevin V; Kaskel, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests an association between food sensitivity and gut microbiota in children with nephrotic syndrome. Diminished proteinuria resulted from eliminating cow's milk and the use of an oligoantigenic diet which excluded gluten, especially in patients with immune-related conditions, i.e., celiac disease and nephrotic syndrome. The mechanisms underlying the association of diet, gut microbiota, and dysregulation of the immune system are unknown. Gut microbiota is influenced by a number of factors including diet composition and other environmental epigenetic exposures. The imbalance in gut microbiota may be ameliorated by gluten-free and dairy-free diets. Gluten-free diet increased the number of unhealthy bacteria while reducing bacterial-induced cytokine production of IL-10. Thus, gluten-free diet may influence the composition and immune function of gut microbiota and should be considered a possible environmental factor associated with immune-related disease, including nephrotic syndrome. Furthermore, the imbalance of gut microbiota may be related to the development of cow's milk protein allergy. Investigations are needed to fill the gaps in our knowledge concerning the associations between the gut microbiome, environmental exposures, epigenetics, racial influences, and the propensity for immune dysregulation with its inherent risk to the developing individual.

  13. Gut Microbiome and Obesity: A Plausible Explanation for Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmiguel, Claudia; Gupta, Arpana; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disorder that results in excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Although obesity is caused by alterations in the energy consumption/expenditure balance, the factors promoting this disequilibrium are incompletely understood. The rapid development of new technologies and analysis strategies to decode the gut microbiota composition and metabolic pathways has opened a door into the complexity of the guest-host interactions between the gut microbiota and its human host in health and in disease. Pivotal studies have demonstrated that manipulation of the gut microbiota and its metabolic pathways can affect host’s adiposity and metabolism. These observations have paved the way for further assessment of the mechanisms underlying these changes. In this review we summarize the current evidence for possible mechanisms underlying gut microbiota induced obesity. The review addresses some well-known effects of the gut microbiota on energy harvesting and changes in metabolic machinery, on metabolic and immune interactions and on possible changes in brain function and behavior. Although there is limited understanding on the symbiotic relationship between us and our gut microbiome, and how disturbances of this relationship affects our health, there is compelling evidence for an important role of the gut microbiota in the development and perpetuation of obesity. PMID:26029487

  14. Enhanced transferrin receptor expression by proinflammatory cytokines in enterocytes as a means for local delivery of drugs to inflamed gut mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Harel

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs is often associated with adverse effects related to drug distribution into non-diseased tissues, a situation which attracts a rational design of a targeted treatment confined to the inflamed mucosa. Upon activation of immune cells, transferrin receptor (TfR expression increases at their surface. Because TfR is expressed in all cell types we hypothesized that its cell surface levels are regulated also in enterocytes. We, therefore, compared TfR expression in healthy and inflamed human colonic mucosa, as well as healthy and inflamed colonic mucosa of the DNBS-induced rat model. TfR expression was elevated in the colonic mucosa of IBD patients in both the basolateral and apical membranes of the enterocytes. Increased TfR expression was also observed in colonocytes of the induced colitis rats. To explore the underlying mechanism CaCo-2 cells were treated with various proinflammatory cytokines, which increased both TfR expression and transferrin cellular uptake in a mechanism that did not involve hyper proliferation. These findings were then exploited for the design of targetable carrier towards inflamed regions of the colon. Anti-TfR antibodies were conjugated to nano-liposomes. As expected, iron-starved Caco-2 cells internalized anti-TfR immunoliposomes better than controls. Ex vivo binding studies to inflamed mucosa showed that the anti-TfR immunoliposomes accumulated significantly better in the mucosa of DNBS-induced rats than the accumulation of non-specific immunoliposomes. It is concluded that targeting mucosal inflammation can be accomplished by nano-liposomes decorated with anti-TfR due to inflammation-dependent, apical, elevated expression of the receptor.

  15. Gut Microbiota-brain Axis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the updated information about the gut microbiota-brain axis. Data Sources: All articles about gut microbiota-brain axis published up to July 18, 2016, were identified through a literature search on PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science, with the keywords of “gut microbiota”, “gut-brain axis”, and “neuroscience”. Study Selection: All relevant articles on gut microbiota and gut-brain axis were included and carefully reviewed, with no limitation of s...

  16. Insights into the Roles of Gut Microbes in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Sanz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major public health issue as it enhances the risk of suffering several chronic diseases of increasing prevalence. Obesity results from an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, associated with a chronic low-grade inflammation. Gut microbes are considered to contribute to body weight regulation and related disorders by influencing metabolic and immune host functions. The gut microbiota as a whole improves the host's ability to extract and store energy from the diet leading to body weight gain, while specific commensal microbes seem to exert beneficial effects on bile salt, lipoprotein, and cholesterol metabolism. The gut microbiota and some probiotics also regulate immune functions, protecting the host form infections and chronic inflammation. In contrast, dysbiosis and endotoxaemia may be inflammatory factors responsible for developing insulin resistance and body weight gain. In the light of the link between the gut microbiota, metabolism, and immunity, the use of dietary strategies to modulate microbiota composition is likely to be effective in controlling metabolic disorders. Although so far only a few preclinical and clinical trials have demonstrated the effects of specific gut microbes and prebiotics on biological markers of these disorders, the findings indicate that advances in this field could be of value in the struggle against obesity and its associated-metabolic disorders.

  17. Alterations of the human gut microbiome in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangi, Sushrut; Gandhi, Roopali; Cox, Laura M.; Li, Ning; von Glehn, Felipe; Yan, Raymond; Patel, Bonny; Mazzola, Maria Antonietta; Liu, Shirong; Glanz, Bonnie L.; Cook, Sandra; Tankou, Stephanie; Stuart, Fiona; Melo, Kirsy; Nejad, Parham; Smith, Kathleen; Topçuolu, Begüm D.; Holden, James; Kivisäkk, Pia; Chitnis, Tanuja; De Jager, Philip L.; Quintana, Francisco J.; Gerber, Georg K.; Bry, Lynn; Weiner, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome plays an important role in immune function and has been implicated in several autoimmune disorders. Here we use 16S rRNA sequencing to investigate the gut microbiome in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS, n=60) and healthy controls (n=43). Microbiome alterations in MS include increases in Methanobrevibacter and Akkermansia and decreases in Butyricimonas, and correlate with variations in the expression of genes involved in dendritic cell maturation, interferon signalling and NF-kB signalling pathways in circulating T cells and monocytes. Patients on disease-modifying treatment show increased abundances of Prevotella and Sutterella, and decreased Sarcina, compared with untreated patients. MS patients of a second cohort show elevated breath methane compared with controls, consistent with our observation of increased gut Methanobrevibacter in MS in the first cohort. Further study is required to assess whether the observed alterations in the gut microbiome play a role in, or are a consequence of, MS pathogenesis. PMID:27352007

  18. Mucosal Immune Regulation in Intestinal Disease. The role of bacterial products, food components and drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol-Schoenmakers, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304846953

    2009-01-01

    The challenge of the mucosal gut associated immune system is to remain unresponsive to food products and commensal microbiota, while mounting an appropriate immune response towards pathogens. This implicates the necessity of tight immune regulation within the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT).

  19. Obesity-driven gut microbiota inflammatory pathways to metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Agra eCavalcante-Silva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The intimate interplay between immune system, metabolism and gut microbiota plays an important role in controlling metabolic homeostasis and possible obesity development. Obesity involves impairment of immune response affecting both innate and adaptive immunity. The main factors involved in the relationship of obesity with inflammation have not been completely elucidated. On the other hand, gut microbiota, via innate immune receptors, has emerged as one of the key factors regulating events triggering acute inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Inflammatory disorders lead to several signalling transduction pathways activation, inflammatory cytokine, chemokine production and cell migration, which in turn cause metabolic dysfunction. Inflamed adipose tissue, with increased macrophages infiltration, is associated with impaired preadipocyte development and differentiation to mature adipose cells, leading to ectopic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. This review focuses on the relationship between obesity and inflammation, which is essential to understand the pathological mechanisms governing metabolic syndrome.

  20. Towards a Realistic F-theory GUT

    CERN Document Server

    Callaghan, James C; Leontaris, George K; Ross, Graham G

    2011-01-01

    We consider semi-local F-theory GUTs arising from a single E_8 point of local enhancement, leading to simple GUT groups based on E_6, SO(10) and SU(5) with SU(3), SU(4) and SU(5) spectral covers, respectively. Assuming the minimal Z_2 monodromy, we determine the homology classes and the associated spectra after flux breaking for each case. Our analysis includes the GUT singlets which have hitherto been ignored but which play a crucial role in phenomenology. Using these results we construct an E_6 based model that demonstrates, for the first time, that it is possible to construct a phenomenologically viable model which leads to the MSSM at low energies. The exotics that result from flux breaking all get a large mass when singlet fields acquire vacuum expectation values driven by D- and F-flatness. Due to the underlying GUT symmetry and the U(1)s descending from E_8, bare baryon- and lepton-number violating terms are forbidden up to and including dimension 5. As a result nucleon decay is naturally suppressed be...

  1. Gut microbiome in Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Biagi

    Full Text Available Premature aging seriously compromises the health status of Down Syndrome (DS persons. Since human aging has been associated with a deterioration of the gut microbiota (GM-host mutualism, here we investigated the composition of GM in DS.The observational study presented involved 17 adult DS persons. We characterized the GM structure by 454 pyrosequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. DS microbiome was compared with that of age-matched healthy non-trisomic adults enrolled in the same geographic area.The dominant GM fraction of DS persons showed an overall mutualistic immune-modulatory layout, comparable to that of healthy controls. This makes GM a possible factor counteracting the genetic determined acceleration of immune senescence in DS persons. However, we also found detectable signatures specific for DS among subdominant GM components, such as the increase of Parasporobacterium and Sutterella. In particular, the abundance of this last microorganism significantly correlated with the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC total score, allowing us to hypothesize a possible role for this microbial genus in behavioral features in DS.

  2. Gut Microbiome in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Elena; Candela, Marco; Centanni, Manuela; Consolandi, Clarissa; Rampelli, Simone; Turroni, Silvia; Severgnini, Marco; Peano, Clelia; Ghezzo, Alessandro; Scurti, Maria; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Background Premature aging seriously compromises the health status of Down Syndrome (DS) persons. Since human aging has been associated with a deterioration of the gut microbiota (GM)-host mutualism, here we investigated the composition of GM in DS. Methods The observational study presented involved 17 adult DS persons. We characterized the GM structure by 454 pyrosequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. DS microbiome was compared with that of age-matched healthy non-trisomic adults enrolled in the same geographic area. Results and Conclusions The dominant GM fraction of DS persons showed an overall mutualistic immune-modulatory layout, comparable to that of healthy controls. This makes GM a possible factor counteracting the genetic determined acceleration of immune senescence in DS persons. However, we also found detectable signatures specific for DS among subdominant GM components, such as the increase of Parasporobacterium and Sutterella. In particular, the abundance of this last microorganism significantly correlated with the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) total score, allowing us to hypothesize a possible role for this microbial genus in behavioral features in DS. PMID:25386941

  3. Gut Microbiota and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Molin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local inflammation in relation to the resident microbiota of the human gastro-intestinal (GI tract and administration of probiotics are the main themes of the present review. The dominating taxa of the human GI tract and their potential for aggravating or suppressing inflammation are described. The review focuses on human trials with probiotics and does not include in vitro studies and animal experimental models. The applications of probiotics considered are systemic immune-modulation, the metabolic syndrome, liver injury, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and radiation-induced enteritis. When the major genomic differences between different types of probiotics are taken into account, it is to be expected that the human body can respond differently to the different species and strains of probiotics. This fact is often neglected in discussions of the outcome of clinical trials with probiotics.

  4. Gut microbiota in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Icaza-Chávez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota is the community of live microorganisms residing in the digestive tract. There are many groups of researchers worldwide that are working at deciphering the collective genome of the human microbiota. Modern techniques for studying the microbiota have made us aware of an important number of nonculturable bacteria and of the relation between the microorganisms that live inside us and our homeostasis. The microbiota is essential for correct body growth, the development of immunity, and nutrition. Certain epidemics affecting humanity such as asthma and obesity may possibly be explained, at least partially, by alterations in the microbiota. Dysbiosis has been associated with a series of gastrointestinal disorders that include non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, celiac disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. The present article deals with the nomenclature, modern study techniques, and functions of gut microbiota, and its relation to health and disease.

  5. Schizophrenia and the gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemani, Katlyn; Hosseini Ghomi, Reza; McCormick, Beth; Fan, Xiaoduo

    2015-01-02

    Several risk factors for the development of schizophrenia can be linked through a common pathway in the intestinal tract. It is now increasingly recognized that bidirectional communication exists between the brain and the gut that uses neural, hormonal, and immunological routes. An increased incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) barrier dysfunction, food antigen sensitivity, inflammation, and the metabolic syndrome is seen in schizophrenia. These findings may be influenced by the composition of the gut microbiota. A significant subgroup of patients may benefit from the initiation of a gluten and casein-free diet. Antimicrobials and probiotics have therapeutic potential for reducing the metabolic dysfunction and immune dysregulation seen in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of gut microbiota on immunological maturation in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Brandt; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    Maturation and function of the immune system is highly influenced by the establishment of the microbiota in the gut, which in turn, particularly in infancy, is influenced by factors such as maternal microbiota and the environment, including diet. Studies have shown that although lymph nodes...

  7. Gastroenterology issues in schizophrenia: why the gut matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severance, Emily G; Prandovszky, Emese; Castiglione, James; Yolken, Robert H

    2015-05-01

    Genetic and environmental studies implicate immune pathologies in schizophrenia. The body's largest immune organ is the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Historical associations of GI conditions with mental illnesses predate the introduction of antipsychotics. Current studies of antipsychotic-naïve patients support that gut dysfunction may be inherent to the schizophrenia disease process. Risk factors for schizophrenia (inflammation, food intolerances, Toxoplasma gondii exposure, cellular barrier defects) are part of biological pathways that intersect those operant in the gut. Central to GI function is a homeostatic microbial community, and early reports show that it is disrupted in schizophrenia. Bioactive and toxic products derived from digestion and microbial dysbiosis activate adaptive and innate immunity. Complement C1q, a brain-active systemic immune component, interacts with gut-related schizophrenia risk factors in clinical and experimental animal models. With accumulating evidence supporting newly discovered gut-brain physiological pathways, treatments to ameliorate brain symptoms of schizophrenia should be supplemented with therapies to correct GI dysfunction.

  8. Impact of the gut microbiota, prebiotics, and probiotics on human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuan-Sheng; Chang, Chih-Jung; Lu, Chia-Chen; Martel, Jan; Ojcius, David M; Ko, Yun-Fei; Young, John D; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the gut microbiota regulates many physiological functions, ranging from energy regulation and cognitive processes to toxin neutralization and immunity against pathogens. Accordingly, alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota have been shown to contribute to the development of various chronic diseases. The main objectives of this review are to present recent breakthroughs in the study of the gut microbiota and show that intestinal bacteria play a critical role in the development of different disease conditions, including obesity, fatty liver disease, and lung infection. We also highlight the potential application of prebiotics and probiotics in maintaining optimal health and treating chronic inflammatory and immunity-related diseases.

  9. The effect of corticosteroid treatment on local immune responses, intake and performance in lambs infected with Teladorsagia circumcincta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, A W; Huntley, J F; Mackellar, A; McAnulty, R W; Jay, N P; Green, R S; Stankiewicz, M; Sykes, A R

    2008-12-01

    The nutritional cost of, and the sequential cellular changes associated with the developing immune response to the abomasal parasite Teladorsagia circumcincta were investigated using corticosteroid-induced immune-suppression. Six-month-old lambs with minimal nematode experience were either infected with 4000 L3 T. circumcincta per day (group IF), similarly infected and concurrently immune-suppressed with methylprednisolone acetate (group ISIF), immune-suppressed only (group IS) or remained as controls (group C). Food intake, faecal egg count (FEC) and antibody titres in plasma were recorded weekly, worm burden at necropsy on day 63 p.i. and body composition by X-ray computed tomography on days -2 and 62 p.i. Furthermore, sequential immunological changes at the site of parasite infestation in the abomasal mucosa were measured from serial biopsy tissue samples taken from additional animals that were fitted with an abomasal cannula and either infected with the same regime as IF animals above (group CnIF) or concurrently infected and immune-suppressed as above (group CnISIF). Corticosteroid treatment resulted in greater FECs (PCnIF sheep, respectively. Infection reduced feed intake by 17% between 14 and 28 days p.i. (PCnIF from 42 days p.i., all of which were abrogated by corticosteroid treatment. The ability to regulate the worm population appeared to be associated with a rise in tissue IgA concentration and numbers of globule leucocytes (GL). The results support the hypothesis that a majority of the production losses that occur during infection of lambs with T. circumcincta in lambs are a consequence of the host immune response. These findings may have implications for regimes that promote the development of a strong host immune reaction to gastrointestinal parasites in lambs.

  10. Is the Gut Microbiota a New Factor Contributing to Obesity and Its Metabolic Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Harris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota refers to the trillions of microorganisms residing in the intestine and is integral in multiple physiological processes of the host. Recent research has shown that gut bacteria play a role in metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. The mechanisms by which the gut microbiota affects metabolic diseases are by two major routes: (1 the innate immune response to the structural components of bacteria (e.g., lipopolysaccharide resulting in inflammation and (2 bacterial metabolites of dietary compounds (e.g., SCFA from fiber, which have biological activities that regulate host functions. Gut microbiota has evolved with humans as a mutualistic partner, but dysbiosis in a form of altered gut metagenome and collected microbial activities, in combination with classic genetic and environmental factors, may promote the development of metabolic disorders. This paper reviews the available literature about the gut microbiota and aforementioned metabolic disorders and reveals the gaps in knowledge for future study.

  11. Bugging inflammation: role of the gut microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Sj; Wong, Connie HY

    2016-01-01

    The advent of vaccination and improved hygiene have eliminated many of the deadly infectious pathogens in developed nations. However, the incidences of inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, obesity and diabetes are increasing dramatically. Research in the recent decades revealed that it is indeed the lack of early childhood microbial exposure, increase use of antibiotics, as well as increase consumption of processed foods high in carbohydrates and fats, and lacking fibre, which wreak havoc on the proper development of immunity and predispose the host to elevated inflammatory conditions. Although largely unexplored and under-appreciated until recent years, these factors impact significantly on the composition of the gut microbiota (a collection of microorganisms that live within the host mucosal tissue) and inadvertently play intricate and pivotal roles in modulating an appropriate host immune response. The suggestion that shifts in the composition of host microbiota is a risk factor for inflammatory disease raises an exciting opportunity whereby the microbiota may also present as a potential modifiable component or therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. This review provides insights into the interactions between the microbiota and the immune system, how these affect disease phenotypes, and explore current and emerging therapies that target the gut microbiota as potential treatment for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27195115

  12. Complex Adaptive Immunity to enteric fevers in humans: Lessons learned and the path forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo B. Sztein

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid fever, and S. Paratyphi A and B, causative agents of paratyphoid fever, are major public health threats throughout the world. Although two licensed typhoid vaccines are currently available, they are only moderately protective and immunogenic necessitating the development of novel vaccines. A major obstacle in the development of improved typhoid, as well as paratyphoid vaccines is the lack of known immunological correlates of protection in humans. Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding the complex adaptive host responses against S. Typhi. Although the induction of S. Typhi-specific antibodies (including their functional properties and memory B cells, as well as their cross-reactivity with S. Paratyphi A and S. Paratyphi B has been shown, the role of humoral immunity in protection remains undefined. Cell mediated immunity (CMI is likely to play a dominant role in protection against enteric fever pathogens. Detailed measurements of CMI performed in volunteers immunized with attenuated strains of S. Typhi have shown, among others, the induction of lymphoproliferation, multifunctional type 1 cytokine production and CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses. In addition to systemic responses, the local microenvironment of the gut is likely to be of paramount importance in protection from these infections. In this review we will critically assess current knowledge regarding the role of CMI and humoral immunity following natural S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi infections, experimental challenge, and immunization in humans. We will also address recent advances regarding cross-talk between the host’s gut microbiota and immunization with attenuated S. Typhi, mechanisms of systemic immune responses, and the homing potential of S. Typhi-specific B and T cells to the gut and other tissues.

  13. The Human Gut Microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; de Goffau, Marcus. C.; Schwiertz, A

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota in our gut performs many different essential functions that help us to stay healthy. These functions include vitamin production, regulation of lipid metabolism and short chain fatty acid production as fuel for epithelial cells and regulation of gene expression. There is a very numerou

  14. Healthy human gut phageome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; Oost, van der John; Vos, de Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of

  15. The Human Gut Microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; de Goffau, Marcus. C.; Schwiertz, A

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota in our gut performs many different essential functions that help us to stay healthy. These functions include vitamin production, regulation of lipid metabolism and short chain fatty acid production as fuel for epithelial cells and regulation of gene expression. There is a very

  16. Healthy human gut phageome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; Oost, van der John; Vos, de Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of hu

  17. Philosophy with Guts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Western philosophy, from Plato on, has had the tendency to separate feeling and thought, affect and cognition. This article argues that a strong philosophy (metaphorically, with "guts") utilizes both in its work. In fact, a "complete act of thought" also will include action. Feeling motivates thought, which formulates ideas,…

  18. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  19. Intranasal immunization of mice with recombinant Streptococcus gordonii expressing NadA of Neisseria meningitidis induces systemic bactericidal antibodies and local IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciabattini, Annalisa; Giomarelli, Barbara; Parigi, Riccardo; Chiavolini, Damiana; Pettini, Elena; Aricò, Beatrice; Giuliani, Marzia M; Santini, Laura; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni

    2008-08-05

    NadA and NhhA, two surface proteins of serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis identified as candidate vaccine antigens, were expressed on the surface of the human oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus gordonii. Recombinant strains were used to immunize BALB/c mice by the intranasal route and the local and systemic immune response was assessed. Mice were inoculated with recombinant bacteria administered alone or with LTR72, a partially inactivated mutant of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, as a mucosal adjuvant. Intranasal immunization with live bacteria expressing NadA induced a significant serum antibody response, with a prevalence of the IgG2a subclass, bactericidal activity in the sera of 71% of animals, and a NadA-specific IgA response in nasal and bronchoalveolar lavages. A formalin-inactivated recombinant strain of S. gordonii expressing NadA was also administered intranasally, inducing a systemic and mucosal humoral response comparable to that of live bacteria. The administration of recombinant bacteria with the mucosal adjuvant LTR72 stimulated a stronger systemic antibody response, protective in 85% of sera, while did not increase the local IgA response. Recombinant S. gordonii expressing NhhA induced a systemic but not mucosal antibody response. These data support the role of NadA as vaccine candidate against serogroup B meningococci, and the use of S. gordonii as vector for intranasal vaccination.

  20. Translocation of gut flora and its role in sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vaishnavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial translocation is the invasion of indigenous intestinal bacteria through the gut mucosa to normally sterile tissues and the internal organs. Sometimes instead of bacteria, inflammatory compounds are responsible for clinical symptoms as in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. The difference between sepsis and SIRS is that pathogenic bacteria are isolated from patients with sepsis but not with those of SIRS. Bacterial translocation occurs more frequently in patients with intestinal obstruction and in immunocompromised patients and is the cause of subsequent sepsis. Factors that can trigger bacterial translocation from the gut are host immune deficiencies and immunosuppression, disturbances in normal ecological balance of gut, mucosal barrier permeability, obstructive jaundice, stress, etc. Bacterial translocation occurs through the transcellular and the paracellular pathways and can be measured both directly by culture of mesenteric lymph nodes and indirectly by using labeled bacteria, peripheral blood culture, detection of microbial DNA or endotoxin and urinary excretion of non-metabolisable sugars. Bacterial translocation may be a normal phenomenon occurring on frequent basis in healthy individuals without any deleterious consequences. But when the immune system is challenged extensively, it breaks down and results in septic complications at different sites away from the main focus. The factors released from the gut and carried in the mesenteric lymphatics but not in the portal blood are enough to cause multi-organ failure. Thus, bacterial translocation may be a promoter of sepsis but not the initiator. This paper reviews literature on the translocation of gut flora and its role in causing sepsis.

  1. Interactions of gut microbiota with functional food components and nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laparra, J M; Sanz, Y

    2010-03-01

    The human gut is populated by an array of bacterial species, which develop important metabolic and immune functions, with a marked effect on the nutritional and health status of the host. Dietary component also play beneficial roles beyond basic nutrition, leading to the development of the functional food concept and nutraceuticals. Prebiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and phytochemicals are the most well characterized dietary bioactive compounds. The beneficial effects of prebiotics mainly relay on their influence on the gut microbiota composition and their ability to generate fermentation products (short-chain fatty acids) with diverse biological roles. PUFAs include the omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, whose balance may influence diverse aspects of immunity and metabolism. Moreover, interactions between PUFAs and components of the gut microbiota may also influence their biological roles. Phytochemicals are bioactive non-nutrient plant compounds, which have raised interest because of their potential effects as antioxidants, antiestrogenics, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and anticarcinogenics. However, the bioavailability and effects of polyphenols greatly depend on their transformation by components of the gut microbiota. Phytochemicals and their metabolic products may also inhibit pathogenic bacteria while stimulate the growth of beneficial bacteria, exerting prebiotic-like effects. Therefore, the intestinal microbiota is both a target for nutritional intervention and a factor influencing the biological activity of other food compounds acquired orally. This review focuses on the reciprocal interactions between the gut microbiota and functional food components, and the consequences of these interactions on human health. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Alteration in the gut microbiota provokes susceptibility to tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargis Khan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe microbiota that resides in the gastrointestinal tract provides essential health benefits to the host. In particular, they regulate immune homeostasis. Recently, several evidences indicate that alteration in the gut microbial community can cause infectious and non-infectious diseases. Tuberculosis (TB is the most devastating disease, inflicting mortality and morbidity. It remains unexplored, whether changes in the gut microbiota can provoke or prevent TB. In the current study, we have demonstrated the antibiotics driven changes in the gut microbial composition and their impact on the survival of Mtb in the lungs, liver and spleen of infected mice, compared to those with intact microbiota. Interestingly, dysbiosis of microbes showed significant increase in the bacterial burden in lungs and dissemination of Mtb to spleen and liver. Further, elevation in the number of Tregs and decline in the pool of IFN-γ and TNF-α releasing CD4 T cells was noticed. Interestingly, fecal transplantation in the gut microbiota disrupted animals exhibited improved Th1 immunity and lesser Tregs population. Importantly, these animals displayed reduced severity to Mtb infection. This study for the first time demonstrated the novel role of gut microbes in the susceptibility to TB and its prevention by microbial implants. In future, microbial therapies may help in treating patients suffering from TB.

  3. Understanding the role of gut microbiome in metabolic disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Yolanda; Olivares, Marta; Moya-Pérez, Ángela; Agostoni, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota structure, dynamics, and function result from interactions with environmental and host factors, which jointly influence the communication between the gut and peripheral tissues, thereby contributing to health programming and disease risk. Incidence of both type-1 and type-2 diabetes has increased during the past decades, suggesting that there have been changes in the interactions between predisposing genetic and environmental factors. Animal studies show that gut microbiota and its genome (microbiome) influence alterations in energy balance (increased energy harvest) and immunity (inflammation and autoimmunity), leading to metabolic dysfunction (e.g., insulin resistance and deficiency). Thus, although they have different origins, both disorders are linked by the association of the gut microbiota with the immune-metabolic axis. Human studies have also revealed shifts in microbiome signatures in diseased subjects as compared with controls, and a few of them precede the development of these disorders. These studies contribute to pinpointing specific microbiome components and functions (e.g., butyrate-producing bacteria) that can protect against both disorders. These could exert protective roles by strengthening gut barrier function and regulating inflammation, as alterations in these are a pathophysiological feature of both disorders, constituting common targets for future preventive approaches.

  4. Molecular Tools for Investigating the Gut Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Christophe

    The “microbial world within us” (Zoetendal et al., 2006) is populated by a complex society of indigenous microorganisms that feature different “ethnic” populations. Those microbial cells thriving within us are estimated to outnumber human body cells by a factor of ten to one. Insights into the relation between the intestinal microbial community and its host have been gained through gnotobiology. Indeed, the influence of the gut microbiota upon human development, physiology, immunity, and nutrition has been inferred by comparing gnotoxenic and axenic murine models (Hooper et al., 1998, 2002, 2003; Hooper and Gordon, 2001).

  5. Composition of the gut microbiota modulates the severity of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarino, Nicolas F; LeCleir, Gary R; Denny, Joshua E; Dearth, Stephen P; Harding, Christopher L; Sloan, Sarah S; Gribble, Jennifer L; Campagna, Shawn R; Wilhelm, Steven W; Schmidt, Nathan W

    2016-02-23

    Plasmodium infections result in clinical presentations that range from asymptomatic to severe malaria, resulting in ∼1 million deaths annually. Despite this toll on humanity, the factors that determine disease severity remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the gut microbiota of mice influences the pathogenesis of malaria. Genetically similar mice from different commercial vendors, which exhibited differences in their gut bacterial community, had significant differences in parasite burden and mortality after infection with multiple Plasmodium species. Germfree mice that received cecal content transplants from "resistant" or "susceptible" mice had low and high parasite burdens, respectively, demonstrating the gut microbiota shaped the severity of malaria. Among differences in the gut flora were increased abundances of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in resistant mice. Susceptible mice treated with antibiotics followed by yogurt made from these bacterial genera displayed a decreased parasite burden. Consistent with differences in parasite burden, resistant mice exhibited an elevated humoral immune response compared with susceptible mice. Collectively, these results identify the composition of the gut microbiota as a previously unidentified risk factor for severe malaria and modulation of the gut microbiota (e.g., probiotics) as a potential treatment to decrease parasite burden.

  6. Impact of probiotics on colonizing microbiota of the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Mary Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Although precise mechanisms responsible for all demonstrations of probiotic health benefits are not known, many lines of evidence suggest that probiotics function through direct or indirect impact on colonizing microbiota of the gut. Probiotics can directly influence colonizing microbes through multiple mechanisms, including the production of inhibitory compounds (bacteriocins, short chain fatty acids, and others), by producing substrates that might promote the growth of colonizing microbes (secreted exopolysaccharides, vitamins, fatty acids, sugars from undigested carbohydrates and others), and by promoting immune responses against specific microbes. Indirectly, probiotics can influence colonizing microbes by inhibiting attachment through stimulated mucin production, reinforcing gut barrier effects, and downregulation of gut inflammation, thereby promoting microbes that are associated with a healthier gut physiology. Although the value of targeted changes in populations of gut bacteria is a matter of debate, increased levels of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus in the gut correlate with numerous health endpoints. Microbiota changes due to probiotic intake include increased numbers of related phylotypes, decreasing pathogens and their toxins, altering bacterial community structure to enhance evenness, stabilizing bacterial communities when perturbed (eg, with antibiotics), or promoting a more rapid recovery from a perturbation. Further research will provide insight into the degree of permanence of probiotic-induced changes, although research to date suggests that continued probiotic consumption is needed for sustained impact.

  7. Long term effect of gut microbiota transfer on diabetes development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jian; Narasimhan, Sukanya; Marchesi, Julian R; Benson, Andrew; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2014-09-01

    The composition of the gut microbiome represents a very important environmental factor that influences the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have previously shown that MyD88-deficient non-obese diabetic (MyD88-/-NOD) mice, that were protected from T1D development, had a different composition of gut microbiota compared to wild type NOD mice. The aim of our study was to investigate whether this protection could be transferred. We demonstrate that transfer of gut microbiota from diabetes-protected MyD88-deficient NOD mice, reduced insulitis and significantly delayed the onset of diabetes. Gut bacteria from MyD88-deficient mice, administered over a 3-week period, starting at 4 weeks of age, stably altered the family composition of the gut microbiome, with principally Lachnospiraceae and Clostridiaceae increased and Lactobacillaceae decreased. The transferred mice had a higher concentration of IgA and TGFβ in the lumen that was accompanied by an increase in CD8(+)CD103(+) and CD8αβ T cells in the lamina propria of the large intestine. These data indicate not only that gut bacterial composition can be altered after the neonatal/weaning period, but that the composition of the microbiome affects the mucosal immune system and can delay the development of autoimmune diabetes. This result has important implications for the development of probiotic treatment for T1D.

  8. Local applications of GM-CSF induce the recruitment of immune cells in cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Pascale; Doyen, Jean; Capelle, Xavier; Arafa, Mohammad; Renoux, Virginie; Bisig, Bettina; Seidel, Laurence; Evrard, Brigitte; Bousarghin, Latifa; Gerday, Colette; Boniver, Jacques; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Delvenne, Philippe; Jacobs, Nathalie

    2010-08-01

    Quantitative alterations of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in (pre)neoplastic lesions of the uterine cervix associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection suggest a diminished capacity to capture viral antigens and to induce a protective immune response. To test whether a cervical application of GM-CSF could restore an immune response against HPV in women with cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), we performed two clinical trials with 11 healthy women and 15 patients with LSIL. GM-CSF applications were well tolerated in all enrolled women, and no difference in toxicity between the treated and placebo groups was observed during the follow-up (until 30 months). Interestingly, in the GM-CSF treated group, a significant increase of APC and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte infiltration was observed in the cervical biopsies with no change in regulatory T cell numbers. All the HPV16(+) patients exhibited an immune response against HPV16 after GM-CSF applications, as shown by NK and/or T cells producing IFN-gamma whereas no cellular immune response was observed before the treatment. Moreover, the anti-virus-like particles antibody titers also increased after the treatment. These encouraging results obtained from a limited number of subjects justify further study on the therapeutic effect of APC in cervical (pre)neoplastic lesions.

  9. THE ROLE OF GENETIC DETERMINANTS AND DISORDERS IN SYSTEMIC AND LOCAL IMMUNITY IN THE ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS OF HERPETIC ECZEMA (KAPOSI'S ECZEMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Stadnikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an analysis of the literature data on the etiology and pathogenesis  of Herpetic Eczema (Kaposi's Eczema. Modern views on the complex genetic and phenotypic determinants of disease, reflecting the complex interactions between the skin and the immune system. Along with the general regularities characteristic of Herpetic Eczema in sufficient detail the reasons of infringements of functioning of the epidermal skin barrier, which contribute to an easier penetration of the Herpes Simplex  Virus in the skin and its binding  to cellular receptors in the implementation of the infectious process. The effect of systemic and local immunity, namely, changes in T-cell and interferon system in the development of the pathological process.

  10. In vivo imaging and genetic analysis link bacterial motility and symbiosis in the zebrafish gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, John F.; Mahowald, Michael A.; Goodman, Andrew L.; Trent, Chad M.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2007-01-01

    Complex microbial communities reside within the intestines of humans and other vertebrates. Remarkably little is known about how these microbial consortia are established in various locations within the gut, how members of these consortia behave within their dynamic ecosystems, or what microbial factors mediate mutually beneficial host–microbial interactions. Using a gnotobiotic zebrafish–Pseudomonas aeruginosa model, we show that the transparency of this vertebrate species, coupled with methods for raising these animals under germ-free conditions can be used to monitor microbial movement and localization within the intestine in vivo and in real time. Germ-free zebrafish colonized with isogenic P. aeruginosa strains containing deletions of genes related to motility and pathogenesis revealed that loss of flagellar function results in attenuation of evolutionarily conserved host innate immune responses but not conserved nutrient responses. These results demonstrate the utility of gnotobiotic zebrafish in defining the behavior and localization of bacteria within the living vertebrate gut, identifying bacterial genes that affect these processes, and assessing the impact of these genes on host–microbial interactions. PMID:17456593

  11. Gut pathogens: invaders and turncoats in a complex cosmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermon-Taylor, John

    2009-02-03

    Intestinal infections and diarrhoeal diseases of humans are under-reported yet each account worldwide for more deaths than those from Tuberculosis. For external gut pathogens to do this they have to penetrate, survive and prosper in an established and defended ecosystem comprising the human gut with a massive immune system, a structured tight mucosal lining and a lumen densely occupied by a huge community of diverse bacteria adapted to their environment and optimised in a balanced and mutually beneficial relationship with its host.

  12. Gut pathogens: invaders and turncoats in a complex cosmos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermon-Taylor John

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intestinal infections and diarrhoeal diseases of humans are under-reported yet each account worldwide for more deaths than those from Tuberculosis. For external gut pathogens to do this they have to penetrate, survive and prosper in an established and defended ecosystem comprising the human gut with a massive immune system, a structured tight mucosal lining and a lumen densely occupied by a huge community of diverse bacteria adapted to their environment and optimised in a balanced and mutually beneficial relationship with its host.

  13. Interleukin-21 triggers effector cell responses in the gut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniela; De; Nitto; Massimiliano; Sarra; Francesco; Pallone; Giovanni; Monteleone

    2010-01-01

    In the gut of patients with Crohn's disease and patients with ulcerative colitis,the major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases(IBD) in humans,the tissue-damaging immune response is mediated by an active cross-talk between immune and non-immune cells.Accumulating evidence indicates also that cytokines produced by these cells play a major role in initiating and shaping this pathologic process.One such cytokine seems to be interleukin(IL)-21,a member of the common γ-chainreceptor family.IL-21 is produced in e...

  14. Early nutrition and immunity - progress and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calder, PC; Krauss-Etschmann, S; de Jong, EC

    2006-01-01

    and factors affecting the development of atopic disease; factors influencing the maturation of dendritic cells and the development of regulatory T cells; the influence of gut microflora on immunity, allergic sensitization and infectious disease; the role of nutrition in preventing necrotizing enterocolitis...... immune systems. The introduction of formula and of solid foods exposes the infant to novel food antigens and also affects the gut flora. Nutrition may be the source of antigens to which the immune system must become tolerant, provide factors, including nutrients, that themselves might modulate immune...... maturation and responses, and provide factors that influence intestinal flora, which in turn will affect antigen exposure, immune maturation and immune responses. Through these mechanisms it is possible that nutrition early in life might affect later immune competence, the ability to mount an appropriate...

  15. STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF COMPLEX TREATMENT USING IMMUNOMODULATORS ON THE STATE OF LOCAL IMMUNITY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC GENERALIZED PERIODONTITIS I-II SEVERITY ON ENTEROBIASIS

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Due to the high prevalence of chronic generalized periodontitis there is a need for a broader analysis of the causes and development of diseases, as well as the search for effective treatments for etiopathogenetical. The aim of this work was to study the effect of newly developed therapy on local immunity in patients CGP I and II severity with enterobiasis. Material & methods. The main group consisted of 32 people with СGP I degree and 60 people with СGP II severity who were...

  16. Human symbionts inject and neutralize antibacterial toxins to persist in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Aaron G; Bao, Yiqiao; Whitney, John C; Bobay, Louis-Marie; Xavier, Joao B; Schofield, Whitman B; Barry, Natasha A; Russell, Alistair B; Tran, Bao Q; Goo, Young Ah; Goodlett, David R; Ochman, Howard; Mougous, Joseph D; Goodman, Andrew L

    2016-03-29

    The human gut microbiome is a dynamic and densely populated microbial community that can provide important benefits to its host. Cooperation and competition for nutrients among its constituents only partially explain community composition and interpersonal variation. Notably, certain human-associated Bacteroidetes--one of two major phyla in the gut--also encode machinery for contact-dependent interbacterial antagonism, but its impact within gut microbial communities remains unknown. Here we report that prominent human gut symbionts persist in the gut through continuous attack on their immediate neighbors. Our analysis of just one of the hundreds of species in these communities reveals 12 candidate antibacterial effector loci that can exist in 32 combinations. Through the use of secretome studies, in vitro bacterial interaction assays and multiple mouse models, we uncover strain-specific effector/immunity repertoires that can predict interbacterial interactions in vitro and in vivo, and find that some of these strains avoid contact-dependent killing by accumulating immunity genes to effectors that they do not encode. Effector transmission rates in live animals can exceed 1 billion events per minute per gram of colonic contents, and multiphylum communities of human gut commensals can partially protect sensitive strains from these attacks. Together, these results suggest that gut microbes can determine their interactions through direct contact. An understanding of the strategies human gut symbionts have evolved to target other members of this community may provide new approaches for microbiome manipulation.

  17. Epigenetic changes in localized gastric cancer: the role of RUNX3 in tumor progression and the immune microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarrola-Villava, Maider; Peña-Chilet, María; Mongort, Cristina; Martinez-Ciarpaglini, Carolina; Navarro, Lara; Gambardella, Valentina; Castillo, Josefa; Roselló, Susana; Navarro, Samuel; Ribas, Gloria; Cervantes, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) pathogenesis involves genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Epigenetic alterations, such as DNA methylation are considered pivotal in the inactivation of tumor-related genes. We assessed a methylation panel of 5 genes to study their association to GC progression and microsatellite instability (MSI), and studied the role of RUNX3 in GC pathogenesis and the tumor immune microenvironment. The methylation status of 47 promoter-CpG islands was studied through MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis in 35 Microsatellite stable (MSS) GC, 26 MSI, and 18 cancer-free samples (CFS), and 6 MSS GC and 4 MSI GC cell lines. We also studied RUNX3 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 40 samples, and validated differences in methylation levels between tumor, normal, and immune tissue in 14 additional samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of methylation levels revealed no distinct subgroups between MSI and MSS samples or cell lines. CFSs clustered together showing higher levels of RUNX3 methylation compared to GC samples. RUNX3 showed protein silencing in cancer and normal mucosa, compared to inflammatory peritumoural infiltrate in almost all cases, showing a non-lymphocytic predominant pattern and being correlated with epigenetic silencing. Our results show aberrant promoter's methylation in APC, CDH1, CDKN2A, MLH1 and RUNX3 associated with GC, as well as a non-lymphocytic predominant infiltrate with high expression of RUNX3. Deep study of RUNX3 inflammation signaling could help in understanding inflammation and immune activation in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27566570

  18. Organic trace mineral supplementation enhances local and systemic innate immune responses and modulates oxidative stress in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry, H; Yitbarek, A; Munyaka, P; Alizadeh, M; Cleaver, A; Camelo-Jaimes, G; Wang, P; O, K; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C

    2016-03-01

    The effect of organic trace mineral supplementation on performance, intestinal morphology, immune organ weights (bursa of Fabricius and spleen), expression of innate immune response related genes, blood heterophils/lymphocytes ratio, chemical metabolic panel, natural antibodies (IgG), and oxidative stress of broiler chickens was studied. A total of 1,080 day-old male broilers were assigned to 1 of 3 dietary treatments, which included basal diet with Monensin (control), control diet supplemented with bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD), and BMD diet supplemented with organic trace minerals (OTM). No difference in feed conversion ratio was observed among treatments; ileum histomorphological analysis showed a lower crypt depth, higher villi height/crypt depth ratio, and lower villi width in the OTM treatment compared to control. Furthermore, OTM treatment resulted in higher uric acid and lower plasma malondehaldehyde (MDA), indicating lower oxidative stress. Gene expression analysis showed that OTM treatment resulted in up-regulations of TLR2 bin the ileum, and TLR2b, TLR4, and IL-12p35 in the bursa of Fabricius, and down-regulation of TLR2b and TLR4 in the cecal tonsils. In the spleen, OTM treatment resulted in up-regulation of IL-10. In conclusion, OTM supplementation to broiler diets may have beneficial effects on intestinal development, immune system status, and survival by improving ileum histomorphological parameters, modulation of Toll-like receptors and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and decreasing level of MDA, which in conjunction could enhance health status.

  19. Molecular signaling networks in regulation of immunity and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Janne Marie; Jensen, Stina Rikke; Sørensen, Morten

    ), plays a crucial role in shaping the nature of the adaptive/memorybased immune response after encountering inflammatory compounds. In the gut, the DC is continuously exposed to microbial and dietary components that are recognized by its innate pattern recognition receptors, and the phenotype developed......The gut microbiota, host tissues, and the immune system form a complex network where extensive crosstalk and molecular interactions substantially impact the overall state of the system. Concomitantly, modulation of host immune function is recurrently a result of the interaction of complex...... and dynamic microbial communities with the immune cell compartment in the gut, and therefore the interaction between components from different gut bacteria can efficiently shape the phenotype of the immune response. A specialized antigenpresenting cell present at mucosal surfaces, the dendritic cell (DC...

  20. Impact of the gut microbiota on inflammation, obesity, and metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulangé, Claire L; Neves, Ana Luisa; Chilloux, Julien; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel

    2016-04-20

    The human gut harbors more than 100 trillion microbial cells, which have an essential role in human metabolic regulation via their symbiotic interactions with the host. Altered gut microbial ecosystems have been associated with increased metabolic and immune disorders in animals and humans. Molecular interactions linking the gut microbiota with host energy metabolism, lipid accumulation, and immunity have also been identified. However, the exact mechanisms that link specific variations in the composition of the gut microbiota with the development of obesity and metabolic diseases in humans remain obscure owing to the complex etiology of these pathologies. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about the mechanistic interactions between the gut microbiota, host energy metabolism, and the host immune system in the context of obesity and metabolic disease, with a focus on the importance of the axis that links gut microbes and host metabolic inflammation. Finally, we discuss therapeutic approaches aimed at reshaping the gut microbial ecosystem to regulate obesity and related pathologies, as well as the challenges that remain in this area.

  1. Early-Life events, including mode of delivery and type of feeding, siblings and gender, shape the developing gut microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Rocio; Makino, Hiroshi; Yavuz, Aysun Cetinyurek; Ben-Amor, Kaouther; Roelofs, Mieke; Ishikawa, Eiji; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Swinkels, Sophie; Sakai, Takafumi; Oishi, Kenji; Kushiro, Akira; Knol, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of the infant gut is believed to be critically important for a healthy growth as it influences gut maturation, metabolic, immune and brain development in early life. Understanding factors that influence this process is important, since an altered colonization has been associated with

  2. Early-Life events, including mode of delivery and type of feeding, siblings and gender, shape the developing gut microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Rocio; Makino, Hiroshi; Yavuz, Aysun Cetinyurek; Ben-Amor, Kaouther; Roelofs, Mieke; Ishikawa, Eiji; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Swinkels, Sophie; Sakai, Takafumi; Oishi, Kenji; Kushiro, Akira; Knol, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of the infant gut is believed to be critically important for a healthy growth as it influences gut maturation, metabolic, immune and brain development in early life. Understanding factors that influence this process is important, since an altered colonization has been associated with

  3. Brain-gut interactions.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaz, Bruno

    1994-01-01

    International audience; Our digestive tract has an autonomous functioning but also has a bidirectional relation with our brain known as brain-gut interactions. This communication is mediated by the autonomous nervous system, i.e., the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, with a mixed afferent and efferent component, and the circumventricular organs located outside the blood-brain barrier. The vagus nerve, known as the principal component of the parasympathetic nervous system, is a...

  4. Gut microbiota, probiotics and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Aline Corado; Bueno, Allain Amador; de Souza, Rávila Graziany Machado; Mota, João Felipe

    2014-06-17

    Diabetes is a condition of multifactorial origin, involving several molecular mechanisms related to the intestinal microbiota for its development. In type 2 diabetes, receptor activation and recognition by microorganisms from the intestinal lumen may trigger inflammatory responses, inducing the phosphorylation of serine residues in insulin receptor substrate-1, reducing insulin sensitivity. In type 1 diabetes, the lowered expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium favours a greater immune response that may result in destruction of pancreatic β cells by CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and increased expression of interleukin-17, related to autoimmunity. Research in animal models and humans has hypothesized whether the administration of probiotics may improve the prognosis of diabetes through modulation of gut microbiota. We have shown in this review that a large body of evidence suggests probiotics reduce the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, as well as increase the expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium, reducing intestinal permeability. Such effects increase insulin sensitivity and reduce autoimmune response. However, further investigations are required to clarify whether the administration of probiotics can be efficiently used for the prevention and management of diabetes.

  5. Interactions between the microbiota, immune and nervous systems in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Thomas C; Olson, Christine A; Hsiao, Elaine Y

    2017-02-01

    The diverse collection of microorganisms that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, collectively called the gut microbiota, profoundly influences many aspects of host physiology, including nutrient metabolism, resistance to infection and immune system development. Studies investigating the gut-brain axis demonstrate a critical role for the gut microbiota in orchestrating brain development and behavior, and the immune system is emerging as an important regulator of these interactions. Intestinal microbes modulate the maturation and function of tissue-resident immune cells in the CNS. Microbes also influence the activation of peripheral immune cells, which regulate responses to neuroinflammation, brain injury, autoimmunity and neurogenesis. Accordingly, both the gut microbiota and immune system are implicated in the etiopathogenesis or manifestation of neurodevelopmental, psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, such as autism spectrum disorder, depression and Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we discuss the role of CNS-resident and peripheral immune pathways in microbiota-gut-brain communication during health and neurological disease.

  6. Gut microbiota and liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minemura, Masami; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2015-02-14

    Several studies revealed that gut microbiota are associated with various human diseases, e.g., metabolic diseases, allergies, gastroenterological diseases, and liver diseases. The liver can be greatly affected by changes in gut microbiota due to the entry of gut bacteria or their metabolites into the liver through the portal vein, and the liver-gut axis is important to understand the pathophysiology of several liver diseases, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, gut microbiota play a significant role in the development of alcoholic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on these previous findings, trials using probiotics have been performed for the prevention or treatment of liver diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the changes in gut microbiota associated with various liver diseases, and we describe the therapeutic trials of probiotics for those diseases.

  7. Gut microbiota: the brain peacekeeper

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota regulates intestinal and extraintestinal homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the gut microbiota may also regulate brain function and behavior. Results from animal models indicate that disturbances in the composition and functionality of some microbiota members are associated with neurophysiological disorders, strengthening the idea of a microbiota-gut-brain axis and the role of microbiota as a peacekeeper in the brain health. Here, we review recent discoveries on t...

  8. Phylogenetic diversity, localization, and cell morphologies of members of the candidate phylum TG3 and a subphylum in the phylum Fibrobacteres, recently discovered bacterial groups dominant in termite guts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Yuichi; Deevong, Pinsurang; Hattori, Satoshi; Inoue, Tetsushi; Noda, Satoko; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Kudo, Toshiaki; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2006-10-01

    Recently we discovered two novel, deeply branching lineages in the domain Bacteria from termite guts by PCR-based analyses of 16S rRNA (Y. Hongoh, P. Deevong, T. Inoue, S. Moriya, S. Trakulnaleamsai, M. Ohkuma, C. Vongkaluang, N. Noparatnaraporn, and T. Kudo, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71:6590-6599, 2005). Here, we report on the specific detection of these bacteria, the candidate phylum TG3 (Termite Group 3) and a subphylum in the phylum Fibrobacteres, by fluorescence in situ hybridization in the guts of the wood-feeding termites Microcerotermes sp. and Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Both bacterial groups were detected almost exclusively from the luminal fluid of the dilated portion in the hindgut. Each accounted for approximately 10% of the total prokaryotic cells, constituting the second-most dominant groups in the whole-gut microbiota. The detected cells of both groups were in undulate or vibroid forms and apparently resembled small spirochetes. The cell sizes were 0.2 to 0.4 by 1.3 to 6.0 microm and 0.2 to 0.3 by 1.3 to 4.9 microm in the TG3 and Fibrobacteres, respectively. Using PCR screenings with specific primers, we found that both groups are distributed among various termites. The obtained clones formed monophyletic clusters that were delineated by the host genus rather than by the geographic distance, implying a robust association between these bacteria and host termites. TG3 clones were also obtained from a cockroach gut, lake sediment, rice paddy soil, and deep-sea sediments. Our results suggest that the TG3 and Fibrobacteres bacteria are autochthonous gut symbionts of various termites and that the TG3 members are also widely distributed among various other environments.

  9. Towards a realistic F-theory GUT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, James C.; King, Stephen F.; Leontaris, George K.; Ross, Graham G.

    2012-04-01

    We consider semi-local F-theory GUTs arising from a single E 8 point of local enhancement, leading to simple GUT groups based on E 6, SO(10) and SU(5) with SU(3), SU(4) and SU(5) spectral covers, respectively. Assuming the minimal {{Z}_2} monodromy, we determine the homology classes and the associated spectra after flux breaking for each case. Using these results we construct an E 6 based model that demonstrates, for the first time, that it is possible to construct a phenomenologically viable model which leads to the MSSM at low energies. The exotics that result from flux breaking all get a large mass when singlet fields acquire vacuum expectation values driven by D- and F-flatness. Due to the underlying GUT symmetry and the U(1)s descending from E 8, bare baryon- and lepton-number violating terms are forbidden up to and including dimension 5. As a result nucleon decay is naturally suppressed below present bounds. The μ-term is generated by non-perturbative U(1) breaking effects. After including the effect of flux and instanton corrections acceptable quark and charged lepton masses and mixing angles can be obtained. Neutrinos get a mass from the see-saw mechanism through their coupling to singlet neutrinos that acquire large Majorana mass as a result of the monodromy.

  10. Breaking Down the Barriers: The Gut Microbiome, Intestinal Permeability and Stress-related Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Kelly

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting pre-clinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behaviour by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a leaky gut may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signalling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the central nervous system (CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function.

  11. Gut microbiota and environment in patients with major burns – a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kentaro; Ogura, Hiroshi; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Matsushima, Asako; Hayakawa, Koichi; Ikegawa, Hitoshi; Tasaki, Osamu; Kuwagata, Yasuyuki; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    The gut is an important target organ after severe insult. Gut microbiota have an important role in immune response. However, the gut microbiota and environment have not been clarified in patients with burns. Therefore, we serially evaluated the gut microbiota and environment in patients with major burns. Fecal samples from five patients with major burns were measured for quantitative evaluation of the gut microbiota. In the four survivors of major burns, the numbers of beneficial bacteria, especially those of total obligate anaerobes and Bifidobacterium, initially decreased, but then increased as the condition of the survivors improved. By contrast, the numbers severely decreased in the non-survivor as gut failure and sepsis progressed. The number of pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas and Candida did not continue to increase in the survivors, whereas in the non-survivor the number increased and continued to higher counts. Short-chain fatty acids such as propionic and butyric acids decreased to lower-than-normal levels but tended to increase after recovery in the survivors. The levels remained below normal in the non-survivor. The gut microbiota and environment are severely altered in patients with major burns. Consequently, abnormal gut conditions may have an influence on the systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. A novel treatment to maintain the gut microbiota and environment is expected in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Perinatal Programming of Asthma: The Role of Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan B. Azad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal programming, a dominant theory for the origins of cardiovascular disease, proposes that environmental stimuli influence developmental pathways during critical periods of prenatal and postnatal development, inducing permanent changes in metabolism. In this paper, we present evidence for the perinatal programming of asthma via the intestinal microbiome. While epigenetic mechanisms continue to provide new explanations for the programming hypothesis of asthma development, it is increasingly apparent that the intestinal microbiota plays an independent and potentially interactive role. Commensal gut bacteria are essential to immune system development, and exposures disrupting the infant gut microbiota have been linked to asthma. This paper summarizes the recent findings that implicate caesarean delivery, breastfeeding, perinatal stress, probiotics, and antibiotics as modifiers of infant gut microbiota in the development of asthma.

  13. Differential effects of myelin basic protein-activated Th1 and Th2 cells on the local immune microenvironment of injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Guo; Shi, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yue-Juan; Xie, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, An-You; Jiang, Zheng-Song; Feng, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Chen; Xi, Jin; Lü, He-Zuo

    2016-03-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) activated T cells (MBP-T) play an important role in the damage and repair process of the central nervous system (CNS). However, whether these cells play a beneficial or detrimental role is still a matter of debate. Although some studies showed that MBP-T cells are mainly helper T (Th) cells, their subtypes are still not very clear. One possible explanation for MBP-T immunization leading to conflicting results may be the different subtypes of T cells are responsible for distinct effects. In this study, the Th1 and Th2 type MBP-T cells (MBP-Th1 and -Th2) were polarized in vitro, and their effects on the local immune microenvironment and tissue repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) after adoptive immunization were investigated. In MBP-Th1 cell transferred rats, the high levels of pro-inflammatory cells (Th1 cells and M1 macrophages) and cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, -β, IL-1β) were detected in the injured spinal cord; however, the anti-inflammatory cells (Th2 cells, regulatory T cells, and M2 macrophages) and cytokines (IL-4, -10, and -13) were found in MBP-Th2 cell transferred animals. MBP-Th2 cell transfer resulted in decreased lesion volume, increased myelination of axons, and preservation of neurons. This was accompanied by significant locomotor improvement. These results indicate that MBP-Th2 adoptive transfer has beneficial effects on the injured spinal cord, in which the increased number of Th2 cells may alter the local microenvironment from one primarily populated by Th1 and M1 cells to another dominated by Th2, Treg, and M2 cells and is conducive for SCI repair.

  14. Claudin-4 Undergoes Age-Dependent Change in Cellular Localization on Pig Jejunal Villous Epithelial Cells, Independent of Bacterial Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Alex Pasternak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs. In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases.

  15. A local reaction at or near injection site: case definition and guidelines for collection, analysis, and presentation of immunization safety data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidudu, Jane; Kohl, Katrin S; Halperin, Scott; Hammer, Sandra Jo; Heath, Paul T; Hennig, Renald; Hoet, Bernard; Rothstein, Edward; Schuind, Anne; Varricchio, Frederick; Walop, Wikke

    2008-12-09

    The need for developing a case definition and guidelines for a local reaction at or near the injection site, methods for the development of the case definition and guidelines as an adverse event following immunization as well as the rationale for selected decisions about the case definition for a local reaction at or near the injection site are explained in the Preamble section. The case definition is structured in 2 levels of diagnostic certainty: level 1 includes any description of morphological or physiological change at or near the injection site that is described or identified by a healthcare provider. Level 2 is any description of morphological or physiological change at or near injection site that is described by any other person. In Guidelines section, the working group recommends to enable meaningful and standardized data collection, analysis, and presentation of information about a local reaction at or near the injection site. However, implementation of all guidelines might not be possible in all settings. The availability of information may vary depending upon resources, geographic region, and whether the source of information is a prospectively designed clinical trial, a post-marketing surveillance or epidemiologic study, or an individual report of a local reaction at injection site.

  16. A systematic review of probiotics as a potential intervention to restore gut health in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Natalie L; Moneyham, Linda D; Alexandrov, Anne W

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics have beneficial effects on the gut in numerous conditions. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the current literature on probiotics used in chronic illnesses exhibiting similar pathology seen in HIV gut dysfunction, in order to make recommendations for their use to promote and restore healing of the gut with subsequent reduction of ongoing inflammation caused by microbial translocation. A review of the literature was performed, focusing on probiotics as an intervention to improve gut health. Key words were searched in PubMed and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. The literature reviewed was limited to clinical trials, meta-analyses, and practice guidelines. The review provided evidence that probiotics were supportive in modulating aspects of gut physiology, barrier integrity, and immune function. Probiotic use is a supportive adjunct therapy, worthy of consideration and further research in persons infected with HIV.

  17. Modulation of Gut Microbiota-Brain Axis by Probiotics, Prebiotics, and Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofei; Cao, Shangqing; Zhang, Xuewu

    2015-09-16

    There exists a bidirectional communication system between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain. Increasing evidence shows that gut microbiota can play a critical role in this communication; thus, the concept of a gut microbiota and brain axis is emerging. Here, we review recent findings in the relationship between intestinal microbes and brain function, such as anxiety, depression, stress, autism, learning, and memory. We highlight the advances in modulating brain development and behavior by probiotics, prebiotics, and diet through the gut microbiota-brain axis. A variety of mechanisms including immune, neural, and metabolic pathways may be involved in modulation of the gut microbiota-brain axis. We also discuss some future challenges. A deeper understanding of the relationship between the gut bacteria and their hosts is implicated in developing microbial-based therapeutic strategies for brain disorders.

  18. Kin recognition in Drosophila: the importance of ecology and gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizé, Anne; McKay, Raegan; Lewis, Zenobia

    2014-02-01

    The animal gut commonly contains a large reservoir of symbiotic microbes. Although these microbes have obvious functions in digestion and immune defence, gut microbes can also affect behaviour. Here, we explore whether gut microbiota has a role in kin recognition. We assessed whether relatedness, familiarity and food eaten during development altered copulation investment in three species of Drosophila with diverse ecologies. We found that a monandrous species exhibited true kin recognition, whereas familiarity determined kin recognition in a species living in dense aggregations. Finally, in a food generalist species, food eaten during development masked kin recognition. The effect of food type on copulation duration, in addition to the removal of this effect via antibiotic treatment, suggests the influence of bacteria associated with the gut. Our results provide the first evidence that varied ecologically determined mechanisms of kin recognition occur in Drosophila, and that gut bacteria are likely to have a key role in these mechanisms.

  19. Fiber effects in nutrition and gut health in pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Erik Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fiber is associated with impaired nutrient utilization and reduced net energy values. However, fiber has to be included in the diet to maintain normal physiological functions in the digestive tract. Moreover, the negative impact of dietary fiber will be determined by the fiber properties and may differ considerably between fiber sources. Various techniques can be applied to enhance nutritional value and utilization of available feed resources. In addition, the extent of fiber utilization is affected by the age of the pig and the pig breed. The use of potential prebiotic effects of dietary fiber is an attractive way to stimulate gut health and thereby minimize the use of anti-microbial growth promoters. Inclusion of soluble non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) in the diet can stimulate the growth of commensal gut microbes. Inclusion of NSP from chicory results in changes in gut micro-environment and gut morphology of pigs, while growth performance remains unaffected and digestibility was only marginally reduced. The fermentation products and pH in digesta responded to diet type and were correlated with shifts in the microbiota. Interestingly, fiber intake will have an impact on the expression of intestinal epithelial heat-shock proteins in the pig. Heat-shock proteins have an important physiological role in the gut and carry out crucial housekeeping functions in order to maintain the mucosal barrier integrity. Thus, there are increasing evidence showing that fiber can have prebiotic effects in pigs due to interactions with the gut micro-environment and the gut associated immune system.

  20. Embracing the gut microbiota: the new frontier for inflammatory and infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Elsen, Lieke WJ; Poyntz, Hazel C; Weyrich, Laura S; Young, Wayne; Forbes-Blom, Elizabeth E

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota provides essential signals for the development and appropriate function of the immune system. Through this critical contribution to immune fitness, the gut microbiota has a key role in health and disease. Recent advances in the technological applications to study microbial communities and their functions have contributed to a rapid increase in host–microbiota research. Although it still remains difficult to define a so-called ‘normal' or ‘healthy' microbial composition, alterations in the gut microbiota have been shown to influence the susceptibility of the host to different diseases. Current translational research combined with recent technological and computational advances have enabled in-depth study of the link between microbial composition and immune function, addressing the interplay between the gut microbiota and immune responses. As such, beneficial modulation of the gut microbiota is a promising clinical target for many prevalent diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, metabolic abnormalities such as obesity, reduced insulin sensitivity and low-grade inflammation, allergy and protective immunity against infections.

  1. Depletion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells can promote local immunity to suppress tumor growth in benzo[a]pyrene-induced forestomach carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ling Chen; Jung-Hua Fang; Ming-Derg Lai; Yan-Shen Shan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the distribution of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in different lymphoid tissues and its local enhancement on tumor growth before and after depletion of CD4+CD25+ Tregs.METHODS: Female ICR mice were gavaged with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) to induce forestomach carcinoma. CD4+CD25+ Tregs were intraperitoneally depleted with monoclonal antibody PC61. These mice were divided into BaP-only, BaP+IgG, BaP+PC61, and control groups. The forestomach of mice was dissected for histological analysis, and tunnel test was performed for apoptosis of tumor cells. CD4+CD25+ Tregs were sorted from different lymphoid tissues and expression of Foxp3, IL-10, and chemokine receptors was analyzed by flow cytometry, semi-quantitative and real-time polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS: The mice gavaged with only BaP showed increased forestomach papilloma and carcinoma at wk 16 and 32. The proportion of CD4+CD25+ Tregs was significantly higher in peri-stomach regional lymph nodes than in other lymphoid tissues. These CD4+CD25+ Tregs in regional lymph nodes expressed higher levels of Foxp3 and IL-10, enriched in the CD62L-subset, and CCR1 and CCR5 chemokine receptors. In mice gavaged with BaP+PC61, the number of tumor nodules and tumor volume decreased significantly with massive infiltrating cells and apoptosis of tumor cells. In the draining regional lymph nodes, the number of CD4+CD25+ Tregs also decreased significantly.CONCLUSION: Inducible and activated CD4+CD25+ Tregs in the draining regional lymph nodes suppress host local immunity during tumor growth. Depletion of CD4+CD25+ Tregs can promote host local immunity to suppress tumor growth.

  2. Metabolic Interaction of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Jong Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As a barrier, gut commensal microbiota can protect against potential pathogenic microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. Crosstalk between gut microbes and immune cells promotes human intestinal homeostasis. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota has been implicated in the development of many human metabolic disorders like obesity, hepatic steatohepatitis, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes (T2D. Certain microbes, such as butyrate-producing bacteria, are lower in T2D patients. The transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome, but the exact pathogenesis remains unclear. H. pylori in the human stomach cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancers. H. pylori infection also induces insulin resistance and has been defined as a predisposing factor to T2D development. Gastric and fecal microbiota may have been changed in H. pylori-infected persons and mice to promote gastric inflammation and specific diseases. However, the interaction of H. pylori and gut microbiota in regulating host metabolism also remains unknown. Further studies aim to identify the H. pylori-microbiota-host metabolism axis and to test if H. pylori eradication or modification of gut microbiota can improve the control of human metabolic disorders.

  3. Starches, resistant starches, the gut microflora and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, A R; Brown, I L; Topping, D L

    2000-03-01

    Starches are important as energy sources for humans and also for their interactions with the gut microflora throughout the digestive tact. Largely, those interactions promote human health. In the mouth, less gelatinised starches may lower risk of cariogensis. In the large bowel, starches which have escaped small intestinal digestion (resistant starch), together with proteins, other undigested carbohydrates and endogenous secretions are fermented by the resident microflora. The resulting short chain fatty acids contribute substantially to the normal physiological functions of the viscera. Specific types of resistant starch (e.g. the chemically modified starches used in the food industry) may be used to manipulate the gut bacteria and their products (including short chain fatty acids) so as to optimise health. In the upper gut, these starches may assist in the transport of probiotic organisms thus promoting the immune response and suppressing potential pathogens. However, it appears unlikely that current probiotic organisms can be used to modulate large bowel short chain fatty acids in adults although resistant starch and other prebiotics can do so. Suggestions that starch may exacerbate certain conditions (such as ulcerative colitis) through stimulating the growth of certain pathogenic organisms appear to be unfounded. Short chain fatty acids may modulate tissue levels and effects of growth factors in the gut and so modify gut development and risk of serious disease, including colo-rectal cancer. However, information on the relationship between starches and the microflora is relatively sparse and substantial opportunities exist both for basic research and food product development.

  4. Gut Microbial Alterations Associated With Protection From Autoimmune Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukiko K; Metea, Christina; Karstens, Lisa; Asquith, Mark; Gruner, Henry; Moscibrocki, Cathleen; Lee, Iris; Brislawn, Colin J; Jansson, Janet K; Rosenbaum, James T; Lin, Phoebe

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the contribution of the gut microbiota to the pathogenesis of uveitis. Experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) in B10.RIII mice was induced using interphotoreceptor binding protein peptide. Mice were treated with oral or intraperitoneal (IP) antibiotics. Effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T lymphocytes were identified using flow cytometry; 16S rRNA gene sequencing and qPCR were performed on gastrointestinal (GI) contents. Broad-spectrum (four antibiotics given simultaneously) oral, but not IP, antibiotics reduced mean uveitis clinical scores significantly compared with water-treated animals (0.5 vs. 3.0, P 0.99 for IP). Both oral metronidazole (P = 0.02) and vancomycin (P uveitis scores. Oral broad-spectrum antibiotics increased Tregs in the GI lamina propria of EAU animals at 1 week, and in extraintestinal lymphoid tissues later, whereas Teff and inflammatory cytokines were reduced. 16S sequencing of GI contents revealed altered microbiota in immunized mice compared with nonimmunized mice, and microbial diversity clustering in EAU mice treated with uveitis-protective antibiotics. Experimental autoimmune uveitis mice also demonstrated gut microbial diversity clustering associated with clinical score severity. Oral antibiotics modulate the severity of inducible EAU by increasing Tregs in the gut and extraintestinal tissues, as well as decreasing effector T cells and cytokines. 16S sequencing suggests that there may be protective and, conversely, potentially uveitogenic, gut microbiota. These findings may lead to a better understanding of how uveitis can be treated or prevented by modulating the gut microbiome.

  5. Gut microbiota, the pharmabiotics they produce and host health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Elaine; Cryan, John F; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; Dinan, Timothy G; Stanton, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    A healthy gut microbiota plays many crucial functions in the host, being involved in the correct development and functioning of the immune system, assisting in the digestion of certain foods and in the production of health-beneficial bioactive metabolites or 'pharmabiotics'. These include bioactive lipids (including SCFA and conjugated linoleic acid) antimicrobials and exopolysaccharides in addition to nutrients, including vitamins B and K. Alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota and reductions in microbial diversity are highlighted in many disease states, possibly rendering the host susceptible to infection and consequently negatively affecting innate immune function. Evidence is also emerging of microbially produced molecules with neuroactive functions that can have influences across the brain-gut axis. For example, γ-aminobutyric acid, serotonin, catecholamines and acetylcholine may modulate neural signalling within the enteric nervous system, when released in the intestinal lumen and consequently signal brain function and behaviour. Dietary supplementation with probiotics and prebiotics are the most widely used dietary adjuncts to modulate the gut microbiota. Furthermore, evidence is emerging of the interactions between administered microbes and dietary substrates, leading to the production of pharmabiotics, which may directly or indirectly positively influence human health.

  6. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Metagenomic Surveys of Gut Microbiota

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahul Shubhra Mandal; Sudipto Saha; Santasabuj Das

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiota of higher vertebrates is host-specific. The number and diversity of the organisms residing within the gut ecosystem are defined by physiological and environmental factors, such as host genotype, habitat, and diet. Recently, culture-independent sequencing techniques have added a new dimension to the study of gut microbiota and the challenge to analyze the large volume of sequencing data is increasingly addressed by the development of novel computational tools and methods. Interestingly, gut microbiota maintains a constant relative abundance at operational tax-onomic unit (OTU) levels and altered bacterial abundance has been associated with complex diseases such as symptomatic atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and colorectal cancer. Therefore, the study of gut microbial population has emerged as an important field of research in order to ulti-mately achieve better health. In addition, there is a spontaneous, non-linear, and dynamic interac-tion among different bacterial species residing in the gut. Thus, predicting the influence of perturbed microbe–microbe interaction network on health can aid in developing novel therapeutics. Here, we summarize the population abundance of gut microbiota and its variation in different clinical states, computational tools available to analyze the pyrosequencing data, and gut microbe–microbe inter-action networks.

  8. Metagenomic Surveys of Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Shubhra Mandal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota of higher vertebrates is host-specific. The number and diversity of the organisms residing within the gut ecosystem are defined by physiological and environmental factors, such as host genotype, habitat, and diet. Recently, culture-independent sequencing techniques have added a new dimension to the study of gut microbiota and the challenge to analyze the large volume of sequencing data is increasingly addressed by the development of novel computational tools and methods. Interestingly, gut microbiota maintains a constant relative abundance at operational taxonomic unit (OTU levels and altered bacterial abundance has been associated with complex diseases such as symptomatic atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and colorectal cancer. Therefore, the study of gut microbial population has emerged as an important field of research in order to ultimately achieve better health. In addition, there is a spontaneous, non-linear, and dynamic interaction among different bacterial species residing in the gut. Thus, predicting the influence of perturbed microbe–microbe interaction network on health can aid in developing novel therapeutics. Here, we summarize the population abundance of gut microbiota and its variation in different clinical states, computational tools available to analyze the pyrosequencing data, and gut microbe–microbe interaction networks.

  9. First Foods and Gut Microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Bahl, Martin Iain; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2017-01-01

    microbiota development. This perspective paper summarizes the currently very few studies addressing the effects of complementary diet on gut microbiota, and highlights the recent finding that transition to family foods greatly impacts the development of gut microbial diversity. Further, we discuss potential...

  10. Probiotics and gut health:A special focus on liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia; Wilson; Gratz; Hannu; Mykkanen; Hani; S; El-Nezami

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have well-established beneficial ef-fects in the management of diarrhoeal diseases.Newer evidence suggests that probiotics have the potential to reduce the risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal bacterial overgrowth after gut surgery.In liver health,the main benefits of probiotics might occur through preventing the production and/or uptake of lipopolysaccharides in the gut,and therefore reducing levels of low-grade inflammation.Specific immune stimulation by probiot...

  11. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors and stress-related alterations of gut motor function.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Over the past few decades, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways have been shown to be the main coordinators of the endocrine, behavioral, and immune responses to stress. Emerging evidence also links the activation of CRF receptors type 1 and type 2 with stress-related alterations of gut motor function. Here, we review the role of CRF receptors in both the brain and the gut as part of key mechanisms through which various stressors impact propulsive ac...

  12. Mucosal tolerance of the hookworm Ancylostoma caninum in the gut of naturally infected wild dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinoiu, Constantin C; Goullet, Mark S; Constantinoiu, Elena C; Scott, Jenni L

    2015-07-27

    Ancylostoma caninum is a very pathogenic hookworm that locates in the small intestine of the dog and other canid species. The mucosal response of wild dogs naturally infected with A. caninum was investigated in this study. In spite of diffuse infiltrations of the mucosa with CD3(+) , CD4(+) , CD8(+) , CD11c(+) , CD21(+) or MHC class II antigen cells no focal infiltrations with any of these cell phenotypes were observed around the buccal capsule or the body of the feeding worms. Very few or no apoptotic cells could be detected around the worms fixed into the mucosa but they were detected on the tip of villi and in the superficial layer of cellular debris and proteinaceous exudate that covers the mucosa. Muc5AC, a mucine associated with expulsion of gut worms (Trichuris muris) was expressed extremely weakly or was not expressed at all in the intestine of the wild dogs infected with A. caninum. Our data show that individual specimens of A. caninum can reside for some time in the mucosa of the gut of dogs undetected and most likely unaffected by the effectors of the local immune response. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Glial-cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibiza, Sales; García-Cassani, Bethania; Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M; Pavan, William J; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-07-21

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers. ILC3 development is thought to be programmed, but how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 in mice sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a glial–ILC3–epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate Il22 downstream of the p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Notably, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic-factor-expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88-dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired production of ILC3-derived IL-22 and a pronounced propensity towards gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light on a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing that glial cells are central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation by neurotrophic factor signals.

  14. Gut microbiota: the brain peacekeeper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlong eMu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota regulates intestinal and extraintestinal homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the gut microbiota may also regulate brain function and behavior. Results from animal models indicate that disturbances in the composition and functionality of some microbiota members are associated with neurophysiological disorders, strengthening the idea of a microbiota-gut-brain axis and the role of microbiota as a peacekeeper in the brain health. Here, we review recent discoveries on the role of the gut microbiota in central nervous system (CNS-related diseases. We also discuss the emerging concept of the bidirectional regulation by the circadian rhythm and gut microbiota, and the potential role of the epigenetic regulation in neuronal cell function. Microbiome studies are also highlighted as crucial in the development of targeted therapies for neurodevelopmental disorders.

  15. Cesarean section changes neonatal gut colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Thorsen, Jonathan; Chawes, Bo L; Schjørring, Susanne; Krogfelt, Karen A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans

    2016-09-01

    Delivery by means of cesarean section has been associated with increased risk of childhood immune-mediated diseases, suggesting a role of early bacterial colonization patterns for immune maturation. We sought to describe the influence of delivery method on gut and airway colonization patterns in the first year of life in the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2010 (COPSAC2010) birth cohort. Seven hundred children from the COPSAC2010 birth cohort participated in this analysis. Fecal samples were collected at age 1 week, 1 month, and 1 year, and hypopharyngeal aspirates were collected at age 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months and cultured for bacteria. Detailed information on delivery method, intrapartum antibiotics, and lifestyle factors was obtained by personal interviews. Seventy-eight percent of the children were born by means of natural delivery, 12% by means of emergency cesarean section, and 9% by means of elective cesarean section. Birth by means of cesarean section was significantly associated with colonization of the intestinal tract by Citrobacter freundii, Clostridium species, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus at age 1 week, whereas colonization by Escherichia coli was associated with natural birth. At age 1 month, these differences were less prominent, and at age 1 year, they were not apparent, which was confirmed by means of multivariate data-driven partial least squares analyses. The initial airway microbiota was unaffected by birth method. Delivery by means of cesarean section was associated with early colonization patterns of the neonatal gut but not of the airways. The differences normalized within the first year of life. We speculate that microbial derangements, as indicated in our study, can demonstrate a possible link between delivery by means of cesarean section and immune-mediated disease. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma

  16. Dysbiotic gut microbiome: A key element of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øyri, Styrk Furnes; Műzes, Györgyi; Sipos, Ferenc

    2015-12-01

    Since the first publication on "regional ileitis", the relevance of this chronic inflammatory disease condition termed finally as Crohn's disease is continuously increasing. Although we are beginning to comprehend certain aspects of its pathogenesis, many facets remain unexplored. Host's gut microbiota is involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes including immune system development, and pathogen regulation. Further, the microbiome is thought to play a key role in Crohn's disease. The presence of Crohn's-associated variants of NOD2 and ATG16L genes appears to be associated not only with alterations of mucosal barrier functions, and bacterial killing, but the gut microbiota, as well, reflecting a potential relationship between the host's genotype and intestinal dysbiosis, involved in disease etiology. This review aims to characterize some exciting new aspect of Crohn's disease pathology, focusing mainly on the role of intestinal microbes, and their interplay with the immune system of the host.

  17. MHC class II up-regulation and co-localization with Fas in experimental models of immune-mediated bone marrow failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Andrew J.; Samsel, Leigh; Takaku, Tomoiku; Desierto, Marie J.; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; McCoy, J. Philip; Young, Neal S.; Chen, Jichun

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) promotes MHC class II expression on bone marrow (BM) cell targets that facilitates T cell-mediated BM destruction in immune-mediated BM failure. Materials and Methods Allogeneic lymph node (LN) cells were infused into MHC or minor histocompatibility antigen (minor-H) mismatched hosts to induce BM failure. MHC class II and Fas expression and cell apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. MHC class II-Fas co-localization was detected by ImageStream Imaging Flow Cytometry and other cell-cell associations were visualized by confocal microscopy. T cell-mediated BM cell apoptosis and effects of IFN-γ on MHC class II-Fas co-localization on normal BM cells were studied using cell culture in vitro followed by conventional and imaging flow cytometry. Results BM failure animals had significantly up-regulated MHC class II expression on CD4−CD8−CD11b−CD45R− residual BM cells and significantly increased MHC class II-Fas co-localization on BM CD150+ and CD34+ hematopoietic cells. MHC class II+Fas+ BM cells were closely associated with CD4+ T cells in the BM of affected animals, and they were significantly more responsive to T-cell mediated cell apoptosis relative to MHC class II−Fas− BM cells. Infusion of IFN-γ-deficient LN cells into minor-H mismatched recipients resulted in no MHC class II-Fas up-regulation and no clinically overt BM failure. Treatment with recombinant IFN-γ significantly increased both MHC class II-Fas co-expression and co-localization on normal BM cells. Conclusion Elevation of the inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ stimulated MHC class II expression and MHC class II-Fas co-localization, which may facilitate T-cell mediated cell destruction. PMID:21635935

  18. In Situ Microscopy Analysis Reveals Local Innate Immune Response Developed around Brucella Infected Cells in Resistant and Susceptible Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copin, Richard; Vitry, Marie-Alice; Hanot Mambres, Delphine; Machelart, Arnaud; De Trez, Carl; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Magez, Stefan; Akira, Shizuo; Ryffel, Bernhard; Carlier, Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Muraille, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Brucella are facultative intracellular bacteria that chronically infect humans and animals causing brucellosis. Brucella are able to invade and replicate in a broad range of cell lines in vitro, however the cells supporting bacterial growth in vivo are largely unknown. In order to identify these, we used a Brucella melitensis strain stably expressing mCherry fluorescent protein to determine the phenotype of infected cells in spleen and liver, two major sites of B. melitensis growth in mice. In both tissues, the majority of primary infected cells expressed the F4/80 myeloid marker. The peak of infection correlated with granuloma development. These structures were mainly composed of CD11b+ F4/80+ MHC-II+ cells expressing iNOS/NOS2 enzyme. A fraction of these cells also expressed CD11c marker and appeared similar to inflammatory dendritic cells (DCs). Analysis of genetically deficient mice revealed that differentiation of iNOS+ inflammatory DC, granuloma formation and control of bacterial growth were deeply affected by the absence of MyD88, IL-12p35 and IFN-γ molecules. During chronic phase of infection in susceptible mice, we identified a particular subset of DC expressing both CD11c and CD205, serving as a reservoir for the bacteria. Taken together, our results describe the cellular nature of immune effectors involved during Brucella infection and reveal a previously unappreciated role for DC subsets, both as effectors and reservoir cells, in the pathogenesis of brucellosis. PMID:22479178

  19. Influence of dietary supplementation with flaxseed and lactobacilli on the cells of local innate immunity response in the jejunal mucosa in piglets after weaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Stefan; Jonecova, Zuzana; Kruzliak, Peter; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Nemcova, Radomira

    2015-03-01

    A histological study was designed to determine the influence of flaxseed and/or lactobacilli inclusion in the diet of piglets from 10 days before to 21 days after weaning. The selected inflammatory cell population incidence in the piglet jejunal mucosa was investigated. Significantly higher numbers of myeloperoxidase-positive (Plactobacilli group was detected. In contrast, the number of CD163-positive cells in the flaxseed+lactobacilli group was significantly lower on the day of weaning (Plactobacilli alone during the first 3 days after weaning (Plactobacilli. The presence of lactobacilli in the diet had a stimulatory effect on goblet cell quantity in the epithelium (Plactobacilli group was the only significant difference (Plactobacilli on the cells of local innate immunity response in the jejunal mucosa in piglets after weaning might be linked with significant anti-inflammatory effects in the jejunal mucosa.

  20. The MAL-ED study: a multinational and multidisciplinary approach to understand the relationship between enteric pathogens, malnutrition, gut physiology, physical growth, cognitive development, and immune responses in infants and children up to 2 years of age in resource-poor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Highly prevalent conditions with multiple and complex underlying etiologies are a challenge to public health. Undernutrition, for example, affects 20% of children in the developing world. The cause and consequence of poor nutrition are multifaceted. Undernutrition has been associated with half of all deaths worldwide in children aged immunity to further infections and to reduce the efficacy of childhood vaccines. The Etiology, Risk Factors, and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health (MAL-ED) Study, led by the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health and the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, has been established at sites in 8 countries with historically high incidence of diarrheal disease and undernutrition. Central to the study is the hypothesis that enteropathogen infection contributes to undernutrition by causing intestinal inflammation and/or by altering intestinal barrier and absorptive function. It is further postulated that this leads to growth faltering and deficits in cognitive development. The effects of repeated enteric infection and undernutrition on the immune response to childhood vaccines is also being examined in the study. MAL-ED uses a prospective longitudinal design that offers a unique opportunity to directly address a complex system of exposures and health outcomes in the community-rather than the relatively rarer circumstances that lead to hospitalization-during the critical period of development of the first 2 years of life. Among the factors being evaluated are enteric infections (with or without diarrhea) and other illness indicators, micronutrient levels, diet, socioeconomic status, gut function, and the environment. MAL-ED aims to describe these factors, their interrelationships, and their overall impact on health outcomes in unprecedented detail, and to make individual, site-specific, and generalized recommendations regarding the nature and timing

  1. Host age, social group, and habitat type influence the gut microbiota of wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Genevieve; Malone, Matthew; Sauther, Michelle L; Cuozzo, Frank P; White, Bryan; Nelson, Karen E; Stumpf, Rebecca M; Knight, Rob; Leigh, Steven R; Amato, Katherine R

    2016-08-01

    The gut microbiota contributes to host health by maintaining homeostasis, increasing digestive efficiency, and facilitating the development of the immune system. The composition of the gut microbiota can change dramatically within and between individuals of a species as a result of diet, age, or habitat. Therefore, understanding the factors determining gut microbiota diversity and composition can contribute to our knowledge of host ecology as well as to conservation efforts. Here we use high-throughput sequencing to describe variation in the gut microbiota of the endangered ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve (BMSR) in southwestern Madagascar. Specifically, we measured the diversity and composition of the gut microbiota in relation to social group, age, sex, tooth wear and loss, and habitat disturbance. While we found no significant variation in the diversity of the ring-tailed lemur gut microbiota in response to any variable tested, the taxonomic composition of the gut microbiota was influenced by social group, age, and habitat disturbance. However, effect sizes were small and appear to be driven by the presence or absence of relatively low abundance taxa. These results suggest that habitat disturbance may not impact the lemur gut microbiota as strongly as it impacts the gut microbiota of other primate species, highlighting the importance of distinct host ecological and physiological factors on host-gut microbe relationships. Am. J. Primatol. 78:883-892, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Vaccination of sheep against haemonchosis with H11, a gut membrane-derived protective antigen from the adult parasite: prevention of the periparturient rise and colostral transfer of protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S J; Hole, N J; Munn, E A; Rolph, T P

    1995-07-01

    Pregnant ewes were immunised with a fraction highly enriched in the membrane glycoprotein antigen H11, isolated from the intestinal brush border of adult Haemonchus contortus. Immunity induced by immunisation was able to abolish almost completely (98-99%) the worm egg output from pregnant ewes challenged with ca. 10,000 infective larvae of H. contortus during the last trimester. Furthermore, lambs born and reared on vaccinated ewes had substantial antibody levels to H11 derived from maternal transfer. This antibody conferred moderate protection against a bolus challenge of ca. 3000 infective larvae of H. contortus in 5-week-old lambs.

  3. Antibiotic treatment partially protects against type 1 diabetes in the Bio-Breeding diabetes-prone rat. Is the gut flora involved in the development of type 1 diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, S.; Klatter, F. A.; Visser, J. T. J.; Wildeboer-Veloo, A. C. M.; Harmsen, H. J. M.; Rozing, J.; Bos, N. A.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Accumulating data suggest that the gut immune system plays a role in the development of type 1 diabetes. The intestinal flora is essential for the development of the (gut) immune system and the establishment of tolerance. It has been reported that oral administration of food and bact

  4. The gut microbiota in mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi eGkouskou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestine and the intestinal immune system have evolved through a symbiotic homeostasis under which a highly diverse microbial flora is maintained in the gastrointestinal tract while pathogenic bacteria are recognized and eliminated. Disruption of the balance between the immune system and the gut microbiota results in the development of multiple pathologies in humans. Inflammatory bowel diseases have been associated with alterations in the composition of intestinal flora but whether these changes are causal or result of inflammation is still under dispute. Various chemical and genetic models of inflammatory bowel diseases have been developed and utilized to elucidate the complex relationship between intestinal epithelium, immune system and the gut microbiota. In this review we describe some of the most commonly used mouse models of colitis and Crohn’s disease and summarize the current knowledge of how changes in microbiota composition may affect intestinal disease pathogenesis. The pursuit of gut-microbiota interactions will no doubt continue to provide invaluable insight into the complex biology of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  5. Emerging Roles for the Gut Microbiome in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Helen E; Hsiao, Elaine Y

    2017-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a serious neurodevelopmental disorder that affects one in 45 children in the United States, with a similarly striking prevalence in countries around the world. However, mechanisms underlying its etiology and manifestations remain poorly understood. Although ASD is diagnosed based on the presence and severity of impaired social communication and repetitive behavior, immune dysregulation and gastrointestinal issues are common comorbidities. The microbiome is an integral part of human physiology; recent studies show that changes in the gut microbiota can modulate gastrointestinal physiology, immune function, and even behavior. Links between particular bacteria from the indigenous