WorldWideScience

Sample records for local equilibrium conditions

  1. On the local equilibrium condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessling, H.

    1994-11-01

    A physical system is in local equilibrium if it cannot be distinguished from a global equilibrium by ''infinitesimally localized measurements''. This should be a natural characterization of local equilibrium, but the problem is to give a precise meaning to the qualitative phrase ''infinitesimally localized measurements''. A solution is suggested in form of a Local Equilibrium Condition (LEC), which can be applied to linear relativistic quantum field theories but not directly to selfinteracting quantum fields. The concept of local temperature resulting from LEC is compared to an old approach to local temperature based on the principle of maximal entropy. It is shown that the principle of maximal entropy does not always lead to physical states if it is applied to relativistic quantum field theories. (orig.)

  2. Local equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-12-15

    From 3-6 September the First International Workshop on Local Equilibrium in Strong Interaction Physics took place in Bad-Honnef at the Physics Centre of the German Physical Society. A number of talks covered the experimental and theoretical investigation of the 'hotspots' effect, both in high energy particle physics and in intermediate energy nuclear physics.

  3. Equilibrium Droplets on Deformable Substrates: Equilibrium Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koursari, Nektaria; Ahmed, Gulraiz; Starov, Victor M

    2018-05-15

    Equilibrium conditions of droplets on deformable substrates are investigated, and it is proven using Jacobi's sufficient condition that the obtained solutions really provide equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformed support. At the equilibrium, the excess free energy of the system should have a minimum value, which means that both necessary and sufficient conditions of the minimum should be fulfilled. Only in this case, the obtained profiles provide the minimum of the excess free energy. The necessary condition of the equilibrium means that the first variation of the excess free energy should vanish, and the second variation should be positive. Unfortunately, the mentioned two conditions are not the proof that the obtained profiles correspond to the minimum of the excess free energy and they could not be. It is necessary to check whether the sufficient condition of the equilibrium (Jacobi's condition) is satisfied. To the best of our knowledge Jacobi's condition has never been verified for any already published equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate. A simple model of the equilibrium droplet on the deformable substrate is considered, and it is shown that the deduced profiles of the equilibrium droplet and deformable substrate satisfy the Jacobi's condition, that is, really provide the minimum to the excess free energy of the system. To simplify calculations, a simplified linear disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm is adopted for the calculations. It is shown that both necessary and sufficient conditions for equilibrium are satisfied. For the first time, validity of the Jacobi's condition is verified. The latter proves that the developed model really provides (i) the minimum of the excess free energy of the system droplet/deformable substrate and (ii) equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate.

  4. Local Equilibrium and Retardation Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott K; Vesselinov, Velimir V

    2018-01-01

    In modeling solute transport with mobile-immobile mass transfer (MIMT), it is common to use an advection-dispersion equation (ADE) with a retardation factor, or retarded ADE. This is commonly referred to as making the local equilibrium assumption (LEA). Assuming local equilibrium, Eulerian textbook treatments derive the retarded ADE, ostensibly exactly. However, other authors have presented rigorous mathematical derivations of the dispersive effect of MIMT, applicable even in the case of arbitrarily fast mass transfer. We resolve the apparent contradiction between these seemingly exact derivations by adopting a Lagrangian point of view. We show that local equilibrium constrains the expected time immobile, whereas the retarded ADE actually embeds a stronger, nonphysical, constraint: that all particles spend the same amount of every time increment immobile. Eulerian derivations of the retarded ADE thus silently commit the gambler's fallacy, leading them to ignore dispersion due to mass transfer that is correctly modeled by other approaches. We then present a particle tracking simulation illustrating how poor an approximation the retarded ADE may be, even when mobile and immobile plumes are continually near local equilibrium. We note that classic "LEA" (actually, retarded ADE validity) criteria test for insignificance of MIMT-driven dispersion relative to hydrodynamic dispersion, rather than for local equilibrium. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Analytical interpretation of the local thermal non-equilibrium condition of porous media imbedded in tube heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehghan, Maziar; Jamal-Abad, Milad Tajik; Rashidi, Saman

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The Brinkman–Forchheimer–Darcy equation is solved using the perturbation methods. • Temperature profile is obtained analytically using the successive approx. method. • A new dimensionless number representing the intensity of LTNE is presented. • The LENT intensity is proportional to the product of velocity and temperature. • Effects of Da number, porosity of medium, and conductivity ratio are investigated. - Abstract: Local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) effects in the developed region of the forced convection in a circular tube filled with saturated porous medium are analytically studied at the constant wall-temperature boundary condition, as well as at the iso-flux boundary condition. The flow in the pipe is described by the Brinkman-Forchheimer-extended Darcy equation. A two-equation model is used for the energy balance. Profiles describing the velocity field obtained by perturbation techniques are used to find the temperature distributions using the successive approximation method. Moreover, the velocity and temperature fields are simulated numerically to validate the results of the analytical part. A fundamental relation and a new dimensionless number, ΔNE, for the temperature difference between the fluid and solid phases (LTNE intensity) are established based on a perturbation analysis. It is found that the LTNE intensity (ΔNE) is proportional to the product of the normalized velocity and the dimensionless temperature at LTE condition and depends on the conductivity ratio, Darcy number, and the porosity of the medium. Finally, the proposed relation for the LTNE intensity is simple and fundamental for estimation of the importance of LTNE condition

  6. Local Nash equilibrium in social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M A; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

    2014-08-29

    Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures.

  7. Local equilibrium in bird flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an example of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with respect to analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. This non-equilibrium characteristic has been studied theoretically, but its impact on actual animal groups remains to be fully explored experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accommodates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment occurs on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  8. Relativistic Fluid Dynamics Far From Local Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romatschke, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Fluid dynamics is traditionally thought to apply only to systems near local equilibrium. In this case, the effective theory of fluid dynamics can be constructed as a gradient series. Recent applications of resurgence suggest that this gradient series diverges, but can be Borel resummed, giving rise to a hydrodynamic attractor solution which is well defined even for large gradients. Arbitrary initial data quickly approaches this attractor via nonhydrodynamic mode decay. This suggests the existence of a new theory of far-from-equilibrium fluid dynamics. In this Letter, the framework of fluid dynamics far from local equilibrium for a conformal system is introduced, and the hydrodynamic attractor solutions for resummed Baier-Romatschke-Son-Starinets-Stephanov theory, kinetic theory in the relaxation time approximation, and strongly coupled N =4 super Yang-Mills theory are identified for a system undergoing Bjorken flow.

  9. Conditions for the Existence of Market Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, William D. A.

    1997-01-01

    Maintains that most graduate-level economics textbooks rarely mention the need for consumers to be above their minimum wealth position as a condition for market equilibrium. Argues that this omission leaves students with a mistaken sense about the range of circumstances under which market equilibria can exist. (MJP)

  10. Is local equilibrium a useful concept in hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, P.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of multiparticle production phenomena are reviewed, which bear on the existence of local equilibrium in all or part of a collision event. Several universal features of purely hadronic events, such as the p/sub perpendicular/ distribution of secondaries, the independence of multiplicities and multiplicity distributions on the quantum numbers of the colliding particles are easily interpreted by postulating the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium for the dominant nondiffractive events. Except in the case of the multiplicity distribution, other interpretations often do not exist. Equilibration mechanisms which might establish local equilibrium are examined. We point out that several mechanisms besides the usual kinetic relaxation have not been seriously studied. These include collective instabilities, turbulence and chaos, which could be more effective in establishing equilibrium. Developments in the use of the hydrodynamic model are reviewed, with particular attention to the initial conditions appropriate to hadronic and nuclear collisions. We conclude that local equilibrium is indeed a useful concept but that much effort is needed to assess its accuracy and domain of applicability

  11. Local approximation of a metapopulation's equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, A D; McVinish, R; Pollett, P K

    2018-04-18

    We consider the approximation of the equilibrium of a metapopulation model, in which a finite number of patches are randomly distributed over a bounded subset [Formula: see text] of Euclidean space. The approximation is good when a large number of patches contribute to the colonization pressure on any given unoccupied patch, and when the quality of the patches varies little over the length scale determined by the colonization radius. If this is the case, the equilibrium probability of a patch at z being occupied is shown to be close to [Formula: see text], the equilibrium occupation probability in Levins's model, at any point [Formula: see text] not too close to the boundary, if the local colonization pressure and extinction rates appropriate to z are assumed. The approximation is justified by giving explicit upper and lower bounds for the occupation probabilities, expressed in terms of the model parameters. Since the patches are distributed randomly, the occupation probabilities are also random, and we complement our bounds with explicit bounds on the probability that they are satisfied at all patches simultaneously.

  12. Quasilocal equilibrium condition for black ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astefanesei, Dumitru; Rodriguez, Maria J.; Theisen, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    We use the conservation of the renormalized boundary stress-energy tensor to obtain the equilibrium condition for a general (thin or fat) black ring solution. We also investigate the role of the spatial stress in the thermodynamics of deformation within the quasilocal formalism of Brown and York and discuss the relation with other methods. In particular, we discuss the quantum statistical relation for the unbalanced black ring solution.

  13. 46 CFR 42.20-12 - Conditions of equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions of equilibrium. 42.20-12 Section 42.20-12... BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-12 Conditions of equilibrium. The following conditions of equilibrium are... stability. Through an angle of 20 degrees beyond its position of equilibrium, the vessel must meet the...

  14. Local effect of equilibrium current on tearing mode stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzani, F.

    1985-12-01

    The local effect of the equilibrium current on the linear stability of low poloidal number tearing modes in tokamaks is investigated analytically. The plasma response inside the tearing layer is derived from fluid theory and the local equilibrium current is shown to couple to the mode dynamics through its gradient, which is proportional to the local electron temperature gradient under the approximations used in the analysis. The relevant eigenmode equations, expressing Ampere's law and the plasma quasineutrality condition, respectively, are suitably combined in a single integral equation, from which a variational principle is formulated to derive the mode dispersion relations for several cases of interest. The local equilibrium current is treated as a small perturbation of the known results for the m greater than or equal to 2 and the m = 1 tearing modes in the collisional regime, and the m greater than or equal to 2 tearing mode in the semicollisional regime; its effect is found to enhance stabilization for the m greater than or equal to 2 drift-tearing mode in the collisional regime, whereas the m = 1 growth rate is very slightly increased and the stabilizing effect of the parallel thermal conduction on the m greater than or equal to 2 mode in the semicollisional regime is slightly reduced

  15. The Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium Approach to Far-From-Local-Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Metghalchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE method for the description of the time-dependent behavior of dynamical systems in non-equilibrium states is a general, effective, physically based method for model order reduction that was originally developed in the framework of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. A generalized mathematical formulation is presented here that allows including nonlinear constraints in non-local equilibrium systems characterized by the existence of a non-increasing Lyapunov functional under the system’s internal dynamics. The generalized formulation of RCCE enables to clarify the essentials of the method and the built-in general feature of thermodynamic consistency in the chemical kinetics context. In this paper, we work out the details of the method in a generalized mathematical-physics framework, but for definiteness we detail its well-known implementation in the traditional chemical kinetics framework. We detail proofs and spell out explicit functional dependences so as to bring out and clarify each underlying assumption of the method. In the standard context of chemical kinetics of ideal gas mixtures, we discuss the relations between the validity of the detailed balance condition off-equilibrium and the thermodynamic consistency of the method. We also discuss two examples of RCCE gas-phase combustion calculations to emphasize the constraint-dependent performance of the RCCE method.

  16. Strong Duality and Optimality Conditions for Generalized Equilibrium Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a generalized equilibrium problem involving DC functions. By using the properties of the epigraph of the conjugate functions, some sufficient and/or necessary conditions for the weak and strong duality results and optimality conditions for generalized equilibrium problems are provided.

  17. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) under non-equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberthur, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) for the study of systems under non-equilibrium conditions is illustrated by three types of experiments in the field of polymer research: - the relaxation of a system from an initial non-equilibrium state towards equilibrium, - the cyclic or repetitive installation of a series of non-equilibrium states in a system, - the steady non-equilibrium state maintained by a constant dissipation of energy within the system. Characteristic times obtained in these experiments with SANS are compared with the times obtained from quasi-elastic neutron and light scattering, which yield information about the equilibrium dynamics of the system. The limits of SANS applied to non-equilibrium systems for the measurement of relaxation times at different length scales are shown and compared to the limits of quasielastic neutron and light scattering

  18. A theoretical analysis of local thermal equilibrium in fibrous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Mingwei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The internal heat exchange between each phase and the Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE scenarios in multi-phase fibrous materials are considered in this paper. Based on the two-phase heat transfer model, a criterion is proposed to evaluate the LTE condition, using derived characteristic parameters. Furthermore, the LTE situations in isothermal/adiabatic boundary cases with two different heat sources (constant heat flux and constant temperature are assessed as special transient cases to test the proposed criterion system, and the influence of such different cases on their LTE status are elucidated. In addition, it is demonstrated that even the convective boundary problems can be generally estimated using this approach. Finally, effects on LTE of the material properties (thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity of each phase, sample porosity and pore hydraulic radius are investigated, illustrated and discussed in our study.

  19. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance

  20. The local temperature and chemical potential inside a mesoscopic device driven out of equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Pei

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a method for calculating the local temperature and chemical potential inside a mesoscopic device out of equilibrium. We show how to check the conditions of local thermal equilibrium when the whole system is out of equilibrium. In particular, we study the on-site chemical potentials inside a chain coupled to two reservoirs at a finite voltage bias. We observe in the presence of disorder a large fluctuation in on-site chemical potentials, which can be suppressed by the electron–electron interaction. By taking the average with respect to the configurations of the disorder, we recover the classical picture where the voltage drops monotonically through the resistance wire. We prove the existence of local intensive variables in a mesoscopic device which is in equilibrium or not far from equilibrium

  1. Do conditional benefits reduce equilibrium unemployment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, F.

    2006-01-01

    Although unconditional unemployment benefits destroy jobs in competitive and noncompetitive labor markets, conditional benefits can spur job growth in noncompetitive labor markets. Unconditional benefits reduce the penalty of shirking and misconduct, while conditional benefits increase this penalty.

  2. Convection with local thermal non-equilibrium and microfluidic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Straughan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This book is one of the first devoted to an account of theories of thermal convection which involve local thermal non-equilibrium effects, including a concentration on microfluidic effects. The text introduces convection with local thermal non-equilibrium effects in extraordinary detail, making it easy for readers newer to the subject area to understand. This book is unique in the fact that it addresses a large number of convection theories and provides many new results which are not available elsewhere. This book will be useful to researchers from engineering, fluid mechanics, and applied mathematics, particularly those interested in microfluidics and porous media.

  3. Identifying apparent local stable isotope equilibrium in a complex non-equilibrium system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuyang; Cao, Xiaobin; Wang, Jianwei; Bao, Huiming

    2018-02-28

    Although being out of equilibrium, biomolecules in organisms have the potential to approach isotope equilibrium locally because enzymatic reactions are intrinsically reversible. A rigorous approach that can describe isotope distribution among biomolecules and their apparent deviation from equilibrium state is lacking, however. Applying the concept of distance matrix in graph theory, we propose that apparent local isotope equilibrium among a subset of biomolecules can be assessed using an apparent fractionation difference (|Δα|) matrix, in which the differences between the observed isotope composition (δ') and the calculated equilibrium fractionation factor (1000lnβ) can be more rigorously evaluated than by using a previous approach for multiple biomolecules. We tested our |Δα| matrix approach by re-analyzing published data of different amino acids (AAs) in potato and in green alga. Our re-analysis shows that biosynthesis pathways could be the reason for an apparently close-to-equilibrium relationship inside AA families in potato leaves. Different biosynthesis/degradation pathways in tubers may have led to the observed isotope distribution difference between potato leaves and tubers. The analysis of data from green algae does not support the conclusion that AAs are further from equilibrium in glucose-cultured green algae than in the autotrophic ones. Application of the |Δα| matrix can help us to locate potential reversible reactions or reaction networks in a complex system such as a metabolic system. The same approach can be broadly applied to all complex systems that have multiple components, e.g. geochemical or atmospheric systems of early Earth or other planets. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Analysing chemical equilibrium conditions when studying butyl acetate synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Orjuela Londoño; Fernando Leiva Lenis; Luis Alejandro Boyacá Mendivelso; Gerardo Rodríguez Niño; Luis María Carballo Suárez

    2010-01-01

    This work studied the liquid phase of acetic acid and butyl alcohol esterification reaction (P atm = 560 mmHg),using an ion exchange resin (Lewatit K-2431) as catalyst. A set of assays were carried out for determining the effect of catalyst load, temperature and molar ratio (acid/alcohol) on chemical equilibrium constant. Components’ selective sorption on the resin matrix was noticed; its effect on equilibrium conditions was verified, by using different acid/alcohol starting ratios. A non-ide...

  5. Local thermal equilibrium and ideal gas Stephani universes

    OpenAIRE

    Coll, Bartolomé; Ferrando, Joan Josep

    2004-01-01

    The Stephani universes that can be interpreted as an ideal gas evolving in local thermal equilibrium are determined. Five classes of thermodynamic schemes are admissible, which give rise to five classes of regular models and three classes of singular models. No Stephani universes exist representing an exact solution to a classical ideal gas (one for which the internal energy is proportional to the temperature). But some Stephani universes may approximate a classical ideal gas at first order i...

  6. A Local Probe for Universal Non-equilibrium Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    shown are polarizing beam splitters . About 700µW are superimposed with a reference laser on a glass plate and coupled into an optical fiber to detect...A Local Probe for Universal Non -equilibrium Dynamics We report on the results obtained across a nine-month ARO-sponsored project, whose purpose was...to implement a local probe for a gas of ultracold atoms. We used a phase plate with a spiral phase gradient to create a hollow-core laser beam . This

  7. Diagnosis of the local thermal equilibrium by optical emission spectroscopy in the evolution of electric discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia B, R.; Pacheco S, J.; Pacheco P, M.; Ramos F, F.; Cruz A, A.; Velazquez P, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this work applies the technique of optical emission spectroscopy to diagnose the temperature of the species generated in plasma in the transition to glow discharge arc. Whit this diagnosis is possible to determine the local thermal equilibrium conditions of the discharge. (Author)

  8. Failure of Local Thermal Equilibrium in Quantum Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, F.; Behunin, R. O.; Henkel, C.; Busch, K.; Dalvit, D. A. R.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress in manipulating atomic and condensed matter systems has instigated a surge of interest in nonequilibrium physics, including many-body dynamics of trapped ultracold atoms and ions, near-field radiative heat transfer, and quantum friction. Under most circumstances the complexity of such nonequilibrium systems requires a number of approximations to make theoretical descriptions tractable. In particular, it is often assumed that spatially separated components of a system thermalize with their immediate surroundings, although the global state of the system is out of equilibrium. This powerful assumption reduces the complexity of nonequilibrium systems to the local application of well-founded equilibrium concepts. While this technique appears to be consistent for the description of some phenomena, we show that it fails for quantum friction by underestimating by approximately 80% the magnitude of the drag force. Our results show that the correlations among the components of driven, but steady-state, quantum systems invalidate the assumption of local thermal equilibrium, calling for a critical reexamination of this approach for describing the physics of nonequilibrium systems.

  9. PRESSURE EQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS AND THE LOCAL HOT BUBBLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snowden, S. L.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Porter, F. S.; Thomas, N. E. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cravens, T.; Robertson, I. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Galeazzi, M.; Uprety, Y.; Ursino, E. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Koutroumpa, D. [Université Versailles St-Quentin, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS/INSU, LATMOS-IPSL, 11 Boulevard d' Alembert, F-78280 Guyancourt (France); Kuntz, K. D. [The Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lallement, R.; Puspitarini, L. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8111, Université Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Lepri, S. T. [University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); McCammon, D.; Morgan, K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Walsh, B. M., E-mail: steven.l.snowden@nasa.gov [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    Three recent results related to the heliosphere and the local interstellar medium (ISM) have provided an improved insight into the distribution and conditions of material in the solar neighborhood. These are the measurement of the magnetic field outside of the heliosphere by Voyager 1, the improved mapping of the three-dimensional structure of neutral material surrounding the Local Cavity using extensive ISM absorption line and reddening data, and a sounding rocket flight which observed the heliospheric helium focusing cone in X-rays and provided a robust estimate of the contribution of solar wind charge exchange emission to the ROSAT All-Sky Survey 1/4 keV band data. Combining these disparate results, we show that the thermal pressure of the plasma in the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) is P/k = 10, 700 cm{sup –3} K. If the LHB is relatively free of a global magnetic field, it can easily be in pressure (thermal plus magnetic field) equilibrium with the local interstellar clouds, eliminating a long-standing discrepancy in models of the local ISM.

  10. Local thermal equilibrium and KMS states in curved spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solveen, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    On the example of a free massless and conformally coupled scalar field, it is argued that in quantum field theory in curved spacetimes with the time-like Killing field, the corresponding KMS states (generalized Gibbs ensembles) at parameter β > 0 need not possess a definite temperature in the sense of the zeroth law. In fact, these states, although passive in the sense of the second law, are not always in local thermal equilibrium (LTE). A criterion characterizing LTE states with sharp local temperature is discussed. Moreover, a proposal is made for fixing the renormalization freedom of composite fields which serve as ‘thermal observables’ and a new definition of the thermal energy of LTE states is introduced. Based on these results, a general relation between the local temperature and the parameter β is established for KMS states in (anti) de Sitter spacetime. (paper)

  11. Boson spectra and correlations for thermal locally equilibrium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinyukov, Y.M.

    1999-01-01

    The single- and multi-particle inclusive spectra for strongly inhomogeneous thermal boson systems are studied using the method of statistical operator. The thermal Wick's theorem is generalized and the analytical solution of the problem for a boost-invariant expanding boson gas is found. The results demonstrate the effects of inhomogeneity for such a system: the spectra and correlations for particles with wavelengths larger than the system's homogeneity lengths change essentially as compared with the results based on the local Bose-Einstein thermal distributions. The effects noticeably grow for overpopulated media, where the chemical potential associated with violation of chemical equilibrium is large enough. (author)

  12. A new equilibrium torus solution and GRMHD initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Robert F.; Kulkarni, Akshay; Narayan, Ramesh

    2013-11-01

    Context. General relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations are providing influential models for black hole spin measurements, gamma ray bursts, and supermassive black hole feedback. Many of these simulations use the same initial condition: a rotating torus of fluid in hydrostatic equilibrium. A persistent concern is that simulation results sometimes depend on arbitrary features of the initial torus. For example, the Bernoulli parameter (which is related to outflows), appears to be controlled by the Bernoulli parameter of the initial torus. Aims: In this paper, we give a new equilibrium torus solution and describe two applications for the future. First, it can be used as a more physical initial condition for GRMHD simulations than earlier torus solutions. Second, it can be used in conjunction with earlier torus solutions to isolate the simulation results that depend on initial conditions. Methods: We assume axisymmetry, an ideal gas equation of state, constant entropy, and ignore self-gravity. We fix an angular momentum distribution and solve the relativistic Euler equations in the Kerr metric. Results: The Bernoulli parameter, rotation rate, and geometrical thickness of the torus can be adjusted independently. Our torus tends to be more bound and have a larger radial extent than earlier torus solutions. Conclusions: While this paper was in preparation, several GRMHD simulations appeared based on our equilibrium torus. We believe it will continue to provide a more realistic starting point for future simulations.

  13. Coronal and local thermodynamic equilibriums in a hollow cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xutao

    2005-01-01

    A characteristic two-section profile of excited-state populations is observed in a hollow cathode discharge and is explained by coexistence of the coronal equilibrium (CE) and the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). At helium pressure 0.1 Torr and cathode current 200-300 mA, vacuum ultraviolet radiations from He I 1snp 1 P (n=2-16) and He II np 2 P (n=2-14) are resolved with a 2.2-M McPherson spectrometer. Relative populations of these states are deduced from the discrete line intensities and are plotted against energy levels. For both the He I and He II series, as energy level increases, populations of high-n (n>10) states are found to decrease much more quickly than low-n (n<7) populations. While low-n populations are described with the CE dominated by direct electron-impact excitations, high-n populations are fitted with the LTE to calculate the population temperatures of gas atoms and ions. Validities of the CE and LTE in different n-ranges are considered on the competition between radiative decays of the excited states and their collisions with gas atoms. (author)

  14. Local thermodynamic equilibrium considerations in powerchip laser-induced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merten, Jonathan A., E-mail: jmerten@astate.edu; Smith, Benjamin W., E-mail: bwsmith@chem.ufl.edu; Omenetto, Nicoló, E-mail: omenetto@chem.ufl.edu

    2013-05-01

    Time-resolved emission experiments are reported in the fast-decaying transient plasma induced by a microchip laser on an aluminum target in three different cover gases, i.e., air, argon and helium. The laser operates at 532 nm, with a repetition frequency of 1 kHz and a pulse width of less than 0.5 ns. The overall persistence of plasma emission is of the order of 100 ns. We examine the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) by evaluating the temporal criteria required (in addition to the McWhirter criterion), as recommended by Cristoforetti et al. (Spectrochim. Acta Part B 65, 2010, 86–95). The temporal criteria examine the evolution of temperature and electron number density and compare their rate of change to the rate at which electron collisions can thermalize the change. These considerations are used to determine time windows in which LTE may be present. Our results suggest that calibration-free LIBS measurements with these lasers may be possible for some elements at early times, especially under argon. - Highlights: ► Powerchip laser-induced plasma evolution is affected by cover gas. ► Plasma often out of LTE, despite fulfilling the McWhirter criterion ► Calibration-free LIBS may be possible with powerchip laser plasmas.

  15. Local thermodynamic equilibrium considerations in powerchip laser-induced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merten, Jonathan A.; Smith, Benjamin W.; Omenetto, Nicoló

    2013-01-01

    Time-resolved emission experiments are reported in the fast-decaying transient plasma induced by a microchip laser on an aluminum target in three different cover gases, i.e., air, argon and helium. The laser operates at 532 nm, with a repetition frequency of 1 kHz and a pulse width of less than 0.5 ns. The overall persistence of plasma emission is of the order of 100 ns. We examine the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) by evaluating the temporal criteria required (in addition to the McWhirter criterion), as recommended by Cristoforetti et al. (Spectrochim. Acta Part B 65, 2010, 86–95). The temporal criteria examine the evolution of temperature and electron number density and compare their rate of change to the rate at which electron collisions can thermalize the change. These considerations are used to determine time windows in which LTE may be present. Our results suggest that calibration-free LIBS measurements with these lasers may be possible for some elements at early times, especially under argon. - Highlights: ► Powerchip laser-induced plasma evolution is affected by cover gas. ► Plasma often out of LTE, despite fulfilling the McWhirter criterion ► Calibration-free LIBS may be possible with powerchip laser plasmas

  16. Assessment of local and regional isotopic equilibrium in the mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, A W; Hart, S R [Carnegie Institution of Washington, D.C. (USA). Dept. of Terrestrial Magnetism

    1978-02-01

    The assumption of local equilibrium during partial melting is fundamental to the interpretation of isotope and trace element data for mantle-derived rocks. If disequilibrium melting is significant, the scale of the chemical and isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle indicated by the data could be as small as the grain size of the mantle rock, and the isotope data themselves are then of doubtful value to the understanding of mantle processes. To assess the scale of isotopic heterogeneity in a partially molten asthenosphere the authors review the Sr isotopic data of volcanic rocks from oceanic regions and the available experimental data on diffusion kinetics in minerals and melts similar to those existing in the mantle. Although diffusion data are scarce and afflicted with uncertainties, most of the diffusion coefficients for cations in mantle minerals at temperatures of 1000 to 1200/sup 0/C appear to be greater than 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/. Struntium diffusion in liquid basalt is more rapid, with diffusion coefficients of D = 10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ near 1300/sup 0/C. Simple model calculations show that, with these D values, a fluid-free mantle can maintain a state of disequilibrium on a centimeter scale for periods of 10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ years. The state of disequilibrium found in many mantle-derived xenoliths is thus easily explained. A partially molten mantle, on the other hand, will tend to equilibrate locally in less than 10/sup 5/ to 10/sup 6/ years. The analytical data on natural rocks likewise indicate that the inhomogeneities are both old (> 1.5 b.y.) and regional in character and that the consistent isotopic differences between ocean island and ocean floor volcanics cannot be explained by small-scall hetorogeneity of the source rock.

  17. Violations of local equilibrium and linear response in classical lattice systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kenichiro; Kusnezov, Dimitri

    2003-01-01

    We quantitatively and systematically analyze how local equilibrium, and linear response in transport are violated as systems move far from equilibrium. This is done by studying heat flow in classical lattice models with and without bulk transport behavior, in 1-3 dimensions, at various temperatures. Equations of motion for the system are integrated numerically to construct the non-equilibrium steady states. Linear response and local equilibrium assumptions are seen to break down in a similar manner. We quantify the breakdown through the analysis of both microscopic and macroscopic observables and examine its transformation properties under general redefinitions of the non-equilibrium temperature

  18. Boundary conditions for open quantum systems driven far from equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frensley, William R.

    1990-07-01

    This is a study of simple kinetic models of open systems, in the sense of systems that can exchange conserved particles with their environment. The system is assumed to be one dimensional and situated between two particle reservoirs. Such a system is readily driven far from equilibrium if the chemical potentials of the reservoirs differ appreciably. The openness of the system modifies the spatial boundary conditions on the single-particle Liouville-von Neumann equation, leading to a non-Hermitian Liouville operator. If the open-system boundary conditions are time reversible, exponentially growing (unphysical) solutions are introduced into the time dependence of the density matrix. This problem is avoided by applying time-irreversible boundary conditions to the Wigner distribution function. These boundary conditions model the external environment as ideal particle reservoirs with properties analogous to those of a blackbody. This time-irreversible model may be numerically evaluated in a discrete approximation and has been applied to the study of a resonant-tunneling semiconductor diode. The physical and mathematical properties of the irreversible kinetic model, in both its discrete and its continuum formulations, are examined in detail. The model demonstrates the distinction in kinetic theory between commutator superoperators, which may become non-Hermitian to describe irreversible behavior, and anticommutator superoperators, which remain Hermitian and are used to evaluate physical observables.

  19. Phase equilibrium condition of marine carbon dioxide hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shi-Cai; Liu, Chang-Ling; Ye, Yu-Guang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► CO 2 hydrate phase equilibrium was studied in simulated marine sediments. ► CO 2 hydrate equilibrium temperature in NaCl and submarine pore water was depressed. ► Coarse-grained silica sand does not affect CO 2 hydrate phase equilibrium. ► The relationship between equilibrium temperature and freezing point was discussed. - Abstract: The phase equilibrium of ocean carbon dioxide hydrate should be understood for ocean storage of carbon dioxide. In this paper, the isochoric multi-step heating dissociation method was employed to investigate the phase equilibrium of carbon dioxide hydrate in a variety of systems (NaCl solution, submarine pore water, silica sand + NaCl solution mixture). The experimental results show that the depression in the phase equilibrium temperature of carbon dioxide hydrate in NaCl solution is caused mainly by Cl − ion. The relationship between the equilibrium temperature and freezing point in NaCl solution was discussed. The phase equilibrium temperature of carbon dioxide hydrate in submarine pore water is shifted by −1.1 K to lower temperature region than that in pure water. However, the phase equilibrium temperature of carbon dioxide hydrate in mixture samples of coarsed-grained silica sand and NaCl solution is in agreement with that in NaCl solution with corresponding concentrations. The relationship between the equilibrium temperature and freezing point in mixture samples was also discussed.

  20. Equilibrium Condition during Locomotion and Gait in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MCF Alves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The experiment was carried out with the objective of evaluating a methodology to estimate the angulation and equilibrium condition, relating them to gait score and the main diseases of the locomotion system in males and females of commercial broiler strains. A completely randomized experimental design in a factorial arrangement (2x2 was applied, consisting of two sexes and two genetic strains, with five replicates of 53 chickens each. The following characteristics related to broiler locomotion were studied: gait score (GS; incidence of Valgus (VAL and Varus (VAR deformities and of pododermatitis (POD; body angle relative the ground (ANG; equilibrium condition (EC; body weight (BW and breast weight (BrW; and incidence of femoral degeneration (FD, tibial dyschondroplasia (TD and spondylolisthesis (SPO. GS, and VAL and VAR were assessed inside a broiler house. Birds were then photographed to estimate ANG and EC. Birds were sacrificed at 42 days of age and analyzed for FD, TD, and SPO. Breast percentage was not influenced by sex or strain. Males showed better ANG than females, regardless of strain. Overall, the strains studied showed prostrated EC. The correlation between GS and the evaluated traits was low. There was a moderate to high association between EC and ANG both in males and females. GS showed low correlation with locomotion problems, and therefore, it is a poor indicator of skeletal diseases. On the other hand, the moderate to high correlations of ANG and EC with locomotion problems make them better indicators of bone diseases than gait score, which is possibly more related to EC and body posture than to bone pathologies.

  1. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in a laser-induced plasma evidenced by blackbody radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Jörg; Grojo, David; Axente, Emanuel; Craciun, Valentin

    2018-06-01

    We show that the plasma produced by laser ablation of solid materials in specific conditions has an emission spectrum that is characterized by the saturation of the most intense spectral lines at the blackbody radiance. The blackbody temperature equals the excitation temperature of atoms and ions, proving directly and unambiguously a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The present investigations take benefit from the very rich and intense emission spectrum generated by ablation of a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy. This alternative and direct proof of the plasma equilibrium state re-opens the perspectives of quantitative material analyses via calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Moreover, the unique properties of this laser-produced plasma promote its use as radiation standard for intensity calibration of spectroscopic instruments.

  2. Irreversible Local Markov Chains with Rapid Convergence towards Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfer, Sebastian C.; Krauth, Werner

    2017-12-01

    We study the continuous one-dimensional hard-sphere model and present irreversible local Markov chains that mix on faster time scales than the reversible heat bath or Metropolis algorithms. The mixing time scales appear to fall into two distinct universality classes, both faster than for reversible local Markov chains. The event-chain algorithm, the infinitesimal limit of one of these Markov chains, belongs to the class presenting the fastest decay. For the lattice-gas limit of the hard-sphere model, reversible local Markov chains correspond to the symmetric simple exclusion process (SEP) with periodic boundary conditions. The two universality classes for irreversible Markov chains are realized by the totally asymmetric SEP (TASEP), and by a faster variant (lifted TASEP) that we propose here. We discuss how our irreversible hard-sphere Markov chains generalize to arbitrary repulsive pair interactions and carry over to higher dimensions through the concept of lifted Markov chains and the recently introduced factorized Metropolis acceptance rule.

  3. Deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium in a cesium-seeded argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanov, B.; Zarkova, L.

    1985-11-01

    The possibility of deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium of a cesium seeded argon plasma has been analyzed. A four level model of cesium has been employed. Overpopulations of the ground state and the first excited state as well as the corresponding reduction of the electron density are calculated for cylindrical discharge structures by solving stationary rate equations. Numerical results are presented. These results indicate that in a large regime of plasma conditions the LTE assumption is valid for electron temperatures larger than 3000 K. (orig.)

  4. Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresme, F.; Armstrong, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation

  5. Geodesic acoustic eigenmode for tokamak equilibrium with maximum of local GAM frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhin, V.P. [NRC “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sorokina, E.A., E-mail: sorokina.ekaterina@gmail.com [NRC “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-24

    The geodesic acoustic eigenmode for tokamak equilibrium with the maximum of local GAM frequency is found analytically in the frame of MHD model. The analysis is based on the asymptotic matching technique.

  6. Deviation from local thermodynamical equilibrium in the solar atmosphere. Metodology. The line source function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchukina, N.G.

    1980-01-01

    The methodology of the problem of deviation from local thermodynamical equilibrium in the solar atmosphere is presented. The difficulties of solution and methods of realization are systematized. The processes of line formation are considered which take into account velocity fields, structural inhomogeneity, radiation non-coherence etc. as applied to a quiet solar atmosphere. The conclusion is made on the regularity of deviation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium in upper layers of the solar atmosphere

  7. Conditions of equilibrium of a rotating ideal fluid in the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, N.P.

    1986-01-01

    Conditions of equilibrium of a rotating ideal fluid in parametrized post-Newtonian hydrodynamics are obtained by the variational method. They generalize the analogous equilibrium conditions in the post-Newtonian approximation of the general theory of relativity. A conservation law for the total energy is obtained by integrating the equations of motion

  8. Self-assembly and transformation of hybrid nano-objects and nanostructures under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Understanding how chemically derived processes control the construction and organization of matter across extended and multiple length scales is of growing interest in many areas of materials research. Here we review present equilibrium and non-equilibrium self-assembly approaches to the synthetic construction of discrete hybrid (inorganic-organic) nano-objects and higher-level nanostructured networks. We examine a range of synthetic modalities under equilibrium conditions that give rise to integrative self-assembly (supramolecular wrapping, nanoscale incarceration and nanostructure templating) or higher-order self-assembly (programmed/directed aggregation). We contrast these strategies with processes of transformative self-assembly that use self-organizing media, reaction-diffusion systems and coupled mesophases to produce higher-level hybrid structures under non-equilibrium conditions. Key elements of the constructional codes associated with these processes are identified with regard to existing theoretical knowledge, and presented as a heuristic guideline for the rational design of hybrid nano-objects and nanomaterials.

  9. Local equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics for irreversible systems with thermodynamic inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavatskiy, K S

    2015-10-28

    Validity of local equilibrium has been questioned for non-equilibrium systems which are characterized by delayed response. In particular, for systems with non-zero thermodynamic inertia, the assumption of local equilibrium leads to negative values of the entropy production, which is in contradiction with the second law of thermodynamics. In this paper, we address this question by suggesting a variational formulation of irreversible evolution of a system with non-zero thermodynamic inertia. We introduce the Lagrangian, which depends on the properties of the normal and the so-called "mirror-image" systems. We show that the standard evolution equations, in particular, the Maxwell-Cattaneo-Vernotte equation, can be derived from the variational procedure without going beyond the assumption of local equilibrium. We also argue that the second law of thermodynamics in non-equilibrium should be understood as a consequence of the variational procedure and the property of local equilibrium. For systems with instantaneous response this leads to the standard requirement of the local instantaneous entropy production being always positive. However, if a system is characterized by delayed response, the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics should be altered. In particular, the quantity, which is always positive, is not the instantaneous entropy production, but the entropy production averaged over a proper time interval.

  10. Local equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics for irreversible systems with thermodynamic inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glavatskiy, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Validity of local equilibrium has been questioned for non-equilibrium systems which are characterized by delayed response. In particular, for systems with non-zero thermodynamic inertia, the assumption of local equilibrium leads to negative values of the entropy production, which is in contradiction with the second law of thermodynamics. In this paper, we address this question by suggesting a variational formulation of irreversible evolution of a system with non-zero thermodynamic inertia. We introduce the Lagrangian, which depends on the properties of the normal and the so-called “mirror-image” systems. We show that the standard evolution equations, in particular, the Maxwell-Cattaneo-Vernotte equation, can be derived from the variational procedure without going beyond the assumption of local equilibrium. We also argue that the second law of thermodynamics in non-equilibrium should be understood as a consequence of the variational procedure and the property of local equilibrium. For systems with instantaneous response this leads to the standard requirement of the local instantaneous entropy production being always positive. However, if a system is characterized by delayed response, the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics should be altered. In particular, the quantity, which is always positive, is not the instantaneous entropy production, but the entropy production averaged over a proper time interval

  11. Model uncertainties of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium K-shell spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Blancard, C.; Chung, H. K.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Florido, R.; Fontes, C. J.; Gilleron, F.; Golovkin, I. E.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Loisel, G.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Pain, J.-C.; Rochau, G. A.; Sherrill, M. E.; Lee, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    Local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) K-shell spectroscopy is a common tool to diagnose electron density, ne, and electron temperature, Te, of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Knowing the accuracy of such diagnostics is important to provide quantitative conclusions of many HED-plasma research efforts. For example, Fe opacities were recently measured at multiple conditions at the Sandia National Laboratories Z machine (Bailey et al., 2015), showing significant disagreement with modeled opacities. Since the plasma conditions were measured using K-shell spectroscopy of tracer Mg (Nagayama et al., 2014), one concern is the accuracy of the inferred Fe conditions. In this article, we investigate the K-shell spectroscopy model uncertainties by analyzing the Mg spectra computed with 11 different models at the same conditions. We find that the inferred conditions differ by ±20-30% in ne and ±2-4% in Te depending on the choice of spectral model. Also, we find that half of the Te uncertainty comes from ne uncertainty. To refine the accuracy of the K-shell spectroscopy, it is important to scrutinize and experimentally validate line-shape theory. We investigate the impact of the inferred ne and Te model uncertainty on the Fe opacity measurements. Its impact is small and does not explain the reported discrepancies.

  12. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and...

  13. Expansion dynamics and equilibrium conditions in a laser ablation plume of lithium: Modeling and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapleton, M.W.; McKiernan, A.P.; Mosnier, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    The gas dynamics and atomic kinetics of a laser ablation plume of lithium, expanding adiabatically in vacuum, are included in a numerical model, using isothermal and isentropic self-similar analytical solutions and steady-state collisional radiative equations, respectively. Measurements of plume expansion dynamics using ultrafast imaging for various laser wavelengths (266-1064 nm), fluences (2-6.5 J cm -2 ), and spot sizes (50-1000 μm) are performed to provide input parameters for the model and, thereby, study the influence of laser spot size, wavelength, and fluence, respectively, on both the plume expansion dynamics and atomic kinetics. Target recoil pressure, which clearly affects plume dynamics, is included in the model. The effects of laser wavelength and spot size on plume dynamics are discussed in terms of plasma absorption of laser light. A transition from isothermal to isentropic behavior for spot sizes greater than 50 μm is clearly evidenced. Equilibrium conditions are found to exist only up to 300 ns after the plume creation, while complete local thermodynamic equilibrium is found to be confined to the very early parts of the expansion

  14. Condition of Mechanical Equilibrium at the Phase Interface with Arbitrary Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, V. V.; Zubkova, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    The authors produced an expression for the mechanical equilibrium condition at the phase interface within the force definition of surface tension. This equilibrium condition is the most general one from the mathematical standpoint and takes into account the three-dimensional aspect of surface tension. Furthermore, the formula produced allows describing equilibrium on the fractal surface of the interface. The authors used the fractional integral model of fractal distribution and took the fractional order integrals over Euclidean space instead of integrating over the fractal set.

  15. The Non-Equilibrium Statistical Distribution Function for Electrons and Holes in Semiconductor Heterostructures in Steady-State Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Jόzwikowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work is to determine a statistical non-equilibrium distribution function for the electron and holes in semiconductor heterostructures in steady-state conditions. Based on the postulates of local equilibrium, as well as on the integral form of the weighted Gyarmati’s variational principle in the force representation, using an alternative method, we have derived general expressions, which have the form of the Fermi–Dirac distribution function with four additional components. The physical interpretation of these components has been carried out in this paper. Some numerical results of a non-equilibrium distribution function for an electron in HgCdTe structures are also presented.

  16. Prediction of critical heat flux by a new local condition hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, J. H.; Jun, K. D.; Sim, J. W.; Deng, Zhijian

    1998-01-01

    Critical Heat Flux(CHF) was predicted for uniformly heated vertical round tube by a new local condition hypothesis which incorporates a local true steam quality. This model successfully overcame the difficulties in predicted the subcooled and quality CHF by the thermodynamic equilibrium quality. The local true steam quality is a dependent variable of the thermodynamic equilibrium quality at the exit and the quality at the Onset of Significant Vaporization(OSV). The exit thermodynamic equilibrium quality was obtained from the heat balance, and the quality at OSV was obtained from the Saha-Zuber correlation. In the past CHF has been predicted by the experimental correlation based on local or non-local condition hypothesis. This preliminary study showed that all the available world data on uniform CHF could be predicted by the model based on the local condition hypothesis

  17. The energy balance of a plasma in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, G.M.W.; Schram, D.C.; Timmermans, C.J.; de Haas, J.C.M.

    1990-01-01

    The energy balance for electrons and heavy particles constituting a plasma in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium is derived. The formulation of the energy balance used allows for evaluation of the source terms without knowledge of the particle and radiation transport situation, since most of

  18. Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Beyond the McWhirter criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristoforetti, G.; De Giacomo, A.; Dell'Aglio, M.; Legnaioli, S.; Tognoni, E.; Palleschi, V.; Omenetto, N.

    2010-01-01

    In the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, the existence of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) is the essential requisite for meaningful application of theoretical Boltzmann-Maxwell and Saha-Eggert expressions that relate fundamental plasma parameters and concentration of analyte species. The most popular criterion reported in the literature dealing with plasma diagnostics, and usually invoked as a proof of the existence of LTE in the plasma, is the McWhirter criterion [R.W.P. McWhirter, in: Eds. R.H. Huddlestone, S.L. Leonard, Plasma Diagnostic Techniques, Academic Press, New York, 1965, pp. 201-264]. However, as pointed out in several papers, this criterion is known to be a necessary but not a sufficient condition to insure LTE. The considerations reported here are meant to briefly review the theoretical analysis underlying the concept of thermodynamic equilibrium and the derivation of the McWhirter criterion, and to critically discuss its application to a transient and non-homogeneous plasma, like that created by a laser pulse on solid targets. Specific examples are given of theoretical expressions involving relaxation times and diffusion coefficients, as well as a discussion of different experimental approaches involving space and time-resolved measurements that could be used to complement a positive result of the calculation of the minimum electron number density required for LTE using the McWhirter formula. It is argued that these approaches will allow a more complete assessment of the existence of LTE and therefore permit a better quantitative result. It is suggested that the mere use of the McWhirter criterion to assess the existence of LTE in laser-induced plasmas should be discontinued.

  19. Absence of local thermal equilibrium in two models of heat conduction

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar, Abhishek; Dhar, Deepak

    1998-01-01

    A crucial assumption in the conventional description of thermal conduction is the existence of local thermal equilibrium. We test this assumption in two simple models of heat conduction. Our first model is a linear chain of planar spins with nearest neighbour couplings, and the second model is that of a Lorentz gas. We look at the steady state of the system when the two ends are connected to heat baths at temperatures T1 and T2. If T1=T2, the system reaches thermal equilibrium. If T1 is not e...

  20. Local Tensor Radiation Conditions For Elastic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2001-01-01

    A local boundary condition is formulated, representing radiation of elastic waves from an arbitrary point source. The boundary condition takes the form of a tensor relation between the stress at a point on an arbitrarily oriented section and the velocity and displacement vectors at the point....... The tensor relation generalizes the traditional normal incidence impedance condition by accounting for the angle between wave propagation and the surface normal and by including a generalized stiffness term due to spreading of the waves. The effectiveness of the local tensor radiation condition...

  1. Achieving Chemical Equilibrium: The Role of Imposed Conditions in the Ammonia Formation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Under conditions of constant temperature T and pressure P, chemical equilibrium occurs in a closed system (fixed mass) when the Gibbs free energy G of the reaction mixture is minimized. However, when chemical reactions occur under other conditions, other thermodynamic functions are minimized or maximized. For processes at constant T and volume V,…

  2. Partial local thermal equilibrium in a low-temperature hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hey, J.D.; Chu, C.C.; Rash, J.P.S.

    1999-01-01

    If the degree of ionisation is sufficient, competition between de-excitation by electron collisions and radiative decay determines the smallest principal quantum number (the so-called 'thermal limit') above which partial local thermodynamic equilibrium (PLTE) holds under the particular conditions of electron density and temperature. The LTE (PLTE) criteria of Wilson (JQSRT 1962;2:477-90), Griem (Phys Rev 1963;131:1170-6; Plasma Spectroscopy. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1964), Drawin (Z Physik 1969;228: 99-119), Hey (JQSRT 1976;16:69-75), and Fujimoto and McWhirter (Phys Rev A 1990;42:6588-601) are examined as regards their applicability to neutral atoms. For these purposes, we consider for simplicity an idealised, steady-state, homogeneous and primarily optically thin plasma, with some additional comments and numerical estimates on the roles of opacity and of atom-atom collisions. Particularly for atomic states of lower principal quantum number, the first two of the above criteria should be modified quite appreciably before application to neutral radiators in plasmas of low temperature, because of the profoundly different nature of the near-threshold collisional cross-sections for atoms and ions, while the most recent criterion should be applied with caution to PLTE of atoms in cold plasmas in ionisation balance. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations in binary liquids with realistic boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Zárate, J M; Kirkpatrick, T R; Sengers, J V

    2015-09-01

    Because of the spatially long-ranged nature of spontaneous fluctuations in thermal non-equilibrium systems, they are affected by boundary conditions for the fluctuating hydrodynamic variables. In this paper we consider a liquid mixture between two rigid and impervious plates with a stationary concentration gradient resulting from a temperature gradient through the Soret effect. For liquid mixtures with large Lewis and Schmidt numbers, we are able to obtain explicit analytical expressions for the intensity of the non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations as a function of the frequency ω and the wave number q of the fluctuations. In addition we elucidate the spatial dependence of the intensity of the non-equilibrium fluctuations responsible for a non-equilibrium Casimir effect.

  4. Modeling two-phase flow in a micro-model with local thermal non-equilibrium on the Darcy scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuske, Philipp; Ronneberger, Olaf; Karadimitriou, Nikolaos K.; Helmig, Rainer; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    2015-01-01

    Loosening local equilibrium assumptions in two-phase flow in porous media gives rise to new, unknown variables. More specifically, when loosening the local thermal equilibrium assumption, one has to describe the heat transfer between multiple phases, present at the same mathematical point. In this

  5. One-dimensional arrays of oscillators: Energy localization in thermal equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reigada, R.; Romero, A.H.; Sarmiento, A.; Lindenberg, K.

    1999-01-01

    All systems in thermal equilibrium exhibit a spatially variable energy landscape due to thermal fluctuations. Thus at any instant there is naturally a thermodynamically driven localization of energy in parts of the system relative to other parts of the system. The specific characteristics of the spatial landscape such as, for example, the energy variance, depend on the thermodynamic properties of the system and vary from one system to another. The temporal persistence of a given energy landscape, that is, the way in which energy fluctuations (high or low) decay toward the thermal mean, depends on the dynamical features of the system. We discuss the spatial and temporal characteristics of spontaneous energy localization in 1D anharmonic chains in thermal equilibrium. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  6. Elemental transport coefficients in viscous plasma flows near local thermodynamic equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsini, Alessio; Kustova, Elena V.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a convenient formulation of elemental transport coefficients in chemically reacting and plasma flows locally approaching thermodynamic equilibrium. A set of transport coefficients for elemental diffusion velocities, heat flux, and electric current is introduced. These coefficients relate the transport fluxes with the electric field and with the spatial gradients of elemental fractions, pressure, and temperature. The proposed formalism based on chemical elements and fully symmetric with the classical transport theory based on chemical species, is particularly suitable to model mixing and demixing phenomena due to diffusion of chemical elements. The aim of this work is threefold: to define a simple and rigorous framework suitable for numerical implementation, to allow order of magnitude estimations and qualitative predictions of elemental transport phenomena, and to gain a deeper insight into the physics of chemically reacting flows near local equilibrium.

  7. Effect of configuration widths on the spectra of local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Goldstein, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    We present the extension of the supertransition-array (STA) theory to include configuration widths in the spectra of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) plasmas. Exact analytic expressions for the moments of a STA are given, accounting for the detailed contributions of individual levels within the configurations that belong to a STA. The STA average energy is shifted and an additional term appears in its variance. Various cases are presented, demonstrating the effect of these corrections on the LTE spectrum

  8. Determination of equilibrium composition of thermally ionized monoatomic gas under different physical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, M. S.; Rydalevskaya, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    Perfect gas mixtures that result from thermal ionization of spatially and chemically homogeneous monoatomic gases are considered. Equilibrium concentrations of the components of such mixtures are determined using integration over the momentum space and summation with respect to energy levels of the distribution functions that maximize the entropy of system under condition for constancy of the total number of nuclei and electrons. It is demonstrated that such a method allows significant simplification of the calculation of the equilibrium composition for ionized mixtures at different temperatures and makes it possible to study the degree of ionization of gas versus gas density and number in the periodic table of elements.

  9. Relation between the conditions of helium ion implantation and helium void equilibrium parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Rybalko, V.F.; Ruzhitskij, V.V.; Tolstolutskaya, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The conditions of helium thermodynamic equilibrium in a system of voids produced by helium ion bombardment of a metal sample are studied. As an initial equation for description of the equilibrium the Clapeyron equation was used. The equation is obtained relating basic parameters of helium voids (average diameter and density) to irradiation parameters (dose, ion energy (straggling)) and properties of the metal (surface tension coefficient, yield strength). Comparison of the calculations with experimental data on helium in nickel found in literature shows that the equation yields satisfactory resutls for the dose range 1.10 16 -1x10 17 cm -2 and temperatures T [ru

  10. A conservative multicomponent diffusion algorithm for ambipolar plasma flows in local thermodynamic equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerenboom, Kim; Van Boxtel, Jochem; Janssen, Jesper; Van Dijk, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The usage of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation can be a very powerful assumption for simulations of plasmas in or close to equilibrium. In general, the elemental composition in LTE is not constant in space and effects of mixing and demixing have to be taken into account using the Stefan–Maxwell diffusion description. In this paper, we will introduce a method to discretize the resulting coupled set of elemental continuity equations. The coupling between the equations is taken into account by the introduction of the concept of a Péclet matrix. It will be shown analytically and numerically that the mass and charge conservation constraints can be fulfilled exactly. Furthermore, a case study is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method to a simulation of a mercury-free metal-halide lamp. The source code for the simulations presented in this paper is provided as supplementary material (stacks.iop.org/JPhysD/47/425202/mmedia). (paper)

  11. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics driven by localized time-dependent perturbations at quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissetto, Andrea; Rossini, Davide; Vicari, Ettore

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of many-body systems subject to local (i.e., restricted to a limited space region) time-dependent perturbations. If the system crosses a quantum phase transition, an off-equilibrium behavior is observed, even for a very slow driving. We show that, close to the transition, time-dependent quantities obey scaling laws. In first-order transitions, the scaling behavior is universal, and some scaling functions can be computed exactly. For continuous transitions, the scaling laws are controlled by the standard critical exponents and by the renormalization-group dimension of the perturbation at the transition. Our protocol can be implemented in existing relatively small quantum simulators, paving the way for a quantitative probe of the universal off-equilibrium scaling behavior, without the need to manipulate systems close to the thermodynamic limit.

  12. Interface model conditions for a non-equilibrium heat transfer model for conjugate fluid/porous/solid domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betchen, L.J.; Straatman, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical and numerical model for the treatment of conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer problems in domains containing pure fluid, porous, and pure solid regions has been developed. The model is general and physically reasoned, and allows for local thermal non-equilibrium in the porous region. The model is developed for implementation on a simple collocated finite volume grid. Of particular novelty are the conditions implemented at the interfaces between porous regions, and those containing a pure solid or pure fluid. The model is validated by simulation of a three-dimensional porous plug problem for which experimental results are available. (author)

  13. Adaptive Chemical Networks under Non-Equilibrium Conditions: The Evaporating Droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armao, Joseph J; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2016-10-17

    Non-volatile solutes in an evaporating drop experience an out-of-equilibrium state due to non-linear concentration effects and complex flow patterns. Here, we demonstrate a small molecule chemical reaction network that undergoes a rapid adaptation response to the out-of-equilibrium conditions inside the droplet leading to control over the molecular constitution and spatial arrangement of the deposition pattern. Adaptation results in a pronounced coffee stain effect and coupling to chemical concentration gradients within the drop is demonstrated. Amplification and suppression of network species are readily identifiable with confocal fluorescence microscopy. We anticipate that these observations will contribute to the design and exploration of out-of-equilibrium chemical systems, as well as be useful towards the development of point-of-care medical diagnostics and controlled deposition of small molecules through inkjet printing. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Disorder Induced Dynamic Equilibrium Localization and Random Phase Steps of Bose—Einstein Condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Ya-Fan; Xu Zhen; Qian Jun; Sun Jian-Fang; Jiang Bo-Nan; Hong Tao

    2011-01-01

    We numerically analyze the dynamic behavior of Bose—Einstein condensate (BEC) in a one-dimensional disordered potential before it completely loses spatial quantum coherence. We find that both the disorder statistics and the atom interactions produce remarkable effects on localization. We also find that the single phase of the initial condensate is broken into many small pieces while the system approaches localization, showing a counter-intuitive step-wise phase but not a thoroughly randomized phase. Although the condensates as a whole show less flow and expansion, the currents between adjacent phase steps retain strong time dependence. Thus we show explicitly that the localization of a finite size Bose—Einstein condensate is a dynamic equilibrium state. (general)

  15. Solutions to the Cosmic Initial Entropy Problem without Equilibrium Initial Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihan M. Patel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The entropy of the observable universe is increasing. Thus, at earlier times the entropy was lower. However, the cosmic microwave background radiation reveals an apparently high entropy universe close to thermal and chemical equilibrium. A two-part solution to this cosmic initial entropy problem is proposed. Following Penrose, we argue that the evenly distributed matter of the early universe is equivalent to low gravitational entropy. There are two competing explanations for how this initial low gravitational entropy comes about. (1 Inflation and baryogenesis produce a virtually homogeneous distribution of matter with a low gravitational entropy. (2 Dissatisfied with explaining a low gravitational entropy as the product of a ‘special’ scalar field, some theorists argue (following Boltzmann for a “more natural” initial condition in which the entire universe is in an initial equilibrium state of maximum entropy. In this equilibrium model, our observable universe is an unusual low entropy fluctuation embedded in a high entropy universe. The anthropic principle and the fluctuation theorem suggest that this low entropy region should be as small as possible and have as large an entropy as possible, consistent with our existence. However, our low entropy universe is much larger than needed to produce observers, and we see no evidence for an embedding in a higher entropy background. The initial conditions of inflationary models are as natural as the equilibrium background favored by many theorists.

  16. Modelling Danish local CHP on market conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Hans V.; Riisom, Jannik; Schaumburg-Müller, Camilla

    2004-01-01

    with the liberalisation process of the energy sectors of the EU countries, it is however anticipated that Danish local CHP are to begin operating on market conditions within the year 2005. This means that the income that the local CHPs previously gained from selling electricity at the feed-in tariff is replaced in part...... the consequences of acting in a liberalised market for a given CHP plant, based on the abovementioned bottom-up model. The key assumption determining the bottom line is the electricity spot price. The formation of the spot price in the Nordic area depends heavily upon the state of the water reservoirs in Norway...

  17. Removal of semivolatiles from soils by steam stripping. 1. A local equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.J.; Clarke, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model for the in-situ steam stripping of volatile and semivolatile organics from contaminated vadose zone soils at hazardous waste sites is developed. A single steam injection well is modeled. The model assumes that the pneumatic permeability of the soil is spatially constant and isotropic, that the adsorption isotherm of the contaminant is linear, and that the local equilibrium approximation is adequate. The model is used to explore the streamlines and transit times of the injected steam as well as the effects of injection well depth and contaminant distribution on the time required for remediation

  18. A Study of Interdiffusion in the Fe-C/Ti System Under Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanthi, T. N.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, diffusion behavior under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions in a Fe-C/Ti system is studied in the temperature range of 773 K to 1073 K (500 °C to 800 °C). A defect-free weld joint between mild steel (MS) (Fe-0.14 pct C) and Ti Grade 2 obtained by friction welding is diffusion annealed for various durations to study the interdiffusion behavior under equilibrium conditions, while an explosive clad joint is used to study interdiffusion under nonequilibrium conditions. From the elemental concentration profiles obtained across the MS-Ti interface using electron-probe microanalysis and imaging of the interface, the formation of distinct diffusion zones as a function of temperature and time is established. Concentration and temperature dependence of the interdiffusion coefficients ( D( c)) and activation energies are determined. Under equilibrium conditions, the change in molar volume with concentration shows a close match with the ideal Vegard's law, whereas a negative deviation is observed for nonequilibrium conditions. This deviation can be attributed to the formation of secondary phases, which, in turn, alters the D( c) values of diffusing species. Calculations showed that the D 0 and activation energy for interdiffusion under equilibrium is on the order of 10-11 m2/s and 147 kJ/mol, whereas it is far lower in the nonequilibrium case (10-10 m2/s and 117 kJ/mol) in the compositional range of 40 to 50 wt pct Fe, which also manifests as accelerated growth kinetics of the different diffusion zones.

  19. Elliptic flow from non-equilibrium initial condition with a saturation scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, M.; Scardina, F.; Plumari, S.; Greco, V.

    2013-01-01

    A current goal of relativistic heavy-ion collisions experiments is the search for a Color Glass Condensate (CGC) as the limiting state of QCD matter at very high density. In viscous hydrodynamics simulations, a standard Glauber initial condition leads to estimate 4πη/s∼1, while employing the Kharzeev–Levin–Nardi (KLN) modeling of the glasma leads to at least a factor of 2 larger η/s. Within a kinetic theory approach based on a relativistic Boltzmann-like transport simulation, our main result is that the out-of-equilibrium initial distribution reduces the efficiency in building-up the elliptic flow. At RHIC energy we find the available data on v 2 are in agreement with a 4πη/s∼1 also for KLN initial conditions. More generally, our study shows that the initial non-equilibrium in p-space can have a significant impact on the build-up of anisotropic flow

  20. Effect of non-local equilibrium on minimal thermal resistance porous layered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, Genevieve; Gosselin, Louis

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the cooling of a heat-generating surface by a stacking of porous media (e.g., metallic foam) through which fluid flows parallel to the surface is considered. A two-temperature model is proposed to account for non-local thermal equilibrium (non-LTE). A scale analysis is performed to determine temperatures profiles in the boundary layer regime. The hot spot temperature is minimized with respect to the three design variables of each layer: porosity, pore diameter, and material. Global cost and mass are constrained. The optimization is performed with a hybrid genetic algorithm (GA) including local search to enhance convergence and repeatability. Results demonstrate that the optimized stacks do not operate in LTE. Therefore, we show that assuming LTE might result in underestimation of the hot spot temperature, and into different final designs as well

  1. Diagnosis of the local thermal equilibrium by optical emission spectroscopy in the evolution of electric discharge; Diagnostico del equilibrio termico local por espectroscopia optica de emision en la evolucion de una descarga electrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdivia B, R.; Pacheco S, J.; Pacheco P, M.; Ramos F, F.; Cruz A, A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Velazquez P, S. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Av. Instituto Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho la Virgen, Metepec 52140, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    In this work applies the technique of optical emission spectroscopy to diagnose the temperature of the species generated in plasma in the transition to glow discharge arc. Whit this diagnosis is possible to determine the local thermal equilibrium conditions of the discharge. (Author)

  2. Measurements and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling of mid-Z plasma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, L.; Primout, M.; Kaiser, P.; Clouët, J. F.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.; Oudot, G.

    2015-01-01

    The x-ray yields from laser-irradiated thin foils of iron, copper, zinc, and germanium have been measured in the soft and multi-keV x-ray ranges at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The incident laser power had a pre-pulse to enhance the x-ray emission of a 1 ns flat-top main pulse. The experimental results have been compared with post-shot simulations performed with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code FCI2. A new non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model, NOO-RAD, have been incorporated into FCI2. In this approach, the plasma ionization state is in-line calculated by the atomic physics NOHEL package. In the soft x-ray bands, both simulations using RADIOM [M. Busquet, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] and NOO-RAD clearly over-predict the powers and energies measured by a broad-band spectrometer. In one case (the iron foil), the discrepancy between the measured and simulated x-ray output is nevertheless significantly reduced when NOO-RAD is used in the simulations. In the multi-keV x-ray bands, the simulations display a strong sensitivity to the coupling between the electron thermal conductivity and the NLTE models, and for some particular combinations of these, provide a close match to the measured emission. The comparison between the measured and simulated H-like to He-like line-intensity ratios deduced from high-resolution spectra indicates higher experimental electron temperatures were achieved, compared to the simulated ones. Measurements of the plasma conditions have been achieved using the Thomson-scattering diagnostic. The electron temperatures are found to range from 3 to 5 keV at the end of the laser pulse and are greater than predicted by the simulations. The measured flow velocities are in reasonable agreement with the calculated ones. This last finding gives us confidence in our numerical predictions for the plasma parameters, which are over that time mainly determined by hydrodynamics, such as the mass densities and

  3. Measurements and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling of mid-Z plasma emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, L.; Primout, M.; Kaiser, P.; Clouët, J. F.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.; Oudot, G.

    2015-12-01

    The x-ray yields from laser-irradiated thin foils of iron, copper, zinc, and germanium have been measured in the soft and multi-keV x-ray ranges at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The incident laser power had a pre-pulse to enhance the x-ray emission of a 1 ns flat-top main pulse. The experimental results have been compared with post-shot simulations performed with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code FCI2. A new non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model, NOO-RAD, have been incorporated into FCI2. In this approach, the plasma ionization state is in-line calculated by the atomic physics NOHEL package. In the soft x-ray bands, both simulations using RADIOM [M. Busquet, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] and NOO-RAD clearly over-predict the powers and energies measured by a broad-band spectrometer. In one case (the iron foil), the discrepancy between the measured and simulated x-ray output is nevertheless significantly reduced when NOO-RAD is used in the simulations. In the multi-keV x-ray bands, the simulations display a strong sensitivity to the coupling between the electron thermal conductivity and the NLTE models, and for some particular combinations of these, provide a close match to the measured emission. The comparison between the measured and simulated H-like to He-like line-intensity ratios deduced from high-resolution spectra indicates higher experimental electron temperatures were achieved, compared to the simulated ones. Measurements of the plasma conditions have been achieved using the Thomson-scattering diagnostic. The electron temperatures are found to range from 3 to 5 keV at the end of the laser pulse and are greater than predicted by the simulations. The measured flow velocities are in reasonable agreement with the calculated ones. This last finding gives us confidence in our numerical predictions for the plasma parameters, which are over that time mainly determined by hydrodynamics, such as the mass densities and the

  4. Measurements and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling of mid-Z plasma emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, L., E-mail: laurent.jacquet@cea.fr; Primout, M.; Kaiser, P.; Clouët, J. F.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.; Oudot, G. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2015-12-15

    The x-ray yields from laser-irradiated thin foils of iron, copper, zinc, and germanium have been measured in the soft and multi-keV x-ray ranges at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The incident laser power had a pre-pulse to enhance the x-ray emission of a 1 ns flat-top main pulse. The experimental results have been compared with post-shot simulations performed with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code FCI2. A new non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model, NOO-RAD, have been incorporated into FCI2. In this approach, the plasma ionization state is in-line calculated by the atomic physics NOHEL package. In the soft x-ray bands, both simulations using RADIOM [M. Busquet, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] and NOO-RAD clearly over-predict the powers and energies measured by a broad-band spectrometer. In one case (the iron foil), the discrepancy between the measured and simulated x-ray output is nevertheless significantly reduced when NOO-RAD is used in the simulations. In the multi-keV x-ray bands, the simulations display a strong sensitivity to the coupling between the electron thermal conductivity and the NLTE models, and for some particular combinations of these, provide a close match to the measured emission. The comparison between the measured and simulated H-like to He-like line-intensity ratios deduced from high-resolution spectra indicates higher experimental electron temperatures were achieved, compared to the simulated ones. Measurements of the plasma conditions have been achieved using the Thomson-scattering diagnostic. The electron temperatures are found to range from 3 to 5 keV at the end of the laser pulse and are greater than predicted by the simulations. The measured flow velocities are in reasonable agreement with the calculated ones. This last finding gives us confidence in our numerical predictions for the plasma parameters, which are over that time mainly determined by hydrodynamics, such as the mass densities and

  5. A critical evaluation of the local-equilibrium assumption in modeling NAPL-pool dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagren, Eric A.; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Valocchi, Albert J.

    1999-07-01

    An analytical modeling analysis was used to assess when local equilibrium (LE) and nonequilibrium (NE) modeling approaches may be appropriate for describing nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) pool dissolution. NE mass-transfer between NAPL pools and groundwater is expected to affect the dissolution flux under conditions corresponding to values of Sh'St (the modified Sherwood number ( Lxkl/ Dz) multiplied by the Stanton number ( kl/ vx))≈400, the NE and LE solutions converge, and the LE assumption is appropriate. Based on typical groundwater conditions, many cases of interest are expected to fall in this range. The parameter with the greatest impact on Sh'St is kl. The NAPL pool mass-transfer coefficient correlation of Pfannkuch [Pfannkuch, H.-O., 1984. Determination of the contaminant source strength from mass exchange processes at the petroleum-ground-water interface in shallow aquifer systems. In: Proceedings of the NWWA/API Conference on Petroleum Hydrocarbons and Organic Chemicals in Ground Water—Prevention, Detection, and Restoration, Houston, TX. Natl. Water Well Assoc., Worthington, OH, Nov. 1984, pp. 111-129.] was evaluated using the toluene pool data from Seagren et al. [Seagren, E.A., Rittmann, B.E., Valocchi, A.J., 1998. An experimental investigation of NAPL-pool dissolution enhancement by flushing. J. Contam. Hydrol., accepted.]. Dissolution flux predictions made with kl calculated using the Pfannkuch correlation were similar to the LE model predictions, and deviated systematically from predictions made using the average overall kl=4.76 m/day estimated by Seagren et al. [Seagren, E.A., Rittmann, B.E., Valocchi, A.J., 1998. An experimental investigation of NAPL-pool dissolution enhancement by flushing. J. Contam. Hydrol., accepted.] and from the experimental data for vx>18 m/day. The Pfannkuch correlation kl was too large for vx>≈10 m/day, possibly because of the relatively low Peclet number data used by Pfannkuch [Pfannkuch, H.-O., 1984. Determination

  6. Short-Term Expectation Formation Versus Long-Term Equilibrium Conditions: The Danish Housing Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hetland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary contribution of this paper is to establish that the long-swings behavior observed in the market price of Danish housing since the 1970s can be understood by studying the interplay between short-term expectation formation and long-run equilibrium conditions. We introduce an asset market model for housing based on uncertainty rather than risk, which under mild assumptions allows for other forms of forecasting behavior than rational expectations. We test the theory via an I(2 cointegrated VAR model and find that the long-run equilibrium for the housing price corresponds closely to the predictions from the theoretical framework. Additionally, we corroborate previous findings that housing markets are well characterized by short-term momentum forecasting behavior. Our conclusions have wider relevance, since housing prices play a role in the wider Danish economy, and other developed economies, through wealth effects.

  7. Equilibrium statistical mechanics for self-gravitating systems: local ergodicity and extended Boltzmann-Gibbs/White-Narayan statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping

    2012-01-01

    The long-standing puzzle surrounding the statistical mechanics of self-gravitating systems has not yet been solved successfully. We formulate a systematic theoretical framework of entropy-based statistical mechanics for spherically symmetric collisionless self-gravitating systems. We use an approach that is very different from that of the conventional statistical mechanics of short-range interaction systems. We demonstrate that the equilibrium states of self-gravitating systems consist of both mechanical and statistical equilibria, with the former characterized by a series of velocity-moment equations and the latter by statistical equilibrium equations, which should be derived from the entropy principle. The velocity-moment equations of all orders are derived from the steady-state collisionless Boltzmann equation. We point out that the ergodicity is invalid for the whole self-gravitating system, but it can be re-established locally. Based on the local ergodicity, using Fermi-Dirac-like statistics, with the non-degenerate condition and the spatial independence of the local microstates, we rederive the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. This is consistent with the validity of the collisionless Boltzmann equation, and should be the correct entropy form for collisionless self-gravitating systems. Apart from the usual constraints of mass and energy conservation, we demonstrate that the series of moment or virialization equations must be included as additional constraints on the entropy functional when performing the variational calculus; this is an extension to the original prescription by White & Narayan. Any possible velocity distribution can be produced by the statistical-mechanical approach that we have developed with the extended Boltzmann-Gibbs/White-Narayan statistics. Finally, we discuss the questions of negative specific heat and ensemble inequivalence for self-gravitating systems.

  8. Non local-thermodynamical-equilibrium effects in the simulation of laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapisch, M.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Colombant, D.

    1998-05-01

    Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) breaks down in directly or indirectly driven laser plasmas because of sharp gradients, energy deposition, etc. For modeling non-LTE effects in hydrodynamical simulations, Busquet's model [Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] is very convenient and efficient. It uses off-line generated LTE opacities and equation of states via an effective, radiation-dependent ionization temperature Tz. An overview of the model is given. The results are compared with an elaborate collisional radiative model based on superconfigurations. The agreements for average charge Z* and opacities are surprisingly good, even more so when the plasma is immersed in a radiation field. Some remaining discrepancy at low density is attributed to dielectronic recombination. Improvement appears possible, especially for emissivities, because the concept of ionization temperature seems to be validated.

  9. Non local-thermodynamical-equilibrium effects in the simulation of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapisch, M.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Colombant, D.

    1998-01-01

    Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) breaks down in directly or indirectly driven laser plasmas because of sharp gradients, energy deposition, etc. For modeling non-LTE effects in hydrodynamical simulations, Busquet close-quote s model [Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] is very convenient and efficient. It uses off-line generated LTE opacities and equation of states via an effective, radiation-dependent ionization temperature T z . An overview of the model is given. The results are compared with an elaborate collisional radiative model based on superconfigurations. The agreements for average charge Z * and opacities are surprisingly good, even more so when the plasma is immersed in a radiation field. Some remaining discrepancy at low density is attributed to dielectronic recombination. Improvement appears possible, especially for emissivities, because the concept of ionization temperature seems to be validated. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  10. Influence of equilibrium shear flow on peeling-ballooning instability and edge localized mode crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, P. W.; Xu, X. Q.; Wang, X. G.; Xia, T. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The E × B shear flow plays a dual role on peeling-ballooning modes and their subsequently triggered edge localized mode (ELM) crashes. On one hand, the flow shear can stabilize high-n modes and twist the mode in the poloidal direction, constraining the mode's radial extent and reducing the size of the corresponding ELM. On the other hand, the shear flow also introduces the Kelvin-Helmholtz drive, which can destabilize peeling-ballooning modes. The overall effect of equilibrium shear flow on peeling-ballooning modes and ELM crashes depends on the competition between these two effects. When the flow shear is either small or very large, it can reduce ELM size. However, for moderate values of flow shear, the destabilizing effect from the Kelvin-Helmholtz term is dominant and leads to larger ELM crashes.

  11. A Study of the Polycondensation of (Tetrahydroxy(TetraarylCyclotetrasiloxanes under Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Conditions in the Presence and Absence of Montmorillonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya N. Makarova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oligo- and polycyclosiloxanes were obtained by the polycondensation of (tetrahydroxy(tetraarylcyclotetrasiloxanes in equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions in the presence and absence of montmorillonite (MMT. Their composition and the structures of their components were investigated by infrared (IR spectroscopy, 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI mass spectrometry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and gel-penetrating chromatography (GPC. Also, a comparison of polymers formed in the presence of MMT and via anionic polymerization was performed showing differences in their structures.

  12. The influence of the working conditions on the equilibrium factor F and the unattached fraction fp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streil, T.; Reichert, A.

    1998-01-01

    The influence is reported of working conditions on dose estimation, in particular the equilibrium factor and the unattached fraction. For instance in a cabinet-maker's shop the radon concentration is strongly influenced by the ventilation system. The F factor is affected by dust producing work processes. For a better knowledge of radon dosimetry, the unattached fraction of radon progeny has to be measured continuously and separately. Preliminary results are presented obtained with a monitor containing three alpha detector microsystems measuring radon in the air, attached radon daughters and unattached radon daughters. The system was tested in buildings, caves, mines, waterworks and other places

  13. Analysis of three-phase equilibrium conditions for methane hydrate by isometric-isothermal molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Brumby, Paul E.; Wu, David T.; Sum, Amadeu K.; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2018-05-01

    To develop prediction methods of three-phase equilibrium (coexistence) conditions of methane hydrate by molecular simulations, we examined the use of NVT (isometric-isothermal) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. NVT MD simulations of coexisting solid hydrate, liquid water, and vapor methane phases were performed at four different temperatures, namely, 285, 290, 295, and 300 K. NVT simulations do not require complex pressure control schemes in multi-phase systems, and the growth or dissociation of the hydrate phase can lead to significant pressure changes in the approach toward equilibrium conditions. We found that the calculated equilibrium pressures tended to be higher than those reported by previous NPT (isobaric-isothermal) simulation studies using the same water model. The deviations of equilibrium conditions from previous simulation studies are mainly attributable to the employed calculation methods of pressure and Lennard-Jones interactions. We monitored the pressure in the methane phase, far from the interfaces with other phases, and confirmed that it was higher than the total pressure of the system calculated by previous studies. This fact clearly highlights the difficulties associated with the pressure calculation and control for multi-phase systems. The treatment of Lennard-Jones interactions without tail corrections in MD simulations also contributes to the overestimation of equilibrium pressure. Although improvements are still required to obtain accurate equilibrium conditions, NVT MD simulations exhibit potential for the prediction of equilibrium conditions of multi-phase systems.

  14. Analysis of three-phase equilibrium conditions for methane hydrate by isometric-isothermal molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Brumby, Paul E; Wu, David T; Sum, Amadeu K; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2018-05-14

    To develop prediction methods of three-phase equilibrium (coexistence) conditions of methane hydrate by molecular simulations, we examined the use of NVT (isometric-isothermal) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. NVT MD simulations of coexisting solid hydrate, liquid water, and vapor methane phases were performed at four different temperatures, namely, 285, 290, 295, and 300 K. NVT simulations do not require complex pressure control schemes in multi-phase systems, and the growth or dissociation of the hydrate phase can lead to significant pressure changes in the approach toward equilibrium conditions. We found that the calculated equilibrium pressures tended to be higher than those reported by previous NPT (isobaric-isothermal) simulation studies using the same water model. The deviations of equilibrium conditions from previous simulation studies are mainly attributable to the employed calculation methods of pressure and Lennard-Jones interactions. We monitored the pressure in the methane phase, far from the interfaces with other phases, and confirmed that it was higher than the total pressure of the system calculated by previous studies. This fact clearly highlights the difficulties associated with the pressure calculation and control for multi-phase systems. The treatment of Lennard-Jones interactions without tail corrections in MD simulations also contributes to the overestimation of equilibrium pressure. Although improvements are still required to obtain accurate equilibrium conditions, NVT MD simulations exhibit potential for the prediction of equilibrium conditions of multi-phase systems.

  15. A Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy application based on Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium assumption for the elemental analysis of alexandrite gemstone and copper-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giacomo, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Bari, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Dell' Aglio, M. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Bari, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gaudiuso, R., E-mail: rosalba.gaudiuso@ba.imip.cnr.it [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Bari, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Santagata, A. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Potenza, Via S. Loja, Zona Ind., 85050 Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy); Senesi, G.S. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Bari, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Rossi, M.; Ghiara, M.R. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Mezzocannone 8, 80134 Naples (Italy); Capitelli, F. [Institute of Crystallography - CNR, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo (Roma) (Italy); De Pascale, O. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Bari, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2012-04-04

    Graphical abstract: Self-calibrated analytical techniques based on the approximation of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) have been employed for the analysis of gemstones and copper-based alloys by LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy), with a special focus on LTE conditions in laser induced plasmas. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discussion of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition in laser-induced plasmas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIBS enables elemental analysis with self-calibrated LTE-based methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Be detection in alexandrite gemstone is made possible by LIBS. - Abstract: Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an appealing technique to study laser-induced plasmas (LIPs), both from the basic diagnostics point of view and for analytical applications. LIPs are complex dynamic systems, expanding at supersonic velocities and undergoing a transition between different plasma regimes. If the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition is valid for such plasmas, several analytical methods can be employed and fast quantitative analyses can be performed on a variety of samples. In the present paper, a discussion about LTE is carried out and an innovative application to the analysis of the alexandrite gemstone is presented. In addition, a study about the influence of plasma parameters on the performance of LTE-based methods is reported for bronze and brass targets.

  16. Phase equilibrium condition measurements in nitrogen and air clathrate hydrate forming systems at temperatures below freezing point of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Keita; Oto, Yuya; Shen, Renkai; Uchida, Tsutomu; Ohmura, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Phase equilibrium conditions in the nitrogen and modelled air hydrate forming systems are measured. • Measurements are conducted at temperatures below the freezing point of water. • Results have relevance to the air hydrate formation in the ice sheets. • Measured data are quantitatively compared with the previously reported values. • Range of the equilibrium measurements was from (242 to 268) K. -- Abstract: Contained in this paper are the three phase equilibrium conditions of the (ice + clathrate hydrate + guest-rich) vapour in the (nitrogen + water) and the modelled (air + water) systems at temperatures below the freezing point of water. The precise determination of the equilibrium conditions in those systems are of importance for the analysis of the past climate change using the cored samples from the ice sheets at Antarctica and Greenland because the air hydrates keep the ancient climate signals. The mole ratio of the modelled air composed of nitrogen and oxygen is 0.790:0.210. The equilibrium conditions were measured by the batch, isochoric procedure. The temperature range of the measurements in the nitrogen hydrate forming system is (244.05 < T < 266.55) K and the corresponding equilibrium pressure range is (7.151 < p < 12.613) MPa. The temperature range of the measurements in the modelled air hydrate forming system is (242.55 < T < 267.85) K, and the corresponding equilibrium pressure range is (6.294 < p < 12.144) MPa. The data obtained quantitatively compared with the previously reported data

  17. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Leij, Feike; Simunek, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models were developed to describe various rates of colloid release. These models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of Escherichia coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity. The retention and release of 20nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca(2+) than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca(2+) by Na(+) and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider other interactions (e.g., Born, steric, and/or hydration forces) and/or nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g for the examined conditions. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque; e.g., macroscopic roughness and grain-grain contacts. Our analysis and models improve our understanding and ability to describe the amounts

  18. A NON-LOCAL THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM ANALYSIS OF BORON ABUNDANCES IN METAL-POOR STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Kefeng; Shi Jianrong; Zhao Gang

    2010-01-01

    The non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation of neutral boron in the atmospheres of cool stars are investigated. Our results confirm that NLTE effects for the B I resonance lines, which are due to a combination of overionization and optical pumping effects, are most important for hot, metal-poor, and low-gravity stars; however, the amplitude of departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) found by this work is smaller than that of previous studies. In addition, our calculation shows that the line formation of B I will get closer to LTE if the strength of collisions with neutral hydrogen increases, which is contrary to the result of previous studies. The NLTE line formation results are applied to the determination of boron abundances for a sample of 16 metal-poor stars with the method of spectrum synthesis of the B I 2497 A resonance lines using the archived HST/GHRS spectra. Beryllium and oxygen abundances are also determined for these stars with the published equivalent widths of the Be II 3131 A resonance and O I 7774 A triplet lines, respectively. The abundances of the nine stars which are not depleted in Be or B show that, no matter what the strength of collisions with neutral hydrogen may be, both Be and B increase with O quasilinearly in the logarithmic plane, which confirms the conclusions that Be and B are mainly produced by the primary process in the early Galaxy. The most noteworthy result of this work is that B increases with Fe or O at a very similar speed as, or a bit faster than, Be does, which is in accord with the theoretical models. The B/Be ratios remain almost constant over the metallicity range investigated here. Our average B/Be ratio falls in the interval [13 ± 4, 17 ± 4], which is consistent with the predictions of the spallation process. The contribution of B from the ν-process may be required if the 11 B/ 10 B isotopic ratios in metal-poor stars are the same as the meteoric value. An accurate measurement of the

  19. Estuarine Facies Model Revisited: Conceptual Model of Estuarine Sediment Dynamics During Non-Equilibrium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, E. A.; Rodriguez, A. B.; McKee, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    Traditional models of estuarine systems show deposition occurs primarily within the central basin. There, accommodation space is high within the deep central valley, which is below regional wave base and where current energy is presumed to reach a relative minimum, promoting direct deposition of cohesive sediment and minimizing erosion. However, these models often reflect long-term (decadal-millennial) timescales, where accumulation rates are in relative equilibrium with the rate of relative sea-level rise, and lack the resolution to capture shorter term changes in sediment deposition and erosion within the central estuary. This work presents a conceptual model for estuarine sedimentation during non-equilibrium conditions, where high-energy inputs to the system reach a relative maximum in the central basin, resulting in temporary deposition and/or remobilization over sub-annual to annual timescales. As an example, we present a case study of Core Sound, NC, a lagoonal estuarine system where the regional base-level has been reached, and sediment deposition, resuspension and bypassing is largely a result of non-equilibrium, high-energy events. Utilizing a 465 cm-long sediment core from a mini-basin located between Core Sound and the continental shelf, a 40-year sub-annual chronology was developed for the system, with sediment accumulation rates (SAR) interpolated to a monthly basis over the 40-year record. This study links erosional processes in the estuary directly with sediment flux to the continental shelf, taking advantage of the highly efficient sediment trapping capability of the mini-basin. The SAR record indicates high variation in the estuarine sediment supply, with peaks in the SAR record at a recurrence interval of 1 year (+/- 0.25). This record has been compared to historical storm influence for the area. Through this multi-decadal record, sediment flushing events occur at a much more frequent interval than previously thought (i.e. annual rather than

  20. Composition and partition functions of partially ionized hydrogen plasma in Non-Local Thermal Equilibrium (Non-LThE) and Non-Local Chemical Equilibrium (Non-LChE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Kuan; Eddy, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    A GTME (Generalized MultiThermodynamic Equilibrium) plasma model is developed for plasmas in both Non-LThE (Non-Local Thermal Equilibrium) and Non-LChE (Non-Local Chemical Equilibrium). The model uses multitemperatures for thermal nonequilibrium and non-zero chemical affinities as a measure of the deviation from chemical equilibrium. The plasma is treated as an ideal gas with the Debye-Hueckel approximation employed for pressure correction. The proration method is used when the cutoff energy level is between two discrete levels. The composition and internal partition functions of a hydrogen plasma are presented for electron temperatures ranging from 5000 to 35000 K and pressures from 0.1 to 1000 kPa. Number densities of 7 different species of hydrogen plasma and internal partition functions of different energy modes (rotational, vibrational, and electronic excitation) are computed for three affinity values. The results differ from other plasma properties in that they 1) are not based on equilibrium properties; and 2) are expressed as a function of different energy distribution parameters (temperatures) within each energy mode of each species as appropriate. The computed number densities and partition functions are applicable to calculating the thermodynamic, transport, and radiation properties of a hydrogen plasma not in thermal and chemical equilibria. The nonequilibrium plasma model and plasma compositions presented in this paper are very useful to the diagnosis of high-speed and/or low-pressure plasma flows in which the assumptions of local thermal and chemical equilibrium are invalid. (orig.)

  1. A statistical investigation of the effects of edge localized modes on the equilibrium reconstruction in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murari, A; Peluso, E; Gaudio, P; Gelfusa, M; Maviglia, F; Hawkes, N

    2012-01-01

    The configuration of magnetic fields is an essential ingredient of tokamak physics. In modern day devices, the magnetic topology is normally derived from equilibrium codes, which solve the Grad–Shafranov equation with constraints imposed by the available measurements. On JET, the main code used for this purpose is EFIT and the more commonly used diagnostics are external pick-up coils. Both the code and the measurements present worse performance during edge localized modes (ELMs). To quantify this aspect, various statistical indicators, based on the values of the residuals and their probability distribution, are defined and calculated. They all show that the quality of EFIT reconstructions is clearly better in the absence of ELMs. To investigate the possible causes of the detrimental effects of ELMs on the reconstruction, the pick-up coils are characterized individually and both the spatial distribution and time behaviour of their residuals are analysed in detail. The coils with a faster time response are the ones reproduced less well by EFIT. The constraints of current and pressure at the separatrix are also varied but the effects of such modifications do not result in decisive improvements in the quality of the reconstructions. The interpretation of this experimental evidence is not absolutely compelling but strongly indicative of deficiencies in the physics model on which the JET reconstruction code is based. (paper)

  2. Theory of phase-slip processes in thin and dirty current-carrying superconducting wires: Deviations from local equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraehenbuehl, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Oscillatory phase-slip solution of a set of integrodifferential equations describing time-dependent processes in dirty superconductors in the Ginzburg-Landau regime are found numerically very near Tsub(c). Deviations from local equilibrium improve the agreement with observed V-I curves. (orig.)

  3. Adsorption of hydrogen isotopes by metals in non-equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, A.I.; Notkin, M.E.; Pustovojt, Yu.M.

    1982-01-01

    To study the interaction of thermonuclear plasma and additions with metallic walls, nonequilibrium system of thermal atomary hydrogen - ''cold'' (300-1100 K) metal is experimentally investigated. Atomary hydrogen was feeded to samples of Ni and Pd in the shape of atomic beam, coming into vacuum from high-frequency gaseous discharge. It is shown that hydrogen solubility under nonequilibrium conditions increases with surface passivation (contamination); in this case it surpasses equilibrium solubility by value orders. Nickel and iron dissolve more hydrogen than palladium at a certain state of surface ( passivation) and gas (atomary hydrogen). The sign of the temperature dependence of hydrogen solubility in passivated N 1 and Fe changes when alterating molecular hydrogen by atomary hydrogen

  4. Entropy Production and Equilibrium Conditions of General-Covariant Spin Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Muschik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In generalizing the special-relativistic one-component version of Eckart’s continuum thermodynamics to general-relativistic space-times with Riemannian or post-Riemannian geometry as presented by Schouten (Schouten, J.A. Ricci-Calculus, 1954 and Blagojevic (Blagojevic, M. Gauge Theories of Gravitation, 2013 we consider the entropy production and other thermodynamical quantities, such as the entropy flux and the Gibbs fundamental equation. We discuss equilibrium conditions in gravitational theories, which are based on such geometries. In particular, thermodynamic implications of the non-symmetry of the energy-momentum tensor and the related spin balance equations are investigated, also for the special case of general relativity.

  5. Effects of periodic boundary conditions on equilibrium properties of computer simulated fluids. I. Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, L.R.; Haan, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    An exact formal theory for the effects of periodic boundary conditions on the equilibrium properties of computer simulated classical many-body systems is developed. This is done by observing that use of the usual periodic conditions is equivalent to the study of a certain supermolecular liquid, in which a supermolecule is a polyatomic molecule of infinite extent composed of one of the physical particles in the system plus all its periodic images. For this supermolecular system in the grand ensemble, all the cluster expansion techniques used in the study of real molecular liquids are directly applicable. As expected, particle correlations are translationally uniform, but explicitly anisotropic. When the intermolecular potential energy functions are of short enough range, or cut off, so that the minimum image method is used, evaluation of the cluster integrals is dramatically simplified. In this circumstance, a large and important class of cluster expansion contributions can be summed exactly, and expressed in terms of the correlation functions which result when the system size is allowed to increase without bound. This result yields a simple and useful approximation to the corrections to the particle correlations due to the use of periodic boundary conditions with finite systems. Numerical application of these results are reported in the following paper

  6. Comments on the compatibility of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions with lattice propagators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Giacomini, Alex; Pais, Pablo; Rosa, Luigi; Zerwekh, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the compatibility is analyzed of the non-perturbative equations of state of quarks and gluons arising from the lattice with some natural requirements for self-gravitating objects at equilibrium: the existence of an equation of state (namely, the possibility to define the pressure as a function of the energy density), the absence of superluminal propagation and Le Chatelier's principle. It is discussed under which conditions it is possible to extract an equation of state (in the above sense) from the non-perturbative propagators arising from the fits of the latest lattice data. In the quark case, there is a small but non-vanishing range of temperatures in which it is not possible to define a single-valued functional relation between density and pressure. Interestingly enough, a small change of the parameters appearing in the fit of the lattice quark propagator (of around 10 %) could guarantee the fulfillment of all the three conditions (keeping alive, at the same time, the violation of positivity of the spectral representation, which is the expected signal of confinement). As far as gluons are concerned, the analysis shows very similar results. Whether or not the non-perturbative quark and gluon propagators satisfy these conditions can have a strong impact on the estimate of the maximal mass of quark stars.

  7. Comments on the compatibility of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions with lattice propagators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canfora, Fabrizio [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECs), Valdivia (Chile); Giacomini, Alex [Universidad Austral de Chile, Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Valdivia (Chile); Pais, Pablo [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECs), Valdivia (Chile); Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Brussels (Belgium); Rosa, Luigi [Universita di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Dipartimento di Fisica, Naples (Italy); Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Naples (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Zerwekh, Alfonso [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica and Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper the compatibility is analyzed of the non-perturbative equations of state of quarks and gluons arising from the lattice with some natural requirements for self-gravitating objects at equilibrium: the existence of an equation of state (namely, the possibility to define the pressure as a function of the energy density), the absence of superluminal propagation and Le Chatelier's principle. It is discussed under which conditions it is possible to extract an equation of state (in the above sense) from the non-perturbative propagators arising from the fits of the latest lattice data. In the quark case, there is a small but non-vanishing range of temperatures in which it is not possible to define a single-valued functional relation between density and pressure. Interestingly enough, a small change of the parameters appearing in the fit of the lattice quark propagator (of around 10 %) could guarantee the fulfillment of all the three conditions (keeping alive, at the same time, the violation of positivity of the spectral representation, which is the expected signal of confinement). As far as gluons are concerned, the analysis shows very similar results. Whether or not the non-perturbative quark and gluon propagators satisfy these conditions can have a strong impact on the estimate of the maximal mass of quark stars. (orig.)

  8. Comments on the compatibility of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions with lattice propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Giacomini, Alex; Pais, Pablo; Rosa, Luigi; Zerwekh, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the compatibility is analyzed of the non-perturbative equations of state of quarks and gluons arising from the lattice with some natural requirements for self-gravitating objects at equilibrium: the existence of an equation of state (namely, the possibility to define the pressure as a function of the energy density), the absence of superluminal propagation and Le Chatelier's principle. It is discussed under which conditions it is possible to extract an equation of state (in the above sense) from the non-perturbative propagators arising from the fits of the latest lattice data. In the quark case, there is a small but non-vanishing range of temperatures in which it is not possible to define a single-valued functional relation between density and pressure. Interestingly enough, a small change of the parameters appearing in the fit of the lattice quark propagator (of around 10 %) could guarantee the fulfillment of all the three conditions (keeping alive, at the same time, the violation of positivity of the spectral representation, which is the expected signal of confinement). As far as gluons are concerned, the analysis shows very similar results. Whether or not the non-perturbative quark and gluon propagators satisfy these conditions can have a strong impact on the estimate of the maximal mass of quark stars. (orig.)

  9. Experimental benchmark of non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma atomic physics codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagels-Silvert, V.

    2004-09-01

    The main purpose of this thesis is to get experimental data for the testing and validation of atomic physics codes dealing with non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas. The first part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of xenon and krypton plasmas that have been produced by a nanosecond laser pulse interacting with a gas jet. A Thomson scattering diagnostic has allowed us to measure independently plasma parameters such as electron temperature, electron density and the average ionisation state. We have obtained time integrated spectra in the range between 5 and 10 angstroms. We have identified about one hundred xenon rays between 8.6 and 9.6 angstroms via the use of the Relac code. We have discovered unknown rays for the krypton between 5.2 and 7.5 angstroms. In a second experiment we have extended the wavelength range to the X UV domain. The Averroes/Transpec code has been tested in the ranges from 9 to 15 angstroms and from 10 to 130 angstroms, the first range has been well reproduced while the second range requires a more complex data analysis. The second part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of aluminium, selenium and samarium plasmas in femtosecond operating rate. We have designed an interferometry diagnostic in the frequency domain that has allowed us to measure the expanding speed of the target's backside. Via the use of an adequate isothermal model this parameter has led us to know the plasma electron temperature. Spectra and emission times of various rays from the aluminium and selenium plasmas have been computed satisfactorily with the Averroes/Transpec code coupled with Film and Multif hydrodynamical codes. (A.C.)

  10. Statistical equilibrium equations for trace elements in stellar atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Kubat, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    The conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and statistical equilibrium are discussed in detail. The equations of statistical equilibrium and the supplementary equations are shown together with the expressions for radiative and collisional rates with the emphasize on the solution for trace elements.

  11. Departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium in cutting arc plasmas derived from electron and gas density measurements using a two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2011-01-01

    A two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique that allows inferring the electron and gas densities of axisymmetric arc plasmas without imposing any assumption regarding statistical equilibrium models is reported. This technique was applied to the study of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) departures within the core of a 30 A high-energy density cutting arc. In order to derive the electron and heavy particle temperatures from the inferred density profiles, a generalized two-temperature Saha equation together with the plasma equation of state and the quasineutrality condition were employed. Factors such as arc fluctuations that influence the accuracy of the measurements and the validity of the assumptions used to derive the plasma species temperature were considered. Significant deviations from chemical equilibrium as well as kinetic equilibrium were found at elevated electron temperatures and gas densities toward the arc core edge. An electron temperature profile nearly constant through the arc core with a value of about 14000-15000 K, well decoupled from the heavy particle temperature of about 1500 K at the arc core edge, was inferred.

  12. Description of the equilibrium conditions of chemical reactions in various solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehl, H.

    1983-01-01

    Empirical knowledge is taken as the basis for establishing a method to predict the equilibrium conditions of reactions of macrocyclic polyethers and monovalent metal cations in various solvents. The reactions in the solvents under review can be well described by the donor number DN according to Gutmann, and by the parameters alpha and pi-asterisk for the H bonding donor and polarity/polarisability, respectively, using a three-parameter equation according to Kamlet/Taft. This applies to both protic and aprotic solvents. The calculations rely on data found in the literature and on own experimental results obtained by microcalorimetric examinations. The evaluation methods evolved for this purpose also allow, by means of additional dilution experiments, to convert the ''integral'', microcalorimetrically obtained complex stability constants, (i.e. those non-discriminating between different types of state such as ions or ion pairs) to the corresponding ''differentiating'' constants (referring to purely ionic quantities), and this applied to the various solvents used. The method does not use foreign ions and can thus also be applied to those cases for which the normal standardisation of reaction conditions published in the literature cannot be maintained (e.g. for reasons of solubility). In some cases it was possible to obtain additional information on the dissociation behaviour of the salts used, which revealed differently strong inclination to form higher aggregations in solution, as shown e.g. by the strong concentration dependence of the salt ion pair dissociation constants obtained. (orig./EF) [de

  13. Optimal conditions for local NQR observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechishkin, V.S.; Grechishkina, P.V.

    1998-01-01

    At last the local NQR is used widely for detection of explosions and narcotics. Two methods are applied usually: one-sided detection and translucent detection (TD). These methods are analyzed in the paper. It is shown that the TD method has the greater sensitivity

  14. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Zγ, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter θ(= T e /T h ) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1 atm, 10 atm, and 100 atm in the temperature range from 6000 K to 60 000 K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Zγ with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter

  15. Sorption of benzothiazoles onto sandy aquifer material under equilibrium and nonequlibrium conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kragulj Marijana M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the sorption behaviour of 1,3-benzothiazole (BT and 2-(methylthiobenzothiazole (MTBT was investigated on Danube geosorbent under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. All sorption isotherms fitted well with the Freundlich model (R2=0.932-0.993. The results showed that organic matter of the Danube geosorbent has a higher sorption affinity for the more hydrophobic MTBT compared to BT. However, sorption-desorption experiments showed that MTBT was more easily desorbed than BT molecules, which indicates the importance of absorption relative to adsorption in the overall sorption mechanism of MTBT. In general, molecules of BT and MTBT were more easily desorbed in the lower concentration range, which resulted in an increase in the hysteresis indices with increasing concentrations. Column experiments revealed that retention of the investigated compounds on the aquifer material followed the compound’s hydrophobicity. BT showed a lower retention, in accordance with its lower sorption affinity obtained in the static experiments, while MTBT showed a greater sorption affinity, and thus had a longer retention time on the column. Thus during transport BT represent greater risk for groundwaters than MTBT. These results have increased our understanding of benzothiazoles sorption and desorption process which represent one of the most important factors which influence the behaviour of organic compounds in the environment.

  16. Direct evidence of departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium in a free-burning arc-discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.C.; Lassahn, G.D.; Reynolds, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    Radial profiles of gas temperature, electron temperature, and electron density were measured in a free-burning atmospheric-pressure argon arc-discharge plasma using line-shape analysis of scattered laser light. This method yields gas temperature, electron temperature, and electron density directly, with no reliance on the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Our results show a significant departure from LTE in the center of the discharge, contrary to expectations

  17. Effect of mixing rule boundary conditions on high pressure (liquid + liquid) equilibrium prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Min-Kang; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Prediction of LLE from the combined use of EOS and liquid model are examined. ► The mixing rule used affects the predicted pressure dependence of LLE. ► MHV1 mixing rule predicts decent LLE at low pressures. ► WS mixing rule predicts more accurate excess volume and LLE at high pressures. ► The hybrid of MHV1 and WS mixing rule gives overall the best predictions. - Abstract: We examine the prediction of high pressure (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) from the Peng–Robinson equation with three excess Gibbs free energy (G ex )-based mixing rules (MR): the first order modified Huron–Vidal (MHV1), the Wong–Sandler (WS), and a hybrid of these two (referred to as G ex B 2 ). These mixing rules differ by the boundary conditions used for determination of the temperature and composition dependence of parameters a and b in the PR EOS. The condition of matching the excess Gibbs free energy from the EOS at zero pressure to that from the G ex model, used in MHV1 and G ex B 2 MR, leads to a similar miscibility gap from PR EOS and the G ex model used. On the other hand, the condition of matching excess Helmholtz energy from the EOS at infinite pressure to that from the G ex model, used in the WS MR, shows remarkable deviations. The condition of quadratic composition dependence in the second virial coefficient (B 2 ), used in WS and G ex B 2 MR, allows for both positive and negative values in the molar excess volume. Depending on the mixture, either the increase or decrease of the miscibility gap with pressure can be observed when the WS or the G ex B 2 MR is used. The condition of linear combination of molecular sizes of each component used in the MHV1 MR, however, often leads to small, positive molar excess volumes. As a consequence, the predicted LLE from using the MHV1 MR are insensitive to pressure. Therefore, we find that the G ex B 2 mixing rule provides the best predictive power for the LLE over a wide range of temperature and pressure.

  18. Understanding of surface pit formation mechanism of GaN grown in MOCVD based on local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zhi-Yuan; Xue Xiao-Wei; Li Jiang-Jiang; Wang Xun; Xing Yan-Hui; Cui Bi-Feng; Zou De-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Frank’s theory describes that a screw dislocation will produce a pit on the surface, and has been evidenced in many material systems including GaN. However, the size of the pit calculated from the theory deviates significantly from experimental result. Through a careful observation of the variations of surface pits and local surface morphology with growing temperature and V/III ratio for c -plane GaN, we believe that Frank’s model is valid only in a small local surface area where thermodynamic equilibrium state can be assumed to stay the same. If the kinetic process is too vigorous or too slow to reach a balance, the local equilibrium range will be too small for the center and edge of the screw dislocation spiral to be kept in the same equilibrium state. When the curvature at the center of the dislocation core reaches the critical value 1/ r 0 , at the edge of the spiral, the accelerating rate of the curvature may not fall to zero, so the pit cannot reach a stationary shape and will keep enlarging under the control of minimization of surface energy to result in a large-sized surface pit. (paper)

  19. Understanding of surface pit formation mechanism of GaN grown in MOCVD based on local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi-Yuan, Gao; Xiao-Wei, Xue; Jiang-Jiang, Li; Xun, Wang; Yan-Hui, Xing; Bi-Feng, Cui; De-Shu, Zou

    2016-06-01

    Frank’s theory describes that a screw dislocation will produce a pit on the surface, and has been evidenced in many material systems including GaN. However, the size of the pit calculated from the theory deviates significantly from experimental result. Through a careful observation of the variations of surface pits and local surface morphology with growing temperature and V/III ratio for c-plane GaN, we believe that Frank’s model is valid only in a small local surface area where thermodynamic equilibrium state can be assumed to stay the same. If the kinetic process is too vigorous or too slow to reach a balance, the local equilibrium range will be too small for the center and edge of the screw dislocation spiral to be kept in the same equilibrium state. When the curvature at the center of the dislocation core reaches the critical value 1/r 0, at the edge of the spiral, the accelerating rate of the curvature may not fall to zero, so the pit cannot reach a stationary shape and will keep enlarging under the control of minimization of surface energy to result in a large-sized surface pit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204009 and 61204011) and the Beijing Municipal Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 4142005).

  20. Initial conditions of non-equilibrium quark-gluon plasma evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmatov, S.V.

    2002-01-01

    In accordance with the hydrodynamic Bjorken limit, the initial energy density and temperature for a chemical non-equilibrium quark-gluon system formed in the heavy ion collisions at the LHC are computed. The dependence of this value on the type of colliding nuclei and the collision impact parameter is studied. The principle possibility of the non-equilibrium quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation in the light nuclei collisions is shown. The life time of QGP is calculated. (author)

  1. Under What Conditions Can Equilibrium Gas-Particle Partitioning Be Expected to Hold in the Atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Huajun; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-10-06

    The prevailing treatment of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models is based on the assumption of instantaneous gas-particle equilibrium for the condensing species, yet compelling experimental evidence indicates that organic aerosols can exhibit the properties of highly viscous, semisolid particles, for which gas-particle equilibrium may be achieved slowly. The approach to gas-particle equilibrium partitioning is controlled by gas-phase diffusion, interfacial transport, and particle-phase diffusion. Here we evaluate the controlling processes and the time scale to achieve gas-particle equilibrium as a function of the volatility of the condensing species, its surface accommodation coefficient, and its particle-phase diffusivity. For particles in the size range of typical atmospheric organic aerosols (∼50-500 nm), the time scale to establish gas-particle equilibrium is generally governed either by interfacial accommodation or particle-phase diffusion. The rate of approach to equilibrium varies, depending on whether the bulk vapor concentration is constant, typical of an open system, or decreasing as a result of condensation into the particles, typical of a closed system.

  2. Mechanical measurement of hydrogen bonded host-guest systems under non-equilibrium, near-physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Teresa; Cerrón, Fernando; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro; Ibarra, Borja; Pérez, Emilio M

    2017-09-01

    Decades after the birth of supramolecular chemistry, there are many techniques to measure noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, under equilibrium conditions. As ensembles of molecules rapidly lose coherence, we cannot extrapolate bulk data to single-molecule events under non-equilibrium conditions, more relevant to the dynamics of biological systems. We present a new method that exploits the high force resolution of optical tweezers to measure at the single molecule level the mechanical strength of a hydrogen bonded host-guest pair out of equilibrium and under near-physiological conditions. We utilize a DNA reporter to unambiguously isolate single binding events. The Hamilton receptor-cyanuric acid host-guest system is used as a test bed. The force required to dissociate the host-guest system is ∼17 pN and increases with the pulling rate as expected for a system under non-equilibrium conditions. Blocking one of the hydrogen bonding sites results in a significant decrease of the force-to-break by 1-2 pN, pointing out the ability of the method to resolve subtle changes in the mechanical strength of the binding due to the individual H-bonding components. We believe the method will prove to be a versatile tool to address important questions in supramolecular chemistry.

  3. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Approach Based on Conceptual Change Condition on Students' Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Ibrahim; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the cooperative learning approach based on conceptual change conditions over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' conceptual understanding and achievement of computational problems related to chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 87 tenth grade…

  4. Diffusion in coronas around clinopyroxene: modelling with local equilibrium and steady state, and a non-steady-state modification to account for zoned actinolite-hornblende

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, J. R.; Birdi, J. J.; Emmett, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    evolution of actinolite to more stable aluminous compositions. This is modelled by a non-steady-state modification of the theory, retaining local equilibrium in grain boundaries while relatively steep zoning profiles develop in grain interiors through slow intracrystalline diffusion. Replacement of actinolite by hornblende does not require a change in P- T conditions if actinolite is a kinetically determined, non-equilibrium product. The common preservation of a sharp contact between hornblende and actionolite layers may be explained by ineffectiveness of intracrystalline diffusion: according to the theory, given sufficient grain-boundary Al flux, a metastable actinolite + quartz layer in contact with hornblende may be diffusionally stable and may continue to grow in a steady state.

  5. The dissolution behavior of borosilicate glasses in far-from equilibrium conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeway, James J.; Rieke, Peter C.; Parruzot, Benjamin P.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Asmussen, R. Matthew

    2018-04-01

    An area of agreement in the waste glass corrosion community is that, at far-from-equilibrium conditions, the dissolution of borosilicate glasses used to immobilize nuclear waste is known to be a function of both temperature and pH. The aim of this work is to study the effects of temperature and pH on the dissolution rate of three model nuclear waste glasses (SON68, ISG, AFCI). The dissolution rate data are then used to parameterize a kinetic rate model based on Transition State Theory that has been developed to model glass corrosion behavior in dilute conditions. To do this, experiments were conducted at temperatures of 23, 40, 70, and 90 °C and pH (22 °C) values of 9, 10, 11, and 12 with the single-pass flow-through (SPFT) test method. Both the absolute dissolution rates and the rate model parameters are compared with previous results. Rate model parameters for the three glasses studied here are nearly equivalent within error and in relative agreement with previous studies though quantifiable differences exist. The glass dissolution rates were analyzed with a linear multivariate regression (LMR) and a nonlinear multivariate regression performed with the use of the Glass Corrosion Modeling Tool (GCMT), with which a robust uncertainty analysis is performed. This robust analysis highlights the high degree of correlation of various parameters in the kinetic rate model. As more data are obtained on borosilicate glasses with varying compositions, a mathematical description of the effect of glass composition on the rate parameter values should be possible. This would allow for the possibility of calculating the forward dissolution rate of glass based solely on composition. In addition, the method of determination of parameter uncertainty and correlation provides a framework for other rate models that describe the dissolution rates of other amorphous and crystalline materials in a wide range of chemical conditions. The higher level of uncertainty analysis would provide

  6. The Dissolution Behavior of Borosilicate Glasses in Far-From Equilibrium Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J.; Rieke, Peter C.; Parruzot, Benjamin PG; Ryan, Joseph V.; Asmussen, Robert M.

    2018-02-10

    In far-from-equilibrium conditions, the dissolution of borosilicate glasses used to immobilize nuclear waste is known to be a function of both temperature and pH. The aim of this paper is to study effects of these variables on three model waste glasses (SON68, ISG, AFCI). To do this, experiments were conducted at temperatures of 23, 40, 70, and 90 °C and pH(RT) values of 9, 10, 11, and 12 with the single-pass flow-through (SPFT) test method. The results from these tests were then used to parameterize a kinetic rate model based on transition state theory. Both the absolute dissolution rates and the rate model parameters are compared with previous results. Discrepancies in the absolute dissolution rates as compared to those obtained using other test methods are discussed. Rate model parameters for the three glasses studied here are nearly equivalent within error and in relative agreement with previous studies. The results were analyzed with a linear multivariate regression (LMR) and a nonlinear multivariate regression performed with the use of the Glass Corrosion Modeling Tool (GCMT), which is capable of providing a robust uncertainty analysis. This robust analysis highlights the high degree of correlation of various parameters in the kinetic rate model. As more data are obtained on borosilicate glasses with varying compositions, the effect of glass composition on the rate parameter values could possibly be obtained. This would allow for the possibility of predicting the forward dissolution rate of glass based solely on composition

  7. New insights for mesospheric OH: multi-quantum vibrational relaxation as a driver for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Kalogerakis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The question of whether mesospheric OH(v rotational population distributions are in equilibrium with the local kinetic temperature has been debated over several decades. Despite several indications for the existence of non-equilibrium effects, the general consensus has been that emissions originating from low rotational levels are thermalized. Sky spectra simultaneously observing several vibrational levels demonstrated reproducible trends in the extracted OH(v rotational temperatures as a function of vibrational excitation. Laboratory experiments provided information on rotational energy transfer and direct evidence for fast multi-quantum OH(high-v vibrational relaxation by O atoms. We examine the relationship of the new relaxation pathways with the behavior exhibited by OH(v rotational population distributions. Rapid OH(high-v + O multi-quantum vibrational relaxation connects high and low vibrational levels and enhances the hot tail of the OH(low-v rotational distributions. The effective rotational temperatures of mesospheric OH(v are found to deviate from local thermodynamic equilibrium for all observed vibrational levels. Dedicated to Tom G. Slanger in celebration of his 5 decades of research in aeronomy.

  8. Ignition conditions relaxation for central hot-spot ignition with an ion-electron non-equilibrium model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Liu, Jie

    2016-10-01

    We present an ion-electron non-equilibrium model, in which the hot-spot ion temperature is higher than its electron temperature so that the hot-spot nuclear reactions are enhanced while energy leaks are considerably reduced. Theoretical analysis shows that the ignition region would be significantly enlarged in the hot-spot rhoR-T space as compared with the commonly used equilibrium model. Simulations show that shocks could be utilized to create and maintain non-equilibrium conditions within the hot spot, and the hot-spot rhoR requirement is remarkably reduced for achieving self-heating. In NIF high-foot implosions, it is observed that the x-ray enhancement factors are less than unity, which is not self-consistent and is caused by assuming Te =Ti. And from this non-consistency, we could infer that ion-electron non-equilibrium exists in the high-foot implosions and the ion temperature could be 9% larger than the equilibrium temperature.

  9. The condition of homeostatic equilibrium in patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis before treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Brazhenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conducted studies indicate that before the beginning of antituberculous treatment TB patients with homeostatic equilibrium disorder depending on the phase state of the specific process in the lungs, the expression of the intoxication syndrome, the extent of lung tissue damage and the age of the patients. Increasing of BHE(body homeostatic equilibrium disfunction rate is followed by upraise of defective adaptive reactions. LLI indicators intend for BHE evaluation, H and R of the formed elements of the white bloodcellsintend to state the degree of BHE disfunction.

  10. Measurement of the Rheology of Crude Oil in Equilibrium with CO2 at Reservoir Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ruien; Crawshaw, John

    2017-06-06

    A rheometer system to measure the rheology of crude oil in equilibrium with carbon dioxide (CO2) at high temperatures and pressures is described. The system comprises a high-pressure rheometer which is connected to a circulation loop. The rheometer has a rotational flow-through measurement cell with two alternative geometries: coaxial cylinder and double gap. The circulation loop contains a mixer, to bring the crude oil sample into equilibrium with CO2, and a gear pump that transports the mixture from the mixer to the rheometer and recycles it back to the mixer. The CO2 and crude oil are brought to equilibrium by stirring and circulation and the rheology of the saturated mixture is measured by the rheometer. The system is used to measure the rheological properties of Zuata crude oil (and its toluene dilution) in equilibrium with CO2 at elevated pressures up to 220 bar and a temperature of 50 °C. The results show that CO2 addition changes the oil rheology significantly, initially reducing the viscosity as the CO2 pressure is increased and then increasing the viscosity above a threshold pressure. The non-Newtonian response of the crude is also seen to change with the addition of CO2.

  11. Vaporization of the prototypical ionic liquid BMImNTf₂ under equilibrium conditions: a multitechnique study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Bruno; Ciccioli, Andrea; Gigli, Guido; Lapi, Andrea; Misceo, Nicolaemanuele; Tanzi, Luana; Vecchio Ciprioti, Stefano

    2014-08-07

    The vaporization behaviour and thermodynamics of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (BMImNTf2) were studied by combining the Knudsen Effusion Mass Loss (KEML) and Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS) techniques. KEML studies were carried out in a large temperature range (398-567) K by using effusion orifices with 0.3, 1, and 3 mm diameters. The vapor pressures so measured revealed no kinetically hindered vaporization effects and provided second-law vaporization enthalpies at the mean experimental temperatures in close agreement with literature. By exploiting the large temperature range covered, the heat capacity change associated with vaporization was estimated, resulting in a value of -66.8 J K(-1) mol(-1), much lower than that predicted from calorimetric measurements on the liquid phase and theoretical calculations on the gas phase. The conversion of the high temperature vaporization enthalpy to 298 K was discussed and the value Δ(l)(g)H(m)(298 K) = (128.6 ± 1.3) kJ mol(-1) assessed on the basis of data from literature and present work. Vapor pressure data were also processed by the third-law procedure using different estimations for the auxiliary thermal functions, and a Δ(l)(g)H(m)(298 K) consistent with the assessed value was obtained, although the overall agreement is sensitive to the accuracy of heat capacity data. KEMS measurements were carried out in the lower temperature range (393-467) K and showed that the largely prevailing ion species is BMIm(+), supporting the common view of BMImNTf2 vaporizing as individual, neutral ion pairs also under equilibrium conditions. By monitoring the mass spectrometric signal of this ion as a function of temperature, a second-law Δ(l)(g)H(m)(298 K) of 129.4 ± 7.3 kJ mol(-1) was obtained, well consistent with KEML and literature results. Finally, by combining KEML and KEMS measurements, the electron impact ionization cross section of BMIm(+) was estimated.

  12. Phosphate adsorption and precipitation on calcite under calco-carbonic equilibrium condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenxuan; Sun, Xiaowen; Huang, Lidong; Liu, Dagang; Yu, Luji; Wu, Hongsheng; Wei, Dongyang

    2017-09-01

    Phosphate (PO 4 3- ) removal on calcite often entails two processes: adsorption and precipitation. Separating these two processes is of great importance for assessment of PO 4 3- stability after removal. Thus, this study was aimed at finding a critical range of conditions for separating these two processes in calco-carbonic equilibrium, by adjusting PO 4 3- concentration, reaction time and pH. PO 4 3- removal kinetic results showed that: (I) At pH7.7, PO 4 3- removal was mainly by adsorption at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≤2.2 mg L -1 and reaction time ≤24 h, with dominant precipitation occurring at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≥3 mg L -1 after 24 h reaction; (II) At pH8.3, adsorption was the key removal process at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≤7.5 mg L -1 and reaction time ≤24 h, whereas precipitation was observed at initial PO 4 3- concentration of 10 mg L -1 after 24 h reaction, (III) At pH 9.1 and 10.1, PO 4 3- removal mechanism was mainly by adsorption at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≤10 mg L -1 within 24 h reaction. Based on the kinetic results, it is suggested that PO 4 3- precipitation will occur after 24 h reaction when saturation index of amorphous calcium phosphate is between 1.97 and 2.19. Besides, increasing PO 4 3- concentration does not cause a continuous decline of PO 4 3- removal percentage. Moreover, experimental removal data deviated largely from the theoretical adsorption value by CD-MUSIC model. These indicate occurrence of precipitation which is in agreement with the kinetic result. Therefore our study will provide fundamental reference information for better understanding of phosphorous stabilization after removal by calcite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The instantaneous local transition of a stable equilibrium to a chaotic attractor in piecewise-smooth systems of differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, D.J.W., E-mail: d.j.w.simpson@massey.ac.nz

    2016-09-07

    An attractor of a piecewise-smooth continuous system of differential equations can bifurcate from a stable equilibrium to a more complicated invariant set when it collides with a switching manifold under parameter variation. Here numerical evidence is provided to show that this invariant set can be chaotic. The transition occurs locally (in a neighbourhood of a point) and instantaneously (for a single critical parameter value). This phenomenon is illustrated for the normal form of a boundary equilibrium bifurcation in three dimensions using parameter values adapted from of a piecewise-linear model of a chaotic electrical circuit. The variation of a secondary parameter reveals a period-doubling cascade to chaos with windows of periodicity. The dynamics is well approximated by a one-dimensional unimodal map which explains the bifurcation structure. The robustness of the attractor is also investigated by studying the influence of nonlinear terms. - Highlights: • A boundary equilibrium bifurcation involving stable and saddle foci is considered. • A two-dimensional return map is constructed and approximated by a one-dimensional map. • A trapping region and Smale horseshoe are identified for a Rössler-like attractor. • Bifurcation diagrams reveal period-doubling cascades and windows of periodicity.

  14. The stability of second sound waves in a rotating Darcy–Brinkman porous layer in local thermal non-equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltayeb, I A; Elbashir, T B A, E-mail: ieltayeb@squ.edu.om, E-mail: elbashir@squ.edu.om [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat 123 (Oman)

    2017-08-15

    The linear and nonlinear stabilities of second sound waves in a rotating porous Darcy–Brinkman layer in local thermal non-equilibrium are studied when the heat flux in the solid obeys the Cattaneo law. The simultaneous action of the Brinkman effect (effective viscosity) and rotation is shown to destabilise the layer, as compared to either of them acting alone, for both stationary and overstable modes. The effective viscosity tends to favour overstable modes while rotation tends to favour stationary convection. Rapid rotation invokes a negative viscosity effect that suppresses the stabilising effect of porosity so that the stability characteristics resemble those of the classical rotating Benard layer. A formal weakly nonlinear analysis yields evolution equations of the Landau–Stuart type governing the slow time development of the amplitudes of the unstable waves. The equilibrium points of the evolution equations are analysed and the overall development of the amplitudes is examined. Both overstable and stationary modes can exhibit supercritical stability; supercritical instability, subcritical instability and stability are not possible. The dependence of the supercritical stability on the relative values of the six dimensionless parameters representing thermal non-equilibrium, rotation, porosity, relaxation time, thermal diffusivities and Brinkman effect is illustrated as regions in regime diagrams in the parameter space. The dependence of the heat transfer and the mean heat flux on the parameters of the problem is also discussed. (paper)

  15. Initial conditions for hydrodynamics from weakly coupled pre-equilibrium evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeliauskas, Aleksas

    2017-01-01

    We use leading order effective kinetic theory to simulate the pre-equilibrium evolution of transverse energy and flow perturbations in heavy-ion collisions. We provide a Green function which propagates the initial perturbations of the energy-momentum tensor to a time when hydrodynamics becomes applicable. With this map, the pre-thermal evolution from saturated nuclei to hydrodynamics can be modeled in the framework of weakly coupled QCD. (paper)

  16. The role equilibrium leach testing in understanding the behaviour of nuclear wastes under disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Rees, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Results from the equilibrium leach testing of a range of intermediate level nuclear wastes have been modelled successfully using sorption and solubility data obtained in experiments with individual radionuclides. The wastes involved included fuel cladding (after removal of irradiated fuel for reprocessing), combustible plutonium-contaminated materials and ferric/aluminium hydroxide flocs. The test has an important role in validating nearfield models, and helps to build confidence in disposal assessments. (orig.)

  17. Initial conditions for hydrodynamics from weakly coupled pre-equilibrium evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Keegan, Liam; Mazeliauskas, Aleksas; Teaney, Derek

    2016-01-01

    We use effective kinetic theory, accurate at weak coupling, to simulate the pre-equilibrium evolution of transverse energy and flow perturbations in heavy-ion collisions. We provide a Green function which propagates the initial perturbations to the energy-momentum tensor at a time when hydrodynamics becomes applicable. With this map, the complete pre-thermal evolution from saturated nuclei to hydrodynamics can be modelled in a perturbatively controlled way.

  18. The role of equilibrium leach testing in understanding the behaviour of nuclear wastes under disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Rees, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Results from the equilibrium leach testing of a range of intermediate level nuclear wastes have been modelled using sorption and solubility data obtained in experiments with individual radionuclides. The wastes involved were AGR hulls, Magnox cladding wastes, combustible plutonium-contaminated materials and ferric/aluminium hydroxide flocs. The test has an important role in validating near-field models, and helps to build confidence in disposal assessments. (author)

  19. Effects of deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium in the atmospheres of F supergiants. I. Overionization of Fe I atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarchuk, A.A.; Lyubimkov, L.S.; Sakhibullin, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    For a number of class F supergiants and dwarfs, non-LTE calculations have been made of the Fe I-Fe II ionization balance. It is shown that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium lead to a strong overionization of the Fe I atoms in the upper layers of the atmosphere. This confirms the conclusion obtained by Lyubimkov and Boyarchuk on the basis of an investigation of microturbulence in F supergiants. The reason for the overionization (compared with LTE) is the nonequality of the recombination and photoionization temperatures: To recombination processes there corresponds a local temperature T(/tau/), whereas the photoionization takes place under the influence of ultraviolet radiation from deeper and hotter layers of the atmosphere. The equivalent widths of some Fe I lines have been calculated. It is shown that neglect of the overionization in the analysis of sufficiently strong lines may lead to an underestimation of the iron abundance by an order of magnitude

  20. Effect of Local Thermal Equilibrium Misbalance on Long-wavelength Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakariakov, V. M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Afanasyev, A. N. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics SB RAS, P.O. Box 291, Lermontov St. 126A, Irkutsk 664033 (Russian Federation); Kumar, S.; Moon, Y.-J., E-mail: V.Nakariakov@warwick.ac.uk [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, 446-701, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-01

    Evolution of slow magnetoacoustic waves guided by a cylindrical magnetic flux tube that represents a coronal loop or plume, is modeled accounting for the effects of finite gas pressure, weak nonlinearity, dissipation by thermal conduction and viscosity, and the misbalance between the cooling by optically thin radiation and unspecified heating of the plasma. An evolutionary equation of the Burgers–Malthus type is derived. It is shown that the cooling/heating misbalance, determined by the derivatives of the combined radiative cooling and heating function, with respect to the density, temperature, and magnetic field at the thermal equilibrium affect the wave rather strongly. This effect may either cause additional damping, or counteract it, or lead to the gradual amplification of the wave. In the latter case, the coronal plasma acts as an active medium for the slow magnetoacoustic waves. The effect of the cooling/heating misbalance could be important for coronal slow waves, and could be responsible for certain discrepancies between theoretical results and observations, in particular, the increased or decreased damping lengths and times, detection of the waves at certain heights only, and excitation of compressive oscillations. The results obtained open up a possibility for the diagnostics of the coronal heating function by slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  1. Evaluation of specific tritium transfer parameters in equilibrium conditions for Cernavoda area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paunescu, N.; Galeriu, D.; Mocanu, N.; Margineanu, R.

    1998-01-01

    plants are low, as for an uncontaminated area. The presence of tritium in these samples is due to fallout. Steady-state conditions are achieved for environmental transfer of tritium in absence of local tritium source. Considering the environmental transfer model of Canadian standard, we calculated the transfer parameters for deposition from atmosphere on forage and crops, and the contamination of land and vegetation by spray irrigation water. (authors)

  2. Phase equilibrium conditions of semi-calthrate hydrates of (tetra-n-butyl ammonium chloride + carbon dioxide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhi-Gao; Jiao, Li-Jun; Zhao, Zhi-Gui; Wang, Gong-Liang; Huang, Hai-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon dioxide hydrate stability zone was enlarged with the help of TBAC. • Carbon dioxide uptake into TBAC semi-clathrate hydrates is confirmed. • Equilibrium pressure of hydrate decreased with the increase of TBAC mass concentration. • The addition of TBAC reduces the formation pressures of carbon dioxide hydrate by 2.5 MPa. - Abstract: In the present work, hydrate equilibrium conditions for (tetra-n-butyl ammonium chloride (TBAC) + carbon dioxide + water) mixtures were investigated. Tetra-n-butyl ammonium chloride was reported to form a semi-clathrate hydrate. The experiments were carried out within the TBAC mass fraction range of (0.05 to 0.3). The experimental results showed that the presence of TBAC decreased the formation pressure of carbon dioxide double hydrate within the experimental temperature range. Moreover, pressure reduction was dependent on the TBAC concentration

  3. Departure from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium in argon plasmas sustained in a Torche à Injection Axiale sur Guide d'Ondes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincón, R.; Muñoz, J.; Calzada, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma torches are suitable plasma sources for a wide range of applications. The capability of these discharges to produce processes like sample excitation or decomposition of molecules inside them depends on the density of the plasma species and their energies (temperatures). The relation between these parameters determines the specific state of thermodynamic equilibrium in the discharge. Thus, the understanding of plasma possibilities for application purposes is related to the knowledge of the plasma thermodynamic equilibrium degree. In this paper a discussion about the equilibrium state for Ar plasmas generated by using a Torche à Injection Axiale sur Guide d'Ondes, TIAGO device, is presented. Emission spectroscopy techniques were used to measure gas temperature and electron density at the exit of the nozzle torch and along the dart. Boltzmann-plots as well as b p parameters were calculated to characterize the type and degree of departure from partial Local Saha Equilibrium (pLSE). This study indicates that the closer situation to Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) of the plasma corresponds to larger Ar flows which highlights the importance of the nitrogen (atmosphere surrounding the plasma) in the kinetics of Ar-TIAGO discharges. - Highlights: • Discharges sustained in Ar using a TIAGO Torch show a significant departure from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium. • Nitrogen entrance from surrounding air highly influences Thermodynamic Equilibrium. • Departure from LTE has been studied by means of Boltzmann plots and b p parameters. • The discharge is ionizing at the nozzle exit plasma, while along the dart it becomes recombining

  4. Steady-State Electrodiffusion from the Nernst-Planck Equation Coupled to Local Equilibrium Monte Carlo Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Dezső; Gillespie, Dirk

    2012-03-13

    We propose a procedure to compute the steady-state transport of charged particles based on the Nernst-Planck (NP) equation of electrodiffusion. To close the NP equation and to establish a relation between the concentration and electrochemical potential profiles, we introduce the Local Equilibrium Monte Carlo (LEMC) method. In this method, Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations are performed using the electrochemical potential specified for the distinct volume elements. An iteration procedure that self-consistently solves the NP and flux continuity equations with LEMC is shown to converge quickly. This NP+LEMC technique can be used in systems with diffusion of charged or uncharged particles in complex three-dimensional geometries, including systems with low concentrations and small applied voltages that are difficult for other particle simulation techniques.

  5. Influence of equilibrium shear flow in the parallel magnetic direction on edge localized mode crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y.; Xiong, Y. Y. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Chen, S. Y., E-mail: sychen531@163.com [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Huang, J.; Tang, C. J. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2016-04-15

    The influence of the parallel shear flow on the evolution of peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes is studied with the BOUT++ four-field code in this paper. The parallel shear flow has different effects in linear simulation and nonlinear simulation. In the linear simulations, the growth rate of edge localized mode (ELM) can be increased by Kelvin-Helmholtz term, which can be caused by the parallel shear flow. In the nonlinear simulations, the results accord with the linear simulations in the linear phase. However, the ELM size is reduced by the parallel shear flow in the beginning of the turbulence phase, which is recognized as the P-B filaments' structure. Then during the turbulence phase, the ELM size is decreased by the shear flow.

  6. Ge deposition on Si(1 0 0) in the conditions close to dynamic equilibrium between islands growth and their decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shklyaev, A.A.; Budazhapova, A.E.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solid source MBE is used for island growth by Ge deposition on Si(1 0 0) at 700–900 °C. • Islands acquire a monomodal size distribution at temperatures above 800 °C. • Islands form ordered arrays during Ge deposition at 900 °C. • Conditions close to dynamic equilibrium are realized for growth and decay of islands at 900 °C. • Shape of ordered islands is cone with shallow sidewalls. - Abstract: The formation of islands arrays during Ge deposition on Si(1 0 0) at high temperatures is studied using scanning tunneling and electron microscopies. It is found that the island size and shape distributions, which are known to be bimodal at growth temperatures below 700 °C, become monomodal at temperatures above 800 °C. The obtained data suggest that the processes such as island nucleation and Ostwald ripening become less significant in the surface morphology formation, giving the advantage to selective attachment of deposited Ge atoms to island sidewalls and spatially inhomogeneous Si-Ge intermixing, as the temperature increases. At 900 °C, the islands exhibit a tendency to form laterally ordered arrays when the growth conditions approach the dynamic equilibrium between the growth of islands and their decay by means of Si-Ge intermixing. The islands ordering is accompanied by their shape transformation into the cone with shallow sidewalls inclined from (1 0 0) by angles of around 10°.

  7. A non-local computational boundary condition for duct acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorumski, William E.; Watson, Willie R.; Hodge, Steve L.

    1994-01-01

    A non-local boundary condition is formulated for acoustic waves in ducts without flow. The ducts are two dimensional with constant area, but with variable impedance wall lining. Extension of the formulation to three dimensional and variable area ducts is straightforward in principle, but requires significantly more computation. The boundary condition simulates a nonreflecting wave field in an infinite duct. It is implemented by a constant matrix operator which is applied at the boundary of the computational domain. An efficient computational solution scheme is developed which allows calculations for high frequencies and long duct lengths. This computational solution utilizes the boundary condition to limit the computational space while preserving the radiation boundary condition. The boundary condition is tested for several sources. It is demonstrated that the boundary condition can be applied close to the sound sources, rendering the computational domain small. Computational solutions with the new non-local boundary condition are shown to be consistent with the known solutions for nonreflecting wavefields in an infinite uniform duct.

  8. Local thermodynamic equilibrium and related metrological issues involving collisional-radiative model in laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travaille, G.; Peyrusse, O.; Bousquet, B.; Canioni, L.; Pierres, K. Michel-Le; Roy, S.

    2009-01-01

    We present a collisional-radiative approach of the theoretical analysis of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) plasmas. This model, which relies on an optimized effective potential atomic structure code, was used to simulate a pure aluminum plasma. The description of aluminum involved a set of 220 atomic levels representative of three different stages of ionization (Al 0 , Al + and Al ++ ). The calculations were carried for stationary plasmas, with input parameters (n e and T e ) ranging respectively between 10 13-18 cm -3 and 0.3-2 eV. A comparison of our atomic data with some existing databases is made. The code was mainly developed to address the validity of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) assumption. For usual LIBS plasma parameters, we did not reveal a sizeable discrepancy of the radiative equilibrium of the plasma towards LTE. For cases where LTE was firmly believed to stand, the Boltzmann plot outputs of this code were used to check the physical accuracy of the Boltzmann temperature, as it is currently exploited in several calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CF-LIBS) studies. In this paper, a deviation ranging between 10 and 30% of the measured Boltzmann temperature to the real excitation temperature is reported. This may be due to the huge dispersion induced on the line emissivities, on which the Boltzmann plots are based to extract this parameter. Consequences of this fact on the CF-LIBS procedure are discussed and further insights to be considered for the future are introduced.

  9. Analysis of the equilibrium conditions of a double rotor turbine prototype designed for the exploitation of the tidal currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarelli, Silvio; Amelio, Mario; Castiglione, Teresa; Florio, Gaetano; Scornaienchi, Nino M.; Cutrupi, Antonino; Lo Zupone, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A design a new self-balancing turbine collecting energy from tidal currents has been presented. • The equilibrium in the sea is guaranteed by a central deflector inserted in the blades disc. • The sizing procedure of the turbine needs the knowledge of lift and drag coefficients of the deflector. • A CDF analysis has been carried out for estimating these parameters. • The feasibility of a first pilot plant in the Calabrian site of Punta Pezzo (Italy) has been evaluated. - Abstract: For several years the Department of Mechanical, Energy and Management Engineering (DIMEG), in collaboration with SintEnergy Srl, has been performing researches for the exploitation of tidal currents. An innovative turbine has been developed, anchored to the coast, which does not require the supporting structures on the seabed and should reduces installation costs and environmental impact. This machine, in its latest version, proposes the use of two concentric and contra-rotating rotors, in order to require a small, or non-existent, stabilizing torque. In the present work the machine equilibrium conditions have been defined and, by a CFD analysis, the lift and drag coefficients of the central deflector have been calculated, together with a final machine design procedure. As a case study, applying the above procedure for a machine installed on the Messina strait, the energy output and the payback period have been estimated

  10. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC employing thermodynamic equilibrium conditions at moderate temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics/Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Nipoti, R. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Microelettronica e Microsistemi, Sezione di Bologna (CNR-IMM of Bologna), I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Hallén, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), SE-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-12-21

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a major point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers limiting the minority charge carrier lifetime. In layers grown by chemical vapor deposition techniques, the V{sub C} concentration is typically in the range of 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −3}, and after device processing at temperatures approaching 2000 °C, it can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude. In the present study, both as-grown layers and a high-temperature processed one have been annealed at 1500 °C and the V{sub C} concentration is demonstrated to be strongly reduced, exhibiting a value of only a few times 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −3} as determined by deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements. The value is reached already after annealing times on the order of 1 h and is evidenced to reflect thermodynamic equilibrium under C-rich ambient conditions. The physical processes controlling the kinetics for establishment of the V{sub C} equilibrium are estimated to have an activation energy below ∼3 eV and both in-diffusion of carbon interstitials and out-diffusion of V{sub C}'s are discussed as candidates. This concept of V{sub C} elimination is flexible and readily integrated in a materials and device processing sequence.

  11. Small planar domains in amorphous thin films: Nucleation and equilibrium conditions (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrune, M.; Hamzaoui, S.; Puchalska, I. B.; Battarel, C.; Hubert, A.

    1984-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate a new type of small flat domain in the shape of lozenges. Such domains may be used for high-density nonvolatile shift register memories [C. Battarel, R. Morille, and A. Caplain, IEEE Trans. Magn. July (1983)]. Experimental and theoretical results for nucleation and stability of small lozenge domains less than 10 μm in length in Co-Ni-P and CoTi [G. Suran, K. Ounadjela, and J. Sztern (this Proceedings)] amorphous thin films 1500 Å thick are presented. The films have a low coercivity (Hc ˜1 Oe) and a significant in-plane uniaxial anisotropy (HK ˜35 Oe). The domains were observed in an optical microscope by longitudinal Kerr effect using an experimental method described by Prutton. Domain nucleation is obtained by applying a local field higher than HK. It must be emphasized that to stabilize the domain two constant fields having opposite direction are required: H1 applied inside the domain and parallel to its magnetization; H2 parallel to the main magnetization of the film (H1>H2). Experimental results obtained for such configuration of magnetic fields will be presented and compared with numerical computations. The theoretical model will be discussed and the role played by the magnetostatic energy emphasized. The model takes into account the spreading of the magnetic charges which appear at the boundary of the domain. Finally, application to experimental devices as mentioned in the first reference above will be shown.

  12. Equilibrium of rotating and nonrotating plasmas in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V.D.

    2003-01-01

    One studied plasma equilibrium in tokamak in case of toroidal rotation. Rotation associated centrifugal force is shown to result in decrease of equilibrium limit as to β. One analyzes unlike opinion and considers its supports. It is shown that in possible case of local improvement of equilibrium conditions associated with special selection of profile of plasma rotation rate, the combined integral effect turns to be negative one. But in case of typical conditions, decrease of equilibrium β caused by plasma rotation is negligible one and one may ignore effect of plasma rotation on its equilibrium for hot plasma [ru

  13. Monte-Carlo simulation of the evolution of point defects in solids under non-equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurice, Francoise; Doan, N.V.

    1981-11-01

    This report was written in order to serve as a guide for courageous users who want to tackle the problem of the evolution of point defect populations in a solid under non-equilibrium conditions by the Monte-Carlo technique. The original program, developed by Lanore in her swelling investigations on solids under irradiation by different particles, was generalized in order to take into account the effects and the phenomena related to the presence of solute atoms. Detailed descriptions of the simulation model, computational procedures and formulae used in the calculations are given. Two examples are shown to illustrate the applications to the swelling phenomenon: first, the effect to temperature or dose rate changes on void-swelling in electron-irradiated copper; second, the influence of solute atoms on the void nucleation in electron-irradiated nickel [fr

  14. Estimation of In-Situ Groundwater Conditions Based on Geochemical Equilibrium Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Hokari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a means of estimating in-situ groundwater pH and oxidation-redox potential (ORP, two very important parameters for species migration analysis in safety assessments for radioactive waste disposal or carbon dioxide sequestration. The method was applied to a pumping test in a deep borehole drilled in a tertiary formation in Japan for validation. The following application examples are presented: when applied to several other pumping tests at the same site, it could estimate distributions of the in-situ groundwater pH and ORP; applied to multiple points selected in the groundwater database of Japan, it could help estimate the in-situ redox reaction governing the groundwater conditions in some areas.

  15. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium stellar spectroscopy with 1D and 3D models - II. Chemical properties of the Galactic metal-poor disk and the halo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergemann, Maria; Collet, Remo; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    We have analysed high-resolution spectra of 328 stars and derived Mg abundances using non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) spectral line formation calculations and plane-parallel model stellar atmospheres derived from the mean stratification of 3D hydrodynamical surface convection simulations...

  16. Measurement of Stark width of some Ar I transitions and the investigation of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in an atmospheric d.c. argon plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakshi, V.

    1988-01-01

    The Stark widths of seven Ar I transitions are reported. Axial line shape data from an atmospheric d.c. argon plasma jet were Abel-inverted to obtain radial line shapes. The electron-density was determined by Stark width measurements of the hydrogen H β transition. In the electron-density region of ≤6 x 10 22 m -3 the experimental Ar I Stark widths are fitted to a linear dependence on the electron-density. Values of Stark width extrapolated to other electron densities are compared to measurements reported in the literature on the 4s-4p array. Experimental values are up to 45% smaller than those predicted by Griem's theory of Stark broadening. Conditions for local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) to exist in an atmospheric argon plasma jet were studied. The experiment measures the emission coefficient of seven Ar I transitions and the line shape of the hydrogen H beta transition. After transforming the side-on data into radial space the excited neutral argon atom-density and the electron-density are determined. It is found LTE does not exist below an electron-density of 6 x 10 33 m -3 in the experimental conditions

  17. A mathematical model for malaria transmission relating global warming and local socioeconomic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun M Yang

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sensitivity analysis was applied to a mathematical model describing malaria transmission relating global warming and local socioeconomic conditions. METHODS: A previous compartment model was proposed to describe the overall transmission of malaria. This model was built up on several parameters and the prevalence of malaria in a community was characterized by the values assigned to them. To assess the control efforts, the model parameters can vary on broad intervals. RESULTS: By performing the sensitivity analysis on equilibrium points, which represent the level of malaria infection in a community, the different possible scenarios are obtained when the parameters are changed. CONCLUSIONS: Depending on malaria risk, the efforts to control its transmission can be guided by a subset of parameters used in the mathematical model.

  18. Sweatshop equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Nancy H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a capability-augmented model of on the job search, in which sweatshop conditions stifle the capability of the working poor to search for a job while on the job. The augmented setting unveils a sweatshop equilibrium in an otherwise archetypal Burdett-Mortensen economy, and reconciles a number of oft noted yet perplexing features of sweatshop economies. We demonstrate existence of multiple rational expectation equilibria, graduation pathways out of sweatshops in complete abs...

  19. Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, Vivak

    2014-06-30

    shale cores, which were pressurized with high pressure CO2, determine the fate of sequestered CO2 in these cores. Our results suggested that Illinois bituminous coal in its unperturbed state, i.e., when not pressurized with CO2, showed large variations in the mechanical properties. Modulus varied from 0.7 GPa to 3.4 GPa even though samples were extracted from a single large chunk of coal. We did not observe any glass transition for Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ≤ T ≤ 300oC, however, when the coal was pressurized with CO2 at ambient ≤ P ≤ 20.7 MPa, the viscosity of the coal decreased and inversely scaled with the CO2 pressure. The decrease in viscosity as a function of pressure could pose CO2 injection problems for coal as lower viscosity would allow the solid coal to flow to plug the fractures, fissures, and cleats. Our experiments also showed a very small fraction of CO2 was absorbed in coal; and when CO2 pressurized coals were exposed to atmospheric conditions, the loss of CO2 from coals was massive. Half of the sequestered gas from the coal cores was lost in less than 20 minutes. Our shockwave experiments on Illinois bituminous coal, New Albany shale (Illinois), Devonian shale (Ohio), and Utica shale (Ohio) presented clear evidence that the significant emission of the sequestered CO2 from these formations cannot be discounted during seismic activity, especially if caprock is compromised. It is argued that additional shockwave studies, both compressive and transverse, would be required for successfully mapping the risks associated with sequestering high pressure CO2 in coal and shale formations.

  20. The one-sided Ap conditions and local maximal operator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bernardis, A.L.; Gogatishvili, Amiran; Martin-Reyes, F. J.; Ortega Salvador, P.; Pick, L.

    Roč. 55, č. 1 ( 2012 ), s. 79-104 ISSN 0013-0915 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/08/0383; GA ČR GA201/05/2033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : one-sided Ap conditions * one-sided local maximal operator * quasi-Banach function spaces * variable-exponent Lebesgue spaces Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.561, year: 2012 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8477114&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0013091510000635

  1. Improved distorted wave theory with the localized virial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Y. K.; Zerrad, E.

    2009-12-01

    The distorted wave theory is operationally improved to treat the full collision amplitude, such that the corrections to the distorted wave Born amplitude can be systematically calculated. The localized virial conditions provide the tools necessary to test the quality of successive approximations at each stage and to optimize the solution. The details of the theoretical procedure are explained in concrete terms using a collisional ionization model and variational trial functions. For the first time, adjustable parameters associated with an approximate scattering solution can be fully determined by the theory. A small number of linear parameters are introduced to examine the convergence property and the effectiveness of the new approach.

  2. Mass-density compensation can improve the performance of a range of different detectors under non-equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, T S A; Hill, M A; Winter, H C; Fenwick, J D

    2013-01-01

    Dosimeters often consist of several components whose mass densities differ substantially from water. These components cause small-field correction factors to vary significantly as lateral electronic equilibrium breaks down. Even amongst instruments designed for small-field dosimetry, inter-detector variation in the correction factors associated with very small (∼0.5 cm) fields can amount to tens of per cent. For a given dosimeter, small-field correction factors vary not only with field size but also with detector azimuthal angle and position within the field. Furthermore the accurate determination of these factors typically requires time-intensive Monte Carlo simulations. Thus, if achievable, ‘correction factor free’ small-field dosimetry would be highly desirable. This study demonstrates that a new generation of mass-density compensated detectors could take us towards this goal. Using a 6 MV beam model, it shows that ‘mass-density compensation’ can be utilized to improve the performance of a range of different detectors under small-field conditions. Non-sensitive material of appropriate mass-density is incorporated into detector designs in order to make the instruments behave as if consisting only of water. The dosimeter perturbative effects are then reduced to those associated with volume averaging. An even better solution—which modifies detectors to obtain profiles that look like those measured by a point-like water structure—is also considered. Provided that adequate sensitivity can be achieved for a small measurement volume, this study shows that it may be possible to use mass-density compensation (and Monte Carlo-driven design) to produce a solid-state dosimeter/ionization chamber with a near-perfect non-equilibrium response. (paper)

  3. A Model of Equilibrium Conditions of Roof Rock Mass Giving Consideration to the Yielding Capacity of Powered Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczuk, Marek; Pawlikowski, Arkadiusz

    2017-12-01

    The work presents the model of interactions between the powered roof support units and the rock mass, while giving consideration to the yielding capacity of the supports - a value used for the analysis of equilibrium conditions of roof rock mass strata in geological and mining conditions of a given longwall. In the model, the roof rock mass is kept in equilibrium by: support units, the seam, goafs, and caving rocks (Fig. 1). In the assumed model of external load on the powered roof support units it is a new development - in relation to the model applied in selection of supports based on the allowable deflection of roof theory - that the load bearing capacity is dependent on the increment of the inclination of the roof rock mass and on the properties of the working medium, while giving consideration to the air pockets in the hydraulic systems, the load of the caving rocks on the caving shield, introducing the RA support value of the roof rock mass by the coal seam as a closed-form expression and while giving consideration to the additional support provided by the rocks of the goaf as a horizontal component R01H of the goaf reaction. To determine the roof maintenance conditions it is necessary to know the characteristics linking the yielding capacity of the support units with the heading convergence, which may be measured as the inclination angle of the roof rock mass. In worldwide mining, Ground Reaction Curves are used, which allow to determine the required yielding capacity of support units based on the relation between the load exerted on the unit and the convergence of the heading ensuring the equilibrium of the roof rock mass. (Figs. 4 and 8). The equilibrium of the roof rock mass in given conditions is determined at the displacement of the rock mass by the α angle, which impacts the following values: yielding capacity of units FN, vertical component of goaf reaction R01V and the horizontal component of goaf reaction R01H. In the model of load on the support

  4. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zimmerman

    Full Text Available Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA, a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY. The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin.

  5. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  6. Effect of degree of order of silicon dioxide on localization processes of non-equilibrium charge carriers under the influence of gamma-radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Garibov, A A; Agaev, T N

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the degree of order of SiO sub 2 on the localization process of non-equilibrium charge carriers (NCC) when exposed to gamma-quanta at 77 K has been investigated. It has been found that with decreasing SiO sub 2 structure degree of order, a localization probability of NCC increases. A contribution of surface defect states in SiO sub 2 to localization, migration and recombination annihilation processes of NCC induced by ionizing radiation has been determined.

  7. Errors in Sounding of the Atmosphere Using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) Kinetic Temperature Caused by Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Comas, Maya; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Bermejo-Pantaleon, D.; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Gordley, L. L.; Russell, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The vast set of near global and continuous atmospheric measurements made by the SABER instrument since 2002, including daytime and nighttime kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) from 20 to 105 km, is available to the scientific community. The temperature is retrieved from SABER measurements of the atmospheric 15 micron CO2 limb emission. This emission separates from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions in the rarefied mesosphere and thermosphere, making it necessary to consider the CO2 vibrational state non-LTE populations in the retrieval algorithm above 70 km. Those populations depend on kinetic parameters describing the rate at which energy exchange between atmospheric molecules take place, but some of these collisional rates are not well known. We consider current uncertainties in the rates of quenching of CO2 (v2 ) by N2 , O2 and O, and the CO2 (v2 ) vibrational-vibrational exchange to estimate their impact on SABER T(sub k) for different atmospheric conditions. The T(sub k) is more sensitive to the uncertainty in the latter two and their effects depend on altitude. The T(sub k) combined systematic error due to non-LTE kinetic parameters does not exceed +/- 1.5 K below 95 km and +/- 4-5 K at 100 km for most latitudes and seasons (except for polar summer) if the Tk profile does not have pronounced vertical structure. The error is +/- 3 K at 80 km, +/- 6 K at 84 km and +/- 18 K at 100 km under the less favourable polar summer conditions. For strong temperature inversion layers, the errors reach +/- 3 K at 82 km and +/- 8 K at 90 km. This particularly affects tide amplitude estimates, with errors of up to +/- 3 K.

  8. Extragalactic interstellar extinction curves: Indicators of local physical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.zza Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Viti, Serena; Williams, David A., E-mail: cecchi-pestellini@astropa.unipa.it, E-mail: sv@star.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: daw@star.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-20

    Normalized interstellar extinction curves (ISECs) in the Milky Way and other galaxies show a variety of shapes. This variety is attributed to differences along different sight lines in the abundances of the several dust and gas components contributing to extinction. In this paper we propose that these abundance differences are not arbitrary but are a specific consequence of the physical conditions on those sight lines. If this proposal is correct, then it implies that ISECs contain information about physical conditions in the regions generating extinction. This may be particularly important for high redshift galaxies where information on the conditions may be difficult to obtain. We adopt a model of extinction carriers in which the solid and gaseous components are not immutable but respond time-dependently to the local physics. We validate this model by fitting extinction curves measured on sight lines in the Magellanic Clouds and obtained for the gamma-ray burst afterglow GRB 080605. We present results for this model as follows: (1) we show that computed ISECs are controlled by a small number of physical parameters, (2) we demonstrate the sensitivity of computed ISECs to these parameters, (3) we compute as examples ISECs for particular galaxy types, and (4) we note that different galaxy types have different shapes of ISEC.

  9. Turbulence Generation Using Localized Sources of Energy: Direct Numerical Simulations and the Effects of Thermal Non-Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqui, Agustin Francisco

    Turbulence in high-speed flows is an important problem in aerospace applications, yet extremely difficult from a theoretical, computational and experimental perspective. A main reason for the lack of complete understanding is the difficulty of generating turbulence in the lab at a range of speeds which can also include hypersonic effects such as thermal non-equilibrium. This work studies the feasibility of a new approach to generate turbulence based on laser-induced photo-excitation/dissociation of seeded molecules. A large database of incompressible and compressible direct numerical simulations (DNS) has been generated to systematically study the development and evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence. Governing parameters and the conditions necessary for the establishment of turbulence, as well as the length and time scales associated with such process, are identified. For both the compressible and incompressible experiments a minimum Reynolds number is found to be needed for the flow to evolve towards fully developed turbulence. Additionally, for incompressible cases a minimum time scale is required, while for compressible cases a minimum distance from the grid and limit on the maximum temperature introduced are required. Through an extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, as well as spectral dynamics, the primary mechanisms leading to turbulence are shown. As commonly done in compressible turbulence, dilatational and solenoidal components are separated to understand the effect of acoustics on the development of turbulence. Finally, a large database of forced isotropic turbulence has been generated to study the effect of internal degrees of freedom on the evolution of turbulence.

  10. Experimental benchmark of non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma atomic physics codes; Validation experimentale des codes de physique atomique des plasmas hors equilibre thermodynamique local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagels-Silvert, V

    2004-09-15

    The main purpose of this thesis is to get experimental data for the testing and validation of atomic physics codes dealing with non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas. The first part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of xenon and krypton plasmas that have been produced by a nanosecond laser pulse interacting with a gas jet. A Thomson scattering diagnostic has allowed us to measure independently plasma parameters such as electron temperature, electron density and the average ionisation state. We have obtained time integrated spectra in the range between 5 and 10 angstroms. We have identified about one hundred xenon rays between 8.6 and 9.6 angstroms via the use of the Relac code. We have discovered unknown rays for the krypton between 5.2 and 7.5 angstroms. In a second experiment we have extended the wavelength range to the X UV domain. The Averroes/Transpec code has been tested in the ranges from 9 to 15 angstroms and from 10 to 130 angstroms, the first range has been well reproduced while the second range requires a more complex data analysis. The second part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of aluminium, selenium and samarium plasmas in femtosecond operating rate. We have designed an interferometry diagnostic in the frequency domain that has allowed us to measure the expanding speed of the target's backside. Via the use of an adequate isothermal model this parameter has led us to know the plasma electron temperature. Spectra and emission times of various rays from the aluminium and selenium plasmas have been computed satisfactorily with the Averroes/Transpec code coupled with Film and Multif hydrodynamical codes. (A.C.)

  11. Experimental benchmark of non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma atomic physics codes; Validation experimentale des codes de physique atomique des plasmas hors equilibre thermodynamique local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagels-Silvert, V

    2004-09-15

    The main purpose of this thesis is to get experimental data for the testing and validation of atomic physics codes dealing with non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas. The first part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of xenon and krypton plasmas that have been produced by a nanosecond laser pulse interacting with a gas jet. A Thomson scattering diagnostic has allowed us to measure independently plasma parameters such as electron temperature, electron density and the average ionisation state. We have obtained time integrated spectra in the range between 5 and 10 angstroms. We have identified about one hundred xenon rays between 8.6 and 9.6 angstroms via the use of the Relac code. We have discovered unknown rays for the krypton between 5.2 and 7.5 angstroms. In a second experiment we have extended the wavelength range to the X UV domain. The Averroes/Transpec code has been tested in the ranges from 9 to 15 angstroms and from 10 to 130 angstroms, the first range has been well reproduced while the second range requires a more complex data analysis. The second part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of aluminium, selenium and samarium plasmas in femtosecond operating rate. We have designed an interferometry diagnostic in the frequency domain that has allowed us to measure the expanding speed of the target's backside. Via the use of an adequate isothermal model this parameter has led us to know the plasma electron temperature. Spectra and emission times of various rays from the aluminium and selenium plasmas have been computed satisfactorily with the Averroes/Transpec code coupled with Film and Multif hydrodynamical codes. (A.C.)

  12. Local couplings, double insertions and the Weyl consistency condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, E.; Sibold, K.

    1992-05-01

    Within massless φ 4 4 -theory we set up the formalism which is needed, when the coupling λ is permitted to become an external field, i.e. a function of space-time. In particular we have worked out the action of the corresponding Callan-Symanzik operator and conformal transformations on the vertex functions, and furthermore how the Weyl transformations act on the theory with the energy-momentum tensor invariantly coupled. With the help of the Weyl consistency condition we have shown that in the limit of constant coupling the Weyl braking can entirely be written in terms of differential operators, but that otherwise, for truely local coupling, new breaking terms survive. (orig.)

  13. Contribution of local thyroxine monodeiodination to intracellular 3,5, 3'-triiodothyronine in several tissues of hyperthyroid rats at isotopic equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Doorn, J.; van der Heide, D.; Roelfsema, F.

    1984-01-01

    The local conversion of T4 as a source of intracellular T3 in several organs of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats has recently been recognized to be an important phenomenon. In the present study the source and quantity of T3 in various peripheral tissues of hyperthyroid rats were investigated. Athyreotic rats received a continuous iv infusion of T4 over a prolonged period in order to attain hyperthyroid conditions. At the same time, the animals also received a continuous iv infusion of [ 125 I]T4 and [ 131 I]T3 until isotopic equilibrium was achieved. After the animals were bled and perfused, the source and quantity of T3 in various tissue homogenates and subcellular preparations of liver, kidney, and the anterior pituitary gland were analyzed. In spite of the elevated plasma T3 and T4 levels, the concentration of T3 in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum was within the normal range. The contribution of T3 derived from local T4 to T3 conversion [Lc T3(T4)] was rather low in both parts of the brain when compared with values previously determined for euthyroid rats. Whereas previous studies revealed that Lc T3(T4) contributes significantly to the T3 in the pituitary glands of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats, this was not the case for the hyperthyroid animals; virtually all T3 was derived from plasma. It was found that the T3 in muscle was derived exclusively from plasma. Both the liver and kidney showed high concentrations of T3. Whereas Lc T3(T4) was the main source of T3 in the liver, it contributed only a minor fraction of the total T3 content in the kidney

  14. Contribution of local thyroxine monodeiodination to intracellular 3,5, 3'-triiodothyronine in several tissues of hyperthyroid rats at isotopic equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Doorn, J.; van der Heide, D.; Roelfsema, F.

    1984-07-01

    The local conversion of T4 as a source of intracellular T3 in several organs of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats has recently been recognized to be an important phenomenon. In the present study the source and quantity of T3 in various peripheral tissues of hyperthyroid rats were investigated. Athyreotic rats received a continuous iv infusion of T4 over a prolonged period in order to attain hyperthyroid conditions. At the same time, the animals also received a continuous iv infusion of (/sup 125/I)T4 and (/sup 131/I)T3 until isotopic equilibrium was achieved. After the animals were bled and perfused, the source and quantity of T3 in various tissue homogenates and subcellular preparations of liver, kidney, and the anterior pituitary gland were analyzed. In spite of the elevated plasma T3 and T4 levels, the concentration of T3 in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum was within the normal range. The contribution of T3 derived from local T4 to T3 conversion (Lc T3(T4)) was rather low in both parts of the brain when compared with values previously determined for euthyroid rats. Whereas previous studies revealed that Lc T3(T4) contributes significantly to the T3 in the pituitary glands of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats, this was not the case for the hyperthyroid animals; virtually all T3 was derived from plasma. It was found that the T3 in muscle was derived exclusively from plasma. Both the liver and kidney showed high concentrations of T3. Whereas Lc T3(T4) was the main source of T3 in the liver, it contributed only a minor fraction of the total T3 content in the kidney.

  15. An energy-based equilibrium contact angle boundary condition on jagged surfaces for phase-field methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Florian; Liu, Chen; Scanziani, Alessio; Alpak, Faruk O; Riviere, Beatrice

    2018-08-01

    We consider an energy-based boundary condition to impose an equilibrium wetting angle for the Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes phase-field model on voxel-set-type computational domains. These domains typically stem from μCT (micro computed tomography) imaging of porous rock and approximate a (on μm scale) smooth domain with a certain resolution. Planar surfaces that are perpendicular to the main axes are naturally approximated by a layer of voxels. However, planar surfaces in any other directions and curved surfaces yield a jagged/topologically rough surface approximation by voxels. For the standard Cahn-Hilliard formulation, where the contact angle between the diffuse interface and the domain boundary (fluid-solid interface/wall) is 90°, jagged surfaces have no impact on the contact angle. However, a prescribed contact angle smaller or larger than 90° on jagged voxel surfaces is amplified. As a remedy, we propose the introduction of surface energy correction factors for each fluid-solid voxel face that counterbalance the difference of the voxel-set surface area with the underlying smooth one. The discretization of the model equations is performed with the discontinuous Galerkin method. However, the presented semi-analytical approach of correcting the surface energy is equally applicable to other direct numerical methods such as finite elements, finite volumes, or finite differences, since the correction factors appear in the strong formulation of the model. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of spatially-localized initial conditions via sparse PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Anubhav; Jovanovic, Mihailo

    2017-11-01

    Principal Component Analysis involves maximization of a quadratic form subject to a quadratic constraint on the initial flow perturbations and it is routinely used to identify the most energetic flow structures. For general flow configurations, principal components can be efficiently computed via power iteration of the forward and adjoint governing equations. However, the resulting flow structures typically have a large spatial support leading to a question of physical realizability. To obtain spatially-localized structures, we modify the quadratic constraint on the initial condition to include a convex combination with an additional regularization term which promotes sparsity in the physical domain. We formulate this constrained optimization problem as a nonlinear eigenvalue problem and employ an inverse power-iteration-based method to solve it. The resulting solution is guaranteed to converge to a nonlinear eigenvector which becomes increasingly localized as our emphasis on sparsity increases. We use several fluids examples to demonstrate that our method indeed identifies the most energetic initial perturbations that are spatially compact. This work was supported by Office of Naval Research through Grant Number N00014-15-1-2522.

  17. Heterogeneity of equilibrium molten globule state of cytochrome c induced by weak salt denaturants under physiological condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidur Rahaman

    Full Text Available While many proteins are recognized to undergo folding via intermediate(s, the heterogeneity of equilibrium folding intermediate(s along the folding pathway is less understood. In our present study, FTIR spectroscopy, far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD, ANS and tryptophan fluorescence, near IR absorbance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS were used to study the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the native (N, denatured (D and intermediate state (X of goat cytochorme c (cyt-c induced by weak salt denaturants (LiBr, LiCl and LiClO4 at pH 6.0 and 25°C. The LiBr-induced denaturation of cyt-c measured by Soret absorption (Δε400 and CD ([θ]409, is a three-step process, N ↔ X ↔ D. It is observed that the X state obtained along the denaturation pathway of cyt-c possesses common structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the molten globule (MG state. The MG state of cyt-c induced by LiBr is compared for its structural and thermodynamic parameters with those found in other solvent conditions such as LiCl, LiClO4 and acidic pH. Our observations suggest: (1 that the LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c retains the native Met80-Fe(III axial bond and Trp59-propionate interactions; (2 that LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c is more compact retaining the hydrophobic interactions in comparison to the MG states induced by LiCl, LiClO4 and 0.5 M NaCl at pH 2.0; and (3 that there exists heterogeneity of equilibrium intermediates along the unfolding pathway of cyt-c as highly ordered (X1, classical (X2 and disordered (X3, i.e., D ↔ X3 ↔ X2 ↔ X1 ↔ N.

  18. Abnormal condition detector for a local power range monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Takao.

    1976-01-01

    Object: to permit determination of abnormal condition by a number of local power range monitors (LPRM) to be quickly made through precise estimation of the ratio between the true rate of change in neutron flux and true change in the neutron flux by making use of the fact that the status of the neutron distribution does not widely change with a change in the core flow rate for a short period of time. Structure: While carrying out power control according to the core flow rate, detection values from LPRM which are disposed in a three-dimensional fashion within the reactor core are indicated on an indicator. The average value of rates of change in the indicated values for a group of LPRM under substantially the same fluid dynamic condition as that for each LPRM is determined while measuring time-wise change rate in the indicated value of each of the LPRM. The average value is successively divided by the rate of change in the indicated value for each LPRM and the amplifier gain thereof to obtain the reference value. When the difference between the average value and reference value obtained in this way exceeds a prescribed value, the corresponding LPRM is determined to be defective. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. Sharp Efficiency for Vector Equilibrium Problems on Banach Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Huan Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sharp efficient solution for vector equilibrium problems on Banach spaces is proposed. Moreover, the Fermat rules for local efficient solutions of vector equilibrium problems are extended to the sharp efficient solutions by means of the Clarke generalized differentiation and the normal cone. As applications, some necessary optimality conditions and sufficient optimality conditions for local sharp efficient solutions of a vector optimization problem with an abstract constraint and a vector variational inequality are obtained, respectively.

  20. Phase equilibrium engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brignole, Esteban Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the teaching of phase equilibria emphasizes the relationships between the thermodynamic variables of each phase in equilibrium rather than its engineering applications. This book changes the focus from the use of thermodynamics relationships to compute phase equilibria to the design and control of the phase conditions that a process needs. Phase Equilibrium Engineering presents a systematic study and application of phase equilibrium tools to the development of chemical processes. The thermodynamic modeling of mixtures for process development, synthesis, simulation, design and

  1. Combustion of hydrogen-air jets in local chemical equilibrium: A guide to the CHARNAL computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, D. B.; Launder, B. E.; Morse, A. P.; Maples, G.

    1974-01-01

    A guide to a computer program, written in FORTRAN 4, for predicting the flow properties of turbulent mixing with combustion of a circular jet of hydrogen into a co-flowing stream of air is presented. The program, which is based upon the Imperial College group's PASSA series, solves differential equations for diffusion and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy and also of the R.M.S. fluctuation of hydrogen concentration. The effective turbulent viscosity for use in the shear stress equation is computed. Chemical equilibrium is assumed throughout the flow.

  2. Equilibrium moisture content of wood at different temperature/moisture conditions in the cladding of wooden constructions and in the relation to their reliability and service life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Havířová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the natural properties of wood and wood-based materials is their soaking capacity (hy­gro­sco­pi­ci­ty. The moisture content of wood and building constructions of wood and wood based materials significantly influences the service life and reliability of these constructions and buildings. The equilibrium weight moisture content of built-in wood corresponding to temperature/moisture conditions inside the cladding has therefore a decisive influence on the basic requirements placed on building constructions. The wood in wooden frame cladding changes its moisture content depending on temperature and moisture conditions of the environment it is built into. The water vapor condensation doesn’t necessarily have to occur right in the wooden framework of the cladding for the equilibrium moisture content to rise over the level permissible for the reliable function of a given construction. In spite of the fact that the common heat-technical assessment cannot be considered fully capable of detecting the effects of these factors on the functional reliability of wood-based constructions and buildings, an extension has been proposed of the present method of design an assessment of building constructions according to the ČSN 73 0540 standard regarding the interpretation of equilibrium moisture content in relation to the temperature/moisture conditions and their time behavior inside a construction.

  3. Equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics in supercooled liquids and glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossa, S; Nave, E La; Tartaglia, P; Sciortino, F

    2003-01-01

    We review the inherent structure thermodynamical formalism and the formulation of an equation of state (EOS) for liquids in equilibrium based on the (volume) derivatives of the statistical properties of the potential energy surface. We also show that, under the hypothesis that during ageing the system explores states associated with equilibrium configurations, it is possible to generalize the proposed EOS to out-of-equilibrium (OOE) conditions. The proposed formulation is based on the introduction of one additional parameter which, in the chosen thermodynamic formalism, can be chosen as the local minimum where the slowly relaxing OOE liquid is trapped

  4. Central localization of plasticity involved in appetitive conditioning in Lymnaea

    OpenAIRE

    Straub, Volko A.; Styles, Benjamin J.; Ireland, Julie S.; O'Shea, Michael; Benjamin, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    Learning to associate a conditioned (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) results in changes in the processing of CS information. Here, we address directly the question whether chemical appetitive conditioning of Lymnaea feeding behavior involves changes in the peripheral and/or central processing of the CS by using extracellular recording techniques to monitor neuronal activity at two stages of the sensory processing pathway. Our data show that appetitive conditioning does not affect signific...

  5. Quantum non-locality vs. quasi-local measurements in the conditions of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulian, Armen M

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical explanation of the Meissner effect involves proportionality between current density and vector potential, which has many deep consequences. As noticed by de Gennes, superconductors in a magnetic field 'find an equilibrium state where the sum of kinetic and magnetic energies is minimum' and this state 'corresponds to the expulsion of the magnetic field'. This statement still leaves an open question: from which source is the superconducting current acquiring its kinetic energy? A naïve answer, perhaps, is from the energy of the magnetic field. However, one can consider situations (Aharonov-Bohm effect), where the classical magnetic field is locally absent in the area occupied by the current. Experiments demonstrate that despite the local absence of the magnetic field, current is, nevertheless, building up. From what source is it acquiring its energy then? Locally, only a vector potential is present. How does the vector potential facilitate the formation of the current? Is the current formation a result of a truly non-local quantum action, or does the local action of the vector potential have experimental consequences? We discuss possible experiments with a hybrid normal-metal superconductor circuitry, which can clarify this puzzling situation. Experimental answers will be important for further developments.

  6. Uniqueness of Specific Interfacial Area–Capillary Pressure–Saturation Relationship Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions in Two-Phase Porous Media Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Joekar-Niasar, Vahid

    2012-02-23

    The capillary pressure-saturation (P c-S w) relationship is one of the central constitutive relationships used in two-phase flow simulations. There are two major concerns regarding this relation. These concerns are partially studied in a hypothetical porous medium using a dynamic pore-network model called DYPOSIT, which has been employed and extended for this study: (a) P c-S w relationship is measured empirically under equilibrium conditions. It is then used in Darcy-based simulations for all dynamic conditions. This is only valid if there is a guarantee that this relationship is unique for a given flow process (drainage or imbibition) independent of dynamic conditions; (b) It is also known that P c-S w relationship is flow process dependent. Depending on drainage and imbibition, different curves can be achieved, which are referred to as "hysteresis". A thermodynamically derived theory (Hassanizadeh and Gray, Water Resour Res 29: 3389-3904, 1993a) suggests that, by introducing a new state variable, called the specific interfacial area (a nw, defined as the ratio of fluid-fluid interfacial area to the total volume of the domain), it is possible to define a unique relation between capillary pressure, saturation, and interfacial area. This study investigates these two aspects of capillary pressure-saturation relationship using a dynamic pore-network model. The simulation results imply that P c-S w relation not only depends on flow process (drainage and imbibition) but also on dynamic conditions for a given flow process. Moreover, this study attempts to obtain the first preliminary insights into the global functionality of capillary pressure-saturation-interfacial area relationship under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions and the uniqueness of P c-S w-a nw relationship. © 2012 The Author(s).

  7. Early history of extended irreversible thermodynamics (1953-1983): An exploration beyond local equilibrium and classical transport theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, G.; Jou, D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper gives a historical account of the early years (1953-1983) of extended irreversible thermodynamics (EIT). The salient features of this formalism are to upgrade the thermodynamic fluxes of mass, momentum, energy, and others, to the status of independent variables, and to explore the consistency between generalized transport equations and a generalized version of the second law of thermodynamics. This requires going beyond classical irreversible thermodynamics by redefining entropy and entropy flux. EIT provides deeper foundations, closer relations with microscopic formalisms, a wider spectrum of applications, and a more exciting conceptual appeal to non-equilibrium thermodynamics. We first recall the historical contributions by Maxwell, Cattaneo, and Grad on generalized transport equations. A thermodynamic theory wide enough to cope with such transport equations was independently proposed between 1953 and 1983 by several authors, each emphasizing different kinds of problems. In 1983, the first international meeting on this theory took place in Bellaterra (Barcelona). It provided the opportunity for the various authors to meet together for the first time and to discuss the common points and the specific differences of their previous formulations. From then on, a large amount of applications and theoretical confirmations have emerged. From the historical point of view, the emergence of EIT has been an opportunity to revisit the foundations and to open new avenues in thermodynamics, one of the most classical and well consolidated physical theories.

  8. Conditionally exponential convex functions on locally compact groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okb El-Bab, A.S.

    1992-09-01

    The main results of the thesis are: 1) The construction of a compact base for the convex cone of all conditionally exponential convex functions. 2) The determination of the extreme parts of this cone. Some supplementary lemmas are proved for this purpose. (author). 8 refs

  9. Teleportation protocol with non-ideal conditional local operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Franco, C., E-mail: cdifranco@caesar.ucc.i [Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Ballester, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-12

    We analyze teleportation protocol when some of receiver's conditional operations are more reliable than others and a non-maximally entangled channel is shared by the two parts. We show that the average fidelity of teleportation can be maximized by choosing properly the basis in which the sender performs her two-qubit measurement.

  10. Predictive Local Composition Models for Solid/Liquid Equilibrium in n-Alkane Systems: Wilson Equation for Multicomponent Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, João A.P.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1996-01-01

    The predictive local composition model is applied to multicomponent hydrocarbon systems with long-chain n-alkanes as solutes. The results show that it can successfully be extended to highorder systems and accurately predict the solid appearance temperature, also known as cloud point, in solutions...

  11. Tracer disposition kinetics in the determination of local cerebral blood flow by a venous equilibrium model, tube model, and distributed model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Y.; Sugiyama, Y.; Iga, T.; Hanano, M.

    1987-01-01

    Tracer distribution kinetics in the determination of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) were examined by using three models, i.e., venous equilibrium, tube, and distributed models. The technique most commonly used for measuring LCBF is the tissue uptake method, which was first developed and applied by Kety. The measurement of LCBF with the 14 C-iodoantipyrine (IAP) method is calculated by using an equation derived by Kety based on the Fick's principle and a two-compartment model of blood-tissue exchange and tissue concentration at a single data point. The procedure, in which the tissue is to be in equilibrium with venous blood, will be referred to as the tissue equilibration model. In this article, effects of the concentration gradient of tracer along the length of the capillary (tube model) and the transverse heterogeneity in the capillary transit time (distributed model) on the determination of LCBF were theoretically analyzed for the tissue sampling method. Similarities and differences among these models are explored. The rank order of the LCBF calculated by using arterial blood concentration time courses and the tissue concentration of tracer based on each model were tube model (model II) less than distributed model (model III) less than venous equilibrium model (model I). Data on 14 C-IAP kinetics reported by Ohno et al. were employed. The LCBFs calculated based on model I were 45-260% larger than those in models II or III. To discriminate among three models, we propose to examine the effect of altering the venous infusion time of tracer on the apparent tissue-to-blood concentration ratio (lambda app). A range of the ratio of the predicted lambda app in models II or III to that in model I was from 0.6 to 1.3

  12. Non-local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Abundance Analyses of the Extreme Helium Stars V652 Her and HD 144941

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Gajendra; Lambert, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Optical high-resolution spectra of V652 Her and HD 144941, the two extreme helium stars with exceptionally low C/He ratios, have been subjected to a non-LTE abundance analysis using the tools TLUSTY and SYNSPEC. Defining atmospheric parameters were obtained from a grid of non-LTE atmospheres and a variety of spectroscopic indicators including He i and He ii line profiles, and the ionization equilibrium of ion pairs such as C ii/C iii and N ii/N iii. The various indicators provide a consistent set of atmospheric parameters: T eff = 25,000 ± 300 K, log g = 3.10 ± 0.12(cgs), and ξ = 13 ± 2 km s −1 are provided for V652 Her, and T eff = 22,000 ± 600 K, log g = 3.45 ± 0.15 (cgs), and ξ = 10 km s −1 are provided for HD 144941. In contrast to the non-LTE analyses, the LTE analyses—LTE atmospheres and an LTE line analysis—with the available indicators do not provide a consistent set of atmospheric parameters. The principal non-LTE effect on the elemental abundances is on the neon abundance. It is generally considered that these extreme helium stars with their very low C/He ratio result from the merger of two helium white dwarfs. Indeed, the derived composition of V652 Her is in excellent agreement with predictions by Zhang and Jeffery, who model the slow merger of helium white dwarfs; a slow merger results in the merged star having the composition of the accreted white dwarf. In the case of HD 144941, which appears to have evolved from metal-poor stars, a slow merger is incompatible with the observed composition but variations of the merger rate may account for the observed composition. More detailed theoretical studies of the merger of a pair of helium white dwarfs are to be encouraged.

  13. Local Government Units in Indonesia: Demographic Attributes and Differences in Financial Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusmin Rusmin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the outcome of decentralisation reforms in Indonesia, focusing on the association between demographic characteristics and differences in the financial condition of local governments units. It investigates cross-sectional data pertaining to demographic characteristics and financial statements audited by the Supreme Audit Body of 419 Indonesian local government units for the fiscal year 2007. It utilises demographic attributes including scope of entity, location, tenure (date of entry, gender, human development index (HDI and size of local governments to explain differences in the financial condition of Indonesia’s local government. Local government financial condition is proxied by quick ratio, debt ratio, services ratio, and ratio of local to total revenues. The results suggest that scope and location of local government units help explain all of the financial condition variables. The findings further infer that local government units domiciled in Java tend to report better financial conditions relative to those domiciled in other islands. Our results also show that local government units with greater female populations and higher HDI are more likely to have a local authority that (1 has better ability to finance their general services from their unrestricted net assets, and (2 has greater ability to earn more revenues from local sources. Finally, this study documents that the larger the population of a local government unit, the higher its liquidity position, the stronger its ability to funding general services, and the greater its possibility earning revenues from its local sources.

  14. Local Stability Conditions for Two Types of Monetary Models with Recursive Utility

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Kenji; Utsunomiya, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores local stability conditions for money-in-utility-function (MIUF) and transaction-costs (TC) models with recursive utility.A monetary variant of the Brock-Gale condition provides a theoretical justification of the comparative statics analysis. One of sufficient conditions for local stability is increasing marginal impatience (IMI) in consumption and money. However, this does not deny the possibility of decreasing marginal impatience (DMI). The local stability with DMI is mor...

  15. Wall conditioning and leak localization in the advanced toroidal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.; Glowienka, J.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Murakami, M.; Rayburn, T.F.; Simpkins, J.E.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Yarber, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel and its internal components have been conditioned for plasma operation by baking, discharge cleaning with hydrogen and helium, and gettering with chromium and titanium. The plasma-facing surface of ATF consists mainly of stainless steel with some graphite; the outgassing area is dominated by the graphite because of its open porosity. Since this situation is somewhat different from that in other fusion plasma experiments, in which a single material dominates both the outgassing area and the plasma-facing area, different cleaning and conditioning techniques are required. The situation was aggravated by air leaks in the vacuum vessel, presumably resulting from baking and from vibration during plasma operation. The results of the various cleaning and conditioning techniques used are presented and compared on the basis of residual gas analysis and plasma performance. A technique for detecting leaks from the inside of the vacuum vessel is described; this technique was developed because access to the outside of the vessel is severely restricted by external components. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Wall conditioning and leak localization in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.; Glowienka, J.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Murakami, M.; Rayburn, T.F.; Simpkins, J.E.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Yarber, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel and its internal components have been conditioned for plasma operation by baking, discharge cleaning with hydrogen and helium, and gettering with chromium and titanium. The plasma-facing surface of ATF consists mainly of stainless steel with some graphite; the outgassing area is dominated by the graphite because of its open porosity. Since this situation is somewhat different from that in other fusion plasma experiments, in which a single material dominates both the outgassing area and the plasma-facing area, different cleaning and conditioning techniques are required. The situation was aggravated by air leaks in the vacuum vessel, presumably resulting from baking and from vibration during plasma operation. The results of the various cleaning and conditioning techniques used are presented and compared on the basis of residual gas analysis and plasma performance. A technique for detecting leaks from the inside of the vacuum vessel is described. This technique was developed because access to the outside of the vessel is severely restricted by external components

  17. Fabrication of predominantly Mn4+ -doped TiO2 nanoparticles under equilibrium conditions and their application as visible-light photocatalyts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijie; Fan, Jiajie; Cao, Zetan; Zheng, Yichao; Yao, Zhiqiang; Shao, Guosheng; Hu, Junhua

    2014-07-01

    The chemical state of a transition-metal dopant in TiO(2) can intrinsically determine the performance of the doped material in applications such as photocatalysis and photovoltaics. In this study, manganese-doped TiO2 is fabricated by a near-equilibrium process, in which the TiO(2) precursor powder precipitates from a hydrothermally obtained transparent mother solution. The doping level and subsequent thermal treatment influence the morphology and crystallization of the TiO(2) samples. FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses indicate that the manganese dopant is substitutionally incorporated by replacing Ti(4+) cations. The absorption band edge can be gradually shifted to 1.8 eV by increasing the nominal manganese content to 10 at %. Manganese atoms doped into the titanium lattice are associated with the dominant 4+ valence oxidation state, which introduces two curved, intermediate bands within the band gap and results in a significant enhancement in photoabsorption and the quantity of photogenerated hydroxyl radicals. Additionally, the high photocatalytic performance of manganese-doped TiO(2) is also attributed to the low oxygen content, owing to the equilibrium fabrication conditions. This work provides an important strategy to control the chemical and defect states of dopants by using an equilibrium fabrication process. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Non-local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Abundance Analyses of the Extreme Helium Stars V652 Her and HD 144941

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Gajendra [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, 560034 (India); Lambert, David L., E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [The W.J. McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1083 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Optical high-resolution spectra of V652 Her and HD 144941, the two extreme helium stars with exceptionally low C/He ratios, have been subjected to a non-LTE abundance analysis using the tools TLUSTY and SYNSPEC. Defining atmospheric parameters were obtained from a grid of non-LTE atmospheres and a variety of spectroscopic indicators including He i and He ii line profiles, and the ionization equilibrium of ion pairs such as C ii/C iii and N ii/N iii. The various indicators provide a consistent set of atmospheric parameters: T {sub eff} = 25,000 ± 300 K, log g = 3.10 ± 0.12(cgs), and ξ = 13 ± 2 km s{sup −1} are provided for V652 Her, and T {sub eff} = 22,000 ± 600 K, log g = 3.45 ± 0.15 (cgs), and ξ = 10 km s{sup −1} are provided for HD 144941. In contrast to the non-LTE analyses, the LTE analyses—LTE atmospheres and an LTE line analysis—with the available indicators do not provide a consistent set of atmospheric parameters. The principal non-LTE effect on the elemental abundances is on the neon abundance. It is generally considered that these extreme helium stars with their very low C/He ratio result from the merger of two helium white dwarfs. Indeed, the derived composition of V652 Her is in excellent agreement with predictions by Zhang and Jeffery, who model the slow merger of helium white dwarfs; a slow merger results in the merged star having the composition of the accreted white dwarf. In the case of HD 144941, which appears to have evolved from metal-poor stars, a slow merger is incompatible with the observed composition but variations of the merger rate may account for the observed composition. More detailed theoretical studies of the merger of a pair of helium white dwarfs are to be encouraged.

  19. Instrumentation for localized measurements in two-phase flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, G.G.; Averill, R.H.; Shurts, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    Three types of instrumentation that have been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., and its predecessor, Aerojet Nuclear company, at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to investigate two-phase flow phenomenon in a nuclear reactor at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility are discussed: (a) a combination drag disc-turbine transducer (DTT), (b) a multibeam nuclear hardened gamma densitometer system, and (c) a conductivity sensitive liquid level transducer (LLT). The DTT obtains data on the complex problem of two-phase flow conditions in the LOFT primary coolant system during a loss-os-coolant experiment (LOCE). The discussion of the DTT describes how a turbine, measuring coolant velocity, and a drag disc, measuring coolant momentum flux, can provide valuable mass flow data. The nuclear hardened gamma densitometer is used to obtain density and flow regime information for two-phase flow in the LOFT primary coolant system during a LOCE. The LLT is used to measure water and steam conditions within the LOFT reactor core during a LOCE. The LLT design and the type of data obtained are described

  20. Direct Detection of a Chemical Equilibrium between a Localized Singlet Diradical and Its σ-Bonded Species by Time-Resolved UV/Vis and IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidomi, Shohei; Mishima, Megumi; Seyama, Shin; Abe, Manabu; Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Ishibashi, Taka-Aki

    2017-03-06

    Localized singlet diradicals are key intermediates in bond homolyses. The singlet diradicals are energetically much less stable than the σ-bonded species. In general, only one-way reactions from diradicals to σ-bonded species are observed. In this study, a thermal equilibrium between a singlet 1,2-diazacyclopentane-3,5-diyl diradical and the corresponding σ-bonded species was directly observed. The singlet diradical was more stable than the σ-bonded species. The solvent effect clarified key features, such as the zwitterionic character of the singlet diradical. The effect of the nitrogen atoms is discussed in detail. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Stability of niclosamide in water under local conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hindi, A.M.; Sidra, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The stability of 14 C-labelled niclosamide was studied in distilled water at two different pH values and in canal water. 2 mg/1 niclosamide solutions were exposed to direct atmospheric conditions. The activity was followed by radioassay and the concentration of niclosamide was determined by GLC. The total activity was found to decrease to 46.0% in weakly acidic solution (pH 6.5), 45% in neutral solution (pH 7.0) and 16.7% in filtered canal water after three weeks. GLC analysis showed that niclosamide concentration had dropped to 0.05, 0.06 and 0.03 mg/1 in weakly acidic, neutral medium and canal water after the same period. GLC analysis as compared to radioassay indicated the presence of increasing amounts of degradation product(s), in the chloroform extracts of water with time, which were not detected by GLC

  2. Equilibrium moisture content of wood at different temperature/moisture conditions in the cladding of wooden constructions and in the relation to their reliability and service life

    OpenAIRE

    Zdeňka Havířová; Pavel Kubů

    2010-01-01

    One of the natural properties of wood and wood-based materials is their soaking capacity (hy­gro­sco­pi­ci­ty). The moisture content of wood and building constructions of wood and wood based materials significantly influences the service life and reliability of these constructions and buildings. The equilibrium weight moisture content of built-in wood corresponding to temperature/moisture conditions inside the cladding has therefore a decisive influence on the basic requirements placed on bui...

  3. [Distribution of 137Cs, 90Sr and their chemical analogues in the components of an above-ground part of a pine in a quasi-equilibrium condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamikhin, S V; Manakhov, D V; Shcheglov, A I

    2014-01-01

    The additional study of the distribution of radioactive isotopes of caesium and strontium and their chemical analogues in the above-ground components of pine in the remote from the accident period was carried out. The results of the research confirmed the existence of analogy in the distribution of these elements on the components of this type of wood vegetation in the quasi-equilibrium (relatively radionuclides) condition. Also shown is the selective possibility of using the data on the ash content of the components of forest stands of pine and oak as an information analogue.

  4. Innovative Radiating Systems for Train Localization in Interference Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vegni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of innovative radiating systems based on the metamaterial technology for GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System applications in radio frequency (RF interference conditions is proposed. To this aim, firstly two typical adaptive array techniques (i.e., nulling and beam-forming are discussed and tradeed off. Secondly, FRPA (Fixed Radiation Pattern Antenna and CRPA (Controlled Radiation Pattern Antenna phased array configurations of miniaturized patch antennas are studied by means of electromagnetic commercial tools and phased array optimization algorithms. This process leads to the identification of a phased array design. Benefits and drawbacks for GNSS applications are highlighted. Finally, the design of the phased array is applied to a GNSS user receiver in a navigation realistic environment. Simulation results are obtained in a realistic scenario for railway applications, comprising of a GNSS satellite constellation, a GNSS user receiver (i.e., on-board train equipment running along a track in Western Australia, and a constellation of interfering satellites. Navigation service performances (i.e., user location accuracy and service availability are computed taking into account the adaptive array radiation pattern in two different modes (i.e., FRPA or CRPA and band-limited white noise interference.

  5. The Zr-Pt system. Experimental determination of the phase equilibrium conditions, and obtention of the diagram by thermodynamical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Regina P.

    1997-01-01

    Two regions in the zirconium-platinum system (Zr-Pt) were investigated, namely, the zirconium rich and the platinum rich regions. With this purpose, five alloys were obtained. The performed experiences consisted on heat treatments and electrical resistivity variations with temperature measurements. The appearing phases were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), quantitative microanalysis and X-ray diffraction techniques. Besides that, the existing phases in the rich zirconium region between 0 and 50 % at. Pt were thermodynamically modelled and the resulting diagram was calculated by means of the Thermocalc computational program. Several proposals were formulated: a) A change in the eutectoid transformation temperature βZr ↔ αZr + pp (800 C degrees according to this work); b) The existence of the phase Zr 3 Pt in the equilibrium diagram; c) The existence of the peritectic transformation Liquid + Zr 5 Pt 3 ↔ Zr 3 Pt; d) The occurrence of the two - phases region ZrPt 3 + ZrPt 8 between 1050 and 1320 C degrees, and finally; e) The occurrence of the peritectic transformation ZrPt 3 + Liquid ↔ γPt was verified. (author)

  6. Possibility of Localized Corrosion of PWR primary side materials in oxidative decontamination condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jung, Jun Young; Won, Huijun; Kim, Seon Byeong; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Primary circuit of a PWR (radionuclides uptake in the inner oxide layer and oxide/metal interface occurred inevitably. Therefore, it is necessary to remove the inner oxide layer as well as the outer oxide layer to achieve excellent decontamination effects. It is known that the outer oxide layers are typically composed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. On the other hand, the inner oxide layers are composed of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Ni{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x})(Cr{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Because of chromium in the trivalent oxidation state which is difficult to dissolve, the oxide layer has an excellent protectiveness and is hard to decontaminate. For the dissolution of chromium-rich oxide, there have been developed an alkaline permanganate (AP) or nitric permanganate (NP). A disadvantage of the AP process is the generation of a large volume of secondary waste. On the other hand, NP process is highly incompatible to the corrosion of the structure materials. In this study as a part of developing decontamination process, we investigated the corrosion behavior of the structure materials such as Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP and AP oxidative decontamination conditions for the safe use of an oxidative phase in PWR system decontamination. The corrosion behavior was analyzed through the potential-pH equilibrium for the system of Cr-H{sub 2}O / Mn-H{sub 2}O at 90 .deg. C and potentiodynamic polarization in a typical AP and NP solution were evaluated. The AP or NP treated specimen surface was observed using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for an evaluation of the localized corrosion. The possibility of localized corrosion of PWR primary side materials under oxidative decontamination condition was evaluated using a potentiodynamic polarization technique, observation of localized corrosion morphology, and consideration of potential-pH diagrams at 90 .deg. C. From the results of these tests, we

  7. Adaptation of AASHTO Pavement Design Guide for Local Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, J.J. [Applied Research Associates Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The methodology used to adapt the 1993 AASHTO Guide for Design of Pavement Structures to Ontario conditions was described. The guide expresses the effect of traffic loads on pavement performance using the concept of axle Load Equivalency Factors (LEF). LEF is regarded as a pavement damage factor assigned to each specific load and axle configuration. The size of LEF is related to the damage that is expected to occur from a standard load of 80 kN carried by a single axle with dual tires. The factors are summarized to yield the number of Equivalent Single Axle Loads (ESALs) a pavement is expected to sustain during its life. A summary was also provided of the additional work done to prepare for the transition to the proposed mechanistically-based 2002 AASHTO Guide. The paper focused only on the design of flexible pavements in terms of load characterization using equivalent single axle loads along with axle load spectra, below grade and material characterization, plus initial and terminal serviceability and reliability. The AASHTO Guide uses two parameters to deal with design reliability: design reliability level and overall standard deviation. Data collected on Ontario highway pavements and materials was used for assessing the design inputs. Other data was also collected from research and development studies, laboratory experiments, and from a survey of experienced pavement design engineers. The end result was a new grouping of Ontario soils for pavement design, recommended values for the resilient modulus of below grade soils, recommendations for structural layer coefficients for Ontario pavement materials and recommendations for the initial pavement serviceability based on Ontario smoothness specifications. Results of calibration and verification processes indicate that for new flexible pavements, the AASHTO-Ontario model is in good agreement with the observed results. It was recommended that the calibration and verification of the AASHTO-Ontario model should be a

  8. Non equilibrium atomic processes and plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takako

    2003-01-01

    Along with the technical progress in plasma spectroscopy, non equilibrium ionization processes have been recently observed. We study non local thermodynamic equilibrium and non ionization equilibrium for various kinds of plasmas. Specifically we discuss non equilibrium atomic processes in magnetically confined plasmas, solar flares and laser produced plasmas using a collisional radiative model based on plasma spectroscopic data. (author)

  9. MHD equilibrium with toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    1987-03-01

    The present work attempts to formulate the equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma with purely toroidal flow within ideal MHD theory. In general, the inertial term Rho(v.Del)v caused by plasma flow is so complicated that the equilibrium equation is completely different from the Grad-Shafranov equation. However, in the case of purely toroidal flow the equilibrium equation can be simplified so that it resembles the Grad-Shafranov equation. Generally one arbitrary two-variable functions and two arbitrary single variable functions, instead of only four single-variable functions, are allowed in the new equilibrium equations. Also, the boundary conditions of the rotating (with purely toroidal fluid flow, static - without any fluid flow) equilibrium are the same as those of the static equilibrium. So numerically one can calculate the rotating equilibrium as a static equilibrium. (author)

  10. On local thermal equilibrium and potential gradient vs current characteristic in wall-stabilized argon plasma arc at 0.1 atm pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Haruo; Imazu, Shingo; Inaba, Tsuginori.

    1979-01-01

    In wall-stabilized arc which is a very useful means for determining the transport characteristics of high temperature gases, it is the premise that the inside of arc column is in complete local thermal equilibrium (LTE). In general, the higher the gas pressure, the easier the establishment of LTE, accordingly the experimental investigations on the characteristics of arc discharge as well as the transport characteristics so far were limited to the region of relatively high pressure. However, the authors have found that the theoretical potential vs. current characteristic obtained by the transport characteristic was greatly different from the actually measured one in low pressure region, as the fundamental characteristic of wall-stabilized argon plasma arc below atmospheric pressure. This time, they have clarified this discrepancy at 0.1 atm using the plasma parameters obtained through the spectroscopic measurements. The spectroscopic measurements have been performed through the side observation window at the position 5.5 cm away from the cathode, when arc was ignited vertically at the electrodes distant by 11 cm. Arc radius was 0.5 cm. Electron density and temperature, gas temperature and the excitation density of argon neutral atoms have been experimentally measured. The investigations showed that, in the region of low arc current, where the ratio of current to arc radius is less than 200 A/cm, the fall of gas temperature affected greatly on the decrease of axial electric field of arc column. The non-equilibrium between electron temperature and gas temperature decreased with the increase of arc current, and it was concluded that LTE has been formed at the center portion of arc column above I/R = 300 A/cm. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  11. P-T Equilibrium Conditions of Xenoliths from the Udachnaya Kimberlite Pipe: Thermal Perturbations in the Lithospheric Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tychkov, Nikolay; Agashev, Alexey; Malygina, Elena; Pokhilenko, Nikolay

    2014-05-01

    Integrated study of 250 peridotite xenoliths from Udachnaya -East pipe show difference in mineral paragenesises and textural-structural peculiarities in the different level of cratonic lithosphere mantle (CLM). The compositions of minerals were determined using EPMA. Thermobarometric parameters (Brey, Kohller, 1990) were determined for all rocks occupying different fields on geothermal curve. The deepest layer (the pressure interval of 5.0-7.0 GPa) contains mostly pophyroclastic lherzolites. Anyway, some rocks of this layer have an idiomorphic texture being also enriched in incompatible components. Higher in the CLM sequence, the interval (4.2-6.3 GPa) is composed of the most depleted rocks: megacristalline ultradepleted harzburgite-dunites and depleted granular harzburgite-dunites, as well as lherzolites in a subordinate amount. They correspond strate to 35 mW/m2 and partly overlap the deeper layer in dapth. It is likely that rocks of this layer are in equilibrium and were not subject to significant secondary changes due to kimberlite magma intrusion. Thus, this interval of the CLM sequence reflects the true (relic) geotherm for the area of the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe. Moreover, it is obvious that this interval was a major supplier of diamonds into kimberlites of the Udachnaya pipe. The interval of 4.2-2.0 GPa in the CLM sequence is also composed of coarse depleted lherzolites and harzburgites. Rocks of this interval are slightly more enriched than those of the underlying interval. This is confirmed by the distinct predominance of lherzolites over harzburgite-dunites. The heat flow in this layer varies in the range of 38-45 mW/m2 and shows a general tendency to increase with decreasing depth. According to occurrence of nonequilibrium mineral assemblages and increased heat flow relative to the major heat flow of 35 mW/m2, this interval is similar to the deepest interval of secondary enriched rocks. Interval of less than 2.0 GPa composed of spinel lherzolites and

  12. Equilibrium dialysis-ligand exchange: adaptation of the method for determination of conditional stability constants of radionuclide-fulvic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaus, M.A.; Hummel, W.; Van Loon, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    The equilibrium dialysis-ligand exchange technique (EDLE) is used to determine conditional stability constants for the complexation of metal ions with humic acid, particularly in high pH solutions. Here, this technique has been adapted to measure conditional stability constants with fulvic acid. Fulvic acid permeates across all membranes during the experiment. The quantities involved therefore have to be determined analytically and taken into account when calculating the conditional stability constants. Co(II) and Laurentian Soil fulvic (LFA) acid were selected as a test system in order to investigate the time scale required to establish chemical and diffusion equilibria. After an incubation time of approximately two days, the conditional stability constants measured for the formation of Co-LFA-complexes are not time dependent, although across the whole time period investigated, LFA was still diffusing in increasing amounts across the dialysis membrane. This work demonstrates that the modified EDLE technique can be used in the determination of conditional metal stability constants of fulvic acid. (authors)

  13. Effects of periodic boundary conditions on equilibrium properties of computer simulated fluids. II. Application to simple liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, L.R.; Haan, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    The theory of the previous paper is used to predict anomalous size effects observed for computer simulated liquid Ar. The theoretical results for the boundary condition induced anisotropy of two-particle correlations are found to be large, and in excellent agreement with the computer experimental data of Mandell for densities near the Ar triple point density. The agreement is less good at higher densities

  14. Management through decentralisation and local economic development: A condition for sustainable urbanisation in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Innocents Edoun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the premise that, urbanisation could be effective only if decentralisation policy is at the centre of development initiatives. In this way the paper argues, local authorities could utilize local resources to ignite local economic development (LED through for instance trade activities and investments.LED initiatives aim at empowering local stakeholders to utilise business enterprises, labour, capital and other local resources effectively to maximise local benefits in order to contribute to poverty reduction and the uplifting of citizens life conditions. The paper is divided into four major parts. The first part gives a background of the notion of decentralisation, urbanisation and local economic development. The second part provides an overview of the review of the related literature while the third part gives an account on how the above are inter-related. The fourth part provides the challenges faced by urbanisation in achieving local economic development and part five is presented as conclusion and recommendations.

  15. Research on suitable heating conditions during local PWHT. Pt. 1. Influence of heating conditions on temperature distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Jinkichi; Horii, Yukihiko; Sato, Masanobu; Murakawa, Hidekazu; Wang Jianhua

    1999-01-01

    To improve weld joint properties a heat treatment so called post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is often implemented for steel weldment. Generally, the PWHT is conducted in a furnace at a factory. But in site welds such as the girth joint of pipe, a local PWHT is applied using electric heater and so on. In the local PWHT steep temperature gradient occurs depending on the heating condition and it leads to rise of the thermal stress in addition to the welding residual stress. However, heating condition is not always defined the same in some standards. Therefore, suitable heat conditions for the local PWHT were studied supposing the power plant and so on experimentally and theoretically. Temperature distribution and thermal strains under different heating conditions were measured during the local PWHT using carbon steel pipes of 340 mm in diameter and 53 mm in wall thickness. The temperature gradient, thermal strain were also analyzed using Finite Element Method (FEM) as axis-symmetric model. Further, the influences of pipe size and heat transfer coefficient on the temperature distribution were analyzed and suitable heating source widths for various pipe sizes were proposed from the viewpoint of temperature distribution. (orig.)

  16. Equilibrium Dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    context of antimicrobial therapy in malnutrition. Dialysis has in the past presented technical problems, being complicated and time-consuming. A new dialysis system based on the equilibrium technique has now become available, and it is the principles and practical application of this apparatus (Kontron Diapack; Kontron.

  17. Strategic Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    An outcome in a noncooperative game is said to be self-enforcing, or a strategic equilibrium, if, whenever it is recommended to the players, no player has an incentive to deviate from it.This paper gives an overview of the concepts that have been proposed as formalizations of this requirement and of

  18. Maximin equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept which extends von Neumann and Morgenstern's maximin strategy solution by incorporating `individual rationality' of the players. Maximin equilibrium, extending Nash's value approach, is based on the evaluation of the strategic uncertainty of the whole game. We show that

  19. 'NTA', a locally named unclear condition that causes failure to thrive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'NTA', a locally named unclear condition that causes failure to thrive amongst under five children in southeastern Nigeria: An assessment of mothers' and caregivers' perception of its causes and management.

  20. Deviations from thermal equilibrium in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burm, K.T.A.L.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma system in local thermal equilibrium can usually be described with only two parameters. To describe deviations from equilibrium two extra parameters are needed. However, it will be shown that deviations from temperature equilibrium and deviations from Saha equilibrium depend on one another. As a result, non-equilibrium plasmas can be described with three parameters. This reduction in parameter space will ease the plasma describing effort enormously

  1. Quantum dynamical semigroups and approach to equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigerio, A.

    1977-01-01

    For a quantum dynamical semigroup possessing a faithful normal stationary state, some conditions are discussed, which ensure the uniqueness of the equilibrium state and/or the approach to equilibrium for arbitrary initial condition. (Auth.)

  2. Retrieval of Kinetic Temperature and Carbon Dioxide Abundance from Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Limb Emission Measurements made by the SABER Experiment on the TIMED Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Wintersteiner, Peter P.; Picard, Richard H.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Gordley, Larry L.; Russell, James M., III

    2002-01-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment was launched onboard the TIMED satellite in December, 2001. SABER is designed to provide measurements of the key radiative and chemical sources and sinks of energy in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). SABER measures Earth limb emission in 10 broadband radiometer channels ranging from 1.27 micrometers to 17 micrometers. Measurements are made both day and night over the latitude range from 54 deg. S to 87 deg. N with alternating hemisphere coverage every 60 days. In this paper we concentrate on retrieved profiles of kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) and CO2 volume mixing ratio (vmr), inferred from SABER-observed 15 micrometer and 4.3 micrometer limb emissions, respectively. SABER-measured limb radiances are in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) in the MLT region. The complexity of non-LTE radiation transfer combined with the large volume of data measured by SABER requires new retrieval approaches and radiative transfer techniques to accurately and efficiently retrieve the data products. In this paper we present the salient features of the coupled non-LTE T(sub k)/CO2 retrieval algorithm, along with preliminary results.

  3. Equilibrium phase experimental determination of petroleum + gas systems at supercritical condition using ultrasonic technology; Estudo experimental do equilibrio de fases de sistemas de fracoes de petroleo e gases em condicoes supercriticas utilizando tecnicas de ultra-som: aparato experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehl, Ana; Pessoa, Fernando L.P.; Silva, Silvia M.C. da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica; Feiteira, Jose F. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2008-07-01

    In separation process of multicomponent systems based on phase equilibrium is essential know the phase behavior and the critical points of the system for determination and optimization of the operational conditions. The experimental apparatus presents the challenge of determine the equilibrium phase dates of a system composed by petroleum residua and supercritical solvent. The used method, named acoustic method, allows the composition identification of the phases in equilibrium also in cloudy systems as they are the systems formed by residues of crude oil. For this reason, the acoustic methodology, based on the ultra-sound technology will be used in the study of the phase equilibrium and experimental characterization of the system, in benches scale, operating in severe conditions of temperature and pressure.The acoustic method is one not invasive and not subjective technique, what becomes the work in high pressures safer. (author)

  4. Kinetics of Materials at Extreme Conditions: Understanding the Time Dependent Approach to Equilibrium at MaRIE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mcnabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kumar, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eggert, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Borg, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerreta, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dattelbaum, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fried, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Greeff, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stolken, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-21

    The National Nuclear Security Agency has recently recognized that a long-term need exists to establish a stronger scientific basis for the assessment and qualification of materials and manufacturing processes for the nuclear stockpile and other national security applications. These materials may have undergone substantial changes with age, or may represent new materials that are being introduced because of difficulties associated with reusing or recreating materials used in original stockpile components. Also, with advancements in manufacturing methods, the NNSA anticipates opportunities for an enhanced range of control over fabricated components, an enhanced pace of materials development, and enhanced functionality. The development of qualification standards for these new materials will require the ability to understand and control material characteristics that affect both mechanical and dynamic performance. A unique aspect for NNSA is that the performance requirements for materials are often set by system hydrodynamics, and these materials must perform in extreme environments and loading conditions. Thus, the scientific motivation is to understand “Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE).”

  5. Effects of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption under saturated equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1992-01-01

    Three contaminated bulk surface soils were used for investigating the effect of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption. At a low solution pH, the major chemical species of uranium and thorium, uranyl UO 2 +2 , thorium dihydroxide Th(OH) 2 +2 , and thorium hydroxide Th(OH) +3 , tend to form complexes with acetates in the solution phase, which increases the fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed into this phase. At a high solution pH, important uranium and thorium species such as uranyl tricarbonate complex UO 2 (CO) 33 -4 and thorium tetrahydroxide complex Th(OH) 4 tend to resist complexation with acetates. The presence of complexing reagents in solution can release radionuclides such as uranium and/or thorium from the soil to the solution by forming soluble complexes. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are strong complex formers that released 38% to 62% of total uranium activity and 78% to 86% of total thorium activity, respectively, from the soil samples investigated. Solutions of 0.1 molar sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) and 0.1 molar sodium sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 ) were not effective complex formers with uranium and thorium under the experimental conditions. Fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed by 0.15g/200ml humic acid ranged from 4.62% to 6.17% and 1.59% to 7.09%, respectively. This work demonstrates the importance of a knowledge of solution chemistry in investigating the desorption of radionuclides

  6. A Mobile Localization Strategy for Wireless Sensor Network in NLOS Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Cheng; Yan Wang; Xingming Sun; Nan Hu; Jian Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The problem of mobile localization for wireless sensor network has attracted considerable attention in recent years.The localization accuracy will drastically grade in non-line of sight (NLOS) conditions.In this paper,we propose a mobile localization strategy based on Kalman filter.The key technologies for the proposed method are the NLOS identification and mitigation.The proposed method does not need the prior knowledge of the NLOS error and it is independent of the physical measurement ways.Simulation results show that the proposed method owns the higher localization accuracy when compared with other methods.

  7. Condition for unambiguous state discrimination using local operations and classical communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chefles, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    We obtain a necessary and sufficient condition for a finite set of states of a finite-dimensional multiparticle quantum system to be amenable to unambiguous discrimination using local operations and classical communication. This condition is valid for states which may be mixed, entangled, or both. When the support of the set of states is the entire multiparticle Hilbert space, this condition is found to have an intriguing connection with the theory of entanglement witnesses

  8. Construction of local boundary conditions for an eigenvalue problem using micro-local analysis: application to optical waveguide problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barucq, Helene; Bekkey, Chokri; Djellouli, Rabia

    2004-01-01

    We present a general procedure based on the pseudo-differential calculus for deriving artificial boundary conditions for an eigenvalue problem that characterizes the propagation of guided modes in optical waveguides. This new approach allows the construction of local conditions that (a) are independent of the frequency regime, (b) preserve the sparsity pattern of the finite element discretization, and (c) are applicable to arbitrarily shaped convex artificial boundaries. The last feature has the potential for reducing the size of the computational domain. Numerical results are presented to highlight the potential of conditions of order 1/2 and 1, for improving significantly the computational efficiency of finite element methods for the solution of optical waveguide problems

  9. Local environmental conditions and the stability of protective layers on steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J P [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Bursik, A

    1996-12-01

    Local environmental conditions determine whether the protective layers on steel surfaces are stable. With unfavorable local environmental conditions, the protective layers may be subject to damage. Taking the cation conductivity of all plant cycle streams <0.2 {mu}S/cm for granted, an adequate feed-water and - if applicable - boiler water conditioning is required to prevent such damage. Even if the mentioned conditions are met in a bulk, the local environmental conditions may be inadequate. The reasons for this may be the disregarding of interactions among material, design, and chemistry. The paper presents many possible mechanisms of protective layer damage that are directly influenced or exacerbated by plant cycle chemistry. Two items are discussed in more detail: First, the application of all volatile treatment for boiler water conditioning of drum boiler systems operating at low pressures and, second, the chemistry in the transition zone water/steam in the low pressure turbine. The latter is of major interest for the understanding and prevention of corrosion due to high concentration of impurities in the aqueous liquid phases. This is a typical example showing that local environmental conditions may fundamentally differ from the overall bulk chemistry. (au) 19 refs.

  10. Design and Analysis of Financial Condition Local Government Java and Bali (2013-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natrini Nur Dewi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify financial condition of local government in Java and Bali year 2013-2014. It is due to government financial condition, according to several researchers, provides an image on the ability of a government in fulfilling their obligations whether in the form of debt or service fulfillment in timely manner. According to assessment upon financial condition, local government is able to identify how to fulfill public needs, how to utilize resources and how to proceed resources so that it can be more productive. As for the measurement method of financial condition itself, the standard method cannot be determined. Therefore, indicator used for measuring local government financial condition is Brown's (1993[2] indicator development adjusted to Indonesian government. In order to develop the indicator, this research employs qualitative method by comparing GASB No.34, SAP Government Regulation (“Peraturan Pemerintah” - PP 71 Year 2010, SAP PP 24 year 2005 and literature studies and expert validation. In order to obtain a balanced comparison, this research also employs clusters developed by Baidori (2015[1] for government in Java and Bali. Results of this research showed that among 7 analyzed clusters, there are variations of results, even though each cluster has similar socioeconomic condition to each other. This variation upon Indonesian local government financial condition is caused by regional autonomy.

  11. Sampling the Denatured State of Polypeptides in Water, Urea, and Guanidine Chloride to Strict Equilibrium Conditions with the Help of Massively Parallel Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Roberto; Camilloni, Carlo; Tiana, Guido

    2014-02-11

    The denatured state of polypeptides and proteins, stabilized by chemical denaturants like urea and guanidine chloride, displays residual secondary structure when studied by nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy. However, these experimental techniques are weakly sensitive, and thus molecular-dynamics simulations can be useful to complement the experimental findings. To sample the denatured state, we made use of massively-parallel computers and of a variant of the replica exchange algorithm, in which the different branches, connected with unbiased replicas, favor the formation and disruption of local secondary structure. The algorithm is applied to the second hairpin of GB1 in water, in urea, and in guanidine chloride. We show with the help of different criteria that the simulations converge to equilibrium. It results that urea and guanidine chloride, besides inducing some polyproline-II structure, have different effect on the hairpin. Urea disrupts completely the native region and stabilizes a state which resembles a random coil, while guanidine chloride has a milder effect.

  12. Non-local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Stellar Spectroscopy with 1D and Models. I. Methods and Application to Magnesium Abundances in Standard Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergemann, Maria; Collet, Remo; Amarsi, Anish M.; Kovalev, Mikhail; Ruchti, Greg; Magic, Zazralt

    2017-09-01

    We determine Mg abundances in six Gaia benchmark stars using theoretical one-dimensional (1D) hydrostatic model atmospheres, as well as temporally and spatially averaged three-dimensional () model atmospheres. The stars cover a range of Teff from 4700 to 6500 K, log g from 1.6 to 4.4 dex, and [Fe/H] from -3.0 dex to solar. Spectrum synthesis calculations are performed in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and in non-LTE (NLTE) using the oscillator strengths recently published by Pehlivan Rhodin et al. We find that: (a) Mg abundances determined from the infrared spectra are as accurate as the optical diagnostics, (b) the NLTE effects on Mg I line strengths and abundances in this sample of stars are minor (although for a few Mg I lines the NLTE effects on abundance exceed 0.6 dex in and 0.1 dex in 1D, (c) the solar Mg abundance is 7.56+/- 0.05 dex (total error), in excellent agreement with the Mg abundance measured in CI chondritic meteorites, (d) the 1D NLTE and NLTE approaches can be used with confidence to analyze optical Mg I lines in spectra of dwarfs and sub-giants, but for red giants the Mg I 5711 Å line should be preferred, (e) low-excitation Mg I lines are sensitive to the atmospheric structure; for these lines, LTE calculations with models lead to significant systematic abundance errors. The methods developed in this work will be used to study Mg abundances of a large sample of stars in the next paper in the series.

  13. A non-local thermodynamical equilibrium line formation for neutral and singly ionized titanium in model atmospheres of reference A-K stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnova, T. M.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Ryabchikova, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    We construct a model atom for Ti I-II using more than 3600 measured and predicted energy levels of Ti I and 1800 energy levels of Ti II, and quantum mechanical photoionization cross-sections. Non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for Ti I and Ti II is treated through a wide range of spectral types from A to K, including metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] down to -2.6 dex. NLTE leads to weakened Ti I lines and positive abundance corrections. The magnitude of NLTE corrections is smaller compared to the literature data for FGK atmospheres. NLTE leads to strengthened Ti II lines and negative NLTE abundance corrections. For the first time, we have performed NLTE calculations for Ti I-II in the 6500 ≤ Teff ≤ 13 000 K range. For four A-type stars, we derived in LTE an abundance discrepancy of up to 0.22 dex between Ti I and Ti II, which vanishes in NLTE. For four other A-B stars, with only Ti II lines observed, NLTE leads to a decrease of line-to-line scatter. An efficiency of inelastic Ti I + H I collisions was estimated from an analysis of Ti I and Ti II lines in 17 cool stars with -2.6 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.0. Consistent NLTE abundances from Ti I and Ti II were obtained by applying classical Drawinian rates for the stars with log g ≥ 4.1, and neglecting inelastic collisions with H I for the very metal-poor (VMP) giant HD 122563. For the VMP turn-off stars ([Fe/H] ≤ -2 and log g ≤ 4.1), we obtained the positive abundance difference Ti I-II already in LTE, which increases in NLTE. Accurate collisional data for Ti I and Ti II are necessary to help solve this problem.

  14. Equilibrium Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Anderlini; Daniele Terlizzese

    2009-01-01

    We build a simple model of trust as an equilibrium phenomenon, departing from standard "selfish" preferences in a minimal way. Agents who are on the receiving end of an other to transact can choose whether to cheat and take away the entire surplus, taking into account a "cost of cheating." The latter has an idiosyncratic component (an agent's type), and a socially determined one. The smaller the mass of agents who cheat, the larger the cost of cheating suffered by those who cheat. Depending o...

  15. Equilibrium shoreface profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Hughes, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale coastal behaviour models use the shoreface profile of equilibrium as a fundamental morphological unit that is translated in space to simulate coastal response to, for example, sea level oscillations and variability in sediment supply. Despite a longstanding focus on the shoreface...... profile and its relevance to predicting coastal response to changing environmental conditions, the processes and dynamics involved in shoreface equilibrium are still not fully understood. Here, we apply a process-based empirical sediment transport model, combined with morphodynamic principles to provide......; there is no tuning or calibration and computation times are short. It is therefore easily implemented with repeated iterations to manage uncertainty....

  16. Including local rainfall dynamics and uncertain boundary conditions into a 2-D regional-local flood modelling cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, María; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Bates, Paul D.; Coxon, Gemma; Freer, Jim E.; Cea, Luis; Puertas, Jerónimo

    2016-04-01

    Flood inundation models require appropriate boundary conditions to be specified at the limits of the domain, which commonly consist of upstream flow rate and downstream water level. These data are usually acquired from gauging stations on the river network where measured water levels are converted to discharge via a rating curve. Derived streamflow estimates are therefore subject to uncertainties in this rating curve, including extrapolating beyond the maximum observed ratings magnitude. In addition, the limited number of gauges in reach-scale studies often requires flow to be routed from the nearest upstream gauge to the boundary of the model domain. This introduces additional uncertainty, derived not only from the flow routing method used, but also from the additional lateral rainfall-runoff contributions downstream of the gauging point. Although generally assumed to have a minor impact on discharge in fluvial flood modeling, this local hydrological input may become important in a sparse gauge network or in events with significant local rainfall. In this study, a method to incorporate rating curve uncertainty and the local rainfall-runoff dynamics into the predictions of a reach-scale flood inundation model is proposed. Discharge uncertainty bounds are generated by applying a non-parametric local weighted regression approach to stage-discharge measurements for two gauging stations, while measured rainfall downstream from these locations is cascaded into a hydrological model to quantify additional inflows along the main channel. A regional simplified-physics hydraulic model is then applied to combine these inputs and generate an ensemble of discharge and water elevation time series at the boundaries of a local-scale high complexity hydraulic model. Finally, the effect of these rainfall dynamics and uncertain boundary conditions are evaluated on the local-scale model. Improvements in model performance when incorporating these processes are quantified using observed

  17. Local intensity area descriptor for facial recognition in ideal and noise conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Chi-Kien; Tseng, Chin-Dar; Chao, Pei-Ju; Ting, Hui-Min; Chang, Liyun; Huang, Yu-Jie; Lee, Tsair-Fwu

    2017-03-01

    We propose a local texture descriptor, local intensity area descriptor (LIAD), which is applied for human facial recognition in ideal and noisy conditions. Each facial image is divided into small regions from which LIAD histograms are extracted and concatenated into a single feature vector to represent the facial image. The recognition is performed using a nearest neighbor classifier with histogram intersection and chi-square statistics as dissimilarity measures. Experiments were conducted with LIAD using the ORL database of faces (Olivetti Research Laboratory, Cambridge), the Face94 face database, the Georgia Tech face database, and the FERET database. The results demonstrated the improvement in accuracy of our proposed descriptor compared to conventional descriptors [local binary pattern (LBP), uniform LBP, local ternary pattern, histogram of oriented gradients, and local directional pattern]. Moreover, the proposed descriptor was less sensitive to noise and had low histogram dimensionality. Thus, it is expected to be a powerful texture descriptor that can be used for various computer vision problems.

  18. Enforcing the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition in explicitly conservative local time stepping schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Semenov, Vadim A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2018-04-01

    An optimally efficient explicit numerical scheme for solving fluid dynamics equations, or any other parabolic or hyperbolic system of partial differential equations, should allow local regions to advance in time with their own, locally constrained time steps. However, such a scheme can result in violation of the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, which is manifestly non-local. Although the violations can be considered to be "weak" in a certain sense and the corresponding numerical solution may be stable, such calculation does not guarantee the correct propagation speed for arbitrary waves. We use an experimental fluid dynamics code that allows cubic "patches" of grid cells to step with independent, locally constrained time steps to demonstrate how the CFL condition can be enforced by imposing a constraint on the time steps of neighboring patches. We perform several numerical tests that illustrate errors introduced in the numerical solutions by weak CFL condition violations and show how strict enforcement of the CFL condition eliminates these errors. In all our tests the strict enforcement of the CFL condition does not impose a significant performance penalty.

  19. A New Methodology for Open Pit Slope Design in Karst-Prone Ground Conditions Based on Integrated Stochastic-Limit Equilibrium Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Cao, Ping; Ma, Guowei; Fan, Wenchen; Meng, Jingjing; Li, Kaihui

    2016-07-01

    Using the Chengmenshan Copper Mine as a case study, a new methodology for open pit slope design in karst-prone ground conditions is presented based on integrated stochastic-limit equilibrium analysis. The numerical modeling and optimization design procedure contain a collection of drill core data, karst cave stochastic model generation, SLIDE simulation and bisection method optimization. Borehole investigations are performed, and the statistical result shows that the length of the karst cave fits a negative exponential distribution model, but the length of carbonatite does not exactly follow any standard distribution. The inverse transform method and acceptance-rejection method are used to reproduce the length of the karst cave and carbonatite, respectively. A code for karst cave stochastic model generation, named KCSMG, is developed. The stability of the rock slope with the karst cave stochastic model is analyzed by combining the KCSMG code and the SLIDE program. This approach is then applied to study the effect of the karst cave on the stability of the open pit slope, and a procedure to optimize the open pit slope angle is presented.

  20. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Mário J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions. These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This new edit...

  1. Community Colleges and Labor Market Conditions: How Does Enrollment Demand Change Relative to Local Unemployment Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Nicholas W.; Orians, Erica Lee

    2013-01-01

    This study uses fixed-effects panel data techniques to estimate the elasticity of community college enrollment demand relative to local unemployment rates. The findings suggest that community college enrollment demand is counter-cyclical to changes in the labor market, as enrollments rise during periods of weak economic conditions. Using national…

  2. Probing the local, electronic and magnetic structure of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torchio, R.; Boccato, S.; Cerantola, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present recent achievements in the field of investigation of the local, electronic and magnetic structure of the matter under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. These results were obtained thanks to the coupling of a compact laser heating system to the energy-dispersive...

  3. Under what conditions can local government nurture indigenous people’s democratic practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sareen, Siddharth; Nathan, Iben

    2017-01-01

    This paper asks whether and under what conditions participatory local government can best nurture indigenous peoples’ democratic practice. Based on fieldwork in two similar Ho communities in the Indian state Jharkhand, we show that their village assemblies function differently with regard...

  4. Necessary and Sufficient Condition for Local Exponential Synchronization of Nonlinear Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrieu, Vincent; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Tarbouriech, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Based on recent works on transverse exponential stability, some necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a (locally) exponential synchronizer are established. We show that the existence of a structured synchronizer is equivalent to the existence of a stabilizer for the individual

  5. The geometry of finite equilibrium sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely noncollinear....

  6. The Geometry of Finite Equilibrium Datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely non collinear....

  7. Local conditional entropy in measure for covers with respect to a fixed partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Pierre-Paul

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we introduce two measure theoretical notions of conditional entropy for finite measurable covers conditioned to a finite measurable partition and prove that they are equal. Using this we state a local variational principle with respect to the notion of conditional entropy defined by Misiurewicz (1976 Stud. Math. 55 176–200) for the case of open covers. This in particular extends the work done in Romagnoli (2003 Ergod. Theor. Dynam. Syst. 23 1601–10), Glasner and Weiss (2006 Handbook of Dynamical Systems vol 1B (Amsterdam: Elsevier)) and Huang et al (2006 Ergod. Theor. Dynam. Syst. 26 219–45).

  8. Local conditions and uncertainty bands for Semiscale Test S-02-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis was performed to derive local conditions heat transfer parameters and their uncertainties using computer codes and experimentally derived boundary conditions for the Semiscale core for LOCA Test S-02-9. Calculations performed consisted of nominal code cases using best-estimate input parameters and cases where the specified input parameters were perturbed in accordance with the response surface method of uncertainty analysis. The output parameters of interest were those that are used in film boiling heat transfer correlations including enthalpy, pressure, quality, and coolant flow rate. Large uncertainty deviations occurred during low core mass flow periods where the relative flow uncertainties were large. Utilizing the derived local conditions and their associated uncertainties, a study was then made which showed the uncertainty in film boiling heat transfer coefficient varied between 5 and 250%

  9. Characteristic of local parameter of bubbly flow in rectangular channel under inclined and rolling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Changqi; Jin Guangyuan; Sun Licheng; Wang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Characteristics of local parameters of bubbly flow were investigated in rectangular channel (40 mm × 3 mm) under inclined and rolling conditions. Under vertical condition, the distribution type 'wall peak' and 'core peak' are observed, and 'core peak' exists when the liquid superficial velocity is low and the gas superficial velocity is high. Under inclined condition, the peaks of two distribution types get strengthened at the top of the channel, and weakened at the bottom. Under rolling condition, the peaks of two distribution types get strengthened compared with the same angle under inclined condition when the angle is getting larger. The influence from rolling motion gets stronger on the peak of two distribution types when the rolling movement is more violent. (authors)

  10. Chimera states and the interplay between initial conditions and non-local coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Peter; Sawicki, Jakub; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2017-03-01

    Chimera states are complex spatio-temporal patterns that consist of coexisting domains of coherent and incoherent dynamics. We study chimera states in a network of non-locally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. We investigate the impact of initial conditions in combination with non-local coupling. Based on an analytical argument, we show how the coupling phase and the coupling strength are linked to the occurrence of chimera states, flipped profiles of the mean phase velocity, and the transition from a phase- to an amplitude-mediated chimera state.

  11. On the Local Type I Conditions for the 3D Euler Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Dongho; Wolf, Jörg

    2018-05-01

    We prove local non blow-up theorems for the 3D incompressible Euler equations under local Type I conditions. More specifically, for a classical solution {v\\in L^∞ (-1,0; L^2 ( B(x_0,r)))\\cap L^∞_{loc} (-1,0; W^{1, ∞} (B(x_0, r)))} of the 3D Euler equations, where {B(x_0,r)} is the ball with radius r and the center at x 0, if the limiting values of certain scale invariant quantities for a solution v(·, t) as {t\\to 0} are small enough, then { \

  12. A technical basis for the flux corrected local conditions critical heat flux correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxat, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The so-called 'flux-corrected' local conditions CHF correlation was developed at Ontario Hydro in the 1980's and was demonstrated to successfully correlate the Onset of Intermittent Dryout (OID) CHF data for 37-element fuel with a downstream-skewed axial heat flux distribution. However, because the heat flux correction factor appeared to be an ad-hoc, albeit a successful modifying factor in the correlation, there was reluctance to accept the correlation more generally. This paper presents a thermalhydraulic basis, derived from two-phase flow considerations, that supports the appropriateness of the heat flux correction as a local effects modifying factor. (author)

  13. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  14. Plasma equilibrium and stability in stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V.D.; Shafranov, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    A review of theoretical methods of investigating plasma equilibrium and stability in stellarators is given. Principles forming the basis of toroidal plasma equilibrium and its stabilization, and the main results of analytical theory and numerical calculations are presented. Configurations with spiral symmetry and usual stellarators with plane axis and spiral fields are considered in detail. Derivation of scalar two-dimensional equations, describing equilibrium in these systems is given. These equations were used to obtain one-dimensional equations for displacement and ellipticity of magnetic surfaces. The model of weak-elliptic displaced surfaces was used to consider the evolution of plasma equilibrium in stellarators after elevation of its pressure: change of profile of rotational transformation after change of plasma pressure, current generation during its fast heating and its successive damping due to finite plasma conductivity were described. The derivation of equations of small oscillations in the form, suitable for local disturbance investigation is presented. These equations were used to obtain Mercier criteria and ballon model equations. General sufficient conditions of plasma stability in systems with magnetic confinement were derived

  15. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold.

  16. ``Statistical treatment of the spectral properties of plasmas in local thermodynamical equilibrium using a screened hydrogenic model``; ``Traitement statistique des proprietes spectrales des plasmas a l`equilibre thermodynamique local dans le cadre du modele hydrogenique ecrante``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faussurier, G.

    1996-12-31

    A new screened hydrogenic model is presented. The screening constants depend both on the principal n and orbital l quantum numbers. They have been obtained from numerical fits over a large data base containing ionization potentials and one-electron excitation energies of ions. A rapid and original method to compute the bound-bound and bound-free oscillator strengths is proposed. The discrete spectrum and the series continuum are connected by continuity, and the sum rules are respected. The screened hydrogenic average atom is well-adapted to describe multicharged ion plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Using the key principle of statistical mechanics, it is shown first that this model is properly defined and thermodynamically coherent. Secondly, a new method of detailed ionization stage accounting of a LTE plasma is explained. It can be used to reconstruct the distribution of integer charge states in such a plasma from any average atom model. The l -splitting allows one-electron transitions between two subshells with the same principal quantum number n. They may be of great importance when the Rosseland opacity is computed. Though, methods of classical statistical mechanics are required to calculate the distribution of the configurations around the average atom one and so to improve the spectral opacities. The splitting in integer ionic stages can be easily included. The formalism is tested by comparisons with theoretical and experimental results published in the literature. From the photoabsorption spectra encountered, the main results are the correct estimations of both the Rosseland opacity and the detailed charge degrees accounting. (author).

  17. Subjective quality of video sequences rendered on LCD with local backlight dimming at different lighting conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantel, Claire; Korhonen, Jari; Pedersen, Jesper M.; Bech, Søren; Andersen, Jakob Dahl; Forchhammer, Søren

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influence of ambient light on the perceived quality of videos displayed on Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) with local backlight dimming. A subjective test assessing the quality of videos with two backlight dimming methods and three lighting conditions, i.e. no light, low light level (5 lux) and higher light level (60 lux) was organized to collect subjective data. Results show that participants prefer the method exploiting local dimming possibilities to the conventional full backlight but that this preference varies depending on the ambient light level. The clear preference for one method at the low light conditions decreases at the high ambient light, confirming that the ambient light significantly attenuates the perception of the leakage defect (light leaking through dark pixels). Results are also highly dependent on the content of the sequence, which can modulate the effect of the ambient light from having an important influence on the quality grades to no influence at all.

  18. Subjective quality of video sequences rendered on LCD with local backlight dimming at different lighting conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Korhonen, Jari; Pedersen, Jesper Mørkhøj

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influence of ambient light on the perceived quality of videos displayed on Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) with local backlight dimming. A subjective test assessing the quality of videos with two backlight dimming methods and three lighting conditions, i.e. no light, low...... light level (5 lux) and higher light level (60 lux) was organized to collect subjective data. Results show that participants prefer the method exploiting local dimming possibilities to the conventional full backlight but that this preference varies depending on the ambient light level. The clear...... preference for one method at the low light conditions decreases at the high ambient light, confirming that the ambient light significantly attenuates the perception of the leakage defect (light leaking through dark pixels). Results are also highly dependent on the content of the sequence, which can modulate...

  19. A Multiperiod Equilibrium Pricing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuk Kwak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an equilibrium pricing model in a dynamic multiperiod stochastic framework with uncertain income. There are one tradable risky asset (stock/commodity, one nontradable underlying (temperature, and also a contingent claim (weather derivative written on the tradable risky asset and the nontradable underlying in the market. The price of the contingent claim is priced in equilibrium by optimal strategies of representative agent and market clearing condition. The risk preferences are of exponential type with a stochastic coefficient of risk aversion. Both subgame perfect strategy and naive strategy are considered and the corresponding equilibrium prices are derived. From the numerical result we examine how the equilibrium prices vary in response to changes in model parameters and highlight the importance of our equilibrium pricing principle.

  20. Working the Night Shift: The Impact of Compensating Wages and Local Economic Conditions on Shift Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Colene Trent; Walter J. Mayer

    2014-01-01

    The theory of compensating differentials asserts that night shift workers should receive compensating wage differentials due to undesirable work conditions. In weak local economies, workers may have difficulty finding jobs; thus, these workers might be more likely to accept night shift work and be less concerned with the size of the compensating differential for night shifts. Using CPS data from 2001, this paper employs maximum likelihood estimation of an endogenous switching regression model...

  1. Thermal equilibrium during the electroweak phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetradis, N.

    1991-12-01

    The effective potential for the standard model develops a barrier, at temperatures around the electroweak scale, which separates the minimum at zero field and a deeper non-zero minimum. This could create out of equilibrium conditions by inducing the localization of the Higgs field in a metastable state around zero. In this picture vacuum decay would occur through bubble nucleation. I show that there is an upper bound on the Higgs mass for the above scenario to be realized. The barrier must be high enough to prevent thermal fluctuations of the Higgs expectation value from establishing thermal equilibrium between the two minima. The upper bound is estimated to be lower than the experimental lower limit. This is also imposes constraints on extensions of the standard model constructed in order to generate a strongly first order phase transition. (orig.)

  2. Local power production at the end consumer - legal, political and economical external conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinden, Bjoern; Hunnes, Arngrim; Naesje, Paal; Wangensteen, Ivar; Morch, Andrei Z.

    2002-12-01

    The report deals with the external conditions for local power production, suggested as a production close to or at the end consumer. The political, legal and economical frame conditions for such production including rating are discussed. The report shall together with a technical report regarding appropriate technologies for such production (A5712), serve as a basis for case studies and monitors later in the project. Through the case studies it will be uncovered how the external conditions are functioning which will make foundations for recommendations concerning possible alterations in the conditions in order to make the local power production more profitable. In the discussion on the political and legal external conditions the system of today is studied. From the political area the general development is described and a short analysis is made of what to expect from case handling procedures, and some challenges are pointed out At present there is a simplified handling of cases of minor and smaller power plants. In order to obtain a more realistic construction of such plants the requirements of license handling may need sharpening. The tariffing of energy deliverance is studied. The regulations for tariffing and income regulation in the distribution network is mainly designed with the consumer and the central power production in mind. A study is made of how the regulations work, to what extent precessions and additional rules are needed and to what extent alterations in the regulations are needed in order to incorporate the local power production in a rational way. While a local power producer at best, will want a price for power which is sold at the power market of the size of 20 oere/kWh, the power will increase in value further down in the voltage level. At the 230 V level the power price will be of the size of 60 oere/kWh all expenses included and the network rent (during normal precipitation conditions). Therefore the production for own consumption will be met

  3. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-01-01

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions

  4. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  5. Plasticity in variation of xylem and phloem cell characteristics of Norway spruce under different local conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozica eGricar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is limited information on intra-annual plasticity of secondary tissues of tree species growing under different environmental conditions. To increase the knowledge about the plasticity of secondary growth, which allows trees to adapt to specific local climatic regimes, we examined climate–radial growth relationships of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. H. Karst. from three contrasting locations in the temperate climatic zone by analyzing tree-ring widths for the period 1932–2010, and cell characteristics in xylem and phloem increments formed in the years 2009–2011. Variation in the structure of xylem and phloem increments clearly shows that plasticity in seasonal dynamics of cambial cell production and cell differentiation exists on xylem and phloem sides. Anatomical characteristics of xylem and phloem cells are predominantly site-specific characteristics, because they varied among sites but were fairly uniform among years in trees from the same site. Xylem and phloem tissues formed in the first part of the growing season seemed to be more stable in structure, indicating their priority over latewood and late phloem for tree performance. Long-term climate and radial growth analyses revealed that growth was in general less dependent on precipitation than on temperature; however, growth sensitivity to local conditions differed among the sites. Only partial dependence of radial growth of spruce on climatic factors on the selected sites confirms its strategy to adapt the structure of wood and phloem increments to function optimally in local conditions.

  6. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbina, Andres S.; Torres, F. Javier [Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), Grupo de Química Computacional y Teórica (QCT-USFQ), Departamento de Química e Ingeniería Química, Diego de Robles y Via Interoceanica, Quito 17-1200-841 (Ecuador); Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), Instituto de Simulación Computacional (ISC-USFQ), Diego de Robles y Via Interoceanica, Quito 17-1200-841 (Ecuador); Rincon, Luis, E-mail: lrincon@usfq.edu.ec, E-mail: lrincon@ula.ve [Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), Grupo de Química Computacional y Teórica (QCT-USFQ), Departamento de Química e Ingeniería Química, Diego de Robles y Via Interoceanica, Quito 17-1200-841 (Ecuador); Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), Instituto de Simulación Computacional (ISC-USFQ), Diego de Robles y Via Interoceanica, Quito 17-1200-841 (Ecuador); Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes (ULA), La Hechicera, Mérida-5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-06-28

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for “knowing” about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (D{sub KL}) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. D{sub KL} is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of D{sub KL} with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (N{sup σ}), the quantity χ = (N{sup σ} − 1) D{sub KL}f{sub cut} is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. f{sub cut} is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions.

  7. Beyond the low-skill equilibrium? A case study of the local content policy in the Brazilian oil and gas industry

    OpenAIRE

    Melby, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This master thesis wishes to explore the labor market in the Brazilian oil and gas industry during the peak years of the oil boom, seen from Norwegian multinational companies (MNC) point of view. The theoretical perspective applied in the analysis is the hierarchical market economy (HME) typology, deriving from the varieties of capitalism (VOC) framework. In HMEs, the low-skill equilibrium is a prominent feature, in which none of the actors involved has incentives to invest in education and ...

  8. Diffusion kinetics and spinodal decay of quasi-equilibrium solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Phenomenological theory for rearrangement of solid solutions with the hierarchy of the component atomic mobilities is elaborated in the approximation of the local equilibrium. The hydrodynamic stage of the evolution of these solutions is studied as a sequence of quasi-equilibrium states characterized by implementation of some conditions of the total equilibrium. On the basis of separation of fast and slow constituents of diffusion and on the basis of the method of reduced description one derived equation for evolution of separations of fast components in quasi-equilibrium solid solutions at the arbitrary stages of rearrangement in terms of the generalized lattice model taking account of the proper volumes of the components. The conditions of the stability of quasi-equilibrium solutions to the spinodal decomposition are determined and the equations of metastability boundaries of such systems are derived [ru

  9. Analysis of the unstressed lattice spacing, d0, for the determination of the residual stress in a friction stir welded plate of an age-hardenable aluminum alloy – Use of equilibrium conditions and a genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cioffi, F.; Hidalgo, J.I.; Fernández, R.; Pirling, T.; Fernández, B.; Gesto, D.; Puente Orench, I.; Rey, P.; González-Doncel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Procedures based on equilibrium conditions (stress and bending moment) have been used to obtain an unstressed lattice spacing, d 0 , as a crucial requirement for calculating the residual stress (RS) profile across a joint conducted on a 10 mm thick plate of age-hardenable AA2024 alloy by friction stir welding (FSW). Two procedures have been used that take advantage of neutron diffraction measurements. First, equilibrium conditions were imposed on sections parallel to the weld so that a constant d 0 value corresponding to the base material region could be calculated analytically. Second, balance conditions were imposed on a section transverse to the weld. Then, using the data and a genetic algorithm, suitable d 0 values for the different regions of the weld have been found. For several reasons, the comb method has proved to be inappropriate for RS determination in the case of age-hardenable alloys. However, the equilibrium conditions, together with the genetic algorithm, has been shown to be very suitable for determining RS profiles in FSW joints of these alloys, where inherent microstructural variations of d 0 across the weld are expected

  10. Autonomous tracked robots in planar off-road conditions modelling, localization, and motion control

    CERN Document Server

    González, Ramón; Guzmán, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    This monograph is framed within the context of off-road mobile robotics. In particular, it discusses issues related to modelling, localization, and motion control of tracked mobile robots working in planar slippery conditions. Tracked locomotion constitutes a well-known solution for mobile platforms operating over diverse challenging terrains, for that reason, tracked robotics constitutes an important research field with many applications (e.g. agriculture, mining, search and rescue operations, military activities). The specific topics of this monograph are: historical perspective of tracked vehicles and tracked robots; trajectory-tracking model taking into account slip effect; visual-odometry-based localization strategies; and advanced slip-compensation motion controllers ensuring efficient real-time execution. Physical experiments with a real tracked robot are presented showing the better performance of the suggested novel approaches to known techniques.   Keywords: longitudinal slip, visual odometry, slip...

  11. A Bayesian localized conditional autoregressive model for estimating the health effects of air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Duncan; Rushworth, Alastair; Sahu, Sujit K

    2014-06-01

    Estimation of the long-term health effects of air pollution is a challenging task, especially when modeling spatial small-area disease incidence data in an ecological study design. The challenge comes from the unobserved underlying spatial autocorrelation structure in these data, which is accounted for using random effects modeled by a globally smooth conditional autoregressive model. These smooth random effects confound the effects of air pollution, which are also globally smooth. To avoid this collinearity a Bayesian localized conditional autoregressive model is developed for the random effects. This localized model is flexible spatially, in the sense that it is not only able to model areas of spatial smoothness, but also it is able to capture step changes in the random effects surface. This methodological development allows us to improve the estimation performance of the covariate effects, compared to using traditional conditional auto-regressive models. These results are established using a simulation study, and are then illustrated with our motivating study on air pollution and respiratory ill health in Greater Glasgow, Scotland in 2011. The model shows substantial health effects of particulate matter air pollution and nitrogen dioxide, whose effects have been consistently attenuated by the currently available globally smooth models. © 2014, The Authors Biometrics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Biometric Society.

  12. Atmospheric dispersion characteristics of radioactive materials according to the local weather and emission conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Hye Yeon; Kang, Yoon Hee; Kim, Yoo Keun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Sang Keun [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study evaluated the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material according to local weather conditions and emission conditions. Local weather conditions were defined as 8 patterns that frequently occur around the Kori Nuclear Power Plant and emission conditions were defined as 6 patterns from a combination of emission rates and the total number of particles of the {sup 137}Cs, using the WRF/HYSPLIT modeling system. The highest mean concentration of {sup 137}Cs occurred at 0900 LST under the ME4{sub 1} (main wind direction: SSW, daily average wind speed: 2.8 ms{sup -1}), with a wide region of its high concentration due to the continuous wind changes between 0000 and 0900 LST; under the ME3 (NE, 4.1 ms{sup -1}), the highest mean concentration of {sup 137}Cs occurred at 1500 and 2100 LST with a narrow dispersion along a strong northeasterly wind. In the case of ME4{sub 4} (S, 2.7 ms{sup -1}), the highest mean concentration of {sup 137}Cs occurred at 0300 LST because {sup 137}Cs stayed around the KNPP under low wind speed and low boundary layer height. As for the emission conditions, EM1{sub 3} and EM2{sub 3} that had the maximum total number of particles showed the widest dispersion of {sup 137}Cs, while its highest mean concentration was estimated under the EM1{sub 1} considering the relatively narrow dispersion and high emission rate. This study showed that even though an area may be located within the same radius around the Kori Nuclear Power Plant, the distribution and levels of {sup 137}Cs concentration vary according to the change in time and space of weather conditions (the altitude of the atmospheric boundary layer, the horizontal and vertical distribution of the local winds, and the precipitation levels), the topography of the regions where {sup 137}Cs is dispersed, the emission rate of {sup 137}Cs, and the number of emitted particles.

  13. Reply to 'Photon emission from sputtered atoms - the observation of apparent local thermodynamic equilibrium in the excitation' by R.J. MacDonald, R.F. Garrett and P.J. Martin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsong, I.S.T.

    1978-01-01

    MacDonald, Garrett and Martin have measured the intensities of spectral lines of Fe and Ni in alloy samples to study the problem of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in sputtering by plotting log(Ilambda 3 /gf) versus E. The measurements were made using a spectrometer with good resolution, 0.4 A, and great care was exercised in selecting only the lines free from interference or overlap. While the author agrees that their experimental approach is superior to the one attempted earlier and their experimental data are therefore more accurate, he does not agree with their data analysis. (Auth.)

  14. Deriving appropriate boundary conditions, and accelerating position-jump simulations, of diffusion using non-local jumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P R; Baker, R E; Yates, C A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore lattice-based position-jump models of diffusion, and the implications of introducing non-local jumping; particles can jump to a range of nearby boxes rather than only to their nearest neighbours. We begin by deriving conditions for equivalence with traditional local jumping models in the continuum limit. We then generalize a previously postulated implementation of the Robin boundary condition for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length, and present a novel implementation of flux boundary conditions, again generalized for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length. In both these cases we validate our results using stochastic simulation. We then proceed to consider two variations on the basic diffusion model: a hybrid local/non-local scheme suitable for models involving sharp concentration gradients, and the implementation of biased jumping. In all cases we show that non-local jumping can deliver substantial time savings for stochastic simulations. (paper)

  15. Equilibrium calculations, ch. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deursen, A.P.J. van

    1976-01-01

    A calculation is presented of dimer intensities obtained in supersonic expansions. There are two possible limiting considerations; the dimers observed are already present in the source, in thermodynamic equilibrium, and are accelerated in the expansion. Destruction during acceleration is neglected, as are processes leading to newly formed dimers. On the other hand one can apply a kinetic approach, where formation and destruction processes are followed throughout the expansion. The difficulty of this approach stems from the fact that the density, temperature and rate constants have to be known at all distances from the nozzle. The simple point of view has been adopted and the measured dimer intensities are compared with the equilibrium concentration in the source. The comparison is performed under the assumption that the detection efficiency for dimers is twice the detection efficiency for monomers. The experimental evidence against the simple point of view that the dimers of the onset region are formed in the source already, under equilibrium conditions, is discussed. (Auth.)

  16. Foundations of complex analysis in non locally convex spaces function theory without convexity condition

    CERN Document Server

    Bayoumi, A

    2003-01-01

    All the existing books in Infinite Dimensional Complex Analysis focus on the problems of locally convex spaces. However, the theory without convexity condition is covered for the first time in this book. This shows that we are really working with a new, important and interesting field. Theory of functions and nonlinear analysis problems are widespread in the mathematical modeling of real world systems in a very broad range of applications. During the past three decades many new results from the author have helped to solve multiextreme problems arising from important situations, non-convex and

  17. Reproductive parameters of tropical lesser noddies respond to local variations in oceanographic conditions and weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticelli, David; Ramos, Jaime A.; Catry, Teresa; Pedro, Patricia; Paiva, Vitor H.

    2014-02-01

    Most attempts to link seabirds and climate/oceanographic effects have concerned the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with comparatively few studies in the tropical Indian Ocean. This paper examines the reproductive response of the lesser noddy Anous tenuirostris to temporal fluctuations in oceanographic and climatic conditions using 8 years of monitoring data from Aride Island (Seychelles), tropical Western Indian Ocean. We tested the hypothesis that breeding parameters (mean hatching date, mean egg size, hatching and fledging successes) and chick growth are influenced by local, seasonal oceanographic conditions as expressed by ocean primary productivity (surface chlorophyll-a concentrations; CC), sea surface temperature (SST) and wind speed. We also examined the relationship between lesser noddy breeding parameters and climate conditions recorded at the basin-wide scale of the Indian Ocean (Indian Ocean Dipole Mode Index, DMI). Our findings suggest that birds had a tendency to lay slightly larger eggs during breeding seasons (years) with higher CC during April-June (pre-laying, laying and incubation periods). Hatching date was positively related to SST in April-June, with the regression parameters suggesting that each 0.5 °C increase in SST meant a delay of approx.10 days in hatching date. A negative linear relationship was also apparent between hatching success and SST in June-August (hatching and chick-rearing periods), while the quadratic regression models detected a significant effect of wind speed in June-August on fledging success. Body mass increments of growing chicks averaged over 7-day periods were positively related with (2-week) lagged CC values and negatively related with (2-week) lagged SST values. No significant relationship between DMI and lesser noddy breeding parameters was found, but DMI indices were strongly correlated with local SST. Altogether, our results indicate that the reproduction of this top marine predator is dictated by fluctuations in

  18. Stabilizing local boundary conditions for two-dimensional shallow water equations

    KAUST Repository

    Dia, Ben Mansour

    2018-03-27

    In this article, we present a sub-critical two-dimensional shallow water flow regulation. From the energy estimate of a set of one-dimensional boundary stabilization problems, we obtain a set of polynomial equations with respect to the boundary values as a requirement for the energy decrease. Using the Riemann invariant analysis, we build stabilizing local boundary conditions that guarantee the stability of the hydrodynamical state around a given steady state. Numerical results for the controller applied to the nonlinear problem demonstrate the performance of the method.

  19. Thermodynamic model for predicting equilibrium conditions of clathrate hydrates of noble gases + light hydrocarbons: Combination of Van der Waals–Platteeuw model and sPC-SAFT EoS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolala, Mostafa; Varaminian, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Applying sPC-SAFT for phase equilibrium calculations. • Determining Kihara potential parameters for hydrate formers. • Successful usage of the model for systems with hydrate azeotropes. - Abstract: In this communication, equilibrium conditions of clathrate hydrates containing mixtures of noble gases (Argon, Krypton and Xenon) and light hydrocarbons (C 1 –C 3 ), which form structure I and II, are modeled. The thermodynamic model is based on the solid solution theory of Van der Waals–Platteeuw combined with the simplified Perturbed-Chain Statistical Association Fluid Theory equation of state (sPC-SAFT EoS). In dispersion term of sPC-SAFT EoS, the temperature dependent binary interaction parameters (k ij ) are adjusted; taking advantage of the well described (vapor + liquid) phase equilibria. Furthermore, the Kihara potential parameters are optimized based on the P–T data of pure hydrate former. Subsequently, these obtained parameters are used to predict the binary gas hydrate dissociation conditions. The equilibrium conditions of the binary gas hydrates predicted by this model agree well with experimental data (overall AAD P ∼ 2.17)

  20. Localized corrosion of Alloy C22 nuclear waste canister material under limiting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.G.; Solomon, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Localized corrosion behavior of Alloy C22 in simulated Yucca Mountain (YM) repository environments was studied at the highest achievable but realistic temperatures under boiling and dripping scenarios. Temperatures measured in concentrated boiling solutions of KCl and NaNO 3 were found to be stable at 140 deg. C, although transient boiling before dryout was observed at temperatures as high as 160 deg. C, as the electrolyte became progressively more concentrated. Experiments that simulated a dripping scenario with simulated J13 well water confirmed the existence of concentrated solutions stable at 142 ± 3 deg. C under controlled drip conditions leading to pit initiation in Alloy C22 after only a few hours. The polarization experiments conducted at 140 deg. C in a solution with 0.5 mol L -1 chloride concentration showed that the critical potential for localized corrosion was 250 mV (versus Ag/AgCl). Potentiostatic tests confirmed that active metal dissolution occurred only in the crevice region at this potential. The crevice corrosion of Alloy C22 required an incubation time to develop a critical crevice solution, and it was triggered by severe local chemistry (enrichment of Cl - and H + ) aided by the high temperature

  1. Local and neighboring patch conditions alter sex-specific movement in banana weevils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carval, Dominique; Perrin, Benjamin; Duyck, Pierre-François; Tixier, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying the movements and spread of a species over time and space is a major concern of ecology. Here, we assessed the effects of an individual's sex and the density and sex ratio of conspecifics in the local and neighboring environment on the movement probability of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus. In a "two patches" experiment, we used radiofrequency identification tags to study the C. sordidus movement response to patch conditions. We showed that local and neighboring densities of conspecifics affect the movement rates of individuals but that the density-dependent effect can be either positive or negative depending on the relative densities of conspecifics in local and neighboring patches. We demonstrated that sex ratio also influences the movement of C. sordidus, that is, the weevil exhibits nonfixed sex-biased movement strategies. Sex-biased movement may be the consequence of intrasexual competition for resources (i.e., oviposition sites) in females and for mates in males. We also detected a high individual variability in the propensity to move. Finally, we discuss the role of demographic stochasticity, sex-biased movement, and individual heterogeneity in movement on the colonization process.

  2. Evidence for local and global redox conditions at an Early Ordovician (Tremadocian) mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Cole T.; Fike, David A.; Saltzman, Matthew R.; Lu, Wanyi; Lu, Zunli

    2018-01-01

    Profound changes in environmental conditions, particularly atmospheric oxygen levels, are thought to be important drivers of several major biotic events (e.g. mass extinctions and diversifications). The early Paleozoic represents a key interval in the oxygenation of the ocean-atmosphere system and evolution of the biosphere. Global proxies (e.g. carbon (δ13C) and sulfur (δ34S) isotopes) are used to diagnose potential changes in oxygenation and infer causes of environmental change and biotic turnover. The Cambrian-Ordovician contains several trilobite extinctions (some are apparently local, but others are globally correlative) that are attributed to anoxia based on coeval positive δ13C and δ34S excursions. These extinction and excursion events have yet to be coupled with more recently developed proxies thought to be more reflective of local redox conditions in the water column (e.g. I/Ca) to confirm whether these extinctions were associated with oxygen crises over a regional or global scale. Here we examine an Early Ordovician (Tremadocian Stage) extinction event previously interpreted to reflect a continuation of recurrent early Paleozoic anoxic events that expanded into nearshore environments. δ13C, δ34S, and I/Ca trends were measured from three sections in the Great Basin region to test whether I/Ca trends support the notion that anoxia was locally present in the water column along the Laurentian margin. Evidence for anoxia is based on coincident, but not always synchronous, positive δ13C and δ34S excursions (mainly from carbonate-associated sulfate and less so from pyrite data), a 30% extinction of standing generic diversity, and near-zero I/Ca values. Although evidence for local water column anoxia from the I/Ca proxy broadly agrees with intervals of global anoxia inferred from δ13C and δ34S trends, a more complex picture is evident where spatially and temporally variable local trends are superimposed on time-averaged global trends. Stratigraphic

  3. Field calibration and modification of scs design equation for predicting length of border under local conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, M.R.; Mustafa, U.S.

    2009-01-01

    Field tests were conducted to calibrate the existing SCS design equation in determining field border length using field data of different field lengths during 2nd and 3rd irrigations under local conditions. A single ring infiltrometer was used to estimate the water movement into and through the irrigated soil profile and in estimating the coefficients of Kostiakov infiltration function. Measurements of the unit discharge and time of advance were carried out during different irrigations on wheat irrigated fields having clay loam soil. The collected field data were used to calibrate the existing SCS design equation developed by USDA for testing its validity under local field conditions. SCS equation was modified further to improve its applicability. Results from the study revealed that the Kostiakov model over predicted the coefficients, which in turn overestimated the water advance length for boarder in the selected field using existing SCS design equation. However, the calibrated SCS design equation after parametric modification produced more satisfactory results encouraging the scientists to make its use at larger scale. (author)

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of the local concentration and structure in multicomponent aerosol nanoparticles under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Katerina S; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G; Pandis, Spyros N

    2017-06-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the local structure and local concentration in atmospheric nanoparticles consisting of an organic compound (cis-pinonic acid or n-C 30 H 62 ), sulfate and ammonium ions, and water. Simulations in the isothermal-isobaric (NPT) statistical ensemble under atmospheric conditions with a prespecified number of molecules of the abovementioned compounds led to the formation of a nanoparticle. Calculations of the density profiles of all the chemical species in the nanoparticle, the corresponding radial pair distribution functions, and their mobility inside the nanoparticle revealed strong interactions developing between sulfate and ammonium ions. However, sulfate and ammonium ions prefer to populate the central part of the nanoparticle under the simulated conditions, whereas organic molecules like to reside at its outer surface. Sulfate and ammonium ions were practically immobile; in contrast, the organic molecules exhibited appreciable mobility at the outer surface of the nanoparticle. When the organic compound was a normal alkane (e.g. n-C 30 H 62 ), a well-organized (crystalline-like) phase was rapidly formed at the free surface of the nanoparticle and remained separate from the rest of the species.

  5. Numerical Verification Of Equilibrium Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piro, Markus; Lewis, Brent; Thompson, William T.; Simunovic, Srdjan; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical tool is in an advanced state of development to compute the equilibrium compositions of phases and their proportions in multi-component systems of importance to the nuclear industry. The resulting software is being conceived for direct integration into large multi-physics fuel performance codes, particularly for providing boundary conditions in heat and mass transport modules. However, any numerical errors produced in equilibrium chemistry computations will be propagated in subsequent heat and mass transport calculations, thus falsely predicting nuclear fuel behaviour. The necessity for a reliable method to numerically verify chemical equilibrium computations is emphasized by the requirement to handle the very large number of elements necessary to capture the entire fission product inventory. A simple, reliable and comprehensive numerical verification method is presented which can be invoked by any equilibrium chemistry solver for quality assurance purposes.

  6. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative

  7. The relationship between local area labor market conditions and the use of Veterans Affairs health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edwin S; Liu, Chuan-Fen

    2013-03-13

    In the U.S., economic conditions are intertwined with labor market decisions, access to health care, health care utilization and health outcomes. The Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system has served as a safety net provider by supplying free or reduced cost care to qualifying veterans. This study examines whether local area labor market conditions, measured using county-level unemployment rates, influence whether veterans obtain health care from the VA. We used survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System in years 2000, 2003 and 2004 to construct a random sample of 73,964 respondents self-identified as veterans. VA health service utilization was defined as whether veterans received all, some or no care from the VA. Hierarchical ordered logistic regression was used to address unobserved state and county random effects while adjusting for individual characteristics. Local area labor market conditions were defined as the average 12-month unemployment rate in veterans' county of residence. The mean unemployment rate for veterans receiving all, some and no care was 5.56%, 5.37% and 5.24%, respectively. After covariate adjustment, a one percentage point increase in the unemployment rate in a veteran's county of residence was associated with an increase in the probability of receiving all care (0.34%, p-value = 0.056) or some care (0.29%, p-value = 0.023) from the VA. Our findings suggest that the important role of the VA in providing health care services to veterans is magnified in locations with high unemployment.

  8. Discussions on the non-equilibrium effects in the quantitative phase field model of binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-Jun, Wang; Jin-Cheng, Wang; Gen-Cang, Yang

    2010-01-01

    All the quantitative phase field models try to get rid of the artificial factors of solutal drag, interface diffusion and interface stretch in the diffuse interface. These artificial non-equilibrium effects due to the introducing of diffuse interface are analysed based on the thermodynamic status across the diffuse interface in the quantitative phase field model of binary alloys. Results indicate that the non-equilibrium effects are related to the negative driving force in the local region of solid side across the diffuse interface. The negative driving force results from the fact that the phase field model is derived from equilibrium condition but used to simulate the non-equilibrium solidification process. The interface thickness dependence of the non-equilibrium effects and its restriction on the large scale simulation are also discussed. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  9. Calculation of local flow conditions in the lower core of a PWR with code-Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Y.

    2003-01-01

    to a scale of a few assemblies for practical reasons. We use the calculation result from the lower resolution model to provide realistic inflow conditions for the refined domain, in which much more detail is represented through the mesh, and use of head loss models, is reduced (though not suppressed) as much as possible. Through a series of calculations, using results on coarser meshes as input for boundary conditions on finer meshes, we hope to improve our knowledge of local fluid flow in the lower core, and to better quantify the effects of mixed cores on local fluid flow, especially as regards transverse flow components which may influence vibration and ultimately fuel rod damage through fretting. (author)

  10. Accelerating Multiagent Reinforcement Learning by Equilibrium Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yujing; Gao, Yang; An, Bo

    2015-07-01

    An important approach in multiagent reinforcement learning (MARL) is equilibrium-based MARL, which adopts equilibrium solution concepts in game theory and requires agents to play equilibrium strategies at each state. However, most existing equilibrium-based MARL algorithms cannot scale due to a large number of computationally expensive equilibrium computations (e.g., computing Nash equilibria is PPAD-hard) during learning. For the first time, this paper finds that during the learning process of equilibrium-based MARL, the one-shot games corresponding to each state's successive visits often have the same or similar equilibria (for some states more than 90% of games corresponding to successive visits have similar equilibria). Inspired by this observation, this paper proposes to use equilibrium transfer to accelerate equilibrium-based MARL. The key idea of equilibrium transfer is to reuse previously computed equilibria when each agent has a small incentive to deviate. By introducing transfer loss and transfer condition, a novel framework called equilibrium transfer-based MARL is proposed. We prove that although equilibrium transfer brings transfer loss, equilibrium-based MARL algorithms can still converge to an equilibrium policy under certain assumptions. Experimental results in widely used benchmarks (e.g., grid world game, soccer game, and wall game) show that the proposed framework: 1) not only significantly accelerates equilibrium-based MARL (up to 96.7% reduction in learning time), but also achieves higher average rewards than algorithms without equilibrium transfer and 2) scales significantly better than algorithms without equilibrium transfer when the state/action space grows and the number of agents increases.

  11. A mathematical model for localized corrosion in steam generator crevices under heat transfer conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, G.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Sikora, J.; Macdonald, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    A predictive and self-consistent mathematical model has been developed to describe the localized corrosion in steam generators. The model recognizes that the internal and external environment are coupled by the need to conserve charge in the system. Thus, solution of Laplace's equation for the external environment (outside the crevice) provides the boundary condition for the electric potential at the crevice mouth, which is needed for solving the system of mass transfer equations for the internal environment (inside the crevice). Mass transfer by diffusion, ion migration, and convection was considered. Heat and momentum transfer equations are solved simultaneously, with the mass balance equation for each species and the condition of electroneutrality inside the cavity being considered. The model takes into account the porosity and tortuosity in the corrosion product deposit in the crevice. The homogeneous chemical reactions (hydrolysis of the products of the anodic reaction and the autoprotolysis of water) are included in the model. The model, in this preliminary form predicts the solution chemistry, potential drop, and temperature distribution inside the crevice. An order of magnitude estimate of the crevice corrosion rate also obtained. At this point, the model predicts only the steady state solution, but it is recognized that a steady state may not exist under normal conditions

  12. Why would plant species become extinct locally if growing conditions improve?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, K.; Bijlsma, R.J.; Hickler, T.; Thuiller, W.

    2012-01-01

    Two assumptions underlie current models of the geographical ranges of perennial plant species: 1. current ranges are in equilibrium with the prevailing climate, and 2. changes are attributable to changes in macroclimatic factors, including tolerance of winter cold, the duration of the growing

  13. Losing ground, losing sleep: Local economic conditions, economic vulnerability, and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Francisco; Plage, Stefanie

    2017-02-01

    Medical research shows that healthy sleep has benefits for human wellbeing. We contribute to the emerging social-epidemiological literature on the social determinants of sleep by considering how living in an area with poor economic circumstances can result in sleep loss through financial worry, uncertainty and stress. We use multilevel regression models and nationally-representative data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey (n = 9181) and find that individuals who live in areas with high unemployment rates or experience individual-level economic vulnerability sleep less than comparable individuals in areas with low unemployment rates, or who do not experience financial hardships. The negative association between local economic conditions and sleep duration is substantially stronger amongst economically vulnerable individuals. This highlights the importance of considering multiple levels in the analysis of health inequalities, as status and location can intersect to produce and reproduce disadvantage systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evolution PDEs with nonstandard growth conditions existence, uniqueness, localization, blow-up

    CERN Document Server

    Antontsev, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    This monograph offers the reader a treatment of the theory of evolution PDEs with nonstandard growth conditions. This class includes parabolic and hyperbolic equations with variable or anisotropic nonlinear structure. We develop methods for the study of such equations and present a detailed account of recent results. An overview of other approaches to the study of PDEs of this kind is provided. The presentation is focused on the issues of existence and uniqueness of solutions in appropriate function spaces, and on the study of the specific qualitative properties of solutions, such as localization in space and time, extinction in a finite time and blow-up, or nonexistence of global in time solutions. Special attention is paid to the study of the properties intrinsic to solutions of equations with nonstandard growth.

  15. Quantifying the local influence at a tall tower site in nocturnal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werth, David; Buckley, Robert; Zhang, Gengsheng; Kurzeja, Robert; Leclerc, Monique; Duarte, Henrique; Parker, Matthew; Watson, Thomas

    2015-10-17

    The influence of the local terrestrial environment on nocturnal atmospheric CO2 measurements at a 329-m television transmitter tower (and a component of a CO2 monitoring network) was estimated with a tracer release experiment and a subsequent simulation of the releases. This was done to characterize the vertical transport of emissions from the surface to the uppermost tower level and how it is affected by atmospheric stability. The tracer release experiment was conducted over two nights in May of 2009 near the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. Tracer was released on two contrasting nights—slightly stable and moderately stable—from several upwind surface locations. Measurements at the 329-m level on both nights indicate that tracer was able to mix vertically within a relatively short (~24 km) distance, implying that nocturnal stable conditions do not necessarily prevent vertical dispersion in the boundary layer and that CO2 measurements at the tower are at least partly influenced by nearby emissions. A simulation of the tracer release is used to calculate the tower footprint on the two nights to estimate the degree to which the local domain affects the tower readings. The effect of the nocturnal boundary layer on the area sampled by the tower can be seen clearly, as the footprints were affected by changes in stability. The contribution of local sources to the measurements at the tower was minimal, however, suggesting that nocturnal concentrations at upper levels are contributed mostly by regional sources.

  16. A non-local-thermodynamic equilibrium formulation of the transport equation for polarized light in the presence of weak magnetic fields. Doctoral thesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    The present work is motivated by the desire to better understand solar magnetism. Just as stellar astrophysics and radiative transfer have been coupled in the history of research in physics, so too has the study of radiative transfer of polarized light in magnetic fields and solar magnetism been a history of mutual growth. The Stokes parameters characterize the state of polarization of a beam of radiation. The author considers the changes in polarization, and therefore in the Stokes parameters, due to the transport of a beam through an optically thick medium in a weak magnetic field. The transport equation is derived from a general density matrix equation of motion. This allows the possibility of interference effects arising from the mixing of atomic sublevels in a weak magnetic field to be taken into account. The statistical equilibrium equations are similarly derived. Finally, the coupled system of equations is presented, and the order of magnitude of the interference effects, shown. Collisional effects are not considered. The magnitude of the interference effects in magnetic field measurements of the sun may be evaluated

  17. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finzel, Kati, E-mail: kati.finzel@liu.se [Linköpings University, IFM Department of Physics, 58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-01-21

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  18. Aid conditionalities, international Good Manufacturing Practice standards and local production rights: a case study of local production in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brhlikova, Petra; Harper, Ian; Subedi, Madhusudan; Bhattarai, Samita; Rawal, Nabin; Pollock, Allyson M

    2015-06-14

    Local pharmaceutical production has been endorsed by the WHO as a means of addressing health priorities of developing countries. However, local producers of essential medicines must comply with international pharmaceutical standards in order to be eligible to compete in donor tenders. These standards determine production rights for on-patent and off-patent medicines, and guide international procurement of medicines. We reviewed the literature on the impact of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) on local production; a gap analysis from the literature review indicated a need for further research. Over sixty interviews were conducted with people involved in the Nepali pharmaceutical production and distribution chain from 2006 to 2009 on the GMP areas of relevance: regulatory capacity, staffing, funding and training, resourcing of GMP, inspectors' interpretation of the rules and compliance. Although Nepal producers have increased their overall share of the domestic market, only the public manufacturer, Royal Drugs, focuses on medicines for public health programmes; private producers engage mainly in brand competition for private markets, not essential medicines. Nepali regulators and producers state that implementation of GMP standards is hindered by low regulatory capacity, insufficient training of staff in the industry, financial constraints and lack of investment for upgrading capital. The transition period to mandatory compliance with WHO GMP rules is lengthy. Less than half of private producers had WHO GMP in 2013. Producers are not directly affected by international harmonisation of standards as they do not export medicines and the Nepali regulator does not enforce the WHO standards strictly. Without an international GMP certificate they cannot tender for donor dependent health programmes. In Nepal, local private manufacturers focus mainly on brand competition for private consumption not essential medicines, the government preferentially procures essential

  19. Charged hadrons in local finite-volume QED+QCD with C* boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Lucini, Biagio; Ramos, Alberto; Tantalo, Nazario

    2016-01-01

    In order to calculate QED corrections to hadronic physical quantities by means of lattice simulations, a coherent description of electrically-charged states in finite volume is needed. In the usual periodic setup, Gauss's law and large gauge transformations forbid the propagation of electrically-charged states. A possible solution to this problem, which does not violate the axioms of local quantum field theory, has been proposed by Wiese and Polley, and is based on the use of C* boundary conditions. We present a thorough analysis of the properties and symmetries of QED in isolation and QED coupled to QCD, with C* boundary conditions. In particular we learn that a certain class of electrically-charged states can be constructed in this setup in a fully consistent fashion, without relying on gauge fixing. We argue that this class of states covers most of the interesting phenomenological applications in the framework of numerical simulations. We also calculate finite-volume corrections to the mass of stable charg...

  20. Insulation resistance abnormal condition detector for a local power range monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Takao; Mizuno, Katsuhiro; Kai, Takaaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To permit determination of abnormal condition by a number of local power range monitors (LPRM ) to be quickly made through estimation of the leakage current value by precisely estimating the ratio between the true rate of change in neutron flux and true change in the neutron flux by making use of the fact that the status of the neutron distribution does not widely change with a change of the core flow rate for a short period of time. Structure: While carrying out power control according to the core flow rate, detection values from LPRM which are disposed in a three-dimensional fashion within the reactor core are indicated on an indicator. The average value of rates of change in the indicated values for a group of LPRM under substantially the same fluid dynamic condition as that for each LPRM is determined by measuring the ratio before and after the alteration of the power of the indicated value. Further, the estimation of leakage current is determined by using the ratio of the indicated value, average value thereof and amplifier gain of each LPRM. When the estimation leakage current exceeds a prescribed value, the corresponding LPRM is determined to be defective. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. A Strategic-Equilibrium Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel J. Turbay

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The strategic equilibrium of an N-person cooperative game with transferable utility is a system composed of a cover collection of subsets of N and a set of extended imputations attainable through such equilibrium cover. The system describes a state of coalitional bargaining stability where every player has a bargaining alternative against any other player to support his corresponding equilibrium claim. Any coalition in the sable system may form and divide the characteristic value function of the coalition as prescribed by the equilibrium payoffs. If syndicates are allowed to form, a formed coalition may become a syndicate using the equilibrium payoffs as disagreement values in bargaining for a part of the complementary coalition incremental value to the grand coalition when formed. The emergent well known-constant sum derived game in partition function is described in terms of parameters that result from incumbent binding agreements. The strategic-equilibrium corresponding to the derived game gives an equal value claim to all players.  This surprising result is alternatively explained in terms of strategic-equilibrium based possible outcomes by a sequence of bargaining stages that when the binding agreements are in the right sequential order, von Neumann and Morgenstern (vN-M non-discriminatory solutions emerge. In these solutions a preferred branch by a sufficient number of players is identified: the weaker players syndicate against the stronger player. This condition is referred to as the stronger player paradox.  A strategic alternative available to the stronger players to overcome the anticipated not desirable results is to voluntarily lower his bargaining equilibrium claim. In doing the original strategic equilibrium is modified and vN-M discriminatory solutions may occur, but also a different stronger player may emerge that has eventually will have to lower his equilibrium claim. A sequence of such measures converges to the equal

  2. On the sufficient conditions of the localization of the Fourier-Laplace series of distributions from liouville classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmedov, Anvarjon A; Nurullah bin Rasedee, Ahmad Fadly; Rakhimov, Abdumalik

    2013-01-01

    In this work we investigate the localization principle of the Fourier-Laplace series of the distribution. Here we prove the sufficient conditions of the localization of the Riesz means of the spectral expansions of the Laplace-Beltrami operator on the unit sphere.

  3. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  4. Colwellia psychrerythraea strains from distant deep sea basins show adaptation to local conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Techtmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have shown that microbes, which share nearly identical 16S rRNA genes, can have highly divergent genomes. Microbes from distinct parts of the ocean also exhibit biogeographic patterning. Here we seek to better understand how certain microbes from the same species have adapted for growth under local conditions. The phenotypic and genomic heterogeneity of three strains of Colwellia psychrerythraea was investigated in order to understand adaptions to local environments. Colwellia are psychrophilic heterotrophic marine bacteria ubiquitous in cold marine ecosystems. We have recently isolated two Colwellia strains: ND2E from the Eastern Mediterranean and GAB14E from the Great Australian Bight. The 16S rRNA sequence of these two strains were greater than 98.2% identical to the well-characterized C. psychrerythraea 34H, which was isolated from arctic sediments. Salt tolerance, and carbon source utilization profiles for these strains were determined using Biolog Phenotype Microarrays’. These strains exhibited distinct salt tolerance, which was not associated with the salinity of sites of isolation. The carbon source utilization profiles were distinct with less than half of the tested carbon sources being metabolized by all three strains. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the genomes of these three strains were quite diverse with some genomes having up to 1600 strain-specific genes. Many genes involved in degrading strain-specific carbon sources were identified. There appears to be a link between carbon source utilization and location of isolation with distinctions observed between the Colwellia isolate recovered from sediment compared to water column isolates.

  5. Quantity Constrained General Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babenko, R.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In a standard general equilibrium model it is assumed that there are no price restrictions and that prices adjust infinitely fast to their equilibrium values.In case of price restrictions a general equilibrium may not exist and rationing on net demands or supplies is needed to clear the markets.In

  6. Assessment of surface reactivity of thorium oxide in conditions close to chemical equilibrium by isotope exchange {sup 229}Th/{sup 232}Th method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Muresan, Tomo; Perrigaud, Katy; Vandenborre, Johan; Ribet, Solange; Grambow, Bernd [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Takamasa, Inai [TOKAI Univ., Kanagawa (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    This work aims to assess the solubility and the surface reactivity of crystallized thorium at pH 3.0 in presence of three types of solids: synthesized powder at 1300 C, crushed kernel, and intact kernel. In this study, the kernel is composed by the core solid from high temperature reactors (HTR) sphere particles. The originality of this work consisted in following in a sequential order the kinetic of dissolution, the surface reactivity in presence of isotope tracer {sup 229}Th, and its desorption process. Long time experiments (634 days) allowed to get deeper understanding on the behavior of the surface reactivity in contact with the solution. Solubility values are ranging from 0.3 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1} to 3 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1} with a dissolution rate of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -4} g.m{sup -2} day{sup -1}. PHREEQC modeling showed that crystallized ThO{sub 2}(cr, 20 nm) phase controls the equilibrium in solution. Isotope exchange between {sup 229}Th and {sup 232}Th indicated that well-crystallized phase exist as an inert surface regarding to the absence of exchange between surface solid and solution.

  7. Equilibrium depth of scour at straight guide banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjunsburgs, B.; Bulankina, V.

    2017-10-01

    The equilibrium stage of scour at the head of straight guide banks with a uniform and stratified bed conditions have been studied. The contraction of the river by bridge crossing with straight guide banks considerably alters the flow pattern. The streamlines become curve and the concentration of streamlines, longitudinal and transverse slopes of the water surface, a local increase in velocity, vortex and eddy structures, and the origin of a flow separation zone between the extreme streamlines and the guide bank are observed and local scour is developing at the head of the straight guide banks. New formulae for calculation of equilibrium depth of scour at straight guide banks at uniform and stratified river bed is elaborated and confirmed by tests and computer modelling results.

  8. Modelling stream-fish functional traits in reference conditions: regional and local environmental correlates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M Oliveira

    Full Text Available Identifying the environmental gradients that control the functional structure of biological assemblages in reference conditions is fundamental to help river management and predict the consequences of anthropogenic stressors. Fish metrics (density of ecological guilds, and species richness from 117 least disturbed stream reaches in several western Iberia river basins were modelled with generalized linear models in order to investigate the importance of regional- and local-scale abiotic gradients to variation in functional structure of fish assemblages. Functional patterns were primarily associated with regional features, such as catchment elevation and slope, rainfall, and drainage area. Spatial variations of fish guilds were thus associated with broad geographic gradients, showing (1 pronounced latitudinal patterns, affected mainly by climatic factors and topography, or (2 at the basin level, strong upstream-downstream patterns related to stream position in the longitudinal gradient. Maximum native species richness was observed in midsize streams in accordance with the river continuum concept. The findings of our study emphasized the need to use a multi-scale approach in order to fully assess the factors that govern the functional organization of biotic assemblages in 'natural' streams, as well as to improve biomonitoring and restoration of fluvial ecosystems.

  9. The performance evaluation of fabricated solar still in local environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, A.H.; Akhund, M.A.; Leghari, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness and performance of the fabricated solar distill unit in local environmental conditions of Nawabshah within the temperature range of 23 deg. C to 28 deg. C in terms of quantity and quality of distilled water, an experimental based study was carried out during the month of March. Various samples of water with different degrees of hardness were collected from the different areas in the vicinity of Nawabshah University and supplied to the unit in order to desalinize the saline water. All samples after distillation were chemically analyzed at laboratory; the concentrations of salts were reduced at remarkable level and performance of unit was excellent especially in terms of quality. The chemical composition of analyzed samples shows that the TDS value is decreased from 2259 ppm to 378 ppm, EC (micro s/cm) value from 3.53 to 0.59, pH value from 8.4 to 7.7. The values of other parameters (i.e. Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, Cl, SAR, and RSC) were also reduced at significant level. By comparing results, it is evident that the water is purified to the satisfactory level, which indicated that the fabricated unit has a good capability of desalination. The results indicate that the distilled water can be used for the drinking purposes as well as for the irrigation purposes also. All values of various parameters are within range of standard values. (author)

  10. Simplified model for determining local heat flux boundary conditions for slagging wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingzhi Li; Anders Brink; Mikko Hupa [Aabo Akademi University, Turku (Finland). Process Chemistry Centre

    2009-07-15

    In this work, two models for calculating heat transfer through a cooled vertical wall covered with a running slag layer are investigated. The first one relies on a discretization of the velocity equation, and the second one relies on an analytical solution. The aim is to find a model that can be used for calculating local heat flux boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of such processes. Two different cases where molten deposits exist are investigated: the black liquor recovery boiler and the coal gasifier. The results show that a model relying on discretization of the velocity equation is more flexible in handling different temperature-viscosity relations. Nevertheless, a model relying on an analytical solution is the one fast enough for a potential use as a CFD submodel. Furthermore, the influence of simplifications to the heat balance in the model is investigated. It is found that simplification of the heat balance can be applied when the radiation heat flux is dominant in the balance. 9 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Downwind evolution of transpiration by two irrigated crops under conditions of local advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAneney, K. J.; Brunet, Y.; Itier, B.

    1994-09-01

    Previous measurements of water loss from small-dish evaporimeters mounted at the height of irrigated crops grown under conditions of extreme local advection in the Sudan are reexamined. From these evaporimeter measurements, it is possible to calculate fractional changes in the saturation deficit. Relationships between canopy conductance and saturation deficit are briefly reviewed and introduced into the Penman-Monteith equation to calculate transpiration rates as a function of distance downwind of the boundary between the upwind desert and the irrigated crop. In contradiction to most theoretical predictions, these new calculations show rates of transpiration to undergo only modest changes with increasing fetch. This occurs because of the feedback interaction between saturation deficit and stomatal conductance. This result is in good accord with a recent study suggesting that a dry-moist boundary transition may be best modelled as a simple step change in surface fluxes and further that the advective enhancement of evaporation may have been overestimated by many advection models. Larger effects are expected on dry matter yields because of the direct influence of saturation deficit on the yield-transpiration ratio.

  12. Experimental investigation on local parameter measurement using optical probes in two-phase flow under rolling condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Daogui; Sun Licheng; Yan Changqi; Liu Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    In order to get more local interfacial information as well as to further comprehend the intrinsic mechanism of two-phase flow under rolling condition, a method was proposed to measure the local parameters by using optical probes under rolling condition in this paper. An experimental investigation of two-phase flow under rolling condition was conducted using the probe fabricated by the authors. It is verified that the probe method is feasible to measure the local parameters in two'-phase flow under rolling condition. The results show that the interfacial parameters distribution near wall region has a distinct periodicity due to the rolling motion. The averaged deviation of the void fraction measured by the probe from that obtained from measured pressure drop is about 8%. (authors)

  13. Assessment of existing local houses condition as analysis tools for shore housing improvement program in Weriagar district, Bintuni Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmansyah, F.; Fernando, A.; Allo, I. P. R.

    2018-01-01

    The housing assessment is a part of the pre-feasibility study inThe Shore Housing Improvement Program in Weriagar District, West Papua. The housing assessment was conducted to identify the physical condition of existing houses. The parameters of assessment formulated from local references, practices and also national building regulation that covers each building system components, such as building structure/frame, building floor, building cover, and building roof. This study aims to explains lessons from local practices and references, used as the formula to generate assessment parameter, elaborate with Indonesia building regulation. The result of housing assessment were used as a basis to develop the house improvement strategy, the design alternative for housing improvement and further planning recommendations. The local knowledges involved in housing improvement program expected that the local-based approach could respect to the local build culture, respect the local environment, and the most important can offer best suitable solutions for functional utility and livability.

  14. Study of local winds over Tehran using WRF in ideal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Soltanzadeh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available   Wind is the carrier of pollutants and any other gaseous or particle matters in the atmosphere. Stable atmosphere with low wind provides favourable conditions for high contamination of pollutants in urban areas. The importance of mesoscale atmospheric flows in air pollution dispersion has been recognized in the past three decades and has been the focus of intensive research; both observational and numerical. Mesoscale or local scale circulations are more prominent when the synoptic pressure gradients are weak, allowing horizontal temperature contrasts to develop, which in turn lead to mesoscale pressure perturbations. Tehran, a city which is situated at the southern foothills of the Alborz Mountain chain has an average elevation of 1500m, and covers an area of 864 km2. Alborz Mountains have a significant influence on the dynamics and thermodynamic modification of wind regime over the city. At the same time, the Urban Heat Island effect (UHI can cause its own mesoscale flow, complicating an already complex local scale flow. The topography and the urban fabric can cause slope flows, mountain flows, and valley flows amongst many other factors. Th is paper focuses on the use of state-of-the-art atmospheric numerical model – The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF – in an ideal situation to study the characteristics of the mesoscale flow systems that prevail over Tehran when air quality is unfavourable. So average sound of Radiosonde at Mehrabad station, for almost all the fair days of cold seasons from 2005 to 2008 was selected as an ideal initial condition and boundary condition with 10 × 10 km spatial and 12-hour temporal resolution. The simulations were carried out for a 3-day period in December 2005 when an aircraft , due to low visibility caused by high concentration of air pollution, crashed 2 miles away from the end of runway into an inhabited area. Three simulations were prepared. For the first experiment, called control run, we

  15. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  16. The role of equilibrium and kinetic properties in the dissociation of Gd[DTPA-bis(methylamide)] (Omniscan) at near to physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Brücher, Ernő; Uggeri, Fulvio; Maiocchi, Alessandro; Tóth, Imre; Andrási, Melinda; Gáspár, Attila; Zékány, László; Aime, Silvio

    2015-03-16

    [Gd(DTPA-BMA)] is the principal constituent of Omniscan, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. In body fluids, endogenous ions (Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Ca(2+)) may displace the Gd(3+). To assess the extent of displacement at equilibrium, the stability constants of DTPA-BMA(3-) complexes of Gd(3+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) have been determined at 37 °C in 0.15 M NaCl. The order of these stability constants is as follows: GdL≈CuL>ZnL≫CaL. Applying a simplified blood plasma model, the extent of dissociation of Omniscan (0.35 mM [Gd(DTPA-BMA)]) was found to be 17% by the formation of Gd(PO4), [Zn(DTPA-BMA)](-) (2.4%), [Cu(DTPA-BMA)](-) (0.2%), and [Ca(DTPA-BMA)](-) (17.7%). By capillary electrophoresis, the formation of [Ca(DTPA-BMA)](-) has been detected in human serum spiked with [Gd(DTPA-BMA)] (2.0 mM) at pH 7.4. Transmetallation reactions between [Gd(DTPA-BMA)] and Cu(2+) at 37 °C in the presence of citrate, phosphate, and bicarbonate ions occur by dissociation of the complex assisted by the endogenous ligands. At physiological concentrations of citrate, phosphate, and bicarbonate ions, the half-life of dissociation of [Gd(DTPA-BMA)] was calculated to be 9.3 h at pH 7.4. Considering the rates of distribution and dissociation of [Gd(DTPA-BMA)] in the extracellular space of the body, an open two-compartment model has been developed, which allows prediction of the extent of dissociation of the Gd(III) complex in body fluids depending on the rate of elimination of the contrast agent. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Permafrost conditions at the Upper Kuskokwim river area and its influence on local communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodov, A. L.; Panda, S. K.; Hanson, T.

    2017-12-01

    Research area located within the zone of discontinuous permafrost distribution. Recent mean annual air temperature here is close to the 0C. It means, that taking in consideration warming influence of the snow cower during winter, mean annual temperature at the ground surface is well above freezing point. It means that presence or absence of permafrost here completely controlled by the ecological conditions. Based on remote sensing data and the surveys conducted in 2016-17 we selected 6 main ecotypes typical for this area: black spruce boreal forest, wetlands, low and tall shrubs, deciduous and mixed forest. Most of them (low shrubs, deciduous and mixed forest) represent different stages of area recovering after forest fires that was confirmed by the presence of ashy layer close to ground surface in soil pits had been dug within these landscapes. Permafrost was observed only within 2 of them: low shrubs and black spruce boreal forest. Within these types of terrain temperature at the bottom of active layer varies from -0.2/-0.5C at the areas of low shrubs, recovered after relatively recent (approximately 30-50 years old) fires to -1/-1.5 within black spruce forest. Active (seasonally thawed) layer as thick as 0.6 to 0.8 m. Warmest ecotypes for the area are tall shrubs and deciduous forest, temperature at the depth close to 1 m is about +3C. At the mixed forest temperature at the same depth consists of +1/+2C. Active (seasonally frozen) layer thickness within permafrost free areas is 1-1.5 m at the drained sites and about 0.5 within wetlands. Ice-rich permafrost underlying the active layer was noticed only within the black spruce forest. Areas which are free of permafrost are much better drained, typical moisture of mineral soil is less than 30% versus 45-50% in seasonally thawed layer. The current state of permafrost and the fact that it presence completely depends on ecosystems limits land use abilities of local inhabitants. Any changes of forest coverage or organic

  18. Investigation of local thermodynamic equilibrium of laser induced Al2O3–TiC plasma in argon by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Alnama

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma plume of Al2O3–TiC is generated by third harmonic Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond laser. It is characterized using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES at different argon background gas pressures 10, 102, 103, 104 and 105 Pa. Spatial evolution of excitation and ionic temperatures is deduced from spectral data analysis. Temporal evolution of Ti I emission originated from different energy states is probed. The correlation between the temporal behavior and the spatial temperature evolution are investigated under LTE condition for the possibility to use the temporal profile of Ti I emission as an indicator for LTE validity in the plasma.

  19. Modeling of diffusive plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium with integral constraints: application to mercury-free high pressure discharge lamp mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J. F. J.; Suijker, J. L. G.; Peerenboom, K. S. C.; van Dijk, J.

    2017-03-01

    The mercury free lamp model previously discussed in Gnybida et al (2014 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 47 125201) did not account for self-consistent diffusion and only included two molecular transitions. In this paper we apply, for the first time, a self-consistent diffusion algorithm that features (1) species/mass conservation up to machine accuracy and (2) an arbitrary mix of integral (total mass) and local (cold spot) constraints on the composition. Another advantage of this model is that the total pressure of the gas is calculated self consistently. Therefore, the usage of a predetermined pressure is no longer required. Additionally, the number of association processes has been increased from 2 to 6. The population as a function of interatomic separation determines the spectrum of the emitted continuum radiation. Previously, this population was calculated using the limit of low densities. In this work an expression is used that removes this limitation. The result of these improvements is that the agreement between the simulated and measured spectra has improved considerably.

  20. A simple and rational numerical method of two-phase flow with volume-junction model. 2. The numerical method for general condition of two-phase flow in non-equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Motoaki

    1997-11-01

    In the previous report, the usefulness of a new numerical method to achieve a rigorous numerical calculation using a simple explicit method with the volume-junction model was presented with the verification calculation for the depressurization of a saturated two-phase mixture. In this report, on the basis of solution method above, a numerical method for general condition of two-phase flow in non-equilibrium states is presented. In general condition of two-phase flow, the combinations of saturated and non-saturated conditions of each phase are considered in the each flow of volume and junction. Numerical evaluation programs are separately prepared for each combination of flow condition. Several numerical calculations of various kinds of non-equilibrium two-phase flow are made to examine the validity of the numerical method. Calculated results showed that the thermodynamic states obtained in different solution schemes were consistent with each other. In the first scheme, the states are determined by using the steam table as a function of pressure and specific enthalpy which are obtained as the solutions of simultaneous equations. In the second scheme, density and specific enthalpy of each phase are directly calculated by using conservation equations of mass and enthalpy of each phase, respectively. Further, no accumulation of error in mass and energy was found. As for the specific enthalpy, two cases of using energy equations for the volume are examined. The first case uses total energy conservation equation and the second case uses the type of the first law of thermodynamics. The results of both cases agreed well. (author)

  1. On-farm yield potential of local seed watermelon landraces under heat- and drought-prone conditions in Mali

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nantoume, Aminata Dolo; Christiansen, Jørgen Lindskrog; Andersen, Sven Bode

    2012-01-01

    On-farm yield experiments were carried out in the Tombouctou region of Mali in 2009/10 under heat- and drought-prone desert conditions with three local landraces of seed-type watermelons. The landraces, named Fombou, Kaneye and Musa Musa by the farmers, exhibited distinct characteristics for fruit...... responsive. The yields obtained suggest that these local landraces of watermelon are valuable plant genetic resources for securing food supply in arid, heat- and drought-prone areas....

  2. Equilibrium and generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies the behaviour of radionuclides when it produce a desintegration activity,decay and the isotopes stable creation. It gives definitions about the equilibrium between activity of parent and activity of the daughter, radioactive decay,isotope stable and transient equilibrium and maxim activity time. Some considerations had been given to generators that permit a disgregation of two radioisotopes in equilibrium and its good performance. Tabs

  3. Measurement of local flow pattern in boiling R12 simulating PWR conditions with multiple optical probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.

    1998-01-01

    For a comprehensive approach of boiling crisis phenomenon in order to get more reliable predictions of critical heat flux in PWR core, a flow pattern study is under progress at CEA GRENOBLE (in a joint program with Electricite de France: EdF). The first aim is to get experimental results on flow structure in the range of thermal hydraulic parameters involved in the core of a PWR (pressure up to 16 MPa, heat flux about 1 MW/m 2 , mass velocity up to 5000 kg/s/m 2 . As critical heat flux is a local phenomenon and is the result of the flow development, the data has to be measured from the beginning of boiling until boiling crisis, and from the bulk flow until the boundary layer close to the heating walls. Therefore, these results will be useful in modeling not only boiling crisis phenomenon but also condensation in subcooled boiling, coalescence, splitting up, mass and energy transfers at interfaces, and so on. In a first step, the test section is a vertical tube 19.2 mm internal diameter with an axial uniform heat flux over a 3.5m length. The study is performed on the DEBORA loop with Freon 12 as coolant fluid. We assume that basic boiling phenomena (and the knowledge we get about them) only depend on the fluid properties by means of dimensionless parameters but not on the fluid itself. In a first part, we briefly recall that interfacial detection is the most important parameter of a flow pattern study. Therefore, the use of probes able to measure the Phase Indicator Function (P.I.F.) is necessary. A first study of flow conditions shows that the flow pattern is essentially a bubbly one with vapor particles of low diameter (about 300 clm) and high velocity (up to 7 m/s). These criteria induce that a multiple optical probe is the most appropriate tool provided we improve the technology. We detail the way to obtain probes able to detect small particles at high velocity. Each fiber is stretched to get a tip of 10 Clm with the cladding kept on 50 μm length which defines

  4. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Is Required to Maintain Visual Conditioning-Induced Behavioral Plasticity by Limiting Local Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han-Hsuan; Cline, Hollis T

    2016-07-06

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is thought to regulate neuronal plasticity by limiting dendritic protein synthesis, but direct demonstration of a requirement for FMRP control of local protein synthesis during behavioral plasticity is lacking. Here we tested whether FMRP knockdown in Xenopus optic tectum affects local protein synthesis in vivo and whether FMRP knockdown affects protein synthesis-dependent visual avoidance behavioral plasticity. We tagged newly synthesized proteins by incorporation of the noncanonical amino acid azidohomoalanine and visualized them with fluorescent noncanonical amino acid tagging (FUNCAT). Visual conditioning and FMRP knockdown produce similar increases in FUNCAT in tectal neuropil. Induction of visual conditioning-dependent behavioral plasticity occurs normally in FMRP knockdown animals, but plasticity degrades over 24 h. These results indicate that FMRP affects visual conditioning-induced local protein synthesis and is required to maintain the visual conditioning-induced behavioral plasticity. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. Exaggerated dendritic protein synthesis resulting from loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is thought to underlie cognitive deficits in FXS, but no direct evidence has demonstrated that FMRP-regulated dendritic protein synthesis affects behavioral plasticity in intact animals. Xenopus tadpoles exhibit a visual avoidance behavior that improves with visual conditioning in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. We showed that FMRP knockdown and visual conditioning dramatically increase protein synthesis in neuronal processes. Furthermore, induction of visual conditioning-dependent behavioral plasticity occurs normally after FMRP knockdown, but performance rapidly deteriorated in the absence of FMRP. These studies show that FMRP negatively regulates local protein synthesis and is required to maintain visual conditioning

  5. A decomposition of local labour-market conditions and their relevance for inequalities in transitions to vocational training

    OpenAIRE

    Hillmert, Steffen; Hartung, Andreas; Weßling, Katarina

    2017-01-01

    We investigate to what extent individual transitions to vocational training in Germany have been affected by local labour-market conditions. A statistical decomposition approach is developed and applied, allowing for a systematic differentiation between long-term change, short-term fluctuations, and structural regional differences in labour-market conditions. To study individual-level consequences for transitions to vocational training, regionalized labour-market data are merged with longitud...

  6. Governing environmental conflicts in China: Under what conditions do local government compromise?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Li (Yanwei); J.F.M. Koppenjan (Joop); S. Verweij (Stefan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn recent years, governing environmental conflicts concerning the planning, construction, and operation of urban facilities has increasingly become a challenge for Chinese local governments. Chinese governments seek adequate responses to deal with these conflicts, for instance by

  7. Governing environmental conflicts in China : Under what conditions do local governments compromise?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yanwei; Koppenjan, Joop; Verweij, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, governing environmental conflicts concerning the planning, construction, and operation of urban facilities has increasingly become a challenge for Chinese local governments. Chinese governments seek adequate responses to deal with these conflicts, for instance by ignoring criticism

  8. A condition of a research of local government in the Ukrainian scientific literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Hirnyak

    2014-07-01

    The Constitution of 1918 brings some clarity and perspectives of local government in the Ukrainian People’s Republic. The system of local government had to include the lands, provinces and communities, and their relationship with the state anticipated in the form: «Without prejudice to its single power, UPR provides land, townships and communities with the right of wide government, keeping to the principle of decentralization.» And in the civil war, those intentions were realized.

  9. Intermittent many-body dynamics at equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, C.; Campbell, D. K.; Flach, S.

    2017-06-01

    The equilibrium value of an observable defines a manifold in the phase space of an ergodic and equipartitioned many-body system. A typical trajectory pierces that manifold infinitely often as time goes to infinity. We use these piercings to measure both the relaxation time of the lowest frequency eigenmode of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain, as well as the fluctuations of the subsequent dynamics in equilibrium. The dynamics in equilibrium is characterized by a power-law distribution of excursion times far off equilibrium, with diverging variance. Long excursions arise from sticky dynamics close to q -breathers localized in normal mode space. Measuring the exponent allows one to predict the transition into nonergodic dynamics. We generalize our method to Klein-Gordon lattices where the sticky dynamics is due to discrete breathers localized in real space.

  10. Internal equilibrium layer growth over forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, E.; Jensen, N.O.

    2000-01-01

    the magnitude of the scatter. Different theoretical friction velocity profiles for the Internal Boundary Layer (IBL) are tested against the forest data. The results yield information on the Internal Equilibrium Layer (IEL) growth and an equation for the IEL height fur neutral conditions is derived. For stable...... conditions the results indicate that very long fetches are required in order to measure parameters in equilibrium with the actual surface....

  11. Fall Back Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleppe, J.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hendrickx, R.L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Fall back equilibrium is a refinement of the Nash equilibrium concept. In the underly- ing thought experiment each player faces the possibility that, after all players decided on their action, his chosen action turns out to be blocked. Therefore, each player has to decide beforehand on a back-up

  12. LP Well-Posedness for Bilevel Vector Equilibrium and Optimization Problems with Equilibrium Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Khanh, Phan Quoc; Plubtieng, Somyot; Sombut, Kamonrat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is introduce several types of Levitin-Polyak well-posedness for bilevel vector equilibrium and optimization problems with equilibrium constraints. Base on criterion and characterizations for these types of Levitin-Polyak well-posedness we argue on diameters and Kuratowski’s, Hausdorff’s, or Istrǎtescus measures of noncompactness of approximate solution sets under suitable conditions, and we prove the Levitin-Polyak well-posedness for bilevel vector equilibrium and op...

  13. Localized corrosion of metallic materials and γ radiation effects in passive layers under simulated radwaste repository conditions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.W.; Kudelka, S.; Michaelis, A.; Schweinsberg, M.; Thies, A.

    1996-02-01

    The task of the project was to simulate the conditions in a radwaste repository and to perform local analyses in order to detect the critical conditions and material susceptibilities leading to localized corrosion of materials. The information thus obtained was to yield more precise data on the long-term stability of materials for the intended purpose, in order to be able to appropriately select or optimize the materials (Ti, TiO.2Pd, Hastelloy C4, fine-grained structural steel). A major aspect to be examined was natural inhomogeneities of the electrode surfaces, as determined by the grain structure of the selected materials. Thus a laterally inhomogeneous composition in the welded zone induces an inhomogeneous current distribution, and hence strong susceptibility to localized corrosion. This effect was to be quantified, and the localized corrosion processes had to be identified by means of novel, electrochemical methods with a resolution power of μm. The investigations were to be made under conditions as near to practice as possible, for instance by simulating radwaste repository conditions and performing measurements at elevated temperatures (170 C) in an autoclave. Another task was to examine the radiation effects of γ radiation on passive layers, and describe the possible modifications induced by recrystallisation, photocorrosion, or oxide formation. (orig./MM) [de

  14. Crystallographic relations between face- and body-centred cubic crystals formed under near-equilibrium conditions: Observations from the Gibeon meteorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Youliang; Godet, Stephane; Jacques, Pascal J.; Jonas, John J.

    2006-01-01

    The orientations of the kamacite lamellae formed from a single prior-taenite grain were measured by analysing the electron backscatter diffraction patterns obtained using scanning electron microscopy. These are shown to be close to the Kurdjumov-Sachs and Nishiyama-Wassermann relations and their intermediate, i.e., the Greninger-Troiano relation. The orientations of the α grains in the plessite regions were also measured and these were found to be continuously distributed around the Bain circles formed by the variants of the common correspondence relationships, including the Pitsch one in this case. The local misorientations between individual face- and body-centred cubic crystals along their common interfaces were measured. These can be characterized by the orientation relationships mentioned above as long as a certain amount of tolerance is allowed. Orientation variations within individual kamacite lamellae were also analysed. The crystallographic data support the view that somewhat different mechanisms are involved in the formation of Widmanstaetten structures and of the plessite in meteorites

  15. Contracting out local road and park services: Economic effects and their strategic, contractual, and competitive conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Petersen, Ole Helby; Houlberg, Kurt

    2018-01-01

    such as markets, contracts, municipal strategies and contracting history influence these outcomes. Drawing on original survey data from Danish municipalities, we find that competitive tendering has on average reduced costs. Further analysis shows that savings are not associated with lower quality, thus indicating......The economic rationale for contracting out local services is increasingly contested by empirical research. This article aims to contribute to this literature, first by scrutinising the economic effects of contracting out in local road and park services and, second, by exploring how characteristics...... realise larger savings, whereas the characteristics of markets and contracts do not seem to explain variations in cost savings....

  16. Non-equilibrium surface conditions and microstructural changes following pulsed laser irradiation and ion beam mixing of Ni overlayers on sintered alpha-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, K.L.; Davis, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Pulsed laser irradiation and ion beam mixing of thin Ni overlayers on sintered alpha-SiC have been investigated as potential surface modification techniques for the enhancement of the mechanical properties of the SiC. Each of these surface processing methods are nonequilibrium techniques; materials interactions can be induced at the specimen surface which are not possible with conventional thermal techniques. As a result of the surface modification, the physical properties of the ceramic can be altered under the correct processing conditions. Following laser irradiation using a pulsed ruby or krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser, the fracture strength of the SiC was increased by approximately 50 percent and 20 percent, respectively. However, ion-beam mixing of Ni on SiC resulted in no change in fracture strength. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering techniques, have been used to characterize the extent of mixing between the Ni and SiC as a result of the surface modification and to determine the reason(s) for the observed changes in fracture strength. 19 references

  17. Event-based computer simulation model of aspect-type experiments strictly satisfying Einstein's locality conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, Hans; De Raedt, Koen; Michielsen, Kristel; Keimpema, Koenraad; Miyashita, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    Inspired by Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohtn experiments with photons, we construct an event-based simulation model in which every essential element in the ideal experiment has a counterpart. The model satisfies Einstein's criterion of local causality and does not rely on concepts of quantum and

  18. Assessing the sensitivity of coral reef condition indicators to local and global stressors with Bayesian networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral reefs are highly valued ecosystems that are currently imperiled. Although the value of coral reefs to human societies is only just being investigated and better understood, for many local and global economies coral reefs are important providers of ecosystem services that su...

  19. Public understandings of nature: a case study of local knowledge about "natural" forest conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Bruce Hull; David P. Robertson; Angelina Kendra

    2001-01-01

    This study is intended to serve as an explicit and specific example of the social construction of nature. It is motivated by the need to develop a more sophisticated language for a critical public dialogue about society's relationship with nature. We conducted a case study of environmental discourse in one local population in hopes of better understanding how a...

  20. Weyl consistency conditions and a local renormalisation group equation for general renormalisable field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, H.

    1991-01-01

    A local renormalisation group equation which realises infinitesimal Weyl rescalings of the metric and which is an extension of the usual Callan-Symanzik equation is described. In order to ensure that any local composite operators, with dimensions so that on addition to the basic lagrangian they preserve renormalisability, are well defined for arbitrarily many insertions into correlation functions the couplings are assumed to depend on χ. Local operators are then defined by functional differentiation with respect to the couplings just as the energy-momentum tensor is given by functional differentiation with respect to the metric. The local renormalisation group equation contains terms depending on derivatives of the couplings as well as the curvature tensor formed from the metric, constrained by power counting. Various consistency relations arising from the commutativity of Weyl transformations are derived, extending previous one-loop results for the trace anomaly to all orders. In two dimensions the relations give an alternative derivation of the c-theorem and similar extensions are obtained in four dimensions. The equations are applied in detail to general renormalisable σ-models in two dimensions. The Curci-Paffuti relation is derived without any commitment to a particular regularisation scheme and further equations used to construct an action for the vanishing of the β-functions are also obtained. The discussion is also extended to σ-models with a boundary, as appropriate for open strings, and relations for the additional β-functions present in such models are obtained. (orig.)

  1. Disturbances in equilibrium function after major earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Endo, Nobutaka; Osada, Yoshihisa; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Major earthquakes were followed by a large number of aftershocks and significant outbreaks of dizziness occurred over a large area. However it is unclear why major earthquake causes dizziness. We conducted an intergroup trial on equilibrium dysfunction and psychological states associated with equilibrium dysfunction in individuals exposed to repetitive aftershocks versus those who were rarely exposed. Greater equilibrium dysfunction was observed in the aftershock-exposed group under conditions without visual compensation. Equilibrium dysfunction in the aftershock-exposed group appears to have arisen from disturbance of the inner ear, as well as individual vulnerability to state anxiety enhanced by repetitive exposure to aftershocks. We indicate potential effects of autonomic stress on equilibrium function after major earthquake. Our findings may contribute to risk management of psychological and physical health after major earthquakes with aftershocks, and allow development of a new empirical approach to disaster care after such events.

  2. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  3. Equilibrium and non equilibrium in fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorso, C.O.; Chernomoretz, A.; Lopez, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In this communication we present recent results regarding the interplay of equilibrium and non equilibrium in the process of fragmentation of excited finite Lennard Jones drops. Because the general features of such a potential resemble the ones of the nuclear interaction (fact that is reinforced by the similarity between the EOS of both systems) these studies are not only relevant from a fundamental point of view but also shed light on the problem of nuclear multifragmentation. We focus on the microscopic analysis of the state of the fragmenting system at fragmentation time. We show that the Caloric Curve (i e. the functional relationship between the temperature of the system and the excitation energy) is of the type rise plateau with no vapor branch. The usual rise plateau rise pattern is only recovered when equilibrium is artificially imposed. This result puts a serious question on the validity of the freeze out hypothesis. This feature is independent of the dimensionality or excitation mechanism. Moreover we explore the behavior of magnitudes which can help us determine the degree of the assumed phase transition. It is found that no clear cut criteria is presently available. (Author)

  4. On the forces and fluxes in non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Kazuo

    1986-01-01

    A formulation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics of continuum systems based on local equilibrium assumption is reported. Thermodynamic forces are defined from a generalized local entropy and irreversible fluxes are defined as non-advective parts of fluxes of conservative quantities. The validity of the general evolution criterion and its generalization is discussed. (author)

  5. Toroidal equilibrium in an iron-core reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.

    1984-04-01

    An analytical theory of toroidal equilibrium in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch is obtained, including effects of iron cores and resistive shell. The iron cores alter the form of the equilibrium condition and cause the equilibrium to be unstable on the shell resistive time scale

  6. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  7. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in arcs and torches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A general treatment of non-equilibrium plasma aspects is obtained by relating transport fluxes to equilibrium restoring processes in so-called disturbed Bilateral Relations. The (non) equilibrium stage of a small microwave induced plasma serves as case study.

  8. The phase diagram of molybdenum at extreme conditions and the role of local liquid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M

    2008-08-15

    Recent DAC measurements made of the Mo melting curve by the x-ray diffraction studies confirms that, up to at least 110 GPa (3300K) melting is directly from bcc to liquid, evidence that there is no basis for a speculated bcc-hcp or fcc transition. An examination of the Poisson Ratio, obtained from shock sound speed measurements, provides evidence that the 210 GPa (4100K) transition detected from shock experiments is a continuation of the bcc-liquid melting, but is from a bcc-to a solid-like mixed phase rather than to liquid. Calculations, modeled to include the free energy of liquid local structures, predict that the transition from the liquid to the mixed phase is near 150 GPa(3500K). The presence of local structures provides the simplest and most direct explanation for the Mo phase diagram, and the low melting slopes.

  9. The Working Conditions of Elite Politicians and Administrators at the National and Local Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmar, Ulf; Holm Pedersen, Lene; Bhatti, Yosef

    between family and work, exposure to the media, and harassment/threats against the politicians or their families. More than 70% of the ministers and mayors answered the survey. The surveys were supplemented by in-depth interviews with 3 ministers, 4 mayors and 5 top-administrators concerning the same...... exposed to harassment. Comparing the national and the local level politicians at the national level work longer hours, but surprisingly the politicians at the local level are equally much exposed to face-to-face harassment, though less to harassment on the social media. In comparison to the top...... politicians, the top administrators are less exposed to harassment. The implications of these results for the power balance between top politicians and administrators are discussed....

  10. Counterinsurgency on the Ground in Afghanistan. How Different Units Adapted to Local Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Marines advertised that local Afghans who had worked with the Taliban—known to the Marines as the “little t” Taliban—would have the opportunity to...different part of the district. The first one, in late July, involved the provincial governor. Platoons advertised these shuras during their patrols...The area was too large and the terrain too difficult to clear entirely of enemy fighters. The only alternative was to mobi - lize the population and

  11. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B pol diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T e , n e , and B || along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n e B || product and higher n e and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  12. Thermal equilibrium in Einstein's elevator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rey, Bernardo; Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo; Cubero, David

    2013-05-01

    We report fully relativistic molecular-dynamics simulations that verify the appearance of thermal equilibrium of a classical gas inside a uniformly accelerated container. The numerical experiments confirm that the local momentum distribution in this system is very well approximated by the Jüttner function-originally derived for a flat spacetime-via the Tolman-Ehrenfest effect. Moreover, it is shown that when the acceleration or the container size is large enough, the global momentum distribution can be described by the so-called modified Jüttner function, which was initially proposed as an alternative to the Jüttner function.

  13. Non-equilibrium Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Martinás

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A microeconomic, agent based framework to dynamic economics is formulated in a materialist approach. An axiomatic foundation of a non-equilibrium microeconomics is outlined. Economic activity is modelled as transformation and transport of commodities (materials owned by the agents. Rate of transformations (production intensity, and the rate of transport (trade are defined by the agents. Economic decision rules are derived from the observed economic behaviour. The non-linear equations are solved numerically for a model economy. Numerical solutions for simple model economies suggest that the some of the results of general equilibrium economics are consequences only of the equilibrium hypothesis. We show that perfect competition of selfish agents does not guarantee the stability of economic equilibrium, but cooperativity is needed, too.

  14. DIAGNOSIS OF FINANCIAL EQUILIBRIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUCIU GHEORGHE

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis based on the balance sheet tries to identify the state of equilibrium (disequilibrium that exists in a company. The easiest way to determine the state of equilibrium is by looking at the balance sheet and at the information it offers. Because in the balance sheet there are elements that do not reflect their real value, the one established on the market, they must be readjusted, and those elements which are not related to the ordinary operating activities must be eliminated. The diagnosis of financial equilibrium takes into account 2 components: financing sources (ownership equity, loaned, temporarily attracted. An efficient financial equilibrium must respect 2 fundamental requirements: permanent sources represented by ownership equity and loans for more than 1 year should finance permanent needs, and temporary resources should finance the operating cycle.

  15. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, J E

    1968-01-01

    The International Encyclopedia of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Volume 1: Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics covers the fundamental principles and the development of theoretical aspects of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Statistical mechanical is the study of the connection between the macroscopic behavior of bulk matter and the microscopic properties of its constituent atoms and molecules. This book contains eight chapters, and begins with a presentation of the master equation used for the calculation of the fundamental thermodynamic functions. The succeeding chapters highlight t

  16. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  17. [Towards the problem of necessity to reduce the medical evacuation stages in conditions of local wars and armed conflicts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaĭdar, B V; Ivantsov, V A; Sidel'nikov, V O; Rusev, I T; Madaĭ, D Iu; Kokoev, V G; Zinov'ev, E V; Mutalibov, M M

    2004-06-01

    The article is devoted to the review of modern opinions concerning the experience of military operation medical support in conditions of local wars and military conflicts. On the base of analysis of medical assistance rendered to the wounded and casualties in Republic of Chechnya the advantages and defects of different approaches are discussed. The experience in rendering assistance to the casualties in the Armed Forces of NATO countries during the local wars for the last decades is discussed. It is shown that the optimal variant of organization of treatment-and-evacuation measures during the local armed conflicts and wars is the two-stage scheme of evacuation: the first medical aid--the qualified (specialized) medical aid.

  18. Assist or desist? Conditional bailouts and fiscal discipline in local governments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens; Ellegård, Lina Maria

    2015-01-01

    the development of costs and the fiscal surplus of admitted municipalities to that of their most similar counterparts during the decade after the program, we then estimate fixed effects regressions on the resulting sample. The analysis suggests that conditional bailouts did not erode, and may even had induced...... governments first making efforts to improve the situation. We examine a case in which the Swedish central government provided conditional grants to 36 financially troubled municipalities. We use the synthetic control method to identify suitable comparison units for each of the 36 municipalities. To compare...

  19. Disentangling the record of diagenesis, local redox conditions, and global seawater chemistry during the latest Ordovician glaciation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Anne-Sofie Crüger; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Hammarlund, Emma U.

    2017-01-01

    as pyrite in core samples, while outcrop samples have been significantly altered as pyrite has been oxidized and remobilized by modern weathering processes. Fe speciation in the more pristine core samples indicates persistent deep water anoxia, at least locally through the Late Ordovician, in contrast...... to the prevailing interpretation of increased Hirnantian water column oxygenation in shallower environments. Deep water redox conditions were likely decoupled from shallower environments by a basinal shift in organic matter export driven by decreasing rates of organic matter degradation and decreasing shelf areas......The Late Ordovician stratigraphic record integrates glacio-eustatic processes, water-column redox conditions and carbon cycle dynamics. This complex stratigraphic record, however, is dominated by deposits from epeiric seas that are susceptible to local physical and chemical processes decoupled from...

  20. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger J

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B(pol) diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T(e), n(e), and B(parallel) along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n(e)B(parallel) product and higher n(e) and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  1. Covariant interactions of two spinless particles: all local solutions of the angular condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leutwyler, H.; Stern, J.

    1977-06-01

    The solutions of the algebraic problem posed by covariant Hamiltonian quantum mechanics are discussed. If, in the transverse relative coordinates, the mass and spin operators are differential operators of at most second order, the system is shown to be described by a manifestly covariant wave equation supplemented with a covariant constraint. If, in addition, one requires the wave equation and the constraint to be local in the coordinates of both particles, the freedom left in the interaction reduces to four constants. The resulting class of systems represents a generalization of the relativistic oscillator of Feynman, Kislinger and Ravndal

  2. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  3. Nonideal plasmas as non-equilibrium media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, I V; Norman, G E; Valuev, A A; Valuev, I A

    2003-01-01

    Various aspects of the collective behaviour of non-equilibrium nonideal plasmas are studied. The relaxation of kinetic energy to the equilibrium state is simulated by the molecular dynamics (MD) method for two-component non-degenerate strongly non-equilibrium plasmas. The initial non-exponential stage, its duration and the subsequent exponential stage of the relaxation process are studied for a wide range of ion charge, nonideality parameter and ion mass. A simulation model of the nonideal plasma excited by an electron beam is proposed. An approach is developed to calculate the dynamic structure factor in non-stationary conditions. Instability increment is obtained from MD simulations

  4. Fruit development, pigmentation and biochemical properties of wax apple as affected by localized Application of GA3 under field conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Khandaker, Mohammad Moneruzzaman; Boyce, Amru Nasrulhaq; Osman, Normaniza; Golam, Faruq; Rahman, M. Motior; Sofian-Azirun, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of gibberellin (GA3) on the fruit development, pigmentation and biochemical properties of wax apple. The wax apple trees were rubbing treated with 0, 20, 50 and 100 mgGA3/l under field conditions. The localized application (rubbing) of 50 mg GA3/l significantly increased the fruit set, fruit length and diameter, color development, weight and yieldcompared to the control. In addition, GA3 treatments significantly reduced the fruit drop. With regard to the fr...

  5. Measurement of subcooled boiling pressure drop and local heat transfer coefficient in horizontal tube under LPLF conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baburajan, P.K.; Bisht, G.S.; Gupta, S.K.; Prabhu, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Measured subcooled boiling pressure drop and local heat transfer coefficient in horizontal tubes. ► Infra-red thermal imaging is used for wall temperature measurement. ► Developed correlations for pressure drop and local heat transfer coefficient. -- Abstract: Horizontal flow is commonly encountered in boiler tubes, refrigerating equipments and nuclear reactor fuel channels of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR). Study of horizontal flow under low pressure and low flow (LPLF) conditions is important in understanding the nuclear core behavior during situations like LOCA (loss of coolant accidents). In the present work, local heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop are measured in a horizontal tube under LPLF conditions of subcooled boiling. Geometrical parameters covered in this study are diameter (5.5 mm, 7.5 mm and 9.5 mm) and length (550 mm, 750 mm and 1000 mm). The operating parameters varied are mass flux (450–935 kg/m 2 s) and inlet subcooling (29 °C, 50 °C and 70 °C). Infra-red thermography is used for the measurement of local wall temperature to estimate the heat transfer coefficient in single phase and two phase flows with water as the working medium at atmospheric pressure. Correlation for single phase diabatic pressure drop ratio (diabatic to adiabatic) as a function of viscosity ratio (wall temperature to fluid temperature) is presented. Correlation for pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions as a function of Boiling number (Bo) and Jakob number (Ja) is obtained. Correlation for single phase heat transfer coefficient in the thermal developing region is presented as a function of Reynolds number (Re), Prandtl number (Pr) and z/d (ratio of axial length of the test section to diameter). Correlation for two phase heat transfer coefficient under subcooled boiling condition is developed as a function of boiling number (Bo), Jakob number (Ja) and Prandtl number (Pr)

  6. Effects of earthquake rupture shallowness and local soil conditions on simulated ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apsel, Randy J.; Hadley, David M.; Hart, Robert S.

    1983-03-01

    The paucity of strong ground motion data in the Eastern U.S. (EUS), combined with well recognized differences in earthquake source depths and wave propagation characteristics between Eastern and Western U.S. (WUS) suggests that simulation studies will play a key role in assessing earthquake hazard in the East. This report summarizes an extensive simulation study of 5460 components of ground motion representing a model parameter study for magnitude, distance, source orientation, source depth and near-surface site conditions for a generic EUS crustal model. The simulation methodology represents a hybrid approach to modeling strong ground motion. Wave propagation is modeled with an efficient frequency-wavenumber integration algorithm. The source time function used for each grid element of a modeled fault is empirical, scaled from near-field accelerograms. This study finds that each model parameter has a significant influence on both the shape and amplitude of the simulated response spectra. The combined effect of all parameters predicts a dispersion of response spectral values that is consistent with strong ground motion observations. This study provides guidelines for scaling WUS data from shallow earthquakes to the source depth conditions more typical in the EUS. The modeled site conditions range from very soft soil to hard rock. To the extent that these general site conditions model a specific site, the simulated response spectral information can be used to either correct spectra to a site-specific environment or used to compare expected ground motions at different sites. (author)

  7. The condition of counteraction to administrative corruption offenses in state authorities and local government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. В. Клок

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Article discusses questions dedicated to the analysis of the condition of counteraction to administrative corruption offenses in Ukraine. The statistical information on the dynamics, structure, specific gravity, cost and latency of the administrative corruption is researched. The most effective measures against corrupt practices at the state and municipal service are drawn.

  8. A multi-criterion index for the evaluation of local tropical forest conditions in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochoa-Gaona, S.; Kampichler, C.; de Jong, B.H.J.; Hernández, S.; Geissen, V.; Huerta, E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economical importance of tropical forests they are currently affected by human activities, mainly through deforestation and selective extraction. With the aim of making an opportune diagnosis of the condition of forests, we developed an ecological index based on

  9. Experiment-based modelling of hardening and localized plasticity in metals irradiated under cascade damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Trinkaus, H.

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of the available experimental observations shows that the occurrence of a sudden yield drop and the associated plastic flow localization are the major concerns regarding the performance and lifetime of materials exposed to fission or fusion neutrons. In the light of the known mechanical properties and microstructures of the as-irradiated and irradiated and deformed materials, it has been argued that the increase in the upper yield stress, the sudden yield drop and the initiation of plastic flow localization, can be rationalized in terms of the cascade induced source hardening (CISH) model. Various aspects of the model (main assumptions and predictions) have been investigated using analytical calculations, 3-D dislocation dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The main results and conclusions are briefly summarized. Finally, it is pointed out that even though the formation of cleared channels may be rationalized in terms of climb-controlled glide of the source dislocation, a number of problems regarding the initiation and the evolution of these channels remain unsolved

  10. Experiment-based modelling of hardening and localized plasticity in metals irradiated under cascade damage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.N. E-mail: bachu.singh@risoe.dk; Ghoniem, N.M.; Trinkaus, H

    2002-12-01

    The analysis of the available experimental observations shows that the occurrence of a sudden yield drop and the associated plastic flow localization are the major concerns regarding the performance and lifetime of materials exposed to fission or fusion neutrons. In the light of the known mechanical properties and microstructures of the as-irradiated and irradiated and deformed materials, it has been argued that the increase in the upper yield stress, the sudden yield drop and the initiation of plastic flow localization, can be rationalized in terms of the cascade induced source hardening (CISH) model. Various aspects of the model (main assumptions and predictions) have been investigated using analytical calculations, 3-D dislocation dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The main results and conclusions are briefly summarized. Finally, it is pointed out that even though the formation of cleared channels may be rationalized in terms of climb-controlled glide of the source dislocation, a number of problems regarding the initiation and the evolution of these channels remain unsolved.

  11. Morpho-Productive and Chemical Composition of Local and Foreign Sweet Corn Hybrids Grown in the Conditions of Transylvania Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana PĂCURAR

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sweet corn (Zea mays L. belongs to the Gramineae family, var. rugosa (Bonof convar. Saccharate (Sturt. and can be distinguished from normal corn by presence of one or more mutant genes that affect carbohydrate metabolism in endosperm. Purpose of this research is to compare behavior of sweet corn hybrids created at SCDA Turda, but also foreign hybrids, in terms of quality elements and chemical composition, in conditions of Transylvania plateau, in two localities: Turda and Viişoara. As biological material following domestic sweet corn hybrids were chosen: ‘Prima’, ‘Estival’, ‘Deliciul verii’, ‘Dulcin’, ‘Delicios’, ‘Estival M’ and foreign hybrid ‘Jubilee’. These hybrids were also analyzed in terms of chemical composition. Weight of ‘Estival’ hybrid has the best behavior in both localities; as regards to cobs length, ‘Delicios’ hybrid has registered increases very significant positive, differences between plant height in the two localities confirm significant influence of environment on formation of this important typical qualitative characteristics, highest performances in terms of β-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin content, are recorded by ‘Jubilee’ in both localities, ‘Deliciul Verii’ hybrid records significant value for lutein content, also recording an important addition of carbohydrates in Turda, ‘Prima’ and ‘Estival’ hybrids recorded highest values of sucrose in both localities.

  12. Communication: Recovering the flat-plane condition in electronic structure theory at semi-local DFT cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Akash; Janet, Jon Paul; Kulik, Heather J.

    2017-11-01

    The flat-plane condition is the union of two exact constraints in electronic structure theory: (i) energetic piecewise linearity with fractional electron removal or addition and (ii) invariant energetics with change in electron spin in a half filled orbital. Semi-local density functional theory (DFT) fails to recover the flat plane, exhibiting convex fractional charge errors (FCE) and concave fractional spin errors (FSE) that are related to delocalization and static correlation errors. We previously showed that DFT+U eliminates FCE but now demonstrate that, like other widely employed corrections (i.e., Hartree-Fock exchange), it worsens FSE. To find an alternative strategy, we examine the shape of semi-local DFT deviations from the exact flat plane and we find this shape to be remarkably consistent across ions and molecules. We introduce the judiciously modified DFT (jmDFT) approach, wherein corrections are constructed from few-parameter, low-order functional forms that fit the shape of semi-local DFT errors. We select one such physically intuitive form and incorporate it self-consistently to correct semi-local DFT. We demonstrate on model systems that jmDFT represents the first easy-to-implement, no-overhead approach to recovering the flat plane from semi-local DFT.

  13. Neighborhood Condition and Geographic Locale in Assessing HIV/STI Risk Among African American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jelani C; Valois, Robert F; Siddiqi, Arjumand; Vanable, Peter; Carey, Michael P; DiClemente, Ralph J; Romer, Daniel; Brown, Larry K; Farber, Naomi B; Salazar, Laura F

    2015-06-01

    Although region and neighborhood condition's effect on HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk has been studied separately, there is little research examining their interplay. African American adolescents (n = 1,602) from four matched cities in the Northeastern and Southeastern US completed Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interviews and submitted biospecimen samples to detect Sexually Transmitted Infections (chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomonas). Logistic and negative binomial regressions determined HIV/STI risk differences by region, neighborhood stress, and stress-region dyads. Northeastern participants demonstrated lower HIV/STI risk while participants from higher stress neighborhoods exhibited greater risk. Relationships between neighborhood condition and ever having anal sex (p use (p partners (p partners than participants in comparable Southeastern neighborhoods (p risk.

  14. The idiosyncrasies of streams: local variability mitigates vulnerability of trout to changing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea Watts; Brooke Penaluna; Jason Dunham

    2016-01-01

    Land use and climate change are two key factors with the potential to affect stream conditions and fish habitat. Since the 1950s, Washington and Oregon have required forest practices designed to mitigate the effects of timber harvest on streams and fish. Yet questions remain about the extent to which these practices are effective. Add in the effects of climate change—...

  15. Conditional repair by locally switching the thermal healing capability of dynamic covalent polymers with light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Anne; Göstl, Robert; Wendt, Robert; Kötteritzsch, Julia; Hager, Martin D.; Schubert, Ulrich S.; Brademann-Jock, Kerstin; Thünemann, Andreas F.; Nöchel, Ulrich; Behl, Marc; Hecht, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Healable materials could play an important role in reducing the environmental footprint of our modern technological society through extending the life cycles of consumer products and constructions. However, as most healing processes are carried out by heat alone, the ability to heal damage generally kills the parent material's thermal and mechanical properties. Here we present a dynamic covalent polymer network whose thermal healing ability can be switched `on' and `off' on demand by light, thereby providing local control over repair while retaining the advantageous macroscopic properties of static polymer networks. We employ a photoswitchable furan-based crosslinker, which reacts with short and mobile maleimide-substituted poly(lauryl methacrylate) chains forming strong covalent bonds while simultaneously allowing the reversible, spatiotemporally resolved control over thermally induced de- and re-crosslinking. We reason that our system can be adapted to more complex materials and has the potential to impact applications in responsive coatings, photolithography and microfabrication.

  16. Impact of international and local conditions on sovereign bond spreads: International evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Izadi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of international and domestic factors on the sovereign bond spreads for 22 developed countries in North America, Europe and Pacific Rim regions. First, for all the regions the impact of global factors on the sovereign bond spreads is more intense than regional factors. Second, the findings confirm that for the bond spreads of each region over its domestic government bonds, the countries’ local fundamentals are better determinants of the spreads compared to the spread over US government bonds as a safe haven. Third, the influence of worldwide factors in the Eurozone compared to other regions bond spreads is less. Fourth, the relationship of the market sentiment and the investor risk aversion with the sovereign bond spreads of all regions is positive. Equity market volatility plays significant role in yield speads in international bond markets.

  17. Atmospheric conditions measured by a wireless sensor network on the local scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengfeld, K.; Ament, F.

    2010-09-01

    Atmospheric conditions close to the surface, like temperature, wind speed and humidity, vary on small scales because of surface heterogeneities. Therefore, the traditional measuring approach of using a single, highly accurate station is of limited representativeness for a larger domain, because it is not able to determine these small scale variabilities. However, both the variability and the domain averages are important information for the development and validation of atmospheric models and soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer (SVAT) schemes. Due to progress in microelectronics it is possible to construct networks of comparably cheap meteorological stations with moderate accuracy. Such a network provides data in high spatial and temporal resolution. The EPFL Lausanne developed such a network called SensorScope, consisting of low cost autonomous stations. Each station observes air and surface temperature, humidity, wind direction and speed, incoming solar radiation, precipitation, soil moisture and soil temperature and sends the data via radio communication to a base station. This base station forwards the collected data via GSM/GPRS to a central server. The first measuring campaign took place within the FLUXPAT project in August 2009. We deployed 15 stations as a twin transect near Jülich, Germany. To test the quality of the low cost sensors we compared two of them to more accurate reference systems. It turned out, that although the network sensors are not highly accurate, the measurements are consistent. Consequently an analysis of the pattern of atmospheric conditions is feasible. The transect is 2.3 km long and covers different types of vegetation and a small river. Therefore, we analyse the influence of different land surfaces and the distance to the river on meteorological conditions. For example, we found a difference in air temperature of 0.8°C between the station closest to and the station farthest from the river. The decreasing relative humidity with

  18. Local environmental and meteorological conditions influencing the invasive mosquito Ae. albopictus and arbovirus transmission risk in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Eliza; Bajwa, Waheed; Shaman, Jeffrey

    2017-08-01

    Ae. albopictus, an invasive mosquito vector now endemic to much of the northeastern US, is a significant public health threat both as a nuisance biter and vector of disease (e.g. chikungunya virus). Here, we aim to quantify the relationships between local environmental and meteorological conditions and the abundance of Ae. albopictus mosquitoes in New York City. Using statistical modeling, we create a fine-scale spatially explicit risk map of Ae. albopictus abundance and validate the accuracy of spatiotemporal model predictions using observational data from 2016. We find that the spatial variability of annual Ae. albopictus abundance is greater than its temporal variability in New York City but that both local environmental and meteorological conditions are associated with Ae. albopictus numbers. Specifically, key land use characteristics, including open spaces, residential areas, and vacant lots, and spring and early summer meteorological conditions are associated with annual Ae. albopictus abundance. In addition, we investigate the distribution of imported chikungunya cases during 2014 and use these data to delineate areas with the highest rates of arboviral importation. We show that the spatial distribution of imported arboviral cases has been mostly discordant with mosquito production and thus, to date, has provided a check on local arboviral transmission in New York City. We do, however, find concordant areas where high Ae. albopictus abundance and chikungunya importation co-occur. Public health and vector control officials should prioritize control efforts to these areas and thus more cost effectively reduce the risk of local arboviral transmission. The methods applied here can be used to monitor and identify areas of risk for other imported vector-borne diseases.

  19. The impact of insecticides to local honey bee colony Apis cerana indica in laboratory condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Ramadhani E.; Permana, Agus D.; Nuriyah, Syayidah

    2014-03-01

    Heavy use of insecticides considered as one of common practice at local farming systems. Even though many Indonesian researchers had stated the possible detrimental effect of insecticide on agriculture environment and biodiversity, researches on this subject had been neglected. Therefore, our purpose in this research is observing the impact of insecticides usage by farmer to non target organisme like local honey bee (Apis cerana indica), which commonly kept in area near agriculture system. This research consisted of field observations out at Ciburial, Dago Pakar, Bandung and laboratory tests at School of Life Sciences and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung. The field observations recorded visited agriculture corps and types of pollen carried by bees to the nest while laboratory test recorderd the effect of common insecticide to mortality and behavior of honey bees. Three types of insecticides used in this research were insecticides A with active agent Chlorantraniliprol 50 g/l, insecticide B with active agent Profenofos 500 g/l, and insecticides C with active agent Chlorantraniliprol 100 g/l and λ-cyhalotrin 50g/l. The results show that during one week visit, wild flower, Wedelia montana, visited by most honey bees with average visit 60 honey bees followed by corn, Zea mays, with 21 honey bees. The most pollen carried by foragers was Wedelia montana, Calliandra callothyrsus, and Zea mays. Preference test show that honeybees tend move to flowers without insecticides as the preference to insecticides A was 12.5%, insecticides B was 0%, and insecticides was C 4.2%. Mortality test showed that insecticides A has LD50 value 0.01 μg/μl, insecticide B 0.31 μg/μl, and insecticides C 0.09 μg/μl which much lower than suggested dosage recommended by insecticides producer. This research conclude that the use of insecticide could lower the pollination service provide by honey bee due to low visitation rate to flowers and mortality of foraging bees.

  20. 2D simulation and performance evaluation of bifacial rear local contact c-Si solar cells under variable illumination conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2017-09-18

    A customized 2D computational tool has been developed to simulate bifacial rear local contact PERC type PV structures based on the numerical solution of the transport equations through the finite element method. Simulations were performed under various device material parameters and back contact geometry configurations in order to optimize bifacial solar cell performance under different simulated illumination conditions. Bifacial device maximum power output was also compared with the monofacial equivalent one and the industrial standard Al-BSF structure. The performance of the bifacial structure during highly diffused irradiance conditions commonly observed in the Middle East region due to high concentrations of airborne dust particles was also investigated. Simulation results demonstrated that such conditions are highly favorable for the bifacial device because of the significantly increased diffuse component of the solar radiation which enters the back cell surface.

  1. 2D simulation and performance evaluation of bifacial rear local contact c-Si solar cells under variable illumination conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Kotsovos, Konstantinos; Gereige, Issam; Al-Saggaf, Ahmed; Tzavaras, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    A customized 2D computational tool has been developed to simulate bifacial rear local contact PERC type PV structures based on the numerical solution of the transport equations through the finite element method. Simulations were performed under various device material parameters and back contact geometry configurations in order to optimize bifacial solar cell performance under different simulated illumination conditions. Bifacial device maximum power output was also compared with the monofacial equivalent one and the industrial standard Al-BSF structure. The performance of the bifacial structure during highly diffused irradiance conditions commonly observed in the Middle East region due to high concentrations of airborne dust particles was also investigated. Simulation results demonstrated that such conditions are highly favorable for the bifacial device because of the significantly increased diffuse component of the solar radiation which enters the back cell surface.

  2. Urbanización descontextualizada y condiciones locales. Cinco casos de estudio en España / Decontextualized urbanization and local conditions. Five case study in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Rodríguez Lorite

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLa expansión del sector de la construcción desde mediados del siglo XX hasta principios del siglo XXI ha crecido a un ritmo vertiginoso, especialmente en la década de los 60 a los años 70, por los acontecimientos históricos y demográficos ocurridos en España. Este acelerado desarrollo, trajo consigo la realización de multitud de periferias y nuevos barrios de carácter monótono, sin responder en gran parte de los casos a las condiciones de contorno del territorio en el que se ubicaban.Se describen procesos constructivos y de diseño urbano análogos en cada uno de los casos estudiados, llevando a la pérdida de identidad de la ciudad y de la relación del ciudadano con su territorio.Palabras claveHomogéneo, monótono, falta de identidad, condiciones locales, paisaje urbanoAbstractThe expansion in the field of construction since the mid-twentieth century to the early twenty-first century has grown at a fast pace, especially from the 60s to the 70s, by historical and demographic events that occurred in Spain. This accelerated growth brought about the realization of an many suburbs and new neighborhoods of monotonous character, that no respond in most cases to the boundary conditions of the territory in which they were located.Construction processes and similar urban design in each of the cases studied, are described leading to the loss of identity of the city and the relationship between citizens and their territory.KeywordsHomogeneous, monotonous, lack of identity, local conditions, cityscape

  3. Problems of Instruments of Development of Local Self-Governance under Conditions of Ensuring Stabilisation of Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golovnya Olena M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article considers sustainable social development of local society as a universal technology. Such a technology covers all levels of management, creates conditions for the market and allows consolidation of various social groups. Technology is developed and realised under specific conditions and specific features of economic, organisational and socio-political levels and structure of development of a municipal society. Today, unfortunately, insufficient attentions is paid to the issues of constructing a complex of technologies capable of ensuring dynamic economic development of an integrated system of municipal management. Moreover, one of the directions of the municipal policy should be creation of a system of employment of population and re-training of employees and formation of new working places. Associations of local self-governance bodies could play a significant importance in protection of interests of territorial societies. In order to solve the issue of attraction of the population to participation in local self-governance, it is necessary to establish a feedback between the society and its self-governance bodies – both elected by citizens and its executive structures.

  4. Re-irradiation in stereotactic conditions and cetuximab for local relapses of epidermoid carcinoma of head and neck; Reirradiation en conditions stereotaxiques et cetuximab pour des recidives locales de carcinome epidermoide de la tete et du cou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, F.; Comet, B.; Faivre-Pierret, M.; Coche-Dequeant, B.; Degardin, M.; Lefebvre, J.L.; Lacornerie, T.; Lartigau, E. [Departement universitaire de radiotherapie, centre Oscar Lambret, 59 - Lille (France); Universite Lille-2, 59 (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a work aimed at assessing the feasibility and toxicity of a re-irradiation treatment in stereotactic conditions using CyberKnife and cetuximab in the case of local relapses of epidermoid cancers of the ORL sphere. Thirty three patients have been submitted to this treatment between June 2007 and April 2009. Although six patients died by six months, this treatment seems to be a good alternative, and presents an acceptable short-term toxicity. Further studies are needed to compare this technique to other therapeutic techniques, and to assess the risk of long term complications. Short communication

  5. Immunity by equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  6. KUPOL-M code for simulation of the VVER's accident localization system under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efanov, A.D.; Lukyanov, A.A.; Shangin, N.N.; Zajtsev, A.A.; Solov'ev, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    Computer code KUPOL-M is developed for analysis of thermodynamic parameters of medium within full pressure containment for NPPs with VVER under LOCA conditions. The analysis takes into account the effects of non-stationary heat-mass transfer of gas-drop mixture in the containment compartments with natural convection, volume and surface steam condensation in the presence of noncondensables, heat-mass exchange of the compartment atmosphere with water in the sumps. The operation of the main safety systems like a spray system, hydrogen catalytic recombiners, emergency core cooling pumps, valves and a fan system is simulated in KUPOL-M code. The main results of the code verification including the ones of the participation in ISP-47 International Standard Problem on containment thermal-hydraulics are presented. (author)

  7. The diffusion of medical technology, local conditions, and technology re-invention: a comparative case study on coronary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Noguchi, Haruko; Heidenreich, Paul; Saynina, Olga; Moreland, Abigail; Miyazaki, Shunichi; Ikeda, Shunya; Kaneko, Yoshihiro; Ikegami, Naoki

    2006-12-01

    Innovation of medical technology is a major driving force behind the increase in medical expenditures in developed countries. Previous studies identified that the diffusion of medical technology varied across countries according to the characteristics of regulatory policy and payment systems. Based on Roger's diffusion of innovation theory, this study purported to see how local practice norms, the evolving nature of diffusing technology, and local clinical needs in addition to differences in politico-economic systems would affect the process of innovation diffusion. Taking a case of coronary stenting, an innovative therapeutic technology in early 1990s, we provided a case study of hospital-based data between two teaching high-tech hospitals in Japan and the US for discussion. Stenting began to be widely used in both countries when complementary new technology modified its clinical efficacy, but the diffusion process still differed between the two hospitals due to (1) distinctive payment systems for hospitals and physicians, (2) practice norms in favor of percutaneous intervention rather than bypass surgery that was shaped by payment incentives and cultural attitudes, and (3) local patient's clinical characteristics that the technology had to be tailored for. The case study described the diffusion of stent technology as a dynamic process between patients, physicians, hospitals, health care systems, and technology under global and local conditions.

  8. Effect of Localities and organic Fertilizers on Yield in Conditions of Organic Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Antosovsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fertilization cannot be used by actual needs of plants during vegetation in organic farming. The proper crop rotation and harmonic nutrition are necessary for good and quality products. The methods of treatment are mainly realized by cultivation of green manure crop and fertilizing by organic fertilizers. The aim of the long-term experiment was to evaluate the effect of different localities and different organic fertilizers on crop yield in organic farming. Variants of fertilization included in the experiment are: 1. Unfertilized control, 2. Green manure, 3. Green manure + renewable external sources, 4. Green manure + renewable external sources + auxiliary substances, 5. Green manure + farm fertilizers, 6. Green manure + farm fertilizers + auxiliary substances. The experiment started by sowing of winter wheat so green manure crop was not grown in the first experimental year. The highest yield of winter wheat grain coming from the first year of the experiment was observed on the variant with renewable external sources (digestate. Average grain yield on this variant was about 7.12 t/ha (up to 0.74 t/ha increased than the unfertilized control. Average yield of potatoes from the second year of the experiment was the highest after combination with green manure + renewable external sources (compost + digestate + auxiliary substances. This variant achieved yield about 34.08 t/ha, which is increased by 9.35 t/ha compared to the control variant. Results from this two-year experiment showed that the most suitable combination of fertilization with or without green manure crop is compost + digestate. These results were probably caused by higher content of nitrogen in organic fertilizers (compost + digestate used in this variant compared to other variants. Statistical difference of achieved yields was observed between each experimental station in both experimental years.

  9. Dynamics of postradiation restoration following double irradiation of rats under the conditions of combined pharmacochemical and local protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldzhijska, M.; Pantev, T.

    1988-01-01

    Comparison is made of the quantitative correlation in the dynamics of restoration under the conditions of chemical, local and combined protection after double irradiation of rats with gamma rays (3 Gy + 3 Gy and 3 Gy + 6 Gy). As chemical radioprotector the preparation Adeturon is introduced in a dose of 50 mg/kg b.w. (1/17 of LD 50 ), while the local protection of the abdominal lumbar region is realized by a lead screen (2,5 mm x 50 mm). For quantitative evaluation of the degree of restoration, the changes in the weight of the spleen on the 3d, 6th, 10th and 14th day following the test-irradiation are investigated. The possibility is pointed out of reducing the residual radiation damage and the triple increasing of daily repair rate, when a combination of low ineffective dose of Adeturon and mild physical protection of radiosensitive organs is used

  10. Habitat connectivity and local conditions shape taxonomic and functional diversity of arthropods on green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaker, Sonja; Obrist, Martin Karl; Ghazoul, Jaboury; Moretti, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Increasing development of urban environments creates high pressure on green spaces with potential negative impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem services. There is growing evidence that green roofs - rooftops covered with vegetation - can contribute mitigate the loss of urban green spaces by providing new habitats for numerous arthropod species. Whether green roofs can contribute to enhance taxonomic and functional diversity and increase connectivity across urbanized areas remains, however, largely unknown. Furthermore, only limited information is available on how environmental conditions shape green roof arthropod communities. We investigated the community composition of arthropods (Apidae, Curculionidae, Araneae and Carabidae) on 40 green roofs and 40 green sites at ground level in the city of Zurich, Switzerland. We assessed how the site's environmental variables (such as area, height, vegetation, substrate and connectivity among sites) affect species richness and functional diversity using generalized linear models. We used an extension of co-inertia analysis (RLQ) and fourth-corner analysis to highlight the mechanism underlying community assemblages across taxonomic groups on green roof and ground communities. Species richness was higher at ground-level sites, while no difference in functional diversity was found between green roofs and ground sites. Green roof arthropod diversity increased with higher connectivity and plant species richness, irrespective of substrate depth, height and area of green roofs. The species trait analysis reviewed the mechanisms related to the environmental predictors that shape the species assemblages of the different taxa at ground and roof sites. Our study shows the important contribution of green roofs in maintaining high functional diversity of arthropod communities across different taxonomic groups, despite their lower species richness compared with ground sites. Species communities on green roofs revealed to be characterized

  11. Bioclimatic conditioning places for propagation the plants; Acondicionamiento Bioclimatico de locales para programacion de plantas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriarte, Adolfo [Catamarca, (Argentina); Lesino, Gabriela [Buenos Aires, (Argentina); Matias, Cesar [Catamarca, (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    A special tax reduction to promote agricultural investments in the Province of Catamarca in Argentina has created a strong demand of high quality plants of olive (Olea europea L.), walnut (Junglans regia L.) and fig (Ficus carica L.) trees. The method used for plant propagation consists of three stages: rooting of stem cuttings (two months), growth under controlled conditions in a greenhouse (four to five months) and rustication and acclimatization to outdoor conditions in a half-shadow protected area (three to four months). The plant is ready to be transferred to the field in nine to ten months. The rooting stage cannot take place outdoors in hot, arid and windy climates. This paper refers to the design, construction and monitoring of a building where the ambient temperature, humidity and illumination levels are controlled to promote the growth of roots, maintain the stem hydrated and allow restrained photosynthetic activity. Excellent thermal and agronomic results were obtained with rooting efficiencies of 43 to 75 % in summer and 30 to 60 % in winter for olive stems. [Spanish] La necesidad de produccion de olivo (Olea europea L.), nogal (Junglans regia L.) e higueras (Ficus carica L.) de alta calidad para satisfacer la demanda de los establecimientos agropecuarios, ha obligado a utilizar para la produccion de plantas la tecnica de enraizamiento de estacas semilenosas, lo que permite obtener plantas identicas a la planta madre. En regiones de climas calidos y ventosos los factores climaticos externos dificultan el control y mantenimiento de las condiciones ambientales dentro de los recintos destinados a la produccion de plantas mediante estacas. Esto exige disponer de una camara que permita controlar la temperatura y la humedad simultaneamente obtener niveles de iluminacion natural compatible con las necesidades fotosinteticas de las estacas. En el presente trabajo se describen los aspectos constructivos de una casa de vegetacion, analizandose el balance de calor

  12. Conditional mutation of Smc5 in mouse embryonic stem cells perturbs condensin localization and mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryzhkova, Marina V; Jordan, Philip W

    2016-04-15

    Correct duplication of stem cell genetic material and its appropriate segregation into daughter cells are requisites for tissue, organ and organism homeostasis. Disruption of stem cell genomic integrity can lead to developmental abnormalities and cancer. Roles of the Smc5/6 structural maintenance of chromosomes complex in pluripotent stem cell genome maintenance have not been investigated, despite its important roles in DNA synthesis, DNA repair and chromosome segregation as evaluated in other model systems. Using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) with a conditional knockout allele of Smc5, we showed that Smc5 protein depletion resulted in destabilization of the Smc5/6 complex, accumulation of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Detailed assessment of mitotic mESCs revealed abnormal condensin distribution and perturbed chromosome segregation, accompanied by irregular spindle morphology, lagging chromosomes and DNA bridges. Mutation of Smc5 resulted in retention of Aurora B kinase and enrichment of condensin on chromosome arms. Furthermore, we observed reduced levels of Polo-like kinase 1 at kinetochores during mitosis. Our study reveals crucial requirements of the Smc5/6 complex during cell cycle progression and for stem cell genome maintenance. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Functional structure of the bromeliad tank microbiome is strongly shaped by local geochemical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louca, Stilianos; Jacques, Saulo M S; Pires, Aliny P F; Leal, Juliana S; González, Angélica L; Doebeli, Michael; Farjalla, Vinicius F

    2017-08-01

    Phytotelmata in tank-forming Bromeliaceae plants are regarded as potential miniature models for aquatic ecology, but detailed investigations of their microbial communities are rare. Hence, the biogeochemistry in bromeliad tanks remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the structure of bacterial and archaeal communities inhabiting the detritus within the tanks of two bromeliad species, Aechmea nudicaulis and Neoregelia cruenta, from a Brazilian sand dune forest. We used metagenomic sequencing for functional community profiling and 16S sequencing for taxonomic profiling. We estimated the correlation between functional groups and various environmental variables, and compared communities between bromeliad species. In all bromeliads, microbial communities spanned a metabolic network adapted to oxygen-limited conditions, including all denitrification steps, ammonification, sulfate respiration, methanogenesis, reductive acetogenesis and anoxygenic phototrophy. Overall, CO2 reducers dominated in abundance over sulfate reducers, and anoxygenic phototrophs largely outnumbered oxygenic photoautotrophs. Functional community structure correlated strongly with environmental variables, between and within a single bromeliad species. Methanogens and reductive acetogens correlated with detrital volume and canopy coverage, and exhibited higher relative abundances in N. cruenta. A comparison of bromeliads to freshwater lake sediments and soil from around the world, revealed stark differences in terms of taxonomic as well as functional microbial community structure. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Enstrophy transport conditional on local flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Papapostolou, Vassilios

    2017-09-11

    Enstrophy is an intrinsic feature of turbulent flows, and its transport properties are essential for the understanding of premixed flame-turbulence interaction. The interrelation between the enstrophy transport and flow topologies, which can be assigned to eight categories based on the three invariants of the velocity-gradient tensor, has been analysed here. The enstrophy transport conditional on flow topologies in turbulent premixed flames has been analysed using a Direct Numerical Simulation database representing the corrugated flamelets (CF), thin reaction zones (TRZ) and broken reaction zones (BRZ) combustion regimes. The flame in the CF regime exhibits considerable flame-generated enstrophy, and the dilatation rate and baroclinic torque contributions to the enstrophy transport act as leading order sink and source terms, respectively. Consequently, flow topologies associated with positive dilatation rate values, contribute significantly to the enstrophy transport in the CF regime. By contrast, enstrophy decreases from the unburned to the burned gas side for the cases representing the TRZ and BRZ regimes, with diminishing influences of dilatation rate and baroclinic torque. The enstrophy transport in the TRZ and BRZ regimes is governed by the vortex-stretching and viscous dissipation contributions, similar to non-reacting flows, and topologies existing for all values of dilatation rate remain significant contributors.

  15. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium with the Jigsaw Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooperative learning (jigsaw) versus individual learning methods on students’ understanding of chemical equilibrium in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in two different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was randomly assigned as the non-jigsaw group (control) and other as the jigsaw group (cooperative). Students participating in the jigsaw group were divided into four “home groups” since the topic chemical equilibrium is divided into four subtopics (Modules A, B, C and D). Each of these home groups contained four students. The groups were as follows: (1) Home Group A (HGA), representin g the equilibrium state and quantitative aspects of equilibrium (Module A), (2) Home Group B (HGB), representing the equilibrium constant and relationships involving equilibrium constants (Module B), (3) Home Group C (HGC), representing Altering Equilibrium Conditions: Le Chatelier’s principle (Module C), and (4) Home Group D (HGD), representing calculations with equilibrium constants (Module D). The home groups then broke apart, like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, and the students moved into jigsaw groups consisting of members from the other home groups who were assigned the same portion of the material. The jigsaw groups were then in charge of teaching their specific subtopic to the rest of the students in their learning group. The main data collection tool was a Chemical Equilibrium Achievement Test (CEAT), which was applied to both the jigsaw and non-jigsaw groups The results indicated that the jigsaw group was more successful than the non-jigsaw group (individual learning method).

  16. Dissipation and the relaxation to equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Denis J; Williams, Stephen R; Searles, Debra J

    2009-01-01

    Using the recently derived dissipation theorem and a corollary of the transient fluctuation theorem (TFT), namely the second-law inequality, we derive the unique time independent, equilibrium phase space distribution function for an ergodic Hamiltonian system in contact with a remote heat bath. We prove under very general conditions that any deviation from this equilibrium distribution breaks the time independence of the distribution. Provided temporal correlations decay, we show that any nonequilibrium distribution that is an even function of the momenta eventually relaxes (not necessarily monotonically) to the equilibrium distribution. Finally we prove that the negative logarithm of the microscopic partition function is equal to the thermodynamic Helmholtz free energy divided by the thermodynamic temperature and Boltzmann's constant. Our results complement and extend the findings of modern ergodic theory and show the importance of dissipation in the process of relaxation towards equilibrium

  17. Computation of Phase Equilibrium and Phase Envelopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritschel, Tobias Kasper Skovborg; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    formulate the involved equations in terms of the fugacity coefficients. We present expressions for the first-order derivatives. Such derivatives are necessary in computationally efficient gradient-based methods for solving the vapor-liquid equilibrium equations and for computing phase envelopes. Finally, we......In this technical report, we describe the computation of phase equilibrium and phase envelopes based on expressions for the fugacity coefficients. We derive those expressions from the residual Gibbs energy. We consider 1) ideal gases and liquids modeled with correlations from the DIPPR database...... and 2) nonideal gases and liquids modeled with cubic equations of state. Next, we derive the equilibrium conditions for an isothermal-isobaric (constant temperature, constant pressure) vapor-liquid equilibrium process (PT flash), and we present a method for the computation of phase envelopes. We...

  18. CHMTRNS, Non-Equilibrium Chemical Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorishad, J.; Carnahan, C.L.; Benson, L.V.

    1998-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CHMTRNS simulates solute transport for steady one-dimensional fluid flow by convection and diffusion or dispersion in a saturated porous medium based on the assumption of local chemical equilibrium. The chemical interactions included in the model are aqueous-phase complexation, solid-phase ion exchange of bare ions and complexes using the surface complexation model, and precipitation or dissolution of solids. The program can simulate the kinetic dissolution or precipitation for calcite and silica as well as irreversible dissolution of glass. Thermodynamic parameters are temperature dependent and are coupled to a companion heat transport simulator; thus, the effects of transient temperature conditions can be considered. Options for oxidation-reduction (redox) and C-13 fractionation as well as non-isothermal conditions are included. 2 - Method of solution: The governing equations for both reactive chemical and heat transport are discretized in time and space. For heat transport, the Crank-Nicolson approximation is used in conjunction with a LU decomposition and backward substitution solution procedure. To deal with the strong nonlinearity of the chemical transport equations, a generalized Newton-Raphson method is used

  19. Isotope effects in the equilibrium and non-equilibrium vaporization of tritiated water and ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgaertner, F.; Kim, M.-A.

    1990-01-01

    The vaporization isotope effect of the HTO/H 2 O system has been measured at various temperatures and pressures under equilibrium as well as non-equilibrium conditions. The isotope effect values measured in equilibrium sublimation or distillation are in good agreement with the theoretical values based on the harmonic oscillator model. In non-equilibrium vaporization at low temperatures ( 0 C), the isotope effect decreases rapidly with decreasing system pressure and becomes negligible when the system pressure is lowered more than one tenth of the equilibrium vapor pressure. At higher temperatures, the isotope effect decreases very slowly with decreasing system pressure. Discussion is extended for the application of the present results to the study of biological enrichment of tritium. (author)

  20. Microeconomics : Equilibrium and Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Raa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Microeconomics: Equilibrium and Efficiency teaches how to apply microeconomic theory in an innovative, intuitive and concise way. Using real-world, empirical examples, this book not only covers the building blocks of the subject, but helps gain a broad understanding of microeconomic theory and

  1. Differential Equation of Equilibrium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. Analysis of underground circular cylindrical shell is carried out in this work. The forth order differential equation of equilibrium, comparable to that of beam on elastic foundation, was derived from static principles on the assumptions of P. L Pasternak. Laplace transformation was used to solve the governing ...

  2. Comments on equilibrium, transient equilibrium, and secular equilibrium in serial radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Equations describing serial radioactive decay are reviewed along with published descriptions or transient and secular equilibrium. It is shown that terms describing equilibrium are not used in the same way by various authors. Specific definitions are proposed; they suggest that secular equilibrium is a subset of transient equilibrium

  3. Carbon monoxide distributions from the upper troposphere to the mesosphere inferred from 4.7 μm non-local thermal equilibrium emissions measured by MIPAS on Envisat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Funke

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present global distributions of carbon monoxide (CO from the upper troposphere to the mesosphere observed by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on Envisat. Vertically resolved volume mixing ratio profiles have been retrieved from 4.7 μm limb emission spectra under consideration of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium. The precision of individual CO profiles is typically 5–30 ppbv (15–40% for altitudes greater than 40 km and lower than 15 km and 30–90% within 15–40 km. Estimated systematic errors are in the order of 8–15%. Below 60 km, the vertical resolution is 4–7 km. The data set which covers 54 days from September 2003 to March 2004 has been derived with an improved retrieval version including (i the retrieval of log(vmr, (ii the consideration of illumination-dependent vibrational population gradients along the instrument's line of sight, and (iii joint-fitted vmr horizontal gradients in latitudinal and longitudinal directions. A detailed analysis of spatially resolved CO distributions during the 2003/2004 Northern Hemisphere major warming event demonstrate the potential of MIPAS CO observations to obtain new information on transport processes during dynamical active episodes, particularly on those acting in the vertical. From the temporal evolution of zonally averaged CO abundances, we derived extraordinary polar winter descent velocities of 1200 m per day inside the recovered polar vortex in January 2004. Middle stratospheric CO abundances show a well established correlation with the chemical source CH4, particularly in the tropics. In the upper troposphere, a moderate CO decrease from September 2003 to March 2004 was observed. Upper tropospheric CO observations provide a detailed picture of long-range transport of polluted air masses and uplift events. MIPAS observations taken on 9–11 September 2003 confirm the trapping of convective outflow of polluted CO-rich air from

  4. Conditional estimation of local pooled dispersion parameter in small-sample RNA-Seq data improves differential expression test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Jungsoo; Won, Sungho; Park, Taesung

    2016-10-01

    High throughput sequencing technology in transcriptomics studies contribute to the understanding of gene regulation mechanism and its cellular function, but also increases a need for accurate statistical methods to assess quantitative differences between experiments. Many methods have been developed to account for the specifics of count data: non-normality, a dependence of the variance on the mean, and small sample size. Among them, the small number of samples in typical experiments is still a challenge. Here we present a method for differential analysis of count data, using conditional estimation of local pooled dispersion parameters. A comprehensive evaluation of our proposed method in the aspect of differential gene expression analysis using both simulated and real data sets shows that the proposed method is more powerful than other existing methods while controlling the false discovery rates. By introducing conditional estimation of local pooled dispersion parameters, we successfully overcome the limitation of small power and enable a powerful quantitative analysis focused on differential expression test with the small number of samples.

  5. Groundwater flow analysis on local scale. Setting boundary conditions for groundwater flow analysis on site scale model in step 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Takuya; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Onoe, Hironori

    2005-05-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute has been conducting a wide range of geoscientific research in order to build a foundation for multidisciplinary studies of the deep geological environment as a basis of research and development for geological disposal of nuclear wastes. Ongoing geoscientific research programs include the Regional Hydrogeological Study (RHS) project and Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) project in the Tono region, Gifu Prefecture. The main goal of these projects is to establish comprehensive techniques for investigation, analysis, and assessment of the deep geological environment at several spatial scales. The RHS project is a local scale study for understanding the groundwater flow system from the recharge area to the discharge area. The surface-based Investigation Phase of the MIU project is a site scale study for understanding the groundwater flow system immediately surrounding the MIU construction site. The MIU project is being conducted using a multiphase, iterative approach. In this study, the hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis of the local scale were carried out in order to set boundary conditions of the site scale model based on the data obtained from surface-based investigations in Step 1 in site scale of the MIU project. As a result of the study, head distribution to set boundary conditions for groundwater flow analysis on the site scale model could be obtained. (author)

  6. Pre-equilibrium plasma dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, U.

    1986-01-01

    Approaches towards understanding and describing the pre-equilibrium stage of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. Focus is on a kinetic theory approach to non-equilibrium dynamics, its extension to include the dynamics of color degrees of freedom when applied to the quark-gluon plasma, its quantum field theoretical foundations, and its relationship to both the particle formation stage at the very beginning of the nuclear collision and the hydrodynamic stage at late collision times. The usefulness of this approach to obtain the transport coefficients in the quark-gluon plasma and to derive the collective mode spectrum and damping rates in this phase are discussed. Comments are made on the general difficulty to find appropriated initial conditions to get the kinetic theory started, and a specific model is given that demonstrates that, once given such initial conditions, the system can be followed all the way through into the hydrodynamical regime. 39 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  7. Pre-equilibrium plasma dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, U.

    1986-01-01

    Approaches towards understanding and describing the pre-equilibrium stage of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. Focus is on a kinetic theory approach to non-equilibrium dynamics, its extension to include the dynamics of color degrees of freedom when applied to the quark-gluon plasma, its quantum field theoretical foundations, and its relationship to both the particle formation stage at the very beginning of the nuclear collision and the hydrodynamic stage at late collision times. The usefulness of this approach to obtain the transport coefficients in the quark-gluon plasma and to derive the collective mode spectrum and damping rates in this phase are discussed. Comments are made on the general difficulty to find appropriated initial conditions to get the kinetic theory started, and a specific model is given that demonstrates that, once given such initial conditions, the system can be followed all the way through into the hydrodynamical regime. 39 refs., 7 figs

  8. Estimation of equilibrium factors of radon and its progeny using SSNTDs in the various dwellings of Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadagiri Reddy, P.; Rama Reddy, K.; Sreenath Reddy, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the estimation of effective dose in the indoor environment due to Radon and its progeny the equilibrium factor (F) plays a significant role. It is the radioactive equilibrium between radon and its short-lived decay products. Generally in the dose estimation is made taking the equilibrium factor 0.4 (UNSCEAR value) for the radon and its progeny. But in practice the concentration of radon and its progeny vary significantly with local environmental conditions and time, subsequently the equilibrium factor F also changes and hence affects the effective dose estimation of a particular dwelling. Therefore the UNSCEAR F value does not reflect the actual effective doses. Therefore, the present study is carried out to estimate the equilibrium factors in different types of dwellings in the urban Hyderabad using SSNTDs. It is found that, the equilibrium factors in the urban Hyderabad vary from 0.01 to 0.71 with an average 0.32 ± 0.23. The average F values of urban Hyderabad relatively lower than Indian average and global average. The reasons for the lower equilibrium factor values in the study area have been discussed in this paper. (author)

  9. Dynamics and local boundary properties of the dawn-side magnetopause under conditions observed by Equator-S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Dunlop

    Full Text Available Magnetic field measurements, taken by the magnetometer experiment (MAM on board the German Equator-S spacecraft, have been used to identify and categorise 131 crossings of the dawn-side magnetopause at low latitude, providing unusual, long duration coverage of the adjacent magnetospheric regions and near magnetosheath. The crossings occurred on 31 orbits, providing unbiased coverage over the full range of local magnetic shear from 06:00 to 10:40 LT. Apogee extent places the spacecraft in conditions associated with intermediate, rather than low, solar wind dynamic pressure, as it processes into the flank region. The apogee of the spacecraft remains close to the magnetopause for mean solar wind pressure. The occurrence of the magnetopause encounters are summarised and are found to compare well with predicted boundary location, where solar wind conditions are known. Most scale with solar wind pressure. Magnetopause shape is also documented and we find that the magnetopause orientation is consistently sunward of a model boundary and is not accounted for by IMF or local magnetic shear conditions. A number of well-established crossings, particularly those at high magnetic shear, or exhibiting unusually high-pressure states, were observed and have been analysed for their boundary characteristics and some details of their boundary and near magnetosheath properties are discussed. Of particular note are the occurrence of mirror-like signatures in the adjacent magnetosheath during a significant fraction of the encounters and a high number of multiple crossings over a long time period. The latter is facilitated by the spacecraft orbit which is designed to remain in the near magnetosheath for average solar wind pressure. For most encounters, a well-ordered, tangential (draped magnetosheath field is observed and there is little evidence of large deviations in local boundary orientations. Two passes corresponding to close conjunctions of the Geotail spacecraft

  10. Effects of local and spatial conditions on the quality of harvested rainwater in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbers, Gert-Jan; Sebesvari, Zita; Rechenburg, Andrea; Renaud, Fabrice G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the quality of harvested rainwater in the Mekong Delta (MD), Vietnam for local (roof types, storage system and duration) and spatial (proximity of industry, main roads, coastline) conditions. 78 harvested rainwater samples were collected in the MD and analyzed for pH, turbidity, TDS, COD, nutrients (NH 4 , NO 3 , NO 2 , o-PO 4 ), trace metals and coliforms. The results show that thatch roofs lead to an increase of pollutants like COD (max 23.2 mgl −1 ) and turbidity (max 10.1 mgl −1 ) whereas galvanized roofs lead to an increase of Zn (max 2.2 mgl −1 ). The other local and spatial parameters had no or only minor influence on the quality of household harvested rainwater. However, lead (Pb) (max. 16.9 μgl −1 ) and total coliforms (max. 102 500 CFU100 ml −1 ) were recorded at high concentrations, probably due to a variety of household-specific conditions such as rainwater storage, collection and handling practices. -- Highlights: •Rainwater is a main drinking water source in the Mekong Delta. •Harvested rainwater is severely polluted for turbidity, lead and (total) coliforms. •Roof types significantly affect the quality of harvested rainwater. •Effects of household conditions on harvested rainwater quality should be further assessed. •Harvested rainwater is in potential a safe drinking water resource in the Mekong Delta. -- Concentrations of lead and total coliforms in household-harvested rainwater in the Mekong Delta exceed drinking water guidelines in 17% and 92% of the samples, respectively

  11. Equilibrium and pre-equilibrium emissions in proton-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    necessary for the domain of fission-reactor technology for the calculation of nuclear transmutation ... tions occur in three stages: INC, pre-equilibrium and equilibrium (or compound. 344. Pramana ... In the evaporation phase of the reaction, the.

  12. Gated equilibrium bloodpool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinders Folmer, S.C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with the clinical applications of gated equilibrium bloodpool scintigraphy, performed with either a gamma camera or a portable detector system, the nuclear stethoscope. The main goal has been to define the value and limitations of noninvasive measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction as a parameter of cardiac performance in various disease states, both for diagnostic purposes as well as during follow-up after medical or surgical intervention. Secondly, it was attempted to extend the use of the equilibrium bloodpool techniques beyond the calculation of ejection fraction alone by considering the feasibility to determine ventricular volumes and by including the possibility of quantifying valvular regurgitation. In both cases, it has been tried to broaden the perspective of the observations by comparing them with results of other, invasive and non-invasive, procedures, in particular cardiac catheterization, M-mode echocardiography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. (Auth.)

  13. Problems in equilibrium theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aliprantis, Charalambos D

    1996-01-01

    In studying General Equilibrium Theory the student must master first the theory and then apply it to solve problems. At the graduate level there is no book devoted exclusively to teaching problem solving. This book teaches for the first time the basic methods of proof and problem solving in General Equilibrium Theory. The problems cover the entire spectrum of difficulty; some are routine, some require a good grasp of the material involved, and some are exceptionally challenging. The book presents complete solutions to two hundred problems. In searching for the basic required techniques, the student will find a wealth of new material incorporated into the solutions. The student is challenged to produce solutions which are different from the ones presented in the book.

  14. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, E Atlee

    2000-01-01

    Ideal as an elementary introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics, this volume covers both classical and quantum methodology for open and closed systems. Introductory chapters familiarize readers with probability and microscopic models of systems, while additional chapters describe the general derivation of the fundamental statistical mechanics relationships. The final chapter contains 16 sections, each dealing with a different application, ordered according to complexity, from classical through degenerate quantum statistical mechanics. Key features include an elementary introduction t

  15. Volatility in Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Sizova, Natalia; Tauchen, George

    Stock market volatility clusters in time, carries a risk premium, is fractionally inte- grated, and exhibits asymmetric leverage effects relative to returns. This paper develops a first internally consistent equilibrium based explanation for these longstanding empirical facts. The model is cast i......, and the dynamic cross-correlations of the volatility measures with the returns calculated from actual high-frequency intra-day data on the S&P 500 aggregate market and VIX volatility indexes....

  16. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, C.M.; Huebner, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated. 18 refs

  17. Interfaces at equilibrium: A guide to fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmur, Abraham

    2017-06-01

    The fundamentals of the thermodynamics of interfaces are reviewed and concisely presented. The discussion starts with a short review of the elements of bulk thermodynamics that are also relevant to interfaces. It continues with the interfacial thermodynamics of two-phase systems, including the definition of interfacial tension and adsorption. Finally, the interfacial thermodynamics of three-phase (wetting) systems is discussed, including the topic of non-wettable surfaces. A clear distinction is made between equilibrium conditions, in terms of minimizing energies (internal, Gibbs or Helmholtz), and equilibrium indicators, in terms of measurable, intrinsic properties (temperature, chemical potential, pressure). It is emphasized that the equilibrium indicators are the same whatever energy is minimized, if the boundary conditions are properly chosen. Also, to avoid a common confusion, a distinction is made between systems of constant volume and systems with drops of constant volume. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Oppositely charged colloids out of equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, T.

    2010-11-01

    Colloids are particles with a size in the range of a few nanometers up to several micrometers. Similar to atomic and molecular systems, they can form gases, liquids, solids, gels and glasses. Colloids can be used as model systems because, unlike molecules, they are sufficiently large to be studied directly with light microscopy and move sufficiently slow to study their dynamics. In this thesis, we study binary systems of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) colloidal particles suspended in low-polar solvent mixtures. Since the ions can still partially dissociate, a surface charge builds up which causes electrostatic interactions between the colloids. By carefully tuning the conditions inside the suspension, we make two kinds of particles oppositely charged. To study our samples, we use Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). The positively and negatively charged particles can be distinguished by a different fluorescent dye. Colloids constantly experience a random motion resulting from random kicks of surrounding solvent molecules. When the attractions between the oppositely charged particles are weak, the particles can attach and detach many times and explore a lot of possible configurations and the system can reach thermodynamic equilibrium. For example, colloidal ‘ionic’ crystals consisting of thousands to millions of particles can form under the right conditions. When the attractions are strong, the system can become kinetically trapped inside a gel-like state. We observe that when the interactions change again, crystals can even emerge again from this gel-like phase. By using local order parameters, we quantitatively study the crystallization of colloidal particles and identify growth defects inside the crystals. We also study the effect of gravity on the growth of ionic crystals by using a rotating stage. We find that sedimentation can completely inhibit crystal growth and plays an important role in crystallization from the gel-like state. The surface

  19. Mapping local structural perturbations in the native state of stefin B (cystatin B under amyloid forming conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eParamore

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike a number of amyloid-forming proteins, stefins, in particular stefin B (cystatin B form amyloids under conditions where the native state predominates. In order to trigger oligomerization processes, the stability of the protein needs to be compromised, favoring structural re-arrangement however, accelerating fibril formation is not a simple function of protein stability. We report here on how optimal conditions for amyloid formation lead to the destabilization of dimeric and tetrameric states of the protein in favor of the monomer. Small, highly localized structural changes can be mapped out that allow us to visualize directly areas of the protein which eventually become responsible for triggering amyloid formation. These regions of the protein overlap with the Cu (II-binding sites which we identify here for the first time. We hypothesize that in vivo modulators of amyloid formation may act similarly to painstakingly optimized solvent conditions developed in vitro. We discuss these data in the light of current structural models of stefin B amyloid fibrils based on H-exchange data, where the detachment of the helical part and the extension of loops were observed.

  20. Conditioned pain modulation in patients with nonspecific chronic back pain with chronic local pain, chronic widespread pain, and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Andreas; Eich, Wolfgang; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Tesarz, Jonas

    2017-03-01

    Findings considering conditioned pain modulation (CPM) in chronic back pain (CBP) are contradictory. This might be because many patients with CBP report pain in further areas of the body, and altered CPM might influence spatial extent of pain rather than CBP per se. Therefore, we compared CPM in patients with CBP with different pain extent. Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), for whom CPM impairment is reported most consistently, were measured for comparison. Based on clinical evaluation and pain drawings, patients were categorized into chronic local back pain (CLP; n = 53), chronic widespread back pain (CWP; n = 32), and FMS (n = 92). Conditioned pain modulation was measured by the difference in pressure pain threshold (test stimuli) at the lower back before and after tonic heat pain (conditioning stimulus). We also measured psychosocial variables. Pressure pain threshold was significantly increased in CLP patients after tonic heat pain (P pain modulation in CLP was significantly higher than that in CWP and FMS (P painful areas (0-10) were associated with lower CPM (r = 0.346, P = 0.001) in CBP but not in FMS (r = -0.013, P = 0.903). Anxiety and depression were more pronounced in FMS than in CLP or CWP (P values pain inhibition seem to be more indicated the higher the pain extent.

  1. Non-Equilibrium Radiative Transfer in Structured Atmospheres

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Picard, R. H; Winick, J. R; Wintersteiner, P. P

    2002-01-01

    ... passage of both atmospheric gravity waves and transient frontal disturbances or bores. The infrared emissions from this part of the atmosphere are already typically not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE...

  2. Noncompact Equilibrium Points and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Al-Rumaih

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove an equilibrium existence result for vector functions defined on noncompact domain and we give some applications in optimization and Nash equilibrium in noncooperative game.

  3. Equilibrium thermodynamics - Callen's postulational approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongschaap, R.J.J.; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2001-01-01

    In order to provide the background for nonequilibrium thermodynamics, we outline the fundamentals of equilibrium thermodynamics. Equilibrium thermodynamics must not only be obtained as a special case of any acceptable nonequilibrium generalization but, through its shining example, it also elucidates

  4. Multi-period equilibrium/near-equilibrium in electricity markets based on locational marginal prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Bertrand, Raquel

    In this dissertation we propose an equilibrium procedure that coordinates the point of view of every market agent resulting in an equilibrium that simultaneously maximizes the independent objective of every market agent and satisfies network constraints. Therefore, the activities of the generating companies, consumers and an independent system operator are modeled: (1) The generating companies seek to maximize profits by specifying hourly step functions of productions and minimum selling prices, and bounds on productions. (2) The goals of the consumers are to maximize their economic utilities by specifying hourly step functions of demands and maximum buying prices, and bounds on demands. (3) The independent system operator then clears the market taking into account consistency conditions as well as capacity and line losses so as to achieve maximum social welfare. Then, we approach this equilibrium problem using complementarity theory in order to have the capability of imposing constraints on dual variables, i.e., on prices, such as minimum profit conditions for the generating units or maximum cost conditions for the consumers. In this way, given the form of the individual optimization problems, the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions for the generating companies, the consumers and the independent system operator are both necessary and sufficient. The simultaneous solution to all these conditions constitutes a mixed linear complementarity problem. We include minimum profit constraints imposed by the units in the market equilibrium model. These constraints are added as additional constraints to the equivalent quadratic programming problem of the mixed linear complementarity problem previously described. For the sake of clarity, the proposed equilibrium or near-equilibrium is first developed for the particular case considering only one time period. Afterwards, we consider an equilibrium or near-equilibrium applied to a multi-period framework. This model embodies binary

  5. Partial chemical equilibrium in fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is given for the flow of a multicomponent fluid in which an arbitrary number of chemical reactions may occur, some of which are in equilibrium while the others proceed kinetically. The primitive equations describing this situation are inconvenient to use because the progress rates omega-dot/sub s/ for the equilibrium reactions are determined implicitly by the associated equilibrium constraint conditions. Two alternative equivalent equation systems that are more pleasant to deal with are derived. In the first system, the omega-dot/sub s/ are eliminated by replacing the transport equations for the chemical species involved in the equilibrium reactions with transport equations for the basic components of which these species are composed. The second system retains the usual species transport equations, but eliminates the nonlinear algebraic equilibrium constraint conditions by deriving an explicit expression for the omega-dot/sub s/. Both systems are specialized to the case of an ideal gas mixture. Considerations involved in solving these equation systems numerically are discussed briefly

  6. Nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions regulate thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) expression and thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1) nuclear localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Fernando Toshio; Batista, Wagner Luiz; Sartori, Adriano; Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Masutani, Hiroshi; Arai, Roberto Jun; Yodoi, Junji; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo Pequeno

    2013-01-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX-1) is a multifunctional protein that controls the redox status of other proteins. TRX-1 can be found in the extracellular milieu, cytoplasm and nucleus, and it has distinct functions in each environment. Previously, we studied the intracellular localization of TRX-1 and its relationship with the activation of the p21Ras-ERK1/2 MAP Kinases signaling pathway. In situations where this pathway was activated by stress conditions evoked by a nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), TRX-1 accumulated in the nuclear compartment due to nitrosylation of p21Ras and activation of downstream ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Presently, we demonstrate that ERK1/2 MAP Kinases activation and spatial distribution within cells trigger TRX-1 nuclear translocation through down-regulation of the physiological inhibitor of TRX-1, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein (TXNIP). Once activated by the oxidants, SNAP and H₂O₂, the ERK1/2 MAP kinases migrate to the nucleus. This is correlated with down-regulation of TXNIP. In the presence of the MEK inhibitors (PD98059 or UO126), or in cells transfected with the Protein Enriched in Astrocytes (PEA-15), a cytoplasmic anchor of ERK1/2 MAP kinases, TRX-1 nuclear migration and TXNIP down-regulation are no longer observed in cells exposed to oxidants. On the other hand, over-expression of TXNIP abolishes nuclear migration of TRX-1 under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions, whereas gene silencing of TXNIP facilitates nuclear migration even in the absence of stress conditions. Studies based on the TXNIP promoter support this regulation. In conclusion, changes in TRX-1 compartmentalization under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions are dependent on the expression levels of TXNIP, which are regulated by cellular compartmentalization and activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases.

  7. Nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions regulate thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP expression and thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1 nuclear localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Toshio Ogata

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin (TRX-1 is a multifunctional protein that controls the redox status of other proteins. TRX-1 can be found in the extracellular milieu, cytoplasm and nucleus, and it has distinct functions in each environment. Previously, we studied the intracellular localization of TRX-1 and its relationship with the activation of the p21Ras-ERK1/2 MAP Kinases signaling pathway. In situations where this pathway was activated by stress conditions evoked by a nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP, TRX-1 accumulated in the nuclear compartment due to nitrosylation of p21Ras and activation of downstream ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Presently, we demonstrate that ERK1/2 MAP Kinases activation and spatial distribution within cells trigger TRX-1 nuclear translocation through down-regulation of the physiological inhibitor of TRX-1, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein (TXNIP. Once activated by the oxidants, SNAP and H₂O₂, the ERK1/2 MAP kinases migrate to the nucleus. This is correlated with down-regulation of TXNIP. In the presence of the MEK inhibitors (PD98059 or UO126, or in cells transfected with the Protein Enriched in Astrocytes (PEA-15, a cytoplasmic anchor of ERK1/2 MAP kinases, TRX-1 nuclear migration and TXNIP down-regulation are no longer observed in cells exposed to oxidants. On the other hand, over-expression of TXNIP abolishes nuclear migration of TRX-1 under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions, whereas gene silencing of TXNIP facilitates nuclear migration even in the absence of stress conditions. Studies based on the TXNIP promoter support this regulation. In conclusion, changes in TRX-1 compartmentalization under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions are dependent on the expression levels of TXNIP, which are regulated by cellular compartmentalization and activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases.

  8. Large-scale vortex structures and local heat release in lean turbulent swirling jet-flames under vortex breakdown conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikishev, Leonid; Lobasov, Aleksei; Sharaborin, Dmitriy; Markovich, Dmitriy; Dulin, Vladimir; Hanjalic, Kemal

    2017-11-01

    We investigate flame-flow interactions in an atmospheric turbulent high-swirl methane/air lean jet-flame at Re from 5,000 to 10,000 and equivalence ratio below 0.75 at the conditions of vortex breakdown. The focus is on the spatial correlation between the propagation of large-scale vortex structures, including precessing vortex core, and the variations of the local heat release. The measurements are performed by planar laser-induced fluorescence of hydroxyl and formaldehyde, applied simultaneously with the stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique. The data are processed by the proper orthogonal decomposition. The swirl rate exceeded critical value for the vortex breakdown resulting in the formation of a processing vortex core and secondary helical vortex filaments that dominate the unsteady flow dynamics both of the non-reacting and reacting jet flows. The flame front is located in the inner mixing layer between the recirculation zone and the annular swirling jet. A pair of helical vortex structures, surrounding the flame, stretch it and cause local flame extinction before the flame is blown away. This work is supported by Russian Science Foundation (Grant No 16-19-10566).

  9. Adaptability to pain is associated with potency of local pain inhibition, but not conditioned pain modulation: a healthy human study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhen; Wang, Kelun; Yao, Dongyuan; Xue, Charlie C L; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between pain sensitivity, adaptability, and potency of endogenous pain inhibition, including conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and local pain inhibition. Forty-one healthy volunteers (20 male, 21 female) received conditioning stimulation (CS) over 2 sessions in a random order: tonic heat pain (46 °C) on the right leg for 7 minutes and cold pressor pain (1 °C to 4 °C) on the left hand for 5 minutes. Participants rated the intensity of pain continuously using a 0 to 10 electronic visual analogue scale. The primary outcome measures were pressure pain thresholds (PPT) measured at the heterotopic and homotopic location to the CS sites before, during, and 20 minutes after CS. Two groups of participants, pain adaptive and pain nonadaptive, were identified based on their response to pain in the cold pressor test. Pain-adaptive participants showed a pain reduction between peak pain and pain at end of the test by at least 2 of 10 (n=16); whereas the pain-nonadaptive participants reported unchanged peak pain during 5-minute CS (n=25). Heterotopic PPTs during the CS did not differ between the 2 groups. However, increased homotopic PPTs measured 20 minutes after CS correlated with the amount of pain reduction during CS. These results suggest that individual sensitivity and adaptability to pain does not correlate with the potency of CPM. Adaptability to pain is associated with longer-lasting local pain inhibition. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Equilibrium states for a plane incompressible perfect fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldrighini, C; Frigio, S [Camerino Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Matematica

    1980-01-01

    We associate to the plane incompressible Euler equation with periodic conditions the corresponding Hopf equation, as an equation for measures on the space of solenoidal distributions. We define equilibrium states as the solutions of the stationary Hopf equation. We find a class of equilibrium states which corresponds to a class of infinitely divisible distributions, and investigate the properties of gaussian and poissonian states. Equilibrium dynamics for a class of poissonian states is constructed by means of the Onsager vortex equations.

  11. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics…

  12. Calculating Shocks In Flows At Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Scott; Palmer, Grant

    1988-01-01

    Boundary conditions prove critical. Conference paper describes algorithm for calculation of shocks in hypersonic flows of gases at chemical equilibrium. Although algorithm represents intermediate stage in development of reliable, accurate computer code for two-dimensional flow, research leading up to it contributes to understanding of what is needed to complete task.

  13. Local expression of vaginal Th1 and Th2 cytokines in murine vaginal candidiasis under different immunity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanjuan; Li, Shaohua; Wu, Yan; Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Jiawen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal Th1 and Th2 cytokines in rats with experimental vaginal candidiasis under different immune conditions, ICR murine vaginal candidiasis model was established and immno-suppressed murine models of vaginal cadidiasis were established in estrogen-treated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls. The mRNA level of Th1 (IL-2)/Th2 (IL-4, IL-10, TGF-beta1) cytokines in murine vaginal tissues was determined by RT-PCR. The cykotine in local tissues was increased to different extent under normal immune condition. IL-2 mRNA was increased during early stage of infection, while IL-10 was increased transiently during late stage of infection. TGF-beta1 production was found to be increased persistently. At same time, the expression of IL-2 mRNA was suppressed in immno-suppressed group, and the level of IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-beta1 were higher than the normal immunity group to different degree during infection. The high level of IL-2 mRNA during early stage of infection was associated with clearance of mucosal Candidia albicans (C. albicans), and its expression suppressed leading to decreased clearance of mucosal C. albican in immuno-suppression. The over-expression of IL-4 and IL-10 could significantly enhance the susceptibility to C. albicans infection in mice.

  14. Analysis of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W.; Panesi, M., E-mail: mpanesi@illinois.edu [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61822 (United States); Lani, A. [Von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Rhode-Saint-Genèse (Belgium)

    2016-07-15

    This work addresses the modeling of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma discharges. In the proposed computational model, the electromagnetic induction equation is solved together with the set of Navier-Stokes equations in order to compute the electromagnetic and flow fields, accounting for their mutual interaction. Semi-classical statistical thermodynamics is used to determine the plasma thermodynamic properties, while transport properties are obtained from kinetic principles, with the method of Chapman and Enskog. Particle ambipolar diffusive fluxes are found by solving the Stefan-Maxwell equations with a simple iterative method. Two physico-mathematical formulations are used to model the chemical reaction processes: (1) A Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium (LTE) formulation and (2) a thermo-chemical non-equilibrium (TCNEQ) formulation. In the TCNEQ model, thermal non-equilibrium between the translational energy mode of the gas and the vibrational energy mode of individual molecules is accounted for. The electronic states of the chemical species are assumed in equilibrium with the vibrational temperature, whereas the rotational energy mode is assumed to be equilibrated with translation. Three different physical models are used to account for the coupling of chemistry and energy transfer processes. Numerical simulations obtained with the LTE and TCNEQ formulations are used to characterize the extent of non-equilibrium of the flow inside the Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute. Each model was tested using different kinetic mechanisms to assess the sensitivity of the results to variations in the reaction parameters. A comparison of temperatures and composition profiles at the outlet of the torch demonstrates that the flow is in non-equilibrium for operating conditions characterized by pressures below 30 000 Pa, frequency 0.37 MHz, input power 80 kW, and mass flow 8 g/s.

  15. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Groot, Sybren Ruurds

    1984-01-01

    The study of thermodynamics is especially timely today, as its concepts are being applied to problems in biology, biochemistry, electrochemistry, and engineering. This book treats irreversible processes and phenomena - non-equilibrium thermodynamics.S. R. de Groot and P. Mazur, Professors of Theoretical Physics, present a comprehensive and insightful survey of the foundations of the field, providing the only complete discussion of the fluctuating linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. The application covers a wide range of topics: the theory of diffusion and heat conduction, fluid dyn

  16. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium extraction separation of rare earth metals in presence of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid in aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azis, Abdul; Teramoto, Masaaki; Matsuyama, Hideto.

    1995-01-01

    Equilibrium and non-equilibrium extraction separations of rare earth metals were carried out in the presence of chelating agent in the aqueous phase. The separation systems of the rare earth metal mixtures used were Y/Dy, Y/Ho, Y/Er and Y/Tm, and the chelating agent and the extractant were diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and bis (2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid (CYANEXR 272), respectively. For Y/Dy and Y/Ho systems, higher selectivities were obtained in equilibrium separation compared with those in non-equilibrium separation. On the other hand, the selectivities in non-equilibrium separation were higher for Y/Er and Y/Tm systems. In the separation condition suitable to each system, the addition of DTPA to the aqueous phase was found to be very effective for obtaining higher selectivities. The distribution ratios of the rare earth metals and the selectivities in the equilibrium separations obtained experimentally were thoroughly analyzed by considering various equilibria such as the extraction equilibrium and the complex formation equilibrium between rare earth metals and DTPA in the aqueous phase. Moreover, the extraction rates and the selectivities in the non-equilibrium separations were also analyzed by the extraction model considering the dissociation reactions of the rare earth metal-DTPA complexes in the aqueous stagnant layer. Based on these analyses, we presented an index which is useful for selecting the optimum operation mode. Using this index, we can predict that the selectivities under equilibrium conditions are higher than those under non-equilibrium conditions for Y/Dy and Y/Ho systems, while for Y/Er and Y/Tm systems, higher selectivities are obtained under non-equilibrium conditions. The experimental results were in agreement with predictions by this index. Further, the selectivities in various systems including other chelating agents and extractants were discussed based on this index. (J.P.N.)

  17. Asymptotic stability estimates near an equilibrium point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, H. Scott; Meyer, Kenneth R.; Palacián, Jesús F.; Yanguas, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    We use the error bounds for adiabatic invariants found in the work of Chartier, Murua and Sanz-Serna [3] to bound the solutions of a Hamiltonian system near an equilibrium over exponentially long times. Our estimates depend only on the linearized system and not on the higher order terms as in KAM theory, nor do we require any steepness or convexity conditions as in Nekhoroshev theory. We require that the equilibrium point where our estimate applies satisfy a type of formal stability called Lie stability.

  18. Thermodynamic equilibrium in relativistic rotating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suen, W.M.; Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO; Young, K.

    1988-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium configurations of relativistic rotating stars are studied using the maximum entropy principle. It is shown that the heuristic arguments for the equilibrium conditions can be developed into a maximum entropy principle in which the variations are carried out in a fixed background spacetime. This maximum principle with the fixed background assumption is technically simpler than, but has to be justified by, a maximum entropy principle without the assumption. Such a maximum entropy principle is formulated in this paper, showing that the general relativistic system can be treated on the same footing as other long-range force systems. (author)

  19. Application of the 3D Iced-Ale method to equilibrium and stability problems of a magnetically confined plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.C.; Brackbill, J.U.

    1977-01-01

    A numerical study of the equilibrium and stability properties of the Scyllac experiment at Los Alamos is described. The formulation of the numerical method, which is an extension of the ICED-ALE method to magnetohydrodynamic flow in three dimensions, is given. The properties of the method are discussed, including low computational diffusion, local conservation, and implicit formulation in the time variable. Also discussed are the problems encountered in applying boundary conditions and computing equilibria. The results of numerical computations of equilibria indicate that the helical field amplitudes must be doubled from their design values to produce equilibrium in the Scyllac experiment. This is consistent with other theoretical and experimental results

  20. Non-equilibrium dynamics from RPMD and CMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Ralph; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang; Althorpe, Stuart C; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-11-28

    We investigate the calculation of approximate non-equilibrium quantum time correlation functions (TCFs) using two popular path-integral-based molecular dynamics methods, ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD). It is shown that for the cases of a sudden vertical excitation and an initial momentum impulse, both RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs for linear operators that are exact for high temperatures, in the t = 0 limit, and for harmonic potentials; the subset of these conditions that are preserved for non-equilibrium TCFs of non-linear operators is also discussed. Furthermore, it is shown that for these non-equilibrium initial conditions, both methods retain the connection to Matsubara dynamics that has previously been established for equilibrium initial conditions. Comparison of non-equilibrium TCFs from RPMD and CMD to Matsubara dynamics at short times reveals the orders in time to which the methods agree. Specifically, for the position-autocorrelation function associated with sudden vertical excitation, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O(t 4 ) and O(t 1 ), respectively; for the position-autocorrelation function associated with an initial momentum impulse, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O(t 5 ) and O(t 2 ), respectively. Numerical tests using model potentials for a wide range of non-equilibrium initial conditions show that RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs with an accuracy that is comparable to that for equilibrium TCFs. RPMD is also used to investigate excited-state proton transfer in a system-bath model, and it is compared to numerically exact calculations performed using a recently developed version of the Liouville space hierarchical equation of motion approach; again, similar accuracy is observed for non-equilibrium and equilibrium initial conditions.

  1. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Scaling studies of spheromak formation and equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geddes, C.G.; Kornack, T.W.; Brown, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Formation and equilibrium studies have been performed on the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Spheromaks are formed with a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and equilibrium is established in both small (d small =0.16 m) and large (d large =3d small =0.50 m) copper flux conservers. Using magnetic probe arrays it has been verified that spheromak formation is governed solely by gun physics (in particular the ratio of gun current to flux, μ 0 I gun /Φ gun ) and is independent of the flux conserver dimensions. It has also been verified that equilibrium is well described by the force free condition ∇xB=λB (λ=constant), particularly early in decay. Departures from the force-free state are due to current profile effects described by a quadratic function λ=λ(ψ). Force-free SSX spheromaks will be merged to study magnetic reconnection in simple magnetofluid structures. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  3. Pressure swing adsorption: experimental study of an equilibrium theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, J C; Knaebel, K S

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical model of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) processes that is based on local, linear equilibrium of a binary gas mixture with an adsorbent was experimentally tested under conditions supportive of the inherent assumptions and constraints. The components studied were nitrogen, oxygen and argon with 5A zeolite molecular sieve, at temperatures from 20 to 60/sup 0/C. Simple breakthrough experiments were analyzed to predict the slopes of the isotherms within 5.4% (mean absolute error) of actual equilibrium values. In two-bed PSA experiments at pressure ratios from 6.5 to 840, the recoveries of the light component (oxygen and argon) were within 7.1% (mean absolute error) of those predicted by theory. Typically, the feed rate to the process was about 2751 (STP)/kg h, based on the total mass of adsorbent. The light-component product purity averaged 99.6% (based on volume) and was never less than 99.2%, while theory predicts complete separation is possible. The results support the validity of the theoretical model for the conditions of the experiments.

  4. Structural Stability of Tokamak Equilibrium: Transport Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solano, E. R.

    2001-07-01

    A generalised theory of structural stability of differential equations is introduced and applied to the Grad-Shafranov equation. It is discussed how the formation and loss of transport barrier could be associated with the appearance/disappearance of equilibria. The equilibrium conjecture is presented: transport barriers are associated with locally diamagnetic regions in the plasma, and affected by the paramagnetism of the bootstrap current. (Author) 18 refs.

  5. Fruit development, pigmentation and biochemical properties of wax apple as affected by localized Application of GA3 under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moneruzzaman Khandaker

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of gibberellin (GA3 on the fruit development, pigmentation and biochemical properties of wax apple. The wax apple trees were rubbing treated with 0, 20, 50 and 100 mgGA3/l under field conditions. The localized application (rubbing of 50 mg GA3/l significantly increased the fruit set, fruit length and diameter, color development, weight and yieldcompared to the control. In addition, GA3 treatments significantly reduced the fruit drop. With regard to the fruit quality, 50 mg/l GA3 treatment increased the juice content, K+, TSS, total sugar and sugar acid ratio of wax apple fruits. In addition, higher vitamin C, phenol, flavonoid, anthocyanin, carotene content, PAL and antioxidant activities were recorded in the treated fruits. There was a positive correlation between the peel colour and TSS content and between the PAL activity and anthocyanin formation in the GA3-treated fruit. It was concluded that rubbing with 50 mg/L GA3 at inflorescence developing point of phloem once a week from the tiny inflorescence bud until the flower opening resulted in better yield and quality of wax apple fruits and could be an effective technique to safe the environment from excessive spray.

  6. Adaptive differentiation coincides with local bioclimatic conditions along an elevational cline in populations of a lichen-forming fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Grande, Francesco; Sharma, Rahul; Meiser, Anjuli; Rolshausen, Gregor; Büdel, Burkhard; Mishra, Bagdevi; Thines, Marco; Otte, Jürgen; Pfenninger, Markus; Schmitt, Imke

    2017-03-31

    Many fungal species occur across a variety of habitats. Particularly lichens, fungi forming symbioses with photosynthetic partners, have evolved remarkable tolerances for environmental extremes. Despite their ecological importance and ubiquity, little is known about the genetic basis of adaption in lichen populations. Here we studied patterns of genome-wide differentiation in the lichen-forming fungus Lasallia pustulata along an altitudinal gradient in the Mediterranean region. We resequenced six populations as pools and identified highly differentiated genomic regions. We then detected gene-environment correlations while controlling for shared population history and pooled sequencing bias, and performed ecophysiological experiments to assess fitness differences of individuals from different environments. We detected two strongly differentiated genetic clusters linked to Mediterranean and temperate-oceanic climate, and an admixture zone, which coincided with the transition between the two bioclimates. High altitude individuals showed ecophysiological adaptations to wetter and more shaded conditions. Highly differentiated genome regions contained a number of genes associated with stress response, local environmental adaptation, and sexual reproduction. Taken together our results provide evidence for a complex interplay between demographic history and spatially varying selection acting on a number of key biological processes, suggesting a scenario of ecological speciation.

  7. LOCAL MEASUREMENTS OF THE IMPACT OF QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF INVESTMENT AND TECHNOLOGICAL DECISIONS ON THE ENVIRONMENT UNDER THE RISK-RELATED CONDITIONS OF MINING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin VELEV

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of globalization in a worldwide scale is even more noticeable in the each country during period of world economic crisis due to the differences in the economic status, deformed by the crisis phenomena. In that case, the conflict between global tendencies and local manifestations in the regional aspect of economic phenomena is even more evidently noticeable as a direct reflection of the resource deficiency. The mineral resources are directly related to that process, not only as a first phase of the transformation of the raw material potential for each country, but also as a serious violator of the ecological equilibrium as a result of the applied technologies. Each country is enforced to resolve the various issues related to preserving the own resource potential as much as possible and to subordinate its investment and technological decisions to an integrated and in-depth utilization in compliance with the sustainable development of society

  8. Equilibrium models and variational inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Konnov, Igor

    2007-01-01

    The concept of equilibrium plays a central role in various applied sciences, such as physics (especially, mechanics), economics, engineering, transportation, sociology, chemistry, biology and other fields. If one can formulate the equilibrium problem in the form of a mathematical model, solutions of the corresponding problem can be used for forecasting the future behavior of very complex systems and, also, for correcting the the current state of the system under control. This book presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts in economics, including several models from related sciences.- Presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts and also the present state of investigations in this field- Describes static and dynamic input-output models, Walras, Cassel-Wald, spatial price, auction market, oligopolistic equilibrium models, transportation and migration equilibrium models- Covers the basics of theory and solution methods both for the complementarity and variational inequality probl...

  9. Iron corrosion in an anoxic soil: Comparison between thermodynamic modelling and ferrous archaeological artefacts characterised along with the local in situ geochemical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saheb, M.; Neff, D.; Michelin, A.; Dillmann, P. [CEA Saclay, CNRS, LAPA SIS2M, UMR3299, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Saheb, M. [ANDRA, F-92298 Chatenay Malabry (France); Descostes, M. [CEA Saclay, DEN DANS DPC SECR, Lab Radionuclides Migrat Measurements and Modelling, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Descostes, M. [Univ Evry, CEA, CNRS, UMR 8587, Evry (France); Dillmann, P. [CNRS, Inst Rech Archeomat, UMR 5060, F-75700 Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    This article is part of an ongoing study on the long-term corrosion behaviour of ferrous archaeological artefacts. The aim of this study is to correlate the corrosion products formed on ancient artefacts in an anoxic medium to the environmental data using thermodynamic modelling. For this purpose, measurement campaigns have been conducted on the archaeological site of Glinet (16. century, High Normandy (Seine-Maritime), France) where the evolution of the pore water chemistry has been recorded for a period of one year. Three evolution steps have been distinguished after the oxidizing perturbation which was induced by the piezometers installation. The first step was related to an oxidizing environment in which pore water was in equilibrium with a Fe(III) precipitated phase: ferri-hydrite (FeOOH center dot 0.4 H{sub 2}O). The second step was considered as an intermediate step and Fe speciation had evolved; equilibrium was achieved between ferri-hydrite and a Fe(II) carbonate phase: siderite (Fe(II)CO{sub 3}). The last step of the evolution was related to a reducing stage where pore water was in equilibrium with magnetite (Fe(II, III){sub 3}O{sub 4}) and with chukanovite (Fe(II){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}). As these phases were present in the corrosion layers formed on the archaeological samples, it is possible to conclude that the thermodynamic approach was helpful in developing a better understanding of the effect of geochemical conditions on the composition and mineralogy of the corrosion products formed on archaeological artefacts. This work could be used as a reference for further corrosion studies, especially on long-term corrosion processes applied to nuclear waste disposal. (authors)

  10. Equilibrium thermodynamics in modified gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, C.-Q.; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    We show that it is possible to obtain a picture of equilibrium thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in the expanding cosmological background for a wide class of modified gravity theories with the Lagrangian density f(R,φ,X), where R is the Ricci scalar and X is the kinetic energy of a scalar field φ. This comes from a suitable definition of an energy-momentum tensor of the 'dark' component that respects to a local energy conservation in the Jordan frame. In this framework the horizon entropy S corresponding to equilibrium thermodynamics is equal to a quarter of the horizon area A in units of gravitational constant G, as in Einstein gravity. For a flat cosmological background with a decreasing Hubble parameter, S globally increases with time, as it happens for viable f(R) inflation and dark energy models. We also show that the equilibrium description in terms of the horizon entropy S is convenient because it takes into account the contribution of both the horizon entropy S in non-equilibrium thermodynamics and an entropy production term.

  11. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  12. Mental Equilibrium and Rational Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Eyal Winter; Ignacio Garcia-Jurado; Jose Mendez-Naya; Luciano Mendez-Naya

    2009-01-01

    We introduce emotions into an equilibrium notion. In a mental equilibrium each player "selects" an emotional state which determines the player's preferences over the outcomes of the game. These preferences typically differ from the players' material preferences. The emotional states interact to play a Nash equilibrium and in addition each player's emotional state must be a best response (with respect to material preferences) to the emotional states of the others. We discuss the concept behind...

  13. Para-equilibrium phase diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Koukkari, Pertti; Pajarre, Risto; Eriksson, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A rapidly cooled system may attain a state of para-equilibrium. • In this state rapidly diffusing elements reach equilibrium but others are immobile. • Application of the Phase Rule to para-equilibrium phase diagrams is discussed. • A general algorithm to calculate para-equilibrium phase diagrams is described. - Abstract: If an initially homogeneous system at high temperature is rapidly cooled, a temporary para-equilibrium state may result in which rapidly diffusing elements have reached equilibrium but more slowly diffusing elements have remained essentially immobile. The best known example occurs when homogeneous austenite is quenched. A para-equilibrium phase assemblage may be calculated thermodynamically by Gibbs free energy minimization under the constraint that the ratios of the slowly diffusing elements are the same in all phases. Several examples of calculated para-equilibrium phase diagram sections are presented and the application of the Phase Rule is discussed. Although the rules governing the geometry of these diagrams may appear at first to be somewhat different from those for full equilibrium phase diagrams, it is shown that in fact they obey exactly the same rules with the following provision. Since the molar ratios of non-diffusing elements are the same in all phases at para-equilibrium, these ratios act, as far as the geometry of the diagram is concerned, like “potential” variables (such as T, pressure or chemical potentials) rather than like “normal” composition variables which need not be the same in all phases. A general algorithm to calculate para-equilibrium phase diagrams is presented. In the limit, if a para-equilibrium calculation is performed under the constraint that no elements diffuse, then the resultant phase diagram shows the single phase with the minimum Gibbs free energy at any point on the diagram; such calculations are of interest in physical vapor deposition when deposition is so rapid that phase

  14. Charge equilibrium processes of energetic incident ions and their range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawagoshi, Hiroshi; Karashima, Shosuke; Watanabe, Tsutomu.

    1984-01-01

    The charge state of energetic ions passing through a certain matter is varied by charge-exchange processes. A rate equation for charge fraction is given by using electron loss and capture cross sections in collision with a target atom under idealized condition. We solved the rate equation of the charge-exchange process of a single electron in a form of linear coupled differential equation. Our calcuiation for the range of ion were carried out for He, Ne and Ar ions passing through an atomic hydrogen gas target. We discuss the charge states of the projectile in relation to a local charge balance consituting a state of charge equilibrium in the target. (author)

  15. The Structure of the Heliosphere with Solar Cycle and Its Effect on the Conditions in the Local ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.; Toth, G.; Swisdak, M.; Michael, A.; Kornbleuth, M. Z.; Zieger, B.

    2017-12-01

    We argued (Opher et al. 2015, Drake et al. 2015) that the magnetic tension of the solar magnetic field plays a crucial role in organizing the solar wind in the heliosheath into two jet-like structures. The heliosphere then has a "croissant"-like shape where the distance to the heliopause downtail is almost the same as towards the nose. Regardless of whether the heliospheric tail is split in two or has a long comet shape there is consensus that the magnetic field in the heliosheath behaves differently than previously expected - it has a "slinky" structure and is turbulent. In this presentation, we will discuss several aspects related with this new model. We will show that this structure persists when the solar magnetic field is treated as a dipole. We show how the heliosphere, with its "Croissant" shape, evolves when the solar wind with solar cycle conditions are included and when the neutrals are treated kinetically (with our new MHD-Kinetic code). Due to reconnection (and turbulence of the jets) there is a substantial amount of heliosheath material sitting on open field lines. We will discuss the impact of artificial dissipation of the magnetic field in driving mixing and how it evolves with the solar cycle. We will discuss as well the development of turbulence in the jets and its role in mixing the plasma in the heliosheath and LISM and controlling the global structure of the heliosphere. We will discuss how the conditions upstream of the heliosphere, in the local interstellar medium are affected by reconnection in the tail and how it evolves with solar cycle. Recently we established (Opher et al. 2017) that reconnection in the eastern flank of the heliosphere is responsible for the twist of the interstellar magnetic field (BISM) acquiring a strong east-west component as it approaches the Heliopause. Reconnection drives a rotational discontinuity (RD) that twists the BISM into the -T direction and propagates upstream in the interstellar medium toward the nose

  16. Condiciones locales de vulnerabilidad asociadas con dengue en dos comunidades de Morelos Local conditions of vulnerability associated with dengue in two communities of Morelos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Chuc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar las condiciones de vulnerabilidad asociadas con la ocurrencia de dengue en dos localidades de Morelos en los años 2006 a 2009. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: se aplicó una encuesta sobre conocimientos, percepción de riesgo, prácticas de prevención y uso del agua en dos localidades de Morelos. Mediante un análisis de componentes principales, se construyó un índice de vulnerabilidad local al dengue (IVL. La asociación del IVL con la enfermedad en la vivienda se evaluó mediante una prueba de ji cuadrada. RESULTADOS: El IVL incluyó cinco componentes explicando el 63% de la varianza y fue clasificado en tres categorías: baja, media y alta. Se observó una asociación significativa entre el aumento de la vulnerabilidad y la prevalencia del reporte de casos de dengue en las localidades. CONCLUSIÓN: El estudio de la vulnerabilidad al dengue permite identificar necesidades locales específicas en materia de promoción de la salud.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the vulnerability associated with the occurrence of dengue in two villages of Morelos, Mexico from 2006 to 2009. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A survey on knowledge, risk perception, prevention practices and water use was applied in two villages of Morelos. Using a principal component analysis, an index of local vulnerability to dengue (IVL was constructed. The association of IVL with the disease at home was assessed using a Chi-square test. RESULTS: The IVL included five components explaining 63% of the variance and was classified in three categories: low, medium and high. There was a significant association between increased vulnerability and prevalence of reported cases of dengue in Temixco and Tlaquiltenango. CONCLUSION: The study of vulnerability to dengue allows us to identify local needs in the field of health promotion.

  17. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetic patients: general and local interfering conditions and management options with advanced wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccioli, Luigi; Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Ruotolo, Valeria; Giurato, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Medical knowledge about wound management has improved as recent studies have investigated the healing process and its biochemical background. Despite this, foot ulcers remain an important clinical problem, often resulting in costly, prolonged treatment. A non-healing ulcer is also a strong risk factor for major amputation. Many factors can interfere with wound healing, including the patient's general health status (i.e., nutritional condition indicated by albumin levels) or drugs such as steroids that can interfere with normal healing. Diabetic complications (i.e., renal insufficiency) may delay healing and account for higher amputation rates observed in diabetic patients under dialysis treatment. Wound environment (e.g., presence of neuropathy, ischaemia, and infection) may significantly influence healing by interfering with the physiological healing cascade and adding local release of factors that may worsen the wound. The timely and well-orchestrated release of factors regulating the healing process, observed in acute wounds, is impaired in non-healing wounds that are blocked in a chronic inflammatory phase without progressing to healing. This chronic phase is characterised by elevated protease activity (EPA) of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteases (e.g., human neutrophil elastase) that interfere with collagen synthesis, as well as growth factor release and action. EPA (mainly MMP 9, MMP-8 and elastase) and inflammatory factors present in the wound bed (such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNFa) account for the catabolic state of non-healing ulcers. The availability of wound dressings that modulate EPA has added new therapeutic options for treating non-healing ulcers. The literature confirms advantages obtained by reducing protease activity in the wound bed, with better outcomes achieved by using these dressings compared with traditional ones. New technologies also allow a physician to know the status of the wound bed environment, particularly EPA, in a clinical

  18. Applicability of Donnan equilibrium theory at nanochannel-reservoir interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huanhuan; Zhang, Li; Wang, Moran

    2015-08-15

    Understanding ionic transport in nanochannels has attracted broad attention from various areas in energy and environmental fields. In most pervious research, Donnan equilibrium has been applied widely to nanofluidic systems to obtain ionic concentration and electrical potential at channel-reservoir interfaces; however, as well known that Donnan equilibrium is derived from classical thermodynamic theories with equilibrium assumptions. Therefore the applicability of the Donnan equilibrium may be questionable when the transport at nanochannel-reservoir interface is strongly non-equilibrium. In this work, the Poisson-Nernst-Planck model for ion transport is numerically solved to obtain the exact distributions of ionic concentration and electrical potential. The numerical results are quantitatively compared with the Donnan equilibrium predictions. The applicability of Donnan equilibrium is therefore justified by changing channel length, reservoir ionic concentration, surface charge density and channel height. The results indicate that the Donnan equilibrium is not applicable for short nanochannels, large concentration difference and wide openings. A non-dimensional parameter, Q factor, is proposed to measure the non-equilibrium extent and the relation between Q and the working conditions is studied in detail. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of equilibrium and topology of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligen, B.P. van.

    1991-01-01

    In a tokamak, the plasma is confined by means of a magnetic field. There exists an equilibrium between outward forces due to the pressure gradient in plasma and inward forces due to the interaction between currents flowing inside the plasma and the magnetic field. The equilibrium magnetic field is characterized by helical field lines that lie on nested toroidal surfaces of constant flux. The equilibrium yields values for global and local plasma parameters (e.g. plasma position, total current, local pressure). Thus, precise knowledge of the equilibrium is essential for plasma control, for the understanding of many phenomena occurring in the plasma (in particular departures from the ideal equilibrium involving current filamentation on the flux surfaces that lead to the formation of islands, i.e. nested helical flux surfaces), and for the interpretation of many different types of measurements (e.g. the translation of line integrated electron density measurements made by laser beams probing the plasma into a local electron density on a flux surface). The problem of determining the equilibrium magnetic field from external magnetic field measurements has been studied extensively in literature. The problem is 'ill-posed', which means that the solution is unstable to small changes in the measurement data, and the solution has to be constrained in order to stabilize it. Various techniques for handling this problem have been suggested in literature. Usually ad-hoc restrictions are imposed on the equilibrium solution in order to stabilize it. More equilibrium solvers are not able to handle very dissimilar measurement data which means information on the equilibrium is lost. The generally do not allow a straightforward error estimate of the obtained results to be made, and they require large amounts of computing time. This problems are addressed in this thesis. (author). 104 refs.; 42 figs.; 6 tabs

  20. Relative importance of current and past landscape structure and local habitat conditions for plant species richness in dry grassland-like forest openings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husáková, Iveta; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    In fragmented landscapes, plant species richness may depend not only on local habitat conditions but also on landscape structure. In addition, both present and past landscape structure may be important for species richness. There are, however, only a few studies that have investigated the relative importance of all of these factors. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of current and past landscape structures and habitat conditions on species richness at dry grassland-like forest openings in a forested landscape and to assess their relative importance for species richness. We analyzed information on past and present landscape structures using aerial photographs from 1938, 1973, 1988, 2000 and 2007. We calculated the area of each locality and its isolation in the present and in the past and the continuity of localities in GIS. At each locality, we recorded all vascular plant species (296 species in 110 forest openings) and information on abiotic conditions of the localities. We found that the current species richness of the forest openings was significantly determined by local habitat conditions as well as by landscape structure in the present and in the past. The highest species richness was observed on larger and more heterogeneous localities with rocks and shallow soils, which were already large and well connected to other localities in 1938. The changes in the landscape structure in the past can thus have strong effects on current species richness. Future studies attempting to understand determinants of species diversity in fragmented landscapes should also include data on past landscape structure, as it may in fact be more important than the present structure.

  1. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  2. Fundamental functions in equilibrium thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, H.J. ter

    In the standard presentations of the principles of Gibbsian equilibrium thermodynamics one can find several gaps in the logic. For a subject that is as widely used as equilibrium thermodynamics, it is of interest to clear up such questions of mathematical rigor. In this paper it is shown that using

  3. FAST Plasma Scenarios and Equilibrium Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabro, G.; Crisanti, F.; Ramogida, G.; Cardinali, A.; Cucchiaro, A.; Maddaluno, G.; Pizzuto, A.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Tuccillo, A.A.; Zonca, F.; Albanese, R.; Granucci, G.; Nowak, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST) plasma scenarios and equilibrium configurations, designed to reproduce the ITER ones (with scaled plasma current) and suitable to fulfil plasma conditions for integrated studies of burning plasma physics, Plasma Wall interaction, ITER relevant operation problems and Steady State scenarios. The attention is focused on FAST flexibility in terms of both performance and physics that can be investigated: operations are foreseen at a wide range of parameters from high performance H-Mode (toroidal field, B T , up to 8.5 T; plasma current, I P , up to 8 MA) to advanced tokamak (AT) operation (I P =3 MA) as well as full non inductive current scenario (I P =2 MA). The coupled heating power is provided with 30MW delivered by an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) system (30-90MHz), 6 MW by a Lower Hybrid (LH) system (3.7 or 5 GHz) for the long pulse AT scenario, 4 MW by an Electron Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ECRH) system (170 GHz-B T =6T) for MHD and electron heating localized control and, eventually, with 10 MW by a Negative Ion Beam (NNBI), which the ports are designed to accommodate. In the reference H-mode scenario FAST preserves (with respect to ITER) fast ions induced as well as turbulence fluctuation spectra, thus, addressing the cross-scale couplings issue of micro- to meso-scale physics. The noninductive scenario at I P =2MA is obtained with 60-70 % of bootstrap and the remaining by LHCD. Predictive simulations of the H-mode scenarios described above have been performed by means of JETTO code, using a semi-empirical mixed Bohm/gyro-Bohm transport model. Plasma position and Shape Control studies are also presented for the reference scenario

  4. Non-equilibrium phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, Malte; Lübeck, Sven

    2009-01-01

    This book describes two main classes of non-equilibrium phase-transitions: (a) static and dynamics of transitions into an absorbing state, and (b) dynamical scaling in far-from-equilibrium relaxation behaviour and ageing. The first volume begins with an introductory chapter which recalls the main concepts of phase-transitions, set for the convenience of the reader in an equilibrium context. The extension to non-equilibrium systems is made by using directed percolation as the main paradigm of absorbing phase transitions and in view of the richness of the known results an entire chapter is devoted to it, including a discussion of recent experimental results. Scaling theories and a large set of both numerical and analytical methods for the study of non-equilibrium phase transitions are thoroughly discussed. The techniques used for directed percolation are then extended to other universality classes and many important results on model parameters are provided for easy reference.

  5. On the Existence of Evolutionary Learning Equilibriums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masudul Alam Choudhury

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The usual kinds of Fixed-Point Theorems formalized on the existence of competitive equilibrium that explain much of economic theory at the core of economics can operate only on bounded and closed sets with convex mappings. But these conditions are hardly true of the real world of economic and financial complexities and perturbations. The category of learning sets explained by continuous fields of interactive, integrative and evolutionary behaviour caused by dynamic preferences at the individual and institutional and social levels cannot maintain the assumption of closed, bounded and convex sets. Thus learning sets and multi-system inter-temporal relations explained by pervasive complementarities and  participation between variables and entities, and evolution by learning, have evolutionary equilibriums. Such a study requires a new methodological approach. This paper formalizes such a methodology for evolutionary equilibriums in learning spaces. It briefly points out the universality of learning equilibriums in all mathematical structures. For a particular case though, the inter-systemic interdependence between sustainable development and ethics and economics in the specific understanding of learning domain is pointed out.

  6. Computational methods for reversed-field equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.K.; Auerbach, S.P.; Willmann, P.A.; Berk, H.L.; McNamara, B.

    1980-01-01

    Investigating the temporal evolution of reversed-field equilibrium caused by transport processes requires the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation and computation of field-line-averaged quantities. The technique for field-line averaging and the computation of the Grad-Shafranov equation are presented. Application of Green's function to specify the Grad-Shafranov equation boundary condition is discussed. Hill's vortex formulas used to verify certain computations are detailed. Use of computer software to implement computational methods is described

  7. Monetary Policy Frameworks and Real Equilibrium Determinacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    In a simple "prototype" model of monetary policymaking, I examine the issue of real equilibrium determinacy under targeting and instrument rules. The former framework involves minimization of a loss function (under discretion or commitment), whereas the latter involves commitment to an interest...... rate rule. While instrument rules only lead to determinacy under certain conditions, the targeting rules under consideration always secure determinacy. Within an extended model, I argue that econometric estimations of nominal interest rate response functions may tell little about the economy...

  8. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    OpenAIRE

    Anza, Fabio; Vedral, Vlatko

    2015-01-01

    To understand under which conditions thermodynamics emerges from the microscopic dynamics is the ultimate goal of statistical mechanics. Despite the fact that the theory is more than 100 years old, we are still discussing its foundations and its regime of applicability. A point of crucial importance is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which is given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy. Here we argue that it is necessary to propose a new way of describing th...

  9. The Equilibrium Spreading Tension of Pulmonary Surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Dagan, Maayan P.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Monomolecular films at an air/water interface coexist at the equilibrium spreading tension (γe) with the bulk phase from which they form. For individual phospholipids, γe is single-valued, and separates conditions at which hydrated vesicles adsorb from tensions at which overcompressed monolayers collapse. With pulmonary surfactant, isotherms show that monolayers compressed on the surface of bubbles coexist with the three-dimensional collapsed phase over a range of surface tensions. γe therefo...

  10. A class of almost equilibrium states in Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueskue, Muharrem

    2008-01-01

    In quantum field theory in curved spacetimes the construction of the algebra of observables of linear fields is today well understood. However, it remains a non-trivial task to construct physically meaningful states on the algebra. For instance, we are in the unsatisfactory situation that there exist no examples of states suited to describe local thermal equilibrium in a non-stationary spacetime. In this thesis, we construct a class of states for the Klein-Gordon field in Robertson-Walker spacetimes, which seem to provide the first example of thermal states in a spacetime without time translation symmetry. More precisely, in the setting of real, linear, scalar fields in Robertson-Walker spacetimes we define on the set of homogeneous, isotropic, quasi-free states a free energy functional that is based on the averaged energy density measured by an isotropic observer along his worldline. This functional is well defined and lower bounded by a suitable quantum energy inequality. Subsequently, we minimize this functional and obtain states that we interpret as 'almost equilibrium states'. It turns out that the states of low energy are the ground states of the almost equilibrium states. Finally, we prove that the almost equilibrium states satisfy the Hadamard condition, which qualifies them as physically meaningful states. (orig.)

  11. A class of almost equilibrium states in Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueskue, Muharrem

    2008-11-06

    In quantum field theory in curved spacetimes the construction of the algebra of observables of linear fields is today well understood. However, it remains a non-trivial task to construct physically meaningful states on the algebra. For instance, we are in the unsatisfactory situation that there exist no examples of states suited to describe local thermal equilibrium in a non-stationary spacetime. In this thesis, we construct a class of states for the Klein-Gordon field in Robertson-Walker spacetimes, which seem to provide the first example of thermal states in a spacetime without time translation symmetry. More precisely, in the setting of real, linear, scalar fields in Robertson-Walker spacetimes we define on the set of homogeneous, isotropic, quasi-free states a free energy functional that is based on the averaged energy density measured by an isotropic observer along his worldline. This functional is well defined and lower bounded by a suitable quantum energy inequality. Subsequently, we minimize this functional and obtain states that we interpret as 'almost equilibrium states'. It turns out that the states of low energy are the ground states of the almost equilibrium states. Finally, we prove that the almost equilibrium states satisfy the Hadamard condition, which qualifies them as physically meaningful states. (orig.)

  12. Equilibrium without Friction of a Particle on a Mobile Surface with Bilateral Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae–Doru Stănescu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will study the equilibrium of a particle on a mobile surface in the case characterized by bilateral constraints between the particle and the surface, and the absence of friction. Based on our previous work, the conditions for the equilibrium are obtained. We prove that the positions of equilibrium on a mobile surface are no longer the same with those obtained for a fixed surface, the system could have either other equilibrium positions, completely different, or some more equilibrium positions, or no equilibrium position.

  13. Abstract generalized vector quasi-equilibrium problems in noncompact Hadamard manifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haishu Lu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper deals with the abstract generalized vector quasi-equilibrium problem in noncompact Hadamard manifolds. We prove the existence of solutions to the abstract generalized vector quasi-equilibrium problem under suitable conditions and provide applications to an abstract vector quasi-equilibrium problem, a generalized scalar equilibrium problem, a scalar equilibrium problem, and a perturbed saddle point problem. Finally, as an application of the existence of solutions to the generalized scalar equilibrium problem, we obtain a weakly mixed variational inequality and two mixed variational inequalities. The results presented in this paper unify and generalize many known results in the literature.

  14. Simulation of milk production by dairy cows fed sugarcane top-based diets with locally available supplements under Indian condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behera, U.K.; Kebreab, E.; Dijkstra, J.; Assis, A.G.; France, J.

    2005-01-01

    A model of sugarcane digestion was applied to indicate the suitability of various locally available supplements for enhancing milk production of Indian crossbred dairy cattle. Milk production was calculated according to simulated energy, lipogenic, glucogenic and aminogenic substrate availability.

  15. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z., E-mail: d.pugliese.physics@gmail.com, E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz [Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezručovo náměstí 13, CZ-74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  16. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-09-18

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  17. Spontaneity and Equilibrium: Why "?G Equilibrium" Are Incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental criteria for chemical reactions to be spontaneous in a given direction are generally incorrectly stated as ?G equilibrium are also misstated as being ?G = 0 or ?A = 0. Following a brief review of the…

  18. Minimizing the Free Energy: A Computer Method for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, Emerson F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a computer method for teaching chemical equilibrium concepts using material balance conditions and the minimization of the free energy. Method for the calculation of chemical equilibrium, the computer program used to solve equilibrium problems and applications of the method are also included. (HM)

  19. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift

  20. Exploring Chemical and Thermal Non-equilibrium in Nitrogen Arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorui, S; Das, A K

    2012-01-01

    Plasma torches operating with nitrogen are of special importance as they can operate with usual tungsten based refractory electrodes and offer radical rich non-oxidizing high temperature environment for plasma chemistry. Strong gradients in temperature as well as species densities and huge convective fluxes lead to varying degrees of chemical non-equilibrium in associated regions. An axi-symmetric two-temperature chemical non-equilibrium model of a nitrogen plasma torch has been developed to understand the effects of thermal and chemical non-equilibrium in arcs. A 2-D finite volume CFD code in association with a non-equilibrium property routine enabled extraction of steady state self-consistent distributions of various plasma quantities inside the torch under various thermal and chemical non-equilibrium conditions. Chemical non-equilibrium has been incorporated through computation of diffusive and convective fluxes in each finite volume cell in every iteration and associating corresponding thermodynamic and transport properties through the scheme of 'chemical non-equilibrium parameter' introduced by Ghorui et. al. Recombination coefficient data from Nahar et. al. and radiation data from Krey and Morris have been used in the simulation. Results are presented for distributions of temperature, pressure, velocity, current density, electric potential, species densities and chemical non-equilibrium effects. Obtained results are compared with similar results under LTE.

  1. A model for non-equilibrium, non-homogeneous two-phase critical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassel, Wageeh Sidrak; Ting, Daniel Kao Sun

    1999-01-01

    Critical two phase flow is a very important phenomena in nuclear reactor technology for the analysis of loss of coolant accident. Several recent papers, Lee and Shrock (1990), Dagan (1993) and Downar (1996) , among others, treat the phenomena using complex models which require heuristic parameters such as relaxation constants or interfacial transfer models. In this paper a mathematical model for one dimensional non equilibrium and non homogeneous two phase flow in constant area duct is developed. The model is constituted of three conservation equations type mass ,momentum and energy. Two important variables are defined in the model: equilibrium constant in the energy equation and the impulse function in the momentum equation. In the energy equation, the enthalpy of the liquid phase is determined by a linear interpolation function between the liquid phase enthalpy at inlet condition and the saturated liquid enthalpy at local pressure. The interpolation coefficient is the equilibrium constant. The momentum equation is expressed in terms of the impulse function. It is considered that there is slip between the liquid and vapor phases, the liquid phase is in metastable state and the vapor phase is in saturated stable state. The model is not heuristic in nature and does not require complex interface transfer models. It is proved numerically that for the critical condition the partial derivative of two phase pressure drop with respect to the local pressure or to phase velocity must be zero.This criteria is demonstrated by numerical examples. The experimental work of Fauske (1962) and Jeandey (1982) were analyzed resulting in estimated numerical values for important parameters like slip ratio, equilibrium constant and two phase frictional drop. (author)

  2. Computation of thermodynamic equilibrium in systems under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic reactions may be partly controlled by the local stress distribution as suggested by observations of phase assemblages around garnet inclusions related to an amphibolite shear zone in granulite of the Bergen Arcs in Norway. A particular example presented in fig. 14 of Mukai et al. [1] is discussed here. A garnet crystal embedded in a plagioclase matrix is replaced on the left side by a high pressure intergrowth of kyanite and quartz and on the right side by chlorite-amphibole. This texture apparently represents disequilibrium. In this case, the minerals adapt to the low pressure ambient conditions only where fluids were present. Alternatively, here we compute that this particular low pressure and high pressure assemblage around a stressed rigid inclusion such as garnet can coexist in equilibrium. To do the computations we developed the Thermolab software package. The core of the software package consists of Matlab functions that generate Gibbs energy of minerals and melts from the Holland and Powell database [2] and aqueous species from the SUPCRT92 database [3]. Most up to date solid solutions are included in a general formulation. The user provides a Matlab script to do the desired calculations using the core functions. Gibbs energy of all minerals, solutions and species are benchmarked versus THERMOCALC, PerpleX [4] and SUPCRT92 and are reproduced within round off computer error. Multi-component phase diagrams have been calculated using Gibbs minimization to benchmark with THERMOCALC and Perple_X. The Matlab script to compute equilibrium in a stressed system needs only two modifications of the standard phase diagram script. Firstly, Gibbs energy of phases considered in the calculation is generated for multiple values of thermodynamic pressure. Secondly, for the Gibbs minimization the proportion of the system at each particular thermodynamic pressure needs to be constrained. The user decides which part of the stress tensor is input as thermodynamic

  3. 42 CFR 418.116 - Condition of participation: Compliance with Federal, State, and local laws and regulations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational Environment § 418.116... regarding disclosure of ownership and control information. All hospice multiple locations must be approved...

  4. Equilibrium deuterium isotope effect of surprising magnitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.J.; Pressman, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Seemingly large deuterium isotope effects are reported for the preference of deuterium for the α-chloro site to the bridgehead or to the vinyl site in samples of anti-7-chlorobicyclo[4.3.2]undecatetraene-d 1 . Studies of molecular models did not provide a basis for these large equilibrium deuterium isotope effects. The possibility is proposed that these isotope effects only appear to be large for want of comparison with isotope effects measured for molecules that might provide even greater contrasts in local force fields

  5. Equilibrium state of colliding electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Warnock

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available We study a nonlinear integral equation that is a necessary condition on the equilibrium phase-space distribution function of stored, colliding electron beams. It is analogous to the Haïssinski equation, being derived from Vlasov-Fokker-Planck theory, but is quite different in form. The equation is analyzed for the case of the Chao-Ruth model of the beam-beam interaction in 1 degree of freedom, a so-called strong-strong model with nonlinear beam-beam force. We prove the existence of a unique solution, for sufficiently small beam current, by an application of the implicit function theorem. We have not yet proved that this solution is positive, as would be required to establish existence of an equilibrium. There is, however, numerical evidence of a positive solution. We expect that our analysis can be extended to more realistic models.

  6. Equilibrium and stability of a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, P.A.E.M.

    1979-01-01

    The author considers the equilibrium and stability of a rotating plasma. The kinetic equations for ions and electrons supplemented with the Maxwell equations and the appropriate boundary conditions are used. Two different models for the rotating plasma are considered: the equilibrium of a 'fast' rotating plasma (Magneto Hydrodynamic ordering) and the stability of a slowly rotating, 'weakly' unstable plasma (Finite Larmor Radius ordering). A striking difference between these orderings is the fact that, regarding the stability of the plasma, for a F.L.R. plasma viscosity effects due to the finite Larmor radius are important, whereas in a M.H.D. plasma they are negligible (at least to the required order). (Auth.)

  7. Instability of quantum equilibrium in Bohm's dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Samuel; Valentini, Antony

    2014-11-08

    We consider Bohm's second-order dynamics for arbitrary initial conditions in phase space. In principle, Bohm's dynamics allows for 'extended' non-equilibrium, with initial momenta not equal to the gradient of phase of the wave function (as well as initial positions whose distribution departs from the Born rule). We show that extended non-equilibrium does not relax in general and is in fact unstable. This is in sharp contrast with de Broglie's first-order dynamics, for which non-standard momenta are not allowed and which shows an efficient relaxation to the Born rule for positions. On this basis, we argue that, while de Broglie's dynamics is a tenable physical theory, Bohm's dynamics is not. In a world governed by Bohm's dynamics, there would be no reason to expect to see an effective quantum theory today (even approximately), in contradiction with observation.

  8. Thermodynamic evolution far from equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khantuleva, Tatiana A.

    2018-05-01

    The presented model of thermodynamic evolution of an open system far from equilibrium is based on the modern results of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, the nonlocal theory of nonequilibrium transport developed by the author and the Speed Gradient principle introduced in the theory of adaptive control. Transition to a description of the system internal structure evolution at the mesoscopic level allows a new insight at the stability problem of non-equilibrium processes. The new model is used in a number of specific tasks.

  9. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central 40 Ca + 40 Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80≤t≤300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables

  10. 47 CFR 20.20 - Conditions applicable to provision of CMRS service by incumbent Local Exchange Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... affiliated incumbent LEC, and use its affiliated incumbent LEC's marketing and other services, subject to paragraphs (a)(3) and (c) of this section. (c) Joint marketing. Joint marketing of local exchange and... and made available for public inspection upon request at the principle place of business of the...

  11. Solvability conditions for non-local boundary value problems for two-dimensional half-linear differential systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kiguradze, I.; Šremr, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 17 (2011), s. 6537-6552 ISSN 0362-546X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : half-linear differential system * non-local boundary value problem * solvability Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.536, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362546X11004573

  12. Not throwing out the baby with the bathwater: Bell's condition of local causality mathematically 'sharp and clean'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seevinck, M.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304847399; Uffink, J.B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074814265

    2011-01-01

    The starting point of the present paper is Bell's notion of local causality and his own sharpening of it so as to provide for mathematical formalisation. Starting with Norsen's (2007, 2009) analysis of this formalisation, it is subjected to a critique that reveals two crucial aspects that have so

  13. Not throwing out the baby with the bathwater: Bell's condition of local causality mathematically 'sharp and clean'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seevinck, M.P.; Uffink, J.M.B.

    2011-01-01

    The starting point of the present paper is Bell’s notion of local causality and his own sharpening of it so as to provide for mathematical formalisation. Starting with Norsen’s (2007 [15], 2009 [16]) analysis of this formalisation, it is subjected to a critique that reveals two crucial aspects

  14. Characteristics of equilibrium and perturbed transport coefficients in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentle, K.W.

    1995-01-01

    Although the evolution of a perturbation to a tokamak equilibrium can generally be described by local transport coefficients modestly enhanced above the equilibrium values, there are some significant cases for which this is inadequate. The density profile evolution in ASDEX-U occurs far more rapidly than is consistent with reasonable particle confinement times, and the evolution of cold pulses in TEXT requires nonlocal behavior in the core and some kind of anomaly near the periphery. The experiments are suggesting effects beyond standard local turbulent transport models. (orig.)

  15. Physics of future equilibrium state of nuclear energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, H.

    1994-01-01

    The governing equations for future equilibrium nuclear state are presented and their characteristics are discussed. These equations are solved for several typical cases. In the present study on the equilibrium state, two coincidences are found. The first is the coincidence on the neutron balance performed by the nuclides satisfying the equilibrium condition. The finite neutron multiplication factor is near unity. The second is the coincidence on the toxicity. The produced long-life fission product toxicity is near the incinerated natural fuel toxicity. (author). 2 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  16. The equilibrium of neural firing: A mathematical theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Sizhong, E-mail: lsz@fuyunresearch.org [Fuyun Research, Beijing, 100055 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Inspired by statistical thermodynamics, we presume that neuron system has equilibrium condition with respect to neural firing. We show that, even with dynamically changeable neural connections, it is inevitable for neural firing to evolve to equilibrium. To study the dynamics between neural firing and neural connections, we propose an extended communication system where noisy channel has the tendency towards fixed point, implying that neural connections are always attracted into fixed points such that equilibrium can be reached. The extended communication system and its mathematics could be useful back in thermodynamics.

  17. Topological vector spaces admissible in economic equilibrium theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans

    2009-01-01

    In models of economic equilibrium in markets with infinitely many commodities, the commodity space is an ordered topological vector space endowed with additional structure. In the present paper, we consider ordered topological vector spaces which are admissible (for equilibrium analysis) in the s......) in the sense that every economy which is reasonably well behaved posesses an equilibrium. It turns out that this condition may be characterized in terms of topology and order. This characterization implies that the commodity space has the structure of a Kakutani space....

  18. Social barriers in wind power implementation in The Netherlands: Perceptions of wind power entrepreneurs and local civil servants of institutional and social conditions in realizing wind power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agterbosch, Susanne; Glasbergen, Pieter; Vermeulen, Walter J.V.

    2007-01-01

    The primary social factors for the implementation of wind energy projects in a liberalized market are entrepreneurs willing to invest. Understanding conditions that trigger entrepreneurs to invest in these projects, and understanding conditions that determine the chance of success for entrepreneurs to implement and exploit their projects, is vital for setting up effective policies to stimulate wind electricity generation. This paper analyses the way in which wind power entrepreneurs and local civil servants experience social and institutional conditions in the operational process of realizing wind power projects, and their perceptions of policy implications. A groups support system in an electronic board room was used to analyze the perceptions. From the analysis it was concluded that wind power entrepreneurs and civil servants share the opinion that the institutionally embedded power position of local politicians, and the sensitiveness of the local political debate for the popular opinion are most critical for project realization. With regard to the proposed solutions, both groups differ in their approach. Entrepreneurs stress procedural solutions, such as limiting the possibilities to appeal, reducing the complexity of the formal authorization trajectory and using a top down planning approach. Civil servants stress more strategic solutions, such as providing more public information on the necessity of wind power for local politicians and citizens, and community involvement in planning processes. Finally, the analysis explains that steering strategies that have been developed at the national level to solve the planning problems at the operational level do not address the right problems. (author)

  19. The phase equilibrium diagrams as a tool for the design and use of refractories; Los diagramas de equilibrio de fases como una herramienta para el diseno y comprension del comportamiento en servicio de los materiales refractarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aza, A. H. de; Pena, P.; Caballero, A.; Aza, S. de

    2011-07-01

    Refractories are complex materials used at high temperature, in severely corrosive atmospheres and in contact with aggressive liquids. The high temperatures imply that such systems tend to equilibrium and this is frequently attained during service; at least local equilibrium is achieved. This allows the basic principles of phase diagrams to be used in this technology. Traditionally, refractories have been designed to be close to equilibrium so that in-service changes were restricted. Currently, additions of raw materials are often made that will react in use, in a controlled manner, to give favorable effects under the service conditions. Equilibrium diagrams are valid not only for determining the thermodynamic tendency but also for predicting the final equilibrium state and to know the way through which the material moves into the final state. In this context equilibrium diagrams become a powerful tool for a better understanding of the behavior of refractories during service. After a general consideration on the importance of phase equilibrium diagrams in this field, criteria for using equilibrium diagrams, as a tool for improving traditional refractories and/or designing advanced or new refractories, will be given. Pertinent examples in different systems will be discussed. This paper compiles and reviews the last plenary lecture given by Professor Salvador De Aza on the subject. (Author) 58 refs.

  20. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other