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Sample records for local atomic structure

  1. Local atomic structure of α-Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, F. J.; Villella, P.; Lashley, J. C.; Conradson, S. D.; Cox, L. E.; Martinez, R.; Martinez, B.; Morales, L.; Terry, J.; Pereyra, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    The local atomic structure of α-Pu was investigated using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XAFS spectra were obtained for a zone-refined α-Pu and the results were compared to 32-year-old and Ce-doped (0.34 at.%) samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were also measured for the zone-refined and 32-year-old materials. The extent of the Bragg peaks showed that amorphization of the 32-year-old sample had not occurred despite the prolonged exposure to self-radiation. Analogous to metastable δ-Pu alloys, the local atomic structure around Pu for the zone-refined material shows the possible presence of noncrystallographic Pu-Pu distances. Conversely, the Ce and the 32-year-old sample show no evidence for such noncrystallographic distances. Disorder in the Pu local environment was found to be impurity dependent. The Ce-doped sample presented a larger Pu-Pu nearest neighbor disorder than the aged sample, although the total amount of Am, U, and He impurities was actually higher in the aged sample. The local environment around U and Ce impurities is consistent with these elements being in substitutional lattice sites. In addition, U and Ce do not introduce significant lattice distortion to their nearest neighbors. This is consistent with disorder being more related to the perturbation of the coupling between the electronic and crystal structure, or the Peierls--Jahn-Teller distortion that generates the monoclinic α-Pu structure, and less to strain fields produced in the vicinity of the impurities

  2. Local atomic structure inheritance in Ag50Sn50 melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Yanwen; Bian, Xiufang; Qin, Jingyu; Hu, Lina; Yang, Jianfei; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yang, Chuncheng; Zhang, Shuo; Huang, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Local structure inheritance signatures were observed during the alloying process of the Ag 50 Sn 50 melt, using high-temperature X-ray diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The coordination number N m around Ag atom is similar in the alloy and in pure Ag melts (N m  ∼ 10), while, during the alloying process, the local structure around Sn atoms rearranges. Sn-Sn covalent bonds were substituted by Ag-Sn chemical bonds, and the total coordination number around Sn increases by about 70% as compared with those in the pure Sn melt. Changes in the electronic structure of the alloy have been studied by Ag and Sn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, as well as by calculations of the partial density of states. We propose that a leading mechanism for local structure inheritance in Ag 50 Sn 50 is due to s-p dehybridization of Sn and to the interplay between Sn-s and Ag-d electrons

  3. Polarization-gradient laser cooling as a way to create strongly localized structures for atom lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Tumaikin, A. M.; Yudin, V. I.

    2007-01-01

    Generally, conditions for deep sub-Doppler laser cooling do not match conditions for strong atomic localization, that takes place in a deeper optical potential and leads to higher temperature. Moreover, for a given detuning in a deep optical potential the secular approximation, which is frequently used for a quantum description of laser cooling, fails. Here we investigate the atomic localization in optical potential, using a full quantum approach for atomic density matrix beyond the secular approximation. It is shown that laser cooling in a deep optical potential, created by a light field with polarization gradients, can be used as an alternative method for the formation of high contrast spatially localized structures of atoms for the purposes of atom lithography and atomic nanofabrication. Finally, we analyze possible limits for the width and contrast of localized atomic structures that can be reached in this type of light mask

  4. Distortion of Local Atomic Structures in Amorphous Ge-Sb-Te Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, A.; Ichitsubo, T.; Guan, P. F.; Fujita, T.; Chen, M. W.

    2018-05-01

    The local atomic structures of amorphous Ge-Sb-Te phase-change materials have yet to be clarified and the rapid crystal-amorphous phase change resulting in distinct optical contrast is not well understood. We report the direct observation of local atomic structures in amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 using "local" reverse Monte Carlo modeling dedicated to an angstrom-beam electron diffraction analysis. The results corroborated the existence of local structures with rocksalt crystal-like topology that were greatly distorted compared to the crystal symmetry. This distortion resulted in the breaking of ideal octahedral atomic environments, thereby forming local disordered structures that basically satisfied the overall amorphous structure factor. The crystal-like distorted octahedral structures could be the main building blocks in the formation of the overall amorphous structure of Ge-Sb-Te.

  5. Local Atomic Structure and Discommensurations in the Charge Density Wave of CeTe{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H J; Tomic, A T; Tessmer, S H; Billinge, S J.L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Malliakas, C D; Kanatzidis, M G [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2006-06-09

    The local structure of CeTe{sub 3} in the incommensurate charge density wave (IC-CDW) state has been obtained using atomic pair distribution function analysis of x-ray diffraction data. Local atomic distortions in the Te nets due to the CDW are larger than observed crystallographically, resulting in distinct short and long Te-Te bonds. Observation of different distortion amplitudes in the local and average structures is explained by the discommensurated nature of the CDW, since the pair distribution function is sensitive to the local displacements within the commensurate regions, whereas the crystallographic result averages over many discommensurated domains. The result is supported by STM data. This is the first quantitative local structural study within the commensurate domains in an IC-CDW system.

  6. Local Atomic Structure and Discommensurations in the Charge Density Wave of CeTe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Tomic, A.T.; Tessmer, S.H.; Billinge, S.J.L.; Malliakas, C.D.; Kanatzidis, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    The local structure of CeTe 3 in the incommensurate charge density wave (IC-CDW) state has been obtained using atomic pair distribution function analysis of x-ray diffraction data. Local atomic distortions in the Te nets due to the CDW are larger than observed crystallographically, resulting in distinct short and long Te-Te bonds. Observation of different distortion amplitudes in the local and average structures is explained by the discommensurated nature of the CDW, since the pair distribution function is sensitive to the local displacements within the commensurate regions, whereas the crystallographic result averages over many discommensurated domains. The result is supported by STM data. This is the first quantitative local structural study within the commensurate domains in an IC-CDW system

  7. Temperature dependent XAFS studies of local atomic structure of the perovskite-type zirconates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedrinskii, R. V.; Lemeshko, M. P.; Novakovich, A. A.; Nazarenko, E. S.; Nassif, V.; Proux, O.; Joly, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Temperature dependent preedge and extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements at the Zr K edge for the perovskite-type zirconates PbZr 0.515 Ti 0.485 O 3 (PZT), PbZrO 3 (PZ), and BaZrO 3 are performed. To carry out a more accurate study of the weak reconstruction of the local atomic structure we employed a combination of two techniques: (i) analysis of the preedge fine structure, and (ii) analysis of the Fourier transform of the difference between χ(k) functions obtained at different temperatures. A detailed investigation of local atomic structure in the cubic phase for all the crystals is also performed. It is shown that neither the displacive nor the order-disorder model can describe correctly the changes of local atomic structure during phase transitions in PZ and PZT. A spherical model describing the local atomic structure of perovskite-type crystals suffering structural phase transitions is proposed

  8. The structure of filled skutterudites and the local vibration behavior of the filling atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiaojuan [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Dongguan Institute of Neutron Science, Dongguan 523808 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zong, Peng-an [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Chen, Xihong [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Tao, Juzhou, E-mail: taoj@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Dongguan Institute of Neutron Science, Dongguan 523808 (China); Lin, He, E-mail: linhe@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Both of atomic pair distribution function (PDF) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) experiments have been carried out on unfilled and Yb-filled skutterudites Yb{sub x}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} (x=0, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.25) samples. The structure refinements on PDF data confirm the large amplitude vibration of Yb atom and the dependence of Yb vibration amplitude on the filling content. Temperature dependent EXAFS experiment on filled skutterudites have been carried out at Yb L{sub Ⅲ}-edge in order to explore the local vibration behavior of filled atom. EXAFS experiments show that the Einstein temperature of the filled atom is very low (70.9 K) which agrees with the rattling behavior.

  9. The local atomic quasicrystal structure of the icosahedral Mg25Y11Zn64 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruehne, S; Uhrig, E; Gross, C; Assmus, W; Masadeh, A S; Billinge, S J L

    2005-01-01

    A local and medium range atomic structure model for the face centred icosahedral (fci) Mg 25 Y 11 Zn 64 alloy has been established in a sphere of r = 27 A. The model was refined by least squares techniques using the atomic pair distribution (PDF) function obtained from synchrotron powder diffraction. Three hierarchies of the atomic arrangement can be found: (i) five types of local coordination polyhedra for the single atoms, four of which are of Frank-Kasper type. In turn, they (ii) form a three-shell (Bergman) cluster containing 104 atoms, which is condensed sharing its outer shell with its neighbouring clusters, and (iii) a cluster connecting scheme corresponding to a three-dimensional tiling leaving space for a few glue atoms. Inside adjacent clusters, Y 8 cubes are tilted with respect to each other and thus allow for overall icosahedral symmetry. It is shown that the title compound is essentially isomorphic to its holmium analogue. Therefore, fci-Mg-Y-Zn can be seen as the representative structure type for the other rare earth analogues fci-Mg-Zn-RE (RE = Dy, Er, Ho, Tb) reported in the literature

  10. Evolution of local atomic structure during solidification of Al2Au liquid: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, L.H.; Lou, H.B.; Wang, X.D.; Debela, T.T.; Cao, Q.P.; Zhang, D.X.; Wang, S.Y.; Wang, C.Z.; Jiang, J.Z.

    2014-01-01

    The local atomic structure evolution in Al 2 Au alloy during solidification from 2000 K to 400 K was studied by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and analyzed using the structure factor, pair correlation functions, bond angle distributions, the Honeycutt–Anderson (HA) index and Voronoi tessellation methods. It was found that the icosahedral-like clusters are negligible in the Al 2 Au stable liquid and supercooled liquid states, and the most abundant clusters are those having HA indices of 131 and 120 or Voronoi indices of 〈0, 4, 4, 0〉, 〈0, 3, 6, 0〉 and 〈0, 4, 4, 2〉 with coordination numbers of 8, 9 and 10, respectively. These clusters are similar to the local atomic structures in the CaF 2 -type Al 2 Au crystal, revealing the existence of structure heredity between liquid and crystalline phase in Al 2 Au alloy

  11. Evolution of local atomic structure during solidification of Al2Au liquid: An ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, L H; Lou, H B; Wang, X D; Debela, T T; Cao, Q P; Zhang, D X; Wang, S Y; Wang, C Z; Jiang, J Z

    2014-04-01

    The local atomic structure evolution in Al2Au alloy during solidification from 2000 K to 400 K was studied by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and analyzed using the structure factor, pair correlation functions, bond angle distributions, the Honeycutt-Anderson (HA) index and Voronoi tessellation methods. It was found that the icosahedral-like clusters are negligible in the Al2Au stable liquid and supercooled liquid states, and the most abundant clusters are those having HA indices of 131 and 120 or Voronoi indices of < 0,4,4,0 >, < 0,3, 6,0 > and < 0,4,4,2 > with coordination numbers of 8, 9 and 10, respectively. These clusters are similar to the local atomic structures in the CaF2-type Al2Au crystal, revealing the existence of structure heredity between liquid and crystalline phase in Al2Au alloy. (C) 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Local atomic structure in tetragonal pure ZrO{sub 2} nanopowders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acuna, Leandro M.; Lamas, Diego G.; Fuentes, Rodolfo O.; Fabregas, Ismael O. [CITEFA-CONICET, Villa Martelli, Provincia de Buenos Aires (AR). CINSO (Centro de Investigaciones en Solidos); Fantini, Marcia C.A.; Craievich, Aldo F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Prado, Rogerio J. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2010-04-15

    The local atomic structures around the Zr atom of pure (undoped) ZrO{sub 2} nanopowders with different average crystallite sizes, ranging from 7 to 40 nm, have been investigated. The nanopowders were synthesized by different wetchemical routes, but all exhibit the high-temperature tetragonal phase stabilized at room temperature, as established by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique was applied to analyze the local structure around the Zr atoms. Several authors have studied this system using the EXAFS technique without obtaining a good agreement between crystallographic and EXAFS data. In this work, it is shown that the local structure of ZrO{sub 2} nanopowders can be described by a model consisting of two oxygen subshells (4+4 atoms) with different Zr-O distances, in agreement with those independently determined by X-ray diffraction. However, the EXAFS study shows that the second oxygen subshell exhibits a Debye-Waller (DW) parameter much higher than that of the first oxygen subshell, a result that cannot be explained by the crystallographic model accepted for the tetragonal phase of zirconia-based materials. However, as proposed by other authors, the difference in the DW parameters between the two oxygen subshells around the Zr atoms can be explained by the existence of oxygen displacements perpendicular to the z direction; these mainly affect the second oxygen subshell because of the directional character of the EXAFS DW parameter, in contradiction to the crystallographic value. It is also established that this model is similar to another model having three oxygen subshells, with a 4+2+2 distribution of atoms, with only one DW parameter for all oxygen subshells. Both models are in good agreement with the crystal structure determined by X-ray diffraction experiments. (orig.)

  13. Effect of local atomic and electronic structures on thermoelectric properties of chemically substituted CoSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C. C.; Pao, C. W.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, C. L.; Dong, C. L.; Liu, Y. S.; Lee, J. F.; Chan, T. S.; Chang, C. L.; Kuo, Y. K.; Lue, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    We report the effects of Ge partial substitution for Si on local atomic and electronic structures of thermoelectric materials in binary compound cobalt monosilicides (\\text{CoSi}_{1-x}\\text{Ge}_{x}\\text{:}\\ 0 \\le x \\le 0.15 ). Correlations between local atomic/electronic structure and thermoelectric properties are investigated by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The spectroscopic results indicate that as Ge is partially substituted onto Si sites at x \\le 0.05 , Co in CoSi1-xGex gains a certain amount of charge in its 3d orbitals. Contrarily, upon further replacing Si with Ge at x \\ge 0.05 , the Co 3d orbitals start to lose some of their charge. Notably, thermopower is strongly correlated with charge redistribution in the Co 3d orbital, and the observed charge transfer between Ge and Co is responsible for the variation of Co 3d occupancy number. In addition to Seebeck coefficient, which can be modified by tailoring the Co 3d states, local lattice disorder may also be beneficial in enhancing the thermoelectric properties. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectrum results further demonstrate that the lattice phonons can be enhanced by Ge doping, which results in the formation of the disordered Co-Co pair. Improvements in the thermoelectric properties are interpreted based on the variation of local atomic and electronic structure induced by lattice distortion through chemical substitution.

  14. Local atomic and crystal structure rearrangement during the martensitic transformation in Ti50Ni25Cu25 shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menushenkov, Alexey; Grishina, Olga; Shelyakov, Alexander; Yaroslavtsev, Alexander; Zubavichus, Yan; Veligzhanin, Alexey; Bednarcik, Jozef; Chernikov, Roman; Sitnikov, Nikolay

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Local crystalline structure of TiNiCu SMA is investigated using EXAFS. • Peculiarities of Ni and Cu local environment are found. • Ti atoms show greater mobility relative to Ni atoms. • Ni local environment change is significant for shape memory effect. -- Abstract: The changes of crystal structure and local crystalline environment of Ti, Ni and Cu atoms in Ti 50 Ni 25 Cu 25 shape memory alloy are investigated using X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) in temperature range of martensite transformation. The analysis of the EXAFS-spectra shows that the bonds involving Ni atoms have the highest degree of disorder and the change in the local environment around Ni atoms is significant for the occurrence of the shape memory effect, while Cu atoms occupy the normal positions in the crystallographic structure and have the lowest displacement amplitude leading to the stabilization of both phases

  15. Local atomic structure of Zr-Cu and Zr-Cu-Al amorphous alloys investigated by EXAFS method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonowicz, J.; Pietnoczka, A.; Zalewski, W.; Bacewicz, R.; Stoica, M.; Georgarakis, K.; Yavari, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Coordination number, interatomic distances and mean square atomic displacement in Zr-Cu and Zr-Cu-Al glasses. → Icosahedral symmetry in local atomic structure. → Deviation from random mixing behavior resulting from Al addition. - Abstract: We report on extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) study of rapidly quenched Zr-Cu and Zr-Cu-Al glassy alloys. The local atomic order around Zr and Cu atoms was investigated. From the EXAFS data fitting the values of coordination number, interatomic distances and mean square atomic displacement were obtained for wide range of compositions. It was found that icosahedral symmetry rather than that of corresponding crystalline analogs dominates in the local atomic structure of Zr-Cu and Zr-Cu-Al amorphous alloys. Judging from bonding preferences we conclude that addition of Al as an alloying element results in considerable deviation from random mixing behavior observed in binary Zr-Cu alloys.

  16. Electrical activation and local structure of Se atoms in ion-implanted indium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.M.; Chan, N.; Hsu, L.

    1996-01-01

    The solid phase regrowth, dopant activation, and local environments of Se-implanted InP are investigated with ion-beam techniques and extended x-ray-absorption fine structure spectroscopy. We find that the local Se endash In structure is already established in the as-implanted amorphous InP although the Se atoms have a lower average coordination number (∼3.5) and no long-range order. After high-temperature rapid thermal annealing (950 degree C, 5 s), the amorphous InP regrows, becoming a single crystal with the Se atoms bonded to four In neighbors; however, only ∼50% of the Se becomes electrically active. Part of the Se precipitates in the form of an In endash Se phase, another part is compensated by defects which are not totally removed by annealing. The Se emdash In bond distance for a Se on a P site is 4.5% longer than the matrix In emdash P bond length, introducing large strains in the crystal. The solid solubility of Se in InP is estimated from our results to be ≅8.7x10 19 /cm 3 while the electron concentration saturates at 5.4x10 19 /cm 3 . Se atoms in InP regrown at lower temperatures in a furnace are only ∼7% electrically active and are found to have different local environments (higher coordination number and shorter bond distance) than those in the InP perfectly regrown at higher temperature. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Local electronic and geometric structures of silicon atoms implanted in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao

    2002-01-01

    Low-energy Si + ions were implanted in highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) up to 1% of surface atomic concentration, and the local electronic and geometric structures around the silicon atoms were in situ investigated by means of the Si K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using linearly polarized synchrotron radiation. The resonance peak appeared at 1839.5 eV in the Si K-edge XANES spectra for Si + -implanted HOPG. This energy is lower than those of the Si 1s→σ * resonance peaks in any other Si-containing materials. The intensity of the resonance peak showed strong polarization dependence, which suggests that the final state orbitals around the implanted Si atoms have π * -like character. It is concluded that the σ-type Si-C bonds produced by the Si + -ion implantation are nearly parallel to the graphite plane, and Si x C phase forms two-dimensionally spread graphite-like layer with sp 2 bonds

  18. Local atomic structure of Fe/Cr multilayers: Depth-resolved method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanov, Yu. A.; Ponomarev, D. A.; Devyaterikov, D. I.; Salamatov, Yu. A.; Romashev, L. N.; Ustinov, V. V.; Vasin, V. V.; Ageev, A. L.

    2017-10-01

    A depth-resolved method for the investigation of the local atomic structure by combining data of X-ray reflectivity and angle-resolved EXAFS is proposed. The solution of the problem can be divided into three stages: 1) determination of the element concentration profile with the depth z from X-ray reflectivity data, 2) determination of the X-ray fluorescence emission spectrum of the element i absorption coefficient μia (z,E) as a function of depth and photon energy E using the angle-resolved EXAFS data Iif (E , ϑl) , 3) determination of partial correlation functions gij (z , r) as a function of depth from μi (z , E) . All stages of the proposed method are demonstrated on a model example of a multilayer nanoheterostructure Cr/Fe/Cr/Al2O3. Three partial pair correlation functions are obtained. A modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and a regularization method are applied.

  19. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    A method for a direct measurement of X-ray projections of the atomic structure is described. Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO 3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO 3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples

  20. Local functional derivative of the total energy and the shell structure in atoms and molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, R.; Markvoort, Albert. J.; Santen, van R.A.; Hilbers, P.A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The full and local Thomas–Fermi–Dirac energy functional derivatives are evaluated at Hartree–Fock densities for several atoms and molecules. These functions are interpreted as local chemical potentials and related mainly to kinetic energy functional derivatives. They are able to reveal the shell

  1. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finzel, Kati, E-mail: kati.finzel@liu.se [Linköpings University, IFM Department of Physics, 58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-01-21

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  2. Forging Fast Ion Conducting Nanochannels with Swift Heavy Ions: The Correlated Role of Local Electronic and Atomic Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachan, Ritesh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Material Science and Technology Division; Cooper, Valentino R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Material Science and Technology Division; Liu, Bin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Voas, Brian K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Lang, Maik [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Ou, Xin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Functional Material for Informatics; Trautmann, Christina [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany); Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany). Dept. of Materials Science; Zhang, Yanwen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Material Science and Technology Division; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Chisholm, Matthew F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Material Science and Technology Division; Weber, William J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Material Science and Technology Division

    2016-12-19

    Atomically disordered oxides have attracted significant attention in recent years due to the possibility of enhanced ionic conductivity. However, the correlation between atomic disorder, corresponding electronic structure, and the resulting oxygen diffusivity is not well understood. The disordered variants of the ordered pyrochlore structure in gadolinium titanate (Gd2Ti2O7) are seen as a particularly interesting prospect due to intrinsic presence of a vacant oxygen site in the unit atomic structure, which could provide a channel for fast oxygen conduction. In this paper, we provide insights into the subangstrom scale on the disordering-induced variations in the local atomic environment and its effect on the electronic structure in high-energy ion irradiation-induced disordered nanochannels, which can be utilized as pathways for fast oxygen ion transport. With the help of an atomic plane-by-plane-resolved analyses, the work shows how the presence of various types of TiOx polyhedral that exist in the amorphous and disordered crystalline phase modify the electronic structures relative to the ordered pyrochlore phase in Gd2Ti2O7. Finally, the correlated molecular dynamics simulations on the disordered structures show a remarkable enhancement in oxygen diffusivity as compared with ordered pyrochlore lattice and make that a suitable candidate for applications requiring fast oxygen conduction.

  3. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  4. Overview of Three-Dimensional Atomic-Resolution Holography and Imaging Techniques: Recent Advances in Local-Structure Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Hiroshi

    2018-06-01

    Local three-dimensional (3D) atomic arrangements without periodicity have not been able to be studied until recently. Recently, several holographies and related techniques have been developed to reveal the 3D atomic arrangement around specific atoms with no translational symmetry. This review gives an overview of these new local 3D atomic imaging techniques.

  5. Atom-atom collision cascades localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsanov, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of an impurity and thermal vibration influence on the atom-atom collision cascade development is analysed by the computer simulation method (the modificated dynamic model). It is discovered that the relatively low energetic cascades are localized with the temperature increase of an irradiated crystal. On the basis of the given effect the mechanism of splitting of the high energetic cascades into subcascades is proposed. It accounts for two factors: the primary knocked atom energy and the irradiated crystal temperature. Introduction of an impurity also localizes the cascades independently from the impurity atom mass. The cascades localization leads to intensification of the process of annealing in the cascades and reduction of the post-cascade vacancy cluster sizes. (author)

  6. Characterization of iron ferromagnetism by the local atomic volume: from three-dimensional structures to isolated atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Sob, M; Wu, Zhe; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2014-02-26

    We present a comprehensive study of the relationship between the ferromagnetism and the structural properties of Fe systems from three-dimensional ones to isolated atoms based on the spin-density functional theory. We have found a relation between the magnetic moment and the volume of the Voronoi polyhedron, determining, in most cases, the value of the total magnetic moment as a function of this volume with an average accuracy of ±0.28 μ(B) and of the 3d magnetic moment with an average accuracy of ±0.07 μ(B) when the atomic volume is larger than 22 ų. It is demonstrated that this approach is applicable for many three-dimensional systems, including high-symmetry structures of perfect body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close-packed (hcp), double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp), and simple cubic (sc) crystals, as well as for lower-symmetry ones, for example atoms near a grain boundary (GB) or a surface, around a vacancy or in a linear chain (for low-dimensional cases, we provide a generalized definition of the Voronoi polyhedron). Also, we extend the validity of the Stoner model to low-dimensional structures, such as atomic chains, free-standing monolayers and surfaces, determining the Stoner parameter for these systems. The ratio of the 3d-exchange splitting to the magnetic moment, corresponding to the Stoner parameter, is found to be I(3d) = (0.998 ± 0.006) eV /μ(B) for magnetic moments up to 3.0 μ(B). Further, the 3d exchange splitting changes nearly linearly in the region of higher magnetic moments (3.0-4.0 μ(B)) and the corresponding Stoner exchange parameter equals I(h)(3d) = (0.272 ± 0.006) eV /μ(B). The existence of these two regions reflects the fact that, with increasing Voronoi volume, the 3d bands separate first and, consequently, the 3d magnetic moment increases. When the Voronoi volume is sufficiently large (≥22 ų), the separation of the 3d bands is complete and the magnetic moment reaches a value of 3.0

  7. Characterization of iron ferromagnetism by the local atomic volume: from three-dimensional structures to isolated atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Šob, M; Wu, Zhe; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the relationship between the ferromagnetism and the structural properties of Fe systems from three-dimensional ones to isolated atoms based on the spin-density functional theory. We have found a relation between the magnetic moment and the volume of the Voronoi polyhedron, determining, in most cases, the value of the total magnetic moment as a function of this volume with an average accuracy of ±0.28 μ B and of the 3d magnetic moment with an average accuracy of ±0.07 μ B when the atomic volume is larger than 22 Å 3 . It is demonstrated that this approach is applicable for many three-dimensional systems, including high-symmetry structures of perfect body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close-packed (hcp), double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp), and simple cubic (sc) crystals, as well as for lower-symmetry ones, for example atoms near a grain boundary (GB) or a surface, around a vacancy or in a linear chain (for low-dimensional cases, we provide a generalized definition of the Voronoi polyhedron). Also, we extend the validity of the Stoner model to low-dimensional structures, such as atomic chains, free-standing monolayers and surfaces, determining the Stoner parameter for these systems. The ratio of the 3d-exchange splitting to the magnetic moment, corresponding to the Stoner parameter, is found to be I 3d = (0.998 ± 0.006) eV /μ B for magnetic moments up to 3.0 μ B . Further, the 3d exchange splitting changes nearly linearly in the region of higher magnetic moments (3.0–4.0 μ B ) and the corresponding Stoner exchange parameter equals I 3d h =(0.272±0.006) eV/μ B . The existence of these two regions reflects the fact that, with increasing Voronoi volume, the 3d bands separate first and, consequently, the 3d magnetic moment increases. When the Voronoi volume is sufficiently large (≥22 Å 3 ), the separation of the 3d bands is complete and the magnetic moment reaches a value of 3.0

  8. Electronic Structures Localized at the Boron Atom in Amorphous Fe-B and Fe-B-P Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hidehiro; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    1989-11-01

    The electronic structures localized at the B in amorphous Fe-B and Fe-B-P alloys and their crystallized alloys were studied by Auger valence electron spectroscopy and the states of solute B are discussed based on the change in the degree of covalent bonding and the charge transfer between the Fe and B atoms. In amorphous phases, the charge transfers from Fe to B above 15at%B where B atoms occupy the substitutionallike situations, and from B to Fe below 15at%B where B atoms occupy the interstitiallike situations. Magnetic properties depend on such states of solute B. In crystalline phases, covalent bonding becomes dominant because the electron excitation occurs to the B2p state. Consequently, amorphous phases are more metallic in character than crystalline phases and amorphous structures are stabilized by a mixture of more than two different bonding states.

  9. Local atomic interdiffusion in CdTe/HgCdTe multilayered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.; Ourmazd, A.; Feldman, R.D.; Rentschler, J.A.; Taylor, D.W.; Austin, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors combine chemical lattice imaging with digital pattern recognition to study atomic interdiffusion at individual CdTe/HgCdTe interfaces in multi-quantum well structures. In this way they obtain quantitative composition profiles for as grown samples, and investigate their development as a function of annealing temperature. The authors' results indicate that interdiffusion depends on the position of the quantum well with respect to the surface, beginning first at quantum wells close to the surface, and proceeding towards the substrate. The authors' approach allows the quantification of interdiffusion as a function of time, temperature, and distance from the surface. The implications of these results for the stability of CdTe/HgCdTe structures, and the interpretation of X-ray data are discussed

  10. The role of electron localization in the atomic structure of transition-metal 13-atom clusters: the example of Co13, Rh13, and Hf13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Maurício J; Piquini, Paulo; Cândido, Ladir; Da Silva, Juarez L F

    2011-10-14

    The crystalline structure of transition-metals (TM) has been widely known for several decades, however, our knowledge on the atomic structure of TM clusters is still far from satisfactory, which compromises an atomistic understanding of the reactivity of TM clusters. For example, almost all density functional theory (DFT) calculations for TM clusters have been based on local (local density approximation--LDA) and semilocal (generalized gradient approximation--GGA) exchange-correlation functionals, however, it is well known that plain DFT fails to correct the self-interaction error, which affects the properties of several systems. To improve our basic understanding of the atomic and electronic properties of TM clusters, we report a DFT study within two nonlocal functionals, namely, the hybrid HSE (Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof) and GGA+U functionals, of the structural and electronic properties of the Co(13), Rh(13), and Hf(13) clusters. For Co(13) and Rh(13), we found that improved exchange-correlation functionals decrease the stability of open structures such as the hexagonal bilayer (HBL) and double simple-cubic (DSC) compared with the compact icosahedron (ICO) structure, however, DFT-GGA, DFT-GGA+U, and DFT-HSE yield very similar results for Hf(13). Thus, our results suggest that the DSC structure obtained by several plain DFT calculations for Rh(13) can be improved by the use of improved functionals. Using the sd hybridization analysis, we found that a strong hybridization favors compact structures, and hence, a correct description of the sd hybridization is crucial for the relative energy stability. For example, the sd hybridization decreases for HBL and DSC and increases for ICO in the case of Co(13) and Rh(13), while for Hf(13), the sd hybridization decreases for all configurations, and hence, it does not affect the relative stability among open and compact configurations.

  11. Local atomic and electronic structure in glassy metallic alloys. Final report, March 1, 1979-May 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messmer, R.P.; Wong, J.

    1982-01-01

    The research results reported, represent the first coordinated experimental-theoretical effort to arrive at important local atomic and electronic structure information in glassy alloys. During the three years covered by the contract, significant experimental and theoretical developments have taken place both in the general technical community and at General Electric which have had an important impact on the approach to this problem. This is particularly true in the theoretical area where two important advances, the development of a general Xα-LCAO approach, and the development of a general and accurate effective potential approach for density functional methods, have allowed us to construct a new computational capability which combines these two advances. Two subsections briefly review the experimental and theoretical technical developments, respectively. These developments have changed initial perspectives regarding research on local atomic and electronic structure in glassy metallic alloys. Section II presents a synopsis of our accomplishments during the contract period and Section III contains a more detailed discussion of some of these accomplishments, namely those portions of the work which have been published or submitted for publication at the time of writing this final report

  12. Characterization of iron ferromagnetism by the local atomic volume: from three-dimensional structures to isolated atoms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, L.; Šob, Mojmír; Wu, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, G-H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 8 (2014), 086002-1-086002-17 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/0311; GA AV ČR IAA100100920 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : electronic structure * magnetism * iron * ab initio calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.346, year: 2014

  13. EXAFS as a tool for investigation of the local environment of Ge atoms in buried low-dimensional structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demchenko, I.N.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Zakharov, D.N.; Zhuravlev, K.S.

    2005-01-01

    In spite of large number of articles dedicated to the investigation of GeSi islands, a lot of problems concerning growth mechanism and island composition, as well as elastic strains inside the QDs, are still unsolved. To solve such problems, the GeSi low dimensional structures were studied by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The aim of this investigation was to get knowledge about the local structure around Ge atoms inside formed quantum dots. The paper presents a series of measurements performed for a single Ge layer buried in the silicon matrix at A1 station at the HASYLAB/DESY (Germany) with the angle of 45 o between the incident beam and sample surface. The fluorescence, total electron yield and the transmission modes of detection were used. To confirm the EXAFS analysis conclusion more measurements were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The low temperature samples with 8-20 ML of Ge were investigated by cross-section and plan-view TEM. The reported results of TEM studies of the local structure of germanium quantum dots (QDs) in Si/Ge/Si '' sandwich '' structures are in good correlation with EXAFS conclusion

  14. The effect of the electronic structure, phase transition, and localized dynamics of atoms in the formation of tiny particles of gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Mubarak, E-mail: mubarak74@comsats.edu.pk, E-mail: mubarak74@mail.com [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics (Pakistan); Lin, I-Nan [Tamkang University, Department of Physics (China)

    2017-01-15

    In addition to self-governing properties, tiny-sized particles of metallic colloids are the building blocks of large-sized particles; thus, their study has been the subject of a large number of publications. In the present work, it has been discussed that geometry structure of tiny particle made through atom-to-atom amalgamation depends on attained dynamics of gold atoms along with protruded orientations. The localized process conditions direct two-dimensional structure of a tiny particle at atomically flat air-solution interface while heating locally dynamically approached atoms, thus, negate the role of van der Waals interactions. At electronphoton-solution interface, impinging electrons stretch or deform atoms of tiny particles depending on the mechanism of impingement. In addition, to strike regular grid of electrons ejected on split of atoms not executing excitations and de-excitations of their electrons, atoms of tiny particles also deform or stretch while occupying various sites depending on the process of synergy. Under suitable impinging electron streams, those tiny particles in monolayer two-dimensional structure electron states of their atoms are diffused in the direction of transferred energy, thus, coincide to the next adjacent atoms in each one-dimensional array dealing the same sort of behavior. Instantaneously, photons of adequate energy propagate on the surfaces of such electronic structures and modify those into smooth elements, thus, disregard the phenomenon of localized surface plasmons. This study highlights the fundamental process of formation of tiny particles where the role of localized dynamics of atoms and their electronic structure along with interaction to light are discussed. Such a tool of processing materials, in nonequilibrium pulse-based process, opens a number of possibilities to develop engineered materials with specific chemical, optical, and electronic properties.

  15. Non-local effects in kaonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.; Florkowski, W.

    2000-04-01

    Optical potentials with non-local (gradient) terms are used to describe the spectra of kaonic atoms. The strength of the non-local terms is determined from a many-body calculation of the kaon self-energy in nuclear matter. The optical potentials show strong non-linearities in the nucleon density and sizeable non-local terms. We find that the non-local terms are quantitatively important and the results depend strongly on the way the gradient terms are arranged. Phenomenologically successful fits are obtained for p-wave like optical potentials. It is suggested that the microscopic form of the non-local interaction terms is obtained systematically by means of a semi-classical expansion of the nucleus structure. We conclude that a microscopic description of kaonic atom data requires further detailed studies of the microscopic K - nuclear dynamics. (orig.)

  16. Non-Local Effects in Kaonic Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.; Florkowski, W.

    2000-01-01

    Optical potentials with non-local (gradient) terms are used to describe the spectra of kaonic atoms. The strength of the non-local terms is determined from a many-body calculation of the kaon self energy in nuclear matter. We find that the non-local terms are quantitatively important and the results depend strongly on the way the gradient terms are arranged. Phenomenologically successful description is obtained for p-wave like optical potentials. It is suggested that the microscopic form of the non-local interaction terms is obtained systematically by means of a semi-classical expansion of the nucleus structure. (author)

  17. Temperature dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La1-xSrxMnO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenholz, Elke; Mannella, N.; Booth, C.H.; Rosenhahn, A.; Sell, B.C.; Nambu, A.; Marchesini, S.; Mun, B. S.; Yang, S.-H.; Watanabe, M.; Ibrahim, K.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.; Guo, J.; Tomioka, Y.; Fadley, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the temperature-dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La 1-x Sr x MnO 3 (x= 0.3-0.4) with core and valence level photoemission (PE), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and magnetometry. As the temperature is varied across the Curie temperature T c , our PE experiments reveal a dramatic change of the electronic structure involving an increase in the Mn spin moment from ∼ 3 (micro)B to ∼ 4 (micro)B, and a modification of the local chemical environment of the other constituent atoms indicative of electron localization on the Mn atom. These effects are reversible and exhibit a slow-timescale ∼200 K-wide hysteresis centered at T c . Based upon the probing depths accessed in our PE measurements, these effects seem to survive for at least 35-50 (angstrom) inward from the surface, while other consistent signatures for this modification of the electronic structure are revealed by more bulk sensitive spectroscopies like XAS and XES/RIXS. We interpret these effects as spectroscopic fingerprints for polaron formation, consistent with the presence of local Jahn-Teller distortions of the MnO 6 octahedra around the Mn atom, as revealed by the EXAFS data. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in addition show typical signatures of ferro-magnetic clusters formation well above the Curie temperature

  18. Change in local atomic and chemical bonding structures of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloys by isothermal heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woo-Sik; Cho, Sung-June; Lee, Hyun-Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we report evaluation of the atomic-scale phase transformation characteristics in one of the most comprehensively utilized phase change materials today, Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 thin film. The phase transformation of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 thin film from amorphous to hexagonal structure via fcc structure was confirmed by XRD measurements. The approximate values of optical energy gap are 0.72 and 0.50 eV, with slopes (B 1/2 ) in the extended absorption region of 5.3 x 10 5 and 10 x 10 5 cm -1 ·eV -1 for the amorphous and fcc-crystalline structures, respectively. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed strengthening of the Te-Te bond as well as weakening of the Ge-Te bond during the amorphous-to-crystalline transition. This trend was also observed in extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis where the Ge metallic bond lengths in the amorphous, fcc, and hexagonal structures were 0.262, 0.280, and 0.290 nm

  19. Transient localization in the kicked Rydberg atom

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, E.; Fürthauer, S.; Wimberger, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the long-time limit of quantum localization of the kicked Rydberg atom. The kicked Rydberg atom is shown to possess in addition to the quantum localization time $\\tau_L$ a second cross-over time $t_D$ where quantum dynamics diverges from classical dynamics towards increased instability. The quantum localization is shown to vanish as either the strength of the kicks at fixed principal quantum number or the quantum number at fixed kick strength increases. The survival probability...

  20. Atom localization with double-cascade configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, Maksim Yu; Rozhdestvensky, Yuri V; Efremova, Ekaterina A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) atom localization of a four-level system in a double-cascade configuration. We demonstrate the possibility of 1D localization in the field of a standing wave, 2D localization in the field of two standing waves and 2D localization only in the field of running waves by using different configurations of driven waves on transitions. In addition, for each configuration we reached a high-precision atom localization in one of the states at scales much smaller than the wavelength of the incident optical radiation. (paper)

  1. Local atomic structure and chemical order in amorphous SiGe:H and SiC:H alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarkiewicz, T.; Stapinski, T.

    1994-01-01

    The local structure and chemical ordering in amorphous hydrogenated silicon-germanium and silicon-carbon alloys were analyzed mainly with the help of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, Raman scattering and electron diffraction. Ge-Ge and Ge-Si distances were found to be independent of concentration and the composition of the first coordination shell around Ge is consistent with a random mixing of the two species in a-Si 1-x Ge:H alloy. The first-coordination-shell average bond lengths for Si-Si and SiC in a-Si 1-x C x :H are also constant with concentration x and the comparison of the first coordination shell composition around Si with average concentration indicates that the alloys tends to be chemically ordered. The degree of crystallinity in microcrystalline Si films determined by EXAFS is in agreement with that obtained in Raman scattering analysis. (author). 16 refs, 5 figs

  2. Atomic Reference Data for Electronic Structure Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, S; Shirley, E L

    We have generated data for atomic electronic structure calculations, to provide a standard reference for results of specified accuracy under commonly used approximations. Results are presented here for total energies and orbital energy eigenvalues for all atoms from H to U, at microHartree accuracy in the total energy, as computed in the local-density approximation (LDA) the local-spin-density approximation (LSD); the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA); and scalar-relativistic local-density approximation (ScRLDA).

  3. Transient localization in the kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Emil; Fuerthauer, S.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Wimberger, S.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the long-time limit of quantum localization of the kicked Rydberg atom. The kicked Rydberg atom is shown to possess in addition to the quantum localization time τ L a second crossover time t D where quantum dynamics diverges from classical dynamics towards increased instability. The quantum localization is shown to vanish as either the strength of the kicks at fixed principal quantum number or the quantum number at fixed kick strength increases. The survival probability as a function of frequency in the transient localization regime τ L D is characterized by highly irregular, fractal-like fluctuations

  4. Subwavelength atom localization via coherent population trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, G S; Kapale, K T

    2006-01-01

    We present an atom localization scheme based on coherent population trapping. We consider atomic transitions in a Lambda configuration where the control field is a standing-wave field. The probe field and the control field produce coherence between the two ground states and prepare the atom in a pure state. We show that the population in one of the ground states has the same fringe pattern as produced by a Fabry-Perot interferometer and thus measurement of this population would localize the atom. Interestingly enough the role of the cavity finesse is played by the ratio of the intensities of the pump and probe. This is in fact the reason for obtaining extreme subwavelength localization

  5. Localization of atomic ensembles via superfluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macovei, Mihai; Evers, Joerg; Keitel, Christoph H.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2007-01-01

    The subwavelength localization of an ensemble of atoms concentrated to a small volume in space is investigated. The localization relies on the interaction of the ensemble with a standing wave laser field. The light scattered in the interaction of the standing wave field and the atom ensemble depends on the position of the ensemble relative to the standing wave nodes. This relation can be described by a fluorescence intensity profile, which depends on the standing wave field parameters and the ensemble properties and which is modified due to collective effects in the ensemble of nearby particles. We demonstrate that the intensity profile can be tailored to suit different localization setups. Finally, we apply these results to two localization schemes. First, we show how to localize an ensemble fixed at a certain position in the standing wave field. Second, we discuss localization of an ensemble passing through the standing wave field

  6. Quantum localization of the kicked rydberg atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida; Reinhold; Burgdorfer

    2000-03-20

    We investigate the quantum localization of the one-dimensional Rydberg atom subject to a unidirectional periodic train of impulses. For high frequencies of the train the classical system becomes chaotic and leads to fast ionization. By contrast, the quantum system is found to be remarkably stable. We find this quantum localization to be directly related to the existence of "scars" of the unstable periodic orbits of the system. The localization length is given by the energy excursion along the periodic orbits.

  7. Local crystallography analysis for atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Li, Qing; Belianinov, Alexei; Gai, Zheng; Baddorf, Arthur P; Pan, Minghu; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Sales, Brian C; Sefat, Athena

    2013-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful and flexible tool for atomically resolved imaging of surface structures. However, due to the amount of information extracted, in many cases the interpretation of such data is limited to being qualitative and semi-quantitative in nature. At the same time, much can be learned from local atom parameters, such as distances and angles, that can be analyzed and interpreted as variations of local chemical bonding, or order parameter fields. Here, we demonstrate an iterative algorithm for indexing and determining atomic positions that allows the analysis of inhomogeneous surfaces. This approach is further illustrated by local crystallographic analysis of several real surfaces, including highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and an Fe-based superconductor FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 . This study provides a new pathway to extract and quantify local properties for scanning probe microscopy images. (paper)

  8. Unusual glass-forming ability induced by changes in the local atomic structure in Ti-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y C; Chang, H J; Kim, D H; Kim, W T; Cha, P R

    2007-01-01

    The effect of partial replacement of Cu by Be in Ti 50 Cu 32 Ni 15 Sn 3 alloy on the thermal properties, structure, and forming ability of an amorphous phase were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray diffraction (XRD), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti 50 Cu 25 Ni 15 Sn 3 Be 7 alloy shows enhanced glass-forming ability, enabling one to fabricate a fully amorphous bulk metallic glass sample 2 mm in diameter by injection casting. With the replacement, the supercooled liquid region ΔT x (= T x -T g , where T x is the crystallization temperature and T g is the glass transition temperature) decreased from 73 to 45 K and the reduced glass transition temperature T rg (= T g /T 1 , where T 1 is the liquidus temperature) increased from 0.53 to 0.57. The amorphous Ti 50 Cu 25 Ni 15 Sn 3 Be 7 phase showed a formation of short-range-ordered clusters 1-2 nm in size, which is attributed to the strong interaction between Ti and Be. The results show that ΔT x can be used as a thermal parameter reflecting the glass-forming ability of the alloy only when the phase formed during crystallization is the same as the phase competing with the glass transition during solidification

  9. Modelling the local atomic structure of molybdenum in nuclear waste glasses with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Peter V; Duffy, Dorothy M

    2016-09-21

    The nature of chemical bonding of molybdenum in high level nuclear waste glasses has been elucidated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Two compositions, (SiO 2 ) 57.5 -(B 2 O 3 ) 10 -(Na 2 O) 15 -(CaO) 15 -(MoO 3 ) 2.5 and (SiO 2 ) 57.3 -(B 2 O 3 ) 20 -(Na 2 O) 6.8 -(Li 2 O) 13.4 -(MoO 3 ) 2.5 , were considered in order to investigate the effect of ionic and covalent components on the glass structure and the formation of the crystallisation precursors (Na 2 MoO 4 and CaMoO 4 ). The coordination environments of Mo cations and the corresponding bond lengths calculated from our model are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. The analysis of the first coordination shell reveals two different types of molybdenum host matrix bonds in the lithium sodium borosilicate glass. Based on the structural data and the bond valence model, we demonstrate that the Mo cation can be found in a redox state and the molybdate tetrahedron can be connected with the borosilicate network in a way that inhibits the formation of crystalline molybdates. These results significantly extend our understanding of bonding in Mo-containing nuclear waste glasses and demonstrate that tailoring the glass composition to specific heavy metal constituents can facilitate incorporation of heavy metals at high concentrations.

  10. Four-parameter analytical local model potential for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei, Yu; Jiu-Xun, Sun; Rong-Gang, Tian; Wei, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Analytical local model potential for modeling the interaction in an atom reduces the computational effort in electronic structure calculations significantly. A new four-parameter analytical local model potential is proposed for atoms Li through Lr, and the values of four parameters are shell-independent and obtained by fitting the results of X a method. At the same time, the energy eigenvalues, the radial wave functions and the total energies of electrons are obtained by solving the radial Schrödinger equation with a new form of potential function by Numerov's numerical method. The results show that our new form of potential function is suitable for high, medium and low Z atoms. A comparison among the new potential function and other analytical potential functions shows the greater flexibility and greater accuracy of the present new potential function. (atomic and molecular physics)

  11. Atomic structure in black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, Yukinori

    2006-01-01

    We propose that any black hole has atomic structure in its inside and has no horizon as a model of black holes. Our proposal is founded on a mean field approximation of gravity. The structure of our model consists of a (charged) singularity at the center and quantum fluctuations of fields around the singularity, namely, it is quite similar to that of atoms. Any properties of black holes, e.g. entropy, can be explained by the model. The model naturally quantizes black holes. In particular, we find the minimum black hole, whose structure is similar to that of the hydrogen atom and whose Schwarzschild radius is approximately 1.1287 times the Planck length. Our approach is conceptually similar to Bohr's model of the atomic structure, and the concept of the minimum Schwarzschild radius is similar to that of the Bohr radius. The model predicts that black holes carry baryon number, and the baryon number is rapidly violated. This baryon number violation can be used as verification of the model. (author)

  12. Construction of localized atomic wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjani, S Sree; Kapoor, A K; Panigrahi, P K

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that highly localized solitons can be created in lower dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), trapped in a regular harmonic trap, by temporally varying the trap frequency. A BEC confined in such a trap can be effectively used to construct a pulsed atomic laser emitting coherent atomic wave packets. In addition to having a complete control over the spatio-temporal dynamics of the solitons, we can separate the equation governing the Kohn mode (centre of mass motion). We investigate the effect of the temporal modulation of the trap frequency on the spatio-temporal dynamics of the bright solitons and also on the Kohn mode. The dynamics of the solitons and the variations in the Kohn mode with time are compared with those in a BEC confined in a trap with unmodulated trap frequency.

  13. A study of the local atomic structure in Hg0.80Cd0.20Te using x-ray diffuse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, J.P.; Cohen, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    The local atomic arrangements in a commercial n-type wafer of Hg 0.8 Cd 0.2 Te were investigated by measuring the diffuse x-ray scattering in two volumes in reciprocal space. A change in contrast between the two measurements was achieved by making one volume measurement at 12037 eV and a second volume measurement at 12270 eV, i.e., near the Hg L III edge. The difference between these two measurements yielded intensity only due to Hg--Hg, Hg--Te, and Hg--Cd pair interactions. In all three patterns, peak-like features were apparent at the forbidden Bragg peak positions on thermal diffuse scattering ridges that joined major Bragg reflections; these are primarily attributed to second order displacement effects on the mixed cation sublattice. The first two Warren-Cowley short-range order parameters were determined to be α 1/2 1/2 0 =-0.050(26) and α 110 =0.118(35). Simulations of the structure revealed small ordered regions with a preference for 3:1 Hg--Cd near neighbor configurations. The near-neighbor Hg--Te bonds contract from that calculated from the average crystal's lattice parameter, and this Hg--Te distance is less than the distance in HgTe

  14. The atomic structure of transition metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Chemical reactions are used to probe the atomic (geometrical) structure of isolated clusters of transition metal atoms. The number of adsorbate molecules that saturate a cluster, and/or the binding energy of molecules to cluster surfaces, are determined as a function of cluster size. Systematics in these properties often make it possible to propose geometrical structures consistent with the experimental observations. We will describe how studies of the reactions of cobalt and nickel clusters with ammonia, water, and nitrogen provide important and otherwise unavailable structural information. Specifically, small (less than 20 atoms) clusters of cobalt and nickel atoms adopt entirely different structures, the former having packing characteristic of the bulk and the latter having pentagonal symmetry. These observations provide important input for model potentials that attempt to describe the local properties of transition metals. In particular, they point out the importance of a proper treatment of d-orbital binding in these systems, since cobalt and nickel differ so little in their d-orbital occupancy

  15. Two-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi-Ping; Ge Qiang; Ruan Yu-Hua; Yu Ben-Li

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via probe absorption in a coherently driven four-level atomic system by means of a radio-frequency field driving a hyperfine transition. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D atom localization can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography via atom localization

  16. Extreme sub-wavelength atom localization via coherent population trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Girish S.; Kapale, Kishore T.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate an atom localization scheme based on monitoring of the atomic coherences. We consider atomic transitions in a Lambda configuration where the control field is a standing wave field. The probe field and the control field produce coherence between the two ground states. We show that this coherence has the same fringe pattern as produced by a Fabry-Perot interferometer and thus measurement of the atomic coherence would localize the atom. Interestingly enough the role of the cavity ...

  17. Local order dynamics: its application to the study of atomic mobility, of point defects in crystalline alloys, and of structural relaxation in amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balanzat, Emmanuel

    1983-01-01

    This research thesis addressed the study of the atomic mobility mechanism and of the atom movement dynamics in the case of crystalline alloys and of amorphous alloys. The first part is based on a previous study performed on an α-Cu 70 -Zn 30 crystalline alloy, and addresses the case of an α-Au 70 -Ni 30 alloy. The specificity of this case relies in the fact that the considered solid solution is metastable and susceptible to de-mixing in the considered temperature range. This case of off-equilibrium crystalline alloy is at the crossroad between steady crystalline alloys and metallic glasses which are studied in the second part. The third part addresses the irradiation of metallic amorphous alloys by fast particles (neutrons or electrons). The author tried to characterise atomic defects induced by irradiation and to compare them with pre-existing ones. He studied how these defects may change atomic mobility, and, more generally, to which extent the impact of energetic particles could modify local order status

  18. Current Capability of Atomic Structure Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ki

    1993-01-01

    Current capability of atomic structure theory is reviewed, and advantages, disadvantages and major features of popular atomic structure codes described. Comparisons between theoretical and experimental data on transition energies and lifetimes of excited levels are presented to illustrate the current capability of atomic structure codes.

  19. Resonance fluorescence based two- and three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Abdul; Rahmatullah; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-06-01

    Two- and three-dimensional atom localization in a two-level atom-field system via resonance fluorescence is suggested. For the two-dimensional localization, the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields, whereas for the three-dimensional atom localization, the atom interacts with three orthogonal standing-wave fields. The effect of the detuning and phase shifts associated with the corresponding standing-wave fields is investigated. A precision enhancement in position measurement of the single atom can be noticed via the control of the detuning and phase shifts.

  20. Analytical local electron-electron interaction model potentials for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Reiher, Markus; Hinze, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Analytical local potentials for modeling the electron-electron interaction in an atom reduce significantly the computational effort in electronic structure calculations. The development of such potentials has a long history, but some promising ideas have not yet been taken into account for further improvements. We determine a local electron-electron interaction potential akin to those suggested by Green et al. [Phys. Rev. 184, 1 (1969)], which are widely used in atom-ion scattering calculations, electron-capture processes, and electronic structure calculations. Generalized Yukawa-type model potentials are introduced. This leads, however, to shell-dependent local potentials, because the origin behavior of such potentials is different for different shells as has been explicated analytically [J. Neugebauer, M. Reiher, and J. Hinze, Phys. Rev. A 65, 032518 (2002)]. It is found that the parameters that characterize these local potentials can be interpolated and extrapolated reliably for different nuclear charges and different numbers of electrons. The analytical behavior of the corresponding localized Hartree-Fock potentials at the origin and at long distances is utilized in order to reduce the number of fit parameters. It turns out that the shell-dependent form of Green's potential, which we also derive, yields results of comparable accuracy using only one shell-dependent parameter

  1. Light localization in cold and dense atomic ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    We report on results of theoretical analysis of possibilities of light strong (Anderson) localization in a cold atomic ensemble. We predict appearance of localization in dense atomic systems in strong magnetic field. We prove that in absence of the field the light localization is impossible. (paper)

  2. Effect of Cu insertion on structural, local electronic/atomic structure and photocatalyst properties of TiO{sub 2}, ZnO and Ni(OH){sub 2} nanostructures: XANES-EXAFS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Aditya; Varshney, Mayora [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyun Joon, E-mail: shj001@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (POSTECH), Pohang, 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byeong-Hyeon [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Keun Hwa, E-mail: khchae@kist.re.kr [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Won, Sung Ok, E-mail: sowon@kist.re.kr [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 02792 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    We report detailed investigations on the synthesis, structural, morphology, electronic/atomic structure and photocatalyst properties of Cu doped TiO{sub 2}, ZnO and Ni(OH){sub 2} nanostructures. All of the samples were synthesized by using the chemical precipitation method. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and photocatalyst measurements. XRD studies revealed single phase nature of the samples and omitted the presence of trivial metallic or binary oxide phases. TiO{sub 2} set of samples have shown nanorod kind of morphology, however TEM images of ZnO and Ni(OH){sub 2} set of samples depicted the spherical morphology of particles. XANES spectra at the Cu K-edge and Cu L-edge, along with the atomic multiplet calculations, revealed the predominance of Cu{sup 2+} ions in all of the samples, within the entire doping range. Ti L-edge and Ti K-edge XANES confirmed the existence of Ti{sup 4+} ions in the pure and Cu doped TiO{sub 2} samples with anatase local structure. Zn L-edge XANES results confirmed the divalent character of Zn ions in the pure and Cu doped ZnO, which is further validated by the Zn K-edge XANES. Ni L-edge and Ni K-edge XANES conveyed the +2 valence state of Ni ions in the pure and Cu doped Ni (OH){sub 2} samples. EXAFS analysis at the Cu K-edge nullifies the formation of Cu metallic clusters and other trivial phases, suggesting random distribution of Cu atoms in the oxide materials. Though, local atomic arrangement of Cu ions is disparate in the different oxide compounds. As an application of the pure and Cu doped TiO{sub 2}, ZnO and Ni(OH){sub 2} nanostructures, towards the degradation of water pollutant dyes, we demonstrate that all of the samples can serve as effective photocatalyst materials towards the degradation of methyl orange aqueous pollutant dye under the UV-light irradiation

  3. Atom localization via controlled spontaneous emission in a five-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiping; Yu Benli; Zhu Jun; Cao Zhigang; Zhen Shenglai; Wu Xuqiang; Xu Feng

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the one- and two-dimensional atom localization behaviors via spontaneous emission in a coherently driven five-level atomic system by means of a radio-frequency field driving a hyperfine transition. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of atom localization behaviors can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters. More importantly, the two-dimensional atom localization patterns reveal that the maximal probability of finding an atom within the sub-wavelength domain of the standing waves can reach unity when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography via atom localization. - Highlights: ► One- and two-dimensional atom localization behaviors via spontaneous emission in five-level atoms are investigated. ► An assisting radio-frequency field is used to control the atom localization behaviors. ► High-precision and high-resolution two-dimensional atom localization can be realized in this scheme.

  4. Optical perturbation of atoms in weak localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedjour, A.

    2018-01-01

    We determine the microscopic transport parameters that are necessary to describe the diffusion process of the atomic gas in optical speckle. We use the self-consistent theory to calculate the self-energy of the atomic gas. We compute the spectral function numerically by an average over disorder realizations in terms of the Greens function. We focus mainly on the behaviour of the energy distribution of the atoms to estimate a correction to the mobility edge. Our results show that the energy distribution of the atoms locates the mobility edge position under the disorder amplitude. This behaviour changes for each disorder parameter. We conclude that the disorder amplitude potential induced modification of the energy distribution of the atoms that plays a major role for the prediction of the mobility edge.

  5. Three-dimensional atom localization via electromagnetically induced transparency in a three-level atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Cao, Dewei; Yu, Benli

    2016-05-01

    We present a new scheme for three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system via measuring the absorption of a weak probe field. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that, by properly varying the parameters of the system, the probability of finding the atom in 3D space can be almost 100%. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 3D atom localization, which provides some potential applications in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization.

  6. Manipulating localized molecular orbitals by single-atom contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weihua; Shi, Xingqiang; Lin, Chensheng; Zhang, Rui Qin; Minot, Christian; Van Hove, Michel A; Hong, Yuning; Tang, Ben Zhong; Lin, Nian

    2010-09-17

    We have fabricated atom-molecule contacts by attachment of single Cu atoms to terpyridine side groups of bis-terpyridine tetra-phenyl ethylene molecules on a Cu(111) surface. By means of scanning tunneling microscopy, spectroscopy, and density functional calculations, we have found that, due to the localization characteristics of molecular orbitals, the Cu-atom contact modifies the state localized at the terpyridine side group which is in contact with the Cu atom but does not affect the states localized at other parts of the molecule. These results illustrate the contact effects at individual orbitals and offer possibilities to manipulate orbital alignments within molecules.

  7. High-dimensional atom localization via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Jinyu; Yu, Benli

    2017-02-20

    We investigate the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) atom localization behaviors via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, it is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D and 3D atom localization behaviors can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters, the phase, amplitude, and initial population distribution. Interestingly, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency atom localization, which provides some potential applications in high-dimensional atom nanolithography.

  8. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakov, V V; Kazakov, V G; Kovalev, V S; Meshkov, O I; Yatsenko, A S

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists. (paper)

  9. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Kazakov, V. G.; Kovalev, V. S.; Meshkov, O. I.; Yatsenko, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists.

  10. Local atomic structure of Pd and Ag in the SiC containment layer of TRISO fuel particles fissioned to 20% burn-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Rachel L.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Velázquez, Daniel; Hunn, John D.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Terry, Jeff

    2018-03-01

    The structure and speciation of fission products within the SiC barrier layer of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles irradiated to 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) burnup in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was investigated. As-irradiated fuel particles, as well as those subjected to simulated accident scenarios, were examined. The TRISO particles were characterized using synchrotron X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The TRISO particles were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program and sent to the ATR for irradiation. XAFS measurements on the palladium and silver K-edges were collected using the MRCAT undulator beamline. Analysis of the Pd edge indicated the formation of palladium silicides of the form PdxSi (2 ≤ x ≤ 3). In contrast, Ag was found to be metallic within the SiC shell safety tested to 1700 °C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first result demonstrating metallic bonding of silver from fissioned samples. Knowledge of these reaction pathways will allow for better simulations of radionuclide transport in the various coating layers of TRISO fuels for next generation nuclear reactors. They may also suggest different ways to modify TRISO particles to improve their fuel performance and to mitigate potential fission product release under both normal operation and accident conditions.

  11. Radial behavior of the average local ionization energies of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politzer, P.; Murray, J.S.; Grice, M.E.; Brinck, T.; Ranganathan, S.

    1991-01-01

    The radial behavior of the average local ionization energy bar I(r) has been investigated for the atoms He--Kr, using ab initio Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions. bar I(r) is found to decrease in a stepwise manner with the inflection points serving effectively to define boundaries between electronic shells. There is a good inverse correlation between polarizability and the ionization energy in the outermost region of the atom, suggesting that bar I(r) may be a meaningful measure of local polarizabilities in atoms and molecules

  12. Modeling of the atomic and electronic structures of interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent tight binding and Car-Parrinello simulations of grain boundaries in semiconductors are reviewed. A critique is given of some models of embrittlement that are based on electronic structure considerations. The structural unit model of grain boundary structure is critically assessed using some results for mixed tilt and twist grain boundaries. A new method of characterizing interfacial structure in terms of bond angle distribution functions is described. A new formulation of thermodynamic properties of interfaces is presented which focusses on the local atomic environment. Effective, temperature dependent N-body atomic interactions are derived for studying grain boundary structure at elevated temperature

  13. Synthesis and atomic scale characterization of Er2O3 nanoparticles: enhancement of magnetic properties and changes in the local structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Eduardo L.; Bosch-Santos, Brianna; Freitas, Rafael S.; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Saiki, Mitiko; Carbonari, Artur W.

    2018-05-01

    In the investigation reported in this paper a modified thermal decomposition method was developed to produce very small Er2O3 nanoparticles (NPs). Particles structure, shape and size were characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy which showed that the synthesis by thermal decomposition under O2 atmosphere produced very small and monodisperse NPs, allowing the investigation of finite-size and surface effects. Results of magnetization measurements showed that the smallest particles present the highest values of susceptibility that decrease as particle size increases. Specific heat measurements indicate that the sample with the smallest NPs (diameter ∼5 nm) has a Néel temperature of 0.54 K. The local structure of particles was investigated by measurements of hyperfine interactions with perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy using 111Cd as probe nuclei replacing the cationic sites. Results showed that the relative population of sites 8b increases in both the core and surface layer of particles.

  14. 2D atom localization in a four-level tripod system in laser fields

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Vladimir; Rozhdestvensky, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    We propose a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization in a four-level tripod system under an influence of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom is retained in the atomic internal states by an additional probe field either of a standing or of a running wave. It is shown that the localization factors depend crucially on the atom-field coupling that results in such spatial structures of populations as spikes, craters and waves. We demonstrate a high-preci...

  15. Three-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a cascade four-level atomic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available For an atomic system with cascade four-level type, a useful scheme about three-dimensional (3D atom localization is proposed. In our scheme the atomic system is coherently controlled by using a radio-frequency field to couple with two-folded levels under the condition of the existence of probe absorption. Our results show that detecting precision of 3D atom localization may be obviously improved by properly adjusting the frequency detuning and strength of the radio-frequency driving field. So our scheme could be helpful to realize 3D atom localization with high-efficiency and high-precision . In the field of laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography, our studies provide potential applications.

  16. Three-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a cascade four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Deng, Li; Chen, Aixi

    2018-03-01

    For an atomic system with cascade four-level type, a useful scheme about three-dimensional (3D) atom localization is proposed. In our scheme the atomic system is coherently controlled by using a radio-frequency field to couple with two-folded levels under the condition of the existence of probe absorption. Our results show that detecting precision of 3D atom localization may be obviously improved by properly adjusting the frequency detuning and strength of the radio-frequency driving field. So our scheme could be helpful to realize 3D atom localization with high-efficiency and high-precision . In the field of laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography, our studies provide potential applications.

  17. Measurement of Local Gravity via a Cold Atom Interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Lin; Xiong Zong-Yuan; Yang Wei; Tang Biao; Peng Wen-Cui; Wang Yi-Bo; Xu Peng; Wang Jin; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a precision measurement of local gravity acceleration g in Wuhan by a compact cold atom interferometer. The atom interferometer is in vertical Mach—Zehnder configuration realized using a π/2 - π - π/2 Raman pulse sequence. Cold atoms were prepared in a magneto-optical trap, launched upward to form an atom fountain, and then coherently manipulated to interfere by stimulated Raman transition. Population signal vs Raman laser phase was recorded as interference fringes, and the local gravity was deduced from the interference signal. We have obtained a resolution of 7 × 10 −9 g after an integration time of 236s under the best vibrational environment conditions. The absolute g value was derived from the chirp rate with a difference of 1.5 × 10 −7 g compared to the gravity reference value. The tidal phenomenon was observed by continuously monitoring the local gravity over 123 h. (atomic and molecular physics)

  18. Subwavelength Localization of Atomic Excitation Using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Miles

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We report an experiment in which an atomic excitation is localized to a spatial width that is a factor of 8 smaller than the wavelength of the incident light. The experiment utilizes the sensitivity of the dark state of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT to the intensity of the coupling laser beam. A standing-wave coupling laser with a sinusoidally varying intensity yields tightly confined Raman excitations during the EIT process. The excitations, located near the nodes of the intensity profile, have a width of 100 nm. The experiment is performed using ultracold ^{87}Rb atoms trapped in an optical dipole trap, and atomic localization is achieved with EIT pulses that are approximately 100 ns long. To probe subwavelength atom localization, we have developed a technique that can measure the width of the atomic excitations with nanometer spatial resolution.

  19. Resonance fluorescence microscopy via three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta; Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Das, Nityananda; Mahapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A scheme is proposed to realize three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a driven two-level atomic system via resonance fluorescence. The field arrangement for the atom localization involves the application of three mutually orthogonal standing-wave fields and an additional traveling-wave coupling field. We have shown the efficacy of such field arrangement in tuning the spatially modulated resonance in all directions. Under different parametric conditions, the 3D localization patterns originate with various shapes such as sphere, sheets, disk, bowling pin, snake flute, flower vase. High-precision localization is achieved when the radiation field detuning equals twice the combined Rabi frequencies of the standing-wave fields. Application of a traveling-wave field of suitable amplitude at optimum radiation field detuning under symmetric standing-wave configuration leads to 100% detection probability even in sub-wavelength domain. Asymmetric field configuration is also taken into consideration to exhibit atom localization with appreciable precision compared to that of the symmetric case. The momentum distribution of the localized atoms is found to follow the Heisenberg uncertainty principle under the validity of Raman-Nath approximation. The proposed field configuration is suitable for application in the study of atom localization in an optical lattice arrangement.

  20. Focusing of atoms with spatially localized light pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helseth, Lars Egil

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically study the focusing of atoms using strongly localized light pulses. It is shown that when inhomogenously polarized light is focused at high angular apertures, one may obtain useful potentials for atom focusing. Here we analyze the case of pulsed light potentials for red- and blue-detuned focusings of atoms. In particular, we show that the atomic beam aperture must be stopped considerably down in order to reduce the sidelobes of the atomic density, which is similar to the situation often encountered in conventional optics. It is suggested that an annular aperture in front of the atomic beam could be useful for increasing the resolution, at the cost of a lower atomic density

  1. Efficient atom localization via probe absorption in an inverted-Y atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianchun; Wu, Bo; Mao, Jiejian

    2018-06-01

    The behaviour of atom localization in an inverted-Y atomic system is theoretically investigated. For the atoms interacting with a weak probe field and several orthogonal standing-wave fields, their position information can be obtained by measuring the probe absorption. Compared with the traditional scheme, we couple the probe field to the transition between the middle and top levels. It is found that the probe absorption sensitively depends on the detuning and strength of the relevant light fields. Remarkably, the atom can be localized at a particular position in the standing-wave fields by coupling a microwave field to the transition between the two ground levels.

  2. Entangling two transportable neutral atoms via local spin exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, A M; Lester, B J; Foss-Feig, M; Wall, M L; Rey, A M; Regal, C A

    2015-11-12

    To advance quantum information science, physical systems are sought that meet the stringent requirements for creating and preserving quantum entanglement. In atomic physics, robust two-qubit entanglement is typically achieved by strong, long-range interactions in the form of either Coulomb interactions between ions or dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms. Although such interactions allow fast quantum gates, the interacting atoms must overcome the associated coupling to the environment and cross-talk among qubits. Local interactions, such as those requiring substantial wavefunction overlap, can alleviate these detrimental effects; however, such interactions present a new challenge: to distribute entanglement, qubits must be transported, merged for interaction, and then isolated for storage and subsequent operations. Here we show how, using a mobile optical tweezer, it is possible to prepare and locally entangle two ultracold neutral atoms, and then separate them while preserving their entanglement. Ground-state neutral atom experiments have measured dynamics consistent with spin entanglement, and have detected entanglement with macroscopic observables; we are now able to demonstrate position-resolved two-particle coherence via application of a local gradient and parity measurements. This new entanglement-verification protocol could be applied to arbitrary spin-entangled states of spatially separated atoms. The local entangling operation is achieved via spin-exchange interactions, and quantum tunnelling is used to combine and separate atoms. These techniques provide a framework for dynamically entangling remote qubits via local operations within a large-scale quantum register.

  3. Application of GRID to Foreign Atom Localization in Single Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmann, A; Wesch, W; Weber, B; Börner, H G; Jentschel, M

    2000-01-01

    The application of GRID (Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening) spectroscopy to the localization of foreign atoms in single crystals is demonstrated on erbium in YAP. By the investigation of the Doppler broadened secondary γ line for two crystalline directions, the Er was determined to be localized on the Y site. Conditions for the nuclear parameters of the impurity atoms used for the application of GRID spectroscopy are discussed.

  4. Average and local atomic-scale structure in BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0. 10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics by high-energy x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Tripathi, Saurabh; Petkov, Valeri; Dapiaggi, Monica; Deluca, Marco; Gajović, Andreja; Ren, Yang

    2014-02-12

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and total scattering XRD coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis studies of the atomic-scale structure of archetypal BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0.10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics are presented over a wide temperature range (100-450 K). For x = 0.1 and 0.2 the results reveal, well above the Curie temperature, the presence of Ti-rich polar clusters which are precursors of a long-range ferroelectric order observed below TC. Polar nanoregions (PNRs) and relaxor behaviour are observed over the whole temperature range for x = 0.4. Irrespective of ceramic composition, the polar clusters are due to locally correlated off-centre displacement of Zr/Ti cations compatible with local rhombohedral symmetry. Formation of Zr-rich clusters is indicated by Raman spectroscopy for all compositions. Considering the isovalent substitution of Ti with Zr in BaZrxTi1-xO3, the mechanism of formation and growth of the PNRs is not due to charge ordering and random fields, but rather to a reduction of the local strain promoted by the large difference in ion size between Zr(4+) and Ti(4+). As a result, non-polar or weakly polar Zr-rich clusters and polar Ti-rich clusters are randomly distributed in a paraelectric lattice and the long-range ferroelectric order is disrupted with increasing Zr concentration.

  5. High-precision atom localization via controllable spontaneous emission in a cycle-configuration atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chunling; Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Hao, Xiangying; Wu, Ying

    2012-03-26

    A scheme for realizing two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is proposed based on controllable spontaneous emission in a coherently driven cycle-configuration atomic system. As the spatial-position-dependent atom-field interaction, the frequency of the spontaneously emitted photon carries the information about the position of the atom. Therefore, by detecting the emitted photon one could obtain the position information available, and then we demonstrate high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization induced by the quantum interference between the multiple spontaneous decay channels. Moreover, we can achieve 100% probability of finding the atom at an expected position by choosing appropriate system parameters under certain conditions.

  6. Two-dimensional atom localization via Raman-driven coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmatullah,; Qamar, Sajid, E-mail: sajid_qamar@comsats.edu.pk

    2014-02-07

    A scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via Raman-driven coherence in a four-level diamond-configuration system is suggested. The atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields where each standing-wave field is constructed from the superposition of the two-standing wave fields along the corresponding directions. Due to the position-dependent atom–field interaction, the frequency of the spontaneously emitted photon carries the position information about the atom. We investigate the effect of the detunings and phase shifts associated with standing-wave fields. Unique position information of the single atom is obtained by properly adjusting the system parameters. This is an extension of our previous proposal for one-dimensional atom localization via Raman-driven coherence.

  7. Scheme of 2-dimensional atom localization for a three-level atom via quantum coherence

    OpenAIRE

    Zafar, Sajjad; Ahmed, Rizwan; Khan, M. Khalid

    2013-01-01

    We present a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system. The scheme is based on quantum coherence via classical standing wave fields between the two excited levels. Our results show that conditional position probability is significantly phase dependent of the applied field and frequency detuning of spontaneously emitted photons. We obtain a single localization peak having probability close to unity by manipulating the control parameters. The effect of ato...

  8. Pattern recognition approach to quantify the atomic structure of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    We report a pattern recognition approach to detect the atomic structure in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of graphene. The approach provides quantitative information such as carbon-carbon bond lengths and bond length variations on a global and local scale alike. © 2014...

  9. Unraveling the atomic structure of ultrafine iron clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-12-18

    Unraveling the atomic structures of ultrafine iron clusters is critical to understanding their size-dependent catalytic effects and electronic properties. Here, we describe the stable close-packed structure of ultrafine Fe clusters for the first time, thanks to the superior properties of graphene, including the monolayer thickness, chemical inertness, mechanical strength, electrical and thermal conductivity. These clusters prefer to take regular planar shapes with morphology changes by local atomic shuffling, as suggested by the early hypothesis of solid-solid transformation. Our observations differ from observations from earlier experimental study and theoretical model, such as icosahedron, decahedron or cuboctahedron. No interaction was observed between Fe atoms or clusters and pristine graphene. However, preferential carving, as observed by other research groups, can be realized only when Fe clusters are embedded in graphene. The techniques introduced here will be of use in investigations of other clusters or even single atoms or molecules.

  10. Relativistic Collisions of Structured Atomic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Voitkiv, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The book reviews the progress achieved over the last decade in the study of collisions between an ion and an atom in which both the atomic particles carry electrons and can undergo transitions between their internal states -- including continua. It presents the detailed considerations of different theoretical approaches, that can be used to describe collisions of structured atomic particles for the very broad interval of impact energies ranging from 0.5--1 MeV/u till extreme relativistic energies where the collision velocity very closely approaches the speed of light.

  11. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches

    OpenAIRE

    Micklitz, T.; Müller, C. A.; Altland, A.

    2013-01-01

    Signatures of strong Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Anderson localization leads to a formation of a coherence peak in the \\emph{forward} scattering direction (as opposed to the common weak localization backscattering peak). We present a microscopic, and fully time...

  12. PDF analysis of PuAl alloys local structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platteau, C. [CEA Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)], E-mail: platteau.cyril@yahoo.fr; Bruckel, P.; Ravat, B.; Delaunay, F. [CEA Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-03-15

    For understanding singular properties of plutonium, there is a need in studying the average and local atomic structure in Pu alloys. To study the local structure of the {delta} phase, a pair distribution function (PDF) analysis was done and has shown some significant differences with the average structure.

  13. Max Auwaerter Price lecture: building and probing atomic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternes, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The control of the geometric, electronic, and magnetic properties of atomic-scale nanostructures is a prerequisite for the understanding and fabrication of new materials and devices. Two routes lead towards this goal: Atomic manipulation of single atoms and molecules by scanning probe microscopy, or patterning using self-assembly. Atomic manipulation has been performed since almost 20 years, but it has been difficult to answer the simple question: how much force does it take to manipulate atoms and molecules on surfaces? To address this question, we used a combined atomic force and scanning tunneling microscope to simultaneously measure the force and the current between an adsorbate and a tip during atomic manipulation. We found that the force it takes to move an atom depends crucially on the binding between adsorbate and surface. Our results indicate that for moving metal atoms on metal surfaces, the lateral force component plays the dominant role. Measuring the forces during manipulation yielded the full potential energy landscape of the tip-sample interaction. Surprisingly, the potential energy barriers are comparable to diffusion barriers, which are obtained in the absence of a probe tip. Furthermore, we used the scanning tunneling microscope to assemble magnetic structures on a thin insulator. We found, that the spin of the atom is influenced by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the supporting surface which lifts the spin degeneracy of the ground state and enables the identification of individual atoms. The ground state of atoms with half-integer spin remains always degenerated at zero field due to Kramers theorem. We found that if these states differ by an orbital momentum of m = ±1 the localized spin is screened by the surrounding conducting electrons of the non-magnetic host and form a many-electron spin-singlet at sufficiently low temperature. (author)

  14. Semiempirical studies of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    The energy level structure, transition probabilities, and general spectroscopic properties of highly ionized many-electron systems are studied through the combined use of sensitive semiempirical data systematizations, selected precision experimental measurements, and specialized theoretical computations. Measurements are made primarily through the use of fast ion beam excitation methods, which are combined with available data from laser-and tokamak-produced plasmas, astrophysical sources, and conventional light sources. The experimental studies are strengthened through large-scale ab initio calculations. Typical examples are the following: lifetime measurements in the neon isoelectronic sequence; multiplexed decay curve measurements of Li-like Si XII; and isoelectronic specification of intershell resonance and intercombination decay rates using measured transition probabilities and spectroscopically determined singlet-mixing amplitudes

  15. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklitz, T; Müller, C A; Altland, A

    2014-03-21

    Signatures of Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well-defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Quantum interference generates a peak in the forward scattering amplitude which, unlike the common weak localization backscattering peak, is a signature of strong Anderson localization. We present a nonperturbative, and fully time resolved description of the phenomenon, covering the entire diffusion-to-localization crossover. Our results should be observable by present day experiments.

  16. Performance and applications of the ORNL local electrode atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Russell, K.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The commercial introduction in 2003 of the local electrode atom probe (LEAP) developed by Imago Scientific Instruments has made dramatic, orders of magnitude improvements in the data acquisition rate and the size of the analyzed volume compared to previous types of three-dimensional atom probes and other scanning atom probes. This state-of-the-art instrument may be used for the analysis of traditional needle-shaped specimens and specimens fabricated from 'flat' specimens with focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. The advantage of this local electrode configuration is that significantly lower (∼50 %) standing and pulse voltages are required to produce the field strength required to field evaporate ions from the specimen. New high speed (200 kHz) pulse generators coupled with crossed delay line detectors and faster timing systems also enable significantly faster (up to 300 times) data acquisition rates to be achieved. This new design also permits a significantly larger field of view to be analyzed and results in data sets containing up to 10 8 atoms. In the local electrode atom probe, a ∼10-50 μm diameter aperture is typically positioned approximately one aperture diameter in front of the specimen. In order to accurately align the specimen to the aperture in the funnel-shaped electrode, the specimen is mounted on a three axis nanopositioning stage. An approximate alignment is performed while viewing the relative positions of the specimen and the local electrode with a pair of low magnification video cameras and then a pair of higher magnification video cameras attached to long range microscopes. The final alignment is performed with the use of the field evaporated ions from the specimen. A discussion on the alignment of the specimen with the local electrode, the effects of the fields on the specimen, and the effects of aperture size on aperture lifetime will be presented. The performance of the ORNL local electrode atom probe will be described. The

  17. Structure formation in atom lithography using geometric collimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, T.; Beardmore, J.P.; Fabrie, C.G.C.H.M.; van Lieshout, J.P.; Notermans, R.P.M.J.W.; Sang, R.T.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; Leeuwen, van K.A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Atom lithography uses standing wave light fields as arrays of lenses to focus neutral atom beams into line patterns on a substrate. Laser cooled atom beams are commonly used, but an atom beam source with a small opening placed at a large distance from a substrate creates atom beams which are locally

  18. Self-consistent-field calculations of atoms and ions using a modified local-density approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, D.A.; Albritton, J.R.; Wilson, B.G.; Alley, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    Local-density-approximation calculations of atomic structure are useful for the description of atoms and ions in plasmas. The large number of different atomic configurations that exist in typical plasmas leads one to consider the expression of total energies in terms of a Taylor series in the orbital occupation numbers. Two schemes for computing the second derivative Taylor-series coefficients are given; the second, and better one, uses the linear response method developed by Zangwill and Soven [Phys. Rev. A 21, 1561 (1980)] for the calculation of optical response in atoms. A defect in the local-density approximation causes some second derivatives involving Rydberg orbitals to be infinite. This is corrected by using a modified local-density approximation that had previously been proposed [Phys. Rev. B 2, 244 (1970)

  19. On the atomic shell structure calculation (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe Sun Chol

    1986-01-01

    We have considered the problem of atomic shell structure calculation using operator technique. We introduce reduced matrix elements of annihilation operators according to eg. (4). The normalized basis function is denoted as || ...>. The reduced matrix elements of the pair annihilation operators are expressed throw one-electron matrix elements. Some numerical results are represented and the problem of sign assignment is discussed. (author)

  20. Relativistic atomic structure: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, I P

    2010-01-01

    Developments in a relativistic atomic structure have been driven by a combination of advances in experimental methods, in the theory of quantum electrodynamics, in numerical algorithms, computer hardware and software. Today's programs are still in many respects 'legacy codes' containing many features going back nearly half a century. It is time for a rethink.

  1. Localized atomic basis set in the projector augmented wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Vanin, Marco; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    We present an implementation of localized atomic-orbital basis sets in the projector augmented wave (PAW) formalism within the density-functional theory. The implementation in the real-space GPAW code provides a complementary basis set to the accurate but computationally more demanding grid...

  2. Nanometer-scale optical traps using atomic state localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D. D.; Proite, N. A.; Green, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    We suggest a scheme where a laser beam forms an optical trap with a spatial size that is much smaller than the wavelength of light. The key idea is to combine a far-off-resonant dipole trap with a scheme that localizes an atomic excitation.

  3. Dynamical localization in the 3-D kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, E.; Yoshida, S.; Tong, X.-M.; Reinhold, C.; Burgdoerfer, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The dynamical localization for the 3D periodically kicked Rydberg atom is analyzed. For the 1D kicked atom, earlier work shows dynamical localization as the quantum suppression of classically fast ionization associated with unbounded chaotic trajectories. The corresponding wave functions localize around unstable periodic orbits. For the experimental observation, the crucial question is the dependence of the dynamical localization on the dimension. As the first step, we simulate the full 3D evolution of an extreme parabolic initial state elongated in the direction of the unidirectional kicks. We compare this simulation with the 1D model and find signatures of localization also in 3D. We further examine the dependence of quantum localization on the parabolic quantum number of the initial state. In the limit of high kick frequencies, the origin of the localization can be understood in terms of Stark states in the average field. We discuss conditions for where an experimental observation of the localization is most likely. (author)

  4. Local atomic structure and electrical properties of Ge(20)Se(80-x)Te(x) (x=0, 5, 10, and 15) glasses doped with Ho

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubliha, M.; Kostka, Petr; Trnovcová, V.; Zavadil, Jiří; Bednarčík, J.; Labas, V.; Pedlíková, Jitka; Dippel, A.C.; Liermann, H.P.; Psota, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 586, FEB 15 (2014), s. 308-313 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/12/2384 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : chalcogenide glasses * crystal phase * electrical and dielectric properties * structure Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2014

  5. Matter-wave localization in disordered cold atom lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavish, Uri; Castin, Yvan

    2005-07-08

    We propose to observe Anderson localization of ultracold atoms in the presence of a random potential made of atoms of another species or spin state and trapped at the nodes of an optical lattice, with a filling factor less than unity. Such systems enable a nearly perfect experimental control of the disorder, while the possibility of modeling the scattering potentials by a set of pointlike ones allows an exact theoretical analysis. This is illustrated by a detailed analysis of the one-dimensional case.

  6. Dressed-state analysis of efficient two-dimensional atom localization in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    We investigate two-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system. It is found that the detection probability and precision of two-dimensional atom localization can be significantly improved due to the interference effect between the spontaneous decay channels and the dynamically induced quantum interference generated by the probe and composite fields. More importantly, a 100% probability of finding an atom within the sub-half-wavelength domain of the standing waves can be reached when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization. (paper)

  7. Description of the atomic disorder (local order) in crystals by the mixed-symmetry method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, A. P.; Novikova, N. E.

    2017-11-01

    An approach to the description of local atomic disorder (short-range order) in single crystals by the mixed-symmetry method based on Bragg scattering data is proposed, and the corresponding software is developed. In defect-containing crystals, each atom in the unit cell can be described by its own symmetry space group. The expression for the calculated structural factor includes summation over different sets of symmetry operations for different atoms. To facilitate the search for new symmetry elements, an "atomic disorder expert" was developed, which estimates the significance of tested models. It is shown that the symmetry lowering for some atoms correlates with the existence of phase transitions (in langasite family crystals) and the anisotropy of physical properties (in rare-earth dodecaborides RB12).

  8. An Atomic Data and Analysis Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, Hugh P.

    2000-01-01

    The Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) Project is a shared activity of a world-wide consortium of fusion and astrophysical laboratories directed at developing and maintaining a common approach to analysing and modelling the radiating properties of plasmas. The origin and objectives of ADAS and the organization of its codes and data collections outlined. Current special projects in the ADAS Project work-plans are listed and an illustration given of ADAS at work. (author)

  9. Structural reliability of atomic power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemin, A.I.; Polyakov, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    In 1978 the first specialized technical manual ''Technique of Calculating the Structural Reliability of an Atomic Power Plant and Its Systems in the Design Stage'' was developed. The present article contains information about the main characteristics and capabilities of the manual. The manual gives recommendations concerning the calculations of the reliability of such specific systems as the reactor control and safety system, the system of instrumentation and automatic control, and safety systems. 2 refs

  10. Two-dimensional atom localization via a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhan Zhiming [School of Physics and Information Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China); Liu Jibing, E-mail: clding2006@126.com, E-mail: huajia_li@163.com [Department of Physics, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China)

    2011-07-28

    A scheme of two-dimensional atom localization based on a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level system is proposed, in which the atom interacts with a weak probe field and three standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom can be achieved by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that the localization properties are significantly improved due to the interaction of dark resonances. It is also shown that the localization factors depend strongly on the system parameters that lead to such spatial structures of localization as chain-like, wave-like, '8'-like, spike-like, crater-like and heart-like patterns. By properly adjusting the system parameters, we can achieve a high-precision and high-resolution atom localization under certain conditions.

  11. Two-dimensional atom localization via a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Zhan Zhiming; Liu Jibing

    2011-01-01

    A scheme of two-dimensional atom localization based on a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level system is proposed, in which the atom interacts with a weak probe field and three standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom can be achieved by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that the localization properties are significantly improved due to the interaction of dark resonances. It is also shown that the localization factors depend strongly on the system parameters that lead to such spatial structures of localization as chain-like, wave-like, '8'-like, spike-like, crater-like and heart-like patterns. By properly adjusting the system parameters, we can achieve a high-precision and high-resolution atom localization under certain conditions.

  12. Subwavelength atom localization via amplitude and phase control of the absorption spectrum-II

    OpenAIRE

    Kapale, Kishore T.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2005-01-01

    Interaction of the internal states of an atom with spatially dependent standing-wave cavity field can impart position information of the atom passing through it leading to subwavelength atom localization. We recently demonstrated a new regime of atom localization [Sahrai {\\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 72}, 013820 (2005)], namely sub-half-wavelength localization through phase control of electromagnetically induced transparency. This regime corresponds to extreme localization of atoms within a...

  13. Localizing gravitational wave sources with single-baseline atom interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Jung, Sunghoon

    2018-02-01

    Localizing sources on the sky is crucial for realizing the full potential of gravitational waves for astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology. We show that the midfrequency band, roughly 0.03 to 10 Hz, has significant potential for angular localization. The angular location is measured through the changing Doppler shift as the detector orbits the Sun. This band maximizes the effect since these are the highest frequencies in which sources live for several months. Atom interferometer detectors can observe in the midfrequency band, and even with just a single baseline they can exploit this effect for sensitive angular localization. The single-baseline orbits around the Earth and the Sun, causing it to reorient and change position significantly during the lifetime of the source, and making it similar to having multiple baselines/detectors. For example, atomic detectors could predict the location of upcoming black hole or neutron star merger events with sufficient accuracy to allow optical and other electromagnetic telescopes to observe these events simultaneously. Thus, midband atomic detectors are complementary to other gravitational wave detectors and will help complete the observation of a broad range of the gravitational spectrum.

  14. Antiprotonic Radioactive Atom for Nuclear Structure Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A future experiment to synthesize antiprotonic radioactive nuclear ions is proposed for nuclear structure studies. Antiprotonic radioactive nuclear atom can be synthesized in a nested Penning trap where a cloud of antiprotons is prestored and slow radioactive nuclear ions are bunch-injected into the trap. By observing of the ratio of π+ and π- produced in the annihilation process, we can deduce the different abundance of protons and neutrons at the surface of the nuclei. The proposed method would provide a unique probe for investigating the nuclear structure of unstable nuclei

  15. Diamond surface: atomic and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of the diamond surface (with primary emphasis on the (111) surface) are presented. Aspects of the diamond surface which are addressed include (1) the electronic structure, (2) the atomic structure, and (3) the effect of termination of the lattice by foreign atoms. Limited studies of graphite are discussed for comparison with the diamond results. Experimental results from valence band and core level photoemission spectroscopy (PES), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and carbon 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy (both the total electron yield (TEY) and Auger electron yield (AEY) techniques) are used to study and characterize both the clean and hydrogenated surface. In addition, the interaction of hydrogen with the diamond surface is examined using results from vibrational high resolution low energy electron loss spectroscopy (in collaboration with Waclawski, Pierce, Swanson, and Celotta at the National Bureau of Standards) and photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID) yield at photon energies near the carbon k-edge (hv greater than or equal to 280 eV). Both EELS and PSID verify that the mechanically polished 1 x 1 surface is hydrogen terminated and also that the reconstructed surface is hydrogen free. The (111) 2 x 2/2 x 1 reconstructed surface is obtained from the hydrogenated (111) 1 x 1:H surface by annealing to approx. = 1000 0 C. We observe occupied intrinsic surface states and a surface chemical shift (0.95 +- 0.1 eV) to lower binding energy of the carbon 1s level on the hydrogen-free reconstructed surface. Atomic hydrogen is found to be reactive with the reconstructed surface, while molecular hydrogen is relatively inert. Exposure of the reconstructed surface to atomic hydrogen results in chemisorption of hydrogen and removal of the intrinsic surface state emission in and near the band gap region

  16. Finding the Atomic Configuration with a Required Physical Property in Multi-Atom Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Avezac, M.; Zunger, A.

    2007-01-01

    In many problems in molecular and solid state structures one seeks to determine the energy-minimizing decoration of sites with different atom types. In other problems, one is interested in finding a decoration with a target physical property (e.g. alloy band gap) within a certain range. In both cases, the sheer size of the configurational space can be horrendous. We present two approaches which identify either the minimum-energy configuration or configurations with a target property for a fixed underlying Bravais lattice. We compare their efficiency at locating the deepest minimum energy configuration of face centered cubic Au-Pd alloy. We show that a global-search genetic-algorithm approach with diversity-enhancing constraints and reciprocal-space mating can efficiently find the global optimum, whereas the local-search virtual-atom approach presented here is more efficient at finding structures with a target property

  17. Localization of Cold Atoms in State-Dependent Optical Lattices via a Rabi Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstmann, Birger; Duerr, Stephan; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel realization of Anderson localization in nonequilibrium states of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A Rabi pulse transfers part of the population to a different internal state with infinite effective mass. These frozen atoms create a quantum superposition of different disorder potentials, localizing the mobile atoms. For weakly interacting mobile atoms, Anderson localization is obtained. The localization length increases with increasing disorder and decreasing interaction strength, contrary to the expectation for equilibrium localization.

  18. Quantum localization in the three-dimensional kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Emil; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdoerfer, Joachim; Tong, X.-M.; Reinhold, Carlos O.

    2003-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional (3D) unidirectionally kicked Rydberg atom. For parabolic initial states elongated in the direction of the kicks we show that the ionization of the quantum system is suppressed as compared to the classical counterpart and that the quantum wave function is localized along all degrees of freedom, whereas the classical system is globally diffusive. We discuss the connection to the previously studied one-dimensional (1D) model of the kicked Rydberg atom and verify that the 1D model is a good approximation to the 3D quantum case in the limiting case of the most elongated initial states. We further study the quantum phase-space distribution (Husimi distribution) of the eigenstates of the period-one time-evolution (Floquet) operator and show that the eigenstates are localized in phase space. For the most elongated parabolic initial state, we are able to identify the unstable periodic orbits around which Floquet states localize. We discuss the possibility of observing quantum localization in high Rydberg states in n>100

  19. Two-dimensional atom localization via two standing-wave fields in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongtao; Wang Hui; Wang Zhiping

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the two-dimensional (2D) localization of an atom in a four-level Y-type atomic system. By applying two orthogonal standing-wave fields, the atoms can be localized at some special positions, leading to the formation of sub-wavelength 2D periodic spatial distributions. The localization peak position and number as well as the conditional position probability can be controlled by the intensities and detunings of optical fields.

  20. Detecting many-body-localization lengths with cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuefei; Li, Xiaopeng

    2018-03-01

    Considering ultracold atoms in optical lattices, we propose experimental protocols to study many-body-localization (MBL) length and criticality in quench dynamics. Through numerical simulations with exact diagonalization, we show that in the MBL phase the perturbed density profile following a local quench remains exponentially localized in postquench dynamics. The size of this density profile after long-time-dynamics defines a localization length, which tends to diverge at the MBL-to-ergodic transition as we increase the system size. The determined localization transition point agrees with previous exact diagonalization calculations using other diagnostics. Our numerical results provide evidence for violation of the Harris-Chayes bound for the MBL criticality. The critical exponent ν can be extracted from our proposed dynamical procedure, which can then be used directly in experiments to determine whether the Harris-Chayes-bound holds for the MBL transition. These proposed protocols to detect localization criticality are justified by benchmarking to the well-established results for the noninteracting three-dimensional Anderson localization.

  1. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  2. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  3. An intrinsic representation of atomic structure: From clusters to periodic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Tian; Xu, Shao-Gang; Yang, Xiao-Bao; Zhao, Yu-Jun

    2017-10-01

    We have improved our distance matrix and eigen-subspace projection function (EPF) [X.-T. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 146, 154108 (2017)] to describe the atomic structure for periodic systems. Depicting the local structure of an atom, the EPF turns out to be invariant with respect to the choices of the unit cell and coordinate frame, leading to an intrinsic representation of the crystal with a set of EPFs of the nontrivial atoms. The difference of EPFs reveals the difference of atoms in local structure, while the accumulated difference between two sets of EPFs can be taken as the distance between configurations. Exemplified with the cases of carbon allotropes and boron sheets, our EPF approach shows exceptional rationality and efficiency to distinguish the atomic structures, which is crucial in structure recognition, comparison, and analysis.

  4. Local vs. Non-local core potentials in electron scattering from sodium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartschat, K.; Bray, I.

    1996-02-01

    We have tested the use of a local potential instead of the non-local Hartree-Fock potential to represent exchange effects between the valence or the projectile electron and the core in electron scattering from sodium atoms For some of the most detailed observables in this collision system/ the results of the two approaches are nearly identical, even though the effect of the exchange part is shown to be particularly large. (authors). 16 refs., 4 figs

  5. Local versus non-local core potentials in electron scattering from sodium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartschat, K.; Bray, I.

    1996-01-01

    We have tested the use of a local potential instead of the non-local Hartree-Fock potential to represent exchange effects between the valence or the projectile electron and the core in electron scattering from sodium atoms. For some of the most detailed observables in this collision system, the results of the two approaches are nearly identical, even though the effect of the exchange part is shown to be particularly large. (Author)

  6. Localized structures in vibrated emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcón, Claudio; Bruggeman, Jake; Pasquali, Matteo; Deegan, Robert D.

    2012-04-01

    We report our observations of localized structures in a thin layer of an emulsion subjected to vertical oscillations. We observe persistent holes, which are voids that span the layer depth, and kinks, which are fronts between regions with and without fluid. These structures form in response to a finite amplitude perturbation. Combining experimental and rheological measurements, we argue that the ability of these structures to withstand the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding fluid is due to convection within their rim. For persistent holes the oscillatory component of the convection generates a normal stress which opposes contraction, while for kinks the steady component of the convection generates a shear stress which opposes the hydrostatic stress of the surrounding fluid.

  7. Atomic structures and compositions of internal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidman, D.N. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Merkle, K.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-03-01

    This research program addresses fundamental questions concerning the relationships between atomic structures and chemical compositions of metal/ceramic heterophase interfaces. The chemical composition profile across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, produced by the internal oxidation of a Cu(Mg) single phase alloy, is measured via atom-probe field-ion microscopy with a spatial resolution of 0.121 nm; this resolution is equal to the interplanar space of the {l brace}222{r brace} MgO planes. In particular, we demonstrate for the first time that the bonding across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, along a <111> direction common to both the Cu matrix and an MgO precipitate, has the sequence Cu{vert bar}O{vert bar}Mg{hor ellipsis} and not Cu{vert bar}Mg{vert bar}O{hor ellipsis}; this result is achieved without any deconvolution of the experimental data. Before determining this chemical sequence it was established, via high resolution electron microscopy, that the morphology of an MgO precipitate in a Cu matrix is an octahedron faceted on {l brace}111{r brace} planes with a cube-on-cube relationship between a precipitate and the matrix. First results are also presented for the Ni/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} interface; for this system selected area atom probe microscopy was used to analyze this interface; Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} precipitates are located in a field-ion microscope tip and a precipitate is brought into the tip region via a highly controlled electropolishing technique.

  8. Self-consistent calculation of atomic structure for mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xujun; Bai Yun; Sun Yongsheng; Zhang Jinglin; Zong Xiaoping

    2000-01-01

    Based on relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater self-consistent average atomic model, atomic structure for mixture is studied by summing up component volumes in mixture. Algorithmic procedure for solving both the group of Thomas-Fermi equations and the self-consistent atomic structure is presented in detail, and, some numerical results are discussed

  9. Local atomic order of a metallic glass made visible by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuansu; Samwer, Konrad

    2018-06-01

    Exploring the atomic level structure in amorphous materials by STM becomes extremely difficult due to the localized electronic states. Here we carried out STM studies on a quasi-low-dimensional film of metallic glass Zr65Cu27.5Al7.5 which is ‘ultrathin’ compared with the localization length and/or the length scale of short range order. The local electronic structure must appear more inherent, having states at E f available for tip-sample tunneling current. To enhance imaging contrasts between long-range and short-range orders, the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was chosen as substrate, so that the structural heterogeneity arising from competition between the glass former ability and the epitaxy can be ascertained. A chemical order predicted for this system was observed in atomic ordered regimes (1–2 monolayers), accompanied with a superstructure with the period Zr–Cu(Al)–Zr along three hexagonal axes. The result implies a chemical short range order in disordered regimes, where polyhedral clusters are dominant with the solute atom Cu(Al) in the center. An attempt for the structural modelling was made based on high resolution STM images, giving icosahedral order on the surface and different Voronoi clusters in 3D space.

  10. Atomic structures of Cd Te and Cd Se (110) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, K.; Ferraz, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    Results are reported based on the self-consistent density-functional theory, within the local-density approximation using ab-initio pseudopotentials of clean Cd Te and Cd Se (110) surfaces. We analyzed the trends for the equilibrium atomic structures, and the variations of the bond angles at the II-VI (110). The calculations are sensitive to the ionicity of the materials and the results are in agreement with the arguments which predict that the relaxed zinc-blend (110) surfaces should depend on ionicity. (author). 17 refs., 1 figs., 3 tabs

  11. On-line system for investigation of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amus'ya, M.Ya.; Chernysheva, L.V.

    1983-01-01

    A description of the on-line ATOM system is presented that enables to investigate the structure of atomic electron shells and their interactions with different scattering particles-electrons, positronse photons, mesons - with the use of computerized numerical solutions. The problem is stated along with mathematical description of atomic properties including theoretical and numerical models for each investigated physical process. The ATOM system structure is considered. The Hartree-Fock method is used to determine the wave functions of the ground and excited atomic states. The programs are written in the ALGOL langauge. Different atomic characteristics were possible to be calculated for the first time with an accuracy exceeding an experimental one

  12. Electronic structure of super heavy atoms revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D M; Levin, A D; Tyutin, I V; Voronov, B L

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure of an atom with Z ⩽ Z c = 137 can be described by the Dirac equation with the Coulomb field of a point charge Ze. It was believed that the Dirac equation with Z > Z c poses difficulties because the formula for the lower energy level of the Dirac Hamiltonian formally gives imaginary eigenvalues. But a strict mathematical consideration shows that difficulties with the electronic spectrum for Z > Z c do not arise if the Dirac Hamiltonian is correctly defined as a self-adjoint operator. In this paper, we briefly summarize the main physical results of that consideration in a form suitable for physicists with some additional new details and numerical calculations of the electronic spectra. (comment)

  13. Structurally uniform and atomically precise carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Yasutomo; Ito, Hideto; Itami, Kenichiro

    2016-01-01

    Nanometre-sized carbon materials consisting of benzene units oriented in unique geometric patterns, hereafter named nanocarbons, conduct electricity, absorb and emit light, and exhibit interesting magnetic properties. Spherical fullerene C60, cylindrical carbon nanotubes and sheet-like graphene are representative forms of nanocarbons, and theoretical simulations have predicted several exotic 3D nanocarbon structures. At present, synthetic routes to nanocarbons mainly lead to mixtures of molecules with a range of different structures and properties, which cannot be easily separated or refined into pure forms. Some researchers believe that it is impossible to synthesize these materials in a precise manner. Obtaining ‘pure’ nanocarbons is a great challenge in the field of nanocarbon science, and the construction of structurally uniform nanocarbons, ideally as single molecules, is crucial for the development of functional materials in nanotechnology, electronics, optics and biomedical applications. This Review highlights the organic chemistry approach — more specifically, bottom-up construction with atomic precision — that is currently the most promising strategy towards this end.

  14. Atomic probes of surface structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.; Jonsson, H.

    1992-01-01

    The following were studied: New semiclassical method for scattering calculations, He atom scattering from defective Pt surfaces, He atom scattering from Xe overlayers, thermal dissociation of H 2 on Cu(110), spin flip scattering of atoms from surfaces, and Car-Parrinello simulations of surface processes

  15. Radio frequency selective addressing of localized atoms in a periodic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, H.; De Mirandes, E.; Ferlaino, F.; Roati, G.; Tuerck, V.; Modugno, G.; Inguscio, M.

    2004-01-01

    We study the localization and addressability of ultracold atoms in a combined parabolic and periodic potential. Such a potential supports the existence of localized stationary states and we show that applying a radio frequency field allows us to selectively address atoms in these states. This method is used to measure the energy and momentum distribution of the atoms in the localized states. We also discuss possible extensions of this scheme to address and manipulate atoms in single lattice sites

  16. Influence of the atomic structure on the quantum state of sputtered Ir atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastiaansen, J.; Philipsen, V.; Lievens, P.; Silverans, R.E.; Vandeweert, E.

    2004-01-01

    The probability of the ejection of a neutral atom in a specific quantum state after keV-ion beam sputtering is often interpreted in terms of the interaction between the atomic states of the escaping atom and the electronic states of the solid. In this work, we examined this interplay in the sputtering of iridium as this element has--unlike the elements employed in previous investigations--a complex atomic structure due to strong configuration interactions. Double-resonant two-photon laser ionization is used to probe the sputtered Ir atoms yielding information about the probability for an ejected atom to populate a specific atomic state and its escape velocity. The qualitative features of the corresponding population partition and state-selective velocity distributions show the influence of the excitation energy and the electronic structure of the different atomic states. A comparison is made between the experimental data and predictions from the resonant electron transfer description

  17. Diagnosing Students’ conception on atomic structure using open ended questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitriza, Z.; Gazali, F.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to diagnose students’ conception on atomic structure concepts using open ended questions. For this reason, a 7 items of assay test was administered to 135 senior high school students from different schools in West Sumatera. The data were collected using a an open ended test which is covering the concept used in the topic Atomic Structure. The open ended test of students’ conceptual was developed to identify the alternative conceptions that student might have regarding the concepts in Atomic Structure, to measure the level of students’ conceptions, and the way of students’ thinking concerning the concepts. The results showed that students find difficulties about some concepts of Atomic structure such as atom, atomic model, electron configuration, period and group.The result of this study illuminated the concepts to be underlined in developing teaching and learning approach concerning the topic of Atomic Structure.

  18. Comparative study of local atomic structures in Zr{sub 2}Cu{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x} (x = 0, 0.5, 1) metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuxiang [Department of Physics, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Huang, Li, E-mail: huangl@sustc.edu.cn [Department of Physics, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M. [Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kramer, M. J. [Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2015-11-21

    Extensive analysis has been performed to understand the key structural motifs accounting for the difference in glass forming ability in the Zr-Cu and Zr-Ni binary alloy systems. Here, the reliable atomic structure models of Zr{sub 2}Cu{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x} (x = 0, 0.5, 1) are constructed using the combination of X-ray diffraction experiments, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and a constrained reverse Monte Carlo method. We observe a systematic variation of the interatomic distance of different atomic pairs with respect to the alloy composition. The ideal icosahedral content in all samples is limited, despite the high content of five-fold symmetry motifs. We also demonstrate that the population of Z-clusters in Zr{sub 2}Cu glass is much higher than that in the Zr{sub 2}Ni and Zr{sub 2}Cu{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5} samples. And Z12 〈0, 0, 12, 0〉 Voronoi polyhedra clusters prefer to form around Cu atoms, while Ni-centered clusters are more like Z11 〈0, 2, 8, 1〉 clusters, which is less energetically stable compared to Z12 clusters. These two different structural properties may account for the higher glass forming ability of Zr{sub 2}Cu alloy than that of Zr{sub 2}Ni alloy.

  19. Machine Learning Based Localization and Classification with Atomic Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Cameron; Griffin, Lewis D.; Marmugi, Luca; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate identification of position, material, orientation, and shape of objects imaged by a Rb 85 atomic magnetometer performing electromagnetic induction imaging supported by machine learning. Machine learning maximizes the information extracted from the images created by the magnetometer, demonstrating the use of hidden data. Localization 2.6 times better than the spatial resolution of the imaging system and successful classification up to 97% are obtained. This circumvents the need of solving the inverse problem and demonstrates the extension of machine learning to diffusive systems, such as low-frequency electrodynamics in media. Automated collection of task-relevant information from quantum-based electromagnetic imaging will have a relevant impact from biomedicine to security.

  20. A generative, probabilistic model of local protein structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Mardia, Kanti V.; Taylor, Charles C.

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant progress in recent years, protein structure prediction maintains its status as one of the prime unsolved problems in computational biology. One of the key remaining challenges is an efficient probabilistic exploration of the structural space that correctly reflects the relative...... conformational stabilities. Here, we present a fully probabilistic, continuous model of local protein structure in atomic detail. The generative model makes efficient conformational sampling possible and provides a framework for the rigorous analysis of local sequence-structure correlations in the native state...

  1. Atomic probes of surface structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.; Jonsson, H.

    1992-01-01

    Progress for the period Sept. 15, 1992 to Sept. 14, 1993 is discussed. Semiclassical methods that will allow much faster and more accurate three-dimensional atom--surface scattering calculations, both elastic and inelastic, are being developed. The scattering of He atoms from buckyballs is being investigated as a test problem. Somewhat more detail is given on studies of He atom scattering from defective Pt surfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations of He + and Ar + ion sputtering of Pt surfaces are also being done. He atom scattering from Xe overlayers on metal surfaces and the thermalized dissociation of H 2 on Cu(110) are being studied. (R.W.R.) 64 refs

  2. Two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization via controlled spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ren-Gang; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2011-12-05

    We propose a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization based on the controlled spontaneous emission, in which the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Due to the spatially dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the resulting spontaneously emission spectrum. The phase sensitive property of the atomic system leads to quenching of the spontaneous emission in some regions of the standing-waves, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in the position measurement of the atom. We find that the frequency measurement of the emitted light localizes the atom in half-wavelength domain. Especially the probability of finding the atom at a particular position can reach 100% when a photon with certain frequency is detected. By increasing the Rabi frequencies of the driving fields, such 2D sub-half-wavelength atom localization can acquire high spatial resolution.

  3. TWO-DIMENSIONAL LOCALIZATION OF ATOMIC POPULATIONS IN FOUR-LEVEL QUANTUM SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Efremova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with investigation of one aspect of fundamental problem of laser radiation interaction with the matter. This problem is spatial localization of atomic populations due to fields impact of few running waves. We are the first to propose in our work two–dimensional spatial localization of atomic populations in medium with tripod–like configuration of levels under the field influence of running waves only. Three running waves, propagating along one plane 120o angle-wise to each other, form the system of standing waves in this plane. Atomic populations can be localized in the field of these standing waves. Moreover, the degree of such localization can make up hundredth parts of the wavelength of the incident optical radiation. It is shown that an excitation of the central transition of the tripod-like system using a field of multidirectional linearly polarized running waves is the necessary condition of the population dependence from spatial coordinates in the XY – plane. The two–dimensional shapes that appear in this system can have very complicated structure such as “double – craters”.

  4. Big Atoms for Small Children: Building Atomic Models from Common Materials to Better Visualize and Conceptualize Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Laura; Ferrari, Lia A.

    2016-01-01

    A hands-on approach to introduce the chemical elements and the atomic structure to elementary/middle school students is described. The proposed classroom activity presents Bohr models of atoms using common and inexpensive materials, such as nested plastic balls, colored modeling clay, and small-sized pasta (or small plastic beads).

  5. Theoretical development of atomic structure: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwary, S.N.

    1994-11-01

    Theoretical development of atomic structure is briefly discussed. The role of correlation, relativity, quantum electrodynamic (QED), finite nuclear size (FNS) and parity nonconservation (PNC) in high precision theoretical investigation of properties of atomic and ionic systems is demonstrated. At present, we do not have a comprehensive and practical atomic structure theory which accounts all these physical effects on an equal footing. Suggestions are made for future directions. (author). 108 refs, 5 figs, 9 tabs

  6. Niels Bohr and the Atomic Structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    principle with the restriction that no more than two electrons occupy a given ... displacement laws. Early in his ... The only difference between them is their atomic weight. F Soddy ... validity, Bohr took his theory to Rutherford. Unfortunately,.

  7. Electronic structure of fractionally nuclear charged atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavao, Antonio C.; Bastos, Cristiano C.; Ferreira, Joacy V.

    2008-01-01

    Different properties of quark chemistry are studied by performing accurate ab initio Hartree- Fock calculations on fractionally nuclear charged atoms. Ground and first excited states of sodium atoms with quarks attached to the nucleus are obtained using CI calculations. It is suggested that the sodium 2 P -> 2 S electronic transition can be used as a guide in searching for unconfined quarks. Also, the variation of the binding electronic energy with nuclear charge in the isoelectronic series of fractionally nuclear charged atoms A ±2/3 and A ±1/3 (A = H, Li, Na, P and Ca) is analyzed. The present calculations suggest that unconfined colored particles have large appetite for heavy nuclei and that quark-antiquark pairs could be stabilized in presence of the atomic matter. (author)

  8. Determination of atomic cluster structure with cluster fusion algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2005-01-01

    We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters.......We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters....

  9. Unraveling the atomic structure of ultrafine iron clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao; Li, Kun; Yao, Yingbang; Wang, Qingxiao; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Zhang, Xixiang; Yang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Unraveling the atomic structures of ultrafine iron clusters is critical to understanding their size-dependent catalytic effects and electronic properties. Here, we describe the stable close-packed structure of ultrafine Fe clusters for the first

  10. Two-dimensional atom localization based on coherent field controlling in a five-level M-type atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangqian; Li, Jinjiang; Sun, Xiudong

    2017-12-11

    We study two-dimensional sub-wavelength atom localization based on the microwave coupling field controlling and spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) effect. For a five-level M-type atom, introducing a microwave coupling field between two upper levels and considering the quantum interference between two transitions from two upper levels to lower levels, the analytical expression of conditional position probability (CPP) distribution is obtained using the iterative method. The influence of the detuning of a spontaneously emitted photon, Rabi frequency of the microwave field, and the SGC effect on the CPP are discussed. The two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization with high-precision and high spatial resolution is achieved by adjusting the detuning and the Rabi frequency, where the atom can be localized in a region smaller thanλ/10×λ/10. The spatial resolution is improved significantly compared with the case without the microwave field.

  11. Local cohomology and superselection structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.E.

    1976-02-01

    A novel quantum analogue of the classical problem of cohomology incorporating locality is introduced and is shown to generate those superselection sectors whose charge can be strictly localized. In a 2-dimensional space-time there are further possibilities; in particular, soliton sectors can be generated by this procedure [fr

  12. Localization of a two-level atom via the absorption spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jun; Hu, Xiang-Ming

    2007-01-01

    We show that it is possible to localize a two-level atom as it passes through a standing-wave field by measuring the probe-field absorption. There is 50% detecting probability of the atom at the nodes of the standing-wave field in the subwavelength domain when the probe field is tuned resonant with the atomic transition

  13. Further localization studies of Co atoms diffused into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezsi, I.; Feher, S.; Forgacs, G.; Horvath, D.; Kotai, E.; Manuaba, A.; Mezey, G.; Molnar, B.; Nagy, D.L.; Zsoldos, E.

    1982-01-01

    57 Co atoms diffused at 1270 K for 1 h into single crystals of Si have a single Moessbauer line at (-0.059 +- 0.001) mm/s. Channelling studies show that 77% of the Co atoms occupy some substitutional sites. It is found that Co forms epitaxial CoSi 2 clusters in the Si lattice. (orig.)

  14. Further localization studies of Co atoms diffused into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezsi, I.; Feher, S.; Forgacs, Gy.; Horvath, D.; Kotai, E.; Manuaba, A.; Mezey, G.; Molnar, B.; Nagy, D.L.; Zsoldos, E.

    1981-01-01

    57 Co atoms diffused at 1270 K for 1 hour into single crystals of Si have a single Moessbauer line at -0.059+-0.001 mm/s. Channelling studies show 77 per cent of the Co atoms to occupy substitutional sites. It is found that Co forms epitaxial CoSi 2 clusters in the Si lattice. (author)

  15. Intrinsic localized modes in arrays of atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullaev, F.Kh.; Konotop, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    The existence of strongly localized matter solitons, intrinsic localized modes (ILM's), in an array of atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates (AMBEC's) is shown. The theory is based on the Wannier function expansion of the system order parameter and predicts the possibility of strong localization of the atomic and molecular components whose relative populations are determined by the Raman detuning parameter and by the atom-molecule conversion rate. ILM's can possess different symmetries and spatial distributions of the components. In this context AMBEC arrays can be viewed as potential compressors and separators of atomic and molecular condensates

  16. Kinetic-energy density functional: Atoms and shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E.

    1996-01-01

    We present a nonlocal kinetic-energy functional which includes an anisotropic average of the density through a symmetrization procedure. This functional allows a better description of the nonlocal effects of the electron system. The main consequence of the symmetrization is the appearance of a clear shell structure in the atomic density profiles, obtained after the minimization of the total energy. Although previous results with some of the nonlocal kinetic functionals have given incipient structures for heavy atoms, only our functional shows a clear shell structure for most of the atoms. The atomic total energies have a good agreement with the exact calculations. Discussion of the chemical potential and the first ionization potential in atoms is included. The functional is also extended to spin-polarized systems. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Internal structure of reactor building for Madras Atomic Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandit, D.P.

    1975-01-01

    The structural configuration and analysis of structural elements of the internal structure of reactor building for the Madras Atomic Power Project has been presented. Two methods of analysis of the internal structure, viz. Equivalent Plane Frame and Finite Element Method, are explained and compared with the use of bending moments obtained. (author)

  18. Localization of the relative position of two atoms induced by spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, L.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Sun, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    We reexamine the back-action of emitted photons on the wave packet evolution about the relative position of two cold atoms. We show that photon recoil resulting from the spontaneous emission can induce the localization of the relative position of the two atoms through the entanglement between the spatial motion of individual atoms and their emitted photons. The obtained result provides a more realistic model for the analysis of the environment-induced localization of a macroscopic object

  19. Atomic quantum simulation of the lattice gauge-Higgs model: Higgs couplings and emergence of exact local gauge symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2013-09-13

    Recently, the possibility of quantum simulation of dynamical gauge fields was pointed out by using a system of cold atoms trapped on each link in an optical lattice. However, to implement exact local gauge invariance, fine-tuning the interaction parameters among atoms is necessary. In the present Letter, we study the effect of violation of the U(1) local gauge invariance by relaxing the fine-tuning of the parameters and showing that a wide variety of cold atoms is still a faithful quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge-Higgs model containing a Higgs field sitting on sites. The clarification of the dynamics of this gauge-Higgs model sheds some light upon various unsolved problems, including the inflation process of the early Universe. We study the phase structure of this model by Monte Carlo simulation and also discuss the atomic characteristics of the Higgs phase in each simulator.

  20. Structures of 38-atom gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Yee Pin; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Bimetallic nanoclusters, such as gold-platinum nanoclusters, are nanomaterials promising wide range of applications. We perform a numerical study of 38-atom gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters, Au{sub n}Pt{sub 38−n} (0 ≤ n ≤ 38), to elucidate the geometrical structures of these clusters. The lowest-energy structures of these bimetallic nanoclusters at the semi-empirical level are obtained via a global-minimum search algorithm known as parallel tempering multi-canonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), in which empirical Gupta many-body potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the constituent atoms. The structures of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters are predicted to be core-shell segregated nanoclusters. Gold atoms are observed to preferentially occupy the surface of the clusters, while platinum atoms tend to occupy the core due to the slightly smaller atomic radius of platinum as compared to gold’s. The evolution of the geometrical structure of 38-atom Au-Pt clusters displays striking similarity with that of 38-atom Au-Cu nanoalloy clusters as reported in the literature.

  1. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahms, Sven O.; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach is presented that allows the efficient localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds used in experimental phasing by a molecular replacement procedure. This permits the calculation of meaningful phases up to the highest resolution of the diffraction data. Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome

  2. The atomic structure of Fe100-xCux nanoalloys: X-ray absorption analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsova, A.N.; Yalovega, G.E.; Soldatov, A.V.; Yan, W.S.; Wei, S.Q.

    2009-01-01

    The local atomic structure of Fe 100-x Cu x nanoalloys (x = 0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 70, 80 and 100%) has been investigated by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis. Local environment around copper and iron atoms in Fe 100-x Cu x has been studied by comparing the experimental XANES with corresponding theoretical spectra calculated for several structural models. It has been established that the most probable structure of the Fe 100-x Cu x nanoalloys for a low concentration of copper (x = 10-20%) is a homogenous bcc structure, for a high copper concentration (x = 60-80%)-a homogenous fcc structure, while at an intermediate copper concentration (about 40%) the nanoalloys have an inhomogeneous structure consisting of clusters of fcc solid solution (90%) and of clusters of bcc solid solution (10%)

  3. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belianinov, Alex; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Lin, Wenzhi; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 (T c = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe 1−x Se x structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces

  4. Atomic structure of highly-charged ions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, A. Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Atomic properties of multiply charged ions have been investigated using excitation of energetic heavy ion beams. Spectroscopy of excited atomic transitions has been applied from the visible to the extreme ultraviolet wavelength regions to provide accurate atomic structure and transition rate data in selected highly ionized atoms. High-resolution position-sensitive photon detection has been introduced for measurements in the ultraviolet region. The detailed structures of Rydberg states in highly charged beryllium-like ions have been measured as a test of long-range electron-ion interactions. The measurements are supported by multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations and by many-body perturbation theory. The high-angular-momentum Rydberg transitions may be used to establish reference wavelengths and improve the accuracy of ionization energies in highly charged systems. Precision wavelength measurements in highly charged few-electron ions have been performed to test the most accurate relativistic atomic structure calculations for prominent low-lying excited states. Lifetime measurements for allowed and forbidden transitions in highly charged few-electron ions have been made to test theoretical transition matrix elements for simple atomic systems. Precision lifetime measurements in laser-excited alkali atoms have been initiated to establish the accuracy of relativistic atomic many-body theory in many-electron systems

  5. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier, E-mail: javierh@triumf.ca; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia [TRIUMF (Canada); Barnea, Nir [The Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  6. Report on atomic structure research 1961-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, B.C.

    1990-07-01

    This report documents the atomic-structure research carried out during the period 1961-90. The contributions are in two main areas. The first comprises original line classifications of spectra of highly ionized atoms including identifications of a major proportion of newly observed lines in the solar far ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectrum. The second consists of theoretical calculations of atomic data such as oscillator strengths, wavelengths, energy levels and their composition. These were calculated with advanced atomic-structure codes and cover most solar abundant ions. A new method was applied to collision calculations. Research in this field, presently conducted at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), was initiated in the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) at Harwell in 1960. It continued under the UKAEA at Culham Laboratory in 1962 and until 1986 when staff were taken over by Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) and later transferred to RAL in 1981. (author)

  7. Protein crystal structure analysis using synchrotron radiation at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa

    1999-01-01

    We can now obtain a detailed picture of protein, allowing the identification of individual atoms, by interpreting the diffraction of X-rays from a protein crystal at atomic resolution, 1.2 A or better. As of this writing, about 45 unique protein structures beyond 1.2 A resolution have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This review provides a simplified overview of how protein crystallographers use such diffraction data to solve, refine, and validate protein structures. (author)

  8. Atomic fine structure in a space of constant curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessis, N.; Bessis, G.; Shamseddine, R.

    1982-01-01

    As a contribution to a tentative formulation of atomic physics in a curved space, the determination of atomic fine structure energies in a space of constant curvature is investigated. Starting from the Dirac equation in a curved space-time, the analogue of the Pauli equation in a general coordinate system is derived. The theoretical curvature induced shifts and splittings of the fine structure energy levels are put in evidence and examined for the particular case of the hydrogenic n=2 levels. (author)

  9. Computer simulation of local atomic displacements in alloys. Application to Guinier-Preston zones in Al-Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyobu, J.; Murata, Y.; Morinaga, M.

    1994-01-01

    A new computer program has been developed for the simulation of local atomic displacements in alloys with face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic lattices. The combined use of this program with the Gehlen-Cohen program for the simulation of chemical short-range order completely describes atomic fluctuations in alloys. The method has been applied to the structural simulation of Guinier-Preston (GP) zones in an Al-Cu alloy, using the experimental data of Matsubara and Cohen. Characteristic displacements of atoms have been observed around the GP zones and new structural models including local displacements have been proposed for a single-layer zone and several multilayer zones. (orig.)

  10. Sub-half-wavelength atom localization via two standing-wave fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Luling; Sun Hui; Niu Yueping; Gong Shangqing

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scheme for sub-half-wavelength atom localization in a four-level ladder-type atomic system, which is coupled by two classical standing-wave fields. We find that one of the standing-wave fields can help in enhancing the localization precision, and the other is of crucial importance in increasing the detecting probability and leading sub-half-wavelength localization

  11. High-efficiency one-dimensional atom localization via two parallel standing-wave fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Wu, Xuqiang; Lu, Liang; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    We present a new scheme of high-efficiency one-dimensional (1D) atom localization via measurement of upper state population or the probe absorption in a four-level N-type atomic system. By applying two classical standing-wave fields, the localization peak position and number, as well as the conditional position probability, can be easily controlled by the system parameters, and the sub-half-wavelength atom localization is also observed. More importantly, there is 100% detecting probability of the atom in the subwavelength domain when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. The proposed scheme may open up a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 1D atom localization. (paper)

  12. DFT computations of the lattice constant, stable atomic structure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the most stable atomic structure and lattice constant of Fullerenes (C60). FHI-aims DFT code was used to predict the stable structure and the computational lattice constant of C60. These were compared with known experimental structures and lattice constants of C60. The results obtained showed that ...

  13. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Sven O; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E

    2013-02-01

    Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome.

  14. Kinetic theory of beam-induced plasmas generalised to sophisticated atomic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyraud-Cuenca, Nelly

    1987-01-01

    We present an analytic kinetic model available for all particle-beam-induced atomic plasmas, without any restriction on the distribution of electronic levels. The method is an iteration of the already known solution available only for the distribution of atomic levels as in the rare gases. We recall a universal atomic kinetic model which, independently of its applications to the study of efficient laser systems, might be a first step in the analytic investigation of molecular problems. Then, the iteration is systematically applied to all possible atomic structures whose number is increased by the non-local character of inelastic processes. We deduce a general analytic representation of the 'tail' of the electron distribution function as a ratio between non-local source terms and a combination of inelastic cross sections, from which we exhibit a physical interpretation and essential scaling laws. The theory is applied to sodium which is an important element in the research of efficient laser systems. (author)

  15. Topology of local atomic environments: implications for magnetism and superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.H.; Watson, R.E.; Pearson, W.B.

    1985-01-01

    Wigner-Seitz cells have been constructed, as a function of atomic size, for a number of transition-metal alloys (SmCo 5 etc.) and a disclination network has been obtained from these. Magnetism in these alloys can be related to the disclination lines, much like the superexchange paths familiar in the magnetism of salts

  16. Inelastic scattering and local heating in atomic gold wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads; Lorente, N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for including inelastic scattering in a first-principles density-functional computational scheme for molecular electronics. As an application, we study two geometries of four-atom gold wires corresponding to two different values of strain and present results for nonlinear...

  17. Holographic Reconstruction of Photoelectron Diffraction and Its Circular Dichroism for Local Structure Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2018-06-01

    The local atomic structure around a specific element atom can be recorded as a photoelectron diffraction pattern. Forward focusing peaks and diffraction rings around them indicate the directions and distances from the photoelectron emitting atom to the surrounding atoms. The state-of-the-art holography reconstruction algorithm enables us to image the local atomic arrangement around the excited atom in a real space. By using circularly polarized light as an excitation source, the angular momentum transfer from the light to the photoelectron induces parallax shifts in these diffraction patterns. As a result, stereographic images of atomic arrangements are obtained. These diffraction patterns can be used as atomic-site-resolved probes for local electronic structure investigation in combination with spectroscopy techniques. Direct three-dimensional atomic structure visualization and site-specific electronic property analysis methods are reviewed. Furthermore, circular dichroism was also found in valence photoelectron and Auger electron diffraction patterns. The investigation of these new phenomena provides hints for the development of new techniques for local structure probing.

  18. Formulation of probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail using the reference ratio method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Jan B.; Andreetta, Christian; Boomsma, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to formulate probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail, for a given amino acid sequence, based on Bayesian principles, while retaining a close link to physics. We start from two previously developed probabilistic models of protein structure on a local length s....... The results indicate that the proposed method and the probabilistic models show considerable promise for probabilistic protein structure prediction and related applications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  19. Three-Dimensional Atomic Structure of Metastable Nanoclusters in Doped Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couillard, Martin; Radtke, Guillaume; Knights, Andrew P.; Botton, Gianluigi A.

    2011-10-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy is used to determine the atomic structure of nanoclusters of cerium dopant atoms embedded in silicon. By channeling electrons along two crystallographic orientations, we identify a characteristic zinc-blende chemical ordering within CeSi clusters coherent with the silicon host matrix. Strain energy limits the size of these ordered arrangements to just above 1 nm. With the local order identified, we then determine the atomic configuration of an individual subnanometer cluster by quantifying the scattering intensity under weak channeling condition in terms of the number of atoms. Analysis based on single-atom visualization also evidences the presence of split-vacancy impurity complexes, which supports the hypothesis of a vacancy-assisted formation of these metastable CeSi nanophases.

  20. Fine structure studies of terbium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhay Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Krishnanath; Niraj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Terbium (Z = 65) is a typical rare-earth element. Fine structure of spectural lines of terbium (Tb) are presented using the laser optogalvanic spectroscopic technique. Altogether eighty transitions in the 5686-6367 A range have been observed in the fine structure spectrum of 159 Tb. Wavelengths of all the observed transitions have been determined. Out of 80 transitions of Tb, a total of 59 transitions are being reported for the first time. Classifications of 39 new transitions have been provided using the known energy levels, Doppler-limited optogalvanic spectroscopic technique is employed to study the fine structure (fs) 159 Tb. (author)

  1. Probing Local Ionic Dynamics in Functional Oxides: From Nanometer to Atomic Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Vacancy-mediated electrochemical reactions in oxides underpin multiple applications ranging from electroresistive memories, to chemical sensors to energy conversion systems such as fuel cells. Understanding the functionality in these systems requires probing reversible (oxygen reduction/evolution reaction) and irreversible (cathode degradation and activation, formation of conductive filaments) electrochemical processes. In this talk, I summarize recent advances in probing and controlling these transformations locally on nanometer level using scanning probe microscopy. The localized tip concentrates the electric field in the nanometer scale volume of material, inducing local transition. Measured simultaneously electromechanical response (piezoresponse) or current (conductive AFM) provides the information on the bias-induced changes in material. Here, I illustrate how these methods can be extended to study local electrochemical transformations, including vacancy dynamics in oxides such as titanates, LaxSr1-xCoO3, BiFeO3, and YxZr1-xO2. The formation of electromechanical hysteresis loops and their bias-, temperature- and environment dependences provide insight into local electrochemical mechanisms. In materials such as lanthanum-strontium cobaltite, mapping both reversible vacancy motion and vacancy ordering and static deformation is possible, and can be corroborated by post mortem STEM/EELS studies. In ceria, a broad gamut of electrochemical behaviors is observed as a function of temperature and humidity. The possible strategies for elucidation ionic motion at the electroactive interfaces in oxides using high-resolution electron microscopy and combined ex-situ and in-situ STEM-SPM studies are discussed. In the second part of the talk, probing electrochemical phenomena on in-situ grown surfaces with atomic resolution is illustrated. I present an approach based on the multivariate statistical analysis of the coordination spheres of individual atoms to reveal

  2. Nano structures of amorphous silicon: localization and energy gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Nourbakhsh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy research has created a push for new materials; one of the most attractive material in this field is quantum confined hybrid silicon nano-structures (nc-Si:H embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H. The essential step for this investigation is studying a-Si and its ability to produce quantum confinement (QC in nc-Si: H. Increasing the gap of a-Si system causes solar cell efficiency to increase. By computational calculations based on Density Functional Theory (DFT, we calculated a special localization factor, [G Allan et al., Phys. Rev. B 57 (1997 6933.], for the states close to HOMO and LUMO in a-Si, and found most weak-bond Si atoms. By removing these silicon atoms and passivating the system with hydrogen, we were able to increase the gap in the a-Si system. As more than 8% hydrogenate was not experimentally available, we removed about 2% of the most localized Si atoms in the almost tetrahedral a-Si system. After removing localized Si atoms in the system with 1000 Si atoms, and adding 8% H, the gap increased about 0.24 eV. Variation of the gap as a function of hydrogen percentage was in good agreement with the Tight –Binding results, but about 2 times more than its experimental value. This might come from the fact that in the experimental conditions, it does not have the chance to remove the most localized states. However, by improving the experimental conditions and technology, this value can be improved.

  3. High-precision two-dimensional atom localization via quantum interference in a tripod-type system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for high-precision two-dimensional atom localization in a four-level tripod-type atomic system via measurement of the excited state population. It is found that because of the position-dependent atom–field interaction, the precision of 2D atom localization can be significantly improved by appropriately adjusting the system parameters. Our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or atom nanolithography via high-precision and high-resolution atom localization. (letter)

  4. Atomic structure investigation of ionized krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotze, P.B.

    1981-12-01

    The experimental lifetimes of ionized Krypton are discussed. Theoretical, the Coulomb approximation proves to be a reliable tool for the performance of calculations in Krypton II, where in general good agreement between experimental and theoretical lifetimes is reached, but its vulnerability is exposed in the case of Krypton III, where only results concerning levels with a 4p 3 ( 4 S 0 ) parent core can be obtained. Although the single configuration Hartree-Fock approximation turns out to be an adequate way of obtaining wave functions of excited states in Krypton III, cancellation effects resulting from configuration-interaction mixing, make the calculated transition probabilities in Krypton II less reliable. Previous work on configuration-interaction effects in the spectrum of Krypton II (El 76a, El 76b) reveals that good agreement between experimental and theoretical results can be obtained. A systematic theoretical analysis based on the multi-configurarion Hartree-Fock approximation to account for configuration-interaction effects should contribute a great deal to the existing knowledge of the energy spectra of ionized atoms

  5. Understanding Atomic Structure: Is There a More Direct and Compelling Connection between Atomic Line Spectra and the Quantization of an Atom's Energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The "atoms first" philosophy, adopted by a growing number of General Chemistry textbook authors, places greater emphasis on atomic structure as a key to a deeper understanding of the field of chemistry. A pivotal concept needed to understand the behavior of atoms is the restriction of an atom's energy to specific allowed values. However,…

  6. Exploring the electron density localization in single MoS2 monolayers by means of a localize-electrons detector and the quantum theory of atoms in molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosslen Aray

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the electron density localization in a MoS2 monolayer under 0 % to 11% tensile strain has been systematically studied by means of a localized electron detector function and the Quantum Theory of atoms in molecules. At 10% tensile strain, this monolayer become metallic. It was found that for less than 6.5% of applied stress, the same atomic structure of the equilibrium geometry (0% strain is maintained; while over 6.5% strain induces a transformation to a structure where the sulfur atoms placed on the top and bottom layer form S2 groups. The localized electron detector function shows the presence of zones of highly electron delocalization extending throughout the Mo central layer. For less than 10% tensile strain, these zones comprise the BCPs and the remainder CPs in separates regions of the space; while for the structures beyond 10% strain, all the critical points are involved in a region of highly delocalized electrons that extends throughout the material. This dissimilar electron localization pattern is like to that previously reported for semiconductors such as Ge bulk and metallic systems such as transition metals bulk.

  7. Subwavelength atom localization via quantum coherence in a three-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafoor, Fazal [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-12-15

    We propose a three-level atomic system where quantum coherence is generated by a classical standing-wave field coupled to the two upper excited decaying levels. Quantum coherence results in cancellation of the spontaneously emitted spectral lines depending on the choice of the phase of the standing wave. We exploit this phenomenon for precision measurement of the atomic position in the standing wave. Measurement of the conditional position probability distribution shows one to eight peaks per unit wavelength of the standing wave. Only one controllable parameter, that is, the phase of the driving standing wave, is enough to control these atomic positions. Along with the other results, the result of obtaining a single peak is remarkable as it enhances the efficiency of our system by a factor of 8.

  8. Subwavelength atom localization via quantum coherence in a three-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, Fazal

    2011-01-01

    We propose a three-level atomic system where quantum coherence is generated by a classical standing-wave field coupled to the two upper excited decaying levels. Quantum coherence results in cancellation of the spontaneously emitted spectral lines depending on the choice of the phase of the standing wave. We exploit this phenomenon for precision measurement of the atomic position in the standing wave. Measurement of the conditional position probability distribution shows one to eight peaks per unit wavelength of the standing wave. Only one controllable parameter, that is, the phase of the driving standing wave, is enough to control these atomic positions. Along with the other results, the result of obtaining a single peak is remarkable as it enhances the efficiency of our system by a factor of 8.

  9. Direct experimental determination of the atomic structure at internal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, N.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Pennycook, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    A crucial first step in understanding the effect that internal interfaces have on the properties of materials is the ability to determine the atomic structure at the interface. As interfaces can contain atomic disorder, dislocations, segregated impurities and interphases, sensitivity to all of these features is essential for complete experimental characterization. By combining Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), the ability to probe the structure, bonding and composition at interfaces with the necessary atomic resolution has been obtained. Experimental conditions can be controlled to provide, simultaneously, both incoherent imaging and spectroscopy. This enables interface structures observed in the image to be interpreted intuitively and the bonding in a specified atomic column to be probed directly by EELS. The bonding and structure information can then be correlated using bond-valence sum analysis to produce structural models. This technique is demonstrated for 25{degrees}, 36{degrees} and 67{degrees} symmetric and 45{degrees} and 25{degrees} asymmetric [001] tilt grain boundaries in SrTiO{sub 3} The structures of both types of boundary were found to contain partially occupied columns in the boundary plane. From these experimental results, a series of structural units were identified which could be combined, using continuity of gain boundary structure principles, to construct all [001] tilt boundaries in SrTiO{sub 3}. Using these models, the ability of this technique to address the issues of vacancies and dopant segregation at grain boundaries in electroceramics is discussed.

  10. Local product structure for expansive homeomorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Artigue, Alfonso; Brum, Joaquin; Potrie, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    Let $f\\colon M\\to M$ be an expansive homeomorphism with dense topologically hyperbolic periodic points, $M$ a compact manifold. Then there is a local product structure in an open and dense subset of $M$. Moreover, if some topologically hyperbolic periodic point has codimension one, then this local product structure is uniform. In particular, we conclude that the homeomorphism is conjugated to a linear Anosov diffeomorphism of a torus.

  11. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Ryan, E-mail: rbwagner@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Pittendrigh, Barry R. [Department of Entomology, University of Illinois, Champaign (United States); Raman, Arvind, E-mail: raman@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the wing membrane of Drosophila melanogaster with atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the structure, elasticity, and adhesion on the wing membrane in air and nitrogen environments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results provide insight into the nature of the wing membrane enabling the development of biomimetic surface and micro air vehicles. - Abstract: Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 {mu}m long, 0.5-1 {mu}m diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m{sup 2}, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  12. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied the wing membrane of Drosophila melanogaster with atomic force microscopy. ► We report the structure, elasticity, and adhesion on the wing membrane in air and nitrogen environments. ► Results provide insight into the nature of the wing membrane enabling the development of biomimetic surface and micro air vehicles. - Abstract: Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10–20 μm long, 0.5–1 μm diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30–60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m 2 , these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  13. Tightly localized stationary pulses in a multilevel atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiong-Jun; Oh, C. H.; Liu, Xin; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Kwek, L. C.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the pulse matching phenomenon can be obtained in the general multilevel system with electromagnetically induced transparency. For this we find a different way to create tightly localized stationary pulses by using counterpropagating pump fields. The present process is a spatial compression of excitation so that it allows us to shape and further intensify the localized stationary pulses, without using standing waves of pump fields or spatially modulated pump fields

  14. Local atomic order in nanocrystalline Fe-based alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jartych, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using the 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy, a local atomic order in nanocrystalline alloys of iron with Al, Ni, W and Mo has been determined. Alloys were prepared by mechanical alloying method. Analysis of Moessbauer spectra was performed on the basis of the local environment model in terms of Warren-Cowley parameters. It was shown that impurity atoms are not randomly distributed in the volume of the first and the second co-ordination spheres of 57 Fe nuclei and they form clusters

  15. Atomic structures of a monolayer of AlAs, GaAs, and InAs on Si(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Geunjung; Yoon, Younggui

    2010-01-01

    We study atomic structures of a monolayer of AlAs, GaAs, and InAs on a Si(111) substrate from first-principles. The surface with the stacking sequence of ...SiSiMAsSiAs is energetically more stable than the surface with the stacking sequence of ...SiSiSiAsMAs, where M is Al, Ga, or In. The atomic structure of the three top layers of the low-energy surfaces are quite robust, irrespective of M, and the atomic structure of the AlAsSiAs terminated surface and that of the GaAsSiAs terminated surface are very similar. For the high-energy AsMAs terminated surfaces, the broken local tetrahedral symmetry plays an important role in the atomic structures. The calculated atomic structures of InAs on the Si(111) substrate depart most from the structure of crystalline Si.

  16. Atomic-level structure and structure-property relationship in metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yongqiang

    One of the key tasks in material science is to understand the structure and structure-property relationship. The recently emerging bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have demonstrated unique properties, especially intriguing mechanical properties such as their high strength and high propensity to localize deformation in shear bands. However, a comprehensive understanding of the structure of BMGs has been hindered by the complexity of these amorphous materials. Even more challenging is the structure-property correlation, which has been well established in crystals but has been seriously lacking for BMGs. This thesis presents a systematic study of the atomic-level structures of two representative BMGs, Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al. The interpenetrating Cu-centered icosahedral clusters have been identified to be the primary structural feature. The fraction of icosahedra increases with increasing Cu or Al contents, and with decreasing cooling rate. The effect of Al in improving the icosahedral order is two-fold: the geometric effect due to the atomic-size mismatch and the chemical effect originated from the Cu-Al bond shortening. The resolved structure is used to study the structure-property relationship. The full icosahedra are found to be responsible for the dynamical slowdown of the supercooled liquid, which underlies the non-Arrhenius behavior, and explains the composition dependence of glass transition temperature, glass forming ability, and the room temperature strength. By simulated deformation, the initiation of plasticity and tendency for strain localization are also investigated. The full icosahedra are found to be the most rigid and resistant cluster with solid-like character, while the unstable clusters with liquid-like character serve as the fertile sites for initiating shear transformations. In addition, the elastic moduli are calculated and analyzed, and the origins of the different configurational dependence of shear modulus (G) and bulk modulus ( B) are explained. The

  17. 2D-PES/XAS method for atomic-layer-resolved magnetic structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, F.; Daimon, H.; Matsushita, T.; Guo, F.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Photoelectron and Auger electron angular distributions from a localized core level provide information on atomic configurations. Forward-focusing peaks indicate the directions of atoms surrounding the excited atom. X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements by Auger electron yield detection on the other hand are excellent methods for studying of the electronic and magnetic structures of surfaces, adsorbates, and thin films. However, all the information from atoms within the electron mean-free-path region is averaged into the obtained spectra. Here, we introduce a new method of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) combined with measurements of Auger electron angular distribution using a display-type analyzer. Taking advantage of the forward-focusing peak as an excellent element- and site-selective probe, 2D-XAS enables direct access to the individual electronic and magnetic structures of each atomic layer. This method was applied to studying the electronic and magnetic structures of Ni thin film at atomic level. (author)

  18. Nanoscale structure and atomic disorder in the iron-based chalcogenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naurang Lal Saini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiband iron-based superconductors have layered structure with a phase diagram characterized by a complex interplay of charge, spin and lattice excitations, with nanoscale atomic structure playing a key role in their fundamental electronic properties. In this paper, we briefly review nanoscale structure and atomic disorder in iron-based chalcogenide superconductors. We focus on the Fe(Se,S1−xTex (11-type and K0.8Fe1.6Se2 (122-type systems, discussing their local structure obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure. Local structure studies on the Fe(Se,S1−xTex system reveal clear nanoscale phase separation characterized by coexisting components of different atomic configurations, similar to the case of random alloys. In fact, the Fe–Se/S and Fe–Te distances in the ternary Fe(Se,S1−xTex are found to be closer to the respective distances in the binary FeSe/FeS and FeTe systems, showing significant divergence of the local structure from the average one. The observed features are characteristic of ternary random alloys, indicating breaking of the local symmetry in these materials. On the other hand, K0.8Fe1.6Se2 is known for phase separation in an iron-vacancy ordered phase and an in-plane compressed lattice phase. The local structure of these 122-type chalcogenides shows that this system is characterized by a large local disorder. Indeed, the experiments suggest a nanoscale glassy phase in K0.8Fe1.6Se2, with the superconductivity being similar to the granular materials. While the 11-type structure has no spacer layer, the 122-type structure contains intercalated atoms unlike the 1111-type REFeAsO (RE = rare earth oxypnictides, having well-defined REO spacer layers. It is clear that the interlayer atomic correlations in these iron-based superconducting structures play an important role in structural stability as well as superconductivity and magnetism.

  19. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szakál, Alex; Markó, Márton; Cser, László

    2015-01-01

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems

  20. Atom localization via phase and amplitude control of the driving field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, Fazal; Qamar, Sajid; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2002-01-01

    Control of amplitude and phase of the driving field in an atom-field interaction leads towards the strong line narrowing and quenching in the spontaneous emission spectrum. We exploit this fact for the atom localization scheme and achieve a much better spatial resolution in the conditional position probability distribution of the atom. Most importantly the quenching in the spontaneous emission manifests itself in reducing the periodicity in the conditional position probability distribution and hence the uncertainty in a particular position measurement of the single atom by a factor of 2

  1. Magnetic-field-driven localization of light in a cold-atom gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipetrov, S E; Sokolov, I M

    2015-02-06

    We discover a transition from extended to localized quasimodes for light in a gas of immobile two-level atoms in a magnetic field. The transition takes place either upon increasing the number density of atoms in a strong field or upon increasing the field at a high enough density. It has many characteristic features of a disorder-driven (Anderson) transition but is strongly influenced by near-field interactions between atoms and the anisotropy of the atomic medium induced by the magnetic field.

  2. Structural atlas of dynein motors at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Hideaki; Kurisu, Genji

    2018-04-01

    Dynein motors are biologically important bio-nanomachines, and many atomic resolution structures of cytoplasmic dynein components from different organisms have been analyzed by X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM, and NMR spectroscopy. This review provides a historical perspective of structural studies of cytoplasmic and axonemal dynein including accessory proteins. We describe representative structural studies of every component of dynein and summarize them as a structural atlas that classifies the cytoplasmic and axonemal dyneins. Based on our review of all dynein structures in the Protein Data Bank, we raise two important points for understanding the two types of dynein motor and discuss the potential prospects of future structural studies.

  3. Sub-half-wavelength localization of an atom via trichromatic phase control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jun; Hu Xiangming

    2007-01-01

    We show that the trichromatic manipulation of the absorption spectrum leads to sub-half-wavelength atom localization. In particular, a three-level atom in the Λ configuration is considered, in which one transition is coupled by a trichromatic field with one sideband component being a standing-wave field while the other transition is probed by a weak monochromatic field. By varying the sum of relative phases of the sideband components of the trichromatic field to the central component, the atom is localized in either of the two half-wavelength regions with 50% detecting probability when the absorption spectrum is measured

  4. Sub-half-wavelength atom localization via phase control of a pair of bichromatic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jun; Hu Xiangming

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme of atom localization based on the interaction of the atom in the Λ configuration with a strong bichromatic coupling field and a weak bichromatic probe field with equal frequency difference. One of the bichromatic coupling components is a standing-wave field, which imposes position information on the Rabi frequency. By varying the difference between the relative phases of the two bichromatic fields, the atom is localized in either of the two half-wavelength regions with 50% probability provided the population in the upper state is detected

  5. Relativistic many-body theory of atomic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, K.T.

    1983-01-01

    The main objective of this program is to improve our understanding of the effect of relativity and electron correlations on atomic processes. Current efforts include hyperfine structure (hfs) studies using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) technique. Atomic hfs are known to be sensitive to relativity and electron correlations, and provide important tests of relativistic atomic many-body theories. Preliminary results on the hfs of the 4f 12 3 H ground state of 68 Er 167 are shown and are in good agreement with experiment. This shows that the MCDF technique can be an efficient and powerful method for atomic hfs studies. Further tests of this method are in progress. We are also studying the absorption spectra for Xe-like ions in the region of 4d → nf, epsilonf transitions

  6. Theoretical atomic physics code development I: CATS: Cowan Atomic Structure Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, J. Jr.; Clark, R.E.H.; Cowan, R.D.

    1988-12-01

    An adaptation of R.D. Cowan's Atomic Structure program, CATS, has been developed as part of the Theoretical Atomic Physics (TAPS) code development effort at Los Alamos. CATS has been designed to be easy to run and to produce data files that can interface with other programs easily. The CATS produced data files currently include wave functions, energy levels, oscillator strengths, plane-wave-Born electron-ion collision strengths, photoionization cross sections, and a variety of other quantities. This paper describes the use of CATS. 10 refs

  7. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao; Zhang Duo

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  8. Properties of the localized field emitted from degenerate Λ-type atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroozani, N.; Golshan, M. M.; Mahjoei, M.

    2007-01-01

    The spontaneous emission from a degenerate Λ-type three-level atom, embedded in a photonic crystal, is studied. The emitted field, as a function of time and position, is calculated by solving the three coupled differential equations governing the amplitudes. We show that the spontaneously emitted field is characterized by three components (as in the case of two-level and V-type atoms): a localized part, a traveling part, and a t -3/2 decaying part. Our calculations indicate that under specific conditions the atoms do not emit propagating fields, while the localized field, having shorter localization length and time, is intensified. As a consequence, the population of the upper level, after a short period of oscillations, approaches a constant value. It is also shown that this steady value, under the same conditions, is much larger than its counterpart in V-type atoms

  9. Localization of metastable atom beams with optical standing waves: nanolithography at the heisenberg limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson; Thywissen; Dekker; Berggren; Chu; Younkin; Prentiss

    1998-06-05

    The spatially dependent de-excitation of a beam of metastable argon atoms, traveling through an optical standing wave, produced a periodic array of localized metastable atoms with position and momentum spreads approaching the limit stated by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Silicon and silicon dioxide substrates placed in the path of the atom beam were patterned by the metastable atoms. The de-excitation of metastable atoms upon collision with the surface promoted the deposition of a carbonaceous film from a vapor-phase hydrocarbon precursor. The resulting patterns were imaged both directly and after chemical etching. Thus, quantum-mechanical steady-state atom distributions can be used for sub-0.1-micrometer lithography.

  10. Quantitative study of two- and three-dimensional strong localization of matter waves by atomic scatterers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antezza, Mauro; Castin, Yvan; Hutchinson, David A. W.

    2010-01-01

    We study the strong localization of atomic matter waves in a disordered potential created by atoms pinned at the nodes of a lattice, for both three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) systems. The localization length of the matter wave, the density of localized states, and the occurrence of energy mobility edges (for the 3D system), are numerically investigated as a function of the effective scattering length between the atomic matter wave and the pinned atoms. Both positive and negative matter wave energies are explored. Interesting features of the density of states are discovered at negative energies, where maxima in the density of bound states for the system can be interpreted in terms of bound states of a matter wave atom with a few pinned atomic scatterers. In 3D we found evidence of up to three mobility edges, one at positive energies, and two at negative energies, the latter corresponding to transitions between extended and localized bound states. In 2D, no mobility edge is found, and a rapid exponential-like increase of the localization length is observed at high energy.

  11. Vortex-ring-fractal Structure of Atom and Molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmera, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    This chapter is an attempt to attain a new and profound model of the nature's structure using a vortex-ring-fractal theory (VRFT). Scientists have been trying to explain some phenomena in Nature that have not been explained so far. The aim of this paper is the vortex-ring-fractal modeling of elements in the Mendeleev's periodic table, which is not in contradiction to the known laws of nature. We would like to find some acceptable structure model of the hydrogen as a vortex-fractal-coil structure of the proton and a vortex-fractal-ring structure of the electron. It is known that planetary model of the hydrogen atom is not right, the classical quantum model is too abstract. Our imagination is that the hydrogen is a levitation system of the proton and the electron. Structures of helium, oxygen, and carbon atoms and a hydrogen molecule are presented too.

  12. Atomic parity nonconservation: Electroweak parameters and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, S.J.; Fortson, E.N.; Wilets, L.

    1992-01-01

    There have been suggestions to measure atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) along an isotopic chain, by taking ratios of observables in order to cancel complicated atomic-structure effects. Precise atomic PNC measurements could make a significant contribution to tests of the standard model at the level of one-loop radiative corrections. However, the results also depend upon certain features of nuclear structure, such as the spatial distribution of neutrons in the nucleus. To examine the sensitivity to nuclear structure, we consider the case of Pb isotopes using various recent relativistic and nonrelativistic nuclear model calculations. Contributions from nucleon internal weak structure are included, but found to be fairly negligible. The spread among present models in predicted sizes of nuclear-structure effects may preclude using Pb isotope ratios to test the standard model at better than a 1% level, unless there are adequate independent tests of the nuclear models by various alternative strong and electroweak nuclear probes. On the other hand, sufficiently accurate atomic PNC experiments would provide a unique method to measure neutron distributions in heavy nuclei

  13. Atomic structure of graphene supported heterogeneous model catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    Graphene on Ir(111) forms a moire structure with well defined nucleation centres. Therefore it can be utilized to create hexagonal metal cluster lattices with outstanding structural quality. At diffraction experiments these 2D surface lattices cause a coherent superposition of the moire cell structure factor, so that the measured signal intensity scales with the square of coherently scattering unit cells. This artificial signal enhancement enables the opportunity for X-ray diffraction to determine the atomic structure of small nano-objects, which are hardly accessible with any experimental technique. The uniform environment of every metal cluster makes the described metal cluster lattices on graphene/Ir(111) an attractive model system for the investigation of catalytic, magnetic and quantum size properties of ultra-small nano-objects. In this context the use of x-rays provides a maximum of flexibility concerning the possible sample environments (vacuum, selected gases, liquids, sample temperature) and allows in-situ/operando measurements. In the framework of the present thesis the structure of different metal clusters grown by physical vapor deposition in an UHV environment and after gas exposure have been investigated. On the one hand the obtained results will explore many aspects of the atomic structure of these small metal clusters and on the other hand the presented results will proof the capabilities of the described technique (SXRD on cluster lattices). For iridium, platinum, iridium/palladium and platinum/rhodium the growth on graphene/Ir(111) of epitaxial, crystalline clusters with an ordered hexagonal lattice arrangement has been confirmed using SXRD. The clusters nucleate at the hcp sites of the moire cell and bind via rehybridization of the carbon atoms (sp"2 → sp"3) to the Ir(111) substrate. This causes small displacements of the substrate atoms, which is revealed by the diffraction experiments. All metal clusters exhibit a fcc structure, whereupon

  14. Mechanical instability in non-uniform atomic structure: Application to amorphous metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeno, Yoshitaka; Kitamura, Takayuki; Tagawa, Motoki

    2007-01-01

    It is important to reveal the deformation of amorphous metal in the atomistic scale level as materials with non-crystal structure have been attracting attention with their prominent functions. In this paper atomistic simulations of tensile deformation of an amorphous model are conducted and local mechanical instability is analyzed to clarify the deformation mechanism of the amorphous structure. Instability causing sharp stress drop is associated with unstable motion of atoms within local region. The size of the region where the unstable atomic motion occurs corresponds to the magnitude of total stress decrease. At instability with large stress decrease the deformation at the onset of the instability propagates to surrounding region, which gives rise to a hysteresis loop in the stress-strain relation. This manifests the microscopic mechanism of the plasticity of amorphous structure

  15. Classroom: inexpensive models for teaching atomic structure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Classroom: inexpensive models for teaching atomic structure and compounds at junior secondary school level of education. WHK Hordzi, BA Mensah. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Educational Research Vol. 2(1&2) 2003: 33-40. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  16. Workshop on foundations of the relativistic theory of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    The conference is an attempt to gather state-of-the-art information to understand the theory of relativistic atomic structure beyond the framework of the original Dirac theory. Abstracts of twenty articles from the conference were prepared separately for the data base

  17. Localization of atomic excitation beyond the diffraction limit using electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, J. A.; Das, Diptaranjan; Simmons, Z. J.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the localization of excitation between hyperfine ground states of 87Rb atoms to as small as λ /13 -wide spatial regions. We use ultracold atoms trapped in a dipole trap and utilize electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for the atomic excitation. The localization is achieved by combining a spatially varying coupling laser (standing wave) with the intensity dependence of EIT. The excitation is fast (150 ns laser pulses) and the dark-state fidelity can be made higher than 94% throughout the standing wave. Because the width of the localized regions is much smaller than the wavelength of the driving light, traditional optical imaging techniques cannot resolve the localized features. Therefore, to measure the excitation profile, we use an autocorrelation-like method where we perform two EIT sequences separated by a time delay, during which we move the standing wave.

  18. Surface structure investigations using noncontact atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziej, J.J.; Such, B.; Goryl, M.; Krok, F.; Piatkowski, P.; Szymonski, M.

    2006-01-01

    Surfaces of several A III B V compound semiconductors (InSb, GaAs, InP, InAs) of the (0 0 1) orientation have been studied with noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). Obtained atomically resolved patterns have been compared with structural models available in the literature. It is shown that NC-AFM is an efficient tool for imaging complex surface structures in real space. It is also demonstrated that the recent structural models of III-V compound surfaces provide a sound base for interpretation of majority of features present in recorded patterns. However, there are also many new findings revealed by the NC-AFM method that is still new experimental technique in the context of surface structure determination

  19. Local Structure and Magnetism of (Ga,Mn)As

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2093111; Temst, Kristiaan

    Throughout the years, dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) have emerged as promising materials for semiconductor-based spintronics. In particular, (Ga,Mn)As has become the model system in which to explore the physics of carrier-mediated ferromagnetism in semiconductors and the associated spintronic phenomena, with a number of interesting functionalities and demonstrated proof-of-concept devices. It constitutes the perfect example of how the magnetic behavior of DMS materials is strongly influenced by local structure. In this thesis, we address key aspects of the interplay between local structure and ferromagnetism of (Ga,Mn)As. We unambiguously identify the lattice site occupied by interstitial Mn as the tetrahedral interstitial site with As nearest neighbors T(As). We show, furthermore, that the T(As) is the most energetically favorable site regardless of the interstitial atom forming or not complexes with substitutional Mn. We also evaluate the thermal stability of both interstitial and substitutional Mn si...

  20. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of substitutional transition-metal atoms in GaN nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Min; Shi Jun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of the transition-metal (TM) atoms (Sc—Zn, Pt and Au) doped zigzag GaN single-walled nanotubes (NTs) are investigated using first-principles spin-polarized density functional calculations. Our results show that the bindings of all TM atoms are stable with the binding energy in the range of 6–16 eV. The Sc- and V-doped GaN NTs exhibit a nonmagnetic behavior. The GaN NTs doped with Ti, Mn, Ni, Cu and Pt are antiferromagnetic. On the contrary, the Cr-, Fe-, Co-, Zn- and Au-doped GaN NTs show the ferromagnetic characteristics. The Mn- and Co-doped GaN NTs induce the largest local moment of 4μ B among these TM atoms. The local magnetic moment is dominated by the contribution from the substitutional TM atom and the N atoms bonded with it. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. Subwavelength atom localization via amplitude and phase control of the absorption spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahrai, Mostafa; Tajalli, Habib; Kapale, Kishore T.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2005-01-01

    We propose a scheme for subwavelength localization of an atom conditioned upon the absorption of a weak probe field at a particular frequency. Manipulating atom-field interaction on a certain transition by applying drive fields on nearby coupled transitions leads to interesting effects in the absorption spectrum of the weak probe field. We exploit this fact and employ a four-level system with three driving fields and a weak probe field, where one of the drive fields is a standing-wave field of a cavity. We show that the position of an atom along this standing wave is determined when probe-field absorption is measured. We find that absorption of the weak probe field at a certain frequency leads to subwavelength localization of the atom in either of the two half-wavelength regions of the cavity field by appropriate choice of the system parameters. We term this result as sub-half-wavelength localization to contrast it with the usual atom localization result of four peaks spread over one wavelength of the standing wave. We observe two localization peaks in either of the two half-wavelength regions along the cavity axis

  2. On the effect of atomic structure on the deactivation of catalytic gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, M J; Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2012-01-01

    Here we present atomic scale studies into the nature of both the internal structure and external surfaces of catalytic Au nanoparticles using aberration corrected in-situ electron microscopy. The activity of catalytic nanoparticles is thought to be highly sensitive to the particles' structure, meaning typical local atomic rearrangements are likely to significantly affect the overall performance of the catalyst. As-deposited Au nanoparticles are found to exhibit a variety of morphologies, with many being internally strained or highly stepped at the surface. Upon heating, surface atoms are observed to minimise the particles' surface energy by restructuring towards planar (111) facets, resulting in the removal of low co-ordinated sites thought to be crucial in catalysis by Au nanoparticles. These results suggest the process of surface energy minimisation made possible by heating may lead to a loss of active sites and consequently contribute to the deactivation of the catalyst.

  3. Fine structures of atomic excited states: precision atomic spectroscopy and electron-ion collision process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiang; Cheng Cheng; Li Jiaming

    2011-01-01

    Scientific research fields for future energies such as inertial confinement fusion researches and astrophysics studies especially with satellite observatories advance into stages of precision physics. The relevant atomic data are not only enormous but also of accuracy according to requirements, especially for both energy levels and the collision data. The fine structure of high excited states of atoms and ions can be measured by precision spectroscopy. Such precision measurements can provide not only knowledge about detailed dynamics of electron-ion interactions but also a bench mark examination of the accuracy of electron-ion collision data, especially incorporating theoretical computations. We illustrate that by using theoretical calculation methods which can treat the bound states and the adjacent continua on equal footing. The precision spectroscopic measurements of excited fine structures can be served as stringent tests of electron-ion collision data. (authors)

  4. Atomic physics. Introduction to quantum physics and structure of the atomic system. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagnac, Bernard; Pebay-Peyroula, J.-C.

    1975-01-01

    This lecture is intended for providing experimental foundations to the basic principles of quantum mechanics, from descriptions of some characteristic experiments which emphasize the limitations of the classical theory. The basic laws that govern the internal structure of atomic systems are exposed (waves and photons, the planetary model and principal quantum number, and the spatial classification of kinetic momenta and magnetic moments). Experimental studies presently in progress are reviewed and their aims are outlined [fr

  5. Detecting structure of haplotypes and local ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present a two-layer hidden Markov model to detect the structure of haplotypes for unrelated individuals. This allows us to model two scales of linkage disequilibrium (one within a group of haplotypes and one between groups), thereby taking advantage of rich haplotype information to infer local an...

  6. Atomic structure of a decagonal Al-Pd-Mn phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalkovič, Marek; Roth, Johannes; Trebin, Hans-Rainer

    2017-12-01

    We present a detailed structure solution for the 16 -Å decagonal quasicrystal in the Al-Pd-Mn system by means of cluster decoration and ab initio energy minimization. It is based on structure models of the ɛ and other approximant phases. The ɛ phases can be represented as subsets of a hexagon-boat-star (HBS) tiling. The decagonal phase comprises further HBS tiles. We have constructed several fictitious HBS approximants and optimized their structures individually. All tiles are decorated by two types of atomic clusters: the pseudo-Mackay icosahedron (PMI) and the large bicapped pentagonal prism (LBPP). It turns out that, whereas the PMI clusters can be kept essentially unchanged, the LBPP clusters must be adjusted in occupancy with Al atoms depending on their positions in the various tiles. In this way we obtain cluster decorations for all tiles of the decagonal quasicrystal. The calculations were confirmed by evaluation of an effective tile Hamiltonian.

  7. Atomic structure of non-stoichiometric transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisy-Maurice, Virginie.

    1981-10-01

    Different kinds of experimental studies of the atomic arrangement in non-stoichiometric transition metal carbides are proposed: the ordering of carbon vacancies and the atomic static displacements are the main subjects studied. Powder neutron diffraction on TiCsub(1-x) allowed us to determine the order-disorder transition critical temperature -Tsub(c) approximately 770 0 C- in the TiCsub(0.52-0.67) range, and to analyze at 300 K the crystal structure of long-range ordered samples. A neutron diffuse scattering quantitative study at 300 K of short-range order in TiCsub(0.76), TiCsub(0.79) and NbCsub(0.73) single crystals is presented: as in Ti 2 Csub(1+x) and Nb 6 C 5 superstructures, vacancies avoid to be on each side of a metal atom. Besides, the mean-square carbon atom displacements from their sites are small, whereas metal atoms move radially about 0.03 A away from vacancies. These results are in qualitative agreement with EXAFS measurements at titanium-K edge of TiCsub(1-x). An interpretation of ordering in term of short-range interaction pair potentials between vacancies is proposed [fr

  8. Ab initio study of symmetrical tilt grain boundaries in bcc Fe: structural units, magnetic moments, interfacial bonding, local energy and local stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Somesh Kr; Tanaka, Shingo; Kohyama, Masanori; Shiihara, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    We present first-principle calculations on symmetric tilt grain boundaries (GBs) in bcc Fe. Using density functional theory (DFT), we studied the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Σ3(111) and Σ11(332) GBs formed by rotation around the [110] axis. The optimized structures, GB energies and GB excess free volumes are consistent with previous DFT and classical simulation studies. The GB configurations can be interpreted by the structural unit model as given by Nakashima and Takeuchi (2000 ISIJ 86 357). Both the GBs are composed of similar structural units of three- and five-membered rings with different densities at the interface according to the rotation angle. The interface atoms with larger atomic volumes reveal higher magnetic moments than the bulk value, while the interface atoms with shorter bond lengths have reduced magnetic moments in each GB. The charge density and local density of states reveal that the interface bonds with short bond lengths have more covalent nature, where minority-spin electrons play a dominant role as the typical nature of ferromagnetic Fe. In order to understand the structural stability of these GBs, we calculated the local energy and local stress for each atomic region using the scheme of Shiihara et al (2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 075441). In each GB, the interface atoms with larger atomic volumes and enhanced magnetic moments reveal larger local energy increase and tensile stress. The interface atoms constituting more covalent-like bonds with reduced magnetic moments have lower local energy increase, contributing to the stabilization, while compressive stress is generated at these atoms. The relative stability between the two GBs can be understood by the local energies at the structural units. The local energy and local stress analysis is a powerful tool to investigate the structural properties of GBs based on the behavior of valence electrons. (paper)

  9. Structural and electronic properties of isovalent boron atoms in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammel, C. M.; Nattermann, L.; Sterzer, E.; Volz, K.; Koenraad, P. M.

    2018-04-01

    Boron containing GaAs, which is grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy, is studied at the atomic level by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (X-STM) and spectroscopy (STS). In topographic X-STM images, three classes of B related features are identified, which are attributed to individual B atoms on substitutional Ga sites down to the second layer below the natural {110} cleavage planes. The X-STM contrast of B atoms below the surface reflects primarily the structural modification of the GaAs matrix by the small B atoms. However, B atoms in the cleavage plane have in contrast to conventional isovalent impurities, such as Al and In, a strong influence on the local electronic structure similar to donors or acceptors. STS measurements show that B in the GaAs {110} surfaces gives rise to a localized state short below the conduction band (CB) edge while in bulk GaAs, the B impurity state is resonant with the CB. The analysis of BxGa1-xAs/GaAs quantum wells reveals a good crystal quality and shows that the incorporation of B atoms in GaAs can be controlled along the [001] growth direction at the atomic level. Surprisingly, the formation of the first and fourth nearest neighbor B pairs, which are oriented along the directions, is strongly suppressed at a B concentration of 1% while the third nearest neighbor B pairs are found more than twice as often than expected for a completely spatially random pattern.

  10. Electronic structure and local distortions in epitaxial ScGaN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, S M; Zhang, S; Rovezzi, M; Joyce, T B; Moram, M A

    2014-01-01

    High energy resolution fluorescence-detected x-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations were used to investigate the local bonding and electronic structure of Sc in epitaxial wurtzite-structure Sc x Ga 1−x N films with x ≤ 0.059. Sc atoms are found to substitute for Ga atoms, accompanied by a local distortion involving an increase in the internal lattice parameter u around the Sc atoms. The local bonding and electronic structure at Sc are not affected strongly by the strain state or the defect microstructure of the films. These data are consistent with theoretical predictions regarding the electronic structure of dilute Sc x Ga 1−x N alloys. (paper)

  11. Atomic Structure Control of Silica Thin Films on Pt(111)

    KAUST Repository

    Crampton, Andrew S

    2015-05-27

    Metal oxide thin films grown on metal single crystals are commonly used to model heterogeneous catalyst supports. The structure and properties of thin silicon dioxide films grown on metal single crystals have only recently been thoroughly characterized and their spectral properties well established. We report the successful growth of a three- dimensional, vitreous silicon dioxide thin film on the Pt(111) surface and reproduce the closed bilayer structure previously reported. The confirmation of the three dimensional nature of the film is unequivocally shown by the infrared absorption band at 1252 cm−1. Temperature programmed desorption was used to show that this three-dimensional thin film covers the Pt(111) surface to such an extent that its application as a catalyst support for clusters/nanoparticles is possible. The growth of a three-dimensional film was seen to be directly correlated with the amount of oxygen present on the surface after the silicon evaporation process. This excess of oxygen is tentatively attributed to atomic oxygen being generated in the evaporator. The identification of atomic oxygen as a necessary building block for the formation of a three-dimensional thin film opens up new possibilities for thin film growth on metal supports, whereby simply changing the type of oxygen enables thin films with different atomic structures to be synthesized. This is a novel approach to tune the synthesis parameters of thin films to grow a specific structure and expands the options for modeling common amorphous silica supports under ultra high vacuum conditions.

  12. Global hybrids from the semiclassical atom theory satisfying the local density linear response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Eduardo; Constantin, Lucian A; Cortona, Pietro; Della Sala, Fabio

    2015-01-13

    We propose global hybrid approximations of the exchange-correlation (XC) energy functional which reproduce well the modified fourth-order gradient expansion of the exchange energy in the semiclassical limit of many-electron neutral atoms and recover the full local density approximation (LDA) linear response. These XC functionals represent the hybrid versions of the APBE functional [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2011, 106, 186406] yet employing an additional correlation functional which uses the localization concept of the correlation energy density to improve the compatibility with the Hartree-Fock exchange as well as the coupling-constant-resolved XC potential energy. Broad energetic and structural testing, including thermochemistry and geometry, transition metal complexes, noncovalent interactions, gold clusters and small gold-molecule interfaces, as well as an analysis of the hybrid parameters, show that our construction is quite robust. In particular, our testing shows that the resulting hybrid, including 20% of Hartree-Fock exchange and named hAPBE, performs remarkably well for a broad palette of systems and properties, being generally better than popular hybrids (PBE0 and B3LYP). Semiempirical dispersion corrections are also provided.

  13. Local structure in the disordered solid solution of cis- and trans-perinones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teteruk, Jaroslav L.; Glinnemann, Juergen; Heyse, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    preferred local arrangements, ordering lengths, and probabilities for the arrangement of neighbouring molecules. The superposition of the atomic positions of all energetically favourable calculated models corresponds well with the experimentally determined crystal structures, explaining not only the atomic....... The crystal structure of the solid solution was determined by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Extensive lattice-energy minimizations with force-field and DFT-D methods were carried out on combinatorially complete sets of ordered models. For the disordered systems, local structures were calculated, including...

  14. Local structure and structural signature underlying properties in metallic glasses and supercooled liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun

    Metallic glasses (MGs), discovered five decades ago as a newcomer in the family of glasses, are of current interest because of their unique structures and properties. There are also many fundamental materials science issues that remain unresolved for metallic glasses, as well as their predecessor above glass transition temperature, the supercooled liquids. In particular, it is a major challenge to characterize the local structure and unveil the structure-property relationship for these amorphous materials. This thesis presents a systematic study of the local structure of metallic glasses as well as supercooled liquids via classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Three typical MG models are chosen as representative candidate, Cu64 Zr36, Pd82Si18 and Mg65Cu 25Y10 systems, while the former is dominant with full icosahedra short-range order and the prism-type short-range order dominate for latter two. Furthermore, we move to unravel the underlying structural signature among several properties in metallic glasses. Firstly, the temperature dependence of specific heat and liquid fragility between Cu-Zr and Mg-Cu-Y (also Pd-Si) in supercooled liquids are quite distinct: gradual versus fast evolution of specific heat and viscosity/relaxation time with undercooling. Their local structural ordering are found to relate with the temperature dependence of specific heat and relaxation time. Then elastic heterogeneity has been studied to correlate with local structure in Cu-Zr MGs. Specifically, this part covers how the degree of elastic deformation correlates with the internal structure at the atomic level, how to quantitatively evaluate the local solidity/liquidity in MGs and how the network of interpenetrating connection of icosahedra determine the corresponding shear modulus. Finally, we have illustrated the structure signature of quasi-localized low-frequency vibrational normal modes, which resides the intriguing vibrational properties in MGs. Specifically, the

  15. Shaped input distributions for structural damage localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulriksen, Martin Dalgaard; Bernal, Dionisio; Damkilde, Lars

    2018-01-01

    localization method is cast that operates on the premise of shaping inputs—whose spatial distribution is fixed—by use of a model, such that these inputs, in one structural subdomain at a time, suppress certain steady-state vibration quantities (depending on the type of damage one seeks to interrogate for......). Accordingly, damage is localized when the vibration signature induced by the shaped inputs in the damaged state corresponds to that in the reference state, hereby implying that the approach does not point directly to damage. Instead, it operates with interrogation based on postulated damage patterns...

  16. Hydrogen atoms in protein structures: high-resolution X-ray diffraction structure of the DFPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen atoms represent about half of the total number of atoms in proteins and are often involved in substrate recognition and catalysis. Unfortunately, X-ray protein crystallography at usual resolution fails to access directly their positioning, mainly because light atoms display weak contributions to diffraction. However, sub-Ångstrom diffraction data, careful modeling and a proper refinement strategy can allow the positioning of a significant part of hydrogen atoms. Results A comprehensive study on the X-ray structure of the diisopropyl-fluorophosphatase (DFPase) was performed, and the hydrogen atoms were modeled, including those of solvent molecules. This model was compared to the available neutron structure of DFPase, and differences in the protein and the active site solvation were noticed. Conclusions A further examination of the DFPase X-ray structure provides substantial evidence about the presence of an activated water molecule that may constitute an interesting piece of information as regard to the enzymatic hydrolysis mechanism. PMID:23915572

  17. SGO: A fast engine for ab initio atomic structure global optimization by differential evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanghui; Jia, Weile; Jiang, Xiangwei; Li, Shu-Shen; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2017-10-01

    As the high throughout calculations and material genome approaches become more and more popular in material science, the search for optimal ways to predict atomic global minimum structure is a high research priority. This paper presents a fast method for global search of atomic structures at ab initio level. The structures global optimization (SGO) engine consists of a high-efficiency differential evolution algorithm, accelerated local relaxation methods and a plane-wave density functional theory code running on GPU machines. The purpose is to show what can be achieved by combining the superior algorithms at the different levels of the searching scheme. SGO can search the global-minimum configurations of crystals, two-dimensional materials and quantum clusters without prior symmetry restriction in a relatively short time (half or several hours for systems with less than 25 atoms), thus making such a task a routine calculation. Comparisons with other existing methods such as minima hopping and genetic algorithm are provided. One motivation of our study is to investigate the properties of magnetic systems in different phases. The SGO engine is capable of surveying the local minima surrounding the global minimum, which provides the information for the overall energy landscape of a given system. Using this capability we have found several new configurations for testing systems, explored their energy landscape, and demonstrated that the magnetic moment of metal clusters fluctuates strongly in different local minima.

  18. Development of atomic spectroscopy technologies - Hyperfine structure of 2 period atoms using optogalvanic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Nam Ic [Hankuk University of foreign studies, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The source of anomalous broad linewidth of 3{sup 3}P{sub 1},{sub 2},{sub 3}-3{sup 3}D{sub 2},{sub 3},4(3s') transition was explained. The broad optogalvanic spectrum was consisted of two gaussian peaks of different linewidths, and they are separated by 250 MHz. The Narrow peak, which has linewidth of room temperature, is from oxygen atoms already separated, and the shifted broad peak, which has linewidth corresponding to a temperature of 9000 K, is from weakly bound molecular ions. Obtained hyperfine spectrum of fluorine atom at the expected frequency, was too weak to analyze hyperfine structure constants. Microwave discharge might be necessary for higher density of excited state. 16 refs., 11 figs. (Author)

  19. The variational method in the atomic structure calcularion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimura, A.

    1970-01-01

    The importance and limitations of variational methods on the atomic structure calculations is set into relevance. Comparisons are made to the Perturbation Theory. Ilustrating it, the method is applied to the H - , H + and H + 2 simple atomic structure systems, and the results are analysed with basis on the study of the associated essential eigenvalue spectrum. Hydrogenic functions (where the screening constants are replaced by variational parameters) are combined to construct the wave function with proper symmetry for each one of the systems. This shows the existence of a bound state for H - , but no conclusions can be made for the others, where it may or may not be necessary to use more flexible wave functions, i.e., with greater number of terms and parameters. (author) [pt

  20. Calculation of atom displacement cross section for structure material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping; Xu Yiping

    2015-01-01

    The neutron radiation damage in material is an important consideration of the reactor design. The radiation damage of materials mainly comes from atom displacements of crystal structure materials. The reaction cross sections of charged particles, cross sections of displacements per atom (DPA) and KERMA are the basis of radiation damage calculation. In order to study the differences of DPA cross sections with different codes and different evaluated nuclear data libraries, the DPA cross sections for structure materials were calculated with UNF and NJOY codes, and the comparisons of results were given. The DPA cross sections from different evaluated nuclear data libraries were compared. And the comparison of DPA cross sections between NJOY and Monte Carlo codes was also done. The results show that the differences among these evaluated nuclear data libraries exist. (authors)

  1. Atomic structure calculations on the CRAY X-MP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    Atomic structure calculations require both radial and angular integrations, where the latter are often based on Racah algebra. With relatively minor modifications, good performance is obtained on vector machines for radial integrations. Angular integrations, however, present the bottleneck. In this paper some recent improvements in the algorithms for angular integrations are described, as well as some multitasking experiments on the CRAY X-MP and CRAY 2. These show that the workload can easily be distributed evenly among available processors with dynamic scheduling

  2. Atomic structure calculations of Mo XV-XL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hirotaka; Sugie, Tatsuo; Shiho, Makoto; Suzuki, Yasuo; Ishii, Keishi; Maeda, Hikosuke.

    1986-06-01

    Energy levels and oscillator strengths were calculated for Mo XV - Mo XL. The computer program for atomic structure calculation, developed by Dr. Robert D. Cowan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, was used in the present work. The scaled energy parameters were empirically determined from the observed spectral data. We present wavelengths and transition probabilities of Mo XV-XL. Energy levels and spectral patterns are presented in figures that are useful for the identification of spectral lines. (author)

  3. Automatic kinetic Monte-Carlo modeling for impurity atom diffusion in grain boundary structure of tungsten material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi M. Ito

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion process of hydrogen and helium in plasma-facing material depends on the grain boundary structures. Whether a grain boundary accelerates or limits the diffusion speed of these impurity atoms is not well understood. In the present work, we proposed the automatic modeling of a kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC simulation to treat an asymmetric grain boundary structure that corresponds to target samples used in fusion material experiments for retention and permeation. In this method, local minimum energy sites and migration paths for impurity atoms in the grain boundary structure are automatically found using localized molecular dynamics. The grain boundary structure was generated with the Voronoi diagram. Consequently, we demonstrate that the KMC simulation for the diffusion process of impurity atoms in the generated grain boundary structure of tungsten material can be performed.

  4. Multifractality in edge localized modes in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60 Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, P.E.; Asakura, N.; Miura, Y.; Nakano, T.; Yoshino, R.

    2001-01-01

    The temporal losses of confinement during edge localized modes in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60 Upgrade (JT-60U) show multifractal scaling and the spectra are generally smooth, but in some cases there are signs of discontinuous derivatives. Dynamics of the Sugama-Horton model, interpreted as edge localized modes, also display multifractal scaling. The spectra display singularities in the derivative, which can be interpreted as a phase transition. It is argued that the multifractal spectra of edge localized modes can be used to discriminate between different experimental discharges and validate edge localized mode models

  5. Atomic and electronic structures of novel silicon surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.H. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    The modification of silicon surfaces is presently of great interest to the semiconductor device community. Three distinct areas are the subject of inquiry: first, modification of the silicon electronic structure; second, passivation of the silicon surface; and third, functionalization of the silicon surface. It is believed that surface modification of these types will lead to useful electronic devices by pairing these modified surfaces with traditional silicon device technology. Therefore, silicon wafers with modified electronic structure (light-emitting porous silicon), passivated surfaces (H-Si(111), Cl-Si(111), Alkyl-Si(111)), and functionalized surfaces (Alkyl-Si(111)) have been studied in order to determine the fundamental properties of surface geometry and electronic structure using synchrotron radiation-based techniques.

  6. Atomic and electronic structure of exfoliated black phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ryan J.; Topsakal, Mehmet; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Low, Tony; Robbins, Matthew C.; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorus, a layered two-dimensional crystal with tunable electronic properties and high hole mobility, is quickly emerging as a promising candidate for future electronic and photonic devices. Although theoretical studies using ab initio calculations have tried to predict its atomic and electronic structure, uncertainty in its fundamental properties due to a lack of clear experimental evidence continues to stymie our full understanding and application of this novel material. In this work, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are used to study the crystal structure of few-layer black phosphorus. Directly interpretable annular dark-field images provide a three-dimensional atomic-resolution view of this layered material in which its stacking order and all three lattice parameters can be unambiguously identified. In addition, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to measure the conduction band density of states of black phosphorus, which agrees well with the results of density functional theory calculations performed for the experimentally determined crystal. Furthermore, experimental EELS measurements of interband transitions and surface plasmon excitations are also consistent with simulated results. Finally, the effects of oxidation on both the atomic and electronic structure of black phosphorus are analyzed to explain observed device degradation. The transformation of black phosphorus into amorphous PO 3 or H 3 PO 3 during oxidation may ultimately be responsible for the degradation of devices exposed to atmosphere over time

  7. Atomic and electronic structure of exfoliated black phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ryan J.; Topsakal, Mehmet; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre, E-mail: mkhoyan@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Low, Tony; Robbins, Matthew C.; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Black phosphorus, a layered two-dimensional crystal with tunable electronic properties and high hole mobility, is quickly emerging as a promising candidate for future electronic and photonic devices. Although theoretical studies using ab initio calculations have tried to predict its atomic and electronic structure, uncertainty in its fundamental properties due to a lack of clear experimental evidence continues to stymie our full understanding and application of this novel material. In this work, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are used to study the crystal structure of few-layer black phosphorus. Directly interpretable annular dark-field images provide a three-dimensional atomic-resolution view of this layered material in which its stacking order and all three lattice parameters can be unambiguously identified. In addition, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to measure the conduction band density of states of black phosphorus, which agrees well with the results of density functional theory calculations performed for the experimentally determined crystal. Furthermore, experimental EELS measurements of interband transitions and surface plasmon excitations are also consistent with simulated results. Finally, the effects of oxidation on both the atomic and electronic structure of black phosphorus are analyzed to explain observed device degradation. The transformation of black phosphorus into amorphous PO{sub 3} or H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} during oxidation may ultimately be responsible for the degradation of devices exposed to atmosphere over time.

  8. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces.

  9. Atomic orbital-based SOS-MP2 with tensor hypercontraction. II. Local tensor hypercontraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chenchen; Martínez, Todd J.

    2017-01-01

    In the first paper of the series [Paper I, C. Song and T. J. Martinez, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 174111 (2016)], we showed how tensor-hypercontracted (THC) SOS-MP2 could be accelerated by exploiting sparsity in the atomic orbitals and using graphical processing units (GPUs). This reduced the formal scaling of the SOS-MP2 energy calculation to cubic with respect to system size. The computational bottleneck then becomes the THC metric matrix inversion, which scales cubically with a large prefactor. In this work, the local THC approximation is proposed to reduce the computational cost of inverting the THC metric matrix to linear scaling with respect to molecular size. By doing so, we have removed the primary bottleneck to THC-SOS-MP2 calculations on large molecules with O(1000) atoms. The errors introduced by the local THC approximation are less than 0.6 kcal/mol for molecules with up to 200 atoms and 3300 basis functions. Together with the graphical processing unit techniques and locality-exploiting approaches introduced in previous work, the scaled opposite spin MP2 (SOS-MP2) calculations exhibit O(N2.5) scaling in practice up to 10 000 basis functions. The new algorithms make it feasible to carry out SOS-MP2 calculations on small proteins like ubiquitin (1231 atoms/10 294 atomic basis functions) on a single node in less than a day.

  10. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS): a novel probe for local structure of glassy solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J.

    1979-01-01

    The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is the oscillation in the absorption coefficient extending a few hundred eVs on the high energy side of an x-ray absorption edge. This mode of spectroscopy has recently been realized to be a powerful tool in probing the local atomic structure of all states of matter, particularly with the advent of intense synchrotron radiation. More importantly is the unique ability of EXAFS to probe the structure and dynamics around individual atomic species in a multi-atomic system. In this paper, the physical processes associated with the EXAFS phenomenon will be discussed. Experimental results obtained at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory on some oxide and metallic glasses will be presented. The local structure in these materials are elucidated using a Fourier transform technique

  11. Characterizing structural transitions using localized free energy landscape analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh K Banavali

    Full Text Available Structural changes in molecules are frequently observed during biological processes like replication, transcription and translation. These structural changes can usually be traced to specific distortions in the backbones of the macromolecules involved. Quantitative energetic characterization of such distortions can greatly advance the atomic-level understanding of the dynamic character of these biological processes.Molecular dynamics simulations combined with a variation of the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method for potential of mean force determination are applied to characterize localized structural changes for the test case of cytosine (underlined base flipping in a GTCAGCGCATGG DNA duplex. Free energy landscapes for backbone torsion and sugar pucker degrees of freedom in the DNA are used to understand their behavior in response to the base flipping perturbation. By simplifying the base flipping structural change into a two-state model, a free energy difference of upto 14 kcal/mol can be attributed to the flipped state relative to the stacked Watson-Crick base paired state. This two-state classification allows precise evaluation of the effect of base flipping on local backbone degrees of freedom.The calculated free energy landscapes of individual backbone and sugar degrees of freedom expectedly show the greatest change in the vicinity of the flipping base itself, but specific delocalized effects can be discerned upto four nucleotide positions away in both 5' and 3' directions. Free energy landscape analysis thus provides a quantitative method to pinpoint the determinants of structural change on the atomic scale and also delineate the extent of propagation of the perturbation along the molecule. In addition to nucleic acids, this methodology is anticipated to be useful for studying conformational changes in all macromolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  12. Semiclassical analysis of quantum localization of the periodically kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.; Persson, E.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Grossmann, F.

    2004-01-01

    The periodically kicked Rydberg atom displays quantum localization, features of which depend on the orientation and strength of the unidirectional kicks. They include scarring of the wave function, localization by cantori, and exponential localization in the regime of strong perturbation resembling dynamical localization. Using the semiclassical Herman-Kluk propagator we investigate the degree to which semiclassical dynamics can mimic quantum localization. While the semiclassical approximation has difficulties to reproduce the scarred wave functions, the exponential tail which is a typical signature of the dynamical localization is well represented in the case of strong classical diffusion. Also the localization by broken tori is observed in the semiclassical recurrence probability for short times but the deviation from the corresponding quantum dynamics becomes more pronounced for the long-time evolution

  13. Efficient evaluation of atom tunneling combined with electronic structure calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ásgeirsson, Vilhjálmur; Arnaldsson, Andri; Jónsson, Hannes

    2018-03-14

    Methodology for finding optimal tunneling paths and evaluating tunneling rates for atomic rearrangements is described. First, an optimal JWKB tunneling path for a system with fixed energy is obtained using a line integral extension of the nudged elastic band method. Then, a calculation of the dynamics along the path is used to determine the temperature at which it corresponds to an optimal Feynman path for thermally activated tunneling (instanton) and a harmonic approximation is used to estimate the transition rate. The method is illustrated with calculations for a modified two-dimensional Müller-Brown surface but is efficient enough to be used in combination with electronic structure calculations of the energy and atomic forces in systems containing many atoms. An example is presented where tunneling is the dominant mechanism well above room temperature as an H 3 BNH 3 molecule dissociates to form H 2 . Also, a solid-state example is presented where density functional theory calculations of H atom tunneling in a Ta crystal give close agreement with experimental measurements on hydrogen diffusion over a wide range in temperature.

  14. Local energy equation for two-electron atoms and relation between kinetic energy and electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2002-08-01

    In early work, Dawson and March [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 5850 (1984)] proposed a local energy method for treating both Hartree-Fock and correlated electron theory. Here, an exactly solvable model two-electron atom with pure harmonic interactions is treated in its ground state in the above context. A functional relation between the kinetic energy density t(r) at the origin r=0 and the electron density p(r) at the same point then emerges. The same approach is applied to the Hookean atom; in which the two electrons repel with Coulombic energy e 2 /r 12 , with r 12 the interelectronic separation, but are still harmonically confined. Again the kinetic energy density t(r) is the focal point, but now generalization away from r=0 is also effected. Finally, brief comments are added about He-like atomic ions in the limit of large atomic number. (author)

  15. Intense deuterium nuclear fusion of pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally within highly deuterated atom clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshiaki, A; Zhang, Y C

    2002-01-01

    Embedded nano-Pd particles of 5 nm in size instantly abundant D-atoms more than 250% in the atomic ratio against Pd-atoms at room temperature when they are kept in D sub 2 gas pressurized to less than 10 atm. In such ultrahigh densities, 2-4 D-atoms can be coagulated inside each octahedral space of Pd lattice (pycnodeuterium-lump). When a stimulation energy such as latticequake causing by ultrasonic wave was supplied to those highly deuterated Pd particles, intense deuterium nuclear fusion (''solid fusion'') was generated there and both excess heat and sup 4 He gas were abundantly produced. Naturally, these facts can not be realized at all in bulk Pd. The results show that the nuclear fusion occurs without any hazardous rays in pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally inside the each cell of the host metal lattice. These unit cells correspond to minimum unit of the solid fusion reactor as a ''Lattice Reactor''. (author)

  16. A Hartree–Fock study of the confined helium atom: Local and global basis set approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Toby D., E-mail: tyoung@ippt.pan.pl [Zakład Metod Komputerowych, Instytut Podstawowych Prolemów Techniki Polskiej Akademia Nauk, ul. Pawińskiego 5b, 02-106 Warszawa (Poland); Vargas, Rubicelia [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingenierías, Departamento de Química, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa, D.F. C.P. 09340, México (Mexico); Garza, Jorge, E-mail: jgo@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingenierías, Departamento de Química, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa, D.F. C.P. 09340, México (Mexico)

    2016-02-15

    Two different basis set methods are used to calculate atomic energy within Hartree–Fock theory. The first is a local basis set approach using high-order real-space finite elements and the second is a global basis set approach using modified Slater-type orbitals. These two approaches are applied to the confined helium atom and are compared by calculating one- and two-electron contributions to the total energy. As a measure of the quality of the electron density, the cusp condition is analyzed. - Highlights: • Two different basis set methods for atomic Hartree–Fock theory. • Galerkin finite element method and modified Slater-type orbitals. • Confined atom model (helium) under small-to-extreme confinement radii. • Detailed analysis of the electron wave-function and the cusp condition.

  17. Atomic and magnetic structure of MnF3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.A.; Kennedy, B.J.; Vogt, T.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The magnetic and atomic structure of MnF 3 has been determined from 4K to 300K using neutron powder diffraction. The MnF 3 compound is the archetypical Mn-based colossal magnetoresistive compound. A Neel temperature of approximately 40K was observed from the temperature variation of the magnetic moment. Below the Neel temperature a large negative thermal expansion was observed, in striking similarity to other Mn-based colossal magnetoresistive compounds. The variation in structure is discussed in relation to other Mn-based compounds, particularly as this compound cannot support charge ordering

  18. On-the-Fly Machine Learning of Atomic Potential in Density Functional Theory Structure Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, T. L.; Jørgensen, M. S.; Hammer, B.

    2018-01-01

    Machine learning (ML) is used to derive local stability information for density functional theory calculations of systems in relation to the recently discovered SnO2 (110 )-(4 ×1 ) reconstruction. The ML model is trained on (structure, total energy) relations collected during global minimum energy search runs with an evolutionary algorithm (EA). While being built, the ML model is used to guide the EA, thereby speeding up the overall rate by which the EA succeeds. Inspection of the local atomic potentials emerging from the model further shows chemically intuitive patterns.

  19. Significant change of local atomic configurations at surface of reduced activation Eurofer steels induced by hydrogenation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greculeasa, S.G.; Palade, P.; Schinteie, G. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Kuncser, A.; Stanciu, A. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Lungu, G.A. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Porosnicu, C.; Lungu, C.P. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Kuncser, V., E-mail: kuncser@infim.ro [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Engineering of Eurofer slab properties by hydrogenation treatments. • Hydrogenation modifies significantly the local atomic configurations at the surface. • Hydrogenation increases the expulsion of the Cr atoms toward the very surface. • Approaching binomial atomic distribution by hydrogenation in the next surface 100 nm. - Abstract: Reduced-activation steels such as Eurofer alloys are candidates for supporting plasma facing components in tokamak-like nuclear fusion reactors. In order to investigate the impact of hydrogen/deuterium insertion in their crystalline lattice, annealing treatments in hydrogen atmosphere have been applied on Eurofer slabs. The resulting samples have been analyzed with respect to local structure and atomic configuration both before and after successive annealing treatments, by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). The corroborated data point out for a bcc type structure of the non-hydrogenated alloy, with an average alloy composition approaching Fe{sub 0.9}Cr{sub 0.1} along a depth of about 100 nm. EDS elemental maps do not indicate surface inhomogeneities in concentration whereas the Mössbauer spectra prove significant deviations from a homogeneous alloying. The hydrogenation increases the expulsion of the Cr atoms toward the surface layer and decreases their oxidation, with considerable influence on the surface properties of the steel. The hydrogenation treatment is therefore proposed as a potential alternative for a convenient engineering of the surface of different Fe-Cr based alloys.

  20. MolProbity: all-atom structure validation for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Vincent B.; Arendall, W. Bryan III; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Keedy, Daniel A.; Immormino, Robert M.; Kapral, Gary J.; Murray, Laura W.; Richardson, Jane S.; Richardson, David C.

    2010-01-01

    MolProbity structure validation will diagnose most local errors in macromolecular crystal structures and help to guide their correction. MolProbity is a structure-validation web service that provides broad-spectrum solidly based evaluation of model quality at both the global and local levels for both proteins and nucleic acids. It relies heavily on the power and sensitivity provided by optimized hydrogen placement and all-atom contact analysis, complemented by updated versions of covalent-geometry and torsion-angle criteria. Some of the local corrections can be performed automatically in MolProbity and all of the diagnostics are presented in chart and graphical forms that help guide manual rebuilding. X-ray crystallography provides a wealth of biologically important molecular data in the form of atomic three-dimensional structures of proteins, nucleic acids and increasingly large complexes in multiple forms and states. Advances in automation, in everything from crystallization to data collection to phasing to model building to refinement, have made solving a structure using crystallography easier than ever. However, despite these improvements, local errors that can affect biological interpretation are widespread at low resolution and even high-resolution structures nearly all contain at least a few local errors such as Ramachandran outliers, flipped branched protein side chains and incorrect sugar puckers. It is critical both for the crystallographer and for the end user that there are easy and reliable methods to diagnose and correct these sorts of errors in structures. MolProbity is the authors’ contribution to helping solve this problem and this article reviews its general capabilities, reports on recent enhancements and usage, and presents evidence that the resulting improvements are now beneficially affecting the global database

  1. Atomic structure of graphene supported heterogeneous model catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, Dirk

    2017-04-15

    Graphene on Ir(111) forms a moire structure with well defined nucleation centres. Therefore it can be utilized to create hexagonal metal cluster lattices with outstanding structural quality. At diffraction experiments these 2D surface lattices cause a coherent superposition of the moire cell structure factor, so that the measured signal intensity scales with the square of coherently scattering unit cells. This artificial signal enhancement enables the opportunity for X-ray diffraction to determine the atomic structure of small nano-objects, which are hardly accessible with any experimental technique. The uniform environment of every metal cluster makes the described metal cluster lattices on graphene/Ir(111) an attractive model system for the investigation of catalytic, magnetic and quantum size properties of ultra-small nano-objects. In this context the use of x-rays provides a maximum of flexibility concerning the possible sample environments (vacuum, selected gases, liquids, sample temperature) and allows in-situ/operando measurements. In the framework of the present thesis the structure of different metal clusters grown by physical vapor deposition in an UHV environment and after gas exposure have been investigated. On the one hand the obtained results will explore many aspects of the atomic structure of these small metal clusters and on the other hand the presented results will proof the capabilities of the described technique (SXRD on cluster lattices). For iridium, platinum, iridium/palladium and platinum/rhodium the growth on graphene/Ir(111) of epitaxial, crystalline clusters with an ordered hexagonal lattice arrangement has been confirmed using SXRD. The clusters nucleate at the hcp sites of the moire cell and bind via rehybridization of the carbon atoms (sp{sup 2} → sp{sup 3}) to the Ir(111) substrate. This causes small displacements of the substrate atoms, which is revealed by the diffraction experiments. All metal clusters exhibit a fcc structure

  2. Atomic Structure of Au−Pd Bimetallic Alloyed Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Yong

    2010-09-08

    Using a two-step seed-mediated growth method, we synthesized bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) having a gold octahedron core and a palladium epitaxial shell with controlled Pd-shell thickness. The mismatch-release mechanism between the Au core and Pd shell of the NPs was systematically investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In the NPs coated with a single atomic layer of Pd, the strain between the surface Pd layer and the Au core is released by Shockley partial dislocations (SPDs) accompanied by the formation of stacking faults. For NPs coated with more Pd (>2 nm), the stacking faults still exist, but no SPDs are found. This may be due to the diffusion of Au atoms into the Pd shell layers to eliminate the SPDs. At the same time, a long-range ordered L11 AuPd alloy phase has been identified in the interface area, supporting the assumption of the diffusion of Au into Pd to release the interface mismatch. With increasing numbers of Pd shell layers, the shape of the Au-Pd NP changes, step by step, from truncated-octahedral to cubic. After the bimetallic NPs were annealed at 523 K for 10 min, the SPDs at the surface of the NPs coated with a single atomic layer of Pd disappeared due to diffusion of the Au atoms into the surface layer, while the stacking faults and the L11 Au-Pd alloyed structure remained. When the annealing temperature was increased to 800 K, electron diffraction patterns and diffraction contrast images revealed that the NPs became a uniform Au-Pd alloy, and most of the stacking faults disappeared as a result of the annealing. Even so, some clues still support the existence of the L11 phase, which suggests that the L11 phase is a stable, long-range ordered structure in Au-Pd bimetallic NPs. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. Indoor footstep localization from structural dynamics instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Jeffrey D.; Buehrer, R. Michael; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2017-05-01

    Measurements from accelerometers originally deployed to measure a building's structural dynamics can serve a new role: locating individuals moving within a building. Specifically, this paper proposes measurements of footstep-generated vibrations as a novel source of information for localization. The complexity of wave propagation in a building (e.g., dispersion and reflection) limits the utility of existing algorithms designed to locate, for example, the source of sound in a room or radio waves in free space. This paper develops enhancements for arrival time determination and time difference of arrival localization in order to address the complexities posed by wave propagation within a building's structure. Experiments with actual measurements from an instrumented public building demonstrate the potential of locating footsteps to sub-meter accuracy. Furthermore, this paper explains how to forecast performance in other buildings with different sensor configurations. This localization capability holds the potential to assist public safety agencies in building evacuation and incidence response, to facilitate occupancy-based optimization of heating or cooling and to inform facility security.

  4. THE STRUCTURE OF THE LOCAL HOT BUBBLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.; Galeazzi, M.; Uprety, Y.; Ursino, E. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, 33124 (United States); Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S. L.; Thomas, N. E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States); Cravens, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Koutroumpa, D. [Universite Versailles St-Quentin (France); Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ. Paris 06 (France); CNRS/INSU, LATMOS-IPSL, F-78280 (France); Kuntz, K. D. [The Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lallement, R. [GEPI Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, F-92190, Meudon (France); Lepri, S. T. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); McCammon, D.; Morgan, K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Walsh, B. M., E-mail: galeazzi@physics.miami.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse X-rays from the Local Galaxy ( DXL ) is a sounding rocket mission designed to quantify and characterize the contribution of Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) to the Diffuse X-ray Background and study the properties of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB). Based on the results from the DXL mission, we quantified and removed the contribution of SWCX to the diffuse X-ray background measured by the ROSAT All Sky Survey. The “cleaned” maps were used to investigate the physical properties of the LHB. Assuming thermal ionization equilibrium, we measured a highly uniform temperature distributed around kT  = 0.097 keV ± 0.013 keV (FWHM) ± 0.006 keV (systematic). We also generated a thermal emission measure map and used it to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the LHB, which we found to be in good agreement with the structure of the local cavity measured from dust and gas.

  5. Atomic structure of a metal-supported two-dimensional germania film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Adrián Leandro; Schlexer, Philomena; Büchner, Christin; Davis, Earl M.; Burrall, Hannah; Burson, Kristen M.; Schneider, Wolf-Dieter; Heyde, Markus; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2018-03-01

    The growth and microscopic characterization of two-dimensional germania films is presented. Germanium oxide monolayer films were grown on Ru(0001) by physical vapor deposition and subsequent annealing in oxygen. We obtain a comprehensive image of the germania film structure by combining intensity-voltage low-energy electron diffraction (I/V-LEED) and ab initio density functional theory (DFT) analysis with atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging. For benchmarking purposes, the bare Ru(0001) substrate and the (2 ×2 )3 O covered Ru(0001) were analyzed with I/V-LEED with respect to previous reports. STM topographic images of the germania film reveal a hexagonal network where the oxygen and germanium atom positions appear in different imaging contrasts. For quantitative LEED, the best agreement has been achieved with DFT structures where the germanium atoms are located preferentially on the top and fcc hollow sites of the Ru(0001) substrate. Moreover, in these atomically flat germania films, local site geometries, i.e., tetrahedral building blocks, ring structures, and domain boundaries, have been identified, indicating possible pathways towards two-dimensional amorphous networks.

  6. Quantum diffusion of muonium atoms in solids: Localization vs. band-like propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storchak, V.G.; Eshchenko, D.G.; Brewer, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Studies of muonium dynamics in insulators and semiconductors at low temperature have led to two fundamentally different pictures: Mu is found to localize strongly in Van der Waals crystals, while in alkali halides and compound semiconductors it has long been believed to undergo bandlike propagation with a characteristic bandwidth Δ∼0.1K. Our recent measurements in transverse field indicate that Mu atom may be localized at low temperatures in both KCl and GaAs. This apparent discrepancy with previous results may dramatically change our understanding of muonium quantum dynamics in solids, raising the question of whether Mu atoms can ever be truly delocalized at low temperature or if its localization is a general phenomenon in solids

  7. Direct Visualization of Local Electromagnetic Field Structures by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Findlay, Scott D; Matsumoto, Takao; Kohno, Yuji; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-07-18

    The functional properties of materials and devices are critically determined by the electromagnetic field structures formed inside them, especially at nanointerface and surface regions, because such structures are strongly associated with the dynamics of electrons, holes and ions. To understand the fundamental origin of many exotic properties in modern materials and devices, it is essential to directly characterize local electromagnetic field structures at such defect regions, even down to atomic dimensions. In recent years, rapid progress in the development of high-speed area detectors for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub-angstrom spatial resolution has opened new possibilities to directly image such electromagnetic field structures at very high-resolution. In this Account, we give an overview of our recent development of differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy for aberration-corrected STEM and its application to many materials problems. In recent years, we have developed segmented-type STEM detectors which divide the detector plane into 16 segments and enable simultaneous imaging of 16 STEM images which are sensitive to the positions and angles of transmitted/scattered electrons on the detector plane. These detectors also have atomic-resolution imaging capability. Using these segmented-type STEM detectors, we show DPC STEM imaging to be a very powerful tool for directly imaging local electromagnetic field structures in materials and devices in real space. For example, DPC STEM can clearly visualize the local electric field variation due to the abrupt potential change across a p-n junction in a GaAs semiconductor, which cannot be observed by normal in-focus bright-field or annular type dark-field STEM imaging modes. DPC STEM is also very effective for imaging magnetic field structures in magnetic materials, such as magnetic domains and skyrmions. Moreover, real-time imaging of electromagnetic field structures can

  8. Clustered atom-replaced structure in single-crystal-like metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Mariko; Ishii, Hirotaka; Yokoe, Daisaku; Yoshida, Ryuji; Kato, Takeharu; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi

    2018-06-01

    By means of metal organic deposition using trifluoroacetates (TFA-MOD), we replaced and localized two or more atoms in a single-crystalline structure having almost perfect orientation. Thus, we created a new functional structure, namely, clustered atom-replaced structure (CARS), having single-crystal-like metal oxide. We replaced metals in the oxide with Sm and Lu and localized them. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results, where the Sm signal increases with the Lu signal in the single-crystalline structure, confirm evidence of CARS. We also form other CARS with three additional metals, including Pr. The valence number of Pr might change from 3+ to approximately 4+, thereby reducing the Pr–Ba distance. We directly observed the structure by a high-angle annular dark-field image, which provided further evidence of CARS. The key to establishing CARS is an equilibrium chemical reaction and a combination of additional larger and smaller unit cells to matrix cells. We made a new functional metal oxide with CARS and expect to realize CARS in other metal oxide structures in the future by using the above-mentioned process.

  9. Chain-Branching Control of the Atomic Structure of Alkanethiol-Based Gold–Sulfur Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yun; Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory structure calculations at 0 K and simulations at 300 K of observed high-resolution in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images reveal three different atomic-interface structures for the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three isomeric butanethiols on Au(111......): direct binding to the Au(111) surface without pitting, binding to adatoms above a regular surface with extensive pitting, and binding to adatoms with local surface vacancies and some pitting. Thermal motions are shown to produce some observed STM features, with a very tight energy balance controlling...

  10. Femtosecond structural dynamics on the atomic length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongfang

    2014-03-15

    This thesis reports on the development and application of two different but complementary ultrafast electron diffraction setups built at the Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics. One is an ultra-compact femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) setup (Egun300), which is currently operational (with a maximum electron energy of 150 keV) and provides ultrashort (∝300 fs) and bright (∝10 e/μm{sup 2}) electron bunches. The other one, named as Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a radio frequency driven 2 to 5 MeV FED setup built in collaboration with different groups from DESY. REGAE was developed as a facility that will provide high quality diffraction with sufficient coherence to even address structural protein dynamics and with electron pulses as short as 20 fs (FWHM). As one of the first students in Prof. R.J. Dwayne Miller's group, I led the femtosecond (fs) laser sub-group at REGAE being responsible for the construction of different key optical elements required to drive both of aforementioned FED systems. A third harmonic generation (THG) and a nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) have been used for the photo-generation of ultrashort electron bursts as well as sample laser excitation. Different diagnostic tools have been constructed to monitor the performance of the fs optical system. A fast autocorrelator was developed to provide on the fly pulse duration correction. A transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) was built to obtain detail information about the characteristics of fs optical pulse, i.e. phase and amplitude of its spectral components. In addition to these optical setups, I developed a fs optical pump-probe system, which supports broadband probe pulses. This setup was successfully applied to investigate the semiconductor-to-metal photoinduced phase transition in VO{sub 2} and the ultrafast photo-reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. In regard to FED setups, I have been

  11. Femtosecond structural dynamics on the atomic length scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Dongfang

    2014-03-01

    This thesis reports on the development and application of two different but complementary ultrafast electron diffraction setups built at the Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics. One is an ultra-compact femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) setup (Egun300), which is currently operational (with a maximum electron energy of 150 keV) and provides ultrashort (∝300 fs) and bright (∝10 e/μm 2 ) electron bunches. The other one, named as Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a radio frequency driven 2 to 5 MeV FED setup built in collaboration with different groups from DESY. REGAE was developed as a facility that will provide high quality diffraction with sufficient coherence to even address structural protein dynamics and with electron pulses as short as 20 fs (FWHM). As one of the first students in Prof. R.J. Dwayne Miller's group, I led the femtosecond (fs) laser sub-group at REGAE being responsible for the construction of different key optical elements required to drive both of aforementioned FED systems. A third harmonic generation (THG) and a nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) have been used for the photo-generation of ultrashort electron bursts as well as sample laser excitation. Different diagnostic tools have been constructed to monitor the performance of the fs optical system. A fast autocorrelator was developed to provide on the fly pulse duration correction. A transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) was built to obtain detail information about the characteristics of fs optical pulse, i.e. phase and amplitude of its spectral components. In addition to these optical setups, I developed a fs optical pump-probe system, which supports broadband probe pulses. This setup was successfully applied to investigate the semiconductor-to-metal photoinduced phase transition in VO 2 and the ultrafast photo-reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. In regard to FED setups, I have been deeply involved in

  12. Local detection of X-ray spectroscopies with an in-situ Atomic Force Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M S; Dhez, O; Denmat, S Le; Felici, R; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2008-01-01

    The in situ combination of Scanning Probe Microscopies with X-ray microbeams adds a variety of new possibilities to the panoply of synchrotron radiation techniques. This paper describes an optics-free Atomic Force Microscope that can be directly installed on most of the synchrotron radiation end-stations for combined X-ray and atomic force microscopy experiments. The instrument can be used for atomic force imaging of the investigated sample or to locally measure the X-ray absorption or diffraction, or it can also be used to mechanically interact with the sample while simultaneously taking spectroscopy or diffraction measurements. The local character of these measurements is intrinsically linked with the use of the Atomic Force Microscope tip. It is the sharp tip that gives the opportunity to measure the photons flux impinging on it, or to locally measure the absorption coefficient or the shape of the diffraction pattern. At the end an estimation of the limits of the various techniques presented is also discussed.

  13. Atomic size and local order effects on the high temperature strength of binary Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abaspour, Saeideh, E-mail: s.abaspour78@gmail.com [ARC-Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia); Queensland Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacturing (AMPAM), The University of Queensland (Australia); Zambelli, Victor [ARC-Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia); Dargusch, Matthew [Queensland Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacturing (AMPAM), The University of Queensland (Australia); Cáceres, Carlos H. [ARC-Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2016-09-15

    The solid solution strengthening introduced by Ca (0.6 and 0.9 at%) and Sn 0.5–2.5 at%) was studied through tensile, compression and stress relaxation tests at room temperature, 373 K (100 °C) and 453 K (180 °C) on solution heat-treated and quenched specimens and compared with existing data for binary alloys containing Ca, Sn, Y, Gd, Nd, Zn and Al as well as for AZ91 alloy. At room temperature the solution-hardening rate introduced by Ca and Sn was much higher than that of Al, matching those of Y, Gd and Zn. Calcium also reduced the tension/compression asymmetry. At high temperature Ca effectively prevented stress relaxation, nearly matching Y, Gd and Nd. Tin was less effective, but still outperformed Al and AZ91 at low stresses. The effects at room and high temperature introduced by Ca and Sn appeared consistent with the presence of short-range order, in line with those introduced by Y, Nd, Gd and Zn. The larger than Mg atom size of Ca, Nd, Gd and Y can be expected to intensify the local order by strengthening the atomic bonds through its effects on the local electron density, accounting for their greater strengthening at high temperature. For given difference in atomic size, the effects on the local order are expected to be lesser for smaller sized atoms like Sn and Zn, hence their more subdued effects.

  14. High-precision two-dimensional atom localization from four-wave mixing in a double-Λ four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Tao; Yang, Wen-Xing; Chen, Ai-Xi; Liu, Shaopeng; Li, Ling; Zhu, Zhonghu

    2018-03-01

    We propose a scheme for high-precision two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via the four-wave mixing (FWM) in a four-level double-Λ atomic system. Due to the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the 2D position information of the atoms can be directly determined by the measurement of the normalized light intensity of output FWM-generated field. We further show that, when the position-dependent generated FWM field has become sufficiently intense, efficient back-coupling to the FWM generating state becomes important. This back-coupling pathway leads to competitive multiphoton destructive interference of the FWM generating state by three supplied and one internally generated fields. We find that the precision of 2D atom localization can be improved significantly by the multiphoton destructive interference and depends sensitively on the frequency detunings and the pump field intensity. Interestingly enough, we show that adjusting the frequency detunings and the pump field intensity can modify significantly the FWM efficiency, and consequently lead to a redistribution of the atoms. As a result, the atom can be localized in one of four quadrants with holding the precision of atom localization.

  15. Subwavelength atom localization via amplitude and phase control of the absorption spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Sahrai, Mostafa; Tajalli, Habib; Kapale, Kishore T.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2005-01-01

    We propose a scheme for subwavelength localization of an atom conditioned upon the absorption of a weak probe field at a particular frequency. Manipulating atom-field interaction on a certain transition by applying drive fields on nearby coupled transitions leads to interesting effects in the absorption spectrum of the weak probe field. We exploit this fact and employ a four-level system with three driving fields and a weak probe field, where one of the drive fields is a standing-wave field o...

  16. Variable temperature investigation of the atomic structure of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N P; Kirkland, A I; Huis, M A van; Zandbergen, H W; Xu, H

    2010-01-01

    The characterisation of nanoparticle structures is the first step towards understanding and optimising their utility in important technological applications such as catalysis. Using newly developed in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holders, the temperature dependent atomic structure of gold nanoparticles in the size range 5-12 nm has been investigated. In this size interval, the decahedral morphology has been identified as the most favourable structure at or above room temperature, while particle surface roughening becomes evident above 600 0 C. An icosahedral transition has also been identified at low temperature in particles under 9 nm in diameter. These experimental results are consistent with recently published temperature dependent equilibrium phase maps for gold nanoparticles.

  17. Atomic and electronic structures of divacancy in graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jun [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Zeng Hui, E-mail: zenghui@yangtzeu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Wei Jianwei [School of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China)

    2012-01-15

    First principles calculations have been performed to investigate the electronic structures and transport properties of defective graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) in the presence of pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) defects. Electronic band structure results reveal that 5-8-5 defects in the defective zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) is unfavorable for electronic transport. However, such defects in the defective armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) give rise to smaller band gap than that in the pristine AGNR, and eventually results in semiconductor to metal-like transition. The distinct roles of 5-8-5 defects in two kinds of edged-GNR are attributed to the different coupling between {pi}{sup Low-Asterisk} and {pi} subbands influenced by the defects. Our findings indicate the possibility of a new route to improve the electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons via tailoring the atomic structures by ion irradiation.

  18. Variable temperature investigation of the atomic structure of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, N P; Kirkland, A I [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Huis, M A van; Zandbergen, H W [Kavli Insitute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technolgy, Lorentzweg 1, NL-2628CJ, Delft (Netherlands); Xu, H, E-mail: neil.young@materials.ox.ac.u [Department of Geology and Geophysics, and Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The characterisation of nanoparticle structures is the first step towards understanding and optimising their utility in important technological applications such as catalysis. Using newly developed in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holders, the temperature dependent atomic structure of gold nanoparticles in the size range 5-12 nm has been investigated. In this size interval, the decahedral morphology has been identified as the most favourable structure at or above room temperature, while particle surface roughening becomes evident above 600{sup 0}C. An icosahedral transition has also been identified at low temperature in particles under 9 nm in diameter. These experimental results are consistent with recently published temperature dependent equilibrium phase maps for gold nanoparticles.

  19. Structure of BRS-invariant local functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, F.

    1993-01-01

    For a large class of gauge theories a nilpotent BRS-operator s is constructed and its cohomology in the space of local functionals of the off-shell fields is shown to be isomorphic to the cohomology of s=s+d on functions f(C,T) of tensor fields T and of variables C which are constructed of the ghosts and the connection forms. The result allows general statements about the structure of invariant classical actions and anomaly cadidates whose BRS-variation vanishes off-shell. The assumptions under which the result holds are thoroughly discussed. (orig.)

  20. Application of empirical hydration distribution functions around polar atoms for assessing hydration structures of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Daisuke; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Empirical distribution functions of water molecules in protein hydration are made. ► The functions measure how hydrogen-bond geometry in hydration deviate from ideal. ► The functions assess experimentally identified hydration structures of protein. - Abstract: To quantitatively characterize hydrogen-bond geometry in local hydration structures of proteins, we constructed a set of empirical hydration distribution functions (EHDFs) around polar protein atoms in the main and side chains of 11 types of hydrophilic amino acids (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 113 (2009) 11274). The functions are the ensemble average of possible hydration patterns around the polar atoms, and describe the anisotropic deviations from ideal hydrogen bond geometry. In addition, we defined probability distribution function of hydration water molecules (PDFH) over the hydrophilic surface of a protein as the sum of EHDFs of solvent accessible polar protein atoms. The functions envelop most of hydration sites identified in crystal structures of proteins (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 114 (2010) 4652). Here we propose the application of EHDFs and PDFHs for assessing crystallographically identified hydration structures of proteins. First, hydration water molecules are classified with respect to the geometry in hydrogen bonds in referring EHDFs. Difference Fourier electron density map weighted by PDFH of protein is proposed to identify easily density peaks as candidates of hydration water molecules. A computer program implementing those ideas was developed and used for assessing hydration structures of proteins

  1. Exploring the atomic structure of 1.8 nm monolayer-protected gold clusters with aberration-corrected STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian; Jian, Nan; Ornelas, Isabel; Pattison, Alexander J. [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lahtinen, Tanja; Salorinne, Kirsi [Department of Chemistry, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Häkkinen, Hannu [Department of Chemistry, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Department of Physics, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Palmer, Richard E., E-mail: richardepalmerwork@yahoo.com [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Monolayer-protected (MP) Au clusters present attractive quantum systems with a range of potential applications e.g. in catalysis. Knowledge of the atomic structure is needed to obtain a full understanding of their intriguing physical and chemical properties. Here we employed aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (ac-STEM), combined with multislice simulations, to make a round-robin investigation of the atomic structure of chemically synthesised clusters with nominal composition Au{sub 144}(SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 60} provided by two different research groups. The MP Au clusters were “weighed” by the atom counting method, based on their integrated intensities in the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) regime and calibrated exponent of the Z dependence. For atomic structure analysis, we compared experimental images of hundreds of clusters, with atomic resolution, against a variety of structural models. Across the size range 123–151 atoms, only 3% of clusters matched the theoretically predicted Au{sub 144}(SR){sub 60} structure, while a large proportion of the clusters were amorphous (i.e. did not match any model structure). However, a distinct ring-dot feature, characteristic of local icosahedral symmetry, was observed in about 20% of the clusters. - Highlights: • Chemically synthesised gold clusters were “weighed” by atom counting to get true size. • Image simulations show a few percent of clusters have the predicted atomic structure. • But a specific ring-dot feature indicates local icosahedral order in many clusters.

  2. Equilibrium structure and atomic vibrations of Nin clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Svetlana D.; Rusina, Galina G.

    2017-12-01

    The equilibrium bond lengths and binding energy, second differences in energy and vibrational frequencies of free clusters Nin (2 ≤ n ≤ 20) were calculated with the use of the interaction potential obtained in the tight-binding approximation (TBA). The results show that the minimum vibration frequency plays a significant role in the evaluation of the dynamic stability of the clusters. A nonmonotonic dependence of the minimum vibration frequency of clusters on their size and the extreme values for the number of atoms in a cluster n = 4, 6, 13, and 19 are demonstrated. This result agrees with the theoretical and experimental data on stable structures of small metallic clusters.

  3. The influence of the surface atomic structure on surface diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaleb, Dominique

    1984-03-01

    This work represents the first quantitative study of the influence of the surface atomic structure on surface diffusion (in the range: 0.2 Tf up 0.5 Tf; Tf: melting temperature of the substrate). The analysis of our results on a microscopic scale shows low formation and migration energies for adatoms; we can describe the diffusion on surfaces with a very simple model. On (110) surfaces at low temperature the diffusion is controlled by the exchange mechanism; at higher temperature direct jumps of adatoms along the channels contribute also to the diffusion process. (author) [fr

  4. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method for atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Ken

    1982-02-01

    The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method for calculating the atomic structure is reviewed in some detail. Being more comprehensive than the ones introduced in Desclaux's paper, the mathematical formulae derived in this review are more helpful to trace the thread of ideas and understand the algorithm in Desclaux's computer program which embodied the method. A detailed analysis is made on the restrictions on how the program is used, that is, on the fact that it does not apply to the problem where the configuration mixing occurs via the one-electron Hamiltonian. Finally, in conclusion, a way to overcome the difficulty is suggested. (author)

  5. Dislocations in AlGaN: Core Structure, Atom Segregation, and Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massabuau, Fabien C-P; Rhode, Sneha L; Horton, Matthew K; O'Hanlon, Thomas J; Kovács, András; Zielinski, Marcin S; Kappers, Menno J; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Humphreys, Colin J; Oliver, Rachel A

    2017-08-09

    We conducted a comprehensive investigation of dislocations in Al 0.46 Ga 0.54 N. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the atomic structure and atom distribution at the dislocation core have been examined. We report that the core configuration of dislocations in AlGaN is consistent with that of other materials in the III-Nitride system. However, we observed that the dissociation of mixed-type dislocations is impeded by alloying GaN with AlN, which is confirmed by our experimental observation of Ga and Al atom segregation in the tensile and compressive parts of the dislocations, respectively. Investigation of the optical properties of the dislocations shows that the atom segregation at dislocations has no significant effect on the intensity recorded by cathodoluminescence in the vicinity of the dislocations. These results are in contrast with the case of dislocations in In 0.09 Ga 0.91 N where segregation of In and Ga atoms also occurs but results in carrier localization limiting non-radiative recombination at the dislocation. This study therefore sheds light on why InGaN-based devices are generally more resilient to dislocations than their AlGaN-based counterparts.

  6. Complementary structure for designer localized surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Baile

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic localized surface plasmons (LSPs) supported on metallic structures corrugated by very long and curved grooves have been recently proposed and demonstrated on an extremely thin metallic spiral structure (MSS) in the microwave regime. However, the mode profile for the magnetic LSPs was demonstrated by measuring only the electric field, not the magnetic field. Here, based on Babinet's principle, we propose a Babinet-inverted, or complementary MSS whose electric/magnetic mode profiles match the magnetic/electric mode profiles of MSS. This complementarity of mode profiles allows mapping the magnetic field distribution of magnetic LSP mode profile on MSS by measuring the electric field distribution of the corresponding mode on complementary MSS. Experiment at microwave frequencies also demonstrate the use of complementary MSS in sensing refractive-index change in the environment.

  7. Structure of the Balmer jump. The isolated hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F.; Belluzzi, L.; Steiner, O.

    2018-06-01

    Context. The spectrum of the hydrogen atom was explained by Bohr more than one century ago. We revisit here some of the aspects of the underlying quantum structure, with a modern formalism, focusing on the limit of the Balmer series. Aims: We investigate the behaviour of the absorption coefficient of the isolated hydrogen atom in the neighbourhood of the Balmer limit. Methods: We analytically computed the total cross-section arising from bound-bound and bound-free transitions in the isolated hydrogen atom at the Balmer limit, and established a simplified semi-analytical model for the surroundings of that limit. We worked within the framework of the formalism of Landi Degl'Innocenti & Landolfi (2004, Astrophys. Space Sci. Lib., 307), which permits an almost straight-forward generalization of our results to other atoms and molecules, and which is perfectly suitable for including polarization phenomena in the problem. Results: We analytically show that there is no discontinuity at the Balmer limit, even though the concept of a "Balmer jump" is still meaningful. Furthermore, we give a possible definition of the location of the Balmer jump, and we check that this location is dependent on the broadening mechanisms. At the Balmer limit, we compute the cross-section in a fully analytical way. Conclusions: The Balmer jump is produced by a rapid drop of the total Balmer cross-section, yet this variation is smooth and continuous when both bound-bound and bound-free processes are taken into account, and its shape and location is dependent on the broadening mechanisms.

  8. Exponential and nonexponential localization of the one-dimensional periodically kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Kristoefel, P.; Burgdoerfer, J.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the quantum localization of the one-dimensional Rydberg atom subject to a unidirectional periodic train of impulses. For high frequencies of the train the classical system becomes chaotic and leads to fast ionization. By contrast, the quantum system is found to be remarkably stable. We identify for this system the coexistence of different localization mechanisms associated with resonant and nonresonant diffusion. We find for the suppression of nonresonant diffusion an exponential localization whose localization length can be related to the classical dynamics in terms of the ''scars'' of the unstable periodic orbits. We show that the localization length is determined by the energy excursion along the periodic orbits. The suppression of resonant diffusion along the sequence of photonic peaks is found to be nonexponential due to the presence of high harmonics in the driving force. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  9. Intact Four-atom Organic Tetracation Stabilized by Charge Localization in the Gas Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuhashi, Tomoyuki; Toyota, Kazuo; Mitsubayashi, Naoya; Kozaki, Masatoshi; Okada, Keiji; Nakashima, Nobuaki

    2016-10-05

    Several features distinguish intact multiply charged molecular cations (MMCs) from other species such as monocations and polycations: high potential energy, high electron affinity, a high density of electronic states with various spin multiplicities, and charge-dependent reactions. However, repulsive Coulombic interactions make MMCs quite unstable, and hence small organic MMCs are currently not readily available. Herein, we report that the isolated four-atom molecule diiodoacetylene survives after the removal of four electrons via tunneling. We show that the tetracation remains metastable towards dissociation because of the localization (91-95 %) of the positive charges on the terminal iodine atoms, ensuring minimum Coulomb repulsion between adjacent atoms as well as maximum charge-induced attractive dipole interactions between iodine and carbon. Our approach making use of iodines as the positively charged sites enables small organic MMCs to remain intact. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Determination of interstitial oxygen atom position in U2N3+xOy by near edge structure study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, A. K.; Zhao, Y. W.; Long, Z.; Hu, Y.; Wang, X. F.; Yang, R. L.; Bao, H. L.; Zeng, R. G.; Liu, K. Z.

    2018-06-01

    The determination of interstitial oxygen atom site in U2N3+xOy film could facilitate the understanding of the oxidation mechanism of α-U2N3 and the effect of U2N3+xOy on anti-oxidation. By comparing the similarities and variances between N K edge and O K edge electron energy loss spectra (EELS) for oxidized α-U2N3 and UO2, the present work looks at the local structure of nitrogen and oxygen atoms in U2N3+xOy film, identifying the most possible position of interstitial O atom.

  11. Atomic Structure of Type VI Contractile Sheath from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Osman; He, Shaoda; Planamente, Sara; Stach, Lasse; MacDonald, James T; Manoli, Eleni; Scheres, Sjors H W; Filloux, Alain; Freemont, Paul S

    2018-02-06

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs), H1-, H2-, and H3-T6SS, each belonging to a distinct group. The two T6SS components, TssB/VipA and TssC/VipB, assemble to form tubules that conserve structural/functional homology with tail sheaths of contractile bacteriophages and pyocins. Here, we used cryoelectron microscopy to solve the structure of the H1-T6SS P. aeruginosa TssB1C1 sheath at 3.3 Å resolution. Our structure allowed us to resolve some features of the T6SS sheath that were not resolved in the Vibrio cholerae VipAB and Francisella tularensis IglAB structures. Comparison with sheath structures from other contractile machines, including T4 phage and R-type pyocins, provides a better understanding of how these systems have conserved similar functions/mechanisms despite evolution. We used the P. aeruginosa R2 pyocin as a structural template to build an atomic model of the TssB1C1 sheath in its extended conformation, allowing us to propose a coiled-spring-like mechanism for T6SS sheath contraction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Formulation of probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail using the reference ratio method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Jan B; Andreetta, Christian; Boomsma, Wouter; Bottaro, Sandro; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Frellsen, Jes; Mardia, Kanti V; Tian, Pengfei; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method to formulate probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail, for a given amino acid sequence, based on Bayesian principles, while retaining a close link to physics. We start from two previously developed probabilistic models of protein structure on a local length scale, which concern the dihedral angles in main chain and side chains, respectively. Conceptually, this constitutes a probabilistic and continuous alternative to the use of discrete fragment and rotamer libraries. The local model is combined with a nonlocal model that involves a small number of energy terms according to a physical force field, and some information on the overall secondary structure content. In this initial study we focus on the formulation of the joint model and the evaluation of the use of an energy vector as a descriptor of a protein's nonlocal structure; hence, we derive the parameters of the nonlocal model from the native structure without loss of generality. The local and nonlocal models are combined using the reference ratio method, which is a well-justified probabilistic construction. For evaluation, we use the resulting joint models to predict the structure of four proteins. The results indicate that the proposed method and the probabilistic models show considerable promise for probabilistic protein structure prediction and related applications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  14. Calculations with the quasirelativistic local-spin-density-functional theory for high-Z atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Y.; Whitehead, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The generalized-exchange local-spin-density-functional theory (LSD-GX) with relativistic corrections of the mass velocity and Darwin terms has been used to calculate statistical total energies for the neutral atoms, the positive ions, and the negative ions for high-Z elements. The effect of the correlation and relaxation correction on the statistical total energy is discussed. Comparing the calculated results for the ionization potentials and electron affinities for the atoms (atomic number Z from 37 to 56 and 72 to 80) with experiment, shows that for the atoms rubidium to barium both the LSD-GX and the quasirelativistic LSD-GX, with self-interaction correction, Gopinathan, Whitehead, and Bogdanovic's Fermi-hole parameters [Phys. Rev. A 14, 1 (1976)], and Vosko, Wilk, and Nusair's correlation correction [Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)], are very good methods for calculating ionization potentials and electron affinities. For the atoms hafnium to mercury the relativistic effect has to be considered

  15. Computational Study on Atomic Structures, Electronic Properties, and Chemical Reactions at Surfaces and Interfaces and in Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yu; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Morikawa, Yoshitada

    2018-06-01

    Through computer simulations using atomistic models, it is becoming possible to calculate the atomic structures of localized defects or dopants in semiconductors, chemically active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, nanoscale structures, and active sites in biological systems precisely. Furthermore, it is also possible to clarify physical and chemical properties possessed by these nanoscale structures such as electronic states, electronic and atomic transport properties, optical properties, and chemical reactivity. It is sometimes quite difficult to clarify these nanoscale structure-function relations experimentally and, therefore, accurate computational studies are indispensable in materials science. In this paper, we review recent studies on the relation between local structures and functions for inorganic, organic, and biological systems by using atomistic computer simulations.

  16. Analysis of the local structure of AlN:Mn using X-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyajima, Takao [Materials Laboratories, Sony Corporation, 4-14-1 Asahi-cho, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0014 (Japan); Kudo, Yoshihiro [Materials Analysis Lab., Sony Corporation, 4-18-1 Okada, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan); Uruga, Tomoya [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hara, Kazuhiko [Research Inst. of Electronics, Shizuoka Univ., 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8011 (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    The local structure around the Mn atoms in MOCVD-grown AlN:Mn films which show Mn-related red-orange photoluminescence with a 600nm-peak at room temperature was investigated using the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. We found that Mn atoms occupy Al lattice sites in the AlN film and that the Mn ions have a charge between +2 and +3. From these results, we think that the red-orange luminescence is caused by the transition of d-electrons in the Mn ions. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Mechanical properties and electronic structure of edge-doped graphene nanoribbons with F, O, and Cl atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, Sebastián; Fernández-Werner, Luciana; Pardo, Helena; Jasen, Paula; Faccio, Ricardo; Mombrú, Álvaro W

    2017-08-16

    In this study, we present the structural, electronic, and mechanical properties of edge-doped zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) doped with fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine atoms. To the best of our knowledge, to date, no experimental results concerning the mechanical properties of graphene-derived nanoribbons have been reported in the literature. Simulations indicate that Cl- and F-doped ZGNRs present an equivalent 2-dimensional Young's modulus E 2D , which seems to be higher than those of graphene and H-doped ZGNRs. This is a consequence of the electronic structure of the system, particularly originating from strong interactions between the dopant atoms localized at the edges. The interaction between dopant atoms located at the edges is higher for Cl and lower for F and O atoms. This is the origin of the observed trend, in which E > E > E for all the analyzed ZGNRs.

  18. Simulation of the Atomic and Electronic Structure of Oxygen Vacancies and Polyvacancies in ZrO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevalov, T. V.

    2018-03-01

    Cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phases of zirconium oxide with oxygen vacancies and polyvacancies are studied by quantum chemical modeling of the atomic and electronic structure. It is demonstrated that an oxygen vacancy in ZrO2 may act as both an electron trap and a hole one. An electron added to the ZrO2 structure with an oxygen vacancy is distributed between two neighboring Zr atoms and is a bonding orbital by nature. It is advantageous for each subsequent O vacancy to form close to the already existing ones; notably, one Zr atom has no more than two removed O atoms related to it. Defect levels from oxygen polyvacancies are distributed in the bandgap with preferential localization in the vicinity of the oxygen monovacancy level.

  19. Atomic and electronic structures of an extremely fragile liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Shinji; Akola, Jaakko; Patrikeev, Leonid; Ropo, Matti; Ohara, Koji; Itou, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yahiro, Jumpei; Okada, Junpei T; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Masuno, Atsunobu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Usuki, Takeshi

    2014-12-18

    The structure of high-temperature liquids is an important topic for understanding the fragility of liquids. Here we report the structure of a high-temperature non-glass-forming oxide liquid, ZrO2, at an atomistic and electronic level. The Bhatia-Thornton number-number structure factor of ZrO2 does not show a first sharp diffraction peak. The atomic structure comprises ZrO5, ZrO6 and ZrO7 polyhedra with a significant contribution of edge sharing of oxygen in addition to corner sharing. The variety of large oxygen coordination and polyhedral connections with short Zr-O bond lifetimes, induced by the relatively large ionic radius of zirconium, disturbs the evolution of intermediate-range ordering, which leads to a reduced electronic band gap and increased delocalization in the ionic Zr-O bonding. The details of the chemical bonding explain the extremely low viscosity of the liquid and the absence of a first sharp diffraction peak, and indicate that liquid ZrO2 is an extremely fragile liquid.

  20. Atom-chip based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute local gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity based on cold atom interferometry. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates, as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties in temperature as well as in ensemble size that will allow to overcome the current limitations with the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technologies offer the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We show a lab-based prototype that uses the atom-chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serving as inertial reference inside the vacuum. With this setup it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal, within an area of 1 cm3 right below the atom-chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will allow for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz. In cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor will be characterized in the laboratory first, to be ultimately employed in campaigns to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is part of the center of

  1. DFT study of the structures and energetics of 98-atom AuPd clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruma, Alina; Ismail, Ramli; Paz-Borbón, L Oliver; Arslan, Haydar; Barcaro, Giovanni; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Li, Z Y; Johnston, Roy L

    2013-01-21

    The energetics, structures and segregation of 98-atom AuPd nanoclusters are investigated using a genetic algorithm global optimization technique with the Gupta empirical potential (comparing three different potential parameterisations) followed by local minimizations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. A shell optimization program algorithm is employed in order to study the energetics of the highly symmetric Leary Tetrahedron (LT) structure and optimization of the chemical ordering of a number of structural motifs is carried out using the Basin Hopping Monte Carlo approach. Although one of the empirical potentials is found to favour the LT structure, it is shown that Marks Decahedral and mixed FCC-HCP motifs are lowest in energy at the DFT level.

  2. Michael Faraday and the concept of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    Written to commemorate the bicentenary of Faraday's birth, this article surveys his influence on atomic theory during the 19th and early 20th centuries. It identifies which developments were derived from projects which he had started; it shows that his ideas and methods determined the direction of researches which he had not himself initiated. The account is in the form of a chronological narrative. This is based entirely on published sources, and the treatment is non-mathematical. In consequence it contains no new factual data. The presentation of Faraday's work in this particular context is, however, original. Although not covering studies of the nucleus - which were mostly later than the period considered -this article describes the origins of modern theories of atomic structure reasonably completely. It is a useful overview for engineers unfamiliar with details of the history of physics. In addition, it is a case-study of the persistence of scientific ideas in researches occupying a century or more. (author)

  3. Effects of xenon insertion into hydrogen bromide. Comparison of the electronic structure of the HBr···CO2 and HXeBr···CO2 complexes using quantum chemical topology methods: electron localization function, atoms in molecules and symmetry adapted perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarewicz, Emilia; Gordon, Agnieszka J; Mierzwicki, Krzysztof; Latajka, Zdzislaw; Berski, Slawomir

    2014-06-05

    Quantum chemistry methods have been applied to study the influence of the Xe atom inserted into the hydrogen-bromine bond (HBr → HXeBr), particularly on the nature of atomic interactions in the HBr···CO2 and HXeBr···CO2 complexes. Detailed analysis of the nature of chemical bonds has been carried out using topological analysis of the electron localization function, while topological analysis of electron density was used to gain insight into the nature of weak nonbonding interactions. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory within the orbital approach was applied for greater understanding of the physical contributions to the total interaction energy.

  4. Optical meta-atom for localization of light with quantized energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannebère, Sylvain; Silveirinha, Mário G

    2015-10-30

    The capacity to confine light into a small region of space is of paramount importance in many areas of modern science. Here we suggest a mechanism to store a quantized 'bit' of light--with a very precise amount of energy--in an open core-shell plasmonic structure ('meta-atom') with a nonlinear optical response. Notwithstanding the trapped light state is embedded in the radiation continuum, its lifetime is not limited by the radiation loss. Interestingly, it is shown that the interplay between the nonlinear response and volume plasmons enables breaking fundamental reciprocity restrictions, and coupling very efficiently an external light source to the meta-atom. The collision of an incident optical pulse with the meta-atom may be used to release the trapped light 'bit'.

  5. Atomic and electronic structure of MoS2 nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollinger, Mikkel; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2003-01-01

    Using density-functional theory (DFT) we present a detailed theoretical study of MoS2 nanoparticles. We focus on the edge structures, and a number of different edge terminations are investigated. Several, but not all, of these configurations have one-dimensional metallic states localized at the e...... and the composition of the gas phase. Using the Tersoff-Hamann formalism, scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) images of the edges are simulated for direct comparison with recent STM experiments. In this way we identify the experimentally observed edge structure....

  6. Electronic and atomic structure of the AlnHn+2 clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Alonso, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The electronic and atomic structure of the family of hydrogenated Al clusters AlnHn+2 with n=4-11 has been studied using the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for exchange and correlation. All these clusters have substantial gaps between the highest...... a polyhedron of n vertices and n H atoms form strong H-Al terminal bonds; one pair of electrons is involved in each of those bonds. The remaining n+1 electron pairs form a delocalized cloud over the surface of the Al cage. The clusters fulfilling the Wade-Mingos rule have wider HOMO-LUMO gaps...... and are chemically more stable. The trends in the gap have some reflections in the form of the photoabsorption spectra, calculated in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory using the GGA single-particle energies and orbitals and a local density approximation exchange-correlation kernel....

  7. Study of the Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules on Silicon Surfaces: Crystallographics and Electronic Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengio, Silvina

    2003-01-01

    This thesis work has been concerned with adsorption properties of silicon surfaces.The atomic and electronic structure of molecules and atoms adsorbed on Si has been investigated by means of photoemission experiments combined with synchrotron radiation.The quantitative atomic structure determination was held applying the photoelectron diffraction technique.This technique is sensible to the local structure of a reference atomic specie and has elemental and chemical-state specificity.This approach has been applied to three quite different systems with different degrees of complexity, Sb/Si(111) √3x √3R30 0 , H 2 O/Si(100)2x1 and NH 3 /Si(111)7x7.Our results show that Sb which forms a ( √3√3)R30 0 phase produces a bulklike-terminated Si(111)1x1 substrate free of stacking faults.Regarding the atomic structure of its interface, this study strongly favours the T4-site milkstool model over the H3 one.An important aspect regarding the H 2 O/Si(100)(2x1) system was establishing the limits of precision with which one can determine not only the location of the adsorbed hydroxyl (OH) species, but also the extent to which this adsorption modifes the asymmetric dimers of the clean surface to which it is bonded.On the Si(111)(7x7) surface the problem is particularly complex because there are several different potentially active sites for NH3 adsorption and fragmentation.The application of the PhD method, however, has shown that the majority of the N atoms are on so-called 'rest atom' sites when deposited at RT.This is consistent with the N in the NH2 chemical state.This investigation represents the first quantitative structural study of any molecular adsorbate on the complex Si(111)(7x7) surface.This atomic structures determination shows the PhD is a powerful tool for the atomic structure determination.The molecular systems interacting with the active sites of the substrate fragments producing a short-range order surface.This long-range disorder is produced by the

  8. Correlation between local structure and stability of supercooled liquid state in Zr-based metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Junji; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Sato, Shigeo; Sanada, Takashi; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Inoue, Akihisa

    2007-01-01

    The correlation between the local structure and stability of supercooled liquid state is investigated in the Zr 70 (Ni, Cu) 30 binary and Zr 70 Al 10 (Ni, Cu) 20 (numbers indicate at.%) ternary metallic glasses. The Zr 70 Ni 30 binary amorphous alloy with a low stability of supercooled liquid state has a tetragonal Zr 2 Ni-like local structure around Ni atom. Meanwhile, the Zr 70 Cu 30 binary metallic glass has a different local structure of tetragonal Zr 2 Cu, where we suggest the icosahedral local structure by the quasicrystallization behavior in addition of a very small amount of noble metals. The effect of Al addition on the local structure in the Zr-Ni alloy is also examined. We have investigated that the dominant local structure changes in the icosahedral-like structure from the tetragonal Zr 2 Ni-like local structure by the Al substitution with Ni accompanying with the significant stabilization of supercooled liquid state. It is concluded that the formation of icosahedral local structure contributes to the enhancement of stability of supercooled liquid state in the Zr-based alloys

  9. Atomic and electronic structure of surfaces theoretical foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Lannoo, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces and interfaces play an increasingly important role in today's solid state devices. In this book the reader is introduced, in a didactic manner, to the essential theoretical aspects of the atomic and electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces. The book does not pretend to give a complete overview of contemporary problems and methods. Instead, the authors strive to provide simple but qualitatively useful arguments that apply to a wide variety of cases. The emphasis of the book is on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces but it also includes a thorough treatment of transition metals, a general discussion of phonon dispersion curves, and examples of large computational calculations. The exercises accompanying every chapter will be of great benefit to the student.

  10. On the nodal structure of atomic and molecular Wigner functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, J.P.; Schmider, H.

    1996-01-01

    In previous work on the phase-space representation of quantum mechanics, we have presented detailed pictures of the electronic one-particle reduced Wigner function for atoms and small molecules. In this communication, we focus upon the nodal structure of the function. On the basis of the simplest systems, we present an expression which relates the oscillatory decay of the Wigner function solely to the dot product of the position and momentum vector, if both arguments are large. We then demonstrate the regular behavior of nodal patterns for the larger systems. For the molecular systems, an argument analogous to the open-quotes bond-oscillatory principleclose quotes for momentum densities links the nuclear framework to an additional oscillatory term in momenta parallel to bonds. It is shown that these are visible in the Wigner function in terms of characteristic nodes

  11. The atomic and electronic structure of amorphous silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, F.; Valladares, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    Using a novel approach to the ab initio generation of random networks we constructed two nearly stoichiometric samples of amorphous silicon nitride with the same content x= 1.29. The two 64-atom periodically-continued cubic diamond-like cells contain 28 silicons and 36 nitrogens randomly substituted, and were amorphized with a 6 f s time step by heating them to just below their melting temperature with a Harris-functional based, molecular dynamics code in the LDA approximation. The averaged total radial distribution function (RDF) obtained is compared with some existing Tersoff-like potential simulations and with experiment; ours agree with experiment. All the partial radial features are calculated and the composition of the second peak also agrees with experiment. The electronic structure is calculated and the optical gaps obtained using both a HOMO-LUMO approach and the Tauc-like procedure developed recently that gives reasonable gaps. (Author)

  12. Modeling amorphization of tetrahedral structures under local approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesurum, C.E.; Pulim, V.; Berger, B.; Hobbs, L.W.

    1997-01-01

    Many crystalline ceramics can be topologically disordered (amorphized) by disordering radiation events involving high-energy collision cascades or (in some cases) successive single-atom displacements. The authors are interested in both the potential for disorder and the possible aperiodic structures adopted following the disordering event. The potential for disordering is related to connectivity, and among those structures of interest are tetrahedral networks (such as SiO 2 , SiC and Si 3 N 4 ) comprising corner-shared tetrahedral units whose connectivities are easily evaluated. In order to study the response of these networks to radiation, the authors have chosen to model their assembly according to the (simple) local rules that each corner obeys in connecting to another tetrahedron; in this way they easily erect large computer models of any crystalline polymorphic form. Amorphous structures can be similarly grown by application of altered rules. They have adopted a simple model of irradiation in which all bonds in the neighborhood of a designated tetrahedron are destroyed, and they reform the bonds in this region according to a set of (possibly different) local rules appropriate to the environmental conditions. When a tetrahedron approaches the boundary of this neighborhood, it undergoes an optimization step in which a spring is inserted between two corners of compatible tetrahedra when they are within a certain distance of one another; component forces are then applied that act to minimize the distance between these corners and minimize the deviation from the rules. The resulting structure is then analyzed for the complete adjacency matrix, irreducible ring statistics, and bond angle distributions

  13. Distinct atomic structures of the Ni-Nb metallic glasses formed by ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, K. P.; Wang, L. T.; Liu, B. X.

    2007-01-01

    Four Ni-Nb metallic glasses are obtained by ion beam mixing and their compositions are measured to be Ni 77 Nb 23 , Ni 55 Nb 45 , Ni 31 Nb 69 , and Ni 15 Nb 85 , respectively, suggesting that a composition range of 23-85 at. % of Nb is favored for metallic glass formation in the Ni-Nb system. Interestingly, diffraction analyses show that the structure of the Nb-based Ni 31 Nb 69 metallic glass is distinctly different from the structure of the Nb-based Ni 15 Nb 85 metallic glass, as the respective amorphous halos are located at 2θ≅38 and 39 deg. To explore an atomic scale description of the Ni-Nb metallic glasses, an n-body Ni-Nb potential is first constructed with an aid of the ab initio calculations and then applied to perform the molecular dynamics simulation. Simulation results determine not only the intrinsic glass forming range of the Ni-Nb system to be within 20-85 at. % of Nb, but also the exact atomic positions in the Ni-Nb metallic glasses. Through a statistical analysis of the determined atomic positions, a new dominant local packing unit is found in the Ni 15 Nb 85 metallic glass, i.e., an icositetrahedron with a coordination number to be around 14, while in Ni 31 Nb 69 metallic glasses, the dominant local packing unit is an icosahedron with a coordination number to be around 12, which has been reported for the other metallic glasses. In fact, with increasing the irradiation dose, the Ni 31 Nb 69 metallic glasses are formed through an intermediate state of face-centered-cubic-solid solution, whereas the Ni 15 Nb 85 metallic glass is through an intermediate state of body-centered-cubic-solid solution, suggesting that the structures of the constituent metals play an important role in governing the structural characteristics of the resultant metallic glasses

  14. Non-local electron transport through normal and topological ladder-like atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzyna, Marcin; Kwapiński, Tomasz

    2018-05-01

    We propose a locally protected ladder-like atomic system (nanoconductor) on a substrate that is insensitive to external perturbations. The system corresponds to coupled atomic chains fabricated on different surfaces. Electron transport properties of such conductors are studied theoretically using the model tight-binding Su-Schriffer-Hegger (SSH) Hamiltonian and Green's function formalism. We have found that the conductance of the system is almost insensitive to single adatoms and oscillates as a function of the side chain length with very large periods. Non-local character of the electron transport was observed also for topological SSH chains where nontrivial end states survive in the presence of disturbances as well as for different substrates. We have found that the careful inspection of the density of states or charge waves can provide the information about the atom energy levels and hopping amplitudes. Moreover, the ladder-like geometry allows one to distinguish between normal and topological zero-energy states. It is important that topological chains do not reveal Friedel oscillations which are observed in non-topological chains.

  15. Analysis of medical device materials with the local electrode atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, S.L.; Mengelt, T.J.; Ali, M.; Ulfig, R.M.; Martens, R.M.; Kelly, T.F.; Kostrna, S.L.P.; Kostrna, M.S.; Carmichael, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: As medical technology advances towards microsurgical and minimally invasive techniques, there is a drive to produce ever-smaller devices that demand higher material performance and hence enhanced nano and micro-scale control of material structure. These devices are made from stainless steel alloys, Nitinol, titanium, CoCrMo, and non-metals such as pyrolytic carbon and silicon. These applications are made possible due to suitable physical and mechanical properties, good corrosion resistance in biological environments, reasonable biocompatibility, and good manufacturability. With respect to the metals, the nano-structure and composition of the material surface, typically an oxide, is especially critical since biological responses and corrosion occur at the material-environment interface. Thus, there is an increasing need to understand the 3-D structure and composition of metallic biomaterials at the atomic scale. Three-dimensional atom probe microscopy can uniquely provide such atomic-level structural information. In the present study several of these medical device materials were examined. These include a 316L stainless steel alloy which is widely used in implanted spinal fixation devices, bone screws, cardiovascular and neurological stents, a cast CoCrMo acetabular hip cup of a Cormet metal-on-metal Hip Resurfacing System (Corin Group, Cirencester, England) that was rejected for clinical use, Nitinol wires specimens such as are used for stents and guide wires, and low temperature pyrolytic carbon as used in clinical heart valve prosthetics. (author)

  16. Role of string-like collective atomic motion on diffusion and structural relaxation in glass forming Cu-Zr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Zhejiang University and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Zhong, Cheng; Wang, Xiaodong; Cao, Qingping; Jiang, Jian-Zhong, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jack.douglas@nist.gov [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Zhejiang University and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Douglas, Jack F., E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jack.douglas@nist.gov [Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Zhang, Dongxian [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-04-28

    We investigate Cu-Zr liquid alloys using molecular dynamics simulation and well-accepted embedded atom method potentials over a wide range of chemical composition and temperature as model metallic glass-forming (GF) liquids. As with other types of GF materials, the dynamics of these complex liquids are characterized by “dynamic heterogeneity” in the form of transient polymeric clusters of highly mobile atoms that are composed in turn of atomic clusters exhibiting string-like cooperative motion. In accordance with the string model of relaxation, an extension of the Adam-Gibbs (AG) model, changes in the activation free energy ΔG{sub a} with temperature of both the Cu and Zr diffusion coefficients D, and the alpha structural relaxation time τ{sub α} can be described to a good approximation by changes in the average string length, L. In particular, we confirm that the strings are a concrete realization of the abstract “cooperatively rearranging regions” of AG. We also find coexisting clusters of relatively “immobile” atoms that exhibit predominantly icosahedral local packing rather than the low symmetry packing of “mobile” atoms. These two distinct types of dynamic heterogeneity are then associated with different fluid structural states. Glass-forming liquids are thus analogous to polycrystalline materials where the icosahedrally packed regions correspond to crystal grains, and the strings reside in the relatively disordered grain boundary-like regions exterior to these locally well-ordered regions. A dynamic equilibrium between localized (“immobile”) and wandering (“mobile”) particles exists in the liquid so that the dynamic heterogeneity can be considered to be type of self-assembly process. We also characterize changes in the local atomic free volume in the course of string-like atomic motion to better understand the initiation and propagation of these fluid excitations.

  17. The effect of amorphization on the local structure of arsenic chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordovsky, G. A.; Marchenko, A. V.; Seregin, P. P.; Terukov, E. I.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of amorphization on the symmetry of the local environment of chalcogen atoms in As 2 S 3 , As 2 Se 3 , and As 2 Te 3 compounds has been investigated by 129 Te( 129 I) Moessbauer spectroscopy. Three states of triply coordinated tellurium atoms are indistinguishable in the Moessbauer spectra of crystalline As 2 Te 3 . Amorphization of As 2 Te 3 decreases the local symmetry of triply coordinated states of Te atoms and leads to the formation of doubly coordinated states in -As-Te-Te-As- chains. In the structure of crystalline As 2 S 3 and As 2 Se 3 , two states of doubly coordinated chalcogen atoms X in -As-X-As- chains manifest themselves in the broadening of the Moessbauer spectra. Amorphization of As 2 S 3 and As 2 Se 3 is not accompanied by a change in the local symmetry of doubly coordinated chalcogen atoms in -As-X-As- chains; however, doubly coordinated states of S and Se atoms in -As-X-X-As chains are formed in the amorphous material.

  18. Importance of Local Structural Variations on Recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, Dorte; Lin, Fengxiang; Zhang, Yubin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of local variations in the deformation microstructure on subsequent recrystallization are discussed and illustrated by three examples. The three examples consider local variations on different length scales and are: 1. Effects of local variations in the deformation microstructure on the f...

  19. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Yano, F.; Nishida, A.; Takamizawa, H.; Tsunomura, T.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted.

  20. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Yano, F; Nishida, A; Takamizawa, H; Tsunomura, T; Nagai, Y; Hasegawa, M

    2009-11-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted.

  1. The potential of continuous, local atomic clock measurements for earthquake prediction and volcanology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.

  2. Atomic level structural modulation during the structural relaxation and its effect on magnetic properties of Fe81Si4B10P4Cu1 nanocrystalline alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, C. C.; Zhu, L.; Meng, Y.; Zhai, X. B.; Wang, Y. G.

    2018-06-01

    The evolution of local structure and defects in the Fe81Si4B10P4Cu1 amorphous alloy during the structural relaxation has been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to explore their effects on magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline. The atomic rearrangements at the early stage of the structural relaxation cause the density increase of the amorphous matrix, but the subsequent atomic rearrangements contribute to the transformation of Fe3B-like atomic arrangements to FeB-like ones with the temperature increasing. As the structural relaxation processes, the released Fe atoms both from Fe3B- and Fe3P-like atomic arrangements result in the formation of new Fe clusters and the increase of Fe-Fe coordination number in the existing Fe clusters and the nucleation sites for α-Fe gradually increase, both of which promote the crystallization. However, the homogeneity of amorphous matrix will be finally destroyed under excessive relaxation temperature, which coarsens nanograins during the crystallization instead. Therefore, soft magnetic properties of the Fe81Si4B10P4Cu1 nanocrystalline alloy can be improved by pre-annealing the amorphous precursor at an appropriate temperature due to the atomic level structural optimization.

  3. Local, atomic-level elastic strain measurements of metallic glass thin films by electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, C. [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sarkar, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rajagopalan, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rentenberger, C., E-mail: christian.rentenberger@univie.ac.at [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    A novel technique is used to measure the atomic-level elastic strain tensor of amorphous materials by tracking geometric changes of the first diffuse ring of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SAD). An automatic procedure, which includes locating the centre and fitting an ellipse to the diffuse ring with sub-pixel precision is developed for extracting the 2-dimensional strain tensor from the SAD patterns. Using this technique, atomic-level principal strains from micrometre-sized regions of freestanding amorphous Ti{sub 0.45}Al{sub 0.55} thin films were measured during in-situ TEM tensile deformation. The thin films were deformed using MEMS based testing stages that allow simultaneous measurement of the macroscopic stress and strain. The calculated atomic-level principal strains show a linear dependence on the applied stress, and good correspondence with the measured macroscopic strains. The calculated Poisson’s ratio of 0.23 is reasonable for brittle metallic glasses. The technique yields a strain accuracy of about 1×10{sup −4} and shows the potential to obtain localized strain profiles/maps of amorphous thin film samples. - Highlights: • A TEM method to measure elastic strain in metallic glass films is proposed. • Method is based on tracking geometric changes in TEM diffraction patterns. • An automatic procedure is developed for extracting the local strain tensor. • Atomic-level strain in amorphous TiAl film was analysed during in-situ deformation. • Capability of the method to obtain micrometer scale strain profiles/maps is shown.

  4. Iron phosphate glasses: Bulk properties and atomic scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.; Asuvathraman, R.; Dube, Charu L.; Gandy, Amy S.; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Jolley, Kenny; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.; Smith, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Bulk properties such as glass transition temperature, density and thermal expansion of iron phosphate glass compositions, with replacement of Cs by Ba, are investigated as a surrogate for the transmutation of 137Cs to 137Ba, relevant to the immobilisation of Cs in glass. These studies are required to establish the appropriate incorporation rate of 137Cs in iron phosphate glass. Density and glass transition temperature increases with the addition of BaO indicating the shrinkage and reticulation of the iron phosphate glass network. The average thermal expansion coefficient reduces from 19.8 × 10-6 K-1 to 13.4 × 10-6 K-1, when 25 wt. % of Cs2O was replaced by 25 wt. % of BaO in caesium loaded iron phosphate glass. In addition to the above bulk properties, the role of Ba as a network modifier in the structure of iron phosphate glass is examined using various spectroscopic techniques. The FeII content and average coordination number of iron in the glass network was estimated using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The FeII content in the un-doped iron phosphate glass and barium doped iron phosphate glasses was 20, 21 and 22 ± 1% respectively and the average Fe coordination varied from 5.3 ± 0.2 to 5.7 ± 0.2 with increasing Ba content. The atomic scale structure was further probed by Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The average coordination number provided by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure was in good agreement with that given by the Mössbauer data.

  5. Superpose3D: a local structural comparison program that allows for user-defined structure representations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Federico Gherardini

    Full Text Available Local structural comparison methods can be used to find structural similarities involving functional protein patches such as enzyme active sites and ligand binding sites. The outcome of such analyses is critically dependent on the representation used to describe the structure. Indeed different categories of functional sites may require the comparison program to focus on different characteristics of the protein residues. We have therefore developed superpose3D, a novel structural comparison software that lets users specify, with a powerful and flexible syntax, the structure description most suited to the requirements of their analysis. Input proteins are processed according to the user's directives and the program identifies sets of residues (or groups of atoms that have a similar 3D position in the two structures. The advantages of using such a general purpose program are demonstrated with several examples. These test cases show that no single representation is appropriate for every analysis, hence the usefulness of having a flexible program that can be tailored to different needs. Moreover we also discuss how to interpret the results of a database screening where a known structural motif is searched against a large ensemble of structures. The software is written in C++ and is released under the open source GPL license. Superpose3D does not require any external library, runs on Linux, Mac OSX, Windows and is available at http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/superpose3D.

  6. Local structure around Sn in CeCoIn5-xSnx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, M.; Han, S.-W.; Booth, C.H.; Cornelius, A.L.; Bauer, E.D.; Sarrao, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    The local structure around Sn dopants in CeCoIn 5-x Sn z has been probed by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique. The fit results for both x = 0.12 and x = 0.18 clearly indicate the dopant Sn atoms predominantly occupying the planar In(1) site. These results are consistent with the quasi-two-dimensional electronic properties of CeCoIn 5 and is discussed in relation to the observed bulk properties

  7. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Nanoscale Structural Ordering in a Complex Metal Oxide Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhao, Lan; Teng, Baiyang; Lu, Weimin; Han, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The determination of the atomic structure of a functional material is crucial to understanding its "structure-to-property" relationship (e.g., the active sites in a catalyst), which is however challenging if the structure possesses complex

  8. Atomic structure and formation of CuZrAl bulk metallic glasses and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaban, I.; Jóvári, P.; Escher, B.; Tran, D.T.; Svensson, G.; Webb, M.A.; Regier, T.Z.; Kokotin, V.; Beuneu, B.; Gemming, T.; Eckert, J.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Partial radial distribution functions for Cu 47.5 Zr 47.5 Al 5 metallic glass and relevant crystal structures. - Abstract: Cu 47.5 Zr 47.5 Al 5 metallic glass is studied experimentally by high-energy X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution, electron diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The atomic structure of the glass is modeled by reverse Monte-Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. RMC modeling of seven experimental datasets enabled reliable separation of all partial pair distribution functions for Cu 47.5 Zr 47.5 Al 5 metallic glass. A peculiar structural feature of the ternary alloy is formation of the strong Al–Zr bonds, which are supposed to determine its high viscosity and enhanced bulk glass formation. Analysis of the local atomic order in Cu 47.5 Zr 47.5 Al 5 glass and Cu 10 Zr 7 , CuZr 2 and CuZr B2 crystalline structures elucidates their similarities and differences explaining the phase formation sequence by devitrification of the glass.

  9. Structure sensitivity in CO oxidation by a single Au atom supported on ceria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, W.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of CO oxidation by a CeO2(110)-supported gold atom has been investigated by DFT calculations. A novel stable surface structure has been identified in which one surface O atom of ceria migrates toward the isolated Au atom, resulting in a surface Au–O species that can react with CO.

  10. New version: GRASP2K relativistic atomic structure package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, P.; Gaigalas, G.; Bieroń, J.; Fischer, C. Froese; Grant, I. P.

    2013-09-01

    , Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 730252 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 14808872 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran. Computer: Intel Xeon, 2.66 GHz. Operating system: Suse, Ubuntu, and Debian Linux 64-bit. RAM: 500 MB or more Classification: 2.1. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADZL_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 177 (2007) 597 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Prediction of atomic properties — atomic energy levels, oscillator strengths, radiative decay rates, hyperfine structure parameters, Landé gJ-factors, and specific mass shift parameters — using a multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach. Solution method: The computational method is the same as in the previous GRASP2K [1] version except that for v3 codes the njgraf library module [2] for recoupling has been replaced by librang [3,4]. Reasons for new version: New angular libraries with improved performance are available. Also methodology for transforming from jj- to LSJ-coupling has been developed. Summary of revisions: New angular libraries where the coefficients of fractional parentage have been extended to j=9/2, making calculations feasible for the lanthanides and actinides. Inclusion of a new program jj2lsj, which reports the percentage composition of the wave function in LSJ. Transition programs have been modified to produce a file of transition data with one record for each transition in the same format as Atsp2K [C. Froese Fischer, G. Tachiev, G. Gaigalas and M.R. Godefroid, Comput. Phys. Commun. 176 (2007) 559], which identifies each atomic state by the total energy and a label for the CSF with the largest expansion coefficient in LSJ intermediate coupling. Updated to 64-bit architecture. A

  11. Free-complement local-Schrödinger-equation method for solving the Schrödinger equation of atoms and molecules: Basic theories and features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuji, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    The free-complement (FC) method is a general method for solving the Schrödinger equation (SE): The produced wave function has the potentially exact structure as the solution of the Schrödinger equation. The variables included are determined either by using the variational principle (FC-VP) or by imposing the local Schrödinger equations (FC-LSE) at the chosen set of the sampling points. The latter method, referred to as the local Schrödinger equation (LSE) method, is integral-free and therefore applicable to any atom and molecule. The purpose of this paper is to formulate the basic theories of the LSE method and explain their basic features. First, we formulate three variants of the LSE method, the AB, HS, and HTQ methods, and explain their properties. Then, the natures of the LSE methods are clarified in some detail using the simple examples of the hydrogen atom and the Hooke's atom. Finally, the ideas obtained in this study are applied to solving the SE of the helium atom highly accurately with the FC-LSE method. The results are very encouraging: we could get the world's most accurate energy of the helium atom within the sampling-type methodologies, which is comparable to those obtained with the FC-VP method. Thus, the FC-LSE method is an easy and yet a powerful integral-free method for solving the Schrödinger equation of general atoms and molecules.

  12. Structure and stability of semiconductor tip apexes for atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pou, P; Perez, R; Ghasemi, S A; Goedecker, S; Jelinek, P; Lenosky, T

    2009-01-01

    The short range force between the tip and the surface atoms, that is responsible for atomic-scale contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM), is mainly controlled by the tip apex. Thus, the ability to image, manipulate and chemically identify single atoms in semiconductor surfaces is ultimately determined by the apex structure and its composition. Here we present a detailed and systematic study of the most common structures that can be expected at the apex of the Si tips used in experiments. We tackle the determination of the structure and stability of Si tips with three different approaches: (i) first principles simulations of small tip apexes; (ii) simulated annealing of a Si cluster; and (iii) a minima hopping study of large Si tips. We have probed the tip apexes by making atomic contacts between the tips and then compared force-distance curves with the experimental short range forces obtained with dynamic force spectroscopy. The main conclusion is that although there are multiple stable solutions for the atomically sharp tip apexes, they can be grouped into a few types with characteristic atomic structures and properties. We also show that the structure of the last atomic layers in a tip apex can be both crystalline and amorphous. We corroborate that the atomically sharp tips are thermodynamically stable and that the tip-surface interaction helps to produce the atomic protrusion needed to get atomic resolution.

  13. Locking the local oscillator phase to the atomic phase via weak measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, N; Takeuchi, M

    2012-01-01

    A new method is proposed to reduce the frequency noise of a local oscillator to the level of white phase noise by maintaining (not destroying by projective measurement) the coherence of the ensemble pseudo-spin of atoms over many measurement cycles. This method, which we call ‘atomic phase lock (APL)’, uses weak measurement to monitor the phase in the Ramsey method and repeat the cycle without initialization of the phase. APL will achieve white phase noise as long as the noise accumulated during dead time and the decoherence are smaller than the measurement noise. A numerical simulation confirmed that with APL, the Allan deviation is averaged down at a maximum rate that is proportional to the inverse of the total measurement time, τ -1 . In contrast, current atomic clocks that use projection measurement suppress the noise only to the white frequency noise level, in which case the Allan deviation scales as τ -1/2 . Faraday rotation is one way to achieve weak measurement for APL. The strength of Faraday rotation with 171 Yb + ions trapped in a linear rf-trap is evaluated, and the performance of APL is discussed. The main source of decoherence is a spontaneous emission, induced by the probe beam for Faraday rotation measurement. The Faraday rotation measurement can be repeated until the decoherence becomes comparable to the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement. The number of cycles for a realistic experimental parameter is estimated to be ∼100. (paper)

  14. Local photoconductivity of microcrystalline silicon thin films measured by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledinsky, Martin; Fejfar, Antonin; Vetushka, Aliaksei; Stuchlik, Jiri; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kocka, Jan [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i. Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 00 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2011-11-15

    Local currents measured under standard conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) conditions on microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H) thin films were studied. It was shown that the AFM detection diode illuminating the AFM cantilever (see the figure on the right side) 100 x enhanced the current flows through the photosensitive {mu}c-Si:H layer. The local current map and current-voltage characteristics were measured under dark conditions. This study enables mapping of both the dark current and photocurrent. C-AFM cantilever illuminated by the detection diode during measurement on {mu}c-Si:H thin film. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Local structure of disordered Au-Cu and Au-Ag alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenkel, A. I.; Machavariani, V. Sh.; Rubshtein, A.; Rosenberg, Yu.; Voronel, A.; Stern, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) and x-ray-diffraction (XRD) measurements of disordered alloys Au x Cu 1-x and Au 0.5 Ag 0.5 prepared by melt spinning were performed. In the Au 0.5 Ag 0.5 alloy, no significant local deviations of the atoms from the average fcc lattice were detected while in Au x Cu 1-x alloys, significant deviations of atoms from the average fcc lattice were found. Mean-square vibrations of the Cu-Cu distances revealed by the XAFS in Au x Cu 1-x alloys indicate the weakening of contact between Cu atoms in the dilute limit. Our computer simulation for Au x Cu 1-x clusters of 10 5 atoms reproduces the main features of both the XAFS and XRD data

  16. The Evolution and Revival Structure of Localized Quantum Wave Packets

    OpenAIRE

    Bluhm, Robert; Kostelecky, Alan; Porter, James

    1995-01-01

    Localized quantum wave packets can be produced in a variety of physical systems and are the subject of much current research in atomic, molecular, chemical, and condensed-matter physics. They are particularly well suited for studying the classical limit of a quantum-mechanical system. The motion of a localized quantum wave packet initially follows the corresponding classical motion. However, in most cases the quantum wave packet spreads and undergoes a series of collapses and revivals. We pre...

  17. Fundamental problem in the relativistic approach to atomic structure theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Takashi

    1987-01-01

    It is known that the relativistic atomic structure theory contains a serious fundamental problem, so-called the Brown-Ravenhall (BR) problem or variational collapse. This problem arises from the fact that the energy spectrum of the relativistic Hamiltonian for many-electron systems is not bounded from below because the negative-energy solutions as well as the positive-energy ones are obtained from the relativistic equation. This report outlines two methods to avoid the BR problem in the relativistic calculation, that is, the projection operator method and the general variation method. The former method is described first. The use of a modified Hamiltonian containing a projection operator which projects the positive-energy solutions in the relativistic wave equation has been proposed to remove the BR difficulty. The problem in the use of the projection operator method is that the projection operator for the system cannot be determined uniquely. The final part of this report outlines the general variation method. This method can be applied to any system, such as relativistic ones whose Hamiltonian is not bounded from below. (Nogami, K.)

  18. Atomic structure of intracellular amorphous calcium phosphate deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, F; Blumenthal, N C; Posner, A S; Becker, G L; Lehninger, A L

    1975-06-01

    The radial distribution function calculated from x-ray diffraction of mineralized cytoplasmic structures isolated from the hepatopancreas of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) is very similar to that previously found for synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. Both types of mineral apparently have only short-range atomic order, represented as a neutral ion cluster of about 10 A in longest dimension, whose probable composition is expressed by the formula Ca9(PO4)6. The minor differences observed are attributed to the presence in the biological mineral of significant amounts of Mg-2+ and ATP. Synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate in contact with a solution containing an amount of ATP equivalent to that of the biological mineral failed to undergo conversion to the thermodynamically more stable hydroxyapatite. The amorphous calcium phosphate of the cytoplasmic mineral granules is similarly stable, and does not undergo conversion to hydroxyapatite, presumably owing to the presence of ATP and Mg-2+, known in inhibitors of the conversion process. The physiological implications of mineral deposits consisting of stabilized calcium phosphate ion clusters are discussed.

  19. Atomic structures and electronic properties of phosphorene grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yu; Zhou, Si; Bai, Yizhen; Zhao, Jijun; Zhang, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundary (GB) is one main type of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals, and has significant impact on the physical properties of 2D materials. Phosphorene, a recently synthesized 2D semiconductor, possesses a puckered honeycomb lattice and outstanding electronic properties. It is very interesting to know the possible GBs present in this novel material, and how their properties differ from those in the other 2D materials. Based on first-principles calculations, we explore the atomic structure, thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of phosphorene GBs. A total of 19 GBs are predicted and found to be energetically stable with formation energies much lower than those in graphene. These GBs do not severely affect the electronic properties of phosphorene: the band gap of perfect phosphorene is preserved, and the electron mobilities are only moderately reduced in these defective systems. Our theoretical results provide vital guidance for experimental tailoring the electronic properties of phosphorene as well as the device applications using phosphorene materials. (paper)

  20. Direct nuclear reactions and the structure of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterfeld, F.

    1985-01-01

    The present thesis deals with two different aspects of direct nuclear reactions, namely on the one hand with the microscopic calculation of the imaginary optical potential for the elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering as well as on the other hand with the microscopic analysis of giant magnetic resonances in atomic nuclei which are excited by (p,n) charge-exchange reactions. In the first part of the thesis the imaginary part of the optical potential for the elastic proton- and neutron-nucleus scattering is microscopically calculated in the framework of the so called nuclear-structure approximation to the optical potential. The calculations are performed in the Feshbach formalism in second-order perturbation theory corresponding to an effective projectile-target-nucleon interaction. In the second part of this thesis in the framework of microscopic nuclear models a complete analysis of different A(p,n)B charge-exchange reactions at high incident energies 160 MeV 90 Zr(p,n) reaction three collective spin-isospin resonances could be uniquely identified. (orig./HSI) [de

  1. First local electrode atom probe analysis of magnetite (Fe3O4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlman, K.R.; Kelly, T.F.; Miller, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: We have successfully fabricated atom probe samples of a metamorphic magnetite and performed an analysis of one of these samples using a local electrode atom probe (LEAP). This particular magnetite, previously designated LP204-1, was extracted from a polymetamorphosed, granulite-facies marble and contains grain scale heterogeneity in its oxygen isotope ratios. Crystals of LP204-1 contain a high number density of nanometer-scale, disk-shaped Al-Mn-Fe-spinel precipitates making this magnetite particularly attractive for demonstrating the capabilities of the LEAP with regard to geological materials. Field ion microscope images of these magnetite crystals show precipitate size and morphology that agrees with previous results. A sample of LP-204-1 was analyzed in the LEAP, resulting in a cylindrical analyzed volume approx. 26 nm in diameter and 21 nm high. The mass spectrum contained nearly 106,000 atoms, 97.1 % of which were identified. Peaks for singly, doubly and triply ionized species were fully resolved. The analysis volume appeared to be purely magnetite, i.e. no precipitates were observed. If it is assumed that 77 % of the ions in the peak at 16 are O 2 ++ rather than O+, the stoichiometry measured for this sample using electron probe microanalysis is achieved. The high fraction of O 2 ++ can be explained by lack of a peak for O ++ and significant peaks for FeO x indicating a relatively low field strength, which in turn favors molecular ions. This work is an encouraging beginning for analysis of geological materials in atom probes. Refs. 4 (author)

  2. The mystery of gold's chemical activity: local bonding, morphology and reactivity of atomic oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Thomas A; Liu, Xiaoying; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-01-07

    Recently, gold has been intensely studied as a catalyst for key synthetic reactions. Gold is an attractive catalyst because, surprisingly, it is highly active and very selective for partial oxidation processes suggesting promise for energy-efficient "green" chemistry. The underlying origin of the high activity of Au is a controversial subject since metallic gold is commonly thought to be inert. Herein, we establish that one origin of the high activity for gold catalysis is the extremely reactive nature of atomic oxygen bound in 3-fold coordination sites on metallic gold. This is the predominant form of O at low concentrations on the surface, which is a strong indication that it is most relevant to catalytic conditions. Atomic oxygen bound to metallic Au in 3-fold sites has high activity for CO oxidation, oxidation of olefins, and oxidative transformations of alcohols and amines. Among the factors identified as important in Au-O interaction are the morphology of the surface, the local binding site of oxygen, and the degree of order of the oxygen overlayer. In this Perspective, we present an overview of both theory and experiments that identify the reactive forms of O and their associated charge density distributions and bond strengths. We also analyze and model the release of Au atoms induced by O binding to the surface. This rough surface also has the potential for O(2) dissociation, which is a critical step if Au is to be activated catalytically. We further show the strong parallels between product distributions and reactivity for O-covered Au at low pressure (ultrahigh vacuum) and for nanoporous Au catalysts operating at atmospheric pressure as evidence that atomic O is the active species under working catalytic conditions when metallic Au is present. We briefly discuss the possible contributions of oxidants that may contain intact O-O bonds and of the Au-metal oxide support interface in Au catalysis. Finally, the challenges and future directions for fully

  3. Lindhard's polarization parameter and atomic sum rules in the local plasma approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Apell, P.; Oddershede, J.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the effects of Lindhard polarization parameter, χ, on the sum rule, Sp, within the local plasma approximation (LPA) as well as on the logarithmic sum rule Lp = dSp/dp, in both cases for the system in an initial excited state. We show results for a hydrogenic atom with nuc......In this work, we analyze the effects of Lindhard polarization parameter, χ, on the sum rule, Sp, within the local plasma approximation (LPA) as well as on the logarithmic sum rule Lp = dSp/dp, in both cases for the system in an initial excited state. We show results for a hydrogenic atom...... in terms of a screened charge Z* for the ground state. Our study shows that by increasing χ, the sum rule for p0 it increases, and the value p=0 provides the normalization/closure relation which remains fixed to the number of electrons for the same initial state. When p is fixed...

  4. Relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation theory and applications to atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpia, F.Z.

    1984-01-01

    A time-dependent linear-response theory appropriate to the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA) to quantum electrodynamics (QED) is developed. The resulting theory, the relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation (RTDLDA) is specialized to the treatment of electric excitations in closed-shell atoms. This formalism is applied to the calculation of atomic photoionization parameters in the dipole approximation. The static-field limit of the RTDLDA is applied to the calculation of dipole polarizabilities. Extensive numerical calculations of the photoionization parameters for the rare gases neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, and for mercury from the RTDLDA are presented and compared in detail with the results of other theories, in particular the relativistic random-phase approximation (RRPA), and with experimental measurements. The predictions of the RTDLDA are comparable with the RRPA calculations made to date. This is remarkable in that the RTDLDA entails appreciably less computational effort. Finally, the dipole polarizabilities predicted by the static-field RTDLDA are compared with other determinations of these quantities. In view of its simplicity, the static-field RTDLDA demonstrates itself to be one of the most powerful theories available for the calculation of dipole polarizabilities

  5. Quantitative measurement of local elasticity of SiOx film by atomic force acoustic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cun-Fu, He; Gai-Mei, Zhang; Bin, Wu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the elastic properties of SiO x film are investigated quantitatively for local fixed point and qualitatively for overall area by atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) in which the sample is vibrated at the ultrasonic frequency while the sample surface is touched and scanned with the tip contacting the sample respectively for fixed point and continuous measurements. The SiO x films on the silicon wafers are prepared by the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The local contact stiffness of the tip-SiO x film is calculated from the contact resonance spectrum measured with the atomic force acoustic microscopy. Using the reference approach, indentation modulus of SiO x film for fixed point is obtained. The images of cantilever amplitude are also visualized and analysed when the SiO x surface is excited at a fixed frequency. The results show that the acoustic amplitude images can reflect the elastic properties of the sample. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  6. Atomic structure calculations using the relativistic random phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, K.T.; Johnson, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is given for the relativistic random phase approximation (RRPA) applied to atomic transition problems. Selected examples of RRPA calculations on discrete excitations and photoionization are given to illustrate the need of relativistic many-body theories in dealing with atomic processes where both relativity and correlation are important

  7. Evolution of atomic-scale surface structures during ion bombardment: A fractal simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, M.A.; Ruzic, D.N.

    1993-01-01

    Surfaces of interest in microelectronics have been shown to exhibit fractal topographies on the atomic scale. A model utilizing self-similar fractals to simulate surface roughness has been added to the ion bombardment code TRIM. The model has successfully predicted experimental sputtering yields of low energy (less then 1000 eV) Ar on Si and D on C using experimentally determined fractal dimensions. Under ion bombardment the fractal surface structures evolve as the atoms in the collision cascade are displaced or sputtered. These atoms have been tracked and the evolution of the surface in steps of one monolayer of flux has been determined. The Ar--Si system has been studied for incidence energies of 100 and 500 eV, and incidence angles of 0 degree, 30 degree, and 60 degree. As expected, normally incident ion bombardment tends to reduce the roughness of the surface, whereas large angle ion bombardment increases the degree of surface roughness. Of particular interest though, the surfaces are still locally self-similar fractals after ion bombardment and a steady state fractal dimension is reached, except at large angles of incidence

  8. Atomic mechanism of shear localization during indentation of a nanostructured metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoz, F.; Dupont, V.

    2007-01-01

    Shear localization is an important mode of deformation in nanocrystalline metals. However, it is very difficult to verify the existence of local shear planes in nanocrystalline metals experimentally. Sharp indentation techniques may provide novel opportunities to investigate the effect of shear localization at different length scales, but the relationship between indentation response and atomic-level shear band formation has not been fully addressed. This paper describes an effort to provide direct insight on the mechanism of shear localization during indentation of nanocrystalline metals from atomistic simulations. Molecular statics is performed with the quasi-continuum method to simulate the indentation of single crystal and nanocrystalline Al with a sharp cylindrical probe. In the nanocrystalline regime, two grain sizes are investigated, 5 nm and 10 nm. We find that the indentation of nanocrystalline metals is characterized by serrated plastic flow. This effect seems to be independent of the grain size. Serration in nanocrystalline metals is found to be associated with the formation of shear bands by sliding of aligned interfaces and intragranular slip, which results in deformation twinning

  9. Atomic-accuracy prediction of protein loop structures through an RNA-inspired Ansatz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiju Das

    Full Text Available Consistently predicting biopolymer structure at atomic resolution from sequence alone remains a difficult problem, even for small sub-segments of large proteins. Such loop prediction challenges, which arise frequently in comparative modeling and protein design, can become intractable as loop lengths exceed 10 residues and if surrounding side-chain conformations are erased. Current approaches, such as the protein local optimization protocol or kinematic inversion closure (KIC Monte Carlo, involve stages that coarse-grain proteins, simplifying modeling but precluding a systematic search of all-atom configurations. This article introduces an alternative modeling strategy based on a 'stepwise ansatz', recently developed for RNA modeling, which posits that any realistic all-atom molecular conformation can be built up by residue-by-residue stepwise enumeration. When harnessed to a dynamic-programming-like recursion in the Rosetta framework, the resulting stepwise assembly (SWA protocol enables enumerative sampling of a 12 residue loop at a significant but achievable cost of thousands of CPU-hours. In a previously established benchmark, SWA recovers crystallographic conformations with sub-Angstrom accuracy for 19 of 20 loops, compared to 14 of 20 by KIC modeling with a comparable expenditure of computational power. Furthermore, SWA gives high accuracy results on an additional set of 15 loops highlighted in the biological literature for their irregularity or unusual length. Successes include cis-Pro touch turns, loops that pass through tunnels of other side-chains, and loops of lengths up to 24 residues. Remaining problem cases are traced to inaccuracies in the Rosetta all-atom energy function. In five additional blind tests, SWA achieves sub-Angstrom accuracy models, including the first such success in a protein/RNA binding interface, the YbxF/kink-turn interaction in the fourth 'RNA-puzzle' competition. These results establish all-atom enumeration as

  10. Study of local structure by DAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuki, Jun-ichiro

    1997-01-01

    We will describe a rather new X-ray structural technique, Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS), in which the Bragg diffraction intensities of a fixed momentum transfer is measured as a function of the incident X-ray energy. This technique can provide the same short-range structural information as XAFS. Because DAFS combines the capabilities of diffraction and XAFS into a single technique, it has two enhanced sensitivities compared to the separate technique. These are 'spatial selectivity' and 'site selectivity'. In this chapter semiconductor interface structure study as an example for spatial selectivity and structural study of high Tc superconductor as an example for site selectivity will be shown. (author)

  11. Robust procedure for creating and characterizing the atomic structure of scanning tunneling microscope tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Sumit; Bastiaans, Koen M; Allan, Milan P; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M

    2017-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopes (STM) are used extensively for studying and manipulating matter at the atomic scale. In spite of the critical role of the STM tip, procedures for controlling the atomic-scale shape of STM tips have not been rigorously justified. Here, we present a method for preparing tips in situ while ensuring the crystalline structure and a reproducibly prepared tip structure up to the second atomic layer. We demonstrate a controlled evolution of such tips starting from undefined tip shapes.

  12. Clustering methods for the optimization of atomic cluster structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagattini, Francesco; Schoen, Fabio; Tigli, Luca

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a revised global optimization method and apply it to large scale cluster conformation problems. In the 1990s, the so-called clustering methods were considered among the most efficient general purpose global optimization techniques; however, their usage has quickly declined in recent years, mainly due to the inherent difficulties of clustering approaches in large dimensional spaces. Inspired from the machine learning literature, we redesigned clustering methods in order to deal with molecular structures in a reduced feature space. Our aim is to show that by suitably choosing a good set of geometrical features coupled with a very efficient descent method, an effective optimization tool is obtained which is capable of finding, with a very high success rate, all known putative optima for medium size clusters without any prior information, both for Lennard-Jones and Morse potentials. The main result is that, beyond being a reliable approach, the proposed method, based on the idea of starting a computationally expensive deep local search only when it seems worth doing so, is capable of saving a huge amount of searches with respect to an analogous algorithm which does not employ a clustering phase. In this paper, we are not claiming the superiority of the proposed method compared to specific, refined, state-of-the-art procedures, but rather indicating a quite straightforward way to save local searches by means of a clustering scheme working in a reduced variable space, which might prove useful when included in many modern methods.

  13. The cytotoxicity of organobismuth compounds with certain molecular structures can be diminished by replacing the bismuth atom with an antimony atom in the molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohri, Kumiko; Yoshida, Eiko; Yasuike, Shuji; Fujie, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Chika; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid molecules, which are composed of an organic structure and metal(s), are indispensable for synthetic chemical reactions; however, their toxicity has been incompletely understood. In the present study, we discovered two cytotoxic organobismuth compounds whose cytotoxicity diminished upon replacement of the intramolecular bismuth atom with an antimony atom. The intracellular accumulation of the organobismuth compounds was much higher than that of the organoantimony compounds with the corresponding organic structures. We also showed that both the organic structure and bismuth atom are required for certain organobismuth compounds to exert their cytotoxic effect, suggesting that the cytotoxicity of such a compound is a result of an interaction between the organic structure and the bismuth atom. The present data suggest that organobismuth compounds with certain molecular structures exhibit cytotoxicity via an interaction between the molecular structure and the bismuth atom, and this cytotoxicity can be diminished by replacing the bismuth atom with an antimony atom, resulting in lower intracellular accumulation.

  14. Atomic spectral-product representations of molecular electronic structure: metric matrices and atomic-product composition of molecular eigenfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nun, M; Mills, J D; Hinde, R J; Winstead, C L; Boatz, J A; Gallup, G A; Langhoff, P W

    2009-07-02

    Recent progress is reported in development of ab initio computational methods for the electronic structures of molecules employing the many-electron eigenstates of constituent atoms in spectral-product forms. The approach provides a universal atomic-product description of the electronic structure of matter as an alternative to more commonly employed valence-bond- or molecular-orbital-based representations. The Hamiltonian matrix in this representation is seen to comprise a sum over atomic energies and a pairwise sum over Coulombic interaction terms that depend only on the separations of the individual atomic pairs. Overall electron antisymmetry can be enforced by unitary transformation when appropriate, rather than as a possibly encumbering or unnecessary global constraint. The matrix representative of the antisymmetrizer in the spectral-product basis, which is equivalent to the metric matrix of the corresponding explicitly antisymmetric basis, provides the required transformation to antisymmetric or linearly independent states after Hamiltonian evaluation. Particular attention is focused in the present report on properties of the metric matrix and on the atomic-product compositions of molecular eigenstates as described in the spectral-product representations. Illustrative calculations are reported for simple but prototypically important diatomic (H(2), CH) and triatomic (H(3), CH(2)) molecules employing algorithms and computer codes devised recently for this purpose. This particular implementation of the approach combines Slater-orbital-based one- and two-electron integral evaluations, valence-bond constructions of standard tableau functions and matrices, and transformations to atomic eigenstate-product representations. The calculated metric matrices and corresponding potential energy surfaces obtained in this way elucidate a number of aspects of the spectral-product development, including the nature of closure in the representation, the general redundancy or

  15. Formation and structural phase transition in Co atomic chains on a Cu(775) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syromyatnikov, A. G.; Kabanov, N. S.; Saletsky, A. M.; Klavsyuk, A. L.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of Co atomic chains on a Cu(775) surface is investigated by the kinetic Monte Carlo method. It is found that the length of Co atomic chains formed as a result of self-organization during epitaxial growth is a random quantity and its mean value depends on the parameters of the experiment. The existence of two structural phases in atomic chains is detected using the density functional theory. In the first phase, the separations between an atom and its two nearest neighbors in a chain are 0.230 and 0.280 nm. In the second phase, an atomic chain has identical atomic spacings of 0.255 nm. It is shown that the temperature of the structural phase transition depends on the length of the atomic chain.

  16. Formation and structural phase transition in Co atomic chains on a Cu(775) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syromyatnikov, A. G.; Kabanov, N. S.; Saletsky, A. M.; Klavsyuk, A. L., E-mail: klavsyuk@physics.msu.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The formation of Co atomic chains on a Cu(775) surface is investigated by the kinetic Monte Carlo method. It is found that the length of Co atomic chains formed as a result of self-organization during epitaxial growth is a random quantity and its mean value depends on the parameters of the experiment. The existence of two structural phases in atomic chains is detected using the density functional theory. In the first phase, the separations between an atom and its two nearest neighbors in a chain are 0.230 and 0.280 nm. In the second phase, an atomic chain has identical atomic spacings of 0.255 nm. It is shown that the temperature of the structural phase transition depends on the length of the atomic chain.

  17. Towards structural controllability of local-world networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shiwen; Ma, Yilin; Wu, Yafang; Wang, Li; Xia, Chengyi

    2016-01-01

    Controlling complex networks is of vital importance in science and engineering. Meanwhile, local-world effect is an important ingredient which should be taken into consideration in the complete description of real-world complex systems. In this letter, structural controllability of a class of local-world networks is investigated. Through extensive numerical simulations, firstly, effects of local world size M and network size N on structural controllability are examined. For local-world networks with sparse topological configuration, compared to network size, local-world size can induce stronger influence on controllability, however, for dense networks, controllability is greatly affected by network size and local-world effect can be neglected. Secondly, relationships between controllability and topological properties are analyzed. Lastly, the robustness of local-world networks under targeted attacks regarding structural controllability is discussed. These results can help to deepen the understanding of structural complexity and connectivity patterns of complex systems. - Highlights: • Structural controllability of a class of local-world networks is investigated. • For sparse local-world networks, compared to network size, local-world size can bring stronger influence on controllability. • For dense networks, controllability is greatly affected by network size and the effect of local-world size can be neglected. • Structural controllability against targeted node attacks is discussed.

  18. Towards structural controllability of local-world networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shiwen, E-mail: sunsw80@126.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Intelligence Computing and Novel Software Technology, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Key Laboratory of Computer Vision and System (Tianjin University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300384 (China); Ma, Yilin; Wu, Yafang; Wang, Li; Xia, Chengyi [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Intelligence Computing and Novel Software Technology, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Key Laboratory of Computer Vision and System (Tianjin University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Controlling complex networks is of vital importance in science and engineering. Meanwhile, local-world effect is an important ingredient which should be taken into consideration in the complete description of real-world complex systems. In this letter, structural controllability of a class of local-world networks is investigated. Through extensive numerical simulations, firstly, effects of local world size M and network size N on structural controllability are examined. For local-world networks with sparse topological configuration, compared to network size, local-world size can induce stronger influence on controllability, however, for dense networks, controllability is greatly affected by network size and local-world effect can be neglected. Secondly, relationships between controllability and topological properties are analyzed. Lastly, the robustness of local-world networks under targeted attacks regarding structural controllability is discussed. These results can help to deepen the understanding of structural complexity and connectivity patterns of complex systems. - Highlights: • Structural controllability of a class of local-world networks is investigated. • For sparse local-world networks, compared to network size, local-world size can bring stronger influence on controllability. • For dense networks, controllability is greatly affected by network size and the effect of local-world size can be neglected. • Structural controllability against targeted node attacks is discussed.

  19. Local conservation laws and the structure of the many-body localized states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbyn, Maksym; Papić, Z; Abanin, Dmitry A

    2013-09-20

    We construct a complete set of local integrals of motion that characterize the many-body localized (MBL) phase. Our approach relies on the assumption that local perturbations act locally on the eigenstates in the MBL phase, which is supported by numerical simulations of the random-field XXZ spin chain. We describe the structure of the eigenstates in the MBL phase and discuss the implications of local conservation laws for its nonequilibrium quantum dynamics. We argue that the many-body localization can be used to protect coherence in the system by suppressing relaxation between eigenstates with different local integrals of motion.

  20. Software for relativistic atomic structure theory: The grasp project at oxford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpia, F.A.; Grant, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    GRASP is an acronym for General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Program. The objective of the GRASP project at Oxford is to produce user-friendly state-of-the-art multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) software packages for rleativistic atomic structure theory

  1. Atomic structure affects the directional dependence of friction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weymouth, A.J.; Meuer, D.; Mutombo, Pingo; Wutscher, T.; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Giessibl, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 12 (2013), "126103-1"-"126103-4" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP204/11/P578 Grant - others:GA AV(CZ) M100101207 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : atomic scale friction * atomic force microscopy * silicon surface Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.728, year: 2013

  2. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase “composite nanoglass”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro [CSRRI-IIT, MRCAT, Sector 10, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 (United States); Balasubramanian, M. [Sector 20 XOR, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States); Ayyub, Pushan, E-mail: pushan@tifr.res.in [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2016-02-14

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu{sub 55}Nb{sub 45}. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  3. Smallest Nanoelectronic with Atomic Devices with Precise Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    2000-01-01

    Since its invention in 1948, the transistor has revolutionized our everyday life - transistor radios and TV's appeared in the early 1960s, personal computers came into widespread use in the mid-1980s, and cellular phones, laptops, and palm-sized organizers dominated the 1990s. The electronics revolution is based upon transistor miniaturization; smaller transistors are faster, and denser circuitry has more functionality. Transistors in current generation chips are 0.25 micron or 250 nanometers in size, and the electronics industry has completed development of 0.18 micron transistors which will enter production within the next few years. Industry researchers are now working to reduce transistor size down to 0.13 micron - a thousandth of the width of a human hair. However, studies indicate that the miniaturization of silicon transistors will soon reach its limit. For further progress in microelectronics, scientists have turned to nanotechnology to advance the science. Rather than continuing to miniaturize transistors to a point where they become unreliable, nanotechnology offers the new approach of building devices on the atomic scale [see sidebar]. One vision for the next generation of miniature electronics is atomic chain electronics, where devices are composed of atoms aligned on top of a substrate surface in a regular pattern. The Atomic Chain Electronics Project (ACEP) - part of the Semiconductor Device Modeling and Nanotechnology group, Integrated Product Team at the NAS Facility has been developing the theory of understanding atomic chain devices, and the author's patent for atomic chain electronics is now pending.

  4. Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms and measurement of the fine structure constant; Oscillations de Bloch d'atomes ultrafroids et mesure de la constante de structure fine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clade, P

    2005-10-15

    From a measurement of the recoil velocity of an atom absorbing a photon, it is possible to deduce a determination of the ratio h/m between the Planck constant and the mass of the atoms and then to deduce a value of the fine structure constant alpha. To do this measurement, we use the technique of Bloch oscillations, which allows us to transfer a large number of recoils to atoms. A velocity sensor, based on velocity selective Raman transition, enables us to measure the momentum transferred to the atoms. A measurement with a statistical uncertainty of 4.4 10{sup -9}, in conjunction with a careful study of systematic effects (5 10{sup -9}), has led us to a determination of alpha with an uncertainty of 6.7 10{sup -9}: {alpha}{sup -1}(Rb) = 137.03599878 (91). This uncertainty is similar to the uncertainty of the best determinations of alpha based on atom interferometry. (author)

  5. New Equations for Calculating Principal and Fine-Structure Atomic Spectra for Single and Multi-Electron Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdoval, Wayne A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Berry, David A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Shultz, Travis R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2018-03-09

    A set of equations are presented for calculating atomic principal spectral lines and fine-structure energy splits for single and multi-electron atoms. Calculated results are presented and compared to the National Institute of Science and Technology database demonstrating very good accuracy. The equations do not require fitted parameters. The only experimental parameter required is the Ionization energy for the electron of interest. The equations have comparable accuracy and broader applicability than the single electron Dirac equation. Three Appendices discuss the origin of the new equations and present calculated results. New insights into the special relativistic nature of the Dirac equation and its relationship to the new equations are presented.

  6. Defect Structure of Localized Excitons in a WSe2 Monolayer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Shuai

    2017-07-26

    The atomic and electronic structure of intrinsic defects in a WSe2 monolayer grown on graphite was revealed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. Instead of chalcogen vacancies that prevail in other transition metal dichalcogenide materials, intrinsic defects in WSe2 arise surprisingly from single tungsten vacancies, leading to the hole (p-type) doping. Furthermore, we found these defects to dominate the excitonic emission of the WSe2 monolayer at low temperature. Our work provided the first atomic-scale understanding of defect excitons and paved the way toward deciphering the defect structure of single quantum emitters previously discovered in the WSe2 monolayer.

  7. Average and local structure of selected metal deuterides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerby, Magnus H.

    2005-07-01

    The main topic of this thesis is improved understanding of site preference and mutual interactions of deuterium (D) atoms in selected metallic metal deuterides. The work was partly motivated by reports of abnormally short D-D distances in RENiInD1.33 compounds (RE = rear-earth element; D-D {upsilon} square root 1.6 Aa) which show that the so-called Switendick criterion that demands a D-D separation of at least 2 Aa, is not a universal rule. The work is experimental and heavily based on scattering measurements using x-rays (lab and synchrotron) and neutrons. In order to enhance data quality, deuterium is almost exclusively used instead of natural hydrogen in sample preparations. The data-analyses are in some cases taken beyond ''conventional'' analysis of the Bragg scattering, as the diffuse scattering contains important information on D-D distances in disordered deuterides (Paper 3 and 4). A considerable part of this work is devoted to determination of the crystal structure of saturated Zr2Ni deuteride, Zr2NiD-4.8. The structure remained unsolved when only a few months remained of the scholarship. The route to the correct structure was found in the last moment. In Chapter II this winding road towards the structure determination is described; an interesting exercise in how to cope with triclinic superstructures of metal hydrides. The solution emerged by combining data from synchrotron radiation powder x-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), powder neutron diffraction (PND) and electron diffraction (ED). The triclinic crystal structure, described in space group P1 , is fully ordered with composition Zr4Ni2D9 (Zr2NiD4.5). The unit cell is doubled as compared to lower Zr2Ni deuterides due to a deuterium superstructure: asuper = a, bsuper = b - c, csuper = b + c. The deviation from higher symmetry is very small. The metal lattice is pseudo-I-centred tetragonal and the deuterium lattice is pseudo-C-centred monoclinic. The deuterium site preference in Zr2Ni

  8. Average and local structure of selected metal deuterides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerby, Magnus H.

    2004-01-01

    The main topic of this thesis is improved understanding of site preference and mutual interactions of deuterium (D) atoms in selected metallic metal deuterides. The work was partly motivated by reports of abnormally short D-D distances in RENiInD1.33 compounds (RE = rear-earth element; D-D Υ square root 1.6 Aa) which show that the so-called Switendick criterion that demands a D-D separation of at least 2 Aa, is not a universal rule. The work is experimental and heavily based on scattering measurements using x-rays (lab and synchrotron) and neutrons. In order to enhance data quality, deuterium is almost exclusively used instead of natural hydrogen in sample preparations. The data-analyses are in some cases taken beyond ''conventional'' analysis of the Bragg scattering, as the diffuse scattering contains important information on D-D distances in disordered deuterides (Paper 3 and 4). A considerable part of this work is devoted to determination of the crystal structure of saturated Zr2Ni deuteride, Zr2NiD-4.8. The structure remained unsolved when only a few months remained of the scholarship. The route to the correct structure was found in the last moment. In Chapter II this winding road towards the structure determination is described; an interesting exercise in how to cope with triclinic superstructures of metal hydrides. The solution emerged by combining data from synchrotron radiation powder x-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), powder neutron diffraction (PND) and electron diffraction (ED). The triclinic crystal structure, described in space group P1 , is fully ordered with composition Zr4Ni2D9 (Zr2NiD4.5). The unit cell is doubled as compared to lower Zr2Ni deuterides due to a deuterium superstructure: asuper = a, bsuper = b - c, csuper = b + c. The deviation from higher symmetry is very small. The metal lattice is pseudo-I-centred tetragonal and the deuterium lattice is pseudo-C-centred monoclinic. The deuterium site preference in Zr2Ni deuterides at 1 bar D2 and

  9. Atomic size effects on local coordination and medium range order in molten trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatlipinar, H.; Akdeniz, Z.; Pastore, G.

    1992-08-01

    Structural correlations in molten trivalent metal chlorides are evaluated as functions of the metal ion size R M across the range from LaCl 3 (R M approx. 1.4 A) to AlCl 3 (R M approx. 0.8 A), using a charged soft-sphere model and the hypernetted chain approximation. Main attention is given to trends in the local liquid structure (partial radial distribution functions, coordination numbers and bond lengths) and in the intermediate range order (first sharp diffraction peak in the number-number and partial structure factors). The trend towards fourfold local coordination of the metal ions, the stabilization of their first-neighbour chlorine cage and the growth of medium range order are found to proceed in parallel as the size of the metal ion is allowed to decrease at constant number density and temperature. A tendency to molecular-type local structure and liquid-vapour phase separation is found within the hypernetted chain scheme at small metal ion sizes corresponding to AlCl 3 and is emphasized by decreasing the number density of the fluid. The predicted molecular units are rather strongly distorted Al 2 Cl 6 dimers, in agreement with observation. The calculated structural trends for other trichlorides are compared with diffraction and transport data. (author). 17 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  10. Determination of localized magnetic moments in Fe-Cr-Al alloys and the electron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blau, W.

    1977-01-01

    The localized magnetic moments of Fe and Cr are determined by combination of saturation magnetization measurements and magnetic diffuse scattering. Power series characterizing the interactions between the different kinds of atoms in the alloys are chosen to describe the concentration dependence of the magnetic moments. The different terms are discussed on the basis of band structure models valid for dilute alloys taking into account their modification by impurity interactions. (author)

  11. Electronic and atomic structure at metal-oxide heterointerfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, Christoph Friedrich

    2013-07-01

    The results of a series of investigations on modern oxide materials using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) combined with the X-ray standing wave (XSW) method are described in this thesis. The combination of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray standing waves enables the electronic structure to be measured with a spatial resolution in the picometer range. Under suitable preparation conditions, a quasi two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is formed at the heterointerfaces of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) with polar oxides, such as lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO{sub 3}) or lanthanum gallate (LaGaO{sub 3}). Samples were grown at the ESRF and in Naples and surface X-ray diffraction confirmed the excellent epitaxial quality of the films. The XSW-method was used to reconstruct images of the structure of LaAlO{sub 3} layers in real space. These images give evidence of distortions in the LaAlO{sub 3} structure which facilitate the compensation of the potential differences. Furthermore, XSW/HAXPES measurements permit the Ti and Sr,O contributions to the 2DEG close to the Fermi level to be identified unambiguously. The analysis shows that the 3d band crosses the Fermi level and that some density of states is associated with oxygen vacancies. Superlattices of SrTiO{sub 3} with polar calcium cuprate (CaCuO{sub 2}) were investigated by HAXPES. Similar to the case of SrTiO{sub 3}/LaAlO{sub 3}, the polarity of CaCuO{sub 2} should lead to a diverging surface potential. The core level spectra from Ca, Sr, and Ti show that there is a redistribution mechanism for oxygen which compensates the potential differences. When the oxygen concentration is enhanced these superstructures become superconducting (T{sub C} = 40 K). The increased oxidation of the superconducting material is revealed by the additional components in the core level spectra of the metal atoms and in the appearance of a new screening channel in Cu 2p core level spectra, which signals the hole

  12. Electronic and atomic structure at metal-oxide heterointerfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlueter, Christoph Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    The results of a series of investigations on modern oxide materials using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) combined with the X-ray standing wave (XSW) method are described in this thesis. The combination of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray standing waves enables the electronic structure to be measured with a spatial resolution in the picometer range. Under suitable preparation conditions, a quasi two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is formed at the heterointerfaces of strontium titanate (SrTiO 3 ) with polar oxides, such as lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO 3 ) or lanthanum gallate (LaGaO 3 ). Samples were grown at the ESRF and in Naples and surface X-ray diffraction confirmed the excellent epitaxial quality of the films. The XSW-method was used to reconstruct images of the structure of LaAlO 3 layers in real space. These images give evidence of distortions in the LaAlO 3 structure which facilitate the compensation of the potential differences. Furthermore, XSW/HAXPES measurements permit the Ti and Sr,O contributions to the 2DEG close to the Fermi level to be identified unambiguously. The analysis shows that the 3d band crosses the Fermi level and that some density of states is associated with oxygen vacancies. Superlattices of SrTiO 3 with polar calcium cuprate (CaCuO 2 ) were investigated by HAXPES. Similar to the case of SrTiO 3 /LaAlO 3 , the polarity of CaCuO 2 should lead to a diverging surface potential. The core level spectra from Ca, Sr, and Ti show that there is a redistribution mechanism for oxygen which compensates the potential differences. When the oxygen concentration is enhanced these superstructures become superconducting (T C = 40 K). The increased oxidation of the superconducting material is revealed by the additional components in the core level spectra of the metal atoms and in the appearance of a new screening channel in Cu 2p core level spectra, which signals the hole doping of the CaCuO 2 blocks. Magnetoresistive

  13. The method of intersecting spheres for determination of coordination numbers of atoms in crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serezhkin, V.N.; Buslaev, Yu.A.; Mikhajlov, Yu.N.

    1997-01-01

    New method for determination of coordination numbers (CN) of atoms in crystal structures, based on the model of interatomic interaction, within the frames whereof each atom is approximated by two spheres with the common center in the atom nuclei, is proposed. One of the spheres specifies conditionally isolated (chemically unbound) atom and its radius is a constant, which for atoms of the given chemical sort in the structure of any compound is equal to quasi-orbital Sleiter radius. The sphere of the other radius specifies chemically bound atom and coincides with the sphere, the volume whereof is equal to the volume of the Voronoj-Dirichlet polyhedron of the corresponding atom in the structure of the concrete crystal. Using a series of examples, workability of the given method for CN determination of atoms in structures of both simple substances and chemical compounds (alkali, transition metals, U, Th). Good agreement of the obtained results with the generally accepted CN s of atoms for the considered crystals is noted and a number of principal advantages of the new method, as compared to classical one of the CNs evaluation, is demonstrated

  14. A Hartree-Fock program for atomic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock equations for a general open shell atom are described. The matrix equations that result when the single particle orbitals are written in terms of a linear combination of analytic basis functions are derived. Attention is paid to the complexities that occur when open shells are present. The specifics of a working FORTRAN program which is available for public use are described. The program has the flexibility to handle either Slater-type orbitals or Gaussian-type orbitals. It can be obtained over the internet at http://lacebark.ntu.edu.au/j_mitroy/research/atomic.htm Copyright (1999) CSIRO Australia

  15. Localization of the antimony impurity atoms in the PbTe lattice determined by the Moessbauer emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masterov, V.F.; Nasredinov, F.S.; Nemov, S.A.; Seregin, P.P.; Troitskaya, N.N.; Bondarevskij, S.I.

    1997-01-01

    The 119 Sb ( 119m Sn) emission Moessbauer spectroscopy has shown that a localization of the antimony impurity atoms in the PbTe lattice is affected by the conductivity type of the host material, the antimony atoms occupied mainly anion and cation sites in n-type and p-type samples, respectively. The 119 Sn impurity in the anion sublattice of PbTe formed an decay. Its charge state was shown to be independent of the Fermi level position

  16. Consistent structures and interactions by density functional theory with small atomic orbital basis sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-08-07

    A density functional theory (DFT) based composite electronic structure approach is proposed to efficiently compute structures and interaction energies in large chemical systems. It is based on the well-known and numerically robust Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) generalized-gradient-approximation in a modified global hybrid functional with a relatively large amount of non-local Fock-exchange. The orbitals are expanded in Ahlrichs-type valence-double zeta atomic orbital (AO) Gaussian basis sets, which are available for many elements. In order to correct for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) and to account for the important long-range London dispersion effects, our well-established atom-pairwise potentials are used. In the design of the new method, particular attention has been paid to an accurate description of structural parameters in various covalent and non-covalent bonding situations as well as in periodic systems. Together with the recently proposed three-fold corrected (3c) Hartree-Fock method, the new composite scheme (termed PBEh-3c) represents the next member in a hierarchy of "low-cost" electronic structure approaches. They are mainly free of BSSE and account for most interactions in a physically sound and asymptotically correct manner. PBEh-3c yields good results for thermochemical properties in the huge GMTKN30 energy database. Furthermore, the method shows excellent performance for non-covalent interaction energies in small and large complexes. For evaluating its performance on equilibrium structures, a new compilation of standard test sets is suggested. These consist of small (light) molecules, partially flexible, medium-sized organic molecules, molecules comprising heavy main group elements, larger systems with long bonds, 3d-transition metal systems, non-covalently bound complexes (S22 and S66×8 sets), and peptide conformations. For these sets, overall deviations from accurate reference data are smaller than for various other tested DFT methods

  17. Consistent structures and interactions by density functional theory with small atomic orbital basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimme, Stefan; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A density functional theory (DFT) based composite electronic structure approach is proposed to efficiently compute structures and interaction energies in large chemical systems. It is based on the well-known and numerically robust Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) generalized-gradient-approximation in a modified global hybrid functional with a relatively large amount of non-local Fock-exchange. The orbitals are expanded in Ahlrichs-type valence-double zeta atomic orbital (AO) Gaussian basis sets, which are available for many elements. In order to correct for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) and to account for the important long-range London dispersion effects, our well-established atom-pairwise potentials are used. In the design of the new method, particular attention has been paid to an accurate description of structural parameters in various covalent and non-covalent bonding situations as well as in periodic systems. Together with the recently proposed three-fold corrected (3c) Hartree-Fock method, the new composite scheme (termed PBEh-3c) represents the next member in a hierarchy of “low-cost” electronic structure approaches. They are mainly free of BSSE and account for most interactions in a physically sound and asymptotically correct manner. PBEh-3c yields good results for thermochemical properties in the huge GMTKN30 energy database. Furthermore, the method shows excellent performance for non-covalent interaction energies in small and large complexes. For evaluating its performance on equilibrium structures, a new compilation of standard test sets is suggested. These consist of small (light) molecules, partially flexible, medium-sized organic molecules, molecules comprising heavy main group elements, larger systems with long bonds, 3d-transition metal systems, non-covalently bound complexes (S22 and S66×8 sets), and peptide conformations. For these sets, overall deviations from accurate reference data are smaller than for various other tested DFT

  18. Proton-coupled electron transfer versus hydrogen atom transfer: generation of charge-localized diabatic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirjoosingh, Andrew; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-03-24

    The distinction between proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms is important for the characterization of many chemical and biological processes. PCET and HAT mechanisms can be differentiated in terms of electronically nonadiabatic and adiabatic proton transfer, respectively. In this paper, quantitative diagnostics to evaluate the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity are presented. Moreover, the connection between the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity and the physical characteristics distinguishing PCET from HAT, namely, the extent of electronic charge redistribution, is clarified. In addition, a rigorous diabatization scheme for transforming the adiabatic electronic states into charge-localized diabatic states for PCET reactions is presented. These diabatic states are constructed to ensure that the first-order nonadiabatic couplings with respect to the one-dimensional transferring hydrogen coordinate vanish exactly. Application of these approaches to the phenoxyl-phenol and benzyl-toluene systems characterizes the former as PCET and the latter as HAT. The diabatic states generated for the phenoxyl-phenol system possess physically meaningful, localized electronic charge distributions that are relatively invariant along the hydrogen coordinate. These diabatic electronic states can be combined with the associated proton vibrational states to generate the reactant and product electron-proton vibronic states that form the basis of nonadiabatic PCET theories. Furthermore, these vibronic states and the corresponding vibronic couplings may be used to calculate rate constants and kinetic isotope effects of PCET reactions.

  19. Photo-assisted local oxidation of GaN using an atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, J S; Hu, Z S; Lu, T Y; Chen, L W; Chen, S W; Lin, T Y; Hsiao, C-L; Chen, K-H; Chen, L-C

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a photo-assisted atomic force microscope (AFM) local oxidation technique which is capable of producing highly smooth oxide patterns with heights reaching several tens of nanometres on both n- and p-types of GaN (and in principle on most semiconductors) without the use of chemicals. The novel methodology relies on UV illumination of the surface of the substrate during conventional AFM local oxidation. A low 1.2 V threshold voltage for n-type GaN was obtained, which can be explained by UV photo-generation of excess electron-hole pairs in the substrate near the junction, thereby reducing the electric field required to drive carrier flow through the tip-sample Schottky barrier. It was demonstrated that the presence or absence of light alone was sufficient to switch the growth of the oxide on or off. The photo-assisted AFM oxidation technique is of immediate interest to the semiconductor industry for the fabrication of GaN-based complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices and nanodevices, improves chances for AFM-type data storage, and presents new degrees of freedom for process control technique

  20. Chromosome structure investigated with the atomic force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grooth, B.G.; Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.; van der Werf, Kees; van Hulst, N.F.; van Oort, G.; van Oort, Geeske; Greve, Jan; Manne, Srinivas

    1992-01-01

    We have developed an atomic force microscope (AFM) with an integrated optical microscope. The optical microscope consists of an inverted epi-illumination system that yields images in reflection or fluorescence of the sample. With this system it is possible to quickly locate an object of interest. A

  1. Atomic structure of the SnO2 (110) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godin, T.J.; LaFemina, J.P.

    1991-12-01

    Using a tight-binding, total-energy model, we examine atomic relaxations of the ideal stoichiometric and reduced tin oxide (11) surfaces. In both cases we find a nearly bond-length conserving rumple of the top layer, and a smaller counter-relaxation of the second layer. These calculations show no evidence of surface states in the band gap for either surface

  2. Atomic Structure of Au−Pd Bimetallic Alloyed Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Yong; Fan, Fengru; Tian, Zhongqun; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-01-01

    shell of the NPs was systematically investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In the NPs coated with a single atomic layer of Pd, the strain between the surface Pd layer and the Au core is released by Shockley partial dislocations

  3. Atom localization and center-of-mass wave-function determination via multiple simultaneous quadrature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evers, Joerg; Qamar, Shahid; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2007-01-01

    We discuss localization and center-of-mass wave-function measurement of a quantum particle using multiple simultaneous dispersive interactions of the particle with different standing-wave fields. In particular, we consider objects with an internal structure consisting of a single ground state and several excited states. The transitions between ground and the corresponding excited states are coupled to the light fields in the dispersive limit, thus giving rise to a phase shift of the light field during the interaction. We show that multiple simultaneous measurements allow both an increase in the measurement or localization precision in a single direction and the performance of multidimensional measurements or localization. Further, we show that multiple measurements may relax the experimental requirements for each individual measurement

  4. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Ju; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Li, Jian-Ming; Hu, Ke; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein–protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods. (paper: interdisciplinary statistical mechanics)

  5. The Atom in a Molecule: Implications for Molecular Structure and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-23

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 February 2016 – 23 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The atom in a molecule: Implications for molecular...For presentation at American Physical Society - Division of Atomic , Molecular, and Optical Physics (May 2016) PA Case Number: #16075; Clearance Date...10 Energy (eV) R C--H (au) R C--H(au) The Atom in a Molecule: Implications for Molecular Structures and Properties P. W. Langhoff, Chemistry

  6. Electron structure of atoms in laser plasma: The Debye shielding model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Tokuei; Okutsu, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    The electronic structure and the energy spectra of multielectron atoms in laser plasmas are examined by the Debye shielding model. The effect of the plasma environment on the electrons bound in an atom is taken into account by introducing the screened Coulomb-type potentials into the electronic Hamiltonian of an atom in place of the standard nuclear attraction and electron repulsion potentials. The capabilities of this new Hamiltonian are demonstrated for He and Li in laser plasmas. (author)

  7. Local structure of gallate proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannici, F; Messana, D; Martorana, A [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica ed Analitica, Viale delle Scienze, I-90128 Palermo (Italy); Longo, A [CNR, Istituto per lo studio dei materiali nanostrutturati, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy); Sciortino, L, E-mail: sciortino@pa.ismn.cnr.i

    2009-11-15

    Lanthanum barium gallate proton conductors are based on disconnected GaO{sub 4} groups. The insertion of hydroxyls in the LaBaGaO{sub 4} network proceeds through self-doping with Ba{sup 2+}, consequent O{sup 2-} vacancy formation to fulfill charge neutrality. With a structural investigation on self-doped LaBaGaO{sub 4} oxides using synchrotron XRD and EXAFS on the Ga K-edge, we find that: (a) the GaO{sub 4} tetrahedra retain their size throughout the whole series; (b) the GaO{sub 4} tetrahedra rotate as rigid bodies on hydration, leading to the formation of a network of shorter O-O configurations that are stabilized by hydrogen bonds; (c) contraction of the lattice occurs along the a unit cell axis, as a consequence of an overall structural rearrangement of the hydrated solid.

  8. Local structure of gallate proton conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannici, F; Messana, D; Martorana, A; Longo, A; Sciortino, L

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanum barium gallate proton conductors are based on disconnected GaO 4 groups. The insertion of hydroxyls in the LaBaGaO 4 network proceeds through self-doping with Ba 2+ , consequent O 2- vacancy formation to fulfill charge neutrality. With a structural investigation on self-doped LaBaGaO 4 oxides using synchrotron XRD and EXAFS on the Ga K-edge, we find that: (a) the GaO 4 tetrahedra retain their size throughout the whole series; (b) the GaO 4 tetrahedra rotate as rigid bodies on hydration, leading to the formation of a network of shorter O-O configurations that are stabilized by hydrogen bonds; (c) contraction of the lattice occurs along the a unit cell axis, as a consequence of an overall structural rearrangement of the hydrated solid.

  9. Local structure of gallate proton conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannici, F.; Messana, D.; Longo, A.; Sciortino, L.; Martorana, A.

    2009-11-01

    Lanthanum barium gallate proton conductors are based on disconnected GaO4 groups. The insertion of hydroxyls in the LaBaGaO4 network proceeds through self-doping with Ba2+, consequent O2- vacancy formation to fulfill charge neutrality. With a structural investigation on self-doped LaBaGaO4 oxides using synchrotron XRD and EXAFS on the Ga K-edge, we find that: (a) the GaO4 tetrahedra retain their size throughout the whole series; (b) the GaO4 tetrahedra rotate as rigid bodies on hydration, leading to the formation of a network of shorter O-O configurations that are stabilized by hydrogen bonds; (c) contraction of the lattice occurs along the a unit cell axis, as a consequence of an overall structural rearrangement of the hydrated solid.

  10. Local atomic characterization of LiCo1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedoseykina, Tatiana; Kim, Sung-Soo; Nitta, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    Co, Ni and Mn K-edge XAFS investigation of LiCo 1/3 Ni 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 as alternative cathode material to commercially used LiCoO 2 in lithium rechargeable battery has been performed. Parameters of a local atomic structure such as radii of metal-oxygen and metal-metal coordination shells and disorder in those shells have been determined. It has been found that the radius of the first coordination shell (metal-oxygen) as well as a local disorder in the second shell (metal-metal) around each of the 3d-metals are in a good agreement with obtained for superlattice model of √3 x √3] R30 o type in triangular lattice of sites by first principle calculation. Other parameters of the local atomic structure around Co, Ni and Mn atoms do not provide evidence for presence of superstructure in LiCo 1/3 Ni 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2

  11. Intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling of a single atom in a localized hollow-beam trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Yaling; Xia, Yong; Ren, Ruimin; Du, Xiangli; Yin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    In order to realize a convenient and efficient laser cooling of a single atom, we propose a simple and promising scheme to cool a single neutral atom in a blue-detuned localized hollow-beam trap by intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling, and study the dynamic process of the intensity-gradient cooling of a single 87 Rb atom in the localized hollow-beam trap by using Monte-Carlo simulations. Our study shows that a single 87 Rb atom with a temperature of 120 μK from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) can be directly cooled to a final temperature of 4.64 μK in our proposed scheme. We also investigate the dependences of the cooling results on the laser detuning δ of the localized hollow-beam, the power RP 0 of the re-pumping laser beam, the sizes of both the localized hollow-beam and the re-pumping beam, and find that there is a pair of optimal cooling parameters (δ and RP 0 ) for an expected lowest temperature, and the cooling results strongly depend on the size of the re-pumping beam, but weakly depend on the size of the localized hollow-beam. Finally, we further study the cooling potential of our localized hollow-beam trap for the initial temperature of a single atom, and find that a single 87 Rb atom with an initial temperature of higher than 1 mK can also be cooled directly to about 6.6 μK. (paper)

  12. Localized holes and delocalized electrons in photoexcited inorganic perovskites: Watching each atomic actor by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio G. Santomauro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on an element-selective study of the fate of charge carriers in photoexcited inorganic CsPbBr3 and CsPb(ClBr3 perovskite nanocrystals in toluene solutions using time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 80 ps time resolution. Probing the Br K-edge, the Pb L3-edge, and the Cs L2-edge, we find that holes in the valence band are localized at Br atoms, forming small polarons, while electrons appear as delocalized in the conduction band. No signature of either electronic or structural changes is observed at the Cs L2-edge. The results at the Br and Pb edges suggest the existence of a weakly localized exciton, while the absence of signatures at the Cs edge indicates that the Cs+ cation plays no role in the charge transport, at least beyond 80 ps. This first, time-resolved element-specific study of perovskites helps understand the rather modest charge carrier mobilities in these materials.

  13. Atomic-scale structural signature of dynamic heterogeneities in metallic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasturel, Alain; Jakse, Noel

    2017-08-01

    With sufficiently high cooling rates, liquids will cross their equilibrium melting temperatures and can be maintained in a metastable undercooled state before solidifying. Studies of undercooled liquids reveal several intriguing dynamic phenomena and because explicit connections between liquid structure and liquids dynamics are difficult to identify, it remains a major challenge to capture the underlying structural link to these phenomena. Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are yet especially powerful in providing atomic-scale details otherwise not accessible in experiments. Through the AIMD-based study of Cr additions in Al-based liquids, we evidence for the first time a close relationship between the decoupling of component diffusion and the emergence of dynamic heterogeneities in the undercooling regime. In addition, we demonstrate that the origin of both phenomena is related to a structural heterogeneity caused by a strong interplay between chemical short-range order (CSRO) and local fivefold topology (ISRO) at the short-range scale in the liquid phase that develops into an icosahedral-based medium-range order (IMRO) upon undercooling. Finally, our findings reveal that this structural signature is also captured in the temperature dependence of partial pair-distribution functions which opens up the route to more elaborated experimental studies.

  14. Realizing high magnetic moments in fcc Fe nanoparticles through atomic structure stretch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Thornton, S C; Binns, C

    2012-01-01

    We describe the realization of a high moment state in fcc Fe nanoparticles through a controlled change in their atomic structure. Embedding Fe nanoparticles in a Cu 1-x Au x matrix causes their atomic structure to switch from bcc to fcc. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements show that the structure in both the matrix and the Fe nanoparticles expands as the amount of Au in the matrix is increased, with the data indicating a tetragonal stretch in the Fe nanoparticles. The samples were prepared directly from the gas phase by co-deposition, using a gas aggregation source and MBE-type sources respectively for the nanoparticle and matrix materials. The structure change in the Fe nanoparticles is accompanied by a sharp increase in atomic magnetic moment, ultimately to values of ∼2.5 ± 0.3 μ B /atom. (paper)

  15. Enrichment of true positives from structural alerts through the use of novel atomic fragment based descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, A.; Rydberg, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the discrimination rate for methods applying structural alerts and biotransformation rules in the prediction of toxicity and drug metabolism we have developed a set of novel fragment based atomic descriptors. These atomic descriptors encode the properties of the fragments separating an...

  16. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Zhizhong, E-mail: zzyan@bit.edu.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57078 Siegen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  17. Electronic and atomic structures of liquid tellurium containing alkali elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakita, Yukinobu; Yao, Makoto; Endo, Hirohisa.

    1997-01-01

    The measurements of electrical conductivity σ, density, EXAFS and neutron scattering were carried out for liquid K-Te and Rb-Te mixtures. The conductivity σ decreases rapidly with alkali concentration and a metal-semiconductor transition occurs at about 10 at.% alkali. It is found that the compositional variation of σ is nearly independent of the alkali species. The Te-Te bond length deduced from EXAFS and neutron scattering measurements is 2.8 A and changes little with alkali concentrations. The average distances from K and Rb atom to Te atoms are 3.6 A and 3.8 A, respectively. Two kinds of relaxation processes are observed in quasielastic neutron scattering for K 20 Te 80 . Upon the addition of alkali the interaction between the neighbouring Te chains, which is responsible for the metallic conduction, weaken considerably. (author)

  18. On the electronic and geometrical structures of small atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malrieu, J.P.; Maynau, D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper recalls the main challenges and difficulties of the theoretical study of small clusters of atoms. It briefly summarizes some informations concerning rare-gas clusters and clusters of normal elements such as C or Si. The main discussion is devoted to the small clusters of the simplest metal (Li), comparing the agreement and discrepancies between two crude models - the jellium model and the tight-binding one - with the most refined ab initio calculations. 28 refs

  19. Atomic structure calculations for F-like tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunny, Aggarwal

    2014-09-01

    Energy levels, wavefunction compositions and lifetimes have been computed for all levels of 1s22s22p5, 1s22s2p6, 1s22s22p43s, 1s22s22p43p, and 1s22s22p43d configurations in highly charged F-like tungsten ion. The multiconfigurational Dirac—Fock method (MCDF) is adopted to generate the wavefunctions. We have also presented the transition wavelengths, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and line strengths for the electric dipole (E1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transition from the 1s22s22p5 ground configuration. We have performed parallel calculations with the flexible atomic code (FAC) for comparing the atomic data. The reliability of present data is assessed by comparison with other theoretical and experimental data available in the literature. Good agreement is found between our results and those obtained using different approaches confirm the quality of our results. Additionally, we have predicted some new atomic data for F-like W that were not available so far and may be important for plasma diagnostic analysis in fusion plasma.

  20. Evidence for two-dimensional ising structure in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGregor, M.H.

    1976-01-01

    Although the unpaired nucleons in an atomic nucleus exhibit pronounced shell-model-like behavior, the situation with respect to the paired-off ''core region'' nucleons is considerably more obscure. Several recent ''multi-alpha knockout'' and ''quasi-fission'' experiments indicate that nucleon clustering is prevalent throughout the core region of the nucleus; this same conclusion is suggested by nuclear-binding-energy systematics, by the evidence for a ''neutron halo'' in heavy nuclei and by the magnetic-moment systematics of low-mass odd-A nuclei. A number of arguments suggests, in turn, that this nucleon clustering is not spherical or spheroidal in shape, as has generally been assumed, but instead is in the form of two-dimensional Ising-like layers, with the layers arrayed perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the nucleus. The effects of this two-dimensional layering are observed most clearly in low-energy-induced fission, where nuclei with an even (odd) number of Ising layers fission symmetrically (asymmetrically). This picture of the nucleus gives an immediate quantitative explanation for the observed asymmetry in the fission of uranium, and also for the transition from symmetric to asymmetric and back to symmetric fission as the atomic number of the fissioning nuclues increase from A = 197 up to A = 258. These results suggest that, in the shell model formulation of the atomic nucleus, the basis states for the paired-off nucleon core region should be modified so as to contain laminar nucleon cluster correlations

  1. Structural Health Monitoring Based on Combined Structural Global and Local Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilin Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a parameter estimation method for Structural Health Monitoring based on the combined measured structural global frequencies and structural local frequencies. First, the global test is experimented to obtain the low order modes which can reflect the global information of the structure. Secondly, the mass is added on the member of structure to increase the local dynamic characteristic and to make the member have local primary frequency, which belongs to structural local frequency and is sensitive to local parameters. Then the parameters of the structure can be optimized accurately using the combined structural global frequencies and structural local frequencies. The effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method are verified by the experiment of a space truss.

  2. Construction of the energy matrix for complex atoms. Part VIII: Hyperfine structure HPC calculations for terbium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elantkowska, Magdalena; Ruczkowski, Jarosław; Sikorski, Andrzej; Dembczyński, Jerzy

    2017-11-01

    A parametric analysis of the hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even parity configurations of atomic terbium (Tb I) is presented in this work. We introduce the complete set of 4fN-core states in our high-performance computing (HPC) calculations. For calculations of the huge hyperfine structure matrix, requiring approximately 5000 hours when run on a single CPU, we propose the methods utilizing a personal computer cluster or, alternatively a cluster of Microsoft Azure virtual machines (VM). These methods give a factor 12 performance boost, enabling the calculations to complete in an acceptable time.

  3. On the way to unveiling the atomic structure of superheavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laatiaoui, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy of the transfermium elements (atomic number Z > 100) is nowadays one of the most fascinating and simultaneously challenging tasks in atomic physics. On the one hand, key atomic and even nuclear ground-state properties may be obtained by studying the spectral lines of these heaviest elements. On the other hand, these elements have to be produced “online” by heavy-ion induced fusion-evaporation reactions yielding rates on the order of a few atoms per second at most, which renders their optical spectroscopy extremely difficult. Only recently, a first foray of laser spectroscopy into this heaviest element region was reported. Several atomic transitions in the element nobelium (Z = 102) were observed and characterized, using an ultra-sensitive and highly efficient resonance ionization technique. The findings confirm the predictions and additionally provide a benchmark for theoretical modelling. The work represents an important stepping stone towards experimental studies of the atomic structure of superheavy elements.

  4. Chromatin Structure in Bands and Interbands of Polytene Chromosomes Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Avogadro, A.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van der Werf, Kees; Otto, Cornelis; Kraan, Yvonne M.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster, observed from squash preparations, and chromosomes from Chironomus thummi thummi, investigated under physiological conditions, are imaged using an Atomic Force Microscope. Various chromatin fiber structures can be observed with high detail in fixed

  5. Automated Localization of Multiple Pelvic Bone Structures on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Sinan; Lai-Yuen, Susana; Bao, Paul; Weitzenfeld, Alfredo; Hart, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated localization method for multiple pelvic bone structures on magnetic resonance images (MRI). Pelvic bone structures are at present identified manually on MRI to locate reference points for measurement and evaluation of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Given that this is a time-consuming and subjective procedure, there is a need to localize pelvic bone structures automatically. However, bone structures are not easily differentiable from soft tissue on MRI as their pixel intensities tend to be very similar. In this paper, we present a model that combines support vector machines and nonlinear regression capturing global and local information to automatically identify the bounding boxes of bone structures on MRI. The model identifies the location of the pelvic bone structures by establishing the association between their relative locations and using local information such as texture features. Results show that the proposed method is able to locate the bone structures of interest accurately (dice similarity index >0.75) in 87-91% of the images. This research aims to enable accurate, consistent, and fully automated localization of bone structures on MRI to facilitate and improve the diagnosis of health conditions such as female POP.

  6. Atomic structure and electronic properties of the SixSb100-x phase-change memory material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Ashok K.; Modak, Paritosh; Svane, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of SixSb100-x (x∼16) materials are investigated using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Crystalline-liquid-amorphous phase transitions are examined and remarkable changes in the local structure around the Si atoms are found. The average Si...... coordination number 6 (3 long + 3 short Si-Sb bonds) of the crystalline phase changes to 4 (3 long Si-Sb + 1 short Si-Si bonds) by preserving three Si-Sb bonds in both the liquid and the amorphous phases. In the amorphous phase ∼90% of the Si atoms are fourfold coordinated compared to 40% in the liquid....... The electronic density of states is metal-like in both the crystalline and the liquid phases, but it exhibits a pseudogap at the Fermi level in the amorphous phase, reflecting the strong abundance of fourfold coordinated Si in the amorphous phase....

  7. Size effects and strain localization in atomic-scale cleavage modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsner, B A M; Müller, S

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the adhesion and decohesion of Cu(1 0 0) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. An upper stress to surface decohesion is obtained via the universal binding energy relation (UBER), but the model is limited to rigid separation of bulk-terminated surfaces. When structural relaxations are included, an unphysical size effect arises if decohesion is considered to occur as soon as the strain energy equals the energy of the newly formed surfaces. We employ the nudged elastic band (NEB) method to show that this size effect is opposed by a size-dependency of the energy barriers involved in the transition. Further, we find that the transition occurs via a localization of bond strain in the vicinity of the cleavage plane, which resembles the strain localization at the tip of a sharp crack that is predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics. (paper)

  8. Unexpected Symmetry in the Nodal Structure of the He Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressanini, Dario; Reynolds, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    The nodes of even simple wave functions are largely unexplored. Motivated by their importance to quantum simulations of fermionic systems, we have found unexpected symmetries in the nodes of several atoms and molecules. Here, we report on helium. We find that in both ground and excited states the nodes have simple forms. In particular, they have higher symmetry than the wave functions they come from. It is of great interest to understand the source of these new symmetries. For the quantum simulations that motivated the study, these symmetries may help circumvent the fermion sign problem

  9. Atomic-scale nanowires: physical and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, D R

    2004-01-01

    The technology to build and study nanowires with sizes ranging from individual atoms to tens of nanometres has been developing rapidly over the last few years. We survey the motivation behind these developments, and summarize the basics behind quantized conduction. Several of the different experimental techniques and materials systems used in the creation of nanowires are examined, and the range of theoretical methods developed both for examining open systems (especially their conduction properties) and for modelling large systems are considered. We present various noteworthy example results from the field, before concluding with a look at future directions. (topical review)

  10. Localization and force analysis at the single virus particle level using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Horng, Jim-Tong; Chang, Jeng-Shian; Hsieh, Chung-Fan; Tseng, You-Chen; Lin, Shiming

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Localization of single virus particle. ► Force measurements. ► Force mapping. -- Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a vital instrument in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we developed a method that enables AFM to simultaneously measure specific unbinding force and map the viral glycoprotein at the single virus particle level. The average diameter of virus particles from AFM images and the specificity between the viral surface antigen and antibody probe were integrated to design a three-stage method that sets the measuring area to a single virus particle before obtaining the force measurements, where the influenza virus was used as the object of measurements. Based on the purposed method and performed analysis, several findings can be derived from the results. The mean unbinding force of a single virus particle can be quantified, and no significant difference exists in this value among virus particles. Furthermore, the repeatability of the proposed method is demonstrated. The force mapping images reveal that the distributions of surface viral antigens recognized by antibody probe were dispersed on the whole surface of individual virus particles under the proposed method and experimental criteria; meanwhile, the binding probabilities are similar among particles. This approach can be easily applied to most AFM systems without specific components or configurations. These results help understand the force-based analysis at the single virus particle level, and therefore, can reinforce the capability of AFM to investigate a specific type of viral surface protein and its distributions.

  11. Computer Simulation of Atoms Nuclei Structure Using Information Coefficients of Proportionality

    OpenAIRE

    Labushev, Mikhail M.

    2012-01-01

    The latest research of the proportionality of atomic weights of chemical elements made it possible to obtain 3 x 3 matrices for the calculation of information coefficients of proportionality Ip that can be used for 3D modeling of the structure of atom nucleus. The results of computer simulation show high potential of nucleus structure research for the characterization of their chemical and physical properties.

  12. Robust procedure for creating and characterizing the atomic structure of scanning tunneling microscope tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Tewari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Scanning tunneling microscopes (STM are used extensively for studying and manipulating matter at the atomic scale. In spite of the critical role of the STM tip, procedures for controlling the atomic-scale shape of STM tips have not been rigorously justified. Here, we present a method for preparing tips in situ while ensuring the crystalline structure and a reproducibly prepared tip structure up to the second atomic layer. We demonstrate a controlled evolution of such tips starting from undefined tip shapes.

  13. The Hartree product and the description of local and global quantities in atomic systems: A study within Kohn-Sham theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garza, Jorge; Nichols, Jeffrey A.; Dixon, David A.

    2000-01-01

    The Hartree product is analyzed in the context of Kohn-Sham theory. The differential equations that emerge from this theory are solved with the optimized effective potential using the Krieger, Li, and Iafrate approximation, in order to get a local potential as required by the ordinary Kohn-Sham procedure. Because the diagonal terms of the exact exchange energy are included in Hartree theory, it is self-interaction free and the exchange potential has the proper asymptotic behavior. We have examined the impact of this correct asymptotic behavior on local and global properties using this simple model to approximate the exchange energy. Local quantities, such as the exchange potential and the average local electrostatic potential are used to examine whether the shell structure in an atom is revealed by this theory. Global quantities, such as the highest occupied orbital energy (related to the ionization potential) and the exchange energy are also calculated. These quantities are contrasted with those obtained from calculations with the local density approximation, the generalized gradient approximation, and the self-interaction correction approach proposed by Perdew and Zunger. We conclude that the main characteristics in an atomic system are preserved with the Hartree theory. In particular, the behavior of the exchange potential obtained in this theory is similar to those obtained within other Kohn-Sham approximations. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  14. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Nanoscale Structural Ordering in a Complex Metal Oxide Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2012-08-28

    The determination of the atomic structure of a functional material is crucial to understanding its "structure-to-property" relationship (e.g., the active sites in a catalyst), which is however challenging if the structure possesses complex inhomogeneities. Here, we report an atomic structure study of an important MoVTeO complex metal oxide catalyst that is potentially useful for the industrially relevant propane-based BP/SOHIO process. We combined aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with synchrotron powder X-ray crystallography to explore the structure at both nanoscopic and macroscopic scales. At the nanoscopic scale, this material exhibits structural and compositional order within nanosized "domains", while the domains show disordered distribution at the macroscopic scale. We proposed that the intradomain compositional ordering and the interdomain electric dipolar interaction synergistically induce the displacement of Te atoms in the Mo-V-O channels, which determines the geometry of the multifunctional metal oxo-active sites.

  15. Effects of Al addition on atomic structure of Cu-Zr metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Zhang, Huajian; Liu, Xiongjun; Dong, Yuecheng; Yu, Chunyan; Lu, Zhaoping

    2018-02-01

    The atomic structures of Cu52Zr48 and Cu45Zr48Al7 metallic glasses (MGs) have been studied by molecular dynamic simulations. The results reveal that the molar volume of the Cu45Zr48Al7 MG is smaller than that of the Cu52Zr48 MG, although the size of the Al atom is larger than that of the Cu atom, implying an enhanced atomic packing density achieved by introducing Al into the ternary MG. Bond shortening in unlike atomic pairs Zr-Al and Cu-Al is observed in the Cu45Zr48Al7 MG, which is attributed to strong interactions between Al and (Zr, Cu) atoms. Meanwhile, the atomic packing efficiency is enhanced by the minor addition of Al. Compared with the Cu52Zr48 binary MG, the potential energy of the ternary MG decreases and the glass transition temperature increases. Structural analyses indicate that more Cu- and Al-centered full icosahedral clusters emerge in the Cu45Zr48Al7 MG as some Cu atoms are substituted by Al. Furthermore, the addition of Al leads to more icosahedral medium-range orders in the ternary MG. The increase of full icosahedral clusters and the enhancement of the packing density are responsible for the improved glass-forming ability of Cu45Zr48Al7.

  16. Atomic structure of self-organizing iridium induced nanowires on Ge(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabanov, N.S., E-mail: n.kabanov@utwente.nl [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 (Russian Federation); Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Heimbuch, R.; Zandvliet, H.J.W. [Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Saletsky, A.M.; Klavsyuk, A.L. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Ir/Ge(001) structure has been studied with DFT calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy. • Ir/Ge(001) nanowires are composed of Ge atoms and Ir atoms are located in subsurface positions. • The regions in the vicinity of the nanowires are very dynamic, even at temperatures as low as 77 K. - Abstract: The atomic structure of self-organizing iridium (Ir) induced nanowires on Ge(001) is studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The Ir induced nanowires are aligned in a direction perpendicular to the Ge(001) substrate dimer rows, have a width of two atoms and are completely kink-less. Density functional theory calculations show that the Ir atoms prefer to dive into the Ge(001) substrate and push up the neighboring Ge substrate atoms. The nanowires are composed of Ge atoms and not Ir atoms as previously assumed. The regions in the vicinity of the nanowires are very dynamic, even at temperatures as low as 77 K. Time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy measurements reveal that this dynamics is caused by buckled Ge substrate dimers that flip back and forth between their two buckled configurations.

  17. Geometric stability and electronic structure of infinite and finite phosphorus atomic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Jingsi; Zhou Linwei; Ji Wei

    2017-01-01

    One-dimensional mono- or few-atomic chains were successfully fabricated in a variety of two-dimensional materials, like graphene, BN, and transition metal dichalcogenides, which exhibit striking transport and mechanical properties. However, atomic chains of black phosphorus (BP), an emerging electronic and optoelectronic material, is yet to be investigated. Here, we comprehensively considered the geometry stability of six categories of infinite BP atomic chains, transitions among them, and their electronic structures. These categories include mono- and dual-atomic linear, armchair, and zigzag chains. Each zigzag chain was found to be the most stable in each category with the same chain width. The mono-atomic zigzag chain was predicted as a Dirac semi-metal. In addition, we proposed prototype structures of suspended and supported finite atomic chains. It was found that the zigzag chain is, again, the most stable form and could be transferred from mono-atomic armchair chains. An orientation dependence was revealed for supported armchair chains that they prefer an angle of roughly 35 ° –37 ° perpendicular to the BP edge, corresponding to the [110] direction of the substrate BP sheet. These results may promote successive research on mono- or few-atomic chains of BP and other two-dimensional materials for unveiling their unexplored physical properties. (special topic)

  18. Atomic-level structures and physical properties of magnetic CoSiB metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Guangcun; Liang Zhang, Ji; Li, Jiong; Zhang, Shuo; Jiang, Zheng; Huang, Yuying; Shek, Chan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Two CoSiB metallic glasses of low Co contents, which consist of different clusters, have recently been developed by addition of solute atoms. In this work, the atomic structure and the magnetic properties of the two CoBSi metallic glasses were elucidated by state-of-the-art extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) combining with ab initio molecular-dynamics (AIMD) computational techniques. Besides, the origin of these magnetic behaviors was discussed in view of the EXAFS results and atomic structures of the metallic glasses. - Graphical abstract: The atomic structure and the origins of the magnetic properties of two ternary CoBSi metallic glasses were elucidated by state-of-the-art extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) combining with ab initio molecular-dynamics (AIMD) techniques. - Highlights: • The atomic structure and the origins of the magnetic properties of two ternary CoBSi metallic glasses were revealed. • The atomic structures were elucidated by state-of-the-art extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) combining with ab initio molecular-dynamics (AIMD) techniques. • The experimental spectra were in good agreement with the predictions of ab initio full multiple scattering theory using the FEFF8.4 code. • The origin of these magnetic behaviors was discussed in view of the EXAFS results and atomic structures of the metallic glasses. • These two metallic glasses consist of different clusters, and hence different magnetic properties, which are dominated by short-range orders (SROs)

  19. Structured mirror array for two-dimensional collimation of a chromium beam in atom lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wan-Jing; Ma Yan; Li Tong-Bao; Zhang Ping-Ping; Deng Xiao; Chen Sheng; Xiao Sheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Direct-write atom lithography, one of the potential nanofabrication techniques, is restricted by some difficulties in producing optical masks for the deposition of complex structures. In order to make further progress, a structured mirror array is developed to transversely collimate the chromium atomic beam in two dimensions. The best collimation is obtained when the laser red detunes by natural line-width of transition 7 S 3 → 7 P 0 4 of the chromium atom. The collimation ratio is 0.45 vertically (in x axis), and it is 0.55 horizontally (in y axis). The theoretical model is also simulated, and success of our structured mirror array is achieved. (atomic and molecular physics)

  20. Atomic structure of pre-Guinier-Preston and Guinier-Preston-Bagaryatsky zones in Al-alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staab, Torsten E M; Klobes, Benedikt; Kohlbach, Iris; Korff, Bjoern; Haaks, Matz; Maier, Karl; Dudzik, Esther

    2011-01-01

    We present results on the structure of nano-sized particles (Guinier-Preston (GP) and Guinier-Preston-Bagaryatsky (GPB) zones) in Aluminum alloys. Precipitates of alloying elements like Cu, Mg, or Si hinder the motion of dislocations and, thus, are responsible for the strength of AlCuMg- and AlMgSi-alloys - used e.g. as AA2024 (old aircrafts) and AA6013 for the fuselage of the new Airbus A380, respectively. We will discuss the role of quenched-in vacancies for diffusive motion at room temperature (RT) enabling the growth of the precipitates. Using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) - both lifetime and Doppler broadening - gives information on the local atomic environment in the vicinity of vacancies. On the other hand X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is capable of characterizing the local atomic environment around selected elements (Cu, Mg). We will interpret the measured data by comparing them to numerical calculations of PAS and XAFS spectra. However, reliable numerical calculations of spectroscopic quantities are only possible provided that relaxed atomic positions are used as an input. We calculate those employing the ab-initio code SIESTA. Thus, considering decomposition of Al-alloys, we obtain extremely valuable information on the earliest stages, forming immediately after solution heat treatment and quenching, i.e. during the first few minutes of storage at RT.

  1. Atomic structure of pre-Guinier-Preston and Guinier-Preston-Bagaryatsky zones in Al-alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staab, Torsten E M; Klobes, Benedikt; Kohlbach, Iris; Korff, Bjoern; Haaks, Matz; Maier, Karl [HISKP, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Dudzik, Esther, E-mail: torsten.staab@isc.fraunhofer.de [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin/Bessy, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-01-10

    We present results on the structure of nano-sized particles (Guinier-Preston (GP) and Guinier-Preston-Bagaryatsky (GPB) zones) in Aluminum alloys. Precipitates of alloying elements like Cu, Mg, or Si hinder the motion of dislocations and, thus, are responsible for the strength of AlCuMg- and AlMgSi-alloys - used e.g. as AA2024 (old aircrafts) and AA6013 for the fuselage of the new Airbus A380, respectively. We will discuss the role of quenched-in vacancies for diffusive motion at room temperature (RT) enabling the growth of the precipitates. Using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) - both lifetime and Doppler broadening - gives information on the local atomic environment in the vicinity of vacancies. On the other hand X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is capable of characterizing the local atomic environment around selected elements (Cu, Mg). We will interpret the measured data by comparing them to numerical calculations of PAS and XAFS spectra. However, reliable numerical calculations of spectroscopic quantities are only possible provided that relaxed atomic positions are used as an input. We calculate those employing the ab-initio code SIESTA. Thus, considering decomposition of Al-alloys, we obtain extremely valuable information on the earliest stages, forming immediately after solution heat treatment and quenching, i.e. during the first few minutes of storage at RT.

  2. Local structure analysis of materials for increased energy efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medling, Scott

    adjacent to a S vacancy. In Chapter 5, I present a study into thermoelectric clathrates to determine how differences in size of one of the cage atoms affects the local structure and, therefore, the thermoelectric properties. I then discuss the effect of additional cage disorder on the scattering of phonons and the scattering of electrons, and thus the thermoelectric figure of merit. In Chapter 6, I present an XMCD study of La1 --xSrxCoO 3, finding results that are consistent with Sr-induced formation of ferromagnetic clusters within the non-magnetic, insulating matrix. We also show that not only are the O states spin-polarized, but a significant fraction of holes from Sr-doping go onto the O sites. Further, experimental results are compared to density functional calculations and discussed.

  3. The role and structure of the Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is responsible for the control and supervision of the application and use of nuclear materials and the operation of nuclear facilities to ensure that the health and safety of people are protected and that the nuclear materials and equipment are used only in accordance with the government non-proliferation policy. Requirements for control and supervision are made into regulations subject to approval by the Governor in Council. They are applied through a comprehensive licensing system. The interpretation and implementation of the regulations are contained in a series of regulatory documents published from time to time by the Board. The functional organization of staff that assist the Board for the administration, the assessment and issuance of licenses, compliance and inspection, as well as for the management of the regulatory research program is described. (author) [fr

  4. Electron paramagnetic resonance parameters and local structure for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HUA-MING ZHANG. 1. , GUANG-DUO LU. 1 ... the above ZFSs, the local structure information for the impurity Gd. 3+ is obtained, i.e., .... parameters, extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements and crystal-field spectrum ...

  5. Fabrication of amorphous silicon nanoribbons by atomic force microscope tip-induced local oxidation for thin film device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, L; Rogel, R; Demami, F

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of induced local oxidation of amorphous silicon by atomic force microscopy. The resulting local oxide is used as a mask for the elaboration of a thin film silicon resistor. A thin amorphous silicon layer deposited on a glass substrate is locally oxidized following narrow continuous lines. The corresponding oxide line is then used as a mask during plasma etching of the amorphous layer leading to the formation of a nanoribbon. Such an amorphous silicon nanoribbon is used for the fabrication of the resistor

  6. Structure of local interactions in complex financial dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X F; Chen, T T; Zheng, B

    2014-06-17

    With the network methods and random matrix theory, we investigate the interaction structure of communities in financial markets. In particular, based on the random matrix decomposition, we clarify that the local interactions between the business sectors (subsectors) are mainly contained in the sector mode. In the sector mode, the average correlation inside the sectors is positive, while that between the sectors is negative. Further, we explore the time evolution of the interaction structure of the business sectors, and observe that the local interaction structure changes dramatically during a financial bubble or crisis.

  7. Electronic and atomic structures of KFe2Se2 grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Wei; Liu, Da-Yong; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Twist grain boundary has lower grain-boundary energy. •Twist grain-boundary has similar electronic structure to that in crystal. •Charge and magnetic-moment fluctuations are large within tilt grain boundary. •Bi-collinear AFM is most stable even with existence of grain boundary. •Insulating Fe-vacancy phase is stable with existence of twist grain boundary. -- Abstract: The electronic and atomic structures of the twist and tilt grain boundaries (GB) of the iron-based superconductor KFe 2 Se 2 are studied based on the simulations of the first principles density functional theory. Our results have clarified that the Σ5[0 0 1] twist grain boundary of KFe 2 Se 2 with layered structure has the lower grain-boundary energy. The local structure and the main features of the basic electronic structure within the [0 0 1] twist grain-boundary region have small differences compared with those in KFe 2 Se 2 crystal. The large fluctuations of the charges and magnetic moments are found in the [0 0 1] tilt grain-boundary regions, especially the former are more prominent. The bi-collinear anti-ferromagnetic order is the most stable magnetic order even with grain boundaries in the bulk. The √(5)a×√(5)a superstructure of Fe-vacancies in K 2 Fe 4 Se 5 phase is intrinsically related to the coincident-site lattice of Σ5[0 0 1] twist grain boundary

  8. An online substructure identification method for local structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Jilin; Ou, Jinping; Jankowski, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a substructure isolation method, which uses time series of measured local response for online monitoring of substructures. The proposed monitoring process consists of two key steps: construction of the isolated substructure, and its identification. The isolated substructure is an independent virtual structure, which is numerically isolated from the global structure by placing virtual supports on the interface. First, the isolated substructure is constructed by a specific linear combination of time series of its measured local responses. Then, the isolated substructure is identified using its local natural frequencies extracted from the combined responses. The substructure is assumed to be linear; the outside part of the global structure can have any characteristics. The method has no requirements on the initial state of the structure, and so the process can be carried out repetitively for online monitoring. Online isolation and monitoring is illustrated in a numerical example with a frame model, and then verified in a cantilever beam experiment. (paper)

  9. Watching Silica's Dance: Imaging the Structure and Dynamics of the Atomic (Re-) Arrangements in 2D Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David

    2014-03-01

    Even though glasses are almost ubiquitous--in our windows, on our iPhones, even on our faces--they are also mysterious. Because glasses are notoriously difficult to study, basic questions like: ``How are the atoms arranged? Where and how do glasses break?'' are still under contention. We use aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image the atoms in a new two-dimensional phase of silica glass - freestanding it becomes the world's thinnest pane of glass at only 3-atoms thick, and take a unique look into these questions. Using atom-by-atom imaging and spectroscopy, we are able to reconstruct the full structure and bonding of this 2D glass and identify it as a bi-tetrahedral layer of SiO2. Our images also strikingly resemble Zachariasen's original cartoon models of glasses, drawn in 1932. As such, our work realizes an 80-year-old vision for easily understandable glassy systems and introduces promising methods to test theoretical predictions against experimental data. We image atoms in the disordered solid and track their motions in response to local strain. We directly obtain ring statistics and pair distribution functions that span short-, medium-, and long-range order, and test these against long-standing theoretical predictions of glass structure and dynamics. We use the electron beam to excite atomic rearrangements, producing surprisingly rich and beautiful videos of how a glass bends and breaks, as well as the exchange of atoms at a solid/liquid interface. Detailed analyses of these videos reveal a complex dance of elastic and plastic deformations, phase transitions, and their interplay. These examples illustrate the wide-ranging and fundamental materials physics that can now be studied at atomic-resolution via transmission electron microscopy of two-dimensional glasses. Work in collaboration with: S. Kurasch, U. Kaiser, R. Hovden, Q. Mao, J. Kotakoski, J. S. Alden, A. Shekhawat, A. A. Alemi, J. P. Sethna, P. L. McEuen, A.V. Krasheninnikov

  10. Atomic adsorption on pristine graphene along the Periodic Table of Elements - From PBE to non-local functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašti, Igor A.; Jovanović, Aleksandar; Dobrota, Ana S.; Mentus, Slavko V.; Johansson, Börje; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2018-04-01

    The understanding of atomic adsorption on graphene is of high importance for many advanced technologies. Here we present a complete database of the atomic adsorption energies for the elements of the Periodic Table up to the atomic number 86 (excluding lanthanides) on pristine graphene. The energies have been calculated using the projector augmented wave (PAW) method with PBE, long-range dispersion interaction corrected PBE (PBE+D2, PBE+D3) as well as non-local vdW-DF2 approach. The inclusion of dispersion interactions leads to an exothermic adsorption for all the investigated elements. Dispersion interactions are found to be of particular importance for the adsorption of low atomic weight earth alkaline metals, coinage and s-metals (11th and 12th groups), high atomic weight p-elements and noble gases. We discuss the observed adsorption trends along the groups and rows of the Periodic Table as well some computational aspects of modelling atomic adsorption on graphene.

  11. Atomic structure of large angle grain boundaries determined by quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Sass, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to determine the atomic structure of the Σ = 5 and 13 [001] twist boundaries in Au with a resolution of 0.09 Angstrom or better. The reciprocal lattices of these boundaries were mapped out using synchrotron radiation. The atomic structures were obtained by testing model structures against the intensity observations with a chi square analysis. The boundary structure were modeled using polyhedra, including octahedra, special configurations of tetrahedra and Archimedian anti-prisms, interwoven together by the boundary symmetry. The results of this work point to the possibility of obtaining general rules for grain boundary structure based on X-ray diffraction observations that give the atomic positions with high resolution

  12. Atomic structure of Fe thin-films on Cu(0 0 1) studied with stereoscopic photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Azusa N.; Fujikado, M.; Uchida, T.; Okamoto, S.; Fukumoto, K.; Guo, F.Z.; Matsui, F.; Nakatani, K.; Matsushita, T.; Hattori, K.; Daimon, H.

    2004-01-01

    The complex magnetic properties of Fe films epitaxially grown on Cu(0 0 1) have been discussed in relation to their atomic structure. We have studied the Fe films on Cu(0 0 1) by a new direct method for three-dimensional (3D) atomic structure analysis, so-called 'stereoscopic photography'. The forward-focusing peaks in the photoelectron angular distribution pattern excited by the circularly polarized light rotate around the light axis in either clockwise or counterclockwise direction depending on the light helicity. By using a display-type spherical mirror analyzer for this phenomenon, we can obtain stereoscopic photographs of atomic structure. The photographs revealed that the iron structure changes from bcc to fcc and almost bcc structure with increasing iron film thickness

  13. Local mobility in lipid domains of supported bilayers characterized by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, Daniel J.; Buranda, T. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Burns, Alan Richard

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is used to examine mobility of labeled probes at specific sites in supported bilayers consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid domains in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Those sites are mapped beforehand with simultaneous atomic force microscopy and submicron confocal fluorescence imaging, allowing characterization of probe partitioning between gel DPPC and disordered liquid DOPC domains with corresponding topography of domain structure. We thus examine the relative partitioning and mobility in gel and disordered liquid phases for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled GM1 ganglioside probes and for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled phospholipid probes. For the GM1 probes, large differences in mobility between fluid and gel domains are observed; whereas unexpected mobility is observed in submicron gel domains for the phospholipid probes. We attribute the latter to domain heterogeneities that could be induced by the probe. Furthermore, fits to the FCS data for the phospholipid probes in the DOPC fluid phase require two components (fast and slow). Although proximity to the glass substrate may be a factor, local distortion of the probe by the fluorophore could also be important. Overall, we observe nonideal aspects of phospholipid probe mobility and partitioning that may not be restricted to supported bilayers.

  14. Global/local methods for probabilistic structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millwater, H. R.; Wu, Y.-T.

    1993-04-01

    A probabilistic global/local method is proposed to reduce the computational requirements of probabilistic structural analysis. A coarser global model is used for most of the computations with a local more refined model used only at key probabilistic conditions. The global model is used to establish the cumulative distribution function (cdf) and the Most Probable Point (MPP). The local model then uses the predicted MPP to adjust the cdf value. The global/local method is used within the advanced mean value probabilistic algorithm. The local model can be more refined with respect to the g1obal model in terms of finer mesh, smaller time step, tighter tolerances, etc. and can be used with linear or nonlinear models. The basis for this approach is described in terms of the correlation between the global and local models which can be estimated from the global and local MPPs. A numerical example is presented using the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis program with the finite element method used for the structural modeling. The results clearly indicate a significant computer savings with minimal loss in accuracy.

  15. Experimental benchmark of non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma atomic physics codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagels-Silvert, V.

    2004-09-01

    The main purpose of this thesis is to get experimental data for the testing and validation of atomic physics codes dealing with non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas. The first part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of xenon and krypton plasmas that have been produced by a nanosecond laser pulse interacting with a gas jet. A Thomson scattering diagnostic has allowed us to measure independently plasma parameters such as electron temperature, electron density and the average ionisation state. We have obtained time integrated spectra in the range between 5 and 10 angstroms. We have identified about one hundred xenon rays between 8.6 and 9.6 angstroms via the use of the Relac code. We have discovered unknown rays for the krypton between 5.2 and 7.5 angstroms. In a second experiment we have extended the wavelength range to the X UV domain. The Averroes/Transpec code has been tested in the ranges from 9 to 15 angstroms and from 10 to 130 angstroms, the first range has been well reproduced while the second range requires a more complex data analysis. The second part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of aluminium, selenium and samarium plasmas in femtosecond operating rate. We have designed an interferometry diagnostic in the frequency domain that has allowed us to measure the expanding speed of the target's backside. Via the use of an adequate isothermal model this parameter has led us to know the plasma electron temperature. Spectra and emission times of various rays from the aluminium and selenium plasmas have been computed satisfactorily with the Averroes/Transpec code coupled with Film and Multif hydrodynamical codes. (A.C.)

  16. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceano, G; Yousafzai, M S; Ma, W; Ndoye, F; Venturelli, L; Hussain, I; Bonin, S; Niemela, J; Scoles, G; Cojoc, D; Ferrari, E

    2016-02-12

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young's modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines' elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM.

  17. Localization and force analysis at the single virus particle level using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chih-Hao [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Horng, Jim-Tong [Department of Biochemistry, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chang, Jeng-Shian [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Chung-Fan [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Tseng, You-Chen [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shiming, E-mail: til@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Center for Optoelectronic Biomedicine, College of Medicine, Nation Taiwan University, 1-1 Jen-Ai Road, Taipei 10051, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Localization of single virus particle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force mapping. -- Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a vital instrument in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we developed a method that enables AFM to simultaneously measure specific unbinding force and map the viral glycoprotein at the single virus particle level. The average diameter of virus particles from AFM images and the specificity between the viral surface antigen and antibody probe were integrated to design a three-stage method that sets the measuring area to a single virus particle before obtaining the force measurements, where the influenza virus was used as the object of measurements. Based on the purposed method and performed analysis, several findings can be derived from the results. The mean unbinding force of a single virus particle can be quantified, and no significant difference exists in this value among virus particles. Furthermore, the repeatability of the proposed method is demonstrated. The force mapping images reveal that the distributions of surface viral antigens recognized by antibody probe were dispersed on the whole surface of individual virus particles under the proposed method and experimental criteria; meanwhile, the binding probabilities are similar among particles. This approach can be easily applied to most AFM systems without specific components or configurations. These results help understand the force-based analysis at the single virus particle level, and therefore, can reinforce the capability of AFM to investigate a specific type of viral surface protein and its distributions.

  18. Local thermal energy as a structural indicator in glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberg, Jacques; Lerner, Edan; Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2017-07-01

    Identifying heterogeneous structures in glasses—such as localized soft spots—and understanding structure-dynamics relations in these systems remain major scientific challenges. Here, we derive an exact expression for the local thermal energy of interacting particles (the mean local potential energy change caused by thermal fluctuations) in glassy systems by a systematic low-temperature expansion. We show that the local thermal energy can attain anomalously large values, inversely related to the degree of softness of localized structures in a glass, determined by a coupling between internal stresses—an intrinsic signature of glassy frustration—anharmonicity and low-frequency vibrational modes. These anomalously large values follow a fat-tailed distribution, with a universal exponent related to the recently observed universal ω4ω4 density of states of quasilocalized low-frequency vibrational modes. When the spatial thermal energy field—a “softness field”—is considered, this power law tail manifests itself by highly localized spots, which are significantly softer than their surroundings. These soft spots are shown to be susceptible to plastic rearrangements under external driving forces, having predictive powers that surpass those of the normal modes-based approach. These results offer a general, system/model-independent, physical/observable-based approach to identify structural properties of quiescent glasses and relate them to glassy dynamics.

  19. Groundwater Arsenic Adsorption on Granular TiO2: Integrating Atomic Structure, Filtration, and Health Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shan; Shi, Qiantao; Jing, Chuanyong

    2015-08-18

    A pressing challenge in arsenic (As) adsorptive filtration is to decipher how the As atomic surface structure obtained in the laboratory can be used to accurately predict the field filtration cycle. The motivation of this study was therefore to integrate molecular level As adsorption mechanisms and capacities to predict effluent As from granular TiO2 columns in the field as well as its health impacts. Approximately 2,955 bed volumes of groundwater with an average of 542 μg/L As were filtered before the effluent As concentration exceeded 10 μg/L, corresponding to an adsorption capacity of 1.53 mg As/g TiO2. After regeneration, the TiO2 column could treat 2,563 bed volumes of groundwater, resulting in an As load of 1.36 mg/g TiO2. Column filtration and EXAFS results showed that among coexisting ions present in groundwater, only Ca(2+), Si(OH)4, and HCO3(-) would interfere with As adsorption. The compound effects of coexisting ions and molecular level structural information were incorporated in the PHREEQC program to satisfactorily predict the As breakthrough curves. The total urinary As concentration from four volunteers of local residences, ranging from 972 to 2,080 μg/L before groundwater treatment, decreased to the range 31.7-73.3 μg/L at the end of the experimental cycle (15-33 days).

  20. Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms and measurement of the fine structure constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clade, P.

    2005-10-01

    From a measurement of the recoil velocity of an atom absorbing a photon, it is possible to deduce a determination of the ratio h/m between the Planck constant and the mass of the atoms and then to deduce a value of the fine structure constant alpha. To do this measurement, we use the technique of Bloch oscillations, which allows us to transfer a large number of recoils to atoms. A velocity sensor, based on velocity selective Raman transition, enables us to measure the momentum transferred to the atoms. A measurement with a statistical uncertainty of 4.4 10 -9 , in conjunction with a careful study of systematic effects (5 10 -9 ), has led us to a determination of alpha with an uncertainty of 6.7 10 -9 : α -1 (Rb) = 137.03599878 (91). This uncertainty is similar to the uncertainty of the best determinations of alpha based on atom interferometry. (author)

  1. Pre-service physics teachers' ideas on size, visibility and structure of the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenlue, Pervin

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the atom gives the opportunity to both understand and conceptually unify the various domains of science, such as physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy and geology. Among these disciplines, physics teachers are expected to be particularly well educated in this topic. It is important that pre-service physics teachers know what sort of theories regarding the atom they will bring into their own classrooms. Six tasks were developed, comprising size, visibility and structure of the atom. These tasks carried out by pre-service physics teachers were examined by content analysis and six categories were determined. These are size, visibility, subatomic particles, atom models, electron orbit and electron features. Pre-service physics teachers' ideas about the atom were clarified under these categories.

  2. Precision in single atom localization via Raman-driven coherence: Role of detuning and phase shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmatullah,; Qamar, Sajid, E-mail: sajid_qamar@comsats.edu.pk

    2013-10-01

    Role of detuning and phase shift associated with the standing-wave driving fields is revisited for precision position measurement of single atom during its motion through two standing-wave fields. A four-level atomic system in diamond configuration is considered where the intermediate levels are coupled to upper and lower level via standing-wave driving fields and atomic decay channels, respectively. The former is responsible for the generation of quantum mechanical coherence via two-photon Raman transition while the latter leads to spontaneous emission of a photon. Due to standing-wave driving fields the atom–field interaction becomes position-dependent and measurement of the frequency of spontaneously emitted photon gives the position information of the atom. The unique position of the atom with much higher spatial resolution, i.e., of the order of λ/100 is observed using detuning and phase shift associated with the standing-wave driving fields.

  3. Atomic Structure Control of Silica Thin Films on Pt(111)

    KAUST Repository

    Crampton, Andrew S; Ridge, Claron J.; Rö tzer, Marian David; Zwaschka, Gregor; Braun, Thomas; D'Elia, Valerio; Basset, Jean-Marie; Schweinberger, Florian Frank; Gü nther, Sebastian; Heiz, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide thin films grown on metal single crystals are commonly used to model heterogeneous catalyst supports. The structure and properties of thin silicon dioxide films grown on metal single crystals have only recently been thoroughly

  4. Accuracy of the Hartree-Fock and local density approximations for electron densities: a study for light atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almbladh, C.-O.; Ekenberg, U.; Pedroza, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    The authors compare the electron densities and Hartree potentials in the local density and the Hartree-Fock approximations to the corresponding quantities obtained from more accurate correlated wavefunctions. The comparison is made for a number of two-electron atoms, Li, and for Be. The Hartree-Fock approximation is more accurate than the local density approximation within the 1s shell and for the spin polarization in Li, while the local density approximation is slightly better than the Hartree-Fock approximation for charge densities in the 2s shell. The inaccuracy of the Hartree-Fock and local density approximations to the Hartree potential is substantially smaller than the inaccuracy of the local density approximation to the ground-state exchange-correlation potential. (Auth.)

  5. Sampling Realistic Protein Conformations Using Local Structural Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamelryck, Thomas Wim; Kent, John T.; Krogh, A.

    2006-01-01

    The prediction of protein structure from sequence remains a major unsolved problem in biology. The most successful protein structure prediction methods make use of a divide-and-conquer strategy to attack the problem: a conformational sampling method generates plausible candidate structures, which...... are subsequently accepted or rejected using an energy function. Conceptually, this often corresponds to separating local structural bias from the long-range interactions that stabilize the compact, native state. However, sampling protein conformations that are compatible with the local structural bias encoded...... in a given protein sequence is a long-standing open problem, especially in continuous space. We describe an elegant and mathematically rigorous method to do this, and show that it readily generates native-like protein conformations simply by enforcing compactness. Our results have far-reaching implications...

  6. Probing Field Distributions on Waveguide Structures with an Atomic Force/Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgonjen, E.G.; Borgonjen, E.G.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    A 'stand-alone' Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope combined with an Atomic force Microscope, using a micro-fabricated silicon-nitride probe, is applied to the imaging of field distribution in integrated optical ridge waveguides. The electric field on the waveguide is locally probed by coupling to

  7. Structural analysis of γ radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations observed by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Shuang; Chen Ying; Ge Shili; Liu Xiulin; Zhou Pingkun; Zhang Sa; Zhang Detian

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To find a new method for the measurement of radiation-induced damage, the structures of normal chromosomes and 60 Co γ-ray-induced chromosomal aberration were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Methods: Normal and irradiated chromosomes of human peripheral blood lymphocytes were prepared, then three-dimensional structure and height of chromosomes were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Results: Three-dimensional structures of normal chromosomes and dicentric aberration in irradiated chromosomes were observed clearly. The data of chromosome height were helpful to recognizing the dicentric aberrations. Conclusion: Atomic force microscopy providing three-dimension image and linear measurement is a new and valuable tool for structural analysis of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations

  8. Synthesis and atomic structure determination of Al8V5 gamma-brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Uichiro

    2006-01-01

    Many structurally complex compounds like quasicrystals and their approximants are known to be stabilized at a particular electron per atom ratio e/a, regardless of constituent elements involved. This has been often referred to as the Hume-Rothery electron concentration rule. We consider the understanding of the Hume-Rothery stabilization mechanism to be best deepened by performing both ab initio LMTO-ASA and FLAPW band calculations for the complex compound whose atomic structure is experimentally determined. Admittedly, however, a computing time increases rapidly beyond practical level with increasing the number of atoms in a unit cell. Among various candidates, we chose a series of gamma-brasses containing 52 atoms in a unit cell by taking a full advantage of the facts that it exists in as many as 24 binary alloy systems and that its unit cell is just in size to be handled even in more time-consuming FLAPW method. We have so far studied the stability mechanism of Cu 5 Zn 8 and Cu 9 Al 4 , both being regarded as its prototype, and TM 2 Zn 11 gamma-brasses containing late transition elements TM=Fe, Co, Ni and Pd. In the present work, we chose the gamma-brass consisting of early transition metal element V and trivalent element Al. An almost single phase Al 8 V 5 gamma-brass was ultimately synthesized by overcoming metallurgical difficulties encountered. Its atomic structure was determined by using the Brandon model as a starting structure in the Rietveld structure analysis for powdered diffraction spectra taken at the beam line BL02B2 of 8 GeV synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8, Japan. The atomic structure suitable for band calculations was then proposed by eliminating quenched-in chemical disorder, i.e., partial mixing of Al and V atoms at given sites with minimum sacrifice. (author)

  9. Coordination-resolved local bond contraction and electron binding-energy entrapment of Si atomic clusters and solid skins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Maolin; Huang, Yongli; Zhang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan, E-mail: ywang8@hnust.edu.cn, E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Zhang, Xi [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ywang8@hnust.edu.cn, E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China)

    2014-04-14

    Consistency between x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and density-function theory calculations confirms our bond order-length-strength notation-incorporated tight-binding theory predictions on the quantum entrapment of Si solid skin and atomic clusters. It has been revealed that bond-order deficiency shortens and strengthens the Si-Si bond, which results in the local densification and quantum entrapment of the core and valence electrons. Unifying Si clusters and Si(001) and (111) skins, this mechanism has led to quantification of the 2p binding energy of 96.089 eV for an isolated Si atom, and their bulk shifts of 2.461 eV. Findings evidence the significance of atomic undercoordination that is of great importance to device performance.

  10. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  11. Ab initio calculations and modelling of atomic cluster structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2004-01-01

    The optimized structure and electronic properties of small sodium and magnesium clusters have been investigated using it ab initio theoretical methods based on density-functional theory and post-Hartree-Fock many-body perturbation theory accounting for all electrons in the system. A new theoretical...

  12. Pushing the frontiers of atomic models for protein tertiary structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as an NP complete or NP hard problem.4,5 This notwith- standing, the dire need for tertiary structures of proteins in drug discovery and other areas6–8 has propelled the development of a multitude of computational recipes. In this article, we focus on ab initio/de novo strategies,. Bhageerath in particular, for protein tertiary ...

  13. Local and average structures of 0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 - 0.3PbZrO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, P.S.R.; Shinde, A.B.; Narasimhan, S.L.; Tiwari, V.S.; Singh, G.

    2005-01-01

    The local and average structure of 0.7Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 - 0.3PbZrO 3 (PMN-PZ) was studied by neutron diffraction. The Rietveld refinement was carried out to determine the average, long-range crystallographic structure, while the pair density function (PDF) analysis was used in studying the local atomic structure. The local atomic structure determined by the PDF analysis, was found to be significantly different from the average crystallographic structure determined by the Rietveld analysis. These results show that the conflict between the local structural preference and the average structure is not limited to relax or ferroelectric oxides, but may be widely prevalent in mixed-ion ferroelectrics. (author)

  14. Chemical Structure and Properties: A Modified Atoms-First, One-Semester Introductory Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.; Jakubowski, Henry V.; McKenna, Anna G.; McIntee, Edward J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Fazal, M. A.; Peterson, Alicia A.

    2015-01-01

    A one-semester, introductory chemistry course is described that develops a primarily qualitative understanding of structure-property relationships. Starting from an atoms-first approach, the course examines the properties and three-dimensional structure of metallic and ionic solids before expanding into a thorough investigation of molecules. In…

  15. Cation-Poor Complex Metallic Alloys in Ba(Eu)-Au-Al(Ga) Systems: Identifying the Keys that Control Structural Arrangements and Atom Distributions at the Atomic Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Steinberg, Simon; Mudryk, Yaroslav; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Miller, Gordon J; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2015-11-02

    Four complex intermetallic compounds BaAu(6±x)Ga(6±y) (x = 1, y = 0.9) (I), BaAu(6±x)Al(6±y) (x = 0.9, y = 0.6) (II), EuAu6.2Ga5.8 (III), and EuAu6.1Al5.9 (IV) have been synthesized, and their structures and homogeneity ranges have been determined by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. Whereas I and II originate from the NaZn13-type structure (cF104-112, Fm3̅c), III (tP52, P4/nbm) is derived from the tetragonal Ce2Ni17Si9-type, and IV (oP104, Pbcm) crystallizes in a new orthorhombic structure type. Both I and II feature formally anionic networks with completely mixed site occupation by Au and triel (Tr = Al, Ga) atoms, while a successive decrease of local symmetry from the parental structures of I and II to III and, ultimately, to IV correlates with increasing separation of Au and Tr on individual crystallographic sites. Density functional theory-based calculations were employed to determine the crystallographic site preferences of Au and the respective triel element to elucidate reasons for the atom distribution ("coloring scheme"). Chemical bonding analyses for two different "EuAu6Tr6" models reveal maximization of the number of heteroatomic Au-Tr bonds as the driving force for atom organization. The Fermi levels fall in broad pseudogaps for both models allowing some electronic flexibility. Spin-polarized band structure calculations on the "EuAu6Tr6" models hint to singlet ground states for europium and long-range magnetic coupling for both EuAu6.2Ga5.8 (III) and EuAu6.1Al5.9 (IV). This is substantiated by experimental evidence because both compounds show nearly identical magnetic behavior with ferromagnetic transitions at TC = 6 K and net magnetic moments of 7.35 μB/f.u. at 2 K. The effective moments of 8.3 μB/f.u., determined from Curie-Weiss fits, point to divalent oxidation states for europium in both III and IV.

  16. Short- and medium-range order of atomic structure and electronic properties of arsenic salinide and sulphide amorphous films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarsembinov, Sh.Sh.; Prikhodko, O.Yu.; Ryaguzov, A.P.; Maksimova, S.Ya.; Ushanov, V.Zh.

    2004-01-01

    molecule As 4 Se 4 (As 4 S 4 ) or some new structural unit. Structural investigations show that TE and RF films have significant differences in their local structure. The conductivity, activation energy of conductivity, optical gap, shift of the Fermi level with respect to midgap and carrier drift mobility were determined from investigations of electrical and optical properties as well as from investigations of electrons and holes transient photocurrents in TE and RF As 2 Se 3 and As 2 S 3 films. It is established that electrons parameters of TE and RF films have differences, and the drift mobility of electrons differs the most significantly. It is well known that in TE As 2 Se 3 and As 2 S 3 films only holes are mobile carrier. On the contrary, in RF films of those compounds the drift mobility of electrons and holes are practically the same, and these coincide with hole drift mobility in TE films equal measurement conditions. Note that the main features differences of TE and RF films electronic parameters, as well as those parameters of atomic structures, are the same for films of investigated compounds As 2 Se 3 and As 2 S 3 . The analysis of obtained results point to a difference in the spectra of localized and extended electronic states in TE and RF films, i.e. in their electronic structure, and mainly in the spectra of localized states, which control electron transport. Consequently, the amorphous films of As 2 Se 3 and As 2 S 3 compounds prepared by thermal evaporation in a vacuum and by RF ion-plasma sputtering have differences both in local atomic structure and in electronic structure. It is observed the relationship between electronic structure and local atomic structure of As 2 Se 3 and As 2 S 3 films

  17. Student perception and conceptual development as represented by student mental models of atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jung

    The nature of matter based upon atomic theory is a principal concept in science; hence, how to teach and how to learn about atoms is an important subject for science education. To this end, this study explored student perceptions of atomic structure and how students learn about this concept by analyzing student mental models of atomic structure. Changes in student mental models serve as a valuable resource for comprehending student conceptual development. Data was collected from students who were taking the introductory chemistry course. Responses to course examinations, pre- and post-questionnaires, and pre- and post-interviews were used to analyze student mental models of atomic structure. First, this study reveals that conceptual development can be achieved, either by elevating mental models toward higher levels of understanding or by developing a single mental model. This study reinforces the importance of higher-order thinking skills to enable students to relate concepts in order to construct a target model of atomic structure. Second, Bohr's orbital structure seems to have had a strong influence on student perceptions of atomic structure. With regard to this finding, this study suggests that it is instructionally important to teach the concept of "orbitals" related to "quantum theory." Third, there were relatively few students who had developed understanding at the level of the target model, which required student understanding of the basic ideas of quantum theory. This study suggests that the understanding of atomic structure based on the idea of quantum theory is both important and difficult. Fourth, this study included different student assessments comprised of course examinations, questionnaires, and interviews. Each assessment can be used to gather information to map out student mental models. Fifth, in the comparison of the pre- and post-interview responses, this study showed that high achieving students moved toward more improved models or to advanced

  18. Local structure in LaMnO3 and CaMnO3 perovskites: A quantitative structural refinement of Mn K-edge XANES data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monesi, C.; Meneghini, C.; Bardelli, F.; Benfatto, M.; Mobilio, S.; Manju, U.; Sarma, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    Hole-doped perovskites such as La 1-x Ca x MnO 3 present special magnetic and magnetotransport properties, and it is commonly accepted that the local atomic structure around Mn ions plays a crucial role in determining these peculiar features. Therefore experimental techniques directly probing the local atomic structure, like x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), have been widely exploited to deeply understand the physics of these compounds. Quantitative XAS analysis usually concerns the extended region [extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS)] of the absorption spectra. The near-edge region [x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES)] of XAS spectra can provide detailed complementary information on the electronic structure and local atomic topology around the absorber. However, the complexity of the XANES analysis usually prevents a quantitative understanding of the data. This work exploits the recently developed MXAN code to achieve a quantitative structural refinement of the Mn K-edge XANES of LaMnO 3 and CaMnO 3 compounds; they are the end compounds of the doped manganite series La x Ca 1-x MnO 3 . The results derived from the EXAFS and XANES analyses are in good agreement, demonstrating that a quantitative picture of the local structure can be obtained from XANES in these crystalline compounds. Moreover, the quantitative XANES analysis provides topological information not directly achievable from EXAFS data analysis. This work demonstrates that combining the analysis of extended and near-edge regions of Mn K-edge XAS spectra could provide a complete and accurate description of Mn local atomic environment in these compounds

  19. Local structure studies of Fe{sub 2}TeO{sub 6} using x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Harishchandra, E-mail: singh85harish@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India); Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India); Yadav, A. K. [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai – 400 094 (India)

    2016-05-23

    In the present study, we have performed EXAFS measurements on powder samples of Fe{sub 2}TeO{sub 6} (FTO) to probe the local structure surrounding at the Fe site. The structural parameters (atomic coordination and lattice parameters) of FTO used for simulation of theoretical EXAFS spectra of the samples have been obtained from Rietveld refined structure on synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (SXRD) data. Quite similar and satisfactory structural parameters have been obtained from both the study, indicating goodness of synchrotron structural analysis over EXAFS analysis. SXRD and EXAFS results shows absence of any secondary phase proves current synthesis superior over reported techniques.

  20. Mossbauer analysis of the atomic and magnetic structure of alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Ovchinnikov, VV

    2007-01-01

    The monograph indicates the key problems that have to be solved for the further development of the Mössbauer methods for analysis of the nuclear and magnetic structure of alloys, and offer solution variants for some of these problems based on the generalised results of a wide range of theoretical and experimental investigations,including original work by the author of the book and his colleagues. Contents 1. Description of the nature of the Mössbauer effect 2. Interpretation of the ossbauer spectra of alloys 3.Electrical and magnetics hyperfine interactions of resonant nuclei in metals and

  1. Local structural environments of Ge doped in eutectic Sb-Te film before and after crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang Yeol; Cheong, Byung-ki; Choi, Yong Gyu

    2018-06-01

    Electrical phase change device using the Ge-doped eutectic Sb-Te (e.g., Ge1Sb8Te2) film is known to exhibit improved energy efficiency thanks to lowered threshold voltage as well as decreased power consumption for the reset operation, as compared with Ge2Sb2Te5 film. Ge K-edge EXAFS analysis is employed in this study in an effort to elucidate such merits of Ge1Sb8Te2 film in connection with its local atomic arrangements. It is then verified that a Ge atom is four-fold coordinated in its nearest-neighboring shell both in the as-deposited and in the annealed films. It needs to be highlighted that approximately two Sb atoms constitute the Ge tetrahedral units in its amorphous state; however, after being crystallized, heteropolar Ge-Sb bonds hardly exist in this Ge1Sb8Te2 film. It has been known that crystallization temperature and activation energy for crystallization of this Ge1Sb8Te2 composition are greater than those of Ge2Sb2Te5 composition. In addition, these two phase change materials exhibit distinctly different crystallization mechanisms, i.e., nucleation-dominant for Ge2Sb2Te5 film but growth-dominant for Ge1Sb8Te2 film. These discrepancies in the crystallization-related properties are delineated in terms of the local structural changes verified from the present EXAFS analysis.

  2. Taking advantage of local structure descriptors to analyze interresidue contacts in protein structures and protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Juliette; Regad, Leslie; Etchebest, Catherine; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2008-11-15

    Interresidue protein contacts in proteins structures and at protein-protein interface are classically described by the amino acid types of interacting residues and the local structural context of the contact, if any, is described using secondary structures. In this study, we present an alternate analysis of interresidue contact using local structures defined by the structural alphabet introduced by Camproux et al. This structural alphabet allows to describe a 3D structure as a sequence of prototype fragments called structural letters, of 27 different types. Each residue can then be assigned to a particular local structure, even in loop regions. The analysis of interresidue contacts within protein structures defined using Voronoï tessellations reveals that pairwise contact specificity is greater in terms of structural letters than amino acids. Using a simple heuristic based on specificity score comparison, we find that 74% of the long-range contacts within protein structures are better described using structural letters than amino acid types. The investigation is extended to a set of protein-protein complexes, showing that the similar global rules apply as for intraprotein contacts, with 64% of the interprotein contacts best described by local structures. We then present an evaluation of pairing functions integrating structural letters to decoy scoring and show that some complexes could benefit from the use of structural letter-based pairing functions.

  3. Atomic structure-colour relationship in natural diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, I S; Bangert, U

    2010-01-01

    Colour is a physical attribute that can be very difficult to characterise in diamond and consequently it receives regular attention from scientists working in the gem industry. In this work we compare natural brown (the most common colour) and colourless type IIa diamonds containing only trace quantities (< 1 at. ppm) of nitrogen. Numerous attempts have been made to trace the origin of brown tints in natural diamond, with the most likely culprits, i.e. dislocations and nitrogen impurities, ruled out through the application of various analytical techniques. Consequently more emphasis has recently been placed on the study of smaller defects in the diamond structure and their influence on colour. The focus of this research work is the analysis of vacancy defects having a size of the order of 1nm using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (AC-STEM). The small electron probe size and depth of focus afforded by this technique allows such defect structures together with their position to be resolved far more readily than with conventional HR-TEM. Small-scale contrast variations are apparent in the lattice images of brown and not of colourless diamonds. These features have been compared to simulated phase contrast images of vacancy clusters in diamond. In addition, both experimental and simulated defocus series indicate that such features are not restricted to the surface of the specimen.

  4. Structure-aware Local Sparse Coding for Visual Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Yuankai

    2018-01-24

    Sparse coding has been applied to visual tracking and related vision problems with demonstrated success in recent years. Existing tracking methods based on local sparse coding sample patches from a target candidate and sparsely encode these using a dictionary consisting of patches sampled from target template images. The discriminative strength of existing methods based on local sparse coding is limited as spatial structure constraints among the template patches are not exploited. To address this problem, we propose a structure-aware local sparse coding algorithm which encodes a target candidate using templates with both global and local sparsity constraints. For robust tracking, we show local regions of a candidate region should be encoded only with the corresponding local regions of the target templates that are the most similar from the global view. Thus, a more precise and discriminative sparse representation is obtained to account for appearance changes. To alleviate the issues with tracking drifts, we design an effective template update scheme. Extensive experiments on challenging image sequences demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm against numerous stateof- the-art methods.

  5. Structural and electrical evolution of He ion irradiated hydrocarbon films observed by conductive atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Hongyu; Yang, Deming; Sun, Li; Yang, Qi; Niu, Jinhai; Bi, Zhenhua; Liu, Dongping

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-like hydrocarbon films are irradiated with 100 keV He ion at the fluences of 1.0 × 10 15 –1.0 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 or at the irradiation temperature ranging from 25 to 600 °C. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) has been used to evaluate the nanoscale electron conducting properties of these irradiated hydrocarbon films. Nanoscale and conducting defects have been formed in the hydrocarbon films irradiated at a relatively high ion fluence (1.0 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 ) or an elevated sample temperature. Analysis indicates that He ion irradiation results in the evolution of polymer-like hydrocarbon into a dense structure containing a large fraction of sp 2 carbon clusters. The sp 2 carbon clusters formed in irradiated hydrocarbon films can contribute to the formation of filament-like conducting channels with a relatively high local field-enhancing factor. Measurements indicate that the growth of nanoscale defects due to He ion irradiation can result in the surface swelling of irradiated hydrocarbon films at a relatively high ion fluences or elevated temperature

  6. ARECIBO MULTI-EPOCH H I ABSORPTION MEASUREMENTS AGAINST PULSARS: TINY-SCALE ATOMIC STRUCTURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanimirovic, S.; Weisberg, J. M.; Pei, Z.; Tuttle, K.; Green, J. T.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from multi-epoch neutral hydrogen (H I) absorption observations of six bright pulsars with the Arecibo telescope. Moving through the interstellar medium (ISM) with transverse velocities of 10-150 AU yr -1 , these pulsars have swept across 1-200 AU over the course of our experiment, allowing us to probe the existence and properties of the tiny-scale atomic structure (TSAS) in the cold neutral medium (CNM). While most of the observed pulsars show no significant change in their H I absorption spectra, we have identified at least two clear TSAS-induced opacity variations in the direction of B1929+10. These observations require strong spatial inhomogeneities in either the TSAS clouds' physical properties themselves or else in the clouds' galactic distribution. While TSAS is occasionally detected on spatial scales down to 10 AU, it is too rare to be characterized by a spectrum of turbulent CNM fluctuations on scales of 10 1 -10 3 AU, as previously suggested by some work. In the direction of B1929+10, an apparent correlation between TSAS and interstellar clouds inside the warm Local Bubble (LB) indicates that TSAS may be tracing the fragmentation of the LB wall via hydrodynamic instabilities. While similar fragmentation events occur frequently throughout the ISM, the warm medium surrounding these cold cloudlets induces a natural selection effect wherein small TSAS clouds evaporate quickly and are rare, while large clouds survive longer and become a general property of the ISM.

  7. Structural and electrical evolution of He ion irradiated hydrocarbon films observed by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongyu [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Yang, Deming [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Sun, Li [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian 116023 (China); Yang, Qi; Niu, Jinhai; Bi, Zhenhua [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Liu, Dongping, E-mail: dongping.liu@dlnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Fujian Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Electronic Science, Aeronautics, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Polymer-like hydrocarbon films are irradiated with 100 keV He ion at the fluences of 1.0 × 10{sup 15}–1.0 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} or at the irradiation temperature ranging from 25 to 600 °C. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) has been used to evaluate the nanoscale electron conducting properties of these irradiated hydrocarbon films. Nanoscale and conducting defects have been formed in the hydrocarbon films irradiated at a relatively high ion fluence (1.0 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}) or an elevated sample temperature. Analysis indicates that He ion irradiation results in the evolution of polymer-like hydrocarbon into a dense structure containing a large fraction of sp{sup 2} carbon clusters. The sp{sup 2} carbon clusters formed in irradiated hydrocarbon films can contribute to the formation of filament-like conducting channels with a relatively high local field-enhancing factor. Measurements indicate that the growth of nanoscale defects due to He ion irradiation can result in the surface swelling of irradiated hydrocarbon films at a relatively high ion fluences or elevated temperature.

  8. Atomic structures and covalent-to-metallic transition of lead clusters Pbn (n=2-22)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baolin; Zhao Jijun; Chen Xiaoshuang; Shi Daning; Wang Guanghou

    2005-01-01

    The lowest-energy structures and electronic properties of the lead clusters are studied by density-functional-theory calculations with Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr gradient correction. The lowest-energy structures of Pb n (n=2-22) clusters are determined from a number of structural isomers, which are generated from empirical genetic algorithm simulations. The competition between atom-centered compact structures and layered stacking structures leads to the alternative appearance of the two types of structures as global minimum. The size evolution of geometric and electronic properties from covalent bonding towards bulk metallic behavior in Pb clusters is discussed

  9. Genetic structure among the local chicken ecotypes of Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the genetic structure of local chicken ecotypes of Tanzania using 20 polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers. A standard PCR was followed by manual genotyping (6% native polyacrylamide gel visualized by silver staining). Phylogenetic analysis of 13 individuals from each of the nine ...

  10. Topology Optimization of Continuum Structures with Local Stress Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duysinx, Pierre; Bendsøe, Martin P

    1998-01-01

    We introduce an extension of current technologies for topology optimization of continuum structures which allows for treating local stress criteria. We first consider relevant stress criteria for porous composite materials, initially by studying the stress states of the so-called rank 2 layered m...

  11. The development of high-resolution spectroscopic methods and their use in atomic structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, O.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis discusses work performed during the last nine years in the field of atomic spectroscopy. Several high-resolution techniques, ranging from quantum beats, level crossings, rf-laser double resonances to nonlinear field atom interactions, have been employed. In particular, these methods have been adopted and developed to deal with fast accelerated atomic or ionic beams, allowing studies of problems in atomic-structure theory. Fine- and hyperfine-structure determinations in the He I and Li I isoelectronic sequences, in 51 V I, and in 235 U I, II have permitted a detailed comparison with ab initio calculations, demonstrating the change in problems when going towards heavier elements or higher ionization stage. The last part of the thesis is concerned with the fundamental question of obtaining very high optical resolution in the interaction between a fast accelerated atom or ion beam and a laser field, this problem being the core in the continuing development of atomic spectroscopy necessary to challenge the more precise and sophisticated theories advanced. (Auth.)

  12. Atomic structures and mechanical properties of single-crystal GaN nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, B.; Lu, A.J.; Pan, B.C.; Yu, Q.X.

    2005-01-01

    An approach is proposed to theoretically construct a realistic single-crystal GaN nanotube at atomic scale. The generated atomic structures of the single-crystal GaN nanotubes match the structural aspects from experiment very well. Our energetic calculations show that a single-crystal GaN nanotube with [100]-oriented lateral facets is more stable than that with [110]-oriented lateral facets, when they have around the same wall thickness. For a specified orientation of the lateral facets on the single-crystal GaN nanotubes, the energetic stabilities of the tubes obey a P rule, in which P is the ratio of the number of four-coordinated atoms to the number of three-coordinated atoms. Furthermore, the Young's modulus of the considered GaN nanotubes decrease with increasing the ratio of the number of bulk atoms to the number of surface atoms in each type of tube. Our calculations and analysis demonstrate that the surface effect of a single-crystal nanotube enhances its Young's modulus significantly

  13. Atomic and electronic structures of lattice mismatched Cu{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuzhi [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mail Stop 66, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavaipatti, Balasubramaniam; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kim, Sung-Joo; Pan, Xiaoqing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ager, Joel W.; Wang, Lin-Wang, E-mail: lwwang@lbl.gov [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mail Stop 66, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Joint Center of Artificial Photosynthesis, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-26

    Heterojunction interfaces between metal oxides are often highly lattice mismatched. The atomic and electronic structures of such interfaces, however, are not well understood. We have synthesized Cu{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} heterojunction thin films with 13% lattice mismatch and studied the interface via experimental methods and large-scale density function theory calculations of supercells containing ∼1300 atoms. We find that an interface of epitaxial quality is formed via a coincidence site lattice of 8 Cu{sub 2}O unit cells matching 9 TiO{sub 2} unit cells. Calculations reveal the existence of a dislocation core of the O sublattices at the interface and a random arrangement of one layer of interfacial Cu atoms. The interfacial electronic structure is found to be mostly determined by the interfacial Cu distribution, rather than by the O dislocation core. The conduction band minimum and valence band maximum states are spatially separated, and there is no strongly localized state near the core.

  14. Interaction and dynamics of add-atoms with 2-dimensional structures

    CERN Multimedia

    The interaction and dynamics of add-atoms with graphene, graphene-derivate structures and, later, MoSi$_2$, two-dimensional – single and few – atomic layers will be studied with the Perturbed Angular Correlation – PAC – technique. Graphene is also envisaged as new platform for growing semiconductor nanostructure devices, such as quantum dots and as a particularly powerful catalyst. Understanding nucleation of nanostructures and clusters on graphene and related phases in wet conditions as they are used in chemical methods in research and industry require complementary studies. These systems will therefore be studied systematically using radioactive probe atoms attaching via a transfer media (e.g., water in catalysis process) or being deposited with soft-landing techniques under vacuum and UHV conditions, as put in place at the ASPIC setup at ISOLDE. The hyperfine fields obtained under different environments are expected to reveal basic information on the rich atomic and physical mechanisms associated w...

  15. Local fit evaluation of structural equation models using graphical criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoemmes, Felix; Rosseel, Yves; Textor, Johannes

    2018-03-01

    Evaluation of model fit is critically important for every structural equation model (SEM), and sophisticated methods have been developed for this task. Among them are the χ² goodness-of-fit test, decomposition of the χ², derived measures like the popular root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) or comparative fit index (CFI), or inspection of residuals or modification indices. Many of these methods provide a global approach to model fit evaluation: A single index is computed that quantifies the fit of the entire SEM to the data. In contrast, graphical criteria like d-separation or trek-separation allow derivation of implications that can be used for local fit evaluation, an approach that is hardly ever applied. We provide an overview of local fit evaluation from the viewpoint of SEM practitioners. In the presence of model misfit, local fit evaluation can potentially help in pinpointing where the problem with the model lies. For models that do fit the data, local tests can identify the parts of the model that are corroborated by the data. Local tests can also be conducted before a model is fitted at all, and they can be used even for models that are globally underidentified. We discuss appropriate statistical local tests, and provide applied examples. We also present novel software in R that automates this type of local fit evaluation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Probing the atomic structure of metallic nanoclusters with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouteden, Koen; Lauwaet, Koen; Janssens, Ewald; Barcaro, Giovanni; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Lievens, Peter

    2014-02-21

    Preformed Co clusters with an average diameter of 2.5 nm are produced in the gas phase and are deposited under controlled ultra-high vacuum conditions onto a thin insulating NaCl film on Au(111). Relying on a combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we demonstrate visualization of the three-dimensional atomic structure of the Co clusters by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) using a Cl functionalized STM tip that can be obtained on the NaCl surface. More generally, use of a functionalized STM tip may allow for systematic atomic structure determination with STM of nanoparticles that are deposited on metal surfaces.

  17. Dye-sensitized solar cells: Atomic scale investigation of interface structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Wei; Zhang Fan; Meng Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) research is reviewed, focusing on atomic-scale investigations of the interface electronic structures and dynamical processes, including the structure of dye adsorption onto TiO 2 , ultrafast electron injection, hot-electron injection, multiple-exciton generation, and electron—hole recombination. Advanced experimental techniques and theoretical approaches are briefly summarized, and then progressive achievements in photovoltaic device optimization based on insights from atomic scale investigations are introduced. Finally, some challenges and opportunities for further improvement of dye solar cells are presented. (invited review — international conference on nanoscience and technology, china 2013)

  18. Structure of ordered polyelectrolyte films from atomic-force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, V.V.; Tolstikhina, A.L.; Stepina, N.D.; Kayushina, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The possible application of atomic-force microscopy and X-ray reflectometry methods to structural studies of polyelectrolyte films obtained due to alternating adsorption of oppositely charged polyanion [sodium polysterenesulfonate (PSS)] and polycation [poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAA)] layers on solid substrates has been considered. The atomic-force microscopy study has revealed the characteristic features of the surface topography of samples consisting of different numbers of polyelectrolyte layers deposited from solutions characterized by different ionic strength values. It is shown that the shape of the reflectivity curves obtained from thin polyelectrolyte films depends on their surface structure

  19. Formation, atomic structure, and electronic properties of GaSb quantum dots in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timm, R.

    2007-12-14

    In this work, cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are used for the first time to study the shape, size, strain, chemical composition, and electronic properties of capped GaSb/GaAs QDs at the atomic scale. By evaluating such structural results on a variety of nanostructures built using different epitaxy methods and growth conditions, details on the underlying QD formation processes can be revealed. A cross-over from flat quantum wells (QWs) to optically active QDs can be observed in samples grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with increasing amount of GaSb, including self-assembled Sb accumulations within a still two-dimensional layer and tiny three-dimensional GaSb islands probably acting as precursor structures. The QWs consist of significantly intermixed material with stoichiometries of maximally 50% GaSb, additionally exhibiting small gaps filled with GaAs. A higher GaSb content up to nearly pure material is found in the QDs, being characterized by small sizes of up to 8 nm baselength and about 2 nm height. In spite of the intermixing, all nanostructures have rather abrupt interfaces, and no significant Sb segregation in growth direction is observed. This changes completely when molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used as growth method, in which case individual Sb atoms are found to be distributed over several nm above the nanostructures. Massive group-V atomic exchange processes are causing this strong inter-mixing and Sb segregation during GaAs overgrowth. In combination with the large strain inherent to GaSb/GaAs QDs, this segregation upon overgrowth is assumed to be the reason for a unique structural phenomenon: All MBE-grown QDs, independent of the amount of deposited GaSb, exhibit a ring structure, consisting of a ring body of high GaSb content and a more or less extended central gap filled with GaAs. These rings have formed in a self-assembled way even when the initial GaSb layer was overgrown considerably fast

  20. Breit–Pauli atomic structure calculations for Fe XI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Sunny; Singh, Jagjit; Mohan, Man

    2013-01-01

    Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities are calculated for the lowest-lying 165 energy levels of Fe XI using configuration-interaction wavefunctions. The calculations include all the major correlation effects. Relativistic effects are included in the Breit–Pauli approximation by adding mass-correction, Darwin, and spin–orbit interaction terms to the non-relativistic Hamiltonian. For comparison with the calculated ab initio energy levels, we have also calculated the energy levels by using the fully relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac–Fock method. The calculated results are in close agreement with the National Institute of Standards and Technology compilation and other available results. New results are predicted for many of the levels belonging to the 3s3p 4 3d and 3s3p 3 3d 2 configurations, which are very important in astrophysics, relevant, for example, to the recent observations by the Hinode spacecraft. We expect that our extensive calculations will be useful to experimentalists in identifying the fine structure levels in their future work

  1. Analysis of local influences in structural details of the bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam RUDZIK

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the problems of local influences in structural details of bridges as the critical locations, whose damages or excessive force may directly affect the safety of users. These analyses are shown on selected examples. Presented is the example of local changes in the forms of proper vibrations in the node of the truss bridge that can be used in expert issues concerning the causes of damages. The second example are the changes in stresses in the stay cable anchorage element including the nonlinear material models. Models of this type can be successfully used by engineers as they allow for analysis of selected structural details without the need for detailed mapping of the entire structure, but only a selected section.

  2. Complementary information on CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot local structure from extended X-ray absorption fine structure and diffraction anomalous fine structure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piskorska-Hommel, E.; Holý, V.; Caha, O.; Wolska, A.; Gust, A.; Kruse, C.; Kröncke, H.; Falta, J.; Hommel, D.

    2012-01-01

    The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS) have been applied to investigate a local structure for the CdSe/ZnSe quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE). The aim was to study the intermixing of Cd and Zn atoms, chemical compositions and strain induced by cap-layer. The EXAFS at the Cd K-edge and DAFS at the Se K-edge proved the intermixing of Cd and Zn atoms. The distances Cd–Se (2.61 Å) found from EXAFS and DAFS analysis for h 1 region is closer to that in bulk CdSe (2.62 Å). The DAFS analysis revealed the differences in the local structure in two investigated regions (i.e. different iso-strain volumes) on the quantum dots. It was found that the investigated areas differ in the Cd concentration. To explain the experimental results the theoretical calculation based on a full valence-force field (VFF) model was performed. The theoretical VFF model fully explains the experimental data.

  3. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: a theoretical analysis for simple liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρDS) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρDS. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  4. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Ken-ichi, E-mail: aman@tohoku-pharm.ac.jp; Takahashi, Ohgi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1 Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8558 (Japan); Suzuki, Kazuhiro [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Fukuma, Takeshi [Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kobe University, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ{sub DS}) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ{sub DS}. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  5. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ DS ) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ DS . The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule

  6. Atomic disorder and amorphization of B2-structure CoZr by ball milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, G.F.; Bakker, H.

    1996-01-01

    For a considerable number of intermetallic compounds it has been found that ball milling introduces atomic (chemical) disorder. Disorder due to milling was demonstrated by x-ray diffraction in AlRu, crystallizing in the B2 structure (ordered b.c.c.) by a decrease of the intensity of superlattice reflections relative to fundamental reflections. The same technique was used to investigate disordering by milling in Ni 3 Al, crystallizing in the L1 2 structure (ordered f.c.c.). In both cases the disorder is anti-site disorder of both components, i.e. both atomic species substitute on the wrong sublattices. Besides x-ray diffraction measurements of magnetic properties turned out to be useful in monitoring structural changes due to milling. The change in the superconducting transition temperature, measured by magnetic a.c. susceptibility, was used to demonstrate atomic disordering by milling in Nb 3 Sn and Nb 3 Au. The type of disorder turned out to be anti-site disorder. Such a type of disorder occurs in the same materials also at high temperatures or after irradiation by neutrons. The disordering was accompanied by an increase of the lattice parameter. An increase in high-field magnetization accompanied by a decrease of the lattice parameter during milling was found in B2 CoGa and B2 CoAl. In principle in the completely ordered state both compounds are non-magnetic, because the CO atoms are shielded from one another by Ga and Al atoms, respectively. However, when a Co atom is transferred to the wrong sublattice, it is surrounded by Co atoms as nearest neighbors and bears a magnetic moment. This explains the strong increase of the magnetization due to milling

  7. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Siewenie, Joan [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Xu, Hongwu [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Zhu, Jinlong [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, USA and National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Page, Katharine, E-mail: pagekl@ornl.gov [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO{sub 2} measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H{sub 2} and natural gas uptake/storage.

  8. Atomic structure and work function of the metal-film systems: lithium-(011) face of tungsten or molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanash, O.V.; Fedorus, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    The atomic structure and phase transitions in lithium films and also the variation of the work function under lithium adsorption on the (011) face of W or Mo are studied by the low electron diffraction and contact potential difference methods in a wide range of submonolayer coverage. In the low coverage range (theta 5/9), identical sets of anisotropic structures are formed on both substrates which are specific for localized adsorption. In the coverage range between 1/4 for W (011) or 1/6 for Mo (011) and 5/9 (for both substrates) the film grows by virtue of two consecutive first order phase transitions. In the remaining theta region the film compression proceeds continuously. A model of mixing of cells of various sizes is used to explain the continuity of the compression process. At low coverage the film atomic structure corresponds to a predominant effect of dipole-dipole interaction betWeen the adatoms, whereas at high coverage it corresponds to an indirect interaction. The temperature stability of the films at different theta is studied. The effect of the film structure on the work function and surface diffusion is discussed

  9. Correlations between atomic structure and giant magnetoresistance ratio in Co2(Fe,Mn)Si spin valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, L; Sizeland, J; Gilks, D; Uddin, G M; Nedelkoski, Z; Hasnip, P J; Lazarov, V K; Yoshida, K; Galindo, P L; Sato, J; Oogane, M; Ando, Y; Hirohata, A

    2014-01-01

    We show that the magnetoresistance of Co 2 Fe x Mn 1−x Si-based spin valves, over 70% at low temperature, is directly related to the structural ordering in the electrodes and at the electrodes/spacer (Co 2 Fe x Mn 1−x Si/Ag) interfaces. Aberration-corrected atomic resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy of device structures reveals that annealing at 350 °C and 500 °C creates partial B2/L2 1 and fully L2 1 ordering of electrodes, respectively. Interface structural studies show that the Ag/Co 2 Fe x Mn 1−x Si interface is more ordered compared to the Co 2 Fe x Mn 1−x Si/Ag interface. The release of interface strain is mediated by misfit dislocations that localize the strain around the dislocation cores, and the effect of this strain is assessed by first principles electronic structure calculations. This study suggests that by improving the atomic ordering and strain at the interfaces, further enhancement of the magnetoresistance of CFMS-based current-perpendicular-to-plane spin valves is possible. (fast track communication)

  10. Collective effects, relaxation and localization of hole levels in atoms, molecules, solids, and adsorbates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendin, G.

    1979-01-01

    Recent progress in descriptions of photoelectron spectra is reviewed with emphasis on cases where the one-electron and quasi-particle approximations break down and the hole level becomes spread over a number of discrete lines or a continuum or both. Unifying aspects and similarities between interaction processes in atoms, molecules and solids are stressed. 38 references

  11. Electronic structure of graphene nanoribbons doped with nitrogen atoms: a theoretical insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A E; Fomine, S

    2015-04-28

    The electronic structure of graphene nanoribbons doped with a graphitic type of nitrogen atoms has been studied using B3LYP, B2PLYP and CAS methods. In all but one case the restricted B3LYP solutions were unstable and the CAS calculations provided evidence for the multiconfigurational nature of the ground state with contributions from two dominant configurations. The relative stability of the doped nanoribbons depends mostly on the mutual position of the dopant atoms and notably less on the position of nitrogen atoms within the nanoribbon. N-graphitic doping affects cationic states much more than anionic ones due the participation of the nitrogen atoms in the stabilization of the positive charge, resulting in a drop in ionization energies (IPs) for N-graphitic doped systems. Nitrogen atoms do not participate in the negative charge stabilization of anionic species and, therefore, the doping does not affect the electron affinities (EAs). The unrestricted B3LYP method is the method of choice for the calculation of IPs and EAs. Restricted B3LYP and B2PLYP produces unreliable results for both IPs and EAs while CAS strongly underestimates the electron affinities. This is also true for the reorganization energies where restricted B3LYP produces qualitatively incorrect results. Doping changes the reorganization energy of the nanoribbons; the hole reorganization energy is generally higher than the corresponding electron reorganization energy due to the participation of nitrogen atoms in the stabilization of the positive charge.

  12. Quantitative characterization of the atomic-scale structure of oxyhydroxides in rusts formed on steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, M.; Suzuki, S.; Kimura, M.; Suzuki, T.; Kihira, H.; Waseda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray structural analysis coupled with anomalous X-ray scattering has been used for characterizing the atomic-scale structure of rust formed on steel surfaces. Samples were prepared from rust layers formed on the surfaces of two commercial steels. X-ray scattered intensity profiles of the two samples showed that the rusts consisted mainly of two types of ferric oxyhydroxide, α-FeOOH and γ-FeOOH. The amounts of these rust components and the realistic atomic arrangements in the components were estimated by fitting both the ordinary and the environmental interference functions with a model structure calculated using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. The two rust components were found to be the network structure formed by FeO 6 octahedral units, the network structure itself deviating from the ideal case. The present results also suggest that the structural analysis method using anomalous X-ray scattering and the reverse Monte Carlo technique is very successful in determining the atomic-scale structure of rusts formed on the steel surfaces

  13. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J.; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F. Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H.; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L.; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms. PMID:27240357

  14. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2...

  15. Atomic structure and phason modes of the Sc–Zn icosahedral quasicrystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunetomo Yamada

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The detailed atomic structure of the binary icosahedral (i ScZn7.33 quasicrystal has been investigated by means of high-resolution synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction and absolute scale measurements of diffuse scattering. The average atomic structure has been solved using the measured Bragg intensity data based on a six-dimensional model that is isostructural to the i-YbCd5.7 one. The structure is described with a quasiperiodic packing of large Tsai-type rhombic triacontahedron clusters and double Friauf polyhedra (DFP, both resulting from a close-packing of a large (Sc and a small (Zn atom. The difference in chemical composition between i-ScZn7.33 and i-YbCd5.7 was found to lie in the icosahedron shell and the DFP where in i-ScZn7.33 chemical disorder occurs on the large atom sites, which induces a significant distortion to the structure units. The intensity in reciprocal space displays a substantial amount of diffuse scattering with anisotropic distribution, located around the strong Bragg peaks, that can be fully interpreted as resulting from phason fluctuations, with a ratio of the phason elastic constants K2/K1 = −0.53, i.e. close to a threefold instability limit. This induces a relatively large perpendicular (or phason Debye–Waller factor, which explains the vanishing of `high-Qperp' reflections.

  16. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Martínez-Santiago

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms. It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms.

  17. Studying the Consistency between and within the Student Mental Models for Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkadis, Nikolaos; Papageorgiou, George; Stamovlasis, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Science education research has revealed a number of student mental models for atomic structure, among which, the one based on Bohr's model seems to be the most dominant. The aim of the current study is to investigate the coherence of these models when students apply them for the explanation of a variety of situations. For this purpose, a set of…

  18. Energy-related atomic and molecular structure and scattering studies: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The general goals of the DOE research concerned the use of molecular beams techniques in the study of atomic and molecular polarizabilities and the study of the interactions between electrons and highly polar molecules. Both of these goals are directly relevant to the general problem of the role played by long-range forces in atomic and molecular physics. Details related to this motivation can be found in the published literature. Here we will describe in general terms the work performed under DOE sponsorship in the atomic beams laboratory at NYU. Our original intent was to exploit techniques developed at NYU, mainly in the study of simple atomic systems, to the more complex atomic and molecular systems that are related to DOE interests. These included the developing understanding of the structure of molecular systems, particularly of alkali halide molecules, and the study of the interactions of electrons with such molecules. The structure experiments would serve as critical experimental benchmarks for computational techniques on molecular properties, including both molecular wave functions and derivative properties of them, such as vibrational and rotational constants, but in particular of molecular electric dipole polarizabilities. We believe that we have at least to some extent fulfilled these goals. 16 refs., 1 fig

  19. Asymptotic Structure in the Classically Forbidden Region of the Hooke's Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuemei

    2013-01-01

    The two-electron Hooke's atom — a quantum mechanical system with two electrons bound in a harmonic potential — is well known for its exact analytical properties at certain oscillator strengths. The Hooke's atoms with more than two electrons offer more scope for valuable practical applications. In this work, we study the asymptotic structure of these Hooke's atoms in the classically forbidden region. The leading-order term of the long-range expression for the KS exchange-correlation potential v xc (r) is shown to be −1/r. The second and third higher order terms are also exactly obtained. Various components of v xc (r) are also studied. It is shown that the leading term of O(1/r) in v xc (r) is due to the pure Pauli correlation, while the leading contribution of the Coulomb correlation is of O(1/r 3 ). Neither of them makes contribution to the term of O(1/r 2 ), which is shown to be solely due to the kinetic correlation effect. Results for the two-electron Hooke's atom were obtained before in the literature. Our results reduce to those of the two-electron Hooke's atom as a special case. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  20. Atomic-scale structure of dislocations revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jesper; Morgenstern, K.; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    The intersection between dislocations and a Ag(111) surface has been studied using an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular dynamics. Whereas the STM provides atomically resolved information about the surface structure and Burgers vectors of the dislocations, the simulati......The intersection between dislocations and a Ag(111) surface has been studied using an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular dynamics. Whereas the STM provides atomically resolved information about the surface structure and Burgers vectors of the dislocations......, the simulations can be used to determine dislocation structure and orientation in the near-surface region. In a similar way, the subsurface structure of other extended defects can be studied. The simulations show dislocations to reorient the partials in the surface region leading to an increased splitting width...