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Sample records for local ablative therapy

  1. Chemothermal Therapy for Localized Heating and Ablation of Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Shan Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemothermal therapy is a new hyperthermia treatment on tumor using heat released from exothermic chemical reaction between the injected reactants and the diseased tissues. With the highly minimally invasive feature and localized heating performance, this method is expected to overcome the ubiquitous shortcomings encountered by many existing hyperthermia approaches in ablating irregular tumor. This review provides a relatively comprehensive review on the latest advancements and state of the art in chemothermal therapy. The basic principles and features of two typical chemothermal ablation strategies (acid-base neutralization-reaction-enabled thermal ablation and alkali-metal-enabled thermal/chemical ablation are illustrated. The prospects and possible challenges facing chemothermal ablation are analyzed. The chemothermal therapy is expected to open many clinical possibilities for precise tumor treatment in a minimally invasive way.

  2. Local ablation therapy with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for hepatocellular carcinoma: a practical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Kyoung Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A successful program for local ablation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC requires extensive imaging support for diagnosis and localization of HCC, imaging guidance for the ablation procedures, and post-treatment monitoring. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS has several advantages over computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI, including real-time imaging capability, sensitive detection of arterial-phase hypervascularity and washout, no renal excretion, no ionizing radiation, repeatability, excellent patient compliance, and relatively low cost. CEUS is useful for image guidance for isoechoic lesions. While contrast-enhanced CT/MRI is the standard method for the diagnosis of HCC and post-ablation monitoring, CEUS is useful when CT/MRI findings are indeterminate or CT/MRI is contraindicated. This article provides a practical review of the role of CEUS in imaging algorithms for pre- and post-ablation therapy for HCC.

  3. Systematic review of innovative ablative therapies for the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, S. J. E.; Vogel, J. A.; van Santvoort, H. C.; van Lienden, K. P.; van Hillegersberg, R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Besselink, M. G. H.; Molenaar, I. Q.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundLocally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is associated with a very poor prognosis. Current palliative (radio)chemotherapy provides only a marginal survival benefit of 2-3 months. Several innovative local ablative therapies have been explored as new treatment options. This systematic

  4. Evolution of nodule stiffness might predict response to local ablative therapy: A series of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Praktiknjo

    Full Text Available Early information on treatment response of HCC to local ablative therapy is crucial. Elastography as a non-invasive method has recently been shown to play a potential role in distinguishing between benign and malignant liver lesions. Elastography of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in early response to local ablative therapy has not been studied to date.We prospectively included a cohort of 14 patients with diagnosis of HCC who were treated with local ablative therapy (transarterial chemoembolization, TACE and/or radiofrequency ablation, RFA. We used 2D shear-wave elastography (RT 2D-SWE to examine stiffness of HCC lesion before and 3, 30 and 90 days after local ablative therapy. Contrast-enhanced imaging after 90 days was performed to evaluate treatment response. Primary endpoint was stiffness of HCC in response to local ablative therapy. Secondary end point was tumor recurrence.Stiffness of HCC nodules and liver showed no significant difference prior to local ablative therapy. As early as three days after treatment, stiffness of responding HCC was significantly higher compared to non-responding. Higher stiffness before treatment was significantly associated with tumor recurrence.Nodule stiffness in general and RT 2D-SWE in particular could provide a useful tool for early prediction of HCC response to local ablative therapy.

  5. Magnetic resonance guided focalized ultrasound thermo-ablation: A promising oncologic local therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iannessi, A.; Doyen, J.; Leysalle, A.; Thyss, A.

    2014-01-01

    Pain management of bone metastases is usually made using systemic and local therapy. Even though radiations are nowadays the gold standard for painful metastases, innovations regarding minimally invasive treatment approaches have been developed because of the existing non-responder patients [1]. Indeed, cementoplasty and thermo-ablations like radiofrequency or cryotherapy have shown to be efficient on pain [2-4]. Among thermo-therapy, magnetic resonance guided focalized ultrasound is now a new non-invasive weapon for bone pain palliation. (authors)

  6. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy as First Local Therapy for Lung Oligometastases From Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Institution Cohort Study

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    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Badellino, Serena [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ceccarelli, Manuela [Cancer Epidemiology and CPO Piemonte, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Guarneri, Alessia [Radiation Oncology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Franco, Pierfrancesco [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Monagheddu, Chiara [Cancer Epidemiology and CPO Piemonte, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Spadi, Rosella [Medical Oncology, Colorectal Cancer Unit, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Racca, Patrizia [Medical Oncology, Colorectal Cancer Unit, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) efficacy and its potential role as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients who received SABR as first local therapy at the time of lung progression were included, from 2004 to 2014. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and safety. Results: A single nodule was treated in 26 patients (65%), 2 nodules in 10 patients (25%), 3 in 3 patients (7.5%), and 4 in 1 patient (2.5%), for a total of 59 lesions. The median delivered biological effective dose was 96 Gy, in 1 to 8 daily fractions. Median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-72 months). Overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were, respectively, 84%, 73%, and 39%, with 14 patients (35%) dead. Median overall survival was 46 months. Progression occurred in 25 patients (62.5%), at a median interval of 8 months; failure at SABR site was observed in 3 patients (7.5%). Progression-free survival rates were 49% and 27% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Discussion: The results of this retrospective exploratory analysis suggest safety and efficacy of SABR in patients affected with colorectal cancer lung oligometastases and urge inclusion of SABR in prospective clinical trials.

  7. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy as First Local Therapy for Lung Oligometastases From Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Institution Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Badellino, Serena; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Guarneri, Alessia; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Monagheddu, Chiara; Spadi, Rosella; Ragona, Riccardo; Racca, Patrizia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) efficacy and its potential role as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients who received SABR as first local therapy at the time of lung progression were included, from 2004 to 2014. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and safety. Results: A single nodule was treated in 26 patients (65%), 2 nodules in 10 patients (25%), 3 in 3 patients (7.5%), and 4 in 1 patient (2.5%), for a total of 59 lesions. The median delivered biological effective dose was 96 Gy, in 1 to 8 daily fractions. Median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-72 months). Overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were, respectively, 84%, 73%, and 39%, with 14 patients (35%) dead. Median overall survival was 46 months. Progression occurred in 25 patients (62.5%), at a median interval of 8 months; failure at SABR site was observed in 3 patients (7.5%). Progression-free survival rates were 49% and 27% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Discussion: The results of this retrospective exploratory analysis suggest safety and efficacy of SABR in patients affected with colorectal cancer lung oligometastases and urge inclusion of SABR in prospective clinical trials

  8. Detection of Local Cancer Recurrence After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Physician Performance Versus Radiomic Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Johnson, Carol; Louie, Alexander V.; Landis, Mark; Rodrigues, George; Chan, Ian; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Yeung, Timothy P.C.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is a guideline-specified treatment option for early-stage lung cancer. However, significant posttreatment fibrosis can occur and obfuscate the detection of local recurrence. The goal of this study was to assess physician ability to detect timely local recurrence and to compare physician performance with a radiomics tool. Methods and Materials: Posttreatment computed tomography (CT) scans (n=182) from 45 patients treated with SABR (15 with local recurrence matched to 30 with no local recurrence) were used to measure physician and radiomic performance in assessing response. Scans were individually scored by 3 thoracic radiation oncologists and 3 thoracic radiologists, all of whom were blinded to clinical outcomes. Radiomic features were extracted from the same images. Performances of the physician assessors and the radiomics signature were compared. Results: When taking into account all CT scans during the whole follow-up period, median sensitivity for physician assessment of local recurrence was 83% (range, 67%-100%), and specificity was 75% (range, 67%-87%), with only moderate interobserver agreement (κ = 0.54) and a median time to detection of recurrence of 15.5 months. When determining the early prediction of recurrence within <6 months after SABR, physicians assessed the majority of images as benign injury/no recurrence, with a mean error of 35%, false positive rate (FPR) of 1%, and false negative rate (FNR) of 99%. At the same time point, a radiomic signature consisting of 5 image-appearance features demonstrated excellent discrimination, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.85, classification error of 24%, FPR of 24%, and FNR of 23%. Conclusions: These results suggest that radiomics can detect early changes associated with local recurrence that are not typically considered by physicians. This decision support system could potentially allow for early salvage therapy of

  9. Detection of Local Cancer Recurrence After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Physician Performance Versus Radiomic Assessment

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    Mattonen, Sarah A. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Baines Imaging Research Laboratory, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Baines Imaging Research Laboratory, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Johnson, Carol [Baines Imaging Research Laboratory, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Louie, Alexander V. [Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Landis, Mark [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Rodrigues, George [Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Chan, Ian; Etemad-Rezai, Roya [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Yeung, Timothy P.C. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Baines Imaging Research Laboratory, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ward, Aaron D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Baines Imaging Research Laboratory, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is a guideline-specified treatment option for early-stage lung cancer. However, significant posttreatment fibrosis can occur and obfuscate the detection of local recurrence. The goal of this study was to assess physician ability to detect timely local recurrence and to compare physician performance with a radiomics tool. Methods and Materials: Posttreatment computed tomography (CT) scans (n=182) from 45 patients treated with SABR (15 with local recurrence matched to 30 with no local recurrence) were used to measure physician and radiomic performance in assessing response. Scans were individually scored by 3 thoracic radiation oncologists and 3 thoracic radiologists, all of whom were blinded to clinical outcomes. Radiomic features were extracted from the same images. Performances of the physician assessors and the radiomics signature were compared. Results: When taking into account all CT scans during the whole follow-up period, median sensitivity for physician assessment of local recurrence was 83% (range, 67%-100%), and specificity was 75% (range, 67%-87%), with only moderate interobserver agreement (κ = 0.54) and a median time to detection of recurrence of 15.5 months. When determining the early prediction of recurrence within <6 months after SABR, physicians assessed the majority of images as benign injury/no recurrence, with a mean error of 35%, false positive rate (FPR) of 1%, and false negative rate (FNR) of 99%. At the same time point, a radiomic signature consisting of 5 image-appearance features demonstrated excellent discrimination, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.85, classification error of 24%, FPR of 24%, and FNR of 23%. Conclusions: These results suggest that radiomics can detect early changes associated with local recurrence that are not typically considered by physicians. This decision support system could potentially allow for early salvage therapy of

  10. Comparison between local ablative therapy and chemotherapy for non-resectable colorectal liver metastases: a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruers, Theo J. M.; Joosten, Joris J.; Wiering, Bastiaan; Langenhoff, Barbara S.; Dekker, Heleen M.; Wobbes, Theo; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Krabbe, Paul F. M.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing interest for the use of local ablative techniques in patients with non-resectable colorectal liver metastases. Evidence on the efficacy over systemic chemotherapy is, however, extremely weak. In this prospective study we aim to assess the additional benefits of local tumour

  11. Comparison between local ablative therapy and chemotherapy for non-resectable colorectal liver metastases: a prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruers, T.J.M.; Joosten, J.J.; Wiering, B.; Langenhoff, B.S.; Dekker, H.M.; Wobbes, Th.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest for the use of local ablative techniques in patients with non-resectable colorectal liver metastases. Evidence on the efficacy over systemic chemotherapy is, however, extremely weak. In this prospective study we aim to assess the additional benefits of local

  12. [Regression and therapy-resistance of primary liver tumors and liver metastases after regional chemotherapy and local tumor ablation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, H-P

    2005-05-01

    High dosage regional chemotherapy, chemoembolization and other methods of regional treatment are commonly used to treat unresectable primary liver malignancies and liver metastases. In liver malignancies of childhood neoadjuvant chemotherapy is successfully combined with surgical treatment. Chemotherapy and local tumor ablation lead to characteristic histomorphologic changes: Complete destruction of the tumor tissue and its vascular bed is followed by encapsulated necroses. After selective eradication of the tumor cells under preservation of the fibrovasular bed the tumor is replaced by hypocellular edematous and fibrotic tissue. If completely damaged tumor tissue is absorbed quickly, the tumor area is replaced by regenerating liver tissue. Obliterating fibrohyalinosis of tumor vessels, and perivascular edema or necrosis indicate tissue damage along the vascular bed. Degenerative pleomorphism of tumor cells, steatosis, hydropic swelling and Malloryhyalin in HCC can represent cytologic findings of cytotoxic cellular damage. Macroscopic type of HCC influences significantly the response to treatment. Multinodular HCC often contain viable tumor nodules close to destroyed nodules after treatment. Encapsulated uninodular tumors undergo complete necrosis much easier. Large size and a tumor capsule limitate the effect of percutaneous injection of ethanol into HCC. In carcinomas with an infiltrating border, especially in metastases of adenocarcinomas and hepatic cholangiocarcinoma cytostatic treatment damages the tumor tissue mainly in the periphery. Nevertheless the infiltrating rim, portal veins, lymphatic spaces and bile ducts as well as the angle between liver capsule, tumor nodule and bordering parenchyma are the main refugees of viable tumor tissue even after high dosage regional chemotherapy. This local resistance is caused by special local conditions of vascularization and perfusion. These residues are the source of local tumor progression and distant metastases

  13. Colorectal Histology Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Local Failure in Lung Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

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    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jacobs, Lisa Rose; Eyben, Rie von; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shultz, David Benjamin, E-mail: DavidS4@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is increasingly used to treat lung oligometastases. We set out to determine the safety and efficacy of this approach and to identify factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective study of patients treated with SABR for metastatic lung tumors at our institution from 2003 to 2014. We assessed the association between various patient and treatment factors with local failure (LF), progression, subsequent treatment, systemic treatment, and overall survival (OS), using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: We identified 122 tumors in 77 patients meeting inclusion criteria for this study. Median follow-up was 22 months. The 12- and 24-month cumulative incidence rates of LF were 8.7% and 16.2%, respectively; the 24-month cumulative incidence rates of progression, subsequent treatment, and subsequent systemic treatment were 75.2%, 64.5%, and 35.1%, respectively. Twenty-four-month OS was 74.6%, and median OS was 36 months. Colorectal metastases had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of LF at 12 and 24 months (25.5% and 42.2%, respectively), than all other histologies (4.4% and 9.9%, respectively; P<.0004). The 24-month cumulative incidences of LF for colorectal metastases treated with a biologically effective dose at α/β = 10 (BED{sub 10}) of <100 Gy versus BED{sub 10} of ≥100 Gy were 62.5% and 16.7%, respectively (P=.08). Toxicity was minimal, with only a single grade 3 or higher event observed. Conclusions: SABR for metastatic lung tumors appears to be safe and effective with excellent local control, treatment-free intervals, and OS. An exception is metastases from colorectal cancer, which have a high LF rate consistent with a radioresistant phenotype, suggesting a potential role for dose escalation.

  14. Planning Target Volume D95 and Mean Dose Should Be Considered for Optimal Local Control for Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

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    Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhou, Shouhao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shen, Chan [Department of Health Service Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R.; Welsh, James D.; Lin, Steve H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To identify the optimal dose parameters predictive for local/lobar control after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This study encompassed a total of 1092 patients (1200 lesions) with NSCLC of clinical stage T1-T2 N0M0 who were treated with SABR of 50 Gy in 4 fractions or 70 Gy in 10 fractions, depending on tumor location/size, using computed tomography-based heterogeneity corrections and a convolution superposition calculation algorithm. Patients were monitored by chest CT or positron emission tomography/CT and/or biopsy after SABR. Factors predicting local/lobar recurrence (LR) were determined by competing risk multivariate analysis. Continuous variables were divided into 2 subgroups at cutoff values identified by receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: At a median follow-up time of 31.7 months (interquartile range, 14.8-51.3 months), the 5-year time to local recurrence within the same lobe and overall survival rates were 93.8% and 44.8%, respectively. Total cumulative number of patients experiencing LR was 40 (3.7%), occurring at a median time of 14.4 months (range, 4.8-46 months). Using multivariate competing risk analysis, independent predictive factors for LR after SABR were minimum biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) to 95% of planning target volume (PTVD95 BED{sub 10}) ≤86 Gy (corresponding to PTV D95 physics dose of 42 Gy in 4 fractions or 55 Gy in 10 fractions) and gross tumor volume ≥8.3 cm{sup 3}. The PTVmean BED{sub 10} was highly correlated with PTVD95 BED{sub 10.} In univariate analysis, a cutoff of 130 Gy for PTVmean BED{sub 10} (corresponding to PTVmean physics dose of 55 Gy in 4 fractions or 75 Gy in 10 fractions) was also significantly associated with LR. Conclusions: In addition to gross tumor volume, higher radiation dose delivered to the PTV predicts for better local/lobar control. We recommend that both PTVD95 BED

  15. Long-term effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma ineligible for local ablation therapy or surgical resection. Stereotactic radiotherapy for liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Jung Hyun; Bae, Si Hyun; Kim, Ji Yoon; Choi, Byung Ock; Jang, Hong Seok; Jang, Jeong Won; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew; Chung, Kyu Won

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ineligible for local therapy or surgery. Forty-two HCC patients with tumors ≤ 100 cc and ineligible for local ablation therapy or surgical resection were treated with SBRT: 30-39 Gy with a prescription isodose range of 70-85% (median 80%) was delivered daily in three fractions. Median tumor volume was 15.4 cc (3.0-81.8) and median follow-up duration 28.7 months (8.4-49.1). Complete response (CR) for the in-field lesion was initially achieved in 59.6% and partial response (PR) in 26.2% of patients. Hepatic out-of-field progression occurred in 18 patients (42.9%) and distant metastasis developed in 12 (28.6%) patients. Overall in-field CR and overall CR were achieved in 59.6% and 33.3%, respectively. Overall 1-year and 3-year survival rates were 92.9% and 58.6%, respectively. In-field progression-free survival at 1 and 3 years was 72.0% and 67.5%, respectively. Patients with smaller tumor had better in-field progression-free survival and overall survival rates (<32 cc vs. ≥32 cc, P < 0.05). No major toxicity was encountered but one patient died with extrahepatic metastasis and radiation-induced hepatic failure. SBRT is a promising noninvasive-treatment for small HCC that is ineligible for local treatment or surgical resection

  16. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally-Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Mann Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of malignant skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally-advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC, progression-free survival rate (PFS, overall survival rate (OS and toxicities were reported.Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6-67.2 months. The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4-205 cm3. All patients received prior EBRT with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24-75.6 Gy delivered in 12 to 42 fractions. 20 patients had surgeries prior to SABR. 19 patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, 8 patients received concurrent cetuximab (ErbituxTM with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP was 3.3 months (range: 0-16.9 months. For the 29 patients (93.5% who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5-41.4 months. The estimated 1-year overall survival (OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities.Conclusions: SABR has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally-advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base.

  17. Solitary recurrence of castration-resistant prostate cancer with low or undetectable levels of prostate specific antigen salvaged with local ablative radiation therapy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiachien Jake; Ying, James; Kapur, Payal; Wohlfeld, Bryan; Roehrborn, Claus; Kim, Dong W Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer recurrences are usually first detected by increased levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA), and systemic therapy is often initiated if distant metastasis is confirmed. However, low or nearly undetectable levels of PSA in the modern era of ultrasensitive PSA assay may be difficult to interpret in patients with a history of prostate cancer. Deciding whether to initiate additional systemic therapy in limited indolent metastatic disease while balancing the quality of life of the patient and ensuring the oncologic control of the disease may be challenging. In the present study, the case of a biopsy-confirmed solitary spine recurrence of prostate cancer with nearly undetectable but persistent levels of PSA (0.05 ng/ml) is reported. Treatment of the recurrence with local ablative radiotherapy improved the pain experienced by the patient, and reduced his levels of PSA to undetectable limits (<0.05 ng/ml). Repeated imaging analysis, PSA assay and clinical assessment demonstrated durable control of the disease without the requirement for additional systemic treatments. The present case highlighted the importance of initiating appropriate work-up according to the clinical scenario. Local treatment for solitary or oligometastatic recurrence of prostate cancer may enhance the effectiveness of current therapeutic strategies and benefit certain patients.

  18. Local absolute alcohol ablation for the treatment of recurrent pheochromocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Mingyi; Wang Peijun; Lu Ying; Ma Jun; Tang Junjun; Xi Qian; Huang Zongliang; Gao Xiaolong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to assess the clinical value of local injection of absolute alcohol under CT guidance in treating recurrent pheochromocytoma. Methods: Five patients with benign recurrent pheochromocytoma were enrolled in this study. Of the five cases, the lesions were located on the right side in three, on the left in one and on both sides in one. All the lesions were pathologically proved to be benign ones. Under CT guidance the ablation therapy with local injection of absolute alcohol was performed. The therapeutic results were observed and evaluated. Results: Thirty days after the treatment, different degrees of decrease in tumor size was observed on follow-up CT scans. All the patients were followed up for 9-42 months. During the follow-up period, both the blood pressure and the vanillyl mandelic acid (VMA) level in urine remained normal and no paroxysmal dizziness, headache or syncope occurred in all patients. Conclusion: For the treatment of recurrent pheochromocytoma the ablation therapy by using local injection of absolute alcohol under CT guidance is a safe and practical therapeutic means with definite and reliable effectiveness. (authors)

  19. A tubular electrode for radiofrequency ablation therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Antunes, Carlos Lemos Lemos Lemos

    2012-07-06

    Purpose – Due to its good mechanical and biocompatibility characteristics, nitinol SEMS is a popular endoprothesis used for relieving stricture problems in hollow organs due to carcinomas. Besides its mechanical application, SEMS can be regarded as well as potential electrode for performing RF ablation therapy on the tumor. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical and experimental analyses in order to characterize the lesion volume induced in biological tissue using this kind of tubular electrode. Design/methodology/approach – Data concerning electrical conductivity and dimension of the damaged tissue after RF ablation procedure were obtained from ex vivo samples. Next, numerical models using 3D finite element method were obtained reassembling the conditions considered at experimentation setup and results were compared. Findings – Numerical and experimental results show that a regular volume of damaged tissue can be obtained considering this type of electrode. Also, results obtained from numerical simulation are close to those obtained by experimentation. Originality/value – SEMSs, commonly used as devices to minimize obstruction problems due to the growth of tumors, may still be considered as an active electrode for RF ablation procedures. A method considering this observation is presented in this paper. Also, numerical simulation can be regarded in this case as a tool for determining the lesion volume.

  20. Study of 201 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Given Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Shows Local Control Dependence on Dose Calculation Algorithm

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    Latifi, Kujtim, E-mail: Kujtim.Latifi@Moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Oliver, Jasmine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida (United States); Baker, Ryan [University of South Florida School of Medicine, Tampa, Florida (United States); Dilling, Thomas J.; Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Kim, Jongphil; Yue, Binglin [Department of Biostatics and Bioinformatics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); DeMarco, MaryLou; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Feygelman, Vladimir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Pencil beam (PB) and collapsed cone convolution (CCC) dose calculation algorithms differ significantly when used in the thorax. However, such differences have seldom been previously directly correlated with outcomes of lung stereotactic ablative body radiation (SABR). Methods and Materials: Data for 201 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SABR were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were treated with 50 Gy in 5 fractions of 10 Gy each. The radiation prescription mandated that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) receive the prescribed dose. One hundred sixteen patients were planned with BrainLab treatment planning software (TPS) with the PB algorithm and treated on a Novalis unit. The other 85 were planned on the Pinnacle TPS with the CCC algorithm and treated on a Varian linac. Treatment planning objectives were numerically identical for both groups. The median follow-up times were 24 and 17 months for the PB and CCC groups, respectively. The primary endpoint was local/marginal control of the irradiated lesion. Gray's competing risk method was used to determine the statistical differences in local/marginal control rates between the PB and CCC groups. Results: Twenty-five patients planned with PB and 4 patients planned with the CCC algorithms to the same nominal doses experienced local recurrence. There was a statistically significant difference in recurrence rates between the PB and CCC groups (hazard ratio 3.4 [95% confidence interval: 1.18-9.83], Gray's test P=.019). The differences (Δ) between the 2 algorithms for target coverage were as follows: ΔD99{sub GITV} = 7.4 Gy, ΔD99{sub PTV} = 10.4 Gy, ΔV90{sub GITV} = 13.7%, ΔV90{sub PTV} = 37.6%, ΔD95{sub PTV} = 9.8 Gy, and ΔD{sub ISO} = 3.4 Gy. GITV = gross internal tumor volume. Conclusions: Local control in patients receiving who were planned to the same nominal dose with PB and CCC algorithms were statistically significantly different. Possible

  1. Abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression predicts for a poorer outcome in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated by external beam radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation androgen ablation: results based on RTOG study 86-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Grignon, David; Caplan, Richard; Sarkar, Fazlul; Forman, Jeffrey; Mesic, John; Fu, Karen K.; Abrams, Ross

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study is to establish the effect of the abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene on the results of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation. Materials and Methods: Patients evaluated were part of a RTOG phase III multi-institutional trial. This trial assessed the value of pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation on patients with locally advanced disease (bulky stage B and stage C). Of the 471 patients registered, pre-treatment pathological material was available for 129 patients. P-53 status was determined immunohistochemically utilizing a commercially available antibody (D07). Clinical endpoints evaluated were overall survival and development of metastases. Results: Twenty-three of the 129 patients had abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene. Presence of this abnormal expression significantly correlated with lower overall survival (p=0.03) and the development of distant metastases (p=0.03). Abnormal expression of the P-53 gene was an independent prognostic indicator when evaluated against clinical stage and Gleason score. Conclusion: This data from patients entered on a phase III multi-institutional, randomized clinical trial shows that abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression as determined immunohistochemically is an independent predictor of poorer survival and the development of distant metastases in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation

  2. What to choose as radical local treatment for lung metastases from colo-rectal cancer: surgery or radiofrequency ablation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlijper, R.C.; Grutters, J.P.C.; Houben, R.; Dingemans, A.M.; Wildberger, J.E.; Raemdonck, D. Van; Cutsem, E. van; Haustermans, K.; Lammering, G.; Lambin, P.; Ruysscher, D. de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term survival can be obtained with local treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. However, it is unclear as to what the optimal local therapy is: surgery, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT). METHODS: A systematic review included 27 studies

  3. Therapy of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Fine Needle Intervention including Ethanol and Radiofrequency Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Lakhtakia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs are increasingly being detected, though usually as incidental findings. Majority of the PNETs are non-functional and surgical resection is the standard of care for most of them. However, in patients with small PNETs localized within the pancreas, who are unfit or unwilling for surgery, alternate methods of treatment are needed. Direct methods of ablation of PNETs, using either ethanol injection or radiofrequency ablation (RFA, are emerging as effective methods. The limited literature available as case reports or case series on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS-guided local ablation using either ethanol or RFA has demonstrated safety and efficacy along with short- to medium-term sustained relief. Long-term benefits with these local ablative therapies are awaited. Comparative studies are needed to show which of these two competing technologies is superior. Finally, comparative trials of EUS-guided ablation with surgical resection in terms of efficacy and safety will ensure their place in the management algorithm.

  4. Advances in local and ablative treatment of oligometastasis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Henry Hi; Hong, Matthew Kh; Corcoran, Niall M; Siva, Shankar; Foroudi, Farshad

    2014-12-01

    Oligometastasis is a state of limited metastatic disease that may be amenable to aggressive local therapy to achieve long-term survival. This review aims to explore the role of ablative radiotherapy and surgical management of prostate cancer (CaP) patients with oligometastasis. We performed a systematic review of the literature from November 2003 to November 2013 in the PubMed and EMBASE databases using structured search terms. From our literature search, we identified 13 cases of oligometastatic CaP managed by surgery. The longest disease-free survival documented was 12 years following pulmonary metastasectomy. We also found 12 studies using radiotherapy to treat oligometastatic CaP with median follow-up ranging from 6 to 43 months. Local control rates and overall survival at 3 years range from 66 to 90% and from 54 to 92%, respectively. Most patients did not report any significant toxicity. The limited current literature suggests oligometastatic CaP may be amenable to more aggressive local ablative therapy to achieve prolonged local control and delay to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). There is a larger body of evidence supporting the use of radiotherapy than surgery in this disease state. However, no direct comparison with ADT is available to suggest an improvement in overall survival. Further studies are required to determine the role of aggressive-targeted local therapy in oligometastatic CaP. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. MRI-guided prostate focal laser ablation therapy using a mechatronic needle guidance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepek, Jeremy; Lindner, Uri; Ghai, Sangeet; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Trachtenberg, John; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Focal therapy of localized prostate cancer is receiving increased attention due to its potential for providing effective cancer control in select patients with minimal treatment-related side effects. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focal laser ablation (FLA) therapy is an attractive modality for such an approach. In FLA therapy, accurate placement of laser fibers is critical to ensuring that the full target volume is ablated. In practice, error in needle placement is invariably present due to pre- to intra-procedure image registration error, needle deflection, prostate motion, and variability in interventionalist skill. In addition, some of these sources of error are difficult to control, since the available workspace and patient positions are restricted within a clinical MRI bore. In an attempt to take full advantage of the utility of intraprocedure MRI, while minimizing error in needle placement, we developed an MRI-compatible mechatronic system for guiding needles to the prostate for FLA therapy. The system has been used to place interstitial catheters for MRI-guided FLA therapy in eight subjects in an ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial. Data from these cases has provided quantification of the level of uncertainty in needle placement error. To relate needle placement error to clinical outcome, we developed a model for predicting the probability of achieving complete focal target ablation for a family of parameterized treatment plans. Results from this work have enabled the specification of evidence-based selection criteria for the maximum target size that can be confidently ablated using this technique, and quantify the benefit that may be gained with improvements in needle placement accuracy.

  6. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2006-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy (IAAT) may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  7. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2004-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  8. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2005-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  9. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2003-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  10. Renal Involvement in Preeclampsia: Similarities to VEGF Ablation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Müller-Deile

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomerular VEGF expression is critical for the maintenance and function of an intact filtration barrier. Alterations in glomerular VEGF bioavailability result in endothelial as well as in podocyte damage. Renal involvement in preeclampsia includes proteinuria, podocyturia, elevated blood pressure, edema, glomerular capillary endotheliosis, and thrombotic microangiopathy. At least the renal signs, symptoms, and other evidence can sufficiently be explained by reduced VEGF levels. The aim of this paper was to summarize our pathophysiological understanding of the renal involvement of preeclampsia and point out similarities to the renal side effects of VEGF-ablation therapy.

  11. Lung Infarction due to Pulmonary Vein Stenosis after Ablation Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation Misdiagnosed as Organizing Pneumonia: Sequential Changes on CT in Two Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Mi Ri; Lee, Ho Yun; Cho, Jong Ho; Um, Sang Won [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis is a complication of ablation therapy for arrhythmias. We report two cases with chronic lung parenchymal abnormalities showing no improvement and waxing and waning features, which were initially diagnosed as nonspecific pneumonias, and finally confirmed as PV stenosis. When a patient presents for nonspecific respiratory symptoms without evidence of infection after ablation therapy and image findings show chronic and repetitive parenchymal abnormalities confined in localized portion, the possibility of PV stenosis should be considered.

  12. Guidelines for safe practice of stereotactic body (ablative) radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Matthew; Barry, Tamara; Bailey, Michael; Smith, Leigh; Seeley, Anna; Siva, Shankar; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Booth, Jeremy; Ball, David; Thwaites, David

    2015-01-01

    The uptake of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) / stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) worldwide has been rapid. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology (FRO) assembled an expert panel of radiation oncologists, radiation oncology medical physicists and radiation therapists to establish guidelines for safe practice of SABR. Draft guidelines were reviewed by a number of international experts in the field and then distributed through the membership of the FRO. Members of the Australian Institute of Radiography and the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine were also asked to comment on the draft. Evidence-based recommendations (where applicable) address aspects of departmental staffing, procedures and equipment, quality assurance measures, as well as organisational considerations for delivery of SABR treatments. Central to the guidelines is a set of key recommendations for departments undertaking SABR. These guidelines were developed collaboratively to provide an educational guide and reference for radiation therapy service providers to ensure appropriate care of patients receiving SABR.

  13. Experimental research on local renal injury of dog with microwave ablation guided by DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jianping; Xian Zhengyuan; Shi Rongshu; Zhang Gaofeng; Li Xianlang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the efficiency, complications and probability of preserving part renal function by local renal microwave ablation. Methods: The fresh pig renal pelvis full filled with 30% diatrizoate meglumine and the dogs kidney taken arterial pyelography were both ablated with microwave. Dogs were divided into three groups: measuring temperature after ablation group, single point ablation both on the two kidneys group and double points ablation on unilateral kidney group. In measuring temperature after ablation group, DSA and pathology were performed immediately after ablation. In the other groups, DSA with blood and urine samplings were taken for routine tests including renal function right after the ablation and 10 days later. Results: Experiment in vitro showed conspicuous renal pelvic contraction and convolution. The group under power rate of 70, 3 min produced urine leak easily. Preliminary test in vivo with DSA showed the disappearance of local kidney blood supply. The residual renal function was related to areas of necrosis. Acute stage pathology revealed acute renal cortex medulla and pelvic cells injury. DSA of chronic stage showed no change in size of the area of ablation. The blood supply of necrotic areas was not restored. The residual kidney possessed the excretion contrast medium with no urine leaks. Upper pole of right kidney adhered with adjacent tissue, together with thickened covering. Pathology revealed fibrous proliferation around the coagulative necrosis. Conclusion: Microwave ablation can inactivate the local renal tissue, and, effectively preserve the big blood vessels and function of residual kidney. No urine leaks occurred in chronic stage but easily to produce adhesions with adjacent tissue. (authors)

  14. The outcome of I-131 ablation therapy for intermediate and high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer using a strict definition of successful ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ken; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the outcome of radioactive iodine ablation therapy for thyroid cancer in nigh-risk patients and investigates background factors influencing ablation failure. We included 91 patients in this retrospective analysis and evaluated the ablation success rate. Successful ablation was defined as the absence of visible iodine-131 (I-131) accumulation in the thyroid bed after whole-body scans and thyroglobulin levels <2 ng/ml in a TSH-stimulated state after ablation. We extracted data on patients' age, sex, I-131 dose, pathology, resection stump findings, tumor T category and thyroglobulin levels, which could affect ablation outcome. Successful ablation was achieved in only 14 patients (15.4%). Pre-ablation serum thyroglobulin levels were significantly higher in the ablation failure group than in the success group (P < 0.001), while no significant differences were found for other factors between the groups. Furthermore, thyroglobulin levels >10 ng/ml were significantly related to ablation failure after multivariate analysis (odds ratio 27.2; 95% confidence interval 2.469-299.7; P = 0.007). The ablation success rate was very low because of high thyroglobulin levels, even with high-dose I-131. High-risk patients, especially those with high thyroglobulin levels (>10 ng/ml), are unlikely to reach levels low enough to meet successful ablation criteria. (author)

  15. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Octogenarians With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa [Radiation Oncology Center, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Kaneko, Takeshi [Respiratory Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Kanagawa (Japan); Department of Respirology, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Morita, Satoshi [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Kanagawa (Japan); Handa, Hiroshi [Respiratory Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Kanagawa (Japan); Division of Respiratory and Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei [Radiation Oncology Center, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo, E-mail: kunieda-mi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokai University, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate treatment outcomes of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) for octogenarians with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2012, 109 patients aged ≥80 years with T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SABR: 47 patients had histology-unproven lung cancer; 62 patients had pathologically proven NSCLC. The prescribed doses were either 50 Gy/5 fractions for peripheral tumors or 40 Gy/5 fractions for centrally located tumors. The treatment outcomes, toxicities, and the correlating factors for overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up duration after SABR was 24.2 (range, 3.0-64.6) months. Only limited toxicities were observed, except for 1 grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. The 3-year local, regional, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 82.3%, 90.1%, and 76.8%, respectively. The OS and lung cancer-specific survival rates were 53.7% and 70.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that medically inoperable, low body mass index, high T stage, and high C-reactive protein were the predictors for short OS. The OS for the operable octogenarians was significantly better than that for inoperable (P<.01). Conclusions: Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy for octogenarians was feasible, with excellent OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that operability was one of the predictors for OS. For medically operable octogenarians with early-stage NSCLC, SABR should be prospectively compared with resection.

  16. Pellet-plasma interaction: Local disturbances caused by pellet ablation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    The local disturbance amplitudes caused by ablating pellets in tokamaks are computed in the framework of a magnetohydrodynamic model supplemented by the neutral gas plasma shielding ablation model. The model computes, for a given number of pellet particles locally deposited, the time histories of the ablatant cloud parameters, such as cloud radius, cloud length, electron density, temperature and cloud beta, at a succession of magnetic flux surfaces. The cloud radius thus determined may be fed back into the ablation model, thus adjusting the effect of the shielding cloud on the ablation rate. The model is applied to typical plasma parameter ranges of existing and planned tokamaks. The results show that the ablating pellets may cause massive local disturbances in tokamaks, depending upon the number of particles locally deposited. The peaks of these disturbances are of a spike nature, lasting only a few microseconds (Alfven time-scale). The characteristic decay time of the 'quasi-steady' disturbance values that characterize the after-spike period is of the order of several milliseconds (hydrodynamic time-scale). The peak electron density values may be as high as 10 23 to 10 25 m -3 , with the associated beta peaks exceeding unity. The 'quasi-steady' values of the electron density and the ablatant beta may be of the order of 10 22 to 10 24 m -3 and unity, respectively. Furthermore, the results show the strong dependence of the ablation rate on the dynamic characteristics of the ablatant cloud surrounding the pellet. (author). 25 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  17. The outcome of I-131 ablation therapy for intermediate and high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer using a strict definition of successful ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ken; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2017-09-01

    This article examines the outcome of radioactive iodine ablation therapy for thyroid cancer in high-risk patients and investigates background factors influencing ablation failure. We included 91 patients in this retrospective analysis and evaluated the ablation success rate. Successful ablation was defined as the absence of visible iodine-131 (I-131) accumulation in the thyroid bed after whole-body scans and thyroglobulin levels sex, I-131 dose, pathology, resection stump findings, tumor T category and thyroglobulin levels, which could affect ablation outcome. Successful ablation was achieved in only 14 patients (15.4%). Pre-ablation serum thyroglobulin levels were significantly higher in the ablation failure group than in the success group (P 10 ng/ml were significantly related to ablation failure after multivariate analysis (odds ratio 27.2; 95% confidence interval 2.469-299.7; P = 0.007). The ablation success rate was very low because of high thyroglobulin levels, even with high-dose I-131. High-risk patients, especially those with high thyroglobulin levels (>10 ng/ml), are unlikely to reach levels low enough to meet successful ablation criteria.

  18. Paying attention to radiofrequency ablation therapy for neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongming; Li Linsun

    2010-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an effective treatment for malignant tumors. With the development of imaging technique, it has been widely used in treating different kinds of malignant tumors, such as liver cancer, lung cancer, kidney carcinoma, etc. Radiofrequency ablation has a lot of advantages. As a minimally-invasive, safe and effective treatment with less sufferings and fewer complications, this technique has attracted more and more attention of the experts both at home and abroad. (authors)

  19. Local recurrence after microwave thermosphere ablation of malignant liver tumors: results of a surgical series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Kahramangil, Bora; Berber, Eren

    2018-04-01

    Microwave thermosphere ablation is a new treatment modality that creates spherical ablation zones using a single antenna. This study aims to analyze local recurrence associated with this new treatment modality in patients with malignant liver tumors. This is a prospective clinical study of patients who underwent microwave thermosphere ablation of malignant liver tumors between September 2014 and March 2017. Clinical, operative, and oncologic parameters were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards model. One hundred patients underwent 301 ablations. Ablations were performed laparoscopically in 87 and open in 13 patients. Pathology included neuroendocrine liver metastasis (n = 115), colorectal liver metastasis (n = 100), hepatocellular cancer (n = 21), and other tumor types (n = 65). Ninety-day morbidity was 7% with one not procedure-related mortality. Median follow-up was 16 months with 65% of patients completing at least 12 months of follow-up. The rate of local tumor recurrence rate per lesion was 6.6% (20/301). Local tumor, new hepatic, and extrahepatic recurrences were detected in 15%, 40%, and 40% of patients, respectively. Local recurrence rate per pathology was 12% for both colorectal liver metastasis (12/100) and other metastatic tumors (8/65). No local recurrence was observed to date in the neuroendocrine liver metastasis and in the limited number of patients with hepatocellular cancers. Tumor size >3 cm and tumor type were independent predictors of local recurrence. This is the first study to analyze local recurrence after microwave thermosphere ablation of malignant liver tumors. Short-term local tumor control rate compares favorably with that reported for radiofrequency and other microwave technologies in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantifying Local Ablation Rates for the Greenland Ice Sheet Using Terrestrial LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershner, C. M.; Pitcher, L. H.; LeWinter, A.; Finnegan, D. C.; Overstreet, B. T.; Miège, C.; Cooper, M. G.; Smith, L. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying accurate ice surface ablation or melt rates for the Greenland Ice Sheet is important for calibrating and validating surface mass balance models and constraining sea level rise estimates. Common practice is to monitor surface ablation at defined points by manually measuring ice surface lowering in relation to stakes inserted into the ice / snow. However, this method does not account for the effects of local topography, solar zenith angle, and local variations in ice surface albedo/impurities on ablation rates. To directly address these uncertainties, we use a commercially available terrestrial LIDAR scanner (TLS) to monitor daily melt rates in the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet for 7 consecutive days in July 2016. Each survey is registered to previous scans using retroreflective cylinders and is georeferenced using static GPS measurements. Bulk ablation will be calculated using multi-temporal differential LIDAR techniques, and difficulties in referencing scans and collecting high quality surveys in this dynamic environment will be discussed, as well as areas for future research. We conclude that this novel application of TLS technology provides a spatially accurate, higher fidelity measurements of ablation across a larger area with less interpolation and less time spent than using traditional manual point based methods alone. Furthermore, this sets the stage for direct calibration, validation and cross-comparison with existing airborne (e.g. NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper - ATM - onboard Operation IceBridge and NASA's Land, Vegetation & Ice Sensor - LVIS) and forthcoming spaceborne sensors (e.g. NASA's ICESat-2).

  1. Acute termination of human atrial fibrillation by identification and catheter ablation of localized rotors and sources: first multicenter experience of focal impulse and rotor modulation (FIRM) ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Hummel, John D; Miller, John M; Steinberg, Jonathan S

    2012-12-01

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) currently relies on eliminating triggers, and no reliable method exists to map the arrhythmia itself to identify ablation targets. The aim of this multicenter study was to define the use of Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation (FIRM) for identifying ablation targets. We prospectively enrolled the first (n = 14, 11 males) consecutive patients undergoing FIRM-guided ablation for persistent (n = 11) and paroxysmal AF at 5 centers. A 64-pole basket catheter was used for panoramic right and left atrial mapping during AF. AF electrograms were analyzed using a novel system to identify sustained rotors (spiral waves), or focal beats (centrifugal activation to surrounding atrium). Ablation was performed first at identified sources. The primary endpoints were acute AF termination or organization (>10% cycle length prolongation). Conventional ablation was performed only after FIRM-guided ablation. Twelve out of 14 cases were mapped. AF sources were demonstrated in all patients (average of 1.9 ± 0.8 per patient). Sources were left atrial in 18 cases, and right atrial in 5 cases, and 21/23 were rotors. FIRM-guided ablation achieved the acute endpoint in all patients, consisting of AF termination in n = 8 (4.9 ± 3.9 minutes at the primary source), and organization in n = 4. Total FIRM time for all patients was 12.3 ± 8.6 minutes. FIRM-guided ablation revealed localized AF rotors/focal sources in patients with paroxysmal, persistent and longstanding persistent AF. Brief targeted FIRM-guided ablation at a priori identified sites terminated or substantially organized AF in all cases prior to any other ablation. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma Extracranial Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chiachien Jake; Christie, Alana; Lin, Mu-Han; Jung, Matthew; Weix, Derek; Huelsmann, Lorel; Kuhn, Kristin; Meyer, Jeffrey; Desai, Neil; Kim, D. W. Nathan; Pedrosa, Ivan; Margulis, Vitaly; Cadeddu, Jeffrey; Sagalowsky, Arthur; Gahan, Jeffrey; Laine, Aaron; Xie, Xian-Jin; Choy, Hak; Brugarolas, James; Timmerman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma is refractory to conventional radiation therapy but responds to higher doses per fraction. However, the dosimetric data and clinical factors affecting local control (LC) are largely unknown. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SAbR) for extracranial renal cell carcinoma metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 175 metastatic lesions from 84 patients treated with SAbR between 2005 and 2015. LC and toxicity after SAbR were assessed with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1 and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Predictors of local failure were analyzed with χ 2 , Kaplan-Meier, and log-rank tests. Results: In most cases (74%), SAbR was delivered with total doses of 40 to 60 Gy, 30 to 54 Gy, and 20 to 40 Gy in 5 fractions, 3 fractions, and a single fraction, respectively. The median biologically effective dose (BED) using the universal survival model was 134.5 Gy. The 1-year LC rate after SAbR was 91.2% (95% confidence interval, 84.9%-95.0%; median follow-up, 16.7 months). Local failures were associated with prior radiation therapy (hazard ratio [HR], 10.49; P<.0001), palliative-intent radiation therapy (HR, 4.63; P=.0189), spinal location (HR, 5.36; P=.0041), previous systemic therapy status (0-1 vs >1; HR, 3.52; P=.0217), and BED <115 Gy (HR, 3.45; P=.0254). Dose received by 99% of the target volume was the strongest dosimetric predictor for LC. Upon multivariate analysis, dose received by 99% of the target volume greater than BED of 98.7 Gy and systemic therapy status remained significant (HR, 0.12 and 3.64, with P=.0014 and P=.0472, respectively). Acute and late grade 3 toxicities attributed to SAbR were observed in 3 patients (1.7%) and 5 patients (2.9%), respectively. Conclusions: SAbR demonstrated excellent LC of metastatic renal cell carcinoma with a favorable safety profile when an adequate dose and

  3. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma Extracranial Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chiachien Jake [Kidney Cancer Program, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Christie, Alana [Kidney Cancer Program, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Lin, Mu-Han; Jung, Matthew; Weix, Derek; Huelsmann, Lorel; Kuhn, Kristin; Meyer, Jeffrey; Desai, Neil; Kim, D. W. Nathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Pedrosa, Ivan [Department of Radiology, Advanced Imaging Research Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Margulis, Vitaly; Cadeddu, Jeffrey; Sagalowsky, Arthur; Gahan, Jeffrey [Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Laine, Aaron [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Xie, Xian-Jin [Kidney Cancer Program, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Brugarolas, James [Kidney Cancer Program, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Timmerman, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); and others

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma is refractory to conventional radiation therapy but responds to higher doses per fraction. However, the dosimetric data and clinical factors affecting local control (LC) are largely unknown. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SAbR) for extracranial renal cell carcinoma metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 175 metastatic lesions from 84 patients treated with SAbR between 2005 and 2015. LC and toxicity after SAbR were assessed with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1 and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Predictors of local failure were analyzed with χ{sup 2}, Kaplan-Meier, and log-rank tests. Results: In most cases (74%), SAbR was delivered with total doses of 40 to 60 Gy, 30 to 54 Gy, and 20 to 40 Gy in 5 fractions, 3 fractions, and a single fraction, respectively. The median biologically effective dose (BED) using the universal survival model was 134.5 Gy. The 1-year LC rate after SAbR was 91.2% (95% confidence interval, 84.9%-95.0%; median follow-up, 16.7 months). Local failures were associated with prior radiation therapy (hazard ratio [HR], 10.49; P<.0001), palliative-intent radiation therapy (HR, 4.63; P=.0189), spinal location (HR, 5.36; P=.0041), previous systemic therapy status (0-1 vs >1; HR, 3.52; P=.0217), and BED <115 Gy (HR, 3.45; P=.0254). Dose received by 99% of the target volume was the strongest dosimetric predictor for LC. Upon multivariate analysis, dose received by 99% of the target volume greater than BED of 98.7 Gy and systemic therapy status remained significant (HR, 0.12 and 3.64, with P=.0014 and P=.0472, respectively). Acute and late grade 3 toxicities attributed to SAbR were observed in 3 patients (1.7%) and 5 patients (2.9%), respectively. Conclusions: SAbR demonstrated excellent LC of metastatic renal cell carcinoma with a favorable safety profile when an adequate dose

  4. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes in g...

  5. Computed tomography findings after radiofrequency ablation in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Steffi J. E.; Derksen, Tyche C.; Nio, Chung Y.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Walma, Marieke S.; Molenaar, Izaak Q.; van Leeuwen, Maarten S.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide a systematic evaluation of the computed tomography(CT) findings after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer(LAPC). Eighteen patients with intra-operative RFA-treated LAPC were included in a prospective case series. All CT-scans

  6. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker; Ahlstrøm, Andreas P.; Abermann, Jakob; Andersen, Morten L.; Andersen, Signe B.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Box, Jason E.; Braithwaite, Roger J.; Bøggild, Carl E.; Citterio, Michele; Clement, Poul; Colgan, William; Fausto, Robert S.; Gleie, Karin; Gubler, Stefanie; Hasholt, Bent; Hynek, Bernhard; Knudsen, Niels T.; Larsen, Signe H.; Mernild, Sebastian H.; Oerlemans, Johannes; Oerter, Hans; Olesen, Ole B.; Smeets, C. J P Paul; Steffen, Konrad; Stober, Manfred; Sugiyama, Shin; Van As, Dirk; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.; Van De Wal, Roderik S W

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes in

  7. Radiotherapy and androgen ablation for clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, Alan; Zagars, Gunar K; Kopplin, Susan

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: The response of patients with clinical stages T1-4 prostate cancer to radiotherapy is variable. A particularly poor prognostic group has been found to be comprised of those with pretreatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels above 30 ng/ml with any tumor grade, or PSA levels > 10 and {<=} 30 with tumors grade 3 or 4. These patients have over an 80% actuarial risk of biochemical failure 3 years after definitive external beam radiotherapy. Thus, patients with these high-risk features require more aggressive therapy. During the last 3-4 years, the policy to treat such patients with radiotherapy and androgen ablation (XRT/HORM) was instituted. A retrospective comparison was made between high-risk patients treated with radiotherapy alone (XRT) vs. XRT/HORM. Methods and Materials: Between 1987 and 1991, there were 81 high-risk patients treated with XRT. There were 38 high-risk patients treated with XRT/HORM between 1990 and 1992. The median follow-up was 37 months for the XRT group and 22 months for the XRT/HORM group. No patient had clinical, radiographic, or pathologic evidence of lymph node involvement. The median dose to the prostate was 66 Gy for the XRT group and 68 Gy for the XRT/HORM group. Results: The distributions of several potential prognostic factors were analyzed. Significant differences between the groups were observed for tumor grade, pretreatment prostatic acid phosphatase, and age. The XRT/HORM group was composed of patients with worse features, including a greater proportion of patients with grade 4 tumors, more with abnormal acid phosphatase levels, and more under 60 years of age. The actuarial incidence of a rising PSA at 3 years for the XRT group was 81% vs. 15% for the XRT/HORM group (p < 0.0001). In addition, local relapse at 3 years was 34% for the XRT group and 15% for the XRT/HORM group (p < 0.02). There was no difference between the groups in terms of survival. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed using several

  8. Composite Configuration Interventional Therapy Robot for the Microwave Ablation of Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying-Yu; Xue, Long; Qi, Bo-Jin; Jiang, Li-Pei; Deng, Shuang-Cheng; Liang, Ping; Liu, Jia

    2017-11-01

    The existing interventional therapy robots for the microwave ablation of liver tumors have a poor clinical applicability with a large volume, low positioning speed and complex automatic navigation control. To solve above problems, a composite configuration interventional therapy robot with passive and active joints is developed. The design of composite configuration reduces the size of the robot under the premise of a wide range of movement, and the robot with composite configuration can realizes rapid positioning with operation safety. The cumulative error of positioning is eliminated and the control complexity is reduced by decoupling active parts. The navigation algorithms for the robot are proposed based on solution of the inverse kinematics and geometric analysis. A simulation clinical test method is designed for the robot, and the functions of the robot and the navigation algorithms are verified by the test method. The mean error of navigation is 1.488 mm and the maximum error is 2.056 mm, and the positioning time for the ablation needle is in 10 s. The experimental results show that the designed robot can meet the clinical requirements for the microwave ablation of liver tumors. The composite configuration is proposed in development of the interventional therapy robot for the microwave ablation of liver tumors, which provides a new idea for the structural design of medical robots.

  9. Analysis of factors affecting local tumor progression of colorectal cancer liver metastasis after radiofrequency ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Seong Hee; Cho, Yun Ku; Choi, Seung A; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Ho Suk [Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent predictive factors for local tumor progression (LTP) of colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) after radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Patients with CRLM were included in the analysis if nodules were up to five in number, each nodule was ≤ 5 cm, and RFA was performed in our center from January 2006 to December 2015. Univariate and multivariate analyses to identify the predictors of LTP were performed by using a Cox proportional hazard model. Overall, 58 tumors from 38 patients were included in this study. LTP occurred in 14 tumors from 9 patients. The overall 1- and 3-year LTP rates were 23.5% and 29.4%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size > 2 cm and insufficient ablative margin were two independently significant adverse prognostic factors for LTP (p = 0.045 and 0.022, respectively). The 3-year LTP rates for 33 and 25 tumors with and without sufficient ablative margin were 4.5% and 61.2%, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The difference in the 3-year LTP rates according to the tumor size was not statistically significant (p = 0.791). Insufficient ablative margin seems to be the most potent predictor of LTP after RFA of CRLM.

  10. Local recurrence after laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation of malignant liver tumors: Results of a contemporary series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Akyuz, Muhammet; Aksoy, Erol; Karabulut, Koray; Berber, Eren

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the incidence of Local recurrence (LR) in patients at long-term follow-up after laparoscopic RFA (LRFA) and also to determine the risk factors for LR from a contemporary series. Patients undergoing LRFA between 2005 and 2014 by a single surgeon were reviewed. Demographic and perioperative data were analyzed from a prospective database. LRFA was performed on 316 patients with 901 lesions. Median follow-up was 25 months, with 76% of whom completed at least one year of follow-up. The LR rate was 18.4%. The LR in patients followed for less than 12 months was 13.8%, 20.3% for 12 months, and 19.7% for 18 months (P = 0.02). One-fourth of the LRs developed after the 1st year. Morbidity was 8.9% and mortality 0.3%. Tumor type, size, ablation margin, and surgeon experience affected LR, with tumor type, size, and ablation margin being independent. This study shows that 14% of malignant liver tumors will develop LR within a year after LRFA. Additional 4% of the lesions will demonstrate recurrence within 1 cm of the ablation zone, mostly as part of a multifocal recurrence. Ablation margin is the only parameter that the surgeon can manipulate to decrease LR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Prognostic value of postoperative stimulated thyroglobulin levels on 131I ablation therapy in papillary thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zairong; Chang Wei; Cui Kunwei; Chang Guoxiang; Huang Daijuan; Zhang Yongxue

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Stimulated thyroglobulin (Tg) levels postablation was associated with disease recurrence in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of postoperative stimulated Tg level on future Tg positivity after 131 I ablation therapy in PTC. Methods: One hundred and thirty-eight patients (28 men, 110 women; age range 6-70 years, mean age 39.4 years) with PTC were included in this study. All patients underwent total or near-total thyroidectomy, and 102 of these patients had lymphadenectomy. All patients had a documented PTC. 131 I ablation was performed in 3- 4 weeks after thyroidectomy. Sera levels of thyroid hormones (FT 3 , FT 4 ), thyrotropin (TSH), anti-Tg anti-body (TgAb), and Tg were measured before and after 13I ablation. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 13.0 software, and correlation analysis and t-test were used. Results: Postoperative stimulated Tg lev-el had a significantly positive association with postablation stimulated Tg level (r = 0. 960, P 131 I ablation therapy. Total or near-total thyroidectomy simultaneously conjugated with lymphadenectomy might have a better result in lower postablation stimulated Tg positivity in patients with PTC. (authors)

  12. Salvage surgery for local failures after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verstegen, Naomi E.; Maat, Alexander P. W. M.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Versteegh, Michel I; Joosten, Joris J.; Lastdrager, Willem; Smit, Egbert F.; Slotman, Ben J.; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Senan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The literature on surgical salvage, i.e. lung resections in patients who develop a local recurrence following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), is limited. We describe our experience with salvage surgery in nine patients who developed a local recurrence following SABR for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients who underwent surgical salvage for a local recurrence following SABR for NSCLC were identified from two Dutch institutional databases. Complications were scored using the Dindo-Clavien-classification. Nine patients who underwent surgery for a local recurrence were identified. Median time to local recurrence was 22 months. Recurrences were diagnosed with CT- and/or 18FDG-PET-imaging, with four patients also having a pre-surgical pathological diagnosis. Extensive adhesions were observed during two resections, requiring conversion from a thoracoscopic procedure to thoracotomy during one of these procedures. Three patients experienced complications post-surgery; grade 2 (N = 2) and grade 3a (N = 1), respectively. All resection specimens showed viable tumor cells. Median length of hospital stay was 8 days (range 5–15 days) and 30-day mortality was 0 %. Lymph node dissection revealed mediastinal metastases in 3 patients, all of whom received adjuvant therapy. Our experience with nine surgical procedures for local recurrences post-SABR revealed two grade IIIa complications, and a 30-day mortality of 0 %, suggesting that salvage surgery can be safely performed after SABR

  13. Thermal ablation of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: Safety, efficacy, and factors affecting local tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Edwin A; Kinsman, Kristin A; Schmit, Grant D; Atwell, Thomas D; Schmitz, John J; Welch, Brian T; Callstrom, Matthew R; Geske, Jennifer R; Kurup, A Nicholas

    2018-06-04

    To evaluate the safety and oncologic efficacy of percutaneous thermal ablation of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and identify risk factors for local tumor progression (LTP). Retrospective review of an institutional tumor ablation registry demonstrated that 20 patients (9 males, 11 females; mean age 62.5 ± 15.8 years) with 50 ICCs (mean size 1.8 ± 1.3 cm) were treated with percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or microwave ablation (MWA) between 2006 and 2015. Thirty-eight of the treated ICCs (76%) were metastases that developed after surgical resection of the primary tumor. Patient demographics, procedure technical parameters, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to examine the risk of LTP by ablation modality. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Mean imaging follow-up time was 41.5 ± 42.7 months. Forty-four (88%) ICCs were treated with RFA, and 6 (12%) with MWA. Eleven (22%) cases of LTP developed in 5 (25%) patients. The median time to LTP among these 11 tumors was 7.1 months (range, 2.3-22.9 months). Risk of LTP was not significantly different for ICCs treated with MWA compared to RFA (HR 2.72; 95% CI 0.58-12.84; p = 03.21). Median disease-free survival was 8.2 months (1.1-70.4 months), and median overall survival was 23.6 months (7.4-122.5 months). No major complication occurred. Percutaneous thermal ablation is a safe and effective treatment for patients with ICCs and may be particularly valuable in unresectable patients, or those who have already undergone hepatic surgery. Tumor size and ablation modality were not associated with LTP, whereas primary tumors and superficially located tumors were more likely to subsequently recur.

  14. Combined use of radioiodine therapy and radiofrequency ablation in treating postsurgical thyroid remnant of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Long

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Combined use of RAI therapy and radiofrequency ablation in treating excessive postsurgical thyroid remnant of DTC can be an effective approach and avoids re-operation. Long-term efficacy monitoring would further determine its feasibility.

  15. Definitive Management of Oligometastatic Melanoma in a Murine Model Using Combined Ablative Radiation Therapy and Viral Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Miran [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Shim, Kevin G. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Grams, Michael P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Rajani, Karishma; Diaz, Rosa M. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Furutani, Keith M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Thompson, Jill [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R.; Park, Sean S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Markovic, Svetomir N. [Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Pandha, Hardev [The Postgraduate Medical School, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Melcher, Alan [Leeds Institute of Cancer Studies and Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin [Targeted Therapy Laboratory, The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Shane [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Targeted Therapy Laboratory, The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Vile, Richard, E-mail: vile.richard@mayo.edu [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Leeds Institute of Cancer Studies and Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: The oligometastatic state is an intermediate state between a malignancy that can be completely eradicated with conventional modalities and one in which a palliative approach is undertaken. Clinically, high rates of local tumor control are possible with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), using precisely targeted, high-dose, low-fraction radiation therapy. However, in oligometastatic melanoma, virtually all patients develop progression systemically at sites not initially treated with ablative radiation therapy that cannot be managed with conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy. We have demonstrated in mice that intravenous administration of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing defined tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) generates systemic immune responses capable of clearing established tumors. Therefore, in the present preclinical study, we tested whether the combination of systemic VSV-mediated antigen delivery and SABR would be effective against oligometastatic disease. Methods and Materials: We generated a model of oligometastatic melanoma in C57BL/6 immunocompetent mice and then used a combination of SABR and systemically administered VSV-TAA viral immunotherapy to treat both local and systemic disease. Results: Our data showed that SABR generates excellent control or cure of local, clinically detectable, and accessible tumor through direct cell ablation. Also, the immunotherapeutic activity of systemically administered VSV-TAA generated T-cell responses that cleared subclinical metastatic tumors. We also showed that SABR induced weak T-cell-mediated tumor responses, which, particularly if boosted by VSV-TAA, might contribute to control of local and systemic disease. In addition, VSV-TAA therapy alone had significant effects on control of both local and metastatic tumors. Conclusions: We have shown in the present preliminary murine study using a single tumor model that this approach represents an effective, complementary

  16. Definitive Management of Oligometastatic Melanoma in a Murine Model Using Combined Ablative Radiation Therapy and Viral Immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, Miran; Shim, Kevin G.; Grams, Michael P.; Rajani, Karishma; Diaz, Rosa M.; Furutani, Keith M.; Thompson, Jill; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Park, Sean S.; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Pandha, Hardev; Melcher, Alan; Harrington, Kevin; Zaidi, Shane; Vile, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The oligometastatic state is an intermediate state between a malignancy that can be completely eradicated with conventional modalities and one in which a palliative approach is undertaken. Clinically, high rates of local tumor control are possible with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), using precisely targeted, high-dose, low-fraction radiation therapy. However, in oligometastatic melanoma, virtually all patients develop progression systemically at sites not initially treated with ablative radiation therapy that cannot be managed with conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy. We have demonstrated in mice that intravenous administration of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing defined tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) generates systemic immune responses capable of clearing established tumors. Therefore, in the present preclinical study, we tested whether the combination of systemic VSV-mediated antigen delivery and SABR would be effective against oligometastatic disease. Methods and Materials: We generated a model of oligometastatic melanoma in C57BL/6 immunocompetent mice and then used a combination of SABR and systemically administered VSV-TAA viral immunotherapy to treat both local and systemic disease. Results: Our data showed that SABR generates excellent control or cure of local, clinically detectable, and accessible tumor through direct cell ablation. Also, the immunotherapeutic activity of systemically administered VSV-TAA generated T-cell responses that cleared subclinical metastatic tumors. We also showed that SABR induced weak T-cell-mediated tumor responses, which, particularly if boosted by VSV-TAA, might contribute to control of local and systemic disease. In addition, VSV-TAA therapy alone had significant effects on control of both local and metastatic tumors. Conclusions: We have shown in the present preliminary murine study using a single tumor model that this approach represents an effective, complementary

  17. Robotically Assisted Sonic Therapy as a Noninvasive Nonthermal Ablation Modality: Proof of Concept in a Porcine Liver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolock, Amanda R; Cristescu, Mircea M; Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Green, Chelsey; Cannata, Jonathan; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Lee, Fred T

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility of creating a clinically relevant hepatic ablation (ie, an ablation zone capable of treating a 2-cm liver tumor) by using robotically assisted sonic therapy (RAST), a noninvasive and nonthermal focused ultrasound therapy based on histotripsy. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional animal use and care committee. Ten female pigs were treated with RAST in a single session with a prescribed 3-cm spherical treatment region and immediately underwent abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Three pigs (acute group) were sacrificed immediately following MR imaging. Seven pigs (chronic group) were survived for approximately 4 weeks and were reimaged with MR imaging immediately before sacrifice. Animals underwent necropsy and harvesting of the liver for histologic evaluation of the ablation zone. RAST ablations were performed with a 700-kHz therapy transducer. Student t tests were performed to compare prescribed versus achieved ablation diameter, difference of sphericity from 1, and change in ablation zone volume from acute to chronic imaging. Results Ablation zones had a sphericity index of 0.99 ± 0.01 (standard deviation) (P < .001 vs sphericity index of 1). Anteroposterior and transverse dimensions were not significantly different from prescribed (3.4 ± 0.7; P = .08 and 3.2 ± 0.8; P = .29, respectively). The craniocaudal dimension was significantly larger than prescribed (3.8 ± 1.1; P = .04), likely because of respiratory motion. The central ablation zone demonstrated complete cell destruction and a zone of partial necrosis. A fibrous capsule surrounded the ablation zone by 4 weeks. On 4-week follow-up images, ablation zone volumes decreased by 64% (P < .001). Conclusion RAST is capable of producing clinically relevant ablation zones in a noninvasive manner in a porcine model. © RSNA, 2018.

  18. Development of local radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, Chang Woon; Chai, Jong Su; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yong Sik; Lee, Hyun Moo

    1999-04-01

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed

  19. Development of local radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, Chang Woon; Chai, Jong Su; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yong Sik; Lee, Hyun Moo

    1999-04-01

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed.

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy as an ablative treatment for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huertas, Andres; Baumann, Anne-Sophie; Saunier-Kubs, Fleur; Salleron, Julia; Oldrini, Guillaume; Croisé-Laurent, Valérie; Barraud, Hélène; Ayav, Ahmed; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Peiffert, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe efficacy and safety of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: The records of 77 consecutive patients treated with SBRT for 97 liver-confined HCC were reviewed. A total dose of 45 Gy in 3 fractions was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and toxicity were studied. Results: The median follow-up was 12 months. The median tumor diameter was 2.4 cm. The LC rate was 99% at 1 and 2 years. The 1 and 2-year OS were 81.8% and 56.6% respectively. The median time to progression was 9 months (0–38). The rate of hepatic toxicity was 7.7% [1.6–13.7], 14.9% [5.7–23.2] and 23.1% [9.9–34.3] at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years respectively. In multivariate analysis, female gender (HR 7.87 [3.14–19.69]), a BCLC B-C stage (HR 3.71 [1.41–9.76]), a sum of all lesion diameters ⩾2 cm (HR 7.48 [2.09–26.83]) and a previous treatment (HR 0.10 [0.01–0.79]) were independent prognostic factors of overall survival. Conclusion: SBRT allows high local control for inoperable hepatocellular carcinomas. It should be considered when an ablative treatment is indicated in Child A patients

  1. Photodynamic therapy using upconversion nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikehata, Tomohiro; Onodera, Yuji; Nunokawa, Takashi [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Hirano, Tomohisa; Ogura, Shun-ichiro; Kamachi, Toshiaki [Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Odawara, Osamu [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Wada, Hiroyuki, E-mail: wada.h.ac@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Highly crystalline upconversion nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation in liquid. • Highly transparent near-IR irradiation generated singlet oxygen. • Viability of cancer cells was significantly decreased by near-IR irradiation. - Abstract: Upconversion nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation in liquid, and the potential use of the nanoparticles for cancer treatment was investigated. A Nd:YAG/SHG laser (532 nm, 13 ns, 10 Hz) was used for ablation, and the cancer treatment studied was photodynamic therapy (PDT). Morphology and crystallinity of prepared nanoparticles were examined by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Red and green emissions resulting from near-infrared excitation were observed by a fluorescence spectrophotometer. Generation of singlet oxygen was confirmed by a photochemical method using 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF). In vitro experiments using cultivated cancer cells were conducted to investigate PDT effects. Uptake of the photosensitizer by cancer cells and cytotoxicities of cancer cells were also examined. We conclude that the combination of PDT and highly crystalline nanoparticles, which were prepared by laser ablation in liquid, is an effective cancer treatment.

  2. Radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: l.crocetti@med.unipi.i [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy); Lencioni, Riccardo [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumor ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of solid tumors. Among these methods, radiofrequency (RF) ablation is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RF ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options and is considered as a viable alternate to surgery for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer. Recently, RF ablation has been demonstrated to be a safe and valuable treatment option for patients with unresectable or medically inoperable lung malignancies. Resection should remain the standard therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but RF ablation may be better than conventional external-beam radiation for the treatment of the high-risk individual with NSCLC. Initial favourable outcomes encourage combining radiotherapy and RF ablation, especially for treating larger tumors. In the setting of colorectal cancer lung metastases, survival rates provided by RF ablation in selected patients, are substantially higher than those obtained with any chemotherapy regimens and provide indirect evidence that RF ablation therapy improves survival in patients with limited lung metastatic disease.

  3. Gold Nanoparticles as a Photothermal Agent in Cancer Therapy: The Thermal Ablation Characteristic Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Grosges

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer therapy, the thermal ablation of diseased cells by embedded nanoparticles is one of the known therapies. It is based on the absorption of the energy of the illuminating laser by nanoparticles. The resulting heating of nanoparticles kills the cell where these photothermal agents are embedded. One of the main constraints of this therapy is preserving the surrounding healthy cells. Therefore, two parameters are of interest. The first one is the thermal ablation characteristic length, which corresponds to an action distance around the nanoparticles for which the temperature exceeds the ablation threshold. This critical geometric parameter is related to the expected conservation of the body temperature in the surroundings of the diseased cell. The second parameter is the temperature that should be reached to achieve active thermal agents. The temperature depends on the power of the illuminating laser, on the size of nanoparticles and on their physical properties. The purpose of this paper is to propose behavior laws under the constraints of both the body temperature at the boundary of the cell to preserve surrounding cells and an acceptable range of temperature in the target cell. The behavior laws are deduced from the finite element method, which is able to model aggregates of nanoparticles. We deduce sensitivities to the laser power and to the particle size. We show that the tuning of the temperature elevation and of the distance of action of a single nanoparticle is not significantly affected by variations of the particle size and of the laser power. Aggregates of nanoparticles are much more efficient, but represent a potential risk to the surrounding cells. Fortunately, by tuning the laser power, the thermal ablation characteristic length can be controlled.

  4. Clinical Benefit of Ablating Localized Sources for Human Atrial Fibrillation: The Indiana University FIRM Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John M; Kalra, Vikas; Das, Mithilesh K; Jain, Rahul; Garlie, Jason B; Brewster, Jordan A; Dandamudi, Gopi

    2017-03-14

    Mounting evidence shows that localized sources maintain atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear in unselected "real-world" patients if sources drive persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF), long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (LPeAF), or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF); if right atrial sites are important; and what the long-term success of source ablation is. The aim of this study was to analyze the role of rotors and focal sources in a large academic registry of consecutive patients undergoing source mapping for AF. One hundred seventy consecutive patients (mean age 59 ± 12 years, 79% men) with PAF (37%), PeAF (31%), or LPeAF (32%). Of these, 73 (43%) had undergone at least 1 prior ablation attempt (mean 1.9 ± 0.8; range: 1 to 4). Focal impulse and rotor modulation (FIRM) with an endocardial basket catheter was used in all cases. FIRM analysis revealed sources in the right atrium in 85% of patients (1.8 ± 1.3) and in the left atrium in 90% of patients (2.0 ± 1.3). FIRM ablation terminated AF to sinus rhythm or atrial flutter or tachycardia in 59% (PAF), 37% (PeAF), and 19% (LPeAF) of patients, with 15 of 67 terminations due to right atrial ablation. On follow-up, freedom from AF after a single FIRM procedure for the entire series was 95% (PAF), 83% (PeAF), and 82% (LPeAF) at 1 year and freedom from all atrial arrhythmias was 77% (PAF), 75% (PeAF), and 57% (LPeAF). In the Indiana University FIRM registry, FIRM-guided ablation produced high single-procedure success, mostly in patients with nonparoxysmal AF. Data from mapping, acute terminations, and outcomes strongly support the mechanistic role of biatrial rotors and focal sources in maintaining AF in diverse populations. Randomized trials of FIRM-guided ablation and mechanistic studies to determine how rotors form, progress, and regress are needed. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Genetic ablation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curiel, David T

    2000-01-01

    The gene therapy strategy of mutation compensation is designed to rectify the molecular lesions that are etiologic for neoplastic transformation. For dominant oncogenes, such approaches involve the functional knockout of the dysregulated cellular control pathways provoked by the overexpressed oncoprotein. On this basis, molecular interventions may be targeted to the transcriptional level of expression, via antisense or ribozymes, or post-transcriptionally, via intracellular single chain antibodies (intrabodies). For carcinoma of the breast, these approaches have been applied in the context of the disease linked oncogenes erbB-2 and cyclin D 1 , as well as the estrogen receptor. Neoplastic revision accomplished in modal systems has rationalized human trials on this basis

  6. Prostate Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy to Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Lilley, John; Thompson, Christopher M.; Cosgrove, Vivian; Mason, Josh; Sykes, Jonathan; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate boosting dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) in the context of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) and to examine the impact on tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate datasets were selected. DILs were defined using T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Four plans were produced for each dataset: (1) no boost to DILs; (2) boost to DILs, no seminal vesicles in prescription; (3) boost to DILs, proximal seminal vesicles (proxSV) prescribed intermediate dose; and (4) boost to DILs, proxSV prescribed higher dose. The prostate planning target volume (PTV) prescription was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. DILs were initially prescribed 115% of the PTV Prostate prescription, and PTV DIL prescriptions were increased in 5% increments until organ-at-risk constraints were reached. TCP and NTCP calculations used the LQ-Poisson Marsden, and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman models respectively. Results: When treating the prostate alone, the median PTV DIL prescription was 125% (range: 110%-140%) of the PTV Prostate prescription. Median PTV DIL D50% was 55.1 Gy (range: 49.6-62.6 Gy). The same PTV DIL prescriptions and similar PTV DIL median doses were possible when including the proxSV within the prescription. TCP depended on prostate α/β ratio and was highest with an α/β ratio = 1.5 Gy, where the additional TCP benefit of DIL boosting was least. Rectal NTCP increased with DIL boosting and was considered unacceptably high in 5 cases, which, when replanned with an emphasis on reducing maximum dose to 0.5 cm 3 of rectum (Dmax 0.5cc ), as well as meeting existing constraints, resulted in considerable rectal NTCP reductions. Conclusions: Boosting DILs in the context of SABR is technically feasible but should be approached with caution. If this therapy is adopted, strict rectal constraints are required including Dmax 0.5cc . If

  7. Determinants of successful ablation and complete remission after total thyroidectomy and 131I therapy of paediatric differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verburg, Frederik A.; Maeder, Uwe; Luster, Markus; Haenscheid, Heribert; Reiners, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In adult differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients, successful ablation and the number of 131 I therapies needed carry a prognostic significance. The goal was to assess the prognosis of DTC in children and adolescents treated in our centre in relation to the number of treatments needed and to establish the determinants of both complete remission (CR) and successful ablation. Seventy-six DTC patients <21 years of age at diagnosis were included. Recurrence and death rates, rates of CR (=negative stimulated thyroglobulin, negative neck ultrasound and negative 131 I whole-body scintigraphy) and successful ablation (=CR after initial 131 I therapy) were studied. No patients died of DTC. Seven patients were treated by surgery alone and did not show signs of recurrence during follow-up. Of the 69 patients also treated with 131 I therapy, 47 patients achieved CR, 25 of whom had successful ablation. In multivariate analysis, female gender and the absence of distant metastases were independent determinants of a higher CR rate. Female gender, lower T stage and higher 131 I activity (successful ablation, median activity 3.1 GBq, unsuccessful ablation 2.6 GBq) were determinants of a higher rate of successful ablation. After 131 I therapy no patient showed recurrence after reaching CR or disease progression if CR was not reached. In our paediatric DTC population prognosis is extremely good with no deaths or recurrences occurring regardless of the number of 131 I therapies needed or whether CR was reached. The determinants of CR and successful ablation can be used to optimize the chance of therapy success. (orig.)

  8. Determinants of successful ablation and complete remission after total thyroidectomy and {sup 131}I therapy of paediatric differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Frederik A. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maeder, Uwe [University of Wuerzburg, Comprehensive Cancer Center Mainfranken, Wuerzburg (Germany); Luster, Markus [University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany); Haenscheid, Heribert; Reiners, Christoph [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    In adult differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients, successful ablation and the number of {sup 131}I therapies needed carry a prognostic significance. The goal was to assess the prognosis of DTC in children and adolescents treated in our centre in relation to the number of treatments needed and to establish the determinants of both complete remission (CR) and successful ablation. Seventy-six DTC patients <21 years of age at diagnosis were included. Recurrence and death rates, rates of CR (=negative stimulated thyroglobulin, negative neck ultrasound and negative {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy) and successful ablation (=CR after initial {sup 131}I therapy) were studied. No patients died of DTC. Seven patients were treated by surgery alone and did not show signs of recurrence during follow-up. Of the 69 patients also treated with {sup 131}I therapy, 47 patients achieved CR, 25 of whom had successful ablation. In multivariate analysis, female gender and the absence of distant metastases were independent determinants of a higher CR rate. Female gender, lower T stage and higher {sup 131}I activity (successful ablation, median activity 3.1 GBq, unsuccessful ablation 2.6 GBq) were determinants of a higher rate of successful ablation. After {sup 131}I therapy no patient showed recurrence after reaching CR or disease progression if CR was not reached. In our paediatric DTC population prognosis is extremely good with no deaths or recurrences occurring regardless of the number of {sup 131}I therapies needed or whether CR was reached. The determinants of CR and successful ablation can be used to optimize the chance of therapy success. (orig.)

  9. MRI Reconstructions of Human Phrenic Nerve Anatomy and Computational Modeling of Cryoballoon Ablative Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Ryan P; Spencer, Julianne H; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2016-04-01

    The primary goal of this computational modeling study was to better quantify the relative distance of the phrenic nerves to areas where cryoballoon ablations may be applied within the left atria. Phrenic nerve injury can be a significant complication of applied ablative therapies for treatment of drug refractory atrial fibrillation. To date, published reports suggest that such injuries may occur more frequently in cryoballoon ablations than in radiofrequency therapies. Ten human heart-lung blocs were prepared in an end-diastolic state, scanned with MRI, and analyzed using Mimics software as a means to make anatomical measurements. Next, generated computer models of ArticFront cryoballoons (23, 28 mm) were mated with reconstructed pulmonary vein ostias to determine relative distances between the phrenic nerves and projected balloon placements, simulating pulmonary vein isolation. The effects of deep seating balloons were also investigated. Interestingly, the relative anatomical differences in placement of 23 and 28 mm cryoballoons were quite small, e.g., the determined difference between mid spline distance to the phrenic nerves between the two cryoballoon sizes was only 1.7 ± 1.2 mm. Furthermore, the right phrenic nerves were commonly closer to the pulmonary veins than the left, and surprisingly tips of balloons were further from the nerves, yet balloon size choice did not significantly alter calculated distance to the nerves. Such computational modeling is considered as a useful tool for both clinicians and device designers to better understand these associated anatomies that, in turn, may lead to optimization of therapeutic treatments.

  10. Nursing care for patients with pulmonary malignancy after radiofrequency ablation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Caifeng; Gong Yunzhen; Li Huiqian; Ge Lei; Zhao Fang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing care strategy for patients with pulmonary malignancy who were treated with CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapy. Methods CT-guided RFA was performed in 21 patients with pulmonary malignancy, the sum total of ablated lesions was 31. Results: RFA procedure was successfully accomplished in all patients. The operation-related complications included minor pneumothorax, hydropneumothorax, bloody sputum, pain and mild fever. The clinical symptoms were soon relieved after medication according to indications. No death or serious complications occurred. Conclusion: For patients with pulmonary malignancy who were treated with CT-guided RFA, esponsible nursing care and serious, careful observation after operation are very helpful for patient's recovery. (authors)

  11. {sup 18}F-FDG PET as novel imaging biomarker for disease progression after ablation therapy in colorectal liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim, M. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Prevoo, W.; Wit-van der Veen, B.J. de; Stokkel, M.P.M. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuhlmann, K.F.; Ruers, T. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department Surgical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hillegersberg, R. van [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bosch, M.A.A.J. van den; Verkooijen, H.M.; Lam, M.G.E.H. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-07-15

    Recurrent disease following thermal ablation therapy is a frequently reported problem. Preoperative identification of patients with high risk of recurrent disease might enable individualized treatment based on patients' risk profile. The aim of the present work was to investigate the role of metabolic parameters derived from the pre-ablation {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as imaging biomarkers for recurrent disease in patients with colorectal liver metastases (CLM). Included in this retrospective study were all consecutive patients with CLM treated with percutaneous or open thermal ablation therapy who had a pre-treatment baseline {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT available. Multivariable cox regression for survival analysis was performed using different models for the metabolic parameters (SUL{sub peak}, SUL{sub mean}, SUL{sub max}, partial volume corrected SUL{sub mean} (cSUL{sub mean}), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG)) corrected for tumour and procedure characteristics. The study endpoints were defined as local tumour progression free survival (LTP-FS), new intrahepatic recurrence free survival (NHR-FS) and extrahepatic recurrence free survival (EHR-FS). Clinical and imaging follow-up data was used as the reference standard. Fifty-four patients with 90 lesions were selected. Univariable cox regression analysis resulted in eight models. Multivariable analysis revealed that after adjusting for lesion size and the approach of the procedure, none of the metabolic parameters were associated with LTP-FS or EHR-FS. Percutaneous approach was significantly associated with a shorter LTP-FS. It was demonstrated that lower values of SUL{sub peak}, SUL{sub max}, SUL{sub mean}, and cSUL{sub mean} are associated with a significant better NHR-FS, independent of the lesion size and number and prior chemotherapy. We found no association between the metabolic parameters on pre-ablation {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and the LTP-FS. However, low values of the metabolic parameters were significantly

  12. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Subcentimeter Lung Tumors: Clinical, Dosimetric, and Image Guidance Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Use of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for subcentimeter lung tumors is controversial. We report our outcomes for tumors with diameter ≤1 cm and their visibility on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and retrospectively evaluate the planned dose using a deterministic dose calculation algorithm (Acuros XB [AXB]). Methods and Materials: We identified subcentimeter tumors from our institutional SABR database. Tumor size was remeasured on an artifact-free phase of the planning 4-dimensional (4D)-CT. Clinical plan doses were generated using either a pencil beam convolution or an anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA). All AAA plans were recalculated using AXB, and differences among D95 and mean dose for internal target volume (ITV) and planning target volume (PTV) on the average intensity CT dataset, as well as for gross tumor volume (GTV) on the end respiratory phases were reported. For all AAA patients, CBCT scans acquired during each treatment fraction were evaluated for target visibility. Progression-free and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Thirty-five patients with 37 subcentimeter tumors were eligible for analysis. For the 22 AAA plans recalculated using AXB, Mean D95 ± SD values were 2.2 ± 4.4% (ITV) and 2.5 ± 4.8% (PTV) lower using AXB; whereas mean doses were 2.9 ± 4.9% (ITV) and 3.7 ± 5.1% (PTV) lower. Calculated AXB doses were significantly lower in one patient (difference in mean ITV and PTV doses, as well as in mean ITV and PTV D95 ranged from 22%-24%). However, the end respiratory phase GTV received at least 95% of the prescription dose. Review of 92 CBCT scans from all AAA patients revealed that the tumor was visualized in 82 images, and its position could be inferred in other images. The 2-year local progression-free survival was 100%. Conclusions: Patients with subcentimeter lung tumors are good candidates for SABR, given the dosimetry, ability to localize

  13. Radiofrequency ablation combined with transcatheter arterial embolisation in rabbit liver: investigation of the ablation zone according to the time interval between the two therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I J; Kim, Y I; Kim, K W; Kim, D H; Ryoo, I; Lee, M W; Chung, J W

    2012-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the extent of the radiofrequency ablation zone in relation to the time interval between transcatheter arterial embolisation (TAE) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and, ultimately, to determine the optimal strategy of combining these two therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma. 15 rabbits were evenly divided into three groups: Group A was treated with RFA alone; Group B was treated with TAE immediately followed by RFA; and Group C was treated with TAE followed by RFA 5 days later. All animals underwent perfusion CT (PCT) scans immediately after RFA. Serum liver transaminases were measured to evaluate acute liver damage. Animals were euthanised for pathological analysis of ablated tissues 10 days after RFA. Non-parametric analyses were conducted to compare PCT indices, the RFA zone and liver transaminase levels among the three experimental groups. Group B showed a significantly larger ablation zone than the other two groups. Arterial liver perfusion and hepatic perfusion index represented well the perfusion decrease after TAE on PCT. Although Group B showed the most elevated liver transaminase levels at 1 day post RFA, the enzymes decreased to levels that were not different from the other groups at 10 days post-RFA. When combined TAE and RFA therapy is considered, TAE should be followed by RFA as quickly as possible, as it can be performed safely without serious hepatic deterioration, despite the short interval between the two procedures.

  14. Combining partial liver resection and local ablation of liver tumours: a preliminary Dutch experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Gulik Thomas M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The combination of partial liver resection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA is a novel concept in the treatment of unresectable liver malignancies. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of this combined strategy in the Netherlands. Methods Thirty-five patients treated with a combination of partial liver resection and RFA were identified from a prospectively registered pooled multicentre database. All patients were operated between June 1999 and November 2003 in 8 medical centres in the Netherlands. Main outcome parameters were morbidity, mortality, local success rate, and survival. Results Thirty-seven operations were performed in 35 patients. The group consisted of 20 male and 15 female patients with a median age of 59 years (range 41–76. Seventy-six lesions were resected and RFA was performed to ablate 82 unresectable liver tumours. Twelve patients developed a total of 24 complications, resulting in an overall perioperative morbidity rate of 32%. In two patients major complications resulted in postoperative death (postoperative mortality rate 5.4%. Local success rate after RFA was 88% and the estimated 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 84%, 70% and 43%, respectively. Conclusion This strategy should only be performed following strict patient selection and within the context of prospective clinical trials.

  15. Salvage surgery for local failures after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Verstegen (Naomi); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F.J. Lagerwaard (Frank); M.A. Paul (Marinus); M. Versteegh (Michel); J.J. Joosten (Joris); W. Lastdrager (Willem); E.F. Smit (Egbert); B.J. Slotman (Ben); J.J.M.E. Nuyttens (Joost); S. Senan (Suresh)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction:__ The literature on surgical salvage, i.e. lung resections in patients who develop a local recurrence following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), is limited. We describe our experience with salvage surgery in nine patients who developed a local recurrence

  16. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Pulmonary Metastases: Histology, Dose, and Indication Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helou, Joelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Thibault, Isabelle [Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec City, Québec (Canada); Poon, Ian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chiang, Andrew [Northeast Cancer Centre, Health Sciences North, Sudbury, Ontario (Canada); Jain, Suneil [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Soliman, Hany; Erler, Darby [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yeung, Latifa [Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cheung, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.cheung@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between colorectal cancer (CRC) histology, dose, and local failure (LF) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for pulmonary metastases, and to describe subsequent cancer progression, change of systemic therapy (CST), survival, and their association with treatment indications. Methods and Materials: From a prospective SABR cohort, 180 pulmonary metastases in 120 patients were identified. Treatment indications were single metastasis, oligometastases, oligoprogression, and dominant areas of progression. Doses of 48 to 52 Gy/4 to 5 fractions were delivered. Since 2010 the dose for peripheral CRC metastases was increased to 60 Gy/4 fractions. Cumulative incidence function (CIF) was used to report LF, progression probability, and CST. The Kaplan-Meier method estimated overall survival (OS). Univariate and multivariable analyses to assess variable associations were conducted. Results: Median follow-up was 22 months (interquartile range, 14-33 months). At 24 months, the CIF of LF was 23.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.1%-33.3%) and 8.3% (95% CI 2.6%-18.6%), respectively, for CRC and non-CRC metastases (P<.001). This association remained significant after adjusting for confounders (subdistribution hazard ratio [SHR] 13.6, 95% CI 4.2-44.1, P<.001). Among CRC metastases, 56 and 45 received <60 Gy and 60 Gy, respectively. Delivering 60 Gy was independently associated with a lower hazard of LF (SHR 0.271, 95% CI 0.078-0.940, P=.040). At 12 months the CIF of progression was 41.67% (95% CI 21.69%-60.56%), 42.51% (95% CI 29.09%-55.29%), 62.96% (95% CI 41.25%-78.53%), and 78.57% (95% CI 42.20%-93.48%), respectively, for patients treated for single metastasis, oligometastases, oligoprogression, and dominant area of progression (P<.001). A CST was observed, respectively, in 4 (17%), 17 (31%), 12 (44%), and 10 (71%) patients with a median time of 13.1, 11.1, 8.4, and 8.4 months. Conclusion: Colorectal cancer lung

  17. Multi-Institutional Experience of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Stage I Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gajjar, Sameer R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Zhen, Weining [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Harkenrider, Matthew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Matthiesen, Chance L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Braunstein, Steve E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, California (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Dilling, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Allen, Bryan G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Nichols, Elizabeth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: For inoperable stage I (T1-T2N0) small cell lung cancer (SCLC), national guidelines recommend chemotherapy with or without conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. The present multi-institutional cohort study investigated the role of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for this population. Methods and Materials: The clinical and treatment characteristics, toxicities, outcomes, and patterns of failure were assessed in patients with histologically confirmed stage T1-T2N0M0 SCLC. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate the survival outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified predictors of outcomes. Results: From 24 institutions, 76 lesions were treated in 74 patients (median follow-up 18 months). The median age and tumor size was 72 years and 2.5 cm, respectively. Chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation were delivered in 56% and 23% of cases, respectively. The median SABR dose and fractionation was 50 Gy and 5 fractions. The 1- and 3-year local control rate was 97.4% and 96.1%, respectively. The median disease-free survival (DFS) duration was 49.7 months. The DFS rate was 58.3% and 53.2% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. The median, 1-year, and 3-year disease-specific survival was 52.3 months, 84.5%, and 64.4%, respectively. The median, 1-year, and 3-year overall survival (OS) was 17.8 months, 69.9%, and 34.0% respectively. Patients receiving chemotherapy experienced an increased median DFS (61.3 vs 9.0 months; P=.02) and OS (31.4 vs 14.3 months; P=.02). The receipt of chemotherapy independently predicted better outcomes for DFS/OS on multivariate analysis (P=.01). Toxicities were uncommon; 5.2% experienced grade ≥2 pneumonitis. Post-treatment failure was most commonly distant (45.8% of recurrence), followed by nodal (25.0%) and “elsewhere lung” (20.8%). The median time to each was 5 to 7 months. Conclusions: From the findings of the largest report of SABR for stage T1-T2N0 SCLC to date, SABR (≥50

  18. Contrast-enhanced harmonic ultrasound imaging in ablation therapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yasunori; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2009-12-31

    The success rate of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) depends on correct targeting via an imaging technique. However, RF electrode insertion is not completely accurate for residual HCC nodules because B-mode ultrasound (US), color Doppler, and power Doppler US findings cannot adequately differentiate between treated and viable residual tumor tissue. Electrode insertion is also difficult when we must identify the true HCC nodule among many large regenerated nodules in cirrhotic liver. Two breakthroughs in the field of US technology, harmonic imaging and the development of second-generation contrast agents, have recently been described and have demonstrated the potential to dramatically broaden the scope of US diagnosis of hepatic lesions. Contrast-enhanced harmonic US imaging with an intravenous contrast agent can evaluate small hypervascular HCC even when B-mode US cannot adequately characterize tumor. Therefore, contrast-enhanced harmonic US can facilitate RF ablation electrode placement in hypervascular HCC, which is poorly depicted by B-mode US. The use of contrast-enhanced harmonic US in ablation therapy for liver cancer is an efficient approach.

  19. Radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.J.; Richardson, G.; Hafermann, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1965, 401 patients with prostate cancer have received intensive local pelvic radiation therapy at the Virginia Mason Medical Center. Two hundred twenty-one of this series were in the Stage C category. The 36 Stage B cancers were either medically nonoperable, or advanced extent, or had high-grade histopathology. Ten patients each were in diffuse Stage A or Stage D groups, the latter receiving local palliative inensive treatment to the prostate area. The mean age of the patients was 67.6 years. The five year survival of the Stage C group was 57.7%. There was no apparent influence on the survival of irradiated Stage C patients who received estrogen therapy. Current treatment techniques employ 10 megavolt photon beam with whole pelvic nodal fields and bilateral are rotational boost fields. The incidence of reactions and complications is presented

  20. Stochastic Predictions of Cell Kill During Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy: Do Hypoxia and Reoxygenation Really Matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harriss-Phillips, Wendy M., E-mail: wharrphil@gmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Bezak, Eva [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Potter, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Adelaide Radiotherapy Centre, Genesis CancerCare, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To simulate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy on hypoxic and well-oxygenated in silico tumors, incorporating probabilistic parameter distributions and linear-quadratic versus linear-quadratic-cubic methodology and the evaluation of optimal fractionation schemes using biological effective dose (BED{sub α/β=10} {sub or} {sub 3}) comparisons. Methods and Materials: A temporal tumor growth and radiation therapy algorithm simulated high-dose external beam radiation therapy using stochastic methods. Realistic biological proliferative cellular hierarchy and pO{sub 2} histograms were incorporated into the 10{sup 8}-cell tumor model, with randomized radiation therapy applied during continual cell proliferation and volume-based gradual tumor reoxygenation. Dose fractions ranged from 6-35 Gy, with predictive outcomes presented in terms of the total doses (converted to BED) required to eliminate all cells that could potentially regenerate the tumor. Results: Well-oxygenated tumor control BED{sub 10} outcomes were not significantly different for high-dose versus conventional radiation therapy (BED{sub 10}: 79-84 Gy; Equivalent Dose in 2 Gy fractions with α/β of 10: 66-70 Gy); however, total treatment times decreased from 7 down to 1-3 weeks. For hypoxic tumors, an additional 28 Gy (51 Gy BED{sub 10}) was required, with BED{sub 10} increasing with dose per fraction due to wasted dose in the final fraction. Fractions of 9 Gy compromised well for total treatment time and BED, with BED{sub 10}:BED{sub 3} of 84:176 Gy for oxic and 132:278 Gy for non-reoxygenating hypoxic tumors. Initial doses of 12 Gy followed by 6 Gy further increased the therapeutic ratio. When delivering ≥9 Gy per fraction, applying reoxygenation and/or linear-quadratic-cubic cell survival both affected tumor control doses by a significant 1-2 fractions. Conclusions: The complex temporal dynamics of tumor oxygenation combined with probabilistic cell kinetics in the modeling of

  1. Ablative dose proton beam therapy for stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinomas. Ablative dose PBT for NSCLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Joo Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Suh, Yang-Gun; Kim, Yeon-Joo [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sung Ho [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Center for Lung Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ablative dose hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 55 patients with stage I (n = 42) and recurrent (n = 13) NSCLC underwent hypofractionated PBT and were retrospectively reviewed. A total dose of 50-72 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent) in 5-12 fractions was delivered. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (range 4-95 months). There were 24 deaths (43.6%) during the follow-up period: 11 died of disease progression and 13 from other causes. Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate (OS) at 3 years was 54.9% and the median OS was 48.6 months (range 4-95 months). Local progression was observed in 7 patients and the median time to local progression was 9.3 months (range 5-14 months). Cumulative actuarial local control rate (LCR), lymph node metastasis-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates at 3 years were 85.4, 78.4, and 76.5%, respectively. Larger tumor diameter was significantly associated with poorer LCR (3-year: 94% for ≤3 cm vs. 65% for >3 cm, p = 0.006) on univariate analysis and also an independent prognostic factor for LCR (HR 6.9, 95% CI = 1.3-37.8, p = 0.026) on multivariate analysis. No grade 3 or 4 treatment-related toxicities developed. One grade 5 treatment-related adverse event occurred in a patient with symptomatic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Ablative dose hypofractionated PBT was safe and promising for stage I and recurrent NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung von Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit hypofraktionierter Protonentherapie (PBT) mit ablativen Dosen fuer nichtkleinzellige Lungenkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I und rekurrierende NSCLC. Retrospektiv wurden insgesamt 55 NSCLC-Patienten (Stadium I: n = 42; rekurrierender Tumor: n = 13), analysiert. Sie waren mit einer Gesamtdosis von 50-72 CGE (''cobalt gray equivalent'') in 5-12 Fraktionen behandelt worden. Der Median der Follow

  2. Proceedings from an international conference on ablation therapy for Barrett's mucosa: Brittany, France, 31 August - 2 September 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, C G; Demeester, T R

    2017-11-01

    The increasing incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lower esophagus and cardia arising in Barrett's metaplastic epithelium continues to be of great concern because medical and surgical efforts to reverse the process have been disappointing. A potential answer to the problem is removal of the metaplastic epithelium. Modern technology has introduced physical and chemical modalities which facilitate ablation of the neo-epithelium endoscopically. These techniques have been used in several centers, and preliminary results are encouraging. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international symposium on ablative therapy held in Brittany, France in August 1997.Twenty-eight speakers contributed to the talks on the pathology, pathogenesis, current therapy experimental studies and clinical experience of ablation of Barrett's esophagus. © 1998 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus/Harcourt Brace & Co. Ltd.

  3. Long-term local control with radiofrequency ablation or radiotherapy for second, third, and fourth lung tumors after lobectomy for primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokouchi, Hideoki; Murata, Kohei; Miyazaki, Masaki; Miyamoto, Takeaki; Minami, Takafumi; Tsuji, Fumio; Mikami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman developed second, third, and fourth lung tumors at intervals of 1-3 years after left upper lobectomy for primary lung cancer. The tumors were controlled with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or conventional conformal radiotherapy for 9 years postoperatively. For the treatment of second primary lung cancer or lung metastasis after surgical resection of the primary lung cancer, reoperation is not recommended because of the impaired respiratory reserve. Thus, local therapy such as radiotherapy or RFA is applied in some cases. Among these, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a feasible option because of its good local control and safety, which is comparable with surgery. On the other hand, for cases of multiple lesions that are not suitable for radiotherapy or combination therapy, RFA could be an option because of its short-term local control, easiness, safety, and repeatability. After surgery for primary lung cancer, a second lung tumor could be controlled with highly effective and minimally invasive local therapy if it is recognized as a local disease but is medically inoperable. Therefore, long-term postoperative follow-up for primary lung cancer is beneficial. (author)

  4. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the choice of thyreostatic medication?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobe, C.; Weber, I.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Schmidt, M.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: this study was performed to analyse the impact of the choice of antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the outcome of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with Graves' disease. Patients, material, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months after RIT between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were the confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of ATD two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose of 250 Gy was calculated from the results of the radioiodine test and the therapeutically achieved dose was measured by serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months offer RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The pretreatment ATD was retrospectively correlated with the results achieved. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients. 472 patients were treated with carbimazole or methimazole (CMI) and 61 with propylthiouracil (PTU). 38 patients had no thyrostatic drugs (ND) prior to RIT. The success rate was equal in all groups (CMI 451/472; PTU 61/61; ND 37/38; p = 0.22). Conclusion: thyrostatic treatment with PTU achieves excellent results in ablative RIT, using an accurate dosimetric approach with an achieved post-therapeutic dose of more than 200 Gy. (orig.)

  5. Radiofrequency ablation for unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegrachi, Samira; Besselink, Marc G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Molenaar, Izaak Quintus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Median survival in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer lies in the range of 9–15 months. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) may prolong survival, but data on its safety and efficacy are scarce. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library with the syntax ‘(radiofrequency OR RFA) AND (pancreas OR pancreatic)’ for studies published until 1 January 2012. In addition, a search of the proceedings of conferences on pancreatic disease that took place during 2009–2011 was performed. Studies with fewer than five patients were excluded as they were considered to be case reports. The primary endpoint was survival. Secondary endpoints included morbidity and mortality. Results: Five studies involving a total of 158 patients with pancreatic cancer treated with RFA fulfilled the eligibility criteria. These studies reported median survival after RFA of 3–33 months, morbidity related to RFA of 4–37%, mortality of 0–19% and overall morbidity of 10–43%. Pooling of data was not appropriate as the study populations and reported outcomes were heterogeneous. Crucial safety aspects included ensuring a maximum RFA tip temperature of < 90 °C and ensuring minimum distances between the RFA probe and surrounding structures. Conclusions: Radiofrequency ablation seems to be feasible and safe when it is used with the correct temperature and at an appropriate distance from vital structures. It appears to have a positive impact on survival. Multicentre randomized trials are necessary to determine the true effect size of RFA and to minimize the impacts of selection and publication biases. PMID:23600801

  6. Salient points in reconstruction of nasal skin after tumor ablation with local flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A variety of nasal skin reconstruction methods are available to meet the esthetic patient's needs. In this article, we review some of modifications of these procedures and share our experience in reconstruction of different parts of the nasal skin following skin tumor ablation. Patients and Methods : From January 2010 to January 2014, 171 patients underwent nasal skin reconstruction after excising cancerous lesions of the involved nasal skin. The patient's history, pre- and post-operation photographs, and the surgery data were collected and assessed. Demographic data related to the type of cancer, defect size and location, type of reconstruction were collected. Results: A variety of local flaps were used based on location and defect features. Nearly all flaps healed primarily without postsurgical significant complications. Conclusion: According to the results and the outcomes of the operations, we concluded that a certain flaps are more effective than others in nasal skin reconstruction. Local flap reconstruction of the nose has good esthetic result with low complication rate.

  7. Local and systemic antimicrobial therapy in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, David; Matesanz, Paula; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Sanz, Mariano

    2012-09-01

    This review aimed to update the current evidence on the efficacy of the adjunctive use of local and systemic antimicrobials in the treatment of periodontitis and to assess whether it might improve the clinical limitations and shortcomings of standard nonsurgical treatment in the management of periodontitis. Relevant randomized clinical trials (RCT) with more than 3 months of follow-up, published from 2010 to 2012 for systemic antimicrobials and from 2008 to 2012 for local antimicrobials, were searched in Medline and critically analyzed. Scientific evidence evaluated in different systematic reviews and reviews presented at European and World Workshops were also included. Only adjunctive therapies were considered in the present review: articles comparing debridement alone or plus placebo, versus debridement plus systemic or local antimicrobials were included. Adjunctive systemic antimicrobials have been evaluated both in aggressive and chronic periodontitis: in aggressive periodontitis, amoxicillin and metronidazole have been extensively studied, reporting clinical and microbiological benefits; in chronic periodontitis, different products are under scrutiny, such as azithromycin. The clinical efficacy of local antimicrobials, although extensively demonstrated, is still surrounded by a constant debate on the cost-effectiveness evaluation and on its adequate indications. Despite the clinical efficacy of the adjunctive use of local and systemic antimicrobials, demonstrated in RCTs and in systematic reviews, there is a lack of evidence to support well-defined clinical protocols, including products and dosages. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Value of local electrogram characteristics predicting successful catheter ablation of left-versus right-sided accessory atrioventricular pathways by radiofrequency current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J L; Schie, J T; Tseng, C D; Chen, W J; Cheng, T F; Tsou, S S; Chen, J J; Tseng, Y Z; Lien, W P

    1995-01-01

    Despite similar guidance by local electrogram criteria, catheter ablation of right-sided accessory atrioventricular (AV) pathways by radiofrequency current has been less effective than that of left-sided ones. In order to elucidate the possible diversities in local electrosignal criteria, we systematically analyzed the morphological and timing characteristics of 215 bipolar local electrograms from catheter ablation sites of 65 left-sided accessory AV pathways and of 356 from those of 37 right-sided ones in 92 consecutive patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome or AV reentrant tachycardia incorporating concealed accessory AV pathways. After stepwise multivariate analysis, we selected the presence of a possible accessory pathway potential, local ventricular activation preceding QRS complex for 20 ms or more during ventricular insertion mapping, and the local retrograde ventriculoatrial (VA) continuity, local retrograde VA interval right-sided targets only) during atrial insertion mapping, as independent local electrogram predictors for successful ablation of left- and right-sided accessory AV pathways. Combination of all local electrogram predictors could have moderate chance of success (80 and 51%) for the ventricular and atrial insertion ablation of left-sided accessory AV pathways, but only low probability of success (40% in ventricular insertion ablation) or very low sensitivity (12.5% in atrial insertion ablation) for right-sided ones. In conclusion, with the present approach, successful catheter ablation of right-sided accessory AV pathways, compared to left-sided ones, still necessitate a breakthrough in the precision mapping and the efficiency of energy delivery.

  9. Delayed esophageal perforation from stereotactic body radiation therapy for locally recurrent central nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sainathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is a novel form of external beam radiation therapy. It is used to treat early and locally recurrent nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSLC in medically inoperable patients. It uses high dose, hypofractionated radiotherapy, with targeting of the tumor by precise spatial localization, thus minimizing injury to surrounding tissues. It can be safely used to ablate NSLC in both central and peripheral locations. We present two cases of delayed esophageal perforation after SBRT for locally recurrent central NSLC. The perforations occurred several months after the therapy. They were treated with covered esophageal stents, with mortality, due to the perforation in one of the patients. SBRT should be judiciously used to ablate centrally located NSLC and patients who develop episodes of esophagitis during or after SBRT, need to be closely followed with endoscopy to look for esophageal ulcerations. These ulcers should be closely followed for healing as these may degenerate into full thickness perforations several months after SBRT.

  10. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T 10 and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V 10 -V 40 and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 ≤65% before SABR (P=.012), V 20 ≥30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 ≤65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V 20 ≥30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Radiofrequency Ablation for Inoperable Colorectal Liver Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hayeon, E-mail: kimh2@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Gill, Beant; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Roberts, Mark S. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Smith, Kenneth J. [Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a cost-effective therapy compared with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for patients with unresectable colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a Markov model and 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and RFA were captured in the model on the basis of a comprehensive literature review and Medicare reimbursements in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, with effectiveness measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for model uncertainty, 1-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: In base case analysis, treatment costs for 3 fractions of SBRT and 1 RFA procedure were $13,000 and $4397, respectively. Median survival was assumed the same for both strategies (25 months). The SBRT costs $8202 more than RFA while gaining 0.05 QALYs, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $164,660 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of median survival from both treatments. Stereotactic body radiation therapy was economically reasonable if better survival was presumed (>1 month gain) or if used for large tumors (>4 cm). Conclusions: If equal survival is assumed, SBRT is not cost-effective compared with RFA for inoperable colorectal liver metastases. However, if better local control leads to small survival gains with SBRT, this strategy becomes cost-effective. Ideally, these results should be confirmed with prospective comparative data.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Radiofrequency Ablation for Inoperable Colorectal Liver Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hayeon; Gill, Beant; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful; Roberts, Mark S.; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a cost-effective therapy compared with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for patients with unresectable colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a Markov model and 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and RFA were captured in the model on the basis of a comprehensive literature review and Medicare reimbursements in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, with effectiveness measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for model uncertainty, 1-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: In base case analysis, treatment costs for 3 fractions of SBRT and 1 RFA procedure were $13,000 and $4397, respectively. Median survival was assumed the same for both strategies (25 months). The SBRT costs $8202 more than RFA while gaining 0.05 QALYs, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $164,660 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of median survival from both treatments. Stereotactic body radiation therapy was economically reasonable if better survival was presumed (>1 month gain) or if used for large tumors (>4 cm). Conclusions: If equal survival is assumed, SBRT is not cost-effective compared with RFA for inoperable colorectal liver metastases. However, if better local control leads to small survival gains with SBRT, this strategy becomes cost-effective. Ideally, these results should be confirmed with prospective comparative data.

  13. Radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases-software-assisted evaluation of the ablation zone in MDCT: tumor-free follow-up versus local recurrent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Sebastian; Bruners, Philipp; Schiffl, Katharina; Sedlmair, Martin; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Günther, Rolf W; Das, Marco; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in change of size and CT value between local recurrences and tumor-free areas after CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic metastases during follow-up by means of dedicated software for automatic evaluation of hepatic lesions. Thirty-two patients with 54 liver metastases from breast or colorectal cancer underwent triphasic contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate hepatic metastatic spread and localization before CT-guided RFA and for follow-up after intervention. Sixteen of these patients (65.1 + or - 10.3 years) with 30 metastases stayed tumor-free (group 1), while the other group (n = 16 with 24 metastases; 62.0 + or - 13.8 years) suffered from local recurrent disease (group 2). Applying an automated software tool (SyngoCT Oncology; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), size parameters (volume, RECIST, WHO) and attenuation were measured within the lesions before, 1 day after, and 28 days after RFA treatment. The natural logarithm (ln) of the quotient of the volume 1 day versus 28 days after RFA treament was computed: lnQ1//28/0(volume). Analogously, ln ratios of RECIST, WHO, and attenuation were computed and statistically evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA. One lesion in group 2 was excluded from further evaluation due to automated missegmentation. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to initial volume, RECIST, and WHO (p free and local-recurrent ablation zones with respect to the corresponding size parameters. A new parameter (lnQ1//28/0(volume/RECIST/WHO/attenuation)) was introduced, which appears to be of prognostic value at early follow-up CT.

  14. A national multicenter phase 2 study of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) pox virus vaccine with sequential androgen ablation therapy in patients with PSA progression: ECOG 9802.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Robert S; Chen, Yu-Hui; Bubley, Glenn J; Stein, Mark N; Hahn, Noah M; Carducci, Michael A; Lattime, Edmund C; Gulley, James L; Arlen, Philip M; Butterfield, Lisa H; Wilding, George

    2015-09-01

    E9802 was a phase 2 multi-institution study conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of vaccinia and fowlpox prostate-specific antigen (PSA) vaccine (step 1) followed by combination with androgen ablation therapy (step 2) in patients with PSA progression without visible metastasis. To test the hypothesis that vaccine therapy in this early disease setting will be safe and have a biochemical effect that would support future studies of immunotherapy in patients with minimal disease burden. Patients who had PSA progression following local therapy were treated with PROSTVAC-V (vaccinia)/TRICOM on cycle 1 followed by PROSTVAC-F (fowlpox)/TRICOM for subsequent cycles in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (step 1). Androgen ablation was added on progression (step 2). Step 1 primary end points included progression at 6 mo and characterization of change in PSA velocity pretreatment to post-treatment. Step 2 end points included PSA response with combined vaccine and androgen ablation. In step 1, 25 of 40 eligible patients (63%) were progression free at 6 mo after registration (90% confidence interval [CI], 48-75). The median pretreatment PSA velocity was 0.13 log(PSA)/mo, in contrast to median postregistration velocity of 0.09 log(PSA)/mo (p=0.02), which is an increase in median PSA doubling time from 5.3 mo to 7.7 mo. No grade ≥4 treatment-related toxicity was observed. In the 27 patients eligible and treated for step 2, 20 patients achieved a complete response (CR) at 7 mo (CR rate: 74%; 90% CI, 57-87). Although supportive of larger studies in the cooperative group setting, this study is limited by the small number of patients and the absence of a control group as in a phase 3 study. A viral PSA vaccine can be administered safely in the multi-institutional cooperative group setting to patients with minimal disease volume alone and combined with androgen ablation, supporting the feasibility of future phase 3 studies in this

  15. A comparison of laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation versus systemic therapy alone in the treatment of breast cancer metastasis to the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşçi, Yunus; Aksoy, Erol; Taşkın, Halit Eren; Aliyev, Shamil; Moore, Halle; Ağcaoğlu, Orhan; Birsen, Onur; Siperstein, Allan; Berber, Eren

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is controversy about the roles of locoregional therapies in patients with liver metastases from breast cancer (LMBC). The aim of this study was to analyse survival after laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of LMBC and to compare this with survival in patients receiving systemic therapy (ST) alone. Methods During 1996–2011, 24 patients who had failed to respond or had shown an incomplete response to ST underwent laparoscopic RFA for LMBC. Outcomes in these patients were compared with those in 32 patients with LMBC matched by tumour size and number, but treated with ST alone. Clinical parameters and overall survival were compared using t-tests, chi-squared tests and Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results The groups were similar in hormone receptor status and chemotherapy exposure. In the laparoscopic RFA and ST groups, respectively, the mean ± standard deviation size of the dominant liver tumour and the number of tumours per patient were 3.7 ± 0.4 cm and 2.4 ± 0.4 cm, and 2.6 ± 0.4 tumours and 3.3 ± 0.4 tumours, respectively. These differences were not significant. At a median follow-up of 20 months in the laparoscopic RFA group, 42% of patients were found to have developed local liver recurrence, 63% had developed new liver disease and 38% had developed extrahepatic disease. Overall survival after the diagnosis of liver metastasis was 47 months in the laparoscopic RFA group and 9 months in the ST-only group (P = 0.0001). Five-year survival after the diagnosis of liver metastasis was 29% in the RFA group and 0% in the ST-only group. Conclusions This is the first study to compare outcomes in RFA and ST, respectively, in LMBC. The results show that survival after laparoscopic RFA plus ST is better than that after ST alone. PMID:24028270

  16. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for a recurrent metastasis after resection of liver metastases from an ileal clear-cell sarcoma: Long-term local tumor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung Wook

    2017-12-01

    Clear-cell sarcomas (CCSs) in the gastrointestinal tract are extremely rare and aggressive tumors. We present the first case of a CCS arising in the ileum and metastasizing to the liver; our patient was a 60-year-old man. After the resection of the CCS and the liver metastases, a new liver metastasis developed, which was treated via percutaneous radiofrequency ablation only. At the 5-year follow-up, the ablated region was stable without local tumor progression. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation is a viable local treatment option for recurrent metastases from an ileal CCS if they are detected when small and at an early stage in follow-up studies.

  17. Association Between Local Bipolar Voltage and Conduction Gap Along the Left Atrial Linear Ablation Lesion in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Masaharu; Fujita, Masashi; Iida, Osamu; Okamoto, Shin; Ishihara, Takayuki; Nanto, Kiyonori; Kanda, Takashi; Sunaga, Akihiro; Tsujimura, Takuya; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Mano, Toshiaki

    2017-08-01

    A bipolar voltage reflects a thick musculature where formation of a transmural lesion may be hard to achieve. The purpose of this study was to explore the association between local bipolar voltage and conduction gap in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) who underwent atrial roof or septal linear ablation. This prospective observational study included 42 and 36 consecutive patients with persistent AF who underwent roof or septal linear ablations, respectively. After pulmonary vein isolation, left atrial linear ablations were performed, and conduction gap sites were identified and ablated after first-touch radiofrequency application. Conduction gap(s) after the first-touch roof and septal linear ablation were observed in 13 (32%) and 19 patients (53%), respectively. Roof and septal area voltages were higher in patients with conduction gap(s) than in those without (roof, 1.23 ± 0.77 vs 0.73 ± 0.42 mV, p = 0.010; septal, 0.96 ± 0.43 vs 0.54 ± 0.18 mV, p = 0.001). Trisected regional analyses revealed that the voltage was higher at the region with a conduction gap than at the region without. Complete conduction block across the roof and septal lines was not achieved in 3 (7%) and 6 patients (17%), respectively. Patients in whom a linear conduction block could not be achieved demonstrated higher ablation area voltage than those with a successful conduction block (roof, 1.91 ± 0.74 vs 0.81 ± 0.51 mV, p = 0.001; septal, 1.15 ± 0.56 vs 0.69 ± 0.31 mV, p = 0.006). In conclusion, a high regional bipolar voltage predicts failure to achieve conduction block after left atrial roof or septal linear ablation. In addition, the conduction gap was located at the preserved voltage area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A smart drug: a pH-responsive photothermal ablation agent for Golgi apparatus activated cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fengfeng; Wen, Ying; Wei, Peng; Gao, Yilin; Zhou, Zhiguo; Xiao, Shuzhang; Yi, Tao

    2017-06-13

    We report a pH-responsive photothermal ablation agent (pH-PTT) based on cyanine dyes for photothermal therapy (PTT). The nanoparticles formed by BSA and pH-PTT preferentially accumulated in the Golgi apparatus of cancer cells compared to normal cells, and thus can be specifically activated by the acidic Golgi apparatus in cancer cells for effective PTT both ex vivo and in vivo.

  19. Stereotactically-guided Ablation of the Rat Auditory Cortex, and Localization of the Lesion in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Verónica; Estévez, Sheila; Pernía, Marianni; Plaza, Ignacio; Merchán, Miguel A

    2017-10-11

    The rat auditory cortex (AC) is becoming popular among auditory neuroscience investigators who are interested in experience-dependence plasticity, auditory perceptual processes, and cortical control of sound processing in the subcortical auditory nuclei. To address new challenges, a procedure to accurately locate and surgically expose the auditory cortex would expedite this research effort. Stereotactic neurosurgery is routinely used in pre-clinical research in animal models to engraft a needle or electrode at a pre-defined location within the auditory cortex. In the following protocol, we use stereotactic methods in a novel way. We identify four coordinate points over the surface of the temporal bone of the rat to define a window that, once opened, accurately exposes both the primary (A1) and secondary (Dorsal and Ventral) cortices of the AC. Using this method, we then perform a surgical ablation of the AC. After such a manipulation is performed, it is necessary to assess the localization, size, and extension of the lesions made in the cortex. Thus, we also describe a method to easily locate the AC ablation postmortem using a coordinate map constructed by transferring the cytoarchitectural limits of the AC to the surface of the brain.The combination of the stereotactically-guided location and ablation of the AC with the localization of the injured area in a coordinate map postmortem facilitates the validation of information obtained from the animal, and leads to a better analysis and comprehension of the data.

  20. A metastatic adrenal tumor from a hepatocellular carcinoma: combination therapy with transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyun Jin; Cho, Yun Ku; Ahn, Yong Sik; Kim, Mi Young [Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    The adrenal gland is the second most common site of metastasis from a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for these tumors has been reported to be a potentially effective alternative to an adrenalectomy, especially for inoperable patients. However, for intermediate or large adrenal tumors, combination therapy of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and RFA can be attempted as it may reduce the heat sink effect. A 74-year-old patient presented with abdominal discomfort. Abdominal CT images revealed a 5.0 cm sized right adrenal mass. A percutaneous biopsy of the adrenal mass revealed a metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. TACE was performed on the adrenal mass. However, a one-month follow-up CT image revealed a residual viable tumor. RFA was performed for the adrenal tumor six weeks after the TACE. No procedure-related major complications were noted. The serum alpha-fetoprotein level had also been normalized after the treatment, and 10-month follow-up CT images showed no definite evidence of viable adrenal tumor.

  1. The optimization of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2012-12-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enables highly localized, non-invasive tissue ablation and its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of a range of cancers, including those of the kidney, prostate and breast. HIFU offers the ability to treat deep-seated tumours locally, and potentially bears fewer side effects than more invasive treatment modalities such as resection, chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. There remains however a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to ablate tissue at the required foci whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. This sometimes results in overheating of bone and overlying tissue during treatment, leading to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy is deposited. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data (Gélat et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 5553-81). The present paper describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimization problem with nonlinear constraints. The methodology has subsequently been tested at an excitation frequency of 1 MHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence of ribs. A single array-rib geometry was investigated on which a 50% reduction in the maximum acoustic pressure magnitude on the surface of the ribs was achieved with only a 4% reduction in the peak focal pressure compared to the spherical focusing case. This method was then compared with a binarized apodization approach

  2. Acupuncture for the Alleviation of Hot Flashes in Men Treated With Androgen Ablation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashamalla, Hani; Jiang, Ming L.; Guirguis, Adel; Peluso, Francesco; Ashamalla, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Hot flashes are common side effect due to androgen ablation therapy (AAT). The utility of acupuncture for hot flashes in men has not been thoroughly studied. We prospectively studied the effect of acupuncture in men with hot flashes. Methods and Materials: The study was approved by internal review board. Seventeen men with hot flashes and history of AAT for prostate cancer were enrolled. Three men declined participation before receiving any treatment. A hot flash score (HFS) was used to measure daily hot flashes. The composite daily score was calculated as the product of frequency x severity. The baseline daily scores were compared with scores taken at 2 and 6 weeks and at 8-month average follow-up. Results: No side effects were encountered during, immediately after treatment, or at 8 months. The mean initial HFS was 28.3; it dropped to 10.3 (p = 0.0001) at 2 weeks posttreatment, 7.5 (p = 0.0001) at 6 weeks, and 7.0 (p = 0.001) at 8 months. Clinical improvement for each patient is defined as the percent decrease in the mean HFS at each time point. The mean improvement at Weeks 2 and 6 was 68.4% (mean HFS decreased from 37.409 to 11.836, p = 0.001) and 89.2% (mean HFS decreased from 37.409 to 4.05, p = 0.0078) respectively. The improvement at 8 months was 80.3% (mean HFS decreased from 37.409 to 7.385, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Acupuncture provides excellent control of hot flashes in men with a history of AAT. The absence of side effects and the durable response at 8 months are likely to be appealing to patients. Prospective randomized study is warranted to further evaluate this modality against medical therapy.

  3. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shrager, Joseph B. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Leung, Ann N. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Popat, Rita [Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  4. 77 FR 24959 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for Unresectable Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ...The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is seeking scientific information submissions from manufacturers of local, minimally invasive, medical devices for unresectable primary hepatocellular carcinoma (e.g., ablation, radiotherapy, or embolization devices). Scientific information is being solicited to inform our Comparative Effectiveness Review of Local Therapies for Unresectable Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma, which is currently being conducted by the Evidence-based Practice Centers for the AHRQ Effective Health Care Program. Access to published and unpublished pertinent scientific information on this device will improve the quality of this comparative effectiveness review. AHRQ is requesting this scientific information and conducting this comparative effectiveness review pursuant to Section 1013 of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003, Public Law 108-173.

  5. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  6. In vivo study of necrosis on the liver tissue of Wistar rats: a combination of photodynamic therapy and carbon dioxide laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rego, R F; Nicolodelli, G; Bagnato, V S; Araujo, M T; Tirapelli, L F; Araujo-Moreira, F M

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is known to be limited to applications in large volume tumors due to its limited penetration. Therefore, a combination of PDT and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) laser ablation may constitute a potential protocol to destroy bulk tumors because it involves an association of these two techniques allowing the removal of visible lesions with a high selectivity of destruction of remnant tumors. The main aim of this study is to investigate the most appropriate procedure to combine use of a CO 2 laser and PDT on livers of healthy rats, and to analyze different techniques of this treatment using three types of photosensitizers (PSs). Forty eight animals were separated to form six groups: (1) only CO 2 laser ablation, (2) drug and CO 2 laser ablation, (3) only PDT, (4) drug and light (PDT) followed by CO 2 laser ablation, (5) ablated with CO 2 laser followed by PDT, and (6) drug followed by CO 2 laser ablation and light. For each group, three types of photosensitization were used: topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), intravenous ALA and intravenous Photogem ® . Thirty hours after the treatments, the animals were sacrificed and the livers removed. The depth of necrosis was analyzed and measured, considering microscopic and macroscopic aspects. The results show that the effects of the PDT were considerably enhanced when combined with CO 2 laser ablation, especially when the PDT was performed before the CO 2 laser ablation. (paper)

  7. Mandibular Reconstruction Using Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap and Titanium Plates after Ablative Surgery for Locally Advanced Tumors of the Oral Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zohairy, M.A.F.; Mostafa, A.; Amin, A.; Abd El-Fattah, H.; Khalifa, Sh.

    2009-01-01

    The most common indication for mandible resection remains ablative surgery for cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx. The use of vascularized bone grafts has become state-of-the-art for mandibular reconstruction. However, the high cost of such surgery may not be justified in patients with advanced disease and poor prognosis, or poor performance status. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes of mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates covered with a pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap after ablative surgery for locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity. Patients and methods: The study involves a total of 33 patients with locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity that were treated over 5 year period (2003-2008) at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt. Mandibular resections were performed for treatment of patients with primary oral cavity tumors invading the mandible followed by mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates covered with a pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. Results: Of 33 patients, 25 (75.75%) were males and 8 (24.25%) were females. The age ranged from 42 to 70 years (mean 52.3±5.9 years). Tongue cancer was the most common tumor, it affects 17 (51.5%) of the patients, 24 patients received post operative radiation therapy. The flap survival was 100%; partial necrosis of the flap skin was observed in 3 patients. One patient developed wound dehiscence. Oro-cutaneous fistula occurred in 5 patients that closed spontaneously. There were 4 cases of plate failure, one patient experienced plate fracture at 13 months after reconstruction. Three patients developed external plate exposure. All patients achieved good functional and acceptable aesthetic outcome. The overall cause-specific cumulative survival was 72.7% at one year and 56.1% at two years. Conclusions: Titanium plate and pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap is a safe and reliable option for composite mandibular defects

  8. Percutaneous local ablation of unifocal subclinical breast cancer: clinical experience and preliminary results of cryotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manenti, Guglielmo; Perretta, Tommaso; Gaspari, Eleonora; Pistolese, Chiara A.; Scarano, Lia; Cossu, Elsa; Simonetti, Giovanni; Masala, Salvatore [University Hospital ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Molecular Imaging and Radiotherapy, Rome (Italy); Bonanno, Elena [University Hospital ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Biopathology, Rome (Italy); Buonomo, Oreste C.; Petrella, Giuseppe [University Hospital ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of General Surgery Division, Rome (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    To assess the ablative effectiveness, the oncological and cosmetic efficacy of image-guided percutaneous cryoablation in the treatment of single breast nodules with subclinical dimensions after identification with ultrasonography (US), mammography, magnetic resonance (MRI) and characterization by vacuum assisted biopsy. Fifteen women with a mean age of 73 {+-} 5 years (range 64-82 years) and lesion diameter of 8 {+-} 4 mm were undergoing cryotherapy technology with a single probe under US-guidance associated with intra-procedural lymph-node mapping and excision of the sentinel node. All the patients underwent surgical resection (lumpectomy) from 30 to 45 days after the percutaneous ablation. The iceball size generated by the cryoprobe during the procedure at minus 40 C was 16 x 41 mm. In 14 of the 15 patients was observed a complete necrosis of the cryo-ablated lesion both in post-procedural MRI follow-up and anatomo-pathological evaluation after surgical resection. In one case there was a residual disease in post-procedural MRI and postoperative histological examination, probably justified by an incorrect positioning of the probe. The percutaneous cryoablation as a ''minimally invasive'' technique can provide excellent oncological and cosmetic results on selected cases handled by experienced operators by using the tested devices. (orig.)

  9. Percutaneous local ablation of unifocal subclinical breast cancer: clinical experience and preliminary results of cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manenti, Guglielmo; Perretta, Tommaso; Gaspari, Eleonora; Pistolese, Chiara A.; Scarano, Lia; Cossu, Elsa; Simonetti, Giovanni; Masala, Salvatore; Bonanno, Elena; Buonomo, Oreste C.; Petrella, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    To assess the ablative effectiveness, the oncological and cosmetic efficacy of image-guided percutaneous cryoablation in the treatment of single breast nodules with subclinical dimensions after identification with ultrasonography (US), mammography, magnetic resonance (MRI) and characterization by vacuum assisted biopsy. Fifteen women with a mean age of 73 ± 5 years (range 64-82 years) and lesion diameter of 8 ± 4 mm were undergoing cryotherapy technology with a single probe under US-guidance associated with intra-procedural lymph-node mapping and excision of the sentinel node. All the patients underwent surgical resection (lumpectomy) from 30 to 45 days after the percutaneous ablation. The iceball size generated by the cryoprobe during the procedure at minus 40 C was 16 x 41 mm. In 14 of the 15 patients was observed a complete necrosis of the cryo-ablated lesion both in post-procedural MRI follow-up and anatomo-pathological evaluation after surgical resection. In one case there was a residual disease in post-procedural MRI and postoperative histological examination, probably justified by an incorrect positioning of the probe. The percutaneous cryoablation as a ''minimally invasive'' technique can provide excellent oncological and cosmetic results on selected cases handled by experienced operators by using the tested devices. (orig.)

  10. Combination of ablative fractional laser and daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis in organ transplant recipients – a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Lei, Ulrikke; Erlendsson, A M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) for actinic keratoses (AK) is hampered by pain during illumination and inferior efficacy in organ-transplant recipients (OTR). OBJECTIVES: We assessed ablative fractional laser (AFL)-assisted daylight photodynamic therapy (PDT) (AFL-dPDT) compared...

  11. Multimodality therapy of local regional esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, David P

    2005-12-01

    Recent trials regarding the use of multimodality therapy for patients with cancers of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction have not conclusively shown benefit. Regimens containing cisplatin and fluorouracil administered preoperatively appear to be tolerable and do not increase operative morbidity or mortality when compared with surgery alone. Yet clinical trials have not clearly shown that such regimens improve outcome as measured by survival. Likewise, trials of postoperative chemoradiation have not reported a significant improvement in median or overall survival. The reasons for the lack of clinical benefit from multimodality therapy are not completely understood, but improvements in systemic therapy will probably be necessary before disease-free or overall survival improves substantially. Some new single agents such as the taxanes (docetaxel or paclitaxel) and the camptothecan analog irinotecan have shown modest activity for palliative therapy.

  12. Nonthermal Ablation by Using Intravascular Oxygen Radical Generation with WST11: Dynamic Tissue Effects and Implications for Focal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Simon Y.; Tarin, Tatum V.; Monette, Sébastien; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Gerber, Daniel; Durack, Jeremy C.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Scardino, Peter T.; Scherz, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the hypothesis that vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) with WST11 and clinically relevant parameters can be used to ablate target tissues in a non–tumor-bearing large-animal model while selectively sparing blood vessels and collagen. Materials and Methods By using an institutional animal care and use committee–approved protocol, 68 ablations were performed in the kidneys (cortex and medulla) and livers of 27 adult pigs. Posttreatment evaluation was conducted with contrast material–enhanced computed tomography in the live animals at 24 hours. Immunohistochemistry was evaluated and histologic examination with hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed at 4 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days. Intravenous infusion of WST11 (4 mg per kilogram of body weight) was followed by using near-infrared illumination (753 nm for 20 minutes) through optical fibers prepositioned in target tissues by using a fixed template. Treated areas were scanned, measured, and statistically analyzed by using the Student t test and two-way analysis of variance. Results Focal WST11 VTP treatment in the liver and kidney by using a single optical fiber resulted in well-demarcated cylindrical zones of nonthermal necrosis concentrically oriented around the light-emitting diffuser, with no intervening viable parenchymal cells. The radius of ablated tissue increased from approximately 5 mm at 150 mW to approximately 7 mm at 415 mW (P necrosis. Patterns of acute injury within 24 hours were consistent with microcirculatory flow arrest and collagen preservation (demonstrated with trichrome staining). In the peripheral ablation zone, blood vessels at least 40 μm in diameter were selectively preserved and remained functional at 7 days. Ablated tissues exhibited progressive fibrosis and chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates. No histologic changes consistent with thermal injury were observed in blood vessels or collagen. The renal hilum and collecting system did not show treatment

  13. Percutaneous laser ablation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Enrico; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Claudio M

    2008-10-01

    Percutaneous image-guided procedures, largely based on thermal ablation, are at present under investigation for achieving a nonsurgical targeted cytoreduction in benign and malignant thyroid lesions. In several uncontrolled clinical trials and in two randomized clinical trials, laser ablation has demonstrated a good efficacy and safety for the shrinkage of benign cold thyroid nodules. In hyperfunctioning nodules, laser ablation induced a nearly 50% volume reduction with a variable frequency of normalization of thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. Laser ablation has been tested for the palliative treatment of poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas, local recurrences or distant metastases. Laser ablation therapy is indicated for the shrinkage of benign cold nodules in patients with local pressure symptoms who are at high surgical risk. The treatment should be performed only by well trained operators and after a careful cytological evaluation. Laser ablation does not seem to be consistently effective in the long-term control of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules and is not an alternative treatment to 131I therapy. Laser ablation may be considered for the cytoreduction of tumor tissue prior to external radiation therapy or chemotherapy of local or distant recurrences of thyroid malignancy that are not amenable to surgical or radioiodine treatment.

  14. The Antineoplastic Activity of Photothermal Ablative Therapy with Targeted Gold Nanorods in an Orthotopic Urinary Bladder Cancer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoping; Su, Lih-Jen; La Rosa, Francisco G; Smith, Elizabeth Erin; Schlaepfer, Isabel R; Cho, Suehyun K; Kavanagh, Brian; Park, Wounjhang; Flaig, Thomas W

    2017-07-27

    Gold nanoparticles treated with near infrared (NIR) light can be heated preferentially, allowing for thermal ablation of targeted cells. The use of novel intravesical nanoparticle-directed therapy in conjunction with laser irradiation via a fiber optic cystoscope, represents a potential ablative treatment approach in patients with superficial bladder cancer. To examine the thermal ablative effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-directed gold nanorods irradiated with NIR light in an orthotopic urinary bladder cancer model. Gold nanorods linked to an anti-EGFR antibody (Conjugated gold NanoRods - CNR) were instilled into the bladder cavity of an orthotopic murine xenograft model with T24 bladder cancer cells expressing luciferase. NIR light was externally administered via an 808 nm diode laser. This treatment was repeated weekly for 4 weeks. The anti-cancer effect was monitored by an in vivo imaging system in a non-invasive manner, which was the primary outcome of our study. The optimal approach for an individual treatment was 2.1 W/cm 2 laser power for 30 seconds. Using this in vivo model, NIR light combined with CNR demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in tumor-associated bioluminescent activity ( n  = 16) compared to mice treated with laser alone ( n  = 14) at the end of the study ( p  = 0.035). Furthermore, the CNR+NIR light treatment significantly abrogated bioluminescence signals over a 6-week observation period, compared to pre-treatment levels ( p  = 0.045). Photothermal tumor ablation with EGFR-directed gold nanorods and NIR light proved effective and well tolerated in a murine in vivo model of urinary bladder cancer.

  15. Efficacy of Ablation Therapy for Secondary Hyperparathyroidism by Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Thermoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junfeng; Qian, Linxue; Zu, Yuan; Wei, Ying; Hu, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the value of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave thermoablation to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). One hundred and thirty-eight parathyroid glands from 56 patients with SHPT were ablated in this study. All the parathyroid glands were evaluated by real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound before, during and after ablation. Changes in serum parathyroid hormone (sPTH) levels were measured before treatment and at 1 h, 1 wk, 1 mo and 6 mo after thermoablation treatment. All 56 cases had a 1-mo follow-up, and 34 cases had a 6-mo follow-up. The sPTH level of the 54 cases 1 mo after ablation was significantly lower than that before (p 0.05). Ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave thermoablation is a feasible and effective non-surgical alternative treatment for SHPT patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation therapy for the prevention of esophageal cancer in Barrett’s esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha NH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ngoc Hoang Ha, Richard Hummel, David I WatsonDepartment of Surgery, Flinders University, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Barrett’s esophagus is the only known precursor lesion for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Previous studies have shown that a variety of methods can be applied to destroy Barrett’s esophagus epithelium, and healing with a new esophageal squamous epithelium usually occurs following ablation. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA is a relatively new endoscopic technique. It has been claimed that ablation using RFA reduces the risk of cancer progression. RFA is usually easy to apply and is associated with a low risk of morbidity. It achieves complete eradication of (non dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus in most individuals, and the risk of progression to higher grades of dysplasia or cancer is reduced after RFA, although not completely eliminated. Limitations include recurrence of Barrett’s esophagus in up to one-third of individuals, a risk of “buried islands” of Barrett’s esophagus remaining below the regenerated mucosa, and uncertainty about the biological behavior of the new squamous epithelium after RFA. Current evidence supports the use of RFA in individuals with high-grade dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus, and early stage (T1a intramucosal cancer, and select individuals with low-grade dysplasia. As accurate diagnosis of low-grade dysplasia remains difficult outside expert centers, it is probably premature to recommend routine RFA for all patients diagnosed with low-grade dysplasia in the community, despite the favorable outcomes from one randomized trial. Furthermore, long-term outcomes following ablation remain uncertain, and ongoing endoscopy surveillance is still required after RFA as progression to cancer remains a possibility. Outcomes from large studies with long-term follow-up are needed to definitively confirm that RFA ablation can reliably prevent cancer

  17. Thermochemical ablation therapy of VX2 tumor using a permeable oil-packed liquid alkali metal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyi Guo

    Full Text Available Alkali metal appears to be a promising tool in thermochemical ablation, but, it requires additional data on safety is required. The objective of this study was to explore the effectiveness of permeable oil-packed liquid alkali metal in the thermochemical ablation of tumors.Permeable oil-packed sodium-potassium (NaK was prepared using ultrasonic mixing of different ratios of metal to oil. The thermal effect of the mixture during ablation of muscle tissue ex vivo was evaluated using the Fluke Ti400 Thermal Imager. The thermochemical effect of the NaK-oil mixture on VX2 tumors was evaluated by performing perfusion CT scans both before and after treatment in 10 VX2 rabbit model tumors. VX2 tumors were harvested from two rabbits immediately after treatment to assess their viability using trypan blue and hematoxylin and eosin (H.E. staining.The injection of the NaK-oil mixture resulted in significantly higher heat in the ablation areas. The permeable oil controlled the rate of heat released during the NaK reaction with water in the living tissue. Perfusion computed tomography and its parameter map confirmed that the NaK-oil mixture had curative effects on VX2 tumors. Both trypan blue and H.E. staining showed partial necrosis of the VX2 tumors.The NaK-oil mixture may be used successfully to ablate tumor tissue in vivo. With reference to the controlled thermal and chemical lethal injury to tumors, using a liquid alkali in ablation is potentially an effective and safe method to treat malignant tumors.

  18. Mechanical thrombolysis as an adjunct therapy to management of portal vein thrombosis following Radio Frequency Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairol, A O; Affirul, C A; Azlanudin, A; Zamri, Z; Razman, J; Choi, S Y

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has evolved to become the treatment of choice for non-resectable recurrent colorectal liver metastasis. It is however, not without complications. Portal vein thrombosis following RFA is rare but can be fatal to the outcome of the patient. Here, we present a case of a 66-year-old man who developed portal vein thrombosis following RFA. CT scan revealed a left portal vein thrombosis. This case report highlights the challenges and multimodal treatment of portal vein thrombosis following Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in a cirrhotic patient.

  19. Combination of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation and radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid disease. A 3-month follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkusuz, H.; Happel, C.; Koch, D.A.; Gruenwald, F. [Frankfurt University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2016-01-15

    Pilot studies of combined therapies treating benign nodular goiters reported promising results. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of combined microwave ablation (MWA) and radioiodine therapy (RIT) with a special focus on thyroid function at the 3-month follow-up. 15 patients (median age: 55 years) with a large goiter and benign thyroid nodules or Graves' disease were treated with the combined therapy. Serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), thyroglobuline (Tg) and, additionally, antibody levels against thyroglobulin (TgAb), thyrotropin receptors (TRAb) and thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) were measured at enrollment, post MWA and at the 3-month follow-up (3MFU). Furthermore, the goiter volume, I-131 dose and hospitalization time were analyzed to evaluate effectiveness. MWA was operated under local anesthesia with a system working in a wavelength field of 902 to 928 MHz. TSH, T4, T3 and Tg did not change at 3MFU, except for in two patients in whom the initial TSH levels improved to normal thyroid functioning levels at follow-up. One of the patients developed a high TRAb-level that receded back into the normal range. At 3MFU, the combined therapy showed a mean thyroid volume reduction of 26.4 ml ± 7.9 ml (30.5 % ± 4.6 % (p < 0.05)). By utilizing the combined therapy, administered activity could be reduced by 26.6 % ± 4.8 % (p < 0.05) and hospitalization time by 30.9 % ± 19.9 % (p < 0.05). The data confirmed the effectiveness of the combination of MWA with RIT. The combined therapy is an innovative and conservative approach and could become a safe alternative to surgery for the treatment of very large benign nodular goiters. Due to the short follow-up and the limited number of patients, further studies will be necessary.

  20. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  1. MR and CT imaging characteristics and ablation zone volumetry of locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with irreversible electroporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vroomen, Laurien G.P.H.; Scheffer, Hester J.; Melenhorst, Marleen C.A.M.; Jong, Marcus C. de; Bergh, Janneke E. van den; Kuijk, Cornelis van; Meijerink, Martijn R. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Delft, Foke van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kazemier, Geert [VU University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-06-15

    To assess specific imaging characteristics after irreversible electroporation (IRE) for locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) with contrast-enhanced (ce)MRI and ceCT, and to explore the correlation of these characteristics with the development of recurrence. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of imaging data were performed on 25 patients treated with percutaneous IRE for LAPC. Imaging characteristics of the ablation zone on ceCT and ceMRI were assessed over a 6-month follow-up period. Contrast ratio scores between pre- and post-treatment were compared. To detect early imaging markers for treatment failure, attenuation characteristics at 6 weeks were linked to the area of recurrence within 6 months. Post-IRE, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-b800 signal intensities decreased in all cases (p < 0.05). Both ceMRI and ceCT revealed absent or decreased contrast enhancement, with a hyperintense rim on ceMRI. Ablation zone volume increase was noted on both modalities in the first 6 weeks, followed by a decrease (p < 0.05). In the patients developing tumour recurrence (5/25), a focal DWI-b800 hyperintense spot at 6 weeks predated unequivocal recurrence on CT. The most remarkable signal alterations after pancreatic IRE were shown by DWI-b800 and ceMRI. These early imaging characteristics may be useful to establish technical success and predict treatment outcome. (orig.)

  2. Dosimetric and motion analysis of margin-intensive therapy by stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for resectable pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinzerling John H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retroperitoneal margin is a common site of positive surgical margins in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. Preoperative margin-intensive therapy (MIT involves delivery of a single high dose of ablative radiotherapy (30 Gy focused on this surgically inaccessible margin, utilizing stereotactic techniques in an effort to reduce local failure following surgery. In this study, we investigated the motion of regional organs at risk (OAR utilizing 4DCT, evaluated the dosimetric effects of abdominal compression (AC to reduce regional motion, and compared various planning techniques to optimize MIT. Methods 10 patients were evaluated with 4DCT scans. All 10 patients had scans using AC and seven of the 10 patients had scans both with and without AC. The peak respiratory abdominal organ and major vessel centroid excursion was measured. A "sub-GTV" region was defined by a radiation oncologist and surgical oncologist encompassing the retroperitoneal margin typically lateral and posterior to the superior mesenteric artery (SMA, and a 3-5 mm margin was added to constitute the PTV. Identical 3D non-coplanar SABR (3DSABR plans were designed for the average compression and non-compression scans. Compression scans were planned with 3DSABR, coplanar IMRT (IMRT, and Cyberknife (CK planning techniques. Dose volume analysis was undertaken for various endpoints, comparing OAR doses with and without AC and for different planning methods. Results The mean PTV size was 20.2 cm3. Regional vessel motion of the SMA, celiac trunk, and renal vessels was small ( 5 mm, so AC has been used in all patients enrolled thus far. AC did not significantly increase OAR dose including the stomach and traverse colon. There were several statistically significant differences in the doses to OARs as a function of the type of planning modality used. Conclusions AC does not significantly reduce the limited motion of structures in close proximity to the MIT target

  3. Local Arterial Therapies in the Management of Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouli, Samdeep K; Goff, Laura W

    2017-10-27

    Most patients with hepatocellular carcinoma present with intermediate to advanced disease, where curative therapies are no longer an option. These patients with intermediate to advanced disease represent a heterogeneous population with regard to tumor burden, liver function, and performance status. While the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system offers guidelines for the management of these patients, strict adherence to these guidelines may limit treatment options for these patients. Several locoregional therapies exist for these patients, including conventional transarterial chemoembolization (cTACE), transarterial embolization (TAE), drug-eluting embolization (DEE), and radioembolization. Evidence is also emerging for the role of radiation therapy including most notably stereotactic body radiation therapy and proton therapy, although at the current time, clinical trial participation is encouraged. While cTACE is traditionally recommended for BCLC B disease, both cTACE and radioembolization are increasingly used for patients with intermediate disease, as well as in select patients with BCLC A and C disease. TAE and DEE are limited in their use currently, due to lack of clear survival benefits or clinical advantages over cTACE. While several studies have demonstrated similar OS between cTACE and radioembolization, radioembolization provides a longer time to progression and fewer toxicities compared to cTACE. This is particularly relevant in the setting of advanced BCLC B and early BCLC C disease, where patients may have limited reserve. Radioembolization also has additional roles as an alternative to ablation, inducing liver hypertrophy, treating patients with PVT, and downstaging lesions to transplant. Ongoing studies will further define the role of locoregional treatment potentially in combination with and in light of developments in systemic therapy.

  4. A Novel Combination of Thermal Ablation and Heat-Inducible Gene therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    11. Khokhlova, V.A., et al., Effects of nonlinear propagation, cavitation , and boiling in lesion formation by high intensity focused ultrasound in...intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed as an emerging non-invasive strategy for cancer treatment by thermal ablation of tumor tissue. The...Concepts, Seattle, WA) operating at its fundamental frequency (1.1 MHz) or its third harmonics (3.3 MHz). The ultrasound imaging system was a 5/7

  5. Evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma tumor vascularity using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography as a predictor for local recurrence following radiofrequency ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Tomohiro [Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 232-0024 (Japan); Numata, Kazushi, E-mail: kz-numa@urahp.yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 232-0024 (Japan); Hao, Yoshiteru; Doba, Nobutaka; Hara, Koji [Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 232-0024 (Japan); Kondo, Masaaki [Division of Gastroenterology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0004 (Japan); Tanaka, Katsuaki [Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 232-0024 (Japan); Maeda, Shin [Division of Gastroenterology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0004 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the hypervascularity of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) on contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) prior to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a significant risk factor for local recurrence after RFA. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Overall, 208 patients (mean age, 71.7 years; range, 50–87 years; 137 men, 71 women) with 282 HCCs treated with RFA were analyzed retrospectively. The mean maximum tumor diameter was 15.7 mm. We compared the abilities of CEUS and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) to detect hypervascularity in HCCs. We then classified the HCCs into two groups according to the arterial-phase CEUS findings: a “hypervascular group” with whole or partial hypervascular areas within the lesions compared with the surrounding liver parenchyma, and a “non-hypervascular group” with isovascular or hypovascular areas within the lesions. We assessed the cumulative rate of local recurrence after RFA, and we also evaluated the risk factors for local recurrence using a univariate analysis. Results: The detection rate for hypervascular HCCs was significantly higher using CEUS (78%, 221/282) than that using CECT (66%, 186/282) (P < 0.001). Using the CEUS findings, the cumulative rate of local recurrence was significantly higher in the hypervascular group (41.2%, 56/221) than in the non-hypervascular group (18.4%, 6/61) (P = 0.007). A univariate analysis revealed that hypervascularity on CEUS was an independent risk factor for local recurrence (P = 0.010). Conclusion: Hypervascularity in HCCs as observed using CEUS is a significant risk factor for local recurrence after RFA.

  6. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the choice of thyreostatic medication?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobe, C.; Weber, I.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Schmidt, M.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aim: this study was performed to analyse the impact of the choice of antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the outcome of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with Graves' disease. Patients, material, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months after RIT between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were the confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of ATD two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose of 250 Gy was calculated from the results of the radioiodine test and the therapeutically achieved dose was measured by serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months offer RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The pretreatment ATD was retrospectively correlated with the results achieved. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients. 472 patients were treated with carbimazole or methimazole (CMI) and 61 with propylthiouracil (PTU). 38 patients had no thyrostatic drugs (ND) prior to RIT. The success rate was equal in all groups (CMI 451/472; PTU 61/61; ND 37/38; p = 0.22). Conclusion: thyrostatic treatment with PTU achieves excellent results in ablative RIT, using an accurate dosimetric approach with an achieved post-therapeutic dose of more than 200 Gy. (orig.)

  7. Percutaneous tumor ablation in medical radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G. [University Hospital Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Helmberger, T.K. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Technical Univ. Munich (Germany). Dept. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Reiser, M.F. (eds.) [University Hospitals - Grosshadern and Innenstadt Munich Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2008-07-01

    Thermal ablation has become an integral part of oncology, especially in the field of interventional oncology. This very comprehensive book encompasses the different technologies employed in thermal ablation, its indications and the results achieved in various clinical conditions. The first part of the book clearly explains the basics of thermal ablative techniques such as laser-induced thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy, and localized tumor therapy. The latest developments in the application of minimally invasive therapies in localized neoplastic disease are demonstrated. In the main part of the book, techniques of guiding the applicators to the target structures by use of different imaging tools such as ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are discussed. The results are presented for a variety of clinical indications, including liver and lung tumors and metastases and some rather rare conditions involving the kidney, the head and neck, the prostate, and soft tissue structures. A large number of acknowledged experts have contributed to the book, which benefits from a lucid structure and excellent images. (orig.)

  8. Percutaneous tumor ablation in medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G.; Helmberger, T.K.; Reiser, M.F.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal ablation has become an integral part of oncology, especially in the field of interventional oncology. This very comprehensive book encompasses the different technologies employed in thermal ablation, its indications and the results achieved in various clinical conditions. The first part of the book clearly explains the basics of thermal ablative techniques such as laser-induced thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy, and localized tumor therapy. The latest developments in the application of minimally invasive therapies in localized neoplastic disease are demonstrated. In the main part of the book, techniques of guiding the applicators to the target structures by use of different imaging tools such as ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are discussed. The results are presented for a variety of clinical indications, including liver and lung tumors and metastases and some rather rare conditions involving the kidney, the head and neck, the prostate, and soft tissue structures. A large number of acknowledged experts have contributed to the book, which benefits from a lucid structure and excellent images. (orig.)

  9. MRI-guided single fraction ablative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer : a brachytherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charaghvandi, Ramona K; den Hartogh, Mariska D; van Ommen, Anne-Mar L N; de Vries, Wilfred J H; Scholten, Vincent; Moerland, Rien; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Schokker, Rogier I; van Vulpen, Marco; van Asselen, B; van den Bongard, Desirée H J G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A radiosurgical treatment approach for early-stage breast cancer has the potential to minimize the patient's treatment burden. The dosimetric feasibility for single fraction ablative radiotherapy was evaluated by comparing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with an

  10. Validation of geometric measurements of the left atrium and pulmonary veins for analysis of reverse structural remodeling following ablation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Holmes, D. R., III; Gunawan, M. S.; Ge, X.; Karwoski, R. A.; Breen, J. F.; Packer, D. L.; Robb, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    Geometric analysis of the left atrium and pulmonary veins is important for studying reverse structural remodeling following cardiac ablation therapy. It has been shown that the left atrium decreases in volume and the pulmonary vein ostia decrease in diameter following ablation therapy. Most analysis techniques, however, require laborious manual tracing of image cross-sections. Pulmonary vein diameters are typically measured at the junction between the left atrium and pulmonary veins, called the pulmonary vein ostia, with manually drawn lines on volume renderings or on image cross-sections. In this work, we describe a technique for making semi-automatic measurements of the left atrium and pulmonary vein ostial diameters from high resolution CT scans and multi-phase datasets. The left atrium and pulmonary veins are segmented from a CT volume using a 3D volume approach and cut planes are interactively positioned to separate the pulmonary veins from the body of the left atrium. The cut plane is also used to compute the pulmonary vein ostial diameter. Validation experiments are presented which demonstrate the ability to repeatedly measure left atrial volume and pulmonary vein diameters from high resolution CT scans, as well as the feasibility of this approach for analyzing dynamic, multi-phase datasets. In the high resolution CT scans the left atrial volume measurements show high repeatability with approximately 4% intra-rater repeatability and 8% inter-rater repeatability. Intra- and inter-rater repeatability for pulmonary vein diameter measurements range from approximately 2 to 4 mm. For the multi-phase CT datasets, differences in left atrial volumes between a standard slice-by-slice approach and the proposed 3D volume approach are small, with percent differences on the order of 3% to 6%.

  11. Alcohol Ablation Therapy of an Atypically Located Symptomatic Bronchogenic Cyst: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakadamyali, Hatice; Ergun, Tarkan; Lakadamyali, Huseyin; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2007-01-01

    Bronchogenic cyst is a rare developmental lesion. It is usually asymptomatic and most frequently located in the middle mediastinum and lung parenchyma. It can cause symptoms only when infected or pressing on neighboring structures. The MRI findings in a 34-year-old woman with an 8 months history of back pain were evaluated and revealed a cystic lesion in the left paravertebral area. The histopathologic evaluation of the material aspirated with CT guidance was reported to be bronchogenic cyst. A simultaneous alcohol ablation was accomplished. After the procedure the patient's pain disappeared and the follow-up MRI scan 1 year later revealed no relapse. Paravertebrally located bronchogenic cysts are very rare and only 3 cases were found to be reported in the medical literature prior to this one. While aspiration alone is sufficient for diagnosis, it is insufficient to treat the lesion and prevent the recurrences. This paper reports a paravertebral bronchogenic cyst which was symptomatic despite of its small size. CT-guided aspiration was accomplished and simultaneous alcohol ablation was carried out to prevent recurrences

  12. Ablative radiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism: long term follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall-Taylor, P.; Keir, M.J.; Ross, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    A total of 225 patients were treated for hyperthyroidism with 555 MBq (15 mCi) radioiodine to ablate the thyroid and induce early hyperthyroidism. The efficacy of this treatment in eradicating hyperthyroidism and problems of follow up were assessed one to six years later from case records and questionnaires. Information was received from 197 out of 219 live patients (90%) and from 160 doctors concerning 207 patients (92%). Only three patients were not traced and six had died since treatment. The modal time to hyperthyroidism was three months, and 64% of patients were hyperthyroid at one year; 5.6% had failed to become euthyroid within one year. Ninety five per cent of patients had been seen by the doctor and 82% had had a thyroid test done within the past two years. Most doctors preferred patients to be returned to their care once thyroxine treatment was stabilised. An ablative dose of 131 I is recommended as an effective means of treatment which has clear advantages over conventional methods. Good communications and effective follow up should ensure success. (author)

  13. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ablation of musculoskeletal metastases: pain palliation, fracture risk reduction, and oligometastatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Anil Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R

    2013-12-01

    Thermal ablation is an effective, minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies in the palliation of painful musculoskeletal metastases and an emerging approach to obtain local tumor control in the setting of limited metastatic disease. Various thermal ablation technologies have been applied to bone and soft tissue tumors and may be used in combination with percutaneous cement instillation for skeletal lesions with or at risk for pathologic fracture. This article reviews current practices of percutaneous ablation of musculoskeletal metastases with an emphasis on radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation of painful skeletal metastases. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Postmenopausal vaginal atrophy: evaluation of treatment with local estrogen therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkin MJ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mary Jane Minkin,1 Ricardo Maamari,2 Suzanne Reiter3 1Department of Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Novo Nordisk Inc., Plainsboro, NJ, USA; 3Mid-County Health Center, Largo, FL, USA Abstract: Postmenopausal vaginal atrophy, resulting from decreased estrogen production, frequently requires treatment. Estrogen preparations provide the most effective treatment; local application is preferred to systemic drugs when treating only vaginal symptoms. As local estrogen therapies have comparable efficacy, this study aimed to understand treatment practices, assess experiences with different forms of local estrogen-delivering applicators, and evaluate satisfaction. Women who were US residents aged ≥18 years, menopausal (no spontaneous menstrual period for ≥1 year or with a double oophorectomy, and receiving local estrogen therapy for 1–6 months (vaginal cream [supplied with a reusable applicator] or vaginal tablets [supplied with a single-use/disposable applicator], completed an online questionnaire. Data from 200 women (100 cream users and 100 tablet users; mean therapy duration 3.48 months showed that most stored medication in the room in which it was applied (88% and applied it at bedtime (71%, a procedure for which cream users required, on average, more than twice the time of tablet users (5.08 minutes versus 2.48 minutes. Many cream users applied larger-than-prescribed amounts of cream, attempting to achieve greater efficacy (42%, or lower-than-recommended doses (45%, most frequently to avoid messiness (33% or leakage (30%. More tablet users (69% than cream users (14% were "extremely satisfied" with their applicator. Postmenopausal women using local estrogen therapy were generally more satisfied with the application of vaginal tablets than cream. Patient satisfaction may help to facilitate accurate dosing. Positive perceptions of medication will help to optimize treatment, which

  16. Local ablative radiotherapy of oligometastatic colorectal cancer; Moeglichkeiten der lokal-ablativen Bestrahlung (SBRT) bei metastasiertem kolorektalem Karzinom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Hamburg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Ambulanzzentrum, Hamburg (Germany); Gauer, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) often presents as oligometastatic disease. Currently available intensive systemic treatment regimens, including combination chemotherapy and molecular targeted agents, result in tumor response and transient to long-term disease control in a high percentage of patients, thus raising the question of further management. Secondary resection and ablation, e.g. by surgery or radiofrequency may contribute to long-term survival and even be curative or at least allow a relevant chemotherapy-free interval. These approaches are often limited by the anatomical site, invasiveness and morbidity of the respective procedure. With stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) metastases can be treated with very high efficiency in only a few sessions and achieving long-term control. Identification of clinical studies investigating the use of SBRT for treatment of oligometastases in CRC patients. Control rates in liver and lung metastases and survival after SBRT. Toxicity and side effects of the treatment. A literature search was carried out for prospective and retrospective studies on local SBRT. The SBRT procedure has become a valid treatment option for patients with oligometastatic CRC and should also be considered in clinical practice as an alternative to surgical treatment of metastases or other local ablative techniques. (orig.) [German] Kolorektale Karzinome (KRK) sind haeufig oligometastasiert. Aktuell verfuegbare intensive systemische Therapieregime mit Chemotherapie und molekular zielgerichteten Substanzen bewirken ein Tumoransprechen oder die Krankheitskontrolle bei einem Grossteil der Patienten, weshalb sich die Frage nach dem weiteren Vorgehen stellt. Eine chirurgische Resektion oder Radiofrequenzablation kann ein Langzeitueberleben und sogar eine Heilung ermoeglichen, mindestens jedoch zu einem verlaengerten chemotherapiefreien Intervall fuehren. Diese Therapieansaetze sind bezueglich der anatomischen Lokalisation, der Invasivitaet und der Morbiditaet

  17. Iodine uptake patterns om post-ablation whole body scans are related to elevated serum thyroglobulin levels after radioactive iodine therapy in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Geum Cheol; Song, Min Chul; Min, Jung Joon; Cho, Sang Geon; Kwon, Seong Young [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ki Seong; Kang, Sae Ryung; Kim, Ja Hae; Song, Ho Chun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level is frequently elevated shortly after radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation therapy. The authors studied the relationship between the elevation of serum Tg after RAI therapy and iodine uptake pattern on post-ablation whole body scans (RxWBSs) in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The study subjects were patients with PTC that had undergone first RAI therapy with thyroid hormone withdrawal after total thyroidectomy. Patients with a high level of serum anti-Tg antibody (TgAb, ≥ 60 U/mL), possible regional or distant metastasis as determined by pre-ablation or post-ablation studies, and negative iodine uptake of the anterior neck on RxWBS were excluded. Serum Tg was checked twice, that is, 7 days after (post-ablation Tg) and on the day of RAI therapy (pre-ablation Tg). Ratio of pre-ablation Tg to post-ablation Tg (Tg ratio) was used to assess changes in serum Tg levels after RAI therapy. Patients were classified into two groups according to the presence of midline uptake above the thyroidectomy bed on RxWBS (negative (group 1) or positive (group 2) midline uptake). Variables were subjected to analysis to identify differences between the two groups. Two hundred and fifty patients were enrolled in this study; 101 in group 1 and 149 in group 2. Based on univariate analysis, post-ablation Tg (8.12 ± 11.05 vs. 34.12 ± 54.31; P < 0.001) and Tg ratio (7.81 ± 8.98 vs. 20.01 ± 19.84; P < 0.001) were significantly higher in group 2. On the other hand, gender, tumor (T) stage, lymph node (N) stage, size, multiplicity or bilaterality of primary tumor, dose of 131I, serum TgAb and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level (before or after RAI therapy) were not significantly different in the two groups. Variables with P values of < 0.25 by univariate analysis were subjected to multivariate analysis, which showed post-ablation Tg (OR 1.060, 95 % CI = 1.028–1.092; P < 0.001) and Tg ratio (OR 1.059, 95 % CI

  18. Value of epicardial potential maps in localizing pre-excitation sites for radiofrequency ablation. A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, Rok

    1998-06-01

    Using computer simulations, we systematically investigated the limitations of an inverse solution that employs the potential distribution on the epicardial surface as an equivalent source model in localizing pre-excitation sites in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. A model of the human ventricular myocardium that features an anatomically accurate geometry, an intramural rotating anisotropy and a computational implementation of the excitation process based on electrotonic interactions among cells, was used to simulate body surface potential maps (BSPMs) for 35 pre-excitation sites positioned along the atrioventricular ring. Two individualized torso models were used to account for variations in torso boundaries. Epicardial potential maps (EPMs) were computed using the L-curve inverse solution. The measure for accuracy of the localization was the distance between a position of the minimum in the inverse EPMs and the actual site of pre-excitation in the ventricular model. When the volume conductor properties and lead positions of the torso were precisely known and the measurement noise was added to the simulated BSPMs, the minimum in the inverse EPMs was at 12 ms after the onset on average within cm of the pre-excitation site. When the standard torso model was used to localize the sites of onset of the pre-excitation sequence initiated in individualized male and female torso models, the mean distance between the minimum and the pre-excitation site was cm for the male torso and cm for the female torso. The findings of our study indicate that a location of the minimum in EPMs computed using the inverse solution can offer non-invasive means for pre-interventional planning of the ablative treatment.

  19. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the achieved dose above 200 Gy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobe, C.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Weber, I.; Marx, K.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aim: this study was performed to determine the results of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) when the achieved dose in the thyroid was above 200 Gy and to characterize predictive factors for treatment outcome. Patients, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were a confirmed diagnosis Groves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of antithyroid drugs two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose was 250 Gy and the therapeutically achieved dose was calculated from serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months after RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The relation between success rate and the achieved dose, thyroid volume, age and sex of patients, TSH- and TRAb-values and presence of ophthalmopathy was analysed. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients who received more than 200 Gy, even for thyroid volumes >40 ml. The success of ablative RIT was not influenced by age or sex of patients, or by TSH- or TRAb values or concomitant ophthalmopathy. The mean achieved dose in the thyroid was 298 Gy with a standard deviation of 74.6 Gy. Conclusion: to achieve a dose of over 200 Gy with the above standard deviation, we recommend calculating on intended dose of 250 Gy and using a dosimetric approach with early and late uptake values in the radioiodine test, to allow early therapeutic intervention should the posttherapeutic thyroid dose fall unexpectedly below 200 Gy. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadoxetic acid for local tumour progression after radiofrequency ablation in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lee, Jisun; Song, Kyoung Doo; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Seong Hyun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gwak, Geum-Youn [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sin-Ho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Biostatics and Clinical Epidemiology Center, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To develop and validate a prediction model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for local tumour progression (LTP) after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Two hundred and eleven patients who had received RFA as first-line treatment for HCC were retrospectively analyzed. They had undergone gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI before treatment, and parameters including tumour size; margins; signal intensities on T1-, T2-, and diffusion-weighted images, and hepatobiliary phase images (HBPI); intratumoral fat or tumoral capsules; and peritumoural hypointensity in the HBPI were used to develop a prediction model for LTP after treatment. This model to discriminate low-risk from high-risk LTP groups was constructed based on Cox regression analysis. Our analyses produced the following model: 'risk score = 0.617 x tumour size + 0.965 x tumour margin + 0.867 x peritumoural hypointensity on HBPI'. This was able to predict which patients were at high risk for LTP after RFA (p < 0.001). Patients in the low-risk group had a significantly better 5-year LTP-free survival rate compared to the high-risk group (89.6 % vs. 65.1 %; hazard ratio, 3.60; p < 0.001). A predictive model based on MRI before RFA could robustly identify HCC patients at high risk for LTP after treatment. (orig.)

  1. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma using microwave and radiofrequency ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.-X.; Xie, X.-Y.; Lu, M.-D. E-mail: lumd@21cn.com; Chen, J.-W.; Yin, X.-Y.; Xu, Z.-F.; Liu, G.-J

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of thermal ablation for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using microwave and radiofrequency (RF) energy application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 190 nodules in 97 patients (84 male, 13 female; mean age 53.4 years, range 24-74 years) with HCC were treated with microwave or RF ablation in the last 4 years. The applicators were introduced into the tumours under conscious analgesic sedation by intravenous administration of fentanyl citrate and droperidol and local anaesthesia in both thermal ablation procedures. The patients were then followed up with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate treatment response. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Complete ablation was obtained in 92.6% (176/190) nodules. The complete ablation rates were 94.6% (106/112) in microwave ablation and 89.7% (70/78) in RF ablation. The complete ablation rates in tumours{<=}2.0, 2.1-3.9 and {>=}4.0 cm were 93.1, 93.8 and 86.4%, respectively. Local recurrence was found in 9.5% nodules and the rates in tumours{<=}2.0, 2.1-3.9 and {>=}4.0 cm in diameter were 3.4, 9.9 and 31.8%, respectively. In the follow-up period, 7.1% nodules ablated by microwave and 12.8% by RF presented local recurrence. The 1, 2 and 3-year distant recurrence-free survivals were 47.2, 34.9 and 31.0%, respectively. Estimated mean survival was 32 months, and 1, 2 and 3-year cumulative survivals were 75.6, 58.5, and 50.0%, respectively. One and 2 years survivals of Child-Pugh class A, B and C patients were 83.8 and 70.4%, 78.2 and 53.2%, 36.3 and 27.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Thermal ablation therapy by means of microwave and RF energy application is an effective and safe therapeutic technique for hepatocellular carcinoma. Large tumours can be completely ablated, but have a significantly higher risk of local recurrence at follow-up.

  2. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma using microwave and radiofrequency ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H.-X.; Xie, X.-Y.; Lu, M.-D.; Chen, J.-W.; Yin, X.-Y.; Xu, Z.-F.; Liu, G.-J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of thermal ablation for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using microwave and radiofrequency (RF) energy application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 190 nodules in 97 patients (84 male, 13 female; mean age 53.4 years, range 24-74 years) with HCC were treated with microwave or RF ablation in the last 4 years. The applicators were introduced into the tumours under conscious analgesic sedation by intravenous administration of fentanyl citrate and droperidol and local anaesthesia in both thermal ablation procedures. The patients were then followed up with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate treatment response. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Complete ablation was obtained in 92.6% (176/190) nodules. The complete ablation rates were 94.6% (106/112) in microwave ablation and 89.7% (70/78) in RF ablation. The complete ablation rates in tumours≤2.0, 2.1-3.9 and ≥4.0 cm were 93.1, 93.8 and 86.4%, respectively. Local recurrence was found in 9.5% nodules and the rates in tumours≤2.0, 2.1-3.9 and ≥4.0 cm in diameter were 3.4, 9.9 and 31.8%, respectively. In the follow-up period, 7.1% nodules ablated by microwave and 12.8% by RF presented local recurrence. The 1, 2 and 3-year distant recurrence-free survivals were 47.2, 34.9 and 31.0%, respectively. Estimated mean survival was 32 months, and 1, 2 and 3-year cumulative survivals were 75.6, 58.5, and 50.0%, respectively. One and 2 years survivals of Child-Pugh class A, B and C patients were 83.8 and 70.4%, 78.2 and 53.2%, 36.3 and 27.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Thermal ablation therapy by means of microwave and RF energy application is an effective and safe therapeutic technique for hepatocellular carcinoma. Large tumours can be completely ablated, but have a significantly higher risk of local recurrence at follow-up

  3. Radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma patients ineligible for surgery or ablative treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, P.M.; Chung, N.N.; Chang, F.L. [Cheng-Ching General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hsu, W.C. [Cheng-Ching General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Asia Univ., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Healthcare Administration; Fogliata, A.; Cozzi, L. [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this article is to report the dosimetric and clinical findings in the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT, RapidArc). A total of 138 patients were investigated. Dose prescription ranged from 45-66 Gy. Most patients (88.4 %) presented AJCC stage III or IV and 83 % were N0-M0. All were classified as Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage A-C. All patients were treated using 10 MV photons with single or multiple, coplanar or non-coplanar arcs, and cone-down technique in case of early response of tumors. The patients' median age was 66 years (range 27-87 years), 83 % were treated with 60 Gy (12 % at 45 Gy, 6 % at 66 Gy), 62 % with cone-down, 98 % with multiple arcs. The mean initial planning target volume (PTV) was 777 {+-} 632 cm{sup 3}; the mean final PTV (after the cone-down) was 583 {+-} 548 cm{sup 3}. High target coverage was achieved. The final PTV was V{sub 98%} > 98 %. Kidneys received on average 5 and 8 Gy (left and right), while the maximum dose to the spinal cord was 22 Gy; mean doses to esophagus and stomach were 23 Gy and 15 Gy, respectively. The average volume of healthy liver receiving more than 30 Gy was 294 {+-} 145 cm{sup 3}. Overall survival at 12 months was 45 %; median survival was 10.3 months (95 % confidence interval 7.2-13.3 months). Actuarial local control at 6 months was 95 % and 93.7 % at 12 months. The median follow-up was 9 months and a maximum of 28 months. This study showed from the dosimetric point of view the feasibility and technical appropriateness of RapidArc for the treatment of HCC. Clinical results were positive and might suggest, with appropriate care, to consider RapidArc as an additional therapeutic opportunity for these patients. (orig.)

  4. Towards the optimisation of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gélat, P; Ter Haar, G; Saffari, N

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the non-invasive treatment of cancer has been demonstrated for a range of different cancers including those of the liver, kidney, prostate and breast. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over other techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection, in terms of its non-invasiveness and low risk of harmful side effects. There is, however, a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to induce tissue necrosis at the required foci whilst minimising the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. As such, a common side effect of focusing ultrasound in regions located behind the rib cage is the overheating of bone and surrounding tissue, which can lead to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy are deposited. This is likely to rely on a treatment planning procedure in which optimal source velocity distributions are obtained so as to maximise a dose quantity at the treatment sites, whilst ensuring that this quantity does not exceed a specified threshold at other field locations, particularly on the surface of the ribs. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalised Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data [1]. This work describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimisation problem with non-linear constraints. The methodology was subsequently tested at an excitation frequency of 100 kHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence

  5. Towards the optimisation of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the non-invasive treatment of cancer has been demonstrated for a range of different cancers including those of the liver, kidney, prostate and breast. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over other techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection, in terms of its non-invasiveness and low risk of harmful side effects. There is, however, a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to induce tissue necrosis at the required foci whilst minimising the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. As such, a common side effect of focusing ultrasound in regions located behind the rib cage is the overheating of bone and surrounding tissue, which can lead to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy are deposited. This is likely to rely on a treatment planning procedure in which optimal source velocity distributions are obtained so as to maximise a dose quantity at the treatment sites, whilst ensuring that this quantity does not exceed a specified threshold at other field locations, particularly on the surface of the ribs. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalised Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data [1]. This work describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimisation problem with non-linear constraints. The methodology was subsequently tested at an excitation frequency of 100 kHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence

  6. Actual role of radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Philippe L. [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    The liver is, second only to lymph nodes, the most common site for metastatic disease irrespective of the primary tumour. More than 50% of all patients with malignant diseases will develop liver metastases with a significant morbidity and mortality. Although the surgical resection leads to an improved survival in patients with colorectal metastases, only approximately 20% of patients are eligible for surgery. Thermal ablation and especially radiofrequency ablation emerge as an important additional therapy modality for the treatment of liver metastases. RF ablation shows a benefit in life expectancy and may lead in a selected patient group to cure. Percutaneous RF ablation appears safer (versus cryotherapy), easier (versus laser), and more effective (versus ethanol instillation and transarterial chemoembolisation) compared with other minimally invasive procedures. RF ablation can be performed by a percutaneous, laparoscopical or laparotomic approach, and may be potentially combined with chemotherapy and surgery. At present ideal candidates have tumours with a maximum diameter less than 3.5 cm. An untreatable primary tumour or a systemic disease represents contraindications for performing local therapies. Permanent technical improvements of thermal ablation devices and a better integration of thermal ablation in the overall patient care may lead to prognosis improvement in patients with liver metastases. (orig.)

  7. Actual role of radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Philippe L.

    2007-01-01

    The liver is, second only to lymph nodes, the most common site for metastatic disease irrespective of the primary tumour. More than 50% of all patients with malignant diseases will develop liver metastases with a significant morbidity and mortality. Although the surgical resection leads to an improved survival in patients with colorectal metastases, only approximately 20% of patients are eligible for surgery. Thermal ablation and especially radiofrequency ablation emerge as an important additional therapy modality for the treatment of liver metastases. RF ablation shows a benefit in life expectancy and may lead in a selected patient group to cure. Percutaneous RF ablation appears safer (versus cryotherapy), easier (versus laser), and more effective (versus ethanol instillation and transarterial chemoembolisation) compared with other minimally invasive procedures. RF ablation can be performed by a percutaneous, laparoscopical or laparotomic approach, and may be potentially combined with chemotherapy and surgery. At present ideal candidates have tumours with a maximum diameter less than 3.5 cm. An untreatable primary tumour or a systemic disease represents contraindications for performing local therapies. Permanent technical improvements of thermal ablation devices and a better integration of thermal ablation in the overall patient care may lead to prognosis improvement in patients with liver metastases. (orig.)

  8. Quantifying Post- Laser Ablation Prostate Therapy Changes on MRI via a Domain-Specific Biomechanical Model: Preliminary Findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Toth

    Full Text Available Focal laser ablation destroys cancerous cells via thermal destruction of tissue by a laser. Heat is absorbed, causing thermal necrosis of the target region. It combines the aggressive benefits of radiation treatment (destroying cancer cells without the harmful side effects (due to its precise localization. MRI is typically used pre-treatment to determine the targeted area, and post-treatment to determine efficacy by detecting necrotic tissue, or tumor recurrence. However, no system exists to quantitatively evaluate the post-treatment effects on the morphology and structure via MRI. To quantify these changes, the pre- and post-treatment MR images must first be spatially aligned. The goal is to quantify (a laser-induced shape-based changes, and (b changes in MRI parameters post-treatment. The shape-based changes may be correlated with treatment efficacy, and the quantitative effects of laser treatment over time is currently poorly understood. This work attempts to model changes in gland morphology following laser treatment due to (1 patient alignment, (2 changes due to surrounding organs such as the bladder and rectum, and (3 changes due to the treatment itself. To isolate the treatment-induced shape-based changes, the changes from (1 and (2 are first modeled and removed using a finite element model (FEM. A FEM models the physical properties of tissue. The use of a physical biomechanical model is important since a stated goal of this work is to determine the physical shape-based changes to the prostate from the treatment, and therefore only physical real deformations are to be allowed. A second FEM is then used to isolate the physical, shape-based, treatment-induced changes. We applied and evaluated our model in capturing the laser induced changes to the prostate morphology on eight patients with 3.0 Tesla, T2-weighted MRI, acquired approximately six months following treatment. Our results suggest the laser treatment causes a decrease in prostate

  9. Photodynamic therapy as a local therapeutic adjunct for the treatment of vertebral metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Albert; Burch, Shane; Akens, Margarete; Won, Emily; Lo, Victor; Wise-Milestone, Lisa; Bisland, Stuart; Theriault, Aimee; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C.; Whyne, Cari

    2013-03-01

    Metastatic cancer causes the majority of tumors in bone, most frequently detected in the spinal column. Skeletal complications cause pain and neurologic impairment. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used to treat a variety of cancers. Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) strategies may allow targeted light application essential for PDT within bone structures. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an update on pre-clinical status as well as early clinical experience of a Phase I clinical trial on vertebral PDT. A pre-clinical (rnu/rnu rat) vertebral metastasis model of osteolytic (MT-1 breast cancer) was optimized and used to evaluate the effect of vertebral PDT. PDT alone and in combination with other standard local (radiation therapy, RT) and systemic (bisphosphonates, BP) therapies was evaluated through bioluminescence imaging, micro-CT based stereology, histology, and biomechanical testing. Single PDT treatment (photosensitizer BPD-MA, 690nm light) ablated tumor tissue in targeted vertebrae. PDT led to significant increases in bone structural properties, with greatest benefits observed from combined BP+PDT therapy: 76% and 19% increases in bone volume fraction in treated tumor-bearing and healthy untreated controls, respectively. Similar synergistic improvements (but of lesser magnitude) were found in combined PDT+RT treatments. The safety and feasibility of MIS+PDT were evaluated in scale-up animal studies, refining surgical technique for clinical translation. Following appropriate institutional review board as well as Health Canada approval, 5 patients (light only control group) have undergone protocoled treatment to date. These patients have guided further refinement of human therapeutic application from a laser delivery and vertebral bone access perspective.

  10. Combined Therapies for the Treatment of Technically Unresectable Liver Malignancies: Bland Embolization and Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation within the Same Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonomo, Guido; Della Vigna, Paolo; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Orgera, Gianluigi; Chiappa, Antonio; Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Orsi, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective study evaluated the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of combining transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) in a single session for the treatment of technically unresectable liver-only malignancies. Methods: From May 2006 to January 2011, a total of 30 patients affected by liver metastases with single or multiple unresectable liver-only lesions underwent a combined treatment with TAE followed by RFA in the same session, for a total of 36 treated lesions. Patients were extrapolated from a cohort of patients discussed within the weekly institutional tumor board. TAE was performed by using 100 μm microspheres; RFA was performed immediately after TAE by positioning the electrode needle via ultrasound and/or computed tomographic guidance. Local tumor responses and procedure-related complications were evaluated. Results: Completion of both procedures was obtained in all patients for all 36 lesions. Liver lesions had a maximum axial diameter ranging 16–59 mm. Postintervention unenhanced ablated areas ranged 28–104 mm in maximum axial diameter. Safety margins ranged 1–30.5 mm. Complete response, defined as complete devascularization at computed tomography, was obtained in all treated lesions for a maximum period of 12 months. Tumor relapse was observed in one patient at 12 months. Sixteen patients developed new liver lesions or progressive systemic disease during follow-up. Nine patients were still disease-free. Seven patients died as a result of systemic progressive disease. One major treatment-related complication was observed. Conclusions: In patients with technically unresectable liver-only malignancies, single-session combined TAE-RFA is an effective and safe treatment.

  11. Factors influencing distant recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma following combined radiofrequency ablation and transarterial chemoembolization therapy in patients with hepatitis C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Shunsuke; Kusakabe, Atsunori; Shinkai, Noboru; Matsuura, Kentaro; Iio, Etsuko; Miyaki, Tomokatsu; Joh, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify important risk factors for distant recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients positive for hepatitis C and without local recurrence. A total of 212 patients (145 males and 67 females) underwent radiofrequency ablation and transcatheter arterial embolization or transcatheter arterial chemoembolization at initial development of hepatocellular carcinoma. All patients were positive for hepatitis C. Child–Pugh classification was A in 115 and B in 97. The indication for radiofrequency ablation was the presence of up to three tumors ≤ 3 cm. The distant recurrence rate was analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method and tested by Wilcoxon’s method. Cumulative distant recurrence rates at years 1, 3, and 5 were 19%, 62%, and 79%, respectively. On univariate analysis, a ≥ 3 cm tumor, ≥ 50 ng/mL α-fetoprotein level, and < 3.6 g/dL serum albumin level were significant risk factors for distant recurrence, but only a serum albumin level < 3.6 g/dL (P = 0.004) was identified as significant on multivariate analysis. In the group with a pretreatment albumin level ≥ 3.6 g/dL, the distant recurrence rate was compared between patients in whom the albumin level rose, remained unchanged, or decreased by < 0.3 g/dL, and those in whom the level decreased by ≥ 0.3 g/dL. The rate was significantly higher in the latter, with a one-year recurrence rate of 7% versus 15% (P = 0.04). Distant recurrence was significantly decreased in patients with a high serum albumin level. Distant recurrence was more likely to occur in patients with a decreased albumin level, although the pretreatment level was high. Thus, strict follow-up after treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma is necessary in patients with low serum albumin levels

  12. Blood doses and remnant biokinetics after thyroid ablation therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer: withdrawal vs. rh TSH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassmann, Michael; Haenscheid, Heribert; Luster, Markus; Reiners, Christoph; Ablation, Trial Study Group

    2005-01-01

    Full text: An international randomized multicenter trial (9 sites; North America: 5, Europe: 4) was carried out investigating the effectiveness of ablation therapy with 3.7 GBq 131 I in differentiated thyroid cancer. We present the results of the trial dosimetry assessments. 63 patients were randomized after thyroidectomy to either hypothyroidism (THW) or euthyroidism in combination with rh TSH (0.9 mg q d x 2, Thyrogen). The biokinetics and residence times (RT) of the remnants were assessed from 3 neck scans starting 48 h after administration. The blood doses (a surrogate for the bone marrow dose) were calculated from activity concentrations in blood samples and 131 I whole body retention measurements between 2 and 168 h after 131 I administration. The overall dosimetry results were calculated centrally (Wuerzberg) in an externally audited standardized data evaluation procedure. The patient ablation rate was 100%. The 48 h 131 I uptake was lower in the remnant tissue of the rh TSH group: 0.5 ± 0.7%; THW group: 0.9 ±1.0% (p=0.1), the effective half life showed smaller values for the THW group (48.0 ± 52.6 h vs. 67.6 ± 48.9 h, p=0.0116). The mean RT in the remnant tissue was shorter in the rh TSH group: 0.9 ± 1.3 h; THW group: 1.4 ± 1.5 h (p=0.1). A greater decrease in the mean percentage of administered activity in the blood at 48 h, and a lower mean residence time was seen in the rh TSH group: 0.8%, RT: 2.3 ± 0.7 h; THW group: 1.8% (p=0.0011), RT: 3.5 ± 1.63 h (p=0.0004). The mean specific blood dose was significantly lower (p<0.0001) in the rh TSH group (0.072 ± 0.017 mGy/MBq, blood vessel radius (VR):0.2 mm; 0.104 ± 0.025 mGy/MBq, VR: 5 mm) than in the Hypothyroid group (0.106 ± 0.037 mGy/MBq, VR: 0.2 mm; 0.158 ± 0.059 mGy/MBq, VR: 5 mm). Conclusion: Although the remnant RT tended to be lower in the rh TSH group the ablation rates in the 2 study arms were comparable. The radiation dose to the blood was significantly lower in the rh TSH group. This

  13. Graves' disease in a 3 year-old patient with agranulocytosis due to anti-thyroid drugs: Radioiodine ablation therapy as an effective alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Muñoz, E; Ramírez-Ocaña, D; Martín-García, A M; Ruiz-García, F J; Puentes-Zarzuela, C

    The case is presented of a 3 year-old girl with mitochondrial disease (subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy of Leigh syndrome), v-stage chronic kidney disease of a diffuse mesangial sclerosis, as well as developmental disorders, and diagnosed with hyperthyroidism Graves-Basedow disease. Six weeks after starting the treatment with neo-carbimazole, the patient reported a serious case of agranulocytosis. This led to stopping the anti-thyroid drugs, and was treated successfully with 131 I ablation therapy. The relevance of the article is that Graves' disease is uncommon in the paediatric age range (especially in children younger than 6 years old), and developing complications due to a possible late diagnosis. Agranulocytosis as a potentially serious adverse effect following the use of anti-thyroid drugs, and the few reported cases of ablation therapy with 131 I at this age, makes this case unique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  14. Serum alpha-fetoprotein response can predict prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, W.-Y. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Y.-Y., E-mail: yychiou@vghtpe.gov.tw [Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hung, H.-H. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, C.-W., E-mail: cwsu2@vghtpe.gov.tw [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, Y.-H. [Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, J.-C. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Huo, T.-I. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y.-H. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, W.-C. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-15

    Aims: To evaluate the clinical inference of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients undergoing percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Materials and methods: Three hundred and thirteen previously untreated HCC patients were enrolled in the study. The optimal AFP response was defined as >20% decrease from baseline after 1 month of RFA for those with a baseline AFP level of {>=}100 ng/ml. The impact of AFP response on prognosis was analysed and prognostic factors were assessed. Results: After a median follow-up of 26.7 {+-} 19.1 months, 49 patients died and 264 patients were alive. The cumulative 5 year survival rates were 75.3 and 57.4% in patients with an initial AFP of <100 ng/ml and {>=}100 ng/ml, respectively (p = 0.003). In the 58 patients with a baseline AFP of {>=}100 ng/ml and initial completed tumour necrosis after RFA, the cumulative 5 year survival rates were 62.4 and 25.7% in optimal and non-optimal AFP responders, respectively (p = 0.001). By multivariate analysis, the prothrombin time international normalized ratio >1.1 (p = 0.009), non-optimal AFP response (p = 0.023), and creatinine >1.5 mg/dl (p = 0.021) were independent risk factors predictive of poor overall survival. Besides, the cumulative 5 year recurrence rates were 83.4 and 100% in optimal and non-optimal AFP responders, respectively (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated platelet count {<=}10{sup 5}/mm{sup 3} (p = 0.048), tumour size >2 cm (p = 0.027), and non-optimal AFP response (p < 0.001) were independent risk factors associated with tumour recurrence after RFA. Conclusions: Serum AFP response may be a useful marker for predicting prognosis in HCC patients undergoing RFA.

  15. Early detection of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy: radiomics system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammak, Salma; Palma, David; Mattonen, Sarah; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2018-02-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is the standard treatment recommendation for Stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who are inoperable or who refuse surgery. This option is well tolerated by even unfit patients and has a low recurrence risk post-treatment. However, SABR induces changes in the lung parenchyma that can appear similar to those of recurrence, and the difference between the two at an early follow-up time point is not easily distinguishable for an expert physician. We hypothesized that a radiomics signature derived from standard-of-care computed tomography (CT) imaging can detect cancer recurrence within six months of SABR treatment. This study reports on the design phase of our work, with external validation planned in future work. In this study, we performed cross-validation experiments with four feature selection approaches and seven classifiers on an 81-patient data set. We extracted 104 radiomics features from the consolidative and the peri-consolidative regions on the follow-up CT scans. The best results were achieved using the sum of estimated Mahalanobis distances (Maha) for supervised forward feature selection and a trainable automatic radial basis support vector classifier (RBSVC). This system produced an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.84, an error rate of 16.4%, a false negative rate of 12.7%, and a false positive rate of 20.0% for leaveone patient out cross-validation. This suggests that once validated on an external data set, radiomics could reliably detect post-SABR recurrence and form the basis of a tool assisting physicians in making salvage treatment decisions.

  16. Effect of a Low Iodine Diet vs. Restricted Iodine Diet on Postsurgical Preparation for Radioiodine Ablation Therapy in Thyroid Carcinoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chi Young; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Yoon, Mi-Jin; Chang, Hang Seok; Park, Cheong Soo; Chung, Woong Youn

    2015-07-01

    The radioiodine ablation therapy is required for patients who underwent a total thyroidectomy. Through a comparative review of a low iodine diet (LID) and a restricted iodine diet (RID), the study aims to suggest guidelines that are suitable for the conditions of Korea. The study was conducted with 101 patients. With 24-hour urine samples from the patients after a 2-week restricted diet and after a 4-week restricted diet, the amount of iodine in the urine was estimated. The consumed radioiodine amounts for 2 hours and 24 hours were calculated. This study was conducted with 47 LID patients and 54 RID patients. The amounts of iodine in urine, the 2-week case and 4-week case for each group showed no significant differences. The amounts of iodine in urine between the two groups were both included in the range of the criteria for radioiodine ablation therapy. Also, 2 hours and 24 hours radioiodine consumption measured after 4-week restrictive diet did not show statistical differences between two groups. A 2-week RID can be considered as a type of radioiodine ablation therapy after patients undergo a total thyroidectomy.

  17. Photothermal ablation cancer therapy using homogeneous CsxWO3 nanorods with broad near-infra-red absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chongshen; Yin, Shu; Yu, Haijun; Liu, Shaoqin; Dong, Qiang; Goto, Takehiro; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping; Sato, Tsugio

    2013-06-01

    Recently, photothermal ablation therapy (PTA) employing near-infrared radiation (NIR) has been extensively investigated as an emerging modality for cancer management. However, the clinical translation of this promising approach is limited by the lack of PTA agents with broad NIR absorption, low cost and high photothermal conversion efficiency. Herein, we have developed PEGylated homogeneous CsxWO3 nanorods (a mean size ~69.3 nm × 12.8 nm) with broad photo-absorption (780-2500 nm) as a novel NIR absorbent for PTA treatment of human cancer. The prepared CsxWO3 nanocrystals displayed strong near-infrared optical absorption with a high molar extinction coefficient (e.g. 4.8 × 1010 M-1 cm-1 at 980 nm), thus generated significant amounts of heat upon excitation with near-infrared light. The PTA study in two human carcinoma cell lines (i.e. A549 lung cancer cells and HeLa ovarian cancer cells) demonstrated that CsxWO3 nanorods can efficiently cause cell death via hyperthermia induced lysosome destruction, cytoskeleton protein degradation, DNA damage and thereafter cellular necrosis or apoptosis. Our study also confirmed the migration of healthy cells migrated from unirradiated areas to dead cell cycle, which is essential for tissue reconstruction and wound healing after photodestruction of tumor tissue. The prompted results reported in the current study imply the promising potential of CsxWO3 nanorods for application in PTA cancer therapy.Recently, photothermal ablation therapy (PTA) employing near-infrared radiation (NIR) has been extensively investigated as an emerging modality for cancer management. However, the clinical translation of this promising approach is limited by the lack of PTA agents with broad NIR absorption, low cost and high photothermal conversion efficiency. Herein, we have developed PEGylated homogeneous CsxWO3 nanorods (a mean size ~69.3 nm × 12.8 nm) with broad photo-absorption (780-2500 nm) as a novel NIR absorbent for PTA treatment of human

  18. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Thickness...

  19. [Radiofrequency ablation as a palliative therapy option in ENT tumors: in vivo and in vitro testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, S; Hornung, J; Bonkowsky, V; Iro, H; Zenk, J

    2010-04-01

    High frequency thermotherapy (HFTT) is an established palliative therapy for hepatic malignancies. An in vivo and in vitro trial examined the preconditions for the application of HFTT with liquid-cooled wet electrodes for minimally invasive palliation of head and neck tumors. HFTT was applied with needle electrodes, cooled with isotonic saline solution, and a high-frequency generator (Elektrotom HiTT 106, Berchtold, Tuttlingen) to porcine tongue and narcotized, juvenile domestic pigs to the tongue and neck, and monitored in realtime by B-mode ultrasound. The direction of spread of the hyperthermic zone is well observed using ultrasound. Determining the direction of spread is not possible with cooled-tip electrode needles. Severe complications were not observed during the application. RFA with liquid-cooled needle applicators is not safely applicable for the therapy of head and neck tumors.

  20. Excellent local tumor response after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for locally recurrent nasopharynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Y. C.; Lim, D. H.; Choi, D. R.; Kim, D. K.; Kim, D. Y.; Huh, S. J.; Baek, C. H.; Chu, K. C.; Yoon, S. S.; Park, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    This study is to report experience with Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (FSRT) for locally recurrent nasopharynx cancer after curative conventional radiation therapy. Three patients with locally recurrent and symptomatic nasopharynx cancer were given FSRT as reirradiation method between the period of September of 1995 and August of 1996. For two patients, application of FSRT is their third radiation therapy directed to the nasopharynx. Two patients were given low dose chemotherapy as radiation sensitizer concurrently with FSRT. Authors used 3-dimensional coordinate system by individually made, relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) stereotactic frame and multiple non-coplanar arc therapy dose planning was done using XKnife-3. Total of 45 Gy/18 fractions or 50 Gy/20 fractions were given. Authors observed satisfactory symptomatic improvement and remarkable objective tumor size decrease by follow-up MR images taken 1 month post-FSRT in all three patients, while no neurologic side effect attributable to reirradiation was noticed. Two died at 7 and 9 months with loco-regional and distant seeding outside FSRT field, while one patient is living for 4 month. Authors experienced satisfactory therapeutic effectiveness and safety of FSRT as reirradiation method for locally recurrent nasopharynx cancer. Development of more effective systemic chemotherapeutic regimen is desired for distant metastasis. (author)

  1. Locally advanced cervix carcinoma - innovation in combined modality therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, Patrick S.

    1996-01-01

    Locally advanced cervical carcinoma continues to be a challenge to the clinician due to local failure as well as systemic metastases. Standard intracavitary and external beam techniques result in local control rates of only 35-65%, with long term survival rates of 25-60% in patients with state IIIA-IVA disease, indicating the need to identify new treatment strategies. Optimization programs for remote-afterloading interstitial brachytherapy allow the delivery of higher local doses of radiation to volumes that more closely approximate tumor target volumes as identified on MR scans, leading to improved therapeutic ratios. Identification of subsets of patients more likely to fail standard therapy, either locally or systemically, may be possible through such techniques as in vivo measurements of hypoxia with Eppendorf oxygen electrodes, interstitial fluid pressure measurements, the Comet assay, and nitroimidazole binding methods. Traditional chemotherapies, administered in either a neoadjuvant role or concomitantly with radiation have been disappointing in prospective trials. A variety of new agents are being investigated to determine if they can increase the frequency or duration of complete response. The taxanes, with response rates of 17-23% by themselves, are being assessed as potential radiosensitizers. The camptotheicin CRT-11 (Irinotecan) has demonstrated activity in platinum resistant cervix cancer, with response rates of 24%. Bioradiotherapeutic approaches, using 13-cis-retinoic acid and interferon-2a, are undergoing phase II studies. Neoangiogenesis inhibitors and vaccines against HPV are also being examined. The aggressive pursuit of techniques that help identify those patients most likely to fail, that allow the delivery of higher radiation doses more safely to the target volume, and that incorporate the use of more effective systemic therapies is necessary to improve the outcome for this disease

  2. Stroke risks and patterns of warfarin therapy among atrial fibrillation patients post radiofrequency ablation: A real-world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Xingpeng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yin, Xiandong; Wang, Yanjiang; Lu, Xiaoying; Yang, Xinchun

    2017-11-01

    We assessed the thromboembolic risks of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients who had undergone radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using the CHADS2-VASc risk scoring system and further investigated the patterns of warfarin use for thromboprophylaxis according to patient thromboembolic risk scores.In this study, we analyzed the stroke risks of patients who had undergone RFA for AF at our hospital between March 2014 and June 2016 using the CHADS2, CHADS2-VASc, and Hypertension, Abnormal renal/liver function, Stroke, Bleeding history or predisposition, Labile international normalized ratio, Elderly (> 65 years) (HAS-BLED) scoring systems. We retrieved medications, co-morbidities, and initial warfarin dosage data. The primary outcome was the percentage of patients initiated with warfarin therapy for stroke prophylaxis in AF who had a CHADS2-VASc score of 0.Totally, 309 patients were initiated with warfarin therapy for stroke prophylaxis in AF post-RFA. The baseline warfarin dosage was 2.76 ± 0.61 mg. The baseline CHADS2-VASC score was 2.93 ± 1.96 and 40 (12.95%) had a CHADS2-VASC score of 0, 42 (13.6%) had a CHADS2-VASCscore of 1, and 227 (73.5%) had a CHADS2-VASC score ≥2. The baseline CHADS2 score was 2.17 ± 1.55 and 48 (15.5%) had a CHADS2 score of 0, 68 (22.0%) had a CHADS2 score of 1, and 193 (62.5%) had a CHADS2 score ≥2. The baseline HAS-BLED score was 1.25 ± 0.91 and 69 (22.3%) had a HAS-BLED score of 0, 121 (39.2%) had a HAS-BLED score of 1, and 119 (38.5%) had a HAS-BLED score ≥2. Patients aged warfarin thromboprophylaxis in accordance with national guidelines. Our findings suggest that low and intermediate stroke risk patients should be evaluated for stroke risks and risk factors so that tailored warfarin thromboprophylaxis therapy can be given and inappropriate use of warfarin in AF patients can be avoided. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    SUBJECT TERMS Cancer therapy by localized immune response, Magneto -rehological Fluids 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cahit Evrensel...2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy utilizing

  4. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Nicolucci, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  5. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiofrequency Ablation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systemic Review and Pooled Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Nan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zheng, Xiangpeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fskong@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To performed a systematic review and pooled analysis to compare clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive literature search for published trials from 2001 to 2012 was undertaken. Pooled analyses were performed to obtain overall survival (OS) and local tumor control rates (LCRs) and adverse events. Regression analysis was conducted considering each study's proportions of stage IA and age. Results: Thirty-one studies on SBRT (2767 patients) and 13 studies on RFA (328 patients) were eligible. The LCR (95% confidence interval) at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years for RFA was 77% (70%-85%), 48% (37%-58%), 55% (47%-62%), and 42% (30%-54%) respectively, which was significantly lower than that for SBRT: 97% (96%-98%), 92% (91%-94%), 88% (86%-90%), and 86% (85%-88%) (P<.001). These differences remained significant after correcting for stage IA and age (P<.001 at 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years; P=.04 at 5 years). The effect of RFA was not different from that of SBRT on OS (P>.05). The most frequent complication of RFA was pneumothorax, occurring in 31% of patients, whereas that for SBRT (grade ≥3) was radiation pneumonitis, occurring in 2% of patients. Conclusions: Compared with RFA, SBRT seems to have a higher LCR but similar OS. More studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to validate such findings.

  6. Critical structure sparing in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for central lung lesions: helical tomotherapy vs. volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helical tomotherapy (HT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT are both advanced techniques of delivering intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Here, we conduct a study to compare HT and partial-arc VMAT in their ability to spare organs at risk (OARs when stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR is delivered to treat centrally located early stage non-small-cell lung cancer or lung metastases. METHODS: 12 patients with centrally located lung lesions were randomly chosen. HT, 2 & 8 arc (Smart Arc, Pinnacle v9.0 plans were generated to deliver 70 Gy in 10 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV. Target and OAR dose parameters were compared. Each technique's ability to meet dose constraints was further investigated. RESULTS: HT and VMAT plans generated essentially equivalent PTV coverage and dose conformality indices, while a trend for improved dose homogeneity by increasing from 2 to 8 arcs was observed with VMAT. Increasing the number of arcs with VMAT also led to some improvement in OAR sparing. After normalizing to OAR dose constraints, HT was found to be superior to 2 or 8-arc VMAT for optimal OAR sparing (meeting all the dose constraints (p = 0.0004. All dose constraints were met in HT plans. Increasing from 2 to 8 arcs could not help achieve optimal OAR sparing for 4 patients. 2/4 of them had 3 immediately adjacent structures. CONCLUSION: HT appears to be superior to VMAT in OAR sparing mainly in cases which require conformal dose avoidance of multiple immediately adjacent OARs. For such cases, increasing the number of arcs in VMAT cannot significantly improve OAR sparing.

  7. Combined high-intensity local treatment and systemic therapy in metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: An analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Luu, Michael; Yoshida, Emi J; Kim, Sungjin; Tighiouart, Mourad; David, John M; Shiao, Stephen L; Mita, Alain C; Scher, Kevin S; Sherman, Eric J; Lee, Nancy Y; Ho, Allen S

    2017-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that primary tumor ablation can improve survival for some cancer patients with distant metastases. This may be particularly applicable to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) because of its tropism for locoregional progression. This study included patients with metastatic HNSCC undergoing systemic therapy identified in the National Cancer Data Base. High-intensity local treatment was defined as radiation doses ≥ 60 Gy or oncologic resection of the primary tumor. Multivariate Cox regression, propensity score matching, landmark analysis, and subgroup analysis were performed to account for imbalances in covariates, including adjustments for the number and location of metastatic sites in the subset of patients with this information available. In all, 3269 patients were included (median follow-up, 51.5 months). Patients undergoing systemic therapy with local treatment had improved survival in comparison with patients receiving systemic therapy alone in propensity score-matched cohorts (2-year overall survival, 34.2% vs 20.6%; P treatment, whereas those receiving lower-intensity local treatment had survival similar to that of patients receiving systemic therapy without local treatment. The impact of high-intensity local therapy was time-dependent, with a stronger impact within the first 6 months after the diagnosis (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.255; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.210-0.309; P treatment warrants prospective evaluation for select patients with metastatic HNSCC. Cancer 2017;123:4583-4593. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Chitosan in Mucoadhesive Drug Delivery: Focus on Local Vaginal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toril Andersen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucoadhesive drug therapy destined for localized drug treatment is gaining increasing importance in today’s drug development. Chitosan, due to its known biodegradability, bioadhesiveness and excellent safety profile offers means to improve mucosal drug therapy. We have used chitosan as mucoadhesive polymer to develop liposomes able to ensure prolonged residence time at vaginal site. Two types of mucoadhesive liposomes, namely the chitosan-coated liposomes and chitosan-containing liposomes, where chitosan is both embedded and surface-available, were made of soy phosphatidylcholine with entrapped fluorescence markers of two molecular weights, FITC-dextran 4000 and 20,000, respectively. Both liposomal types were characterized for their size distribution, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and the in vitro release profile, and compared to plain liposomes. The proof of chitosan being both surface-available as well as embedded into the liposomes in the chitosan-containing liposomes was found. The capability of the surface-available chitosan to interact with the model porcine mucin was confirmed for both chitosan-containing and chitosan-coated liposomes implying potential mucoadhesive behavior. Chitosan-containing liposomes were shown to be superior in respect to the simplicity of preparation, FITC-dextran load, mucoadhesiveness and in vitro release and are expected to ensure prolonged residence time on the vaginal mucosa providing localized sustained release of entrapped model substances.

  9. Intraoperative radiation therapy for locally advanced gynecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddock, M.G.; Petersen, I.A.; Webb, M.J.; Wilson, T.O.; Podratz, K.C.; Gunderson, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate disease control and survival in patients with locally advanced gynecological malignancies who received intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons (IOERT) as a component of treatment. Methods and Materials: Between March 1983 and June 1995, 63 patients (pts) with locally advanced primary (9 pts) or recurrent (54 pts) gynecological malignancies received IOERT as a component of attempted curative therapy. The site of origin was uterine cervix in 40 pts, uterine corpus in 16 pts, vagina in 5 pts, and ovary in 2 pts. Thirty-eight patients with recurrent disease had been previously irradiated (median prior RT dose 5040 cGy, range 900-8400). External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was given to 43 of 63 pts either before or after IOERT (900-6570 cGy, median 4960 cGy). Chemotherapy was given to 21 pts prior to IOERT and following IOERT in 2 pts. IOERT doses ranged from 800 cGy to 2500 cGy with a median of 1750 cGy. The median IOERT dose was 2000 cGy in 20 patients with gross residual disease and 1500 cGy in 43 patients with microscopic residual disease. Endpoints included central control within the IOERT cone, local control, distant failure, disease free survival and overall survival. Variables evaluated for impact on disease outcome included tumor grade, primary site, prior RT, IOERT dose, EBRT dose, residual disease at time of IOERT, and use of chemotherapy. Results: Survival and disease control data are presented in the table below. There was no impact of any disease or treatment related variable on local or central failure. Pts with microscopic residual disease at the time of IOERT had significantly fewer distant metastases than pts with gross residual (5 yr 31% vs. 77%, p = 0.001) and improved survival (5 yr 37% vs. 10%, p = 0.02). Patients with recurrent disease after previous RT had survival and disease control rates which were similar to those seen in pts without priot RT. Toxicity ≥ grade 3 due to IOERT was observed in 11 pts (17%). Conclusion: A

  10. The role of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in image-guided liver ablations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatori, Lorenzo Carlo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Mauri, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We read with great interest the paper by Kim et al. entitled “Local ablation therapy with contrast enhanced ultrasonography for hepatocellular carcinoma: a practical review,” recently published in Ultrasonography. We think that contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS), together with the development of reliable navigation systems, is likely to represent one of the most important advances in image-guided ablations in recent years. Thus, we offer some considerations on the topic

  11. Cardiac ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ratheal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac ablation is a procedure that uses either radiofrequency or cryothermal energy to destroy cells in the heart to terminate and/or prevent arrhythmias. The indications for cardiac catheter ablation include refractory, symptomatic arrhythmias, with more specific guidelines for atrial fibrillation in particular. The ablation procedure itself involves mapping the arrhythmia and destruction of the aberrant pathway in an effort to permanently prevent the arrhythmia. There are many types of arrhythmias, and they require individualized approaches to ablation based on their innately different electrical pathways. Ablation of arrhythmias, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, and atrial-fibrillation, is discussed in this review. Ablation has a high success rate overall and minimal complication rates, leading to improved quality of life in many patients.

  12. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as an independent predictor for survival in patients with localized clear cell renal cell carcinoma after radiofrequency ablation: a propensity score matching analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Tieshi; Wang, Wei; Guo, Hongqian

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the role of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as a prognostic indicator in patients with localized clear cell renal cell carcinoma treated with radiofrequency ablation. We retrospectively analyzed data from patients with renal cell carcinoma who underwent radiofrequency ablation from 2006 to 2013. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to generate the survival curves according to different categories of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio. Relationships between preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio or the change of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and survival were evaluated with multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. A propensity score matching analysis was carried out to avoid confounding bias. A total of 185 patients were included in present study. When stratified by preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cutoff value of 2.79, 5-year recurrence-free survival, 5-year disease-free survival, and 5-year overall survival rates of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio analysis, 5-year recurrence-free survival, 5-year disease-free survival, and 5-year overall survival rates of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio ratio with the change of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, patients with both preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio ≥2.79 and the change of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio ≥0.40 had the worst disease-free survival. Results of multivariable analysis showed that preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and the change of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio correlated with cancer relapse remarkably. High preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and elevated postoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio are associated with significant increase in risk of local recurrence as well as distant metastasis. The combination of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio with the other prognostic indicators can be applied in the evaluation of relapse risk in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma after radiofrequency ablation.

  13. Determinants of Local Progression After Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Unresectable Lung Tumors: 9-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuma, Tomohisa; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Hamamoto, Shinichi; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Miki, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the local control rate and contributing factors to local progression after computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for unresectable lung tumor. This study included 138 lung tumors in 72 patients (56 men and 16 women; age 70.0 ± 11.6 years (range 31-94); mean tumor size 2.1 ± 1.2 cm [range 0.2-9]) who underwent lung RFA between June 2000 and May 2009. Mean follow-up periods for patients and tumors were 14 and 12 months, respectively. The local progression-free rate and survival rate were calculated to determine the contributing factors to local progression. During follow-up, 44 of 138 (32%) lung tumors showed local progression. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year overall local control rates were 61, 57, 57, and 38%, respectively. The risk factors for local progression were age (≥70 years), tumor size (≥2 cm), sex (male), and no achievement of roll-off during RFA (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis identified tumor size ≥2 cm as the only independent factor for local progression (P = 0.003). For tumors <2 cm, 17 of 68 (25%) showed local progression, and the 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall local control rates were 77, 73, and 73%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified that age ≥70 years was an independent determinant of local progression for tumors <2 cm in diameter (P = 0.011). The present study showed that 32% of lung tumors developed local progression after CT-guided RFA. The significant risk factor for local progression after RFA for lung tumors was tumor size ≥2 cm.

  14. Use of lipid emulsion therapy in local anesthetic overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Karcioglu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE therapy as antidote in systemic toxicity of certain agents has gained widespread support. There are increasing data suggesting use of ILE in reversing from local anesthetic-induced systemic toxicity severe, life-threatening cardiotoxicity, although findings are contradictory. Efficiency of ILE was demonstrated in animal studies in the treatment of severe impairment of cardiac functions, via a mechanism for trapping lipophilic drugs in an expanded plasma lipid compartment (“lipid sink”. In patients with hemodynamic compromise and/or cardiovascular collapse due to lipid-soluble agents, ILE may be considered for resuscitation in the acute setting by emergency physicians. The most common adverse effects from standard ILE include hypertriglyceridemia, fat embolism, infection, vein irritation, pancreatitis, electrolyte disturbances and allergic reactions. The advantages of ILE include an apparent wide margin of safety, relatively low cost, long shelf-life, and ease of administration.

  15. Early experience of proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Youjirou; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Makita, Chiyoko; Suzuki, Motohisa; Azami, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2013-01-01

    Between 2009 and 2012, 10 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer underwent proton therapy combined with chemotherapy. The initial results of this therapy were 8 complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR), local recurrence was detected 1 patient. Proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy is thought to be an effective treatment for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. (author)

  16. SU-F-T-617: Remotely Pre-Planned Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy: Validation of Treatment Plan Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juang, T; Bush, K; Loo, B; Gensheimer, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We propose a workflow to improve access to stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for rural patients. When implemented, a separate trip to the central facility for simulation can be eliminated. Two elements are required: (1) Fabrication of custom immobilization devices to match positioning on prior diagnostic CT (dxCT). (2) Remote radiation pre-planning on dxCT, with transfer of contours/plan to simulation CT (simCT) and initiation of treatment same-day or next day. In this retrospective study, we validated part 2 of the workflow using patients already treated with SABR for upper lobe lung tumors. Methods: Target/normal structures were contoured on dxCT; a plan was created and approved by the physician. Structures were transferred to simCT using deformable image registration and the plan was re-optimized on simCT. Plan quality was evaluated through comparison to gold-standard structures contoured on simCT and a gold-standard plan based on these structures. Workflow-generated plan quality in this study represents a worst-case scenario as these patients were not treated using custom immobilization to match dxCT position as would be done when the workflow is implemented clinically. Results: 5/6 plans created through the pre-planning workflow were clinically acceptable. For all six plans, the gold-standard GTV received full prescription dose, along with median PTV V95%=95.2% and median PTV D95%=95.4%. Median GTV DSC=0.80, indicating high degree of similarity between the deformed and gold-standard GTV contours despite small GTV sizes (mean=3.0cc). One outlier (DSC=0.49) resulted in inadequate PTV coverage (V95%=62.9%) in the workflow plan; in clinical practice, this mismatch between deformed/gold-standard GTV would be revised by the physician after deformable registration. For all patients, normal tissue doses were comparable to the gold-standard plan and well within constraints. Conclusion: Pre-planning SABR cases on diagnostic imaging generated

  17. Bladder preservation using chemoradiation therapy for locally invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Toyofumi; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Sato, Mototaka; Mori, Naoki; Sekii, Ken-Ichiro; Itatani, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the long-term results and molecular markers of outcome with selective organ preservation in invasive bladder cancer using chemoradiation therapy. We examined locally invasive bladder cancer in 32 patients (30 men, 2 women; mean age at treatment 68.1 years) who underwent bladder-sparing protocols in the Department of Urology at Sumitomo Hospital between 2000 and 2005. The clinical stage was T2, T3, and T4 in 13, 16, and 3 patients, respectively. Our protocol includes aggressive transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) and 46 Gy radiotherapy (2 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week) to the pelvis with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy (20 mg/body/day, 5 days/week, the first and fourth week, intravenously). The initial evaluation included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), urine cytology, and cystoscopy with a biopsy. During follow-up, if the patients developed superficial recurrence, they was treated with TURBT and intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), while patients with invasive recurrence were advised to undergo a salvage cystectomy. We examined the association between the expression of the Bcl-2 family in pretreatment TUR specimens and patient outcome. The mean follow-up was 54.6 months. The first assessment after the induction chemoradiotherapy showed that bladder preservation was achieved in 27 patients (84.4%). The actuarial local control rate with an intact bladder was 56.3% (18 patients) at 3 years. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 90.6, 84.0, and 66.9%, respectively. The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 75.0, 67.2, and 33.3% in T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Bcl-x positivity was significantly associated with a poor cancer-specific survival rate (log-rank test, p=0.038). Chemoradiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer can achieve survival rates similar to those in patients treated with radical cystectomy, with successful bladder preservation. Our results suggest that the expression of Bcl-x is a

  18. Similarities and differences in ablative and non-ablative iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Mazur, Courtney M.; Petryk, James D.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. It has been demonstrated by many research groups that ablative temperatures and cytotoxicity can be produced with locally NP-based hyperthermia. Such ablative NP techniques have demonstrated the potential for success. Much attention has also been given to the fact that NP may be administered systemically, resulting in a broader cancer therapy approach, a lower level of tumor NP content and a different type of NP cancer therapy (most likely in the adjuvant setting). To use NP based hyperthermia successfully as a cancer treatment, the technique and its goal must be understood and utilized in the appropriate clinical context. The parameters include, but are not limited to, NP access to the tumor (large vs. small quantity), cancer cell-specific targeting, drug carrying capacity, potential as an ionizing radiation sensitizer, and the material properties (magnetic characteristics, size and charge). In addition to their potential for cytotoxicity, the material properties of the NP must also be optimized for imaging, detection and direction. In this paper we will discuss the differences between, and potential applications for, ablative and non-ablative magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  19. Hyperparathyroidism in pregnancy: options for localization and surgical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Todd P W; Learoyd, Diana L; Williams, David C; Sywak, Mark S; Sidhu, Stan B; Delbridge, Leigh W

    2010-08-01

    Hyperparathyroidism in pregnancy is a threat to the health of both mother and fetus. The mothers suffer commonly from nephrolithiasis, hyperemesis, or even hypercalcemic crisis. Untreated disease will commonly complicate fetal development and fetal death is a significant risk. Treatment options, including medical and surgical therapy, are debated in the literature. This is a case series comprising seven patients with primary hyperparathyroidism in pregnancy. Data collected included symptoms at diagnosis, biochemical abnormalities, pathologic findings, treatment regimes, and subsequent maternal and fetal outcomes. Seven women, aged 20 to 39 years, presented with hyperparathyroidism during pregnancy. The earliest presented at 8 weeks and the latest at 38 weeks. Four of seven patients experienced renal calculi. Calcium levels were 2.7-3.5 mmol/l. All were found to have solitary parathyroid adenomas, of which two were in ectopic locations. Fetal complications included three preterm deliveries and one fetal death with no cases of neonatal tetany. Maternal and fetal complications could not be predicted based on duration or severity of hypercalcemia. Three patients were treated during pregnancy with surgery, and two of these had ectopic glands that required reoperations with a novel approach using Tc-99m sestamibi scanning during pregnancy to assist in localizing the abnormal gland. Four cases were treated postpartum with a combination of open and minimally invasive approaches after localization. No operative complications or fetal loss related to surgery were observed in this cohort. Primary hyperparathyroidism in pregnancy represents a significant risk for maternal and fetal complications that cannot be predicted by duration of symptoms or serum calcium levels. Surgical treatment should be considered early, and a minimally invasive approach with ultrasound is best suited to mitigating risk to mother and fetus. Equally important, Tc-99m sestamibi imaging may be used

  20. More Than Just Tumor Destruction: Immunomodulation by Thermal Ablation of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian P. Haen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, thermoablative techniques for the therapy of localized tumors have gained importance in the treatment of patients not eligible for surgical resection. Anecdotal reports have described spontaneous distant tumor regression after thermal ablation, indicating a possible involvement of the immune system, hence an induction of antitumor immunity after thermoinduced therapy. In recent years, a growing body of evidence for modulation of both adaptive and innate immunity, as well as for the induction of danger signals through thermoablation, has emerged. Induced immune responses, however, are mostly weak and not sufficient for the complete eradication of established tumors or durable prevention of disease progression, and combination therapies with immunomodulating drugs are being evaluated with promising results. This article aims to summarize published findings on immune modulation through radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation therapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and laser-induced thermotherapy.

  1. Post-operative radiation therapy for locally advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hideki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Yoshida, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the treatment outcomes of post-operative radiation therapy (PORT) after radical surgery for locally advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma. From August 2000 to July 2009, 62 patients with hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were treated with radical surgery followed by PORT in our institute. All patients were followed up for more than 6 months or until any events. All patients underwent a total laryngectomy and neck node dissection prior to PORT. There were 55 male and 7 female patients, with ages ranging from 45 to 82 years (median: 64). Pathologic stage was IVA in 55 and IVB in 7 patients. Irradiation dose ranged from 46 to 70 Gy (median: 60). Twenty-four patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 43 months. The 3-year overall and relapse-free survival rates were 56% and 51%, respectively. There was 1 patient with local recurrence and 9 patients with neck node recurrence, and the 3-year loco-regional control rate was 85%. There were 16 patients with distant metastases and the 3-year freedom form distant metastasis rate was 71%. Patients with extra nodal invasion (ENI) had a statistically poorer prognosis (p=0.008). The incidence rate of loco-regional recurrence and distant metastasis were statistically higher in the patients with ENI (p=0.017 and p=0.009, respectively). PORT with concurrent chemotherapy is deemed to be a standard treatment for such high-risk patients. Conformal and precise radiation treatment such as IMRT might also be considered for such high-risk patients in the near future. (author)

  2. Localized prostate cancer in elderly patients. Outcome after radiation therapy compared to matched younger patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, P.U.; Bitterli, M.; Luetolf, U.M.; Glanzmann, C.; Bernhard, J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To detect a difference in outcome (disease-specific survival, local tumor progression, late toxicity, quality of life) after curative radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer in elderly as compared to younger patients. Patients and methods: In a retrospective analysis 59 elderly patients (>74 years old) were matched 1:2 with younger patients from the data base according to tumor stage, grading, pre-treatment PSA values and year of radiotherapy. Surviving patients were contacted to fill in a validated questionnaire for quality of life measurement (EORTC QLQ-C30). Median follow-up for elderly and younger patients was 5.2 and 4.5 years, respectively. Results: Overall survival at 5 years was 66% for the elderly and 80% for younger patients. Intercurrent deaths were observed more frequently in the elderly population. There was no age-specific difference in disease-specific survival (78% vs 82%), late toxicity or quality of life. Clinically meaningful local tumor progression was observed in 15% and 14%, respectively, corresponding to data from the literature following hormonal ablation. Conclusions: There is no obvious difference in outcome including disease-specific survival, late toxicity and quality of life in elderly patients, compared to a matched younger population. A clinically meaningful local tumor progression following radiotherapy or hormonal ablation only is rare. Local radiotherapy or, alternatively, hormonal ablation is recommended to preserve local progression-free survival in elderly patients except for very early stage of disease (i.e. T1 G1-2 M0). (orig.) [de

  3. Local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, C.; Chen, Y.; DuBeshter, B.; Angel, C.; Dawson, A.; Casey, W.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare and aggressive tumor. This tumor is similar to small cell carcinoma of the lung with a tendency to metastasize early. While there has been an increasing interest in the use of chemotherapy regimens similar to those used for small cell carcinoma of the lung, the optimum local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix remains unknown. We reviewed the treatment outcome of patients with small cell carcinoma of the cervix diagnosed in our cancer center with an emphasis on the local/regional disease control. Material and Methods: Between 1983 and 1993, medical records of patients diagnosed with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reviewed. There were 281 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix referred to our department for radiation treatment. Seven patients had pathologic diagnosis of either small cell or neuroendocrine histology. Details of the treatments and follow-up information of these patients were reviewed with a medium follow-up period of three years (range - 1 to 4 years). Results: Five patients had pure small cell histology. Two patients had mixed histology: one with mixed small cell anaplastic neuroendocrine cells and a small foci of adenocarcinoma, the other had mixed small cell and squamous cell histology. Four patients had clinical stage IB disease. The others had IIA, IIB, and IIIB disease, respectively. All patients received either irradiation (XRT) alone or as part of the local therapy. Three patients received XRT alone, one received surgery followed by XRT, one received XRT followed by surgery, and the remaining two had triple modality treatment (chemotherapy, surgery, and XRT). Three patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence at the last follow-up. Two of these received adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to local therapy. The third patient, whose tumor was smaller than one cm at the time of diagnosis, received XRT alone. Four patients died with disease

  4. Innovative approach for in-vivo ablation validation on multimodal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, O.; Karagkounis, G.; Carnegie, D.; Schlaefer, A.; Boctor, E.

    2014-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an important therapeutic procedure for small hepatic tumors. To make sure that the target tumor is effectively treated, RFA monitoring is essential. While several imaging modalities can observe the ablation procedure, it is not clear how ablated lesions on the images correspond to actual necroses. This uncertainty contributes to the high local recurrence rates (up to 55%) after radiofrequency ablative therapy. This study investigates a novel approach to correlate images of ablated lesions with actual necroses. We mapped both intraoperative images of the lesion and a slice through the actual necrosis in a common reference frame. An electromagnetic tracking system was used to accurately match lesion slices from different imaging modalities. To minimize the liver deformation effect, the tracking reference frame was defined inside the tissue by anchoring an electromagnetic sensor adjacent to the lesion. A validation test was performed using a phantom and proved that the end-to-end accuracy of the approach was within 2mm. In an in-vivo experiment, intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) ablation images were correlated to gross and histopathology. The results indicate that the proposed method can accurately correlate invivo ablations on different modalities. Ultimately, this will improve the interpretation of the ablation monitoring and reduce the recurrence rates associated with RFA.

  5. Nitrous oxide/oxygen inhalation provides effective analgesia during the administration of tumescent local anaesthesia for endovenous laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Thomas Oleg; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Clemens, Robert Karl Josef; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice

    2015-11-01

    Tumescent anaesthesia (TA) is an important but sometimes very painful step during endovenous thermal ablation of incompetent veins. The aim of this study was to examine whether the use of fixed 50% nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture (N2O/O2), also called equimolar mixture of oxygen and nitrous oxide, reduces pain during the application of TA. Patients undergoing endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) of incompetent saphenous veins were included. Thirty consecutive patients inhaled N2O/O2 during the application of TA. Thirty consecutive patients received TA alone (controls). Patients were asked to complete a questionnaire immediately after the intervention to assess satisfaction with the intervention and pain-levels during the different steps of the intervention (0=not at all, 10=very much). Adverse events during the treatment were monitored. 30 patients (14 men, mean age of 44 years) were included in the N2O/O2 group and 30 patients (9 men, mean age 48 years) were included in the control group. In the N2O/O2 group a significantly lower pain score was noted (mean 2.45 points, range 0-6) compared to the controls (mean 4.3 points, range 1-9, p<0.001). Overall, 64.5% of the patients were perfectly satisfied with the N2O/O2-Inhalation. Only 4 patients receiving N2O/O2 complained of adverse effects such as unpleasant loss of control (2 patients), headache (1 patient) and dizziness (1 patient). N2O/O2 is a safe and effective method to reduce pain during the application of tumescent anaesthesia for EVLA.

  6. Salvage radiation therapy for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, To-Wai; Tung, Stewart Y.; Sze, Wing-Kin; Sze, Wai-Man; Wong, Victy Y.W.; Wong, Chi-Sing; O, Sai-Ki

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the treatment outcome in patients with locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and to explore whether a combination of high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy (ERT) could improve the therapeutic ratio. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with nonmetastatic locally recurrent NPC who were treated with curative intent during the years 1990-1999 were retrospectively analyzed. Eighty-two patients had histologically proven carcinoma. The remaining 9 had clinical and imaging features suggestive of local recurrence. The Ho's T-stage distribution at recurrence (rT) was as follows: rT1-37, rT2-14, rT3-40. Total equivalent dose (TED) was calculated by the linear-quadratic formula without a time factor correction. For those treated by combined-modality treatment (CMT), the TED was taken as the summation of the equivalent dose by ERT and the absolute dose delivered to floor of the sphenoid by brachytherapy. Eight patients were treated solely with brachytherapy, all receiving 24-45 Gy in 3-10 sessions. Forty-one patients were treated with ERT alone receiving a median TED of 57.3 Gy (range, 49.8-62.5 Gy). Forty-two patients were treated by CMT with a median equivalent dose of 50 Gy (range, 40-60 Gy) given by ERT and 14.8 Gy by brachytherapy (range, 3-29.6 Gy). Multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox regression proportional hazards model. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival rate, disease specific survival rate and local failure-free survival (LFFS) rate for the whole group were 30%, 33.3% and 37.8%, respectively. The 3-year LFFS rates of rT1, rT2, and rT3 diseases were 64%, 61.5%, and 18.4%, respectively (p = 0.001). Of the 8 patients treated with brachytherapy alone, 4 failed locally. Further analyses were concentrated on the ERT (41 patients) and CMT (42 patients) groups. The 3-year LFFS rates of rT1, rT2, and rT3 diseases were 66.7%, 66.7%, and 18.4%, respectively (p 0

  7. Comparison of thallium-201, Tc-99m MIBI and I-131 scan in the follow-up assessment after I-131 ablative therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Jae Sung; Lee, Sung Keun; Kim, Doe Min; Park, Sae Jong; Jang, Kyong Sun; Kim, Eun Sil; Kim, Chong Soon

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a comparative study to evaluate the diagnostic values of Tl-201, Tc-99m MIBI and I-131 scans in the follow-up assessment after ablative I-131 therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer. The study population consisted of 20 patients who underwent surgical removal of thyroid cancer and ablative radioactive iodine therapy, and followed by one or more times of I-131 retreatment (33 cases). In all patients, Tl-201, Tc-99m MIBI, diagnostic and therapeutic I-131 scans were performed and the results were analyzed retrospectively. Also serum thyroglobulin levels were measured in all patients. The final diagnosis of recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer was determined by clinical, biochemical, radiologic and/or biopsy findings. Positive rates (PR) of Tc-99m MIBI, Tl-201, diagnostic and therapeutic I-131 scans in detecting malignant thyroid tissue lesions were 70% (19/27), 54% (15/28), 35% (17/48) and 63% (30/48), respectively. The PR in the group of 20 cases (28 lesions) who underwent concomitant Tl-201 and I-131 scans were in the order of therapeutic 131 scan 71%, Tl-201 scan 54% and diagnostic I-131 scan 36%. There was no statistically significant difference between Tl-201 and diagnostic I-131 scans (p>0.05). In the group of 20 cases (27 lesions) who underwent concomitant Tc-99m MIBI and I-131 scans, the PR were in the order of Tc-99m MIBI scan 70%, I-131 therapeutic scan 52% and I-131 diagnostic scan 33%. The PR of Tc-99m MIBI was significantly higher than that of diagnostic I-131 scan (p<0.05). Tc-99m MIBI scan is superior to diagnostic I-131 scan in detecting recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer following ablation therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Tl-201 scan did not showed significantly higher positive rate than diagnostic I-131 scan. Instead of diagnostic I-131 scan before the I-131 retreatment, Tc-99m MIBI scan without discontinuing thyroid hormone replacement would be a prudent and effective approach in the management of these

  8. Thyroid remnant ablation using 1,110 MBq of I-131 after total thyroidectomy. Regulatory considerations on release of patients after unsealed radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Ito, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to measure the radiation exposure level of caregivers following outpatient NaI (I-131) 1,110 MBq therapy for remnant thyroid ablation after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, and to evaluate the influence of activities of daily living on radiation exposure level, with the goal of proposing an optimum method of I-131 therapy. The study included 37 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, who had undergone total thyroidectomy and received outpatient based remnant thyroid ablation using NaI (I-131) 1,110 MBq, who were satisfying the following requirements: patients who have no evidence of distant metastases, whose living environments were appropriate for outpatient I-131 (1,110 MBq) therapy, and patients who gave written informed consent. The dose rate at a distance of 1 m from the body surface of the patient at the moment of release was measured using survey meters of the GM type or ionization chamber type. The dose level for the caregiver was measured with a personal dosimeter in all cases. The dose rate at a distance of 1 m from the patient's body surface 1 h after I-131 administration was in the range of 29-115 μSv/h (mean 63.8 μSv/h). The 7-day cumulative effective dose of caregivers was 0.11±0.08 mSv, on an average, in 34 dosimeters. In 31 of 34 dosimeters, cumulative effective dose of caregivers was below 0.2 mSv. Dose levels exceeding 0.2 mSv were recorded in 3 cases (0.21, 0.35 and 0.43 mSv in one case each). These results suggest that the exposure level of family members (caregiver and others) was minimal and is lower than the radiation levels affecting human environments. Outpatient-based remnant thyroid ablation with I-131 (1,110 MBq) performed after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer is safe if applied in accordance with the appropriate supervision and guidance by experts with certain qualifications. (author)

  9. Catheter ablation versus medical therapy for patients with persistent atrial fibrillation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence from randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Zhou, Xinbin; Zhu, Min; Chen, Shenjie; Chen, Jie; Cai, Hongwen; Dai, Jin; Xu, Xiaoming; Mao, Wei

    2018-06-01

    The superiority of catheter ablation (CA) for persistent (and long-standing persistent) atrial fibrillation (AF) is currently not well defined. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the clinical outcomes of CA compared with medical therapy in persistent AF patients. We systematically searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and clinicaltrials.gov for RCTs comparing CA with medical therapy in patients with persistent AF. For CA vs medical rhythm control, the primary outcome was freedom from atrial arrhythmia. For CA vs medical rate control, the primary outcome was the change in the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Eight studies with a total of 809 patients were included in the final analysis. Compared with medical rhythm control, CA was superior in achieving freedom from atrial arrhythmia (RR 2.08, 95% CI [1.67, 2.58]; P medical rate control in persistent AF patients with heart failure (HF), CA significantly improved the LVEF (MD 7.72, 95%CI [4.78, 10.67]; P medical therapy in persistent AF patients and might be considered as a first-line therapy for some persistent AF patients especially for those with HF.

  10. Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cahit A. Evrensel...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible... Magneto -rheological Fluid (MRF) iron nano-particles were synthesized using the reverse micelle technique and coated with poly(NIPAAm). The size

  11. Prevalence and prognosis of low-volume, oligorecurrent, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer amenable to lesion ablative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruycker, Aurélie; Lambert, Bieke; Claeys, Tom; Delrue, Louke; Mbah, Chamberlain; De Meerleer, Gert; Villeirs, Geert; De Vos, Filip; De Man, Kathia; Decaestecker, Karel; Fonteyne, Valérie; Lumen, Nicolaas; Ameye, Filip; Billiet, Ignace; Joniau, Steven; Vanhaverbeke, Friedl; Duthoy, Wim; Ost, Piet

    2017-12-01

    To describe the anatomical patterns of prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence after primary therapy and to investigate if patients with low-volume disease have a better prognosis as compared with their counterparts. Patients eligible for an 18-F choline positron-emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Eligible patients had asymptomatic biochemical recurrence after primary PCa treatment and testosterone levels >50 ng/mL. The number of lesions was counted per scan. Patients with isolated local recurrence (LR) or with ≤3 metastases (with or without LR) were considered to have low-volume disease and patients with >3 metastases to have high-volume disease. Descriptive statistics were used to report recurrences. Cox regression analysis was used to investigate the influence of prognostic variables on the time to developing castration-resistant PCa (CRPC). In 208 patients, 625 sites of recurrence were detected in the lymph nodes (N1/M1a: 30%), the bone (18%), the prostate (bed; 11%), viscera (4%), or a combination of any of the previous (37%). In total, 153 patients (74%) had low-volume recurrence and 55 patients (26%) had high-volume recurrence. The 3-year CRPC-free survival rate for the whole cohort was 79% (95% confidence interval 43-55), 88% for low-volume recurrences and 50% for high-volume recurrences (P < 0.001). Longer PSA doubling time at time of recurrence and low-volume disease were associated with a longer time to CRPC. Three out of four patients with PCa with a 18-F choline PET-CT-detected recurrence have low-volume disease, potentially amenable to local therapy. Patients with low-volume disease have a better prognosis as compared with their counterparts. Lymph node recurrence was the most dominant failure pattern. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Conservative treatment of rectal cancer with local excision and postoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    The conventional surgical treatment for patients with potentially curable transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer is a low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy as primary therapy for selected rectal cancers. The limited data suggest that the approach of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy should be limited to patients with either T 1 tumours with adverse pathological factors or T 2 tumours. Transmural tumours, which have a 24% local failure rate, are treated more effectively with standard surgery and pre- or postoperative therapy. The results of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy are encouraging, but more experience is needed to determine if this approach ultimately has similar local control and survival rates as standard surgery. (author)

  13. Acute Cor Pulmonale and Right Heat Failure Complicating Ethanol Ablative Therapy: Anesthetic and Radiologic Considerations and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, Bhiken, E-mail: bin4n@virginia.edu [University of Virginia, Department of Anesthesiology (United States); Matsumoto, Alan H. [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Ethanol is an effective ablative agent used for the treatment of certain solid organ tumors and vascular malformations (VMs). The egress of ethanol beyond the target tissue can be associated with significant changes to the cardiopulmonary system that can lead to cardiac arrest. This article reviews the contemporary role of ethanol in tumor and VM treatment and discusses the physiological mechanisms of acute pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular collapse. The importance of periprocedural recognition of the hemodynamic changes that can occur with the use of ethanol and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  14. Medical therapy versus radiofrequency endometrial ablation in the initial treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding (iTOM Trial: A clinical and economic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola O Famuyide

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency endometrial ablation (REA is currently a second line treatment in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (MHB if medical therapy (MTP is contraindicated or unsatisfactory. Our objective is to compare the effectiveness and cost burden of MTP and REA in the initial treatment of HMB.We performed a randomized trial at Mayo Clinic Rochester, Minnesota. The planned sample size was 60 patients per arm. A total of 67 women with HMB were randomly allocated to receive oral contraceptive pills (Nordette ® or Naproxen (Naprosyn® (n = 33 or REA (n = 34. Primary 12-month outcome measures included menstrual blood loss using pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBLAC, patients' satisfaction, and Menorrhagia Multi-Attribute Scale (MMAS. Secondary outcomes were total costs including direct medical and indirect costs associated with healthcare use, patient out-of-pocket costs, and lost work days and activity limitations over 12 months.Compared to MTP arm, women who received REA had a significantly lower PBLAC score (median [Interquartile range, IQR]: 0 [0-4] vs. 15 [0-131], p = 0.003, higher satisfaction rates (96.8%vs.63.2%, p = 0.003 and higher MMAS (median [IQR]: 100 [100-100] vs. 100 [87-100], p = 0.12 at 12 months. Direct medical costs were higher for REA ($5,331vs.$2,901, 95% confidence interval (CI of mean difference:$727,$4,852, however, when indirect costs are included, the difference did not reach statistical significance ($5,469 vs. $3,869, 95% CI of mean difference:-$339, $4,089.For women with heavy menstrual bleeding, initial radiofrequency endometrial ablation compared to medical therapy offered superior reduction in menstrual blood loss and improvement in quality of life without significant differences in total costs of care.NCT01165307.

  15. Disease volume and distribution as drivers of treatment decisions in metastatic prostate cancer: From chemohormonal therapy to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of oligometastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Ronak; Cheung, Patrick; Zukotynski, Katherine; Emmenegger, Urban

    2016-05-01

    The prognosis of men with metastatic, castration-sensitive prostate cancer (CSPC) depends on both the distribution and extent of metastases, among other things. Patients with low-volume or oligometastatic disease have improved survival compared with those with high-volume metastases. While chemohormonal therapy is the new standard of care for men with high-volume metastatic CSPC, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is emerging as a promising treatment option with low toxicity for the management of oligometastatic CSPC. Our review summarizes the current evidence on the role of SABR in oligometastatic prostate cancer. SABR shows control rates of metastases ranging from 88% to 100% at 6 months to 3 years, and progression-free survival commonly reported as >50% for the first 12 months. In addition, SABR may allow androgen-deprivation therapy to be delayed by more than 2 years in selected patients, minimizing the chronic side effects associated with such therapy. However, much still needs to be learned before SABR can be implemented as standard treatment for oligometastatic prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adjuvant neutron therapy in complex treatment of patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisin, V. A.; Velikaya, V. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Popova, N. O.; Goldberg, V. E.

    2017-09-01

    The study included 128 patients with stage T2-4N0-3M0 locally advanced breast cancer. All patients were divided into two groups. Group I (study group) consisted of 68 patients, who received neutron therapy, and group II (control group) comprised 60 patients, who received electron beam therapy. Neutron therapy was well tolerated by the patients and 1-2 grade radiation skin reactions were the most common. Neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of the patients with locally advanced breast cancer. The 8-year recurrence-free survival rate in the patients with locally advanced breast cancer was 94.5 ± 4.1% after neutron therapy and 81.4 ± 5.9% after electron beam therapy (p = 0.05).

  17. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for lung stereotactic radiation therapy can achieve high local control rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Haga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-11-11

    The aim of this study was to report the outcome of primary or metastatic lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). From October 2010 to December 2013, consecutive 67 lung cancer patients received single-arc VMAT-SBRT using an Elekta-synergy system. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on 10 respiratory phases computed tomography (CT) datasets from 4-dimensional (4D) CT and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The planning target volume (PTV) margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy (43 cases) or 55 Gy (12 cases) in 4 fractions for peripheral tumor or 56 Gy in 7 fractions (12 cases) for central tumor. Among the 67 patients, the median age was 73 years (range, 59-95 years). Of the patients, male was 72% and female 28%. The median Karnofsky performance status was 90-100% in 39 cases (58%) and 80-90% in 20 cases (30%). The median follow-up was 267 days (range, 40-1162 days). Tissue diagnosis was performed in 41 patients (61%). There were T1 primary lung tumor in 42 patients (T1a in 28 patients, T1b in 14 patients), T2 in 6 patients, three T3 in 3 patients, and metastatic lung tumor in 16 patients. The median mean lung dose was 6.87 Gy (range, 2.5-15 Gy). Six patients (9%) developed radiation pneumonitis required by steroid administration. Actuarial local control rate were 100% and 100% at 1 year, 92% and 75% at 2 years, and 92% and 75% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p =0.59). Overall survival rate was 83% and 84% at 1 year, 76% and 53% at 2 years, and 46% and 20% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p =0.12). Use of VMAT-based delivery of SBRT in primary in metastatic lung tumors demonstrates high local control rates and low risk of normal tissue complications.

  18. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for lung stereotactic radiation therapy can achieve high local control rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Haga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the outcome of primary or metastatic lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). From October 2010 to December 2013, consecutive 67 lung cancer patients received single-arc VMAT-SBRT using an Elekta-synergy system. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on 10 respiratory phases computed tomography (CT) datasets from 4-dimensional (4D) CT and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The planning target volume (PTV) margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy (43 cases) or 55 Gy (12 cases) in 4 fractions for peripheral tumor or 56 Gy in 7 fractions (12 cases) for central tumor. Among the 67 patients, the median age was 73 years (range, 59–95 years). Of the patients, male was 72% and female 28%. The median Karnofsky performance status was 90-100% in 39 cases (58%) and 80-90% in 20 cases (30%). The median follow-up was 267 days (range, 40–1162 days). Tissue diagnosis was performed in 41 patients (61%). There were T1 primary lung tumor in 42 patients (T1a in 28 patients, T1b in 14 patients), T2 in 6 patients, three T3 in 3 patients, and metastatic lung tumor in 16 patients. The median mean lung dose was 6.87 Gy (range, 2.5-15 Gy). Six patients (9%) developed radiation pneumonitis required by steroid administration. Actuarial local control rate were 100% and 100% at 1 year, 92% and 75% at 2 years, and 92% and 75% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p = 0.59). Overall survival rate was 83% and 84% at 1 year, 76% and 53% at 2 years, and 46% and 20% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p = 0.12). Use of VMAT-based delivery of SBRT in primary in metastatic lung tumors demonstrates high local control rates and low risk of normal tissue complications

  19. Image-guided Tumor Ablation: Standardization of Terminology and Reporting Criteria—A 10-Year Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L.; Breen, David J.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Charboneau, J. William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D.; Dupuy, Damian E.; Gervais, Debra A.; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R.; Lee, Fred T.; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J.; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S.; McGahan, John P.; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L.; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C.; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Soulen, Michael C.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24927329

  20. Pure Ethiodized Oil-based Transcatheter Ablative Therapy in Normal Rabbit Kidneys and Kidneys Inoculated with VX-2 Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kónya, András; Stephens, L. Clifton; Wright, Kenneth C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of ablation with selective arterial injection of pure ethiodized oil followed by arterial occlusion with 9:1 ethanol–Ethiodol mixture (EEM) and coil placement in normal rabbit kidneys and kidneys inoculated with VX-2 carcinoma. Materials and Methods: All experiments were conducted with Animal Care and Use Committee approval. In six rabbits (group 1), one kidney was embolized with pure Ethiodol until capillary stasis, followed by injection of 9:1 EEM until arterial stasis and then coil placement into the main renal artery. In 12 other rabbits, one kidney was inoculated with VX-2 tumor. Ethiodol and EEM embolization and coil placement followed 7 days later (group 2, n = 6) or 11–14 days later (group 3, n = 6). Kidneys were evaluated (angiography, computed tomography, macro- and microscopy) 7 days after treatment. Results: Capillary stasis was achieved in groups 1, 2, and 3 with (mean ± standard deviation) 0.47 ± 0.03, 0.53 ± 0.02, and 0.56 ± 0.04 ml of pure Ethiodol, followed by 0.47 ± 0.05, 0.42 ± 0.03, and 0.38 ± 0.04 ml of EEM, respectively, which caused complete arterial occlusion in 17 of 18 kidneys. In group 1, all but one kidney showed at least 95% generalized coagulative necrosis. In group 2, all six kidneys exhibited 100% coagulative necrosis, with no viable tumor present. In group 3, 100% coagulative necrosis was present in all kidneys, with a small viable tumor in one. Conclusion: In the rabbit, selective arterial injection of pure Ethiodol can cause complete renal parenchyma and tumor ablation when it is followed by prompt, contiguous, and permanent occlusion of the arterial compartment.

  1. Management of Biochemical Recurrence after Primary Localized Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, Oussama M.; Raj, Ganesh V.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is typically managed by well established therapies like radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, and external beam radiation therapy. While many patients can be cured with definitive local therapy, some will have biochemical recurrence (BCR) of disease detected by a rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Management of these patients is nuanced and controversial. The natural history indicates that a majority of patients with BCR will not die from prostate cancer but from other causes. Despite this, a vast majority of patients with BCR are empirically treated with non-curable systemic androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), with its myriad of real and potential side effects. In this review article, we examined the very definition of BCR after definitive local therapy, the current status of imaging studies in its evaluation, the need for additional therapies, and the factors involved in the decision making in the choice of additional therapies. This review aims to help clinicians with the management of patients with BCR. The assessment of prognostic factors including absolute PSA level, time to recurrence, PSA kinetics, multivariable nomograms, imaging, and biopsy of the prostatic bed may help stratify the patients into localized or systemic recurrence. Patients with low-risk of systemic disease may be cured by a salvage local therapy, while those with higher risk of systemic disease may be offered the option of ADT or a clinical trial. An algorithm incorporating these factors is presented.

  2. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, J.; Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  3. Hyperkalaemia after radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoevena, BH; Haagsma, EB; Appeltans, BMG; Slooff, MJH; de Jong, KP

    Radiofrequency ablation of liver tumours is a useful therapy for otherwise unresectable tumours. The complication rate is said to be low. In this case report we describe hyperkalaemia after radiofrequency ablation of a hepatocellular carcinoma in a patient with end-stage renal insufficiency. (C)

  4. POSSIBILITIES OF LOCAL THERAPY FOR LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Chugunov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is one of the most common pain syndromes caused by musculoarticular pathology. Analgesics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, myorelaxants, and non-drug therapies are used to treat patients with LBP. The sufficient efficiency of this type of therapy is strongly supported by the results of clinical trials; its fundamentals have been embodied in a number of regional and international guidelines for the management of patients with LBP. Alongside the sufficient efficacy of NSAIDs, their use, their long-term use in particular, is associated with a wide range of adverse reactions. The increased efficiency of treatment in patients with LBP is frequently achieved by the application of topical dosage forms. Whether the new Russian drug Nanoplast forte may be used to treat patients with LBP is considered.

  5. Prairie Network Fireballs: Data of motion and ablation of fireball bodies obtained by local-ballistic method applied to variably-sliding path-segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenichenko, Valentin V.

    2000-11-01

    The electronic version of an extensive catalogue of the results of the fireball physics inverse problem solution for the precise observational data of the Prairie Network Fireballs (DTHM-values) obtained by local-ballistic method of a variably-sliding path-segment contains a set of the physical parameters for the 480 fireball images of the 248 cosmic body entries into the Earth's atmosphere (PNVK-values). The parameters are: the fireball velocity with the corresponding values of the mass to cross-section area ratio for the fireball-generating body a teach measured point of the fireball path, the ablation factor and the ratio of the luminous fireball energy to the drag work for the body in the Earth's atmosphere using a factor inversely proportional to the density of the body. The catalogue of all PNVK-values, about 3.1 Mbytes in ASCII is accessible from ftp://ftp2.mao.kiev.ua/pub/astro/pnvk, files pnvk.cat and pnvks.cat

  6. Synthesis of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles with blue-shifted localized surface plasmon resonance by pulsed laser ablation in water with CO2 absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, T.; Rey, N. A.; Rosado, T.; Landi, S.; Larrude, D. G.; Romani, E. C.; Freire Junior, F. L.; Quinteiro, S. M.; Cremona, M.; Aucelio, R. Q.; Margheri, G.; Pandoli, O.

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal suspensions of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles have been synthesized in a one-step procedure by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) at 532 nm of a solid gold target placed in aqueous solution containing CO2 absorbers, but without any stabilizing agent. Multi-wavelength surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy allows the identification of adsorbed amorphous carbon and graphite, Au-carbonyl, Au coordinated CO2-derived bicarbonates/carbonates and hydroxyl groups around the AuNPs core. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and high resolution transmission electron microscopy highlight the organic shell structure around the crystalline metal core. The stability of the colloidal solution of nanocomposites (NCs) seems to be driven by solvation forces and is achieved only in neutral or basic pH using monovalent hydroxide counter-ions (NaOH, KOH). The NCs are characterized by a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band typical of metal-ligand stabilization by terminal π-back bonding, attributed to a core charging effect caused by Au-carbonyls. Total organic carbon measurements detect the final content of organic carbon in the colloidal solution of NCs that is about six times higher than the value of the water solution used to perform PLA. The colloidal dispersions of NCs are stable for months and are applied as analytical probes in amino glycoside antibiotic LSPR based sensing.

  7. Non-ablative 1550 nm fractional laser therapy not effective for erythema dyschromicum perstans and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Marije W.; Wind, Bas S.; Meesters, Arne A.; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; van der Veen, J. P. Wietze; Bos, Jan D.; van der Wal, Allard C.; Beek, Johan F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Erythema dyschromicum perstans and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) are characterized by papillary dermal pigmentation or pigment incontinence. To date, no standard treatment is available. Fractional laser therapy (FLT) was recently reported to improve different pigment

  8. German guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuter, Alexander; Krieg, Thomas; Worm, Margitta; Wenzel, Jörg; Moinzadeh, Pia; Kuhn, Annegret; Aberer, Elisabeth; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Horneff, Gerd; Reil, Emma; Weberschock, Tobias; Hunzelmann, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Localized scleroderma designates a heterogeneous group of sclerotic skin disorders. Depending on the subtype, severity, and site affected, adjacent structures such as adipose tissue, muscles, joints, and bones may be involved. This is an update of the existing German AWMF (Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany) guidelines (classification: S2k). These guidelines provide an overview of the definition, epidemiology, classification, pathogenesis, laboratory workup, histopathology, clinical scoring systems, as well as imaging and device-based workup of localized scleroderma. Moreover, consensus-based recommendations are given on the management of localized scleroderma depending on its clinical subtype. Treatment recommendations are presented in a therapeutic algorithm. No financial support was given by any pharmaceutical company. The guidelines are valid until July 2019. © 2016 The Authors | Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  9. A phase II trial of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) plus chemotherapy as initial treatment for local failures or advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Robert; Stepankiw, Mika; Gonzales, Patricia

    2013-06-01

    Long-term hormonal ablation in prostate cancer is associated with decreased overall health and quality of life. Few reports emphasized the role of chemotherapy in the management of early stage prostate cancer. This study analyzed the safety and efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) plus chemotherapy as initial treatment for patients identified as local failures or not eligible for prostatectomy or radiation therapy due to advanced disease presentation. Enrolled patients received ADT in the form of leuprolide every 12 weeks for 24 months with bicalutamide initiating after the completion of chemotherapy. Chemotherapy consisted of ketoconazole and doxorubicin for weeks 1, 3, and 5 and estramustine and docetaxel and for weeks 2, 4 and 6. During weeks 7 and 8, no treatment was received. Forty-six patients were enrolled, and forty-five patients were evaluable. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 23.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 53.7 months. Out of 45 patients with measurable disease, 22 patients had an objective response: 9 patients achieved a complete response; 2 patients achieved a partial response; 10 patients achieved stable disease. Frequent grade 3 adverse events included elevated ALT (17 %), hypokalemia (13 %), and hypophosphatemia (13 %). Grade 4 adverse events were rare and included low bicarbonate (2 %), hypokalemia (2 %), leukocytopenia (2 %), and neutropenia (2 %). The treatment demonstrated clinical benefit in all patient subsets with minimal reversible treatment-related adverse events. Subgroup analysis suggests that having prior local therapy resulted in greater PFS and OS.

  10. Amiodarone and Catheter Ablation as Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy for Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Jeong, Soo In; Kang, I-Seok; Lee, Heung Jae

    2013-01-01

    Preexcitation by accessory pathways (APs) is known to cause dyssynchrony of the ventricle, related to ventricular dysfunction. Correction of ventricular dyssynchrony can improve heart failure in cases of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMP) with preexcitation. Here, we report the first case of a child with DCMP and Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome treated with amiodarone and radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in Korea. A 7-year-old boy, who suffered from DCMP and WPW syndrome, showed improved left ventricular function and clinical functional class after treatment with amiodarone to eliminate preexcitation. QRS duration and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were inversely correlated with amiodarone dosage. After confirming the reduction of preexcitation effects in DCMP, successful RFCA of the right anterior AP resulted in LVEF improvement, along with the disappearance of preexcitation. Our findings suggest that ventricular dyssynchrony, caused by preexcitation in DCMP with WPW syndrome, can worsen ventricular function and amiodarone, as well as RFCA, which should be considered as a treatment option, even in young children. PMID:23407697

  11. Chemoradiation therapy efficacy in patients with local cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemal'tsova, O.A.

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the efficacy of the original chronomodulation chemoradiation for local cervical cancer (CC) comparing it with the results of the standard treatment protocol and Hydrea administration as a radiomodifier. The use of the original protocol reduced the number of long-term metastases 6.3 times when compared with Hydrea use and 4.5 times when compared with the traditional treatment

  12. Prostate-Specific Antigen 5 Years following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: An Ablative Procedure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaan Kataria

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundOur previous work on early PSA kinetics following prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT demonstrated that an initial rapid and then slow PSA decline may result in very low PSA nadirs. This retrospective study sought to evaluate the PSA nadir 5 years following SBRT for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PCa.Methods65 low- and 80 intermediate-risk PCa patients were treated definitively with SBRT to 35–37.5 Gy in 5 fractions at Georgetown University Hospital between January 2008 and October 2011. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy were excluded from this study. Biochemical relapse was defined as a PSA rise >2 ng/ml above the nadir and analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. The PSA nadir was defined as the lowest PSA value prior to biochemical relapse or as the lowest value recorded during follow-up. Prostate ablation was defined as a PSA nadir <0.2 ng/ml. Univariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate relevant variables on the likelihood of achieving a PSA nadir <0.2 ng/ml.ResultsThe median age at the start of SBRT was 72 years. These patients had a median prostate volume of 36 cc with a median 25% of total cores involved. At a median follow-up of 5.6 years, 86 and 37% of patients achieved a PSA nadir ≤0.5 and <0.2 ng/ml, respectively. The median time to PSA nadir was 36 months. Two low and seven intermediate risk patients experienced a biochemical relapse. Regardless of the PSA outcome, the median PSA nadir for all patients was 0.2 ng/ml. The 5-year biochemical relapse free survival (bRFS rate for low- and intermediate-risk patients was 98.5 and 95%, respectively. Initial PSA (p = 0.024 and a lower testosterone at the time of the PSA nadir (p = 0.049 were found to be significant predictors of achieving a PSA nadir <0.2 ng/ml.ConclusionSBRT for low- and intermediate-risk PCa is a convenient treatment option with low PSA nadirs and a high rate of

  13. The prevalence of thyroid tissue along the thyroglossal tract on SPECT/CT following I131 ablation therapy after total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, T.W.; Cherk, M.H.; Yap, K.S.K.; Kalff, V.; Topliss, D.J.; Serpell, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: the aims of this study are first to determine the prevalence of thyroid tissue along the thyroglossal tract on SPECT/CT and secondly to assess the contribution of this tissue to total neck I-131 activity in patients treated with I-131 ablation therapy after total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer. Materials and methods: a total of 63 consecutive patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer treated with total thyroidectomy underwent whole body planar imaging and SPECT/CT of the neck 48 hours following ablative I-131 therapy. On SPECT/CT, thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue was defined as radioiodine activity in the anterior neck, superior to the thyroid bed in close proximity to the midline without evidence of localisation to lymph nodes. On planar imaging, thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue was defined as linear radioiodine activity in the midline of the neck superior to the thyroid bed. SPECT/CT and planar images were classified by two independent reviewers as positive, negative or equivocal with interobserver agreement quantified using a Kappa score. Disagreement was resolved using a third reviewer. Quantitation of thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue and total neck I-131 activity was performed using region of interest analysis on planar imaging following localisation on SPECT/CT. Results: thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue was present in 31/63 (49%; 95% CI: 37-61%) patients on SPECT/CT. In these 31 patients, thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue contributed to an average of 49% of total neck activity. Interobserver agreement was substantial on SPECT/CT (Kappa = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.61-0.91) and fair on planar imaging (Kappa = 0.31; 95% CI: 0.15-0.47). Conclusion: thyroid tissue along the thyroglossal tract was present in one half of patients in our study population and can contribute to a significant amount of total neck I-131 activity. Given the high prevalence of thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue, our results suggest that total neck

  14. [Radiofrequency ablation in the multimodal treatment of liver metastases--preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcoveanu, C; Dogaru, C; Diaconu, C; Grecu, F; Dragomir, Cr; Pricop, Adriana; Balan, G; Drug, V L

    2007-01-01

    Although the "gold standard" in the multimodal treatment of liver primary and secondary tumors is the surgical ablation, the rate of resection, despite the last decades advances, remains still low (10 - 20%). In addition, the interest for non-surgical ablation therapies is increasing. Among them, regional or systemic chemotherapy, intra-arterial radiotherapy as well as locally targeted therapies--cryotherapy, alcohol instillation and radiofrequency (RF) are the most valuable options as alternative to the surgical approach. Between February 2005 - January 2007, 9 patients with liver metastases underwent open RF ablation of their secondaries in the III-rd Surgical Unit, "St. Spiridon" Hospital. An Elektrotom 106 HiTT Berchtold device with a 60W power generator and a 15 mm monopolar active electrode was used. Destruction of the tumors was certified with intraoperative ultrasound examination. Pre- and postoperative CarcinoEmbryonic Antigen (CEA) together with imaging follow-up was carried out, in order to determine local or systemic recurrencies. Six patients died between 6 month - 4 years after the RF ablation. Median survival is 29.2 months. RF ablation is a challenge alternative in non-resectable liver tumors.

  15. Sexual function with localized prostate cancer: active surveillance vs radical therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Roderick C. N.; Korfage, Ida J.; Roobol, Monique J.; Bangma, Chris H.; de Koning, Harry J.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare sexual function of men with localized prostate cancer (PCa) on active surveillance (AS) with similar patients who received radical therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS Two groups of men with screening-detected localized PCa were compared. The first were men on AS within the prospective

  16. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4±0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA

  17. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensuu, T.K.; Blomqvist, C.P.; Kajanti, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma is one of the leading causes of male cancer deaths. However, the routine diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have not yet been established. Although the outcome of surgical and radiotherapeutical approaches has frequently been reported to be comparable, the profile of side effects is different. This could offer the basis for selecting the treatment of choice in individual cases. During the last decade the radiotherapeutical technique has markedly improved, in part due to the achievements in the field of computer assisted tomography planning and conformal technique; the outcome of side-effects has decreased with concurrent increase in the rate of local control. The prescribing, recording and reporting of irradiation have also recently developed, as well as the staging of the disease. Therefore we consider it timely to review progress in this subject and to emphasize the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer. (orig.)

  18. [Is therapy with local infiltrations feasible in primary care consultations?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña Loarte, J E; Pérez Franco, J; Sánchez Sánchez, G

    1999-01-01

    To study the feasibility of local infiltration in primary care consultations. Before-and-after intervention study. Two clinics at an urban health centre. Patients diagnosed with pathology of tender areas and treated with corticosteroid infiltration between May 1997 and May 1998. Corticoid infiltration plus local anaesthetic. Weekly check-up. Analysis of the variables: sex, age, diagnosis, time elapsed between indication and start of treatment, subjective assessment of pain before and after treatment (VRS scale), number of infiltrations per patient, side-effects. Evaluation of overall and individual effectiveness. 41 patients were infiltrated. Average age was 58. Most common pathologies were: rotary joint tendinitis (48.7%), anserine bursitis (24.4%), plantar fasciitis (7.3%). Average number of infiltrations per pathology: 1.3. Mean waiting time: 3.5 days. Comparison of pain by means of VRS (range 0-5) before and after treatment used the Wilcoxon test, with a statistically significant difference and p < 0.001 (z = -5.5109). For 35 patients (85.4%), pain was solved very well (values 0 and 1 on the VRS). For 3 patients (7.3%), improvement was moderate; and for 3 (7.3%) there was no improvement. 1. Treatment with local infiltration of corticosteroids is effective in dealing with pain, and is an alternative to treatment with NSAIDs. 2. It is feasible in primary care, and there are many advantages if the general practitioner employs this therapeutic technique.

  19. Atrial fibrillation ablation using a closed irrigation radiofrequency ablation catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Keith; Mounsey, John Paul; Chung, Eugene; Roomiani, Pahresah; Morse, Michael Andew; Patel, Ankit; Gehi, Anil

    2012-05-01

    Catheter ablation is an effective therapy for symptomatic, medically refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). Open-irrigated radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheters produce transmural lesions at the cost of increased fluid delivery. In vivo models suggest closed-irrigated RF catheters create equivalent lesions, but clinical outcomes are limited. A cohort of 195 sequential patients with symptomatic AF underwent stepwise AF ablation (AFA) using a closed-irrigation ablation catheter. Recurrence of AF was monitored and outcomes were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards models. Mean age was 59.0 years, 74.9% were male, 56.4% of patients were paroxysmal and mean duration of AF was 5.4 years. Patients had multiple comorbidities including hypertension (76.4%), tobacco abuse (42.1%), diabetes (17.4%), and obesity (mean body mass index 30.8). The median follow-up was 55.8 weeks. Overall event-free survival was 73.6% with one ablation and 77.4% after reablation (reablation rate was 8.7%). Median time to recurrence was 26.9 weeks. AF was more likely to recur in patients being treated with antiarrhythmic therapy at the time of last follow-up (recurrence rate 30.3% with antiarrhythmic drugs, 13.2% without antiarrhythmic drugs; hazard ratio [HR] 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.4, P = 0.024) and in those with a history of AF greater than 2 years duration (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.9, P = 0.038). Our study represents the largest cohort of patients receiving AFA with closed-irrigation ablation catheters. We demonstrate comparable outcomes to those previously reported in studies of open-irrigation ablation catheters. Given the theoretical benefits of a closed-irrigation system, a large head-to-head comparison using this catheter is warranted. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  1. Radiation therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Noriko; Inoue, Masayoshi; Uehara, Tomoko; Miyasaka, T.; Miyasaka, M.; Tabata, Yoji; Sakamoto, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen cases of inoperable advanced breast cancer were treated with radiotherapy between 2002 to 2012 at Nara Prefectural Hospital. All cases were treated by radiotherapy and chemo-endocrine therapy. Patients received 60-81 Gy (median 60 Gy) to the primary breast tumor. Response of the breast tumors were complete response in 3 cases (23%), partial response in 8 cases (62%) and stable disease in 2 cases (15%) (response rate: 85%). All breast tumors had been controlled and skin troubles were reduced. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is useful for primary tumor control and improved quality of life (QOL). Radiotherapy should be considered to be useful modality in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. (author)

  2. Exclusive radiation therapy for locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognoni, P.; Bossi, A.; Molteni, M.; Richetti, A.; Tordiglione, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors analyse a retrospective series of 90 consecutive patients (pts) affected with locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma (T3-4, N0-3 - TNM, UICC 1978) who were radically irradiated from November 1979 to December 1986 at the Radiotherapy Department of the General Hospital of Varese. All the patients were treated with 60 Co and two opposed parallel lateral fields and progressive shrinkage: 66 conventional fractionation (2 Gy once a day, 5 times a week), 24 with an accelerated hyperfractionated regimen (1.5 Gy twice a day, 5 times a week). The median total dose delivered to the tumor and clinically involved nodes was 64 Gy (1678 reu, CRE). Median follow-up was 21 months (range: 3-113). The 5-year overall survival (Kaplan-Meier) was 40.5%. The 5-year disease-free survival, for 47 patients in complete remission at the end of radiotherapy, was 51.9% after irradiation alone and 56.7% with salvage surgery. There were no statistically significant differences in survival according to local spread (T3 vs T4), nodal status (N0 vs N1-3) and dose fractionation regimen (conventional vs accelerated hyper-fractionated). Isoeffect (CRE) values above 1751 reu obtained a 3-year loco-regional control rate was 33.3%. Relevant late sequelae were not observed. Our findings suggest that primary radiotherapy with salvage surgery in reserve could be considered as an effective choice for locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma, at least in selected groups of patients

  3. Spinal cord stimulation therapy for localized central pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirato, Masafumi; Takahashi, Akio; Watanabe, Katsushige; Kazama, Ken; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the pathophysiology of localized central pain and the surgical result of spinal cord stimulation. There were 10 cases; 7 males and 3 females from 24 to 77 years old. Pain was caused by peripheral nerve injury in one case, spinal cord injury in two cases and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (thalamic pain) in 7 cases. All cases were treated by epidural spinal cord stimulation and followed from 0.8 to 8.8 years. Sufficient pain relief was achieved in one case of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury and in 4 cases of CVD. Moderate pain control was achieved in 2 cases of CVD. In one each case of spinal cord injury and of CVD, pain control was ineffective. In cases with thalamic pain, we studied the correlation between the surgical result of spinal cord stimulation and the clinical features, MRI, fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) findings before operation. MRI revealed a small to moderate sized lesion on the thalamus or putamen in each case. PET also showed decreased accumulation of FDG on the affected thalamus. In all cases without one fair responder to spinal cord stimulation, we could recognize definite SEP originating in the sensory cortex ipsilateral side to the CVD lesion during contralateral median or posterior tibial nerve stimulation. In the good responders, we could recognize SEP originating in the sensory cortex of the lesion side with less delayed latency or decreased amplitude than in the moderate responders. In this group, test stimulation with low voltage on the spinal cord evoked a sensory effect (paresthesia) over the painful part of the body. Spinal cord stimulation proved to be an effective treatment for localized central pain. In cases with localized central pain after CVD, we could expect to ameliorate the intractable pain in those cases in which SEP or spinal cord test stimulation revealed that the thalamo-cortical system was preserved. (author)

  4. The survival analysis on localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hong; Li Gaofeng; Wu Qinhong; Li Xuenan; Zhong Qiuzi; Xu Yonggang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively investigate clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy followed by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Between March 2003 and October 2008, 54 localized prostate cancer treated by IMRT were recruited. All patients had received endocrine therapy before IMRT. The endocrine therapy included surgical castration or medical castration in combination with antiandrogens. The target of IMRT was the prostate and seminal vesicles with or without pelvis. The biochemical failure was defined according to the phoenix definition. By using the risk grouping standard proposed by D'Amico, patients were divided into three groups: low-risk group (n = 5), intermediate-risk group (n = 12), and high-risk group (n = 37). Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the overall survival rate. Prognostic factors were analyzed by univariate and multiple Cox regression analysis. Results: The follow-up rate was 98%. The number of patients under follow-up was 39 at 3 years and 25 at 5 years. Potential prognostic factors, including risk groups, mode of endocrine therapy, time of endocrine therapy, phoenix grouping before IMRT, the prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) before radiotherapy, PSA value before IMRT, interval of endocrine therapy and IMRT, irradiation region, and irradiation dose were analyzed by survival analysis. In univariate analysis, time of endocrine therapy (75 % vs 95 %, χ 2 = 6. 45, P = 0. 011), phoenix grouping before IMRT (87% vs 96%, χ 2 = 4. 36, P = 0. 037), interval of endocrine therapy and IMRT (80% vs 95%, χ 2 = 11.60, P= 0. 001), irradiation dose (75% vs 91%, χ 2 =5.92, P= 0. 015) were statistically significant prognostic factors for 3 - year overall survival , and risk groups (85 vs 53 vs 29, χ 2 = 6. 40, P =0. 041) and PSADT before IMRT (62 vs 120, U =24. 50, P =0. 003) were significant factors for the median survival time. In the multiple Cox

  5. Feasibility study of local ultrasound hyperthermia in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.G.; Straube, W.; Emami, B.; Perez, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a retrospective analysis of patients treated at Washington University for recurrent or persistent cancer with Ultrasound Hyperthermia between October 1984 and June 1986. Fifteen of 102 lesions were treated during this time period with Ultrasound Hyperthermia instead of microwave hyperthermia due to the size of the lesion needing heat at depths greater than 4 cm. Also, the patients' lesion could not be implanted for interstitial microwave hyperthermia. Fourteen of the treated patients received concomitant radiotherapy, while one received concomitant Bleomycin. There were 79 total hyperthermia treatments delivered, of which 67 achieved a therapeutic temperature of 43 0 C for 60 minutes. During 15/79 treatments, patients experienced pain; of which 11/15 lead to poor heating. Only one treatment of the twelve poor treatments was secondary to technical difficulties. Complete local control was accomplished in seven patients, a partial response in four patients. The results of therapeutic heating and its relationship to the site of treatment and local control are presented, along with phantom studies of Ultrasound microwave hyperthermia reemphasizing the feasibility of using Ultrasound Hyperthermia

  6. Quality of Life During Treatment With Chemohormonal Therapy: Analysis of E3805 Chemohormonal Androgen Ablation Randomized Trial in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgans, Alicia K; Chen, Yu-Hui; Sweeney, Christopher J; Jarrard, David F; Plimack, Elizabeth R; Gartrell, Benjamin A; Carducci, Michael A; Hussain, Maha; Garcia, Jorge A; Cella, David; DiPaola, Robert S; Patrick-Miller, Linda J

    2018-04-10

    Purpose Chemohormonal therapy with docetaxel and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT+D) for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer improves overall survival as compared with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) alone. We compared the quality of life (QOL) between patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer who were treated with ADT+D and those who were treated with ADT alone. Methods Men were randomly assigned to ADT+ D (six cycles) or to ADT alone. QOL was assessed by Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P), FACT-Taxane, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue, and the Brief Pain Inventory at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to examine changes over time. Mixed-effect models compared the QOL between arms at each time point. Results Seven hundred ninety men were randomly assigned (ADT+D [n = 397] and ADT[ n = 393]) and completed FACT-P (90% at baseline, 86% at 3 months, 83% at 6 months, 78% at 9 months, and 77% at 12 months). ADT+D patients reported a statistically significant decline in FACT-P at 3 months ( P < .001) but FACT-P did not differ significantly between baseline and 12 months ( P = .38). ADT+D FACT-P scores were significantly lower at 3 months ( P = .02) but significantly higher at 12 months ( P = .04) when compared with ADT FACT-P scores. Differences did not exceed the minimal clinically important difference at any time point. ADT+D patients reported significantly lower Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue scores at 3 months than did ADT patients ( P < .001). Over time, both arms reported significantly poorer FACT-Taxane scores ( P < .001) when compared with baseline. Brief Pain Inventory scores were similar between arms. Conclusion Although ADT+D was associated with statistically worse QOL at 3 months, QOL was better at 12 months for ADT+D patients than for ADT patients. Both arms reported a similar minimally changed QOL over time

  7. Residual {sup 18}F-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao, E-mail: v.r.bollineni@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Widder, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Pruim, Jan [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically inoperable patients with proven Stage I NSCLC or FDG-PET-positive primary lung tumors were analyzed retrospectively. SABR consisted of 60 Gy delivered in 3 to 8 fractions. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the treated lesion was assessed 12 weeks after SABR, using FDG-PET. Patients were subsequently followed at regular intervals using computed tomography (CT) scans. Association between post-SABR SUV{sub max} and local control (LC), mediastinal failure, distant failure, overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) was examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 17 months (range, 3-40 months). Median lesion size was 25 mm (range, 9-70 mm). There were 6 local failures: 15 mediastinal failures, 15 distant failures, 13 disease-related deaths, and 16 deaths from intercurrent diseases. Glucose corrected post-SABR median SUV{sub max} was 3.0 (range, 0.55-14.50). Using SUV{sub max} 5.0 as a cutoff, the 2-year LC was 80% versus 97.7% for high versus low SUV{sub max}, yielding an adjusted subhazard ratio (SHR) for high post-SABR SUV{sub max} of 7.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-38.5; p = 0.019). Two-year DSS rates were 74% versus 91%, respectively, for high and low SUV{sub max} values (SHR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-6.3; p = 0.113). Two-year OS was 62% versus 81% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.7; p = 0.268). Conclusions: Residual FDG uptake (SUV{sub max} {>=}5.0) 12 weeks after SABR signifies increased risk of local failure. A single FDG-PET scan at 12 weeks could be used to tailor further follow-up according to the risk of failure, especially in patients potentially eligible for salvage surgery.

  8. Invasive Fetal Therapy: Global Status and Local Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available There are few congenital anomalies that can be treated in utero, despite the rapid development of fetal medicine. The number of available antenatal treatments is growing with the advance of supplementary tools, especially ultrasound and endoscopy. Disorders involving accumulation of excessive fluid in the amniotic cavity (polyhydramnios, chest (hydrothorax, abdomen (ascites and urinary system (obstructive uropathy are regularly treated using aspiration or shunt drainage under ultrasound monitoring. Electrolyte solutions or concentrated blood component supplements are used to treat oligohydramnios (amnioinfusion and amniopatch and fetal anemia (fetal transfusion. Placental tumor (chorioangioma and fetal tumors (cystic hygroma and sacrococcygeal teratoma are also successfully treated by antenatal injection of medications. Fetoscopic procedures, especially obstetric endoscopy, are now used regularly in North America, Europe, Australasia and Japan after the validity was established in the treatment of twin-twin transfusion syndrome when compared with traditional amnioreduction. However, most procedures involving surgical fetoscopy or open fetal surgery remain experimental. Their validity and efficacy are not confirmed in a number of fetal diseases for which they were claimed to be effective. A brief review of the global status and history of invasive fetal therapy is given, and its status in Taiwan is also described. Future development in this field relies on greater understanding of the basic physiology and pathology of the diseases involved, as well as on the progress of sophisticated instrumentation.

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) / Microwave Ablation (MWA) of Lung Tumors ... and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? What are Radiofrequency and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, ...

  10. Role of radiation therapy in locally advanced thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urgesi, A.; Monetti, U.; Rossi, G.; Ricardi, U.; Casadio, C.

    1990-01-01

    The records of all patients treated for thymoma in the Department of Radiotherapy of Torino University between 1970 and 1988 were reviewed. There were 59 in stage 3 and 18 in stage 4a; 74 patients were operated before radiotherapy and 3 had a pre-operative irradiation followed by surgery and post-operative boost. Complete resection was possible in 55.9 per cent of stage 3 cases and in none with stage 4a. Subtotal resection was done in 36.6 per cent of stage 3 patients and 83.3 per cent in stage 4a. 8 patients had only biopsy: 5 in stage 3 (8.5 per cent) and 3 in stage 4a (16.6 per cent). Post-operative radiation doses ranged between 39.6 and 46 Gy to the whole mediastinum followed by a 10-16 Gy boost on smaller fields in cases presenting residual disease after surgery. The pre-operative dose was 30 Gy followed by a post-operative boost of 16-24 Gy. Conventional fraction sizes of 1.8-2 Gy were always used. The 10 years survival rate was 58.3 per cent. There was a significant difference between stage 3 (70.9 per cent) and stage 4a (26.3 per cent)(p<0.0004). Survival of patients in stage 3 was not significantly affected by the type of surgery. No significant difference in survival or recurrence rate was observed in patients with different histologies and in patients with or without myasthenia. Thoracic relapses occurred in 15. 2 per cent of stage 3 patients and in 50 per cent of stage 4a patients (p<0.01). Only 7 relapses (9.1 per cent) were within the limits of the radiation field. Radiotherapy seems to be effective in reducing the risk of local recurrence and prolonging survival in patients operated upon for locally advanced thymoma. More patients are alive and free of disease at 10 years than those who received radical surgery. (author). 26 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  11. MR thermometry for monitoring tumor ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senneville, Baudouin D. de; Quesson, Bruno; Dragonu, Iulius; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Mougenot, Charles; Grenier, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Local thermal therapies are increasingly used in the clinic for tissue ablation. During energy deposition, the actual tissue temperature is difficult to estimate since physiological processes may modify local heat conduction and energy absorption. Blood flow may increase during temperature increase and thus change heat conduction. In order to improve the therapeutic efficiency and the safety of the intervention, mapping of temperature and thermal dose appear to offer the best strategy to optimize such interventions and to provide therapy endpoints. MRI can be used to monitor local temperature changes during thermal therapies. On-line availability of dynamic temperature mapping allows prediction of tissue death during the intervention based on semi-empirical thermal dose calculations. Much progress has been made recently in MR thermometry research, and some applications are appearing in the clinic. In this paper, the principles of MRI temperature mapping are described with special emphasis on methods employing the temperature dependency of the water proton resonance frequency. Then, the prospects and requirements for widespread applications of MR thermometry in the clinic are evaluated. (orig.)

  12. Conformal radiation therapy with or without intensity modulation in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Peignaux, K.; Ammor, A.; Bolla, M.

    2005-01-01

    Conformal radiation therapy has now to be considered as a standard treatment of localized prostatic adenocarcinomas. Using conformational methods and intensity modulated radiation therapy requires a rigorous approach for their implementation in routine, focused on the reproducibility of the treatment, target volume definitions, dosimetry, quality control, setup positioning. In order to offer to the largest number of patients high-dose treatment, the clinicians must integrate as prognostic factors accurate definition of microscopic extension as well as the tolerance threshold of critical organs. High-dose delivery is expected to be most efficient in intermediary risks and locally advanced diseases. Intensity modulated radiation therapy is specifically dedicated to dose escalation. Perfect knowledge of classical constraints of conformal radiation therapy is required. Using such an approach in routine needs a learning curve including the physicists and a specific quality assurance program. (author)

  13. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors: How we do it safety and completely

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Heo, Suk Hee; Hong, Jun Hyung; Lim, Hyo Soon; Seon, Hyun Ju; Hur, Young Hoe; Park, Chang Hwan; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become one of the most promising local cancer therapies for both resectable and nonresectable hepatic tumors. Although RF ablation is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of liver tumors, the outcome of treatment can be closely related to the location and shape of the tumors. There may be difficulties with RF ablation of tumors that are adjacent to large vessels or extrahepatic heat-vulnerable organs and tumors in the caudate lobe, possibly resulting in major complications or treatment failure. Thus, a number of strategies have been developed to overcome these challenges, which include artificial ascites, needle track ablation, fusion imaging guidance, parallel targeting, bypass targeting, etc. Operators need to use the right strategy in the right situation to avoid the possibility of complications and incomplete thermal tissue destruction; with the right strategy, RF ablation can be performed successfully, even for hepatic tumors in high-risk locations. This article offers technical strategies that can be used to effectively perform RF ablation as well as to minimize possible complications related to the procedure with representative cases and schematic illustrations.

  14. Should the General Practitioner Consider Mesotherapy (Intradermal Therapy) to Manage Localized Pain?

    OpenAIRE

    Mammucari, M; Maggiori, E; Lazzari, M; Natoli, S

    2016-01-01

    Wide variations in the types of pain and response to analgesic pharmacotherapy mean that a variety of treatment strategies are needed. One approach is mesotherapy (intradermal therapy). This consists of microinjections into the skin and is ideally suited to the management of localized pain. Advantages include increasing the duration of drug activity, reduced risk of adverse events and interactions, and possible synergy with other therapies. Mesotherapy provides general practitioners with anot...

  15. Long-Term Results after Treatment of Very Low-, Low-, and High-Risk Thyroid Cancers in a Combined Setting of Thyroidectomy and Radio Ablation Therapy in Euthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Emmanouilidis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Differentiated thyroid cancer treatment usually consists of thyroidectomy and radio ablation in hypothyroidism 4-6 weeks after surgery. Replacing hypothyroidism by recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone can facilitate radio ablation in euthyroidism within one week after surgery. The outcome of this approach was investigated. Methods. This is a prospective randomized trial to compare thyroidectomy and radio ablation within a few days after preconditioning with recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone versus thyroidectomy and radio ablation separated by four weeks of L-T4 withdrawal. Tumors were graded into very low-, low- , or high-risk tumors. Recurrence-free survival was confirmed at follow-up controls by neck ultrasound and serum thyroglobulin. Suspected tumor recurrence was treated by additional radio ablation or surgery. Quality-of-life questionnaires with additional evaluation of job performance and sick-leave time were used in all patients. Results. Radio ablation in euthyroidism in quick succession after thyroidectomy did not lead to higher tumor recurrence rates of differentiated thyroid cancers in any risk category and was significantly advantageous with respect to quality-of-life (P<0.001, sick-leave time (P<0.001, and job performance (P=0.002. Conclusion. Recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone can be used safely and with good efficacy to allow radio ablation under sustained euthyroidism within one week after thyroidectomy.

  16. Radiation therapy alone is not successful as salvage treatment for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oas, Lute G; Zagars, Gunar K; Pollack, Alan

    1995-07-01

    whose disease relapsed after XRT received androgen ablation. Although the majority of patients relapsed, survival at 5 years after XRT was 85% - no different from the expected survival for age-matched men in the general population. Conclusion: Using PSA as a disease endpoint, reveals that radiation therapy rarely salvages patients with apparently localized relapse after radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Patients with indications for XRT after RP are better treated immediately rather than waiting for recurrence.

  17. Mucosal ablation in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S J; Selvasekar, C R; Birbeck, N

    2002-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is a prevalent, premalignant condition affecting the gastroesophageal junction and distal esophagus. Ablation plus antireflux therapy has recently been advocated to prevent the development of adenocarcinoma or to treat those unfit or unwilling to undergo esophagectomy. The present article, based on a search of Medline/ISI databases and cross-referencing of relevant articles, reviews the literature on this subject. A number of techniques have been used to remove the affected mucosa, including laser, electrocoagulation, argon plasma coagulation and photodynamic therapy but, as yet, none has been shown to be superior. Depending on the method used, ablation results in complete removal of Barrett's esophagus in approximately one third of patients and a partial response in nearly two-thirds. The resultant squamous mucosa is apparently 'normal' but may regress. To promote and maintain regeneration, antireflux therapy must be sufficient to reduce repetitive injury to the esophageal mucosa. Whether ablation reduces the cancer risk or delays its occurrence is unknown, though recent data suggests benefit. Complications are infrequent and usually mild. Regular follow-up endoscopy and deep biopsies continue to be necessary. Careful data from much larger populations with long-term follow-up is required before ablation reaches the stage of broad clinical application.

  18. Should the General Practitioner Consider Mesotherapy (Intradermal Therapy) to Manage Localized Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammucari, Massimo; Maggiori, Enrica; Lazzari, Marzia; Natoli, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Wide variations in the types of pain and response to analgesic pharmacotherapy mean that a variety of treatment strategies are needed. One approach is mesotherapy (intradermal therapy). This consists of microinjections into the skin and is ideally suited to the management of localized pain. Advantages include increasing the duration of drug activity, reduced risk of adverse events and interactions, and possible synergy with other therapies. Mesotherapy provides general practitioners with another tool for the treatment of local pain. However, it is important to provide patients with full details of the pros and cons of this approach and obtain informed patient consent.

  19. STOMATOLOGIC ASPECTS IN THERAPY OF LOCALLY DISTRIBUTED CANCER OF ORAL CAVITY MUCUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Matyakin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the investigation: to improve prophylaxis of dental complications during the therapy in the patients with locally distributed cancer of oral cavity mucus.Materials. Results of sanation of oral cavity in 305 patients with cancer of oral and pharyngeal area are analyzed.Results. The best results are noted in the patients given surgical sanation before chemo-radial therapy. The most number of complications is observed when teeth were extracted after chemical therapy in the period of radial therapy at summary focal dose above 20 Gy as well as in the late periods after radial therapy.Conclusion. A complex of preventive measures with using haemostatic sponge with canamycin in such patients decreases the number of complications and the terms of healing of alveoli of extracted teeth.

  20. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Disease in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsoo Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer.

  1. Diode laser trans - scleral cyclo - ablation as a primary surgical treatment for primary open - angle glaucoma after maximum tolerated medical therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, K.; Khan, M.T.; Butt, J.B.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence rate and prevalence of glaucoma in Pakistan is similar to that of other dark - colored population countries. Primary trabeculectomy is still a preferred surgical approach. Diode laser is widely accepted as the therapy of choice in severe glaucoma cases. The purpose of this study was to deter-mine the role of Diode Laser Transscleral Cyclo-ablation as a primary surgical treatment option in Primary Open Angle Glaucoma after maximum tolerated medical therapy. This quasi - experimental study was con-ducted at Layton Rahmatullah Benevolent Trust Free Eye Care and Cancer Hospital, Lahore. Sixty patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected from the Glaucoma unit for this study. 25 - 30 burns of Diode Laser were applied to 270 degrees avoiding 3 and 9 O clock positions, 1.5 mm posterior to the limbus. Laser was set at duration of 1 second and power between 1000 and 1500 mw. Patients were followed up for a period of one year. Results: Out of a total of 60 eyes with mean age 52.73 +- 7.40 years, 36 (60%) were male and 24 (40%) were female. The mean pre-operative Intra Ocular Pressure IOP was 41.0 +- 7.0 mmHg (The pre-operative IOP ranged from 28 mmHg to 60 mmHg). The mean post-operative IOP was 18.97 mmHg on day one, 16.75 mmHg at 1 week, 15.68 mmHg at 1 month, 15.00 mmHg at 6 months and by the end of a year it was about 14.15 mmHg (The post-operative IOP ranged from 6 mmHg to 52 mmHg). There was a significant drop of more than 50% of post-operative IOP as compared to pre-operative IOP. Conclusion: Diode Laser Transscleral Cycloablation is a practical, rapid, well - tolerated procedure that provides a significant lowering of intraocular pressure with few complications and can considered as alternative treatment in POAG if medical therapy fails. (author)

  2. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho [The Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy.

  3. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2017-01-01

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy

  4. Radiofrequency-induced thermal therapy: results of a European multicentre study of resistive ablation of incompetent truncal varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, B; Hnatek, L; Zierau, U; Camci, M; Akkersdijk, Gjm; Nio, D; Sarlija, M; Ajduk, M; Santoro, P; Roche, E

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermal therapy (RFITT) in a multicentre non-randomized study. Some 672 incompetent saphenous veins (85% great saphenous varicose vein, 15% short saphenous vein) in 462 patients (56.5% CEAP [clinical, aetiological, anatomical and pathological elements] class 3 or worse) were treated in eight European centres. Patients were assessed between 180 and 360 days postoperatively. Occlusion rates were determined by duplex ultrasound and compared with the power used for treatment, pull back rate and experience of the operating surgeon. Complete occlusion rates of 98.4% were achieved when treatments were performed by an experienced operator (more than 20 cases), when the maximum power setting on the RFITT generator was between 18 and 20 W and the applicator was withdrawn at a rate slower than 1.5 second/cm RFITT is efficacious, well tolerated by patients and has a low incidence of procedure-related post-operative complications.

  5. Ischemic stroke associated with radio frequency ablation for nodal reentry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz M, Juan C; Duran R, Carlos E; Perafan B, Pablo; Pava M, Luis F

    2010-01-01

    Atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia is the most common type of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. In those patients in whom drug therapy is not effective or not desired, radio frequency ablation is an excellent therapeutic method. Although overall these procedures are fast and safe, several complications among which ischemic stroke stands out, have been reported. We present the case of a 41 year old female patient with repetitive episodes of tachycardia due to nodal reentry who was treated with radiofrequency ablation. Immediately after the procedure she presented focal neurologic deficit consistent with ischemic stroke in the right medial cerebral artery territory. Angiography with angioplastia and abxicimab was performed and then tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) was locally infused, with appropriate clinical and angiographic outcome.

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation versus microwave ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF ablation versus microwave (MW ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC measuring ≤ 5 cm in greatest diameter. From January 2006 to December 2006, 78 patients had undergone RF ablation whereas 77 had undergone MW ablation. Complete ablation (CA, local tumour progression (LTP and distant recurrence (DR were compared. The overall survival curves were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier technique and compared with the log-rank test. The CA rate was 83.4% (78/93 for RF ablation and 86.7%(91/105 for MW ablation. The LTP rate was 11.8% (11/93 for RF ablation and 10.5% (11/105 for MW ablation. DR was found in 51 (65.4% in the RF ablation and 62 (80.5% in the MW ablation. There was no significant difference in the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates (P = 0.780 and the 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival rates (P = 0.123 between RF and MW ablation. At subgroup analyses, for patients with tumors ≤ 3.0 cm, there was no significant difference in the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates (P = 0.067 and the corresponding disease-free survival rates(P = 0.849. For patients with tumor diameters of 3.1-5.0 cm, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 87.1%, 61.3%, and 40.1% for RF ablation and 85.4%, 36.6%, and 22% for MW ablation, with no significant difference (P = 0.068. The corresponding disease-free survival rates were 74.2%, 54.8%, and 45.2% for the RF ablation group and 53.3%, 26.8%, and 17.1% for the MW ablation group. The disease-free survival curve for the RF ablation group was significantly better than that for the MW ablation group (P = 0.018. RF ablation and MW ablation are both effective methods in treating hepatocellular carcinomas, with no significant differences in CA, LTP, DR, and overall survival.

  7. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs

  8. Randomized Trial of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) as Early Consolidation Following Marrow Ablative Therapy With Stem Cell Rescue for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samlowski, Wolfram

    2002-01-01

    Marrow ablative doses of chemotherapy followed by stem cell rescue (MAT/SR) produces a high frequency of objective responses in patients with metastatic breast cancer, with up to 40-50% complete responses...

  9. Randomized Trial of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) as Early Consolidation Following Marrow Ablative Therapy with Stem Cell Rescue for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samlowski, Wolfram

    2000-01-01

    Marrow ablative doses of chemotherapy followed by stem cell rescue (MAT/SR) produce a high frequency of objective responses in patients with metastatic breast cancer, with up to 40-50 % complete responses...

  10. Randomized Trial of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) as Early Consolidation Following Marrow Ablative Therapy with Stem Cell Rescue for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samlowski, Wolfram

    2001-01-01

    Marrow ablative doses of chemotherapy followed by stem cell rescue (MAT/SR) produce a high frequency of objective responses in patients with metastatic breast cancer, with up to 40-50% complete responses...

  11. Endometrial ablation with paracervical block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninx, Josien P. M.; Mol, Ben Willem; Bongers, Marlies Y.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of endometrial ablation under local anesthesia. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study was performed at the gynecology department of a large teaching hospital. Women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding were included to undergo NovaSure

  12. Predicting Overall Survival After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Development and External Validation of the Amsterdam Prognostic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, Alexander V., E-mail: Dr.alexlouie@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mokhles, Sahar [Department of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rodrigues, George B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Stephans, Kevin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Lagerwaard, Frank J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Palma, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Warner, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Takkenberg, Johanna J.M. [Department of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Maat, Alex P.W.M. [Department of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Woody, Neil M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: A prognostic model for 5-year overall survival (OS), consisting of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and a nomogram, was developed for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (ES-NSCLC) treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: A primary dataset of 703 ES-NSCLC SABR patients was randomly divided into a training (67%) and an internal validation (33%) dataset. In the former group, 21 unique parameters consisting of patient, treatment, and tumor factors were entered into an RPA model to predict OS. Univariate and multivariate models were constructed for RPA-selected factors to evaluate their relationship with OS. A nomogram for OS was constructed based on factors significant in multivariate modeling and validated with calibration plots. Both the RPA and the nomogram were externally validated in independent surgical (n=193) and SABR (n=543) datasets. Results: RPA identified 2 distinct risk classes based on tumor diameter, age, World Health Organization performance status (PS) and Charlson comorbidity index. This RPA had moderate discrimination in SABR datasets (c-index range: 0.52-0.60) but was of limited value in the surgical validation cohort. The nomogram predicting OS included smoking history in addition to RPA-identified factors. In contrast to RPA, validation of the nomogram performed well in internal validation (r{sup 2}=0.97) and external SABR (r{sup 2}=0.79) and surgical cohorts (r{sup 2}=0.91). Conclusions: The Amsterdam prognostic model is the first externally validated prognostication tool for OS in ES-NSCLC treated with SABR available to individualize patient decision making. The nomogram retained strong performance across surgical and SABR external validation datasets. RPA performance was poor in surgical patients, suggesting that 2 different distinct patient populations are being treated with these 2 effective modalities.

  13. Transarterial ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma. Status and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeleff, B.A.; Stampfl, U.; Sommer, C.M.; Bellemann, N.; Kauczor, H.U.; Hoffmann, K.; Ganten, T.; Ehehalt, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and represents the main cause of death among European patients with liver cirrhosis. Only 30-40% of patients diagnosed with HCC are candidates for curative treatment options (e.g. surgical resection, liver transplantation or ablation). The remaining majority of patients must undergo local regional and palliative therapies. Transvascular ablation of HCC takes advantage of the fact that the hypervascularized HCC receives most of its blood supply from the hepatic artery. In this context transvascular ablation describes different therapy regimens which can be assigned to four groups: cTACE (conventional transarterial chemoembolization), bland embolization (transarterial embolization TAE), DEB-TACE (TACE with drug-eluting beads, DEB) and SIRT (selective internal radiation therapy, radioembolization). Conventional TACE is the most common type of transvascular ablation and represents a combination of intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization with occlusion of the arterial blood supply. However, there is no standardized regimen with respect to the chemotherapeutic drug, the embolic agent, the usage of lipiodol and the interval between the TACE procedures. Even the exact course of a cTACE procedure (order of chemotherapy or embolization) is not standardized. It remains unclear whether or not intra-arterial chemotherapy is definitely required as bland embolization using very small, tightly calibrated spherical particles (without intra-arterial administration of a chemotherapeutic drug) shows tumor necrosis comparable to cTACE. For DEB-TACE microparticles loaded with a chemotherapeutic drug combine the advantages of cTACE and bland embolization. Thereby, a continuing chemotherapeutic effect within the tumor might cause a further increase in intratumoral cytotoxicity and at the same time a decrease in systemic toxicity. (orig.) [de

  14. Synergistic enhancement of cancer therapy using a combination of docetaxel and photothermal ablation induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZZ

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Lei Wang1, Mingyue Zhang1, Nan Zhang1, Jinjin Shi1, Hongling Zhang1, Min Li1, Chao Lu2, Zhenzhong Zhang1 1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA Background: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT are poorly soluble in water, so their applications are limited. Therefore, aqueous solutions of SWNT, designed by noncovalent functionalization and without toxicity, are required for biomedical applications. Methods: In this study, we conjugated docetaxel with SWNT via p-p accumulation and used a surfactant to functionalize SWNT noncovalently. The SWNT were then conjugated with docetaxel (DTX-SWNT and linked with NGR (Asn-Gly-Arg peptide, which targets tumor angiogenesis, to obtain a water-soluble and tumor-targeting SWNT-NGR-DTX drug delivery system. Results: SWNT-NGR-DTX showed higher efficacy than docetaxel in suppressing tumor growth in a cultured PC3 cell line in vitro and in a murine S180 cancer model. Tumor volumes in the S180 mouse model decreased considerably under near-infrared radiation compared with the control group. Conclusion: The SWNT-NGR-DTX drug delivery system may be promising for high treatment efficacy with minimal side effects in future cancer therapy. Keywords: single-walled carbon nanotubes, docetaxel, NGR peptide, tumor-targeting, near-infrared radiation

  15. 3D conformal radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized prostate cancer: Is age a limiting factor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, A.; Negrea, T.; Lechevallier, E.; Coulange, C.; Murraciole, X.; Jouvea, E.; Sambuca, R.; Cowen, D.

    2011-01-01

    No study on side effects had showed that conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer is more harmful in patients older than 70 years to patients younger. The aim of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of conformal radiotherapy, with high dose for localized prostate cancer in patients older than 70 years and compared to patients younger than 70 years. Between 1996 and 2009, 104 patients were treated with radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized cancer prostate. Median follow-up was 105 months (9 300). Acute (occurred at ≤ three months) and late side effects of 55 patients older than 70 years (median age: 75 [71 92]) were graded according to the CTCAE 3.0 criteria and compared to the younger population. Median dose to the prostate was 75.6 Gy (67 80) in both groups. There were no significant differences in acute and late side effects between age groups. For patients above 70 years, the incidence of grade II or higher acute and late side effects were respectively 27 and 22% for urologic symptoms and 13 and 16% for rectal symptoms. The frequency of grade III late symptoms was low and ranged between 0 and 6% for the evaluated symptoms, irrespective of age group. Older patients had a better biochemical recurrence-free survival than younger patients (86 versus 77% at four years, P ≡ ns). High dose 3D conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer was well tolerated in patients older than 70 years. Age is not a limiting factor for conformal radiation therapy and hormonotherapy for older patients. (authors)

  16. Residual F-18-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically

  17. Nephron-sparing percutaneous ablation of a 5 cm renal cell carcinoma by superselective embolization and percutaneous RF-ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, J.; Mahnken, A.; Buecker, A.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Rohde, D. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Abt. Urologie

    2001-11-01

    Purpose: To report on the nephron-sparing, percutaneous ablation of a large renal cell carcinoma by combined superselective embolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation. Materials and Methods: A 5 cm renal cell carcinoma of a 43-year-old drug abusing male with serologically proven HIV, hepatitis B and C infection, who refused surgery, was superselectively embolized using microspheres (size: 500 - 700 {mu}m) and a platinum coil under local anesthesia. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation using a 7F LeVeen probe (size of expanded probe tip: 40 mm) and a 200 Watt generator was performed one day after transcatheter embolization under general anesthesia. Results: The combined treatment resulted in complete destruction of the tumor without relevant damage of the surrounding healthy renal tissue. The patient was discharged 24 hours after RF ablation. No complications like urinary leaks or fistulas were observed and follow up CT one day and 4 weeks after the radiofrequency intervention revealed no signs of residual tumor growth. Conclusion: The combined transcatheter embolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma has proved technically feasible, effective, and safe in this patient. It may be offered as an alternative treatment to partial or radical nephrectomy under certain circumstances. Abbreviations: RF = radiofrequency ablation; CT = computed tomography; HIV = human immunodeficiency virus. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Bericht ueber eine nierenschonende, perkutane Ablation eines 5 cm grossen Nierenzellkarzinoms durch kombinierte Transkatheterembolisation und perkutane Radiofrequenzablation. Material und Methoden: Ein 5 cm grosses Nierenzellkarzinom eines 43 Jahre alten Drogenabhaengigen mit serologisch nachgewiesener HIV, Hepatitis B- und C-Infektion, der eine operative Therapie ablehnte, wurde superselektiv durch Embosphaeren (Partikelgroesse: 500 - 700 {mu}m) und einer Platinspirale unter Lokalanaesthesie embolisiert. Am Folgetag

  18. Subarachnoid dissemination of pineal germinoma 9 years after radiation therapy without local relapse; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokoro, Kazuhiko; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Murase, Shizuo; Yagishita, Saburo [Kanagawa Rehabilitation Center, Atsugi (Japan); Kyuma, Yoshikazu

    1991-11-01

    A 22-year-old female developed intracranial and spinal subarachnoid metastases 9 years after radiation therapy for a pineal germinoma. Computed tomographic scans showed no evidence of local recurrence. Cerebrospinal axis irradiation achieved total remission. Delayed subarachnoid dissemination may be caused by germinoma cells remaining dormant in the subarachnoid space, outside the radiation field. (author).

  19. User involvement in measuring service quality of local authority occupational therapy services: a new approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sixma, H.J.; Calnan, S.; Calnan, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is two-fold: (i) to describe the development of a new measuring instrument for quality of care from the perspective of the users of local authority Occupational Therapy (OT) services, and (ii) to evaluate the potential of the new instrument as a standardized approach for the

  20. Quality of local authority occupational therapy services: developing an instrument to measure the user's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calnan, S.; Sixma, H.J.; Calnan, M.W.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2000-01-01

    The aims of this paper are threefold: (1) to describe the development of an instrument measuring quality of care from the specific perspective of the users of local authority occupational therapy services; (2) to present the results from a survey of users' views about the quality of services offered

  1. Nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Stephen J; Chen, Xinhua; Liu, Jie A; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma often evades effective therapy and recurrences are frequent. Recently, nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) ablation using pulse power technology has emerged as a local-regional, non-thermal, and non-drug therapy for skin cancers. In the studies reported here we use nsPEFs to ablate murine, rat and human HCCs in vitro and an ectopic murine Hepa 1-6 HCC in vivo. Using pulses with 60 or 300 ns and electric fields as high as 60 kV/cm, murine Hepa 1-6, rat N1S1 and human HepG2 HCC are readily eliminated with changes in caspase-3 activity. Interestingly caspase activities increase in the mouse and human model and decrease in the rat model as electric field strengths are increased. In vivo, while sham treated control mice survived an average of 15 days after injection and before humane euthanasia, Hepa 1-6 tumors were eliminated for longer than 50 days with 3 treatments using one hundred pulses with 100 ns at 55 kV/cm. Survival was 40% in mice treated with 30 ns pulses at 55 kV/cm. This study demonstrates that nsPEF ablation is not limited to effectively treating skin cancers and provides a rationale for treating orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma in pre-clinical applications and ultimately in clinical trials.

  2. Cf-252 neutron brachytherapy: an advance for bulky localized cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The physical and radiobiogical basis as well as the rationale for neutron brachytherapy, using Cf-252, in human cancer therapy is reviewed. Cf-252 brachytherapy represents an economical and effective form of neutron radiotherapy that is readily and safely applied clinically. It can be used anywhere in the world without unusual personnel, equipment or facilities, or prohibitive expenses or maintenance costs. Used on bulky head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, pelvic, brain and appendage cancers, it overcomes hypoxic radioresistance and produces remarkable rates of tumor clearance. It is easily combined with photon radiotherapy and in proper schedules and doses, it can control advanced but still localized regional cancers to produce tumor cure. It will clear the local manifestations of recurrent or metastatic tumors or advanced stages of primary tumors and therefore in conjunction with other adjuvant therapies offers much more effective tumor control and palliation than present conventional therapy. (Auth.)

  3. Renal artery nerve distribution and density in the porcine model: biologic implications for the development of radiofrequency ablation therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Armando; Rousselle, Serge; Palmieri, Taylor; Rate, William R; Wicks, Joan; Degrange, Ashley; Hyon, Chelsea M; Gongora, Carlos A; Hart, Randy; Grundy, Will; Kaluza, Greg L; Granada, Juan F

    2013-12-01

    Catheter-based renal artery denervation has demonstrated to be effective in decreasing blood pressure among patients with refractory hypertension. The anatomic distribution of renal artery nerves may influence the safety and efficacy profile of this procedure. We aimed to describe the anatomic distribution and density of periarterial renal nerves in the porcine model. Thirty arterial renal sections were included in the analysis by harvesting a tissue block containing the renal arteries and perirenal tissue from each animal. Each artery was divided into 3 segments (proximal, mid, and distal) and assessed for total number, size, and depth of the nerves according to the location. Nerve counts were greatest proximally (45.62% of the total nerves) and decreased gradually distally (mid, 24.58%; distal, 29.79%). The distribution in nerve size was similar across all 3 sections (∼40% of the nerves, 50-100 μm; ∼30%, 0-50 μm; ∼20%, 100-200 μm; and ∼10%, 200-500 μm). In the arterial segments ∼45% of the nerves were located within 2 mm from the arterial wall whereas ∼52% of all nerves were located within 2.5 mm from the arterial wall. Sympathetic efferent fibers outnumbered sensory afferent fibers overwhelmingly, intermixed within the nerve bundle. In the porcine model, renal artery nerves are seen more frequently in the proximal segment of the artery. Nerve size distribution appears to be homogeneous throughout the artery length. Nerve bundles progress closer to the arterial wall in the distal segments of the artery. This anatomic distribution may have implications for the future development of renal denervation therapies. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Real-time Tumor Oxygenation Changes After Single High-dose Radiation Therapy in Orthotopic and Subcutaneous Lung Cancer in Mice: Clinical Implication for Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Schedule Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Changhoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Beom-Ju; Bok, Seoyeon; Lee, Chan-Ju; Kim, Young-Eun [Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Sang-Rok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong-Gyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong; Paeng, Jin Chul [Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Carlson, David J. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); and others

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the serial changes of tumor hypoxia in response to single high-dose irradiation by various clinical and preclinical methods to propose an optimal fractionation schedule for stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Syngeneic Lewis lung carcinomas were grown either orthotopically or subcutaneously in C57BL/6 mice and irradiated with a single dose of 15 Gy to mimic stereotactic ablative radiation therapy used in the clinic. Serial [{sup 18}F]-misonidazole (F-MISO) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, pimonidazole fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses, hypoxia-responsive element-driven bioluminescence, and Hoechst 33342 perfusion were performed before irradiation (day −1), at 6 hours (day 0), and 2 (day 2) and 6 (day 6) days after irradiation for both subcutaneous and orthotopic lung tumors. For F-MISO, the tumor/brain ratio was analyzed. Results: Hypoxic signals were too low to quantitate for orthotopic tumors using F-MISO PET or hypoxia-responsive element-driven bioluminescence imaging. In subcutaneous tumors, the maximum tumor/brain ratio was 2.87 ± 0.483 at day −1, 1.67 ± 0.116 at day 0, 2.92 ± 0.334 at day 2, and 2.13 ± 0.385 at day 6, indicating that tumor hypoxia was decreased immediately after irradiation and had returned to the pretreatment levels at day 2, followed by a slight decrease by day 6 after radiation. Pimonidazole analysis also revealed similar patterns. Using Hoechst 33342 vascular perfusion dye, CD31, and cleaved caspase 3 co-immunostaining, we found a rapid and transient vascular collapse, which might have resulted in poor intratumor perfusion of F-MISO PET tracer or pimonidazole delivered at day 0, leading to decreased hypoxic signals at day 0 by PET or pimonidazole analyses. Conclusions: We found tumor hypoxia levels decreased immediately after delivery of a single dose of 15 Gy and had returned to the pretreatment levels 2 days after irradiation and had decreased

  5. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Primary Kidney Cancer: A 3-Dimensional Conformal Technique Associated With Low Rates of Early Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.pham@petermac.org [Department of Radiotherapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Thompson, Ann [Department of Radiotherapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kolsky, Michal Schneider [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Devereux, Thomas; Lim, Andrew [Department of Radiotherapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe our 3-dimensional conformal planning approaches and report early toxicities with stereotactic body radiation therapy for the management of primary renal cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of a phase 1 trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary inoperable renal cell carcinoma. A dose of 42 Gy/3 fractions was prescribed to targets ≥5 cm, whereas for <5 cm 26 Gy/1 fraction was used. All patients underwent a planning 4-dimensional CT to generate a planning target volume (PTV) from a 5-mm isotropic expansion of the internal target volume. Planning required a minimum of 8 fields prescribing to the minimum isodose surrounding the PTV. Intermediate dose spillage at 50% of the prescription dose (R50%) was measured to describe the dose gradient. Early toxicity (<6 months) was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (v4.0). Results: From July 2012 to August 2013 a total of 20 patients (median age, 77 years) were recruited into a prospective clinical trial. Eleven patients underwent fractionated treatment and 9 patients a single fraction. For PTV targets <100 cm{sup 3} the median number of beams used was 8 (2 noncoplanar) to achieve an average R50% of 3.7. For PTV targets >100 cm{sup 3} the median beam number used was 10 (4 noncoplanar) for an average R50% value of 4.3. The R50% was inversely proportional to decreasing PTV volume (r=−0.62, P=.003) and increasing total beams used (r=−0.51, P=.022). Twelve of 20 patients (60%) suffered grade ≤2 early toxicity, whereas 8 of 20 patients (40%) were asymptomatic. Nausea, chest wall pain, and fatigue were the most common toxicities reported. Conclusion: A 3-dimensional conformal planning technique of 8-10 beams can be used to deliver highly tolerable stereotactic ablation to primary kidney targets with minimal early toxicities. Ongoing follow-up is currently in place to assess long-term toxicities and cancer control.

  6. Adjuvant VHF therapy in locally recurrent and primary unresectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotter, J.M.; Lamb, M.H.; Bayliss, E.J.; Edis, A.J.; Blackwell, J.B.; Shepherd, J.M.; Cassidy, B.

    1996-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study, 434 MHz microwave therapy combined with external beam radiotherapy (VHF+RT) was compared with standard external beam radiotherapy (RT) in controlling locally recurrent or unresectable primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Independent assessors documented quality of life scores, performance status, toxicities local response to treatment, and systemic disease progression before treatment and after treatment and every 8 week thereafter. Of 75 patients randomized, 73 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Forty-three of these patients had local pelvic tumour recurrence only and 21 also had distant metastases. In addition, nine patients had primary inoperable carcinomas, two of whom also had metastases. Thirty-seven patients were randomized to RT and 36 to VHF+RT. Th median dose of radiation in the VHF+RT arm was 4275 cGy with a median fraction size of 150 cGy and median duration of therapy of 48.5 days versus 4500 cGy in the RT-only arm with a median fraction size of 180 cGy and median duration of therapy of 38 days. These doses are unlikely to be significantly different in biological effect. No significant difference between the two groups was observed in extent and duration of local control, measures of toxicity or quality of life scores. Additionally, survival and cumulative incidence of pelvic site of first progression did not differ significantly between the groups. It is concluded that VHF microwave therapy in conjunction with radiotherapy produces no therapeutic advantage over conventional radiation therapy alone in the treatment of locally recurrent rectal carcinoma. 35 refs., 8 tabs., 3 figs

  7. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for reirradiation of localized adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lominska Chris E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local control rates are poor in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We investigated the role of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT for salvage or boost treatment after conventional doses of external beam radiation therapy. Methods All patients treated with SBRT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma at Georgetown University from June 2002 through July 2007 were examined. Eligible patients had prior external beam radiation therapy to the pancreas. Treatment parameters and clinical and radiographic follow-up were evaluated. Results Twenty-eight patients were identified who received SBRT after a median prior external beam radiotherapy dose of 50.4 Gy. The median patient age was 63 years old and the median follow-up was 5.9 months. Twelve of fourteen (85.7% evaluable patients were free from local progression, with three partial responses and nine patients with stable disease. Toxicity consisted of one case of acute Grade II nausea/vomiting, and two cases of Grade III late GI toxicity. The median overall survival was 5.9 months, with 18% survival and 70% freedom from local progression at one year. Conclusions Hypofractionated SBRT reirradiation of localized pancreatic cancer is a well-tolerated treatment. Most patients are free from local progression, albeit with limited follow-up, but overall survival remains poor.

  8. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improves Local Control After Surgical Resection in Patients With Localized Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabolch, Aaron; Else, Tobias; Griffith, Kent A.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Williams, Andrew; Miller, Barbra S.; Worden, Francis; Hammer, Gary D.; Jolly, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy known for high rates of local recurrence, though the benefit of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) has not been established. In this study of grossly resected ACC, we compare local control of patients treated with surgery followed by adjuvant RT to a matched cohort treated with surgery alone. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients with localized disease who underwent R0 or R1 resection followed by adjuvant RT. Only patients treated with RT at our institution were included. Matching to surgical controls was on the basis of stage, surgical margin status, tumor grade, and adjuvant mitotane. Results: From 1991 to 2011, 360 ACC patients were evaluated for ACC at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI). Twenty patients with localized disease received postoperative adjuvant RT. These were matched to 20 controls. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to stage, margins, grade, or mitotane. Median RT dose was 55 Gy (range, 45-60 Gy). Median follow-up was 34 months. Local recurrence occurred in 1 patient treated with RT, compared with 12 patients not treated with RT (P=.0005; hazard ratio [HR] 12.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.62-97.88). However, recurrence-free survival was no different between the groups (P=.17; HR 1.52; 95% CI 0.67-3.45). Overall survival was also not significantly different (P=.13; HR 1.97; 95% CI 0.57-6.77), with 4 deaths in the RT group compared with 9 in the control group. Conclusions: Postoperative RT significantly improved local control compared with the use of surgery alone in this case-matched cohort analysis of grossly resected ACC patients. Although this retrospective series represents the largest study to date on adjuvant RT for ACC, its findings need to be prospectively confirmed

  9. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improves Local Control After Surgical Resection in Patients With Localized Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabolch, Aaron [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Else, Tobias [Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Center for Cancer Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Williams, Andrew [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Miller, Barbra S. [Division of Endocrine Surgery, Department of General Surgery, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Worden, Francis [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Hammer, Gary D. [Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Jolly, Shruti, E-mail: shrutij@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy known for high rates of local recurrence, though the benefit of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) has not been established. In this study of grossly resected ACC, we compare local control of patients treated with surgery followed by adjuvant RT to a matched cohort treated with surgery alone. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients with localized disease who underwent R0 or R1 resection followed by adjuvant RT. Only patients treated with RT at our institution were included. Matching to surgical controls was on the basis of stage, surgical margin status, tumor grade, and adjuvant mitotane. Results: From 1991 to 2011, 360 ACC patients were evaluated for ACC at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI). Twenty patients with localized disease received postoperative adjuvant RT. These were matched to 20 controls. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to stage, margins, grade, or mitotane. Median RT dose was 55 Gy (range, 45-60 Gy). Median follow-up was 34 months. Local recurrence occurred in 1 patient treated with RT, compared with 12 patients not treated with RT (P=.0005; hazard ratio [HR] 12.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.62-97.88). However, recurrence-free survival was no different between the groups (P=.17; HR 1.52; 95% CI 0.67-3.45). Overall survival was also not significantly different (P=.13; HR 1.97; 95% CI 0.57-6.77), with 4 deaths in the RT group compared with 9 in the control group. Conclusions: Postoperative RT significantly improved local control compared with the use of surgery alone in this case-matched cohort analysis of grossly resected ACC patients. Although this retrospective series represents the largest study to date on adjuvant RT for ACC, its findings need to be prospectively confirmed.

  10. The application of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound to measure volume of affected tissue after HIFU treatment for localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedelaar, J. P.; Aarnink, R. G.; van Leenders, G. J.; Beerlage, H. P.; Debruyne, F. M.; Wijkstra, H.; de la Rosette, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Adequate monitoring of volume and location of affected tissue might provide helpful information when performing localized ablative therapy for prostate cancer. We hypothesize that the change in blood flow patterns after therapy in comparison to the blood flow pattern prior to therapy

  11. Hit by waves-living with local advanced or localized prostate cancer treated with endocrine therapy or under active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervik, Bente; Nordøy, Tone; Asplund, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of living with prostate cancer have shown that the illness and the treatment cause physical as well as psychosocial problems. The aim of this study was to illuminate men's experiences living with localized or local advanced prostate cancer when curative treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy is not an option at the time of diagnosis. The study was conducted via qualitative interviews, using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Ten men treated with endocrine therapy or under active surveillance were interviewed. Being diagnosed with prostate cancer was described as a shock, with different aspects of the illness revealed gradually. The limited amount of time available for meeting with health care providers contributed to patients' feelings of being left alone with difficulty getting information and help. Sexual and urinary problems were perceived as a threat to their manhood. The spouses provided the closest everyday support. The life situation of these patients can be understood as living in a "state of readiness," expecting something to happen regarding their illness, and not always knowing where to get help. The results confirm existing knowledge of patient's experiences in living with prostate cancer regarding the initial shock perceived by the patients, the bodily alterations, and the important role of their spouses. Nurses, as well as general practitioners, must play a more active role in follow-up to ensure that the men and their spouses receive better help and support.

  12. Ablative therapy with radioiodine in the postoperative management of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, a retrospective observational study of the justified indication of the therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto Herrera, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the indication of treatment with I131 as part of the management of differentiated thyroid cancer, was analyzed in patients older than 16 years attended in Hospital San Juan de Dios and Hospital Mexico, who received this therapy, during the years 2006-2009. The medical records of the selected patients were reviewed and registered in the SPSS statistical program. The following variables were obtained: name, file number, age, gender, type of cancer, maximum diameter of the tumor, presence of one of 2 or more tumor foci in the surgical piece, hospital of origin, value of T, N and M according to the TNM staging, MACIS scale score and staging according to the MACIS score. The most common differentiated carcinoma in the studied population was papillary carcinoma. A little less than half of the patients, had the criteria to receive radioiodine therapy according to that established by the ATA, same result when said population was subjected to European criteria Criteria to receive radioiodine dictated by the American school as the European one were fulfilled in the majority of patients with stage 2. Compliance with indication or non-indication of treatment was maintained without significant difference between papillary and follicular carcinomas [es

  13. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas. Technique and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruners, P.; Penzkofer, T.; Guenther, R. W.; Mahnken, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Osteoid osteoma is a benign primary bone tumor that typically occurs in children and young adults. Besides local pain, which is often worse at night, prompt relief due to medication with acetylsalicylic acid (ASS) is characteristic for this bone lesion. Because long-term medication with ASS does not represent an alternative treatment strategy due to its potentially severe side effects, different minimally invasive image-guided techniques for the therapy of osteoid osteoma have been developed. In this context radiofrequency (RF) ablation in particular has become part of the clinical routine. The technique and results of image-guided RF ablation are compared to alternative treatment strategies. Materials and Methods: Using this technique, an often needle-shaped RF applicator is percutaneously placed into the tumor under image guidance. Then a high-frequency alternating current is applied by the tip of the applicator which leads to ionic motion within the tissue resulting in local heat development and thus in thermal destruction of the surrounding tissue including the tumor. Results: The published primary and secondary success rates of this technique are 87 and 83%, respectively. Surgical resection and open curettage show comparable success rates but are associated with higher complication rates. In addition image-guided RF ablation of osteoid osteomas is associated with low costs. (orig.)

  14. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  15. Outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for inoperable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Ningning; Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan; Wang Weihu; Wang Shulian; Song Yongwen; Liu Yuping

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: From January 2000 to December 2007, 41 patients with inoperable locally advanced (stage III) pancreatic cancer were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy(3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Among these patients, 30 received concurrent radio-chemo-therapy. Results: The median survival time(MST) and 1-year overall survival were 9.2 months and 23%. Patients with pretreatment KPS ≥ 80, no regional lymph nodes metastasis, and CR/PR after radiotherapy had better prognosis. The corresponding MSTs were 11.1 months vs 5.8 months (χ 2 =7.50, P=0.006), 10.8 months vs 6.5 months(χ 2 =5.67, P=0.017), and 19.5 months vs 9.1 months (χ 2 =7.28, P=0.007), respectively. Concurrent radio-chemotherapy tended to improve the overall survival(χ 2 =3.25, P=0.072). After radiotherapy, 18 patients had clinical benefit response, mainly being abdominal pain relief. Neither grade 4 hematologic nor grade 3 non-hematologic toxicities were observed. Conclusions: For patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, both 3DCRT and IMRT are effective in alleviation of disease-related symptoms. Patients with better performance status before treatment, no regional lymph nodes metastasis, and better response to radiotherapy may have better prognosis. Concurrent radio-chemotherapy trend to improve overall survival when compared with radiotherapy alone. (authors)

  16. Feasibility of combined modality therapy for localized high-grade soft tissue sarcomas in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, R.H.; Greenberger, J.S.; Wilson, R.E.; Corson, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Seventeen consecutive patients with localized, high grade soft tissue sarcomas had resection of their primary tumor, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The soft tissue sarcoma was primary in 14 patients and regionally recurrent in 3 patients. Chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide 500 mg/M 2 day 1, Adriamycin (ADR) 60 mg/M 2 day 2, and DTIC 400 mg/M 2 days 1 and 2, given every 21 days to a maximum ADR dose of 450 mg/M 2 . Cyclophosphamide and DTIC were then given to a total duration of 1 year. Radiation therapy consisted of 4000 to 5000 rad by megavoltage photons in 5 weeks, and in selected cases, an additional 1500 to 2000 rad by electron beam boost in the tumor bed delivered over 2 additional weeks. Following surgery, 12 patients were treated sequentially with an interval of chemotherapy, radiation therapy and then the completion of chemotherapy. The added morbidity of this sequential approach is minimal: one patient of 12 had delayed primary healing of her wound, 1 of 10 patients required a break in radiation therapy because of skin erythema. Four patients were treated with intensive pre-chemotherapy radiation therapy because of inadequate surgical margins. The median time on study was 18 months from onset of treatment (range, 8 to 41 months). Although there have been no local, regional or distant recurrences, the follow-up time is inadequate to assess the therapeutic benefit of this combined modality treatment

  17. Cost-effectiveness of carbon ion radiation therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobaraki, A.; Ohno, Tatsuya; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Yamada Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy compared with conventional multimodality therapy in the treatment of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Direct costs for diagnosis, recurrent treatment, follow-up, visits, supportive therapy, complications, and admission were computed for each individual using a sample of 25 patients presenting with local recurrent rectal cancer at the National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) and Gunma University Hospital (GUH). Patients received only radical surgery for primary rectal adenocarcinoma and had isolated unresectable pelvic recurrence. Fourteen and 11 patients receiving treatment for the local recurrence between 2003 and 2005 were followed retrospectively at NIRS and GUH, respectively. Treatment was carried out with carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) alone at NIRS, while multimodality therapy including three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hyperthermia was performed at GUH. The 2-year overall survival rate was 85% and 55% for CIRT and multimodality treatment, respectively. The mean cost was 4803946 yen for the CIRT group and 4611100 yen for the multimodality treatment group. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for CIRT was 6428 yen per 1% increase in survival. The median duration of total hospitalization was 37 days for CIRT and 66 days for the multimodality treatment group. In conclusion, by calculating all direct costs, CIRT was found to be a potential cost effective treatment modality as compared to multimodality treatment for locally recurrent rectal cancer. (author)

  18. The ways of improvement of combination therapy results in patients with local cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumilo, A.O.

    2010-01-01

    A new solutions of a scientific task of modern oncogynecology, improvement of the efficacy of treatment for local cervical cancer on the account of expansion of the indications to operative treatment is presented on the clinical material (275 patients with stage II-III CC). The use of the developed technique of multimodality therapy based on the split course of combination radiation therapy against a background of neoadjuvant chemotherapy allowed to convert in 49.6% of cases of immobile tumor process to an operable stage followed by uterus and adnexae removal while at the traditional combination radiotherapy the resectability index was 6.9%.

  19. Risk Factors for Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Røhl, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    and underwent external beam radiation therapy with 45 Gy in 25 fractions (node-negative patients) or 50 Gy in 25 fractions with a simultaneous integrated boost of 60 Gy in 30 fractions (node-positive patients). Pulsed dose rate magnetic resonance imaging guided adaptive brachytherapy was given in addition......PURPOSE: To investigate the incidence of and risk factors for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after definitive chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). METHODS AND MATERIALS: We analyzed 101 patients with LACC treated from 2008-2014. Patients received weekly cisplatin...

  20. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located Early Stage or Isolated Parenchymal Recurrences of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: How to Fly in a “No Fly Zone”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Qiao-Qiao; Xu, Qing-Yong; Allen, Pamela K.; Rebueno, Neal; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mehran, Reza; Swisher, Stephen G.; Roth, Jack A. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: We extended our previous experience with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR; 50 Gy in 4 fractions) for centrally located non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); explored the use of 70 Gy in 10 fractions for cases in which dose-volume constraints could not be met with the previous regimen; and suggested modified dose-volume constraints. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based volumetric image-guided SABR was used for 100 patients with biopsy-proven, central T1-T2N0M0 (n=81) or isolated parenchymal recurrence of NSCLC (n=19). All disease was staged with positron emission tomography/CT; all tumors were within 2 cm of the bronchial tree, trachea, major vessels, esophagus, heart, pericardium, brachial plexus, or vertebral body. Endpoints were toxicity, overall survival (OS), local and regional control, and distant metastasis. Results: At a median follow-up time of 30.6 months, median OS time was 55.6 months, and the 3-year OS rate was 70.5%. Three-year cumulative actuarial local, regional, and distant control rates were 96.5%, 87.9%, and 77.2%, respectively. The most common toxicities were chest-wall pain (18% grade 1, 13% grade 2) and radiation pneumonitis (11% grade 2 and 1% grade 3). No patient experienced grade 4 or 5 toxicity. Among the 82 patients receiving 50 Gy in 4 fractions, multivariate analyses showed mean total lung dose >6 Gy, V{sub 20} >12%, or ipsilateral lung V{sub 30} >15% to independently predict radiation pneumonitis; and 3 of 9 patients with brachial plexus D{sub max} >35 Gy experienced brachial neuropathy versus none of 73 patients with brachial D{sub max} <35 Gy (P=.001). Other toxicities were analyzed and new dose-volume constraints are proposed. Conclusions: SABR for centrally located lesions produces clinical outcomes similar to those for peripheral lesions when normal tissue constraints are respected.

  1. TU-EF-210-03: Real-Time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification Using Harmonic Motion Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konofagou, E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound to provide targeted therapy is an active research area that has a broad application scope. The invited talks in this session will address currently implemented strategies and protocols for both hyperthermia and ablation applications using therapeutic ultrasound. The role of both ultrasound and MRI in the monitoring and assessment of these therapies will be explored in both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Katherine Ferrara: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Drug Delivery, and Immunotherapy Rajiv Chopra: Translating Localized Doxorubicin Delivery to Pediatric Oncology using MRI-guided HIFU Elisa Konofagou: Real-time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification using Harmonic Motion Imaging Keyvan Farahani: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy Learning Objectives: Understand the role of ultrasound in localized drug delivery and the effects of immunotherapy when used in conjunction with ultrasound therapy. Understand potential targeted drug delivery clinical applications including pediatric oncology. Understand the technical requirements for performing targeted drug delivery. Understand how radiation-force approaches can be used to both monitor and assess high intensity focused ultrasound ablation therapy. Understand the role of AAPM task groups in ultrasound imaging and therapies. Chopra: Funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Initiative of Texas (CPRIT), Award R1308 Evelyn and M.R. Hudson Foundation; Research Support from Research Contract with Philips Healthcare; COI are Co-founder of FUS Instruments Inc Ferrara: Supported by NIH, UCDavis and California (CIRM and BHCE) Farahani: In-kind research support from Philips Healthcare

  2. TU-EF-210-03: Real-Time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification Using Harmonic Motion Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konofagou, E. [Columbia University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound to provide targeted therapy is an active research area that has a broad application scope. The invited talks in this session will address currently implemented strategies and protocols for both hyperthermia and ablation applications using therapeutic ultrasound. The role of both ultrasound and MRI in the monitoring and assessment of these therapies will be explored in both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Katherine Ferrara: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Drug Delivery, and Immunotherapy Rajiv Chopra: Translating Localized Doxorubicin Delivery to Pediatric Oncology using MRI-guided HIFU Elisa Konofagou: Real-time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification using Harmonic Motion Imaging Keyvan Farahani: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy Learning Objectives: Understand the role of ultrasound in localized drug delivery and the effects of immunotherapy when used in conjunction with ultrasound therapy. Understand potential targeted drug delivery clinical applications including pediatric oncology. Understand the technical requirements for performing targeted drug delivery. Understand how radiation-force approaches can be used to both monitor and assess high intensity focused ultrasound ablation therapy. Understand the role of AAPM task groups in ultrasound imaging and therapies. Chopra: Funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Initiative of Texas (CPRIT), Award R1308 Evelyn and M.R. Hudson Foundation; Research Support from Research Contract with Philips Healthcare; COI are Co-founder of FUS Instruments Inc Ferrara: Supported by NIH, UCDavis and California (CIRM and BHCE) Farahani: In-kind research support from Philips Healthcare.

  3. Adjuvant hormone therapy in patients undergoing high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Neimark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of using the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone leuprorelin with the Atrigel delivery system in doses of 7.5, 22.5, and 45 mg as an adjuvant regimen in high- and moderate-risk cancer patients who have received high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. Moderate- and high-risk locally advanced prostate cancer (PC patients treated with HIFU (n = 28 and HIFU in combination with hormone therapy during 6 months (n = 31 were examined.Results. The investigation has shown that leuprorelin acetate monotherapy used within 6 months after HIFU therapy can achieve the highest reduction in prostate-specific antigen levels and positively affect the symptoms of the disease. HIFU in combination with androgen deprivation substantially diminishes the clinical manifestations of the disease and improves quality of life in HIFU-treated patients with PC, by reducing the degree of infravesical obstruction (according to uroflowmetric findings and IPSS scores, and causes a decrease in prostate volume as compared to those who have undergone HIFU only. Treatment with leuprorelin having the Atrigel delivery system has demonstrated the low incidence of adverse reactions and good tolerability.

  4. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino J.; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment

  5. The role of local estrogen therapy in the management of pelvic floor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzur, T; Yohai, D; Weintraub, A Y

    2016-04-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are common and bothersome problems that include a variety of conditions. These conditions greatly affect the performance of daily activities and social function such as work, traveling, physical exercise, sleep and sexual function. Aging is a well-known factor affecting the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract anatomy and function. It is clear that the pelvic organs and their surrounding muscular and connective tissue support are estrogen-responsive. Treatment of pelvic floor disorders requires significant health-care resources and their impact is likely to increase in the near future. This literature review aims to provide an overview of both research and clinical aspects of the pathophysiology of urogenital estrogen deficiency and the role of local estrogen therapy as part of the management strategy of different pelvic floor disorders. The safety and risk concerns regarding the use of local estrogen therapy are addressed as well.

  6. Targeted therapy for localized non-small-cell lung cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleiron N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas Paleiron,1 Olivier Bylicki,2 Michel André,1 Emilie Rivière,1 Frederic Grassin,1 Gilles Robinet,3 Christos Chouaïd4 On behalf of the GFPC Group 1Chest Department, HIA Clermont Tonnerre, Brest, 2Chest Department, HIA Percy, Clamart, 3Chest Department, CHU de Brest, Brest, 4GRC OncoEst, Université Paris XII, Paris, France Abstract: Targeted therapies have markedly improved the management of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but their efficacy in localized NSCLC is less well established. The aim of this review is to analyze trials of targeted therapies in localized NSCLC. In patients with wild-type EGFR, tyrosine kinase inhibitors have shown no efficacy in Phase III trials. Few data are available for EGFR-mutated localized NSCLC, as routine biological profiling is not recommended. Available studies are small, often retrospectives, and/or conducted in a single-center making it difficult to draw firm conclusions. Ongoing prospective Phase III trials are comparing adjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitor administration versus adjuvant chemotherapy. By analogy with the indication of bevacizumab in advanced NSCLC, use of antiangiogenic agents in the perioperative setting is currently restricted to nonsquamous NSCLC. Several trials of adjuvant or neoadjuvant bevacizumab are planned or ongoing, but for the moment there is no evidence of efficacy. Data on perioperative use of biomarkers in early-stage NSCLC come mainly from small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. Assessment of customized adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy in localized NSCLC (with or without oncogenic driver mutations is a major challenge. Keywords: targeted therapy, non-small-cell lung cancer, adjuvant, neo-adjuvant, surgery 

  7. Radiation therapy in the management of locally advanced and disseminated breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, F.C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation theraoy should be fully used in the management of advanced breast cancer. Locally advanced primary or recurrent carcinoma, with limited extent, should be treated aggressively, aimed at permanent control. Palliative treatment of incurable or metastatic lesions relieves symptoms and improves patient's quality of survival. Some metastatic lesions involving vital structures may create emergencies. Prompt institution of radiation therapy may reverse the serious complication and save the patient's life

  8. Assessment of extensive surgery for locally advanced lung cancer. Safety and efficacy of induction therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Hiroshi; Nakamae, Katsumi; Yamada, Takeshi; Kani, Hisanori; Maemoto, Katsutoshi; Mizuno, Takeo

    1999-01-01

    Locally advanced lung cancer has a poor prognosis, despite extensive surgery conducted in an effort to improve survival. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of induction therapy prior to extensive surgery for locally advanced lung cancer. Primary resection for lung cancer was done in 549 consecutive patients divided into three groups; 446 undergoing standard pulmonary resection (no extensive surgery), 87 undergoing extensive surgery without induction therapy, and 16 undergoing surgery after induction therapy. Morbidity was 23.5%, 28.6%, and 43.8%, respectively. The rate was significantly higher in the induction group compared with the no extensive surgery group (P<0.05). Surgical mortality was 0.67%, 3.4%, and 6.3%, respectively. The difference was statistically significant between the no extensive surgery and extensive surgery groups (P<0.02), and between the no extensive surgery and induction groups (P<0.02). Hospital mortality was 2.2%, 9.2%, and 6.3%, respectively. The rates were significantly higher in the extensive surgery (P<0.01) and induction (P<0.05) groups compared to the no extensive surgery group. Five-year survival was 50.3% for the patients who received induction therapy, and 14.7% for the patients who did not receive induction therapy. Survival differences between the induction and non induction groups were not significant, but some patients with T3 or T4 disease may benefit from induction therapy. The high morbidity of induction treatment should be recognized, and strict candidate selection and careful postoperative care used to help prevent increased mortality. (author)

  9. Monthly rifampicin, ofloxacin, and minocycline therapy for generalized and localized granuloma annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The localized form of granuloma annulare is usually self-limiting, resolving within 2 years. Generalized granuloma annulare, on the other hand, runs a protracted course, with spontaneous resolution being rare. It is also characterized by a later age of onset, an increased incidence of diabetes mellitus, poor response to therapy, and an increased prevalence of HLA Bw35. Objective: To assess the efficacy of monthly pulsed rifampicin, ofloxacin, and minocycline (ROM therapy in the management of granuloma annulare. Methods : Six biopsy proven patients of granuloma annulare were included in the study, five of the generalized variety, and one localized. Three of these patients were resistant to standard modalities of treatment. All six patients were treated with pulses of once monthly ROM till complete resolution of all lesions. Results were analyzed in terms of complete resolution of lesions and side effects. Presence of comorbid conditions was noted. Result: All six patients were successfully treated with 4-8 pulses of monthly ROM. None of the patients reported any adverse effects. Limitations: Small sample size and the lack of a control group are limitations. Conclusion: Treatment with pulses of once monthly ROM caused complete resolution of lesions in both localized and generalized granuloma annulare, even in cases recalcitrant to conventional therapy. There were no side effects in any of the patients. Larger trials are needed to substantiate the efficacy of monthly ROM in granuloma annulare.

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Progressive and Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer after Prior Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Sutera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionPancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive malignancy that has consistently demonstrated poor outcomes despite aggressive treatments. Despite multimodal treatment, local disease progression and local recurrence are common. Management of recurrent or progressive pancreatic carcinomas proves a further challenge. In patients previously treated with radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is a promising modality capable of delivering high dose to the tumor while limiting dose to critical structures. We aimed to determine the feasibility and tolerability of SBRT for recurrent or local pancreatic cancer in patients previously treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT.Materials and methodsPatients treated with EBRT who developed recurrent or local pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with SBRT reirradiation at our institution, from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed. Our primary endpoints included overall survival (OS, local control, regional control, and late grade 3+ radiation toxicity. Endpoints were analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method. The association of these survival endpoints with risk factors was studied with univariate Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsWe identified 38 patients with recurrent/progressive pancreatic cancer treated with SBRT following prior radiation therapy. Prior radiation was delivered to a median dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. SBRT was delivered to a median dose of 24.5 Gy in 1–3 fractions. Surgical resection was performed on 55.3% of all patients. Within a median follow-up of 24.4 months (inter-quartile range, 14.9–32.7 months, the median OS from diagnosis for the entire cohort was 26.6 months (95% CI: 20.3–29.8 with 2-year OS of 53.0%. Median survival from SBRT was 9.7 months (95% CI, 5.5–13.8. The 2-year freedom from local progression and regional progression was 58 and 82%, respectively. For the entire cohort, 18.4 and 10.5% experienced late grade 2

  11. Local Control With 21-Gy Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Dana L.; Kushner, Brian H.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Modak, Shakeel; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control after 21-Gy radiation therapy (RT) to the primary site in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Methods and Materials: After receiving dose-intensive chemotherapy and gross total resection (GTR), 246 patients (aged 1.2-17.9 years, median 4.0 years) with high-risk neuroblastoma underwent RT to the primary site at Memorial Sloan Kettering from 2000 to 2014. Radiation therapy consisted of 21 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy each. Local failure (LF) was correlated with biologic prognostic factors and clinical findings at the time of diagnosis and start of RT. Results: Median follow-up of surviving patients was 6.4 years. Cumulative incidence of LF was 7.1% at 2 years after RT and 9.8% at 5 years after RT. The isolated LF rate was 3.0%. Eighty-six percent of all local failures were within the RT field. Local control was worse in patients who required more than 1 surgical resection to achieve GTR (22.4% vs 8.3%, P=.01). There was also a trend toward inferior local control with MYCN-amplified tumors or serum lactate dehydrogenase ≥1500 U/L (P=.09 and P=.06, respectively). Conclusion: After intensive chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking, hyperfractionated RT with 21 Gy in high-risk neuroblastoma results in excellent local control. Given the young patient age, concern for late effects, and local control >90%, dose reduction may be appropriate for patients without MYCN amplification who achieve GTR.

  12. Local Control With 21-Gy Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Dana L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Modak, Shakeel [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control after 21-Gy radiation therapy (RT) to the primary site in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Methods and Materials: After receiving dose-intensive chemotherapy and gross total resection (GTR), 246 patients (aged 1.2-17.9 years, median 4.0 years) with high-risk neuroblastoma underwent RT to the primary site at Memorial Sloan Kettering from 2000 to 2014. Radiation therapy consisted of 21 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy each. Local failure (LF) was correlated with biologic prognostic factors and clinical findings at the time of diagnosis and start of RT. Results: Median follow-up of surviving patients was 6.4 years. Cumulative incidence of LF was 7.1% at 2 years after RT and 9.8% at 5 years after RT. The isolated LF rate was 3.0%. Eighty-six percent of all local failures were within the RT field. Local control was worse in patients who required more than 1 surgical resection to achieve GTR (22.4% vs 8.3%, P=.01). There was also a trend toward inferior local control with MYCN-amplified tumors or serum lactate dehydrogenase ≥1500 U/L (P=.09 and P=.06, respectively). Conclusion: After intensive chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking, hyperfractionated RT with 21 Gy in high-risk neuroblastoma results in excellent local control. Given the young patient age, concern for late effects, and local control >90%, dose reduction may be appropriate for patients without MYCN amplification who achieve GTR.

  13. Local superficial hyperthermia in combination with low-dose radiation therapy for palliation of superficially localized metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owczarek, G.; Miszczyk, L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to evaluate the response of superficially located metastases and local toxicity to microwave hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy. From May 2003 through December 2004 58 patients (33 male, 25 female; mean age 60 years) with lymph nodes or skin metastases were treated with microwave superficial hyperthermia combined with low-dose radiation therapy. Hyperthermia was administered twice weekly with high frequency applicator (∼900 Mhz) with water bolus. The temperature was set to 43 o C for 45 minutes. Radiotherapy was performed daily with dose 2 Gy or 4 Gy per fraction, to a total dose 20 Gy. There were 47 patients with carcinoma, 4 with sarcoma, 7 with melanoma. Treated regions were: head and neck (37 patients), chest wall 8, abdomen wall and groins 4, upper and lower limb 2 and 8 patients respectively. Primary tumor sites were: head and neck region (9 patients), lung 15, alimentary tract 8, breast 5, soft tissue 8, urogenital 4 and 9 patients with primary tumor site unknown. The toxicity was evaluated using 6 step scale: 0-no skin reaction, 1-faint red mark, 2-distinct red mark, 3-blisters, 4-brown mark, 5-necrosis. Presence of pain and its intensity were also analyzed. Diameter of tumor after the treatment was observed. Complete response was achieved in 5 patients (8.5 %), and partial response in 29 patients (50 %), no response was observed in 12 patients (20 %) and progression of tumor in 7 patients (12 %). No skin reaction was observed in 3 patients, faint red mark in 14 patients, distinct red mark in 28 patients, blisters in 8 patients, brown mark in 4 patients and necrosis in 1 patient. The pain occurred in 9 patients but it was no the cause of stopping treatment. Local superficial hyperthermia combined with low-dose radiation therapy is an effective method of treatment in a proportion of patients with superficial metastases. This combination of treatment modalities is well tolerated and is useful for palliation

  14. Gleason Pattern 5 Is the Greatest Risk Factor for Clinical Failure and Death From Prostate Cancer After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Hormonal Ablation

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    Sabolch, Aaron [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Daignault-Newton, Stephanie [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Division of Biostatistics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Phelps, Laura [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Olson, Karin B. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The division of Gleason score (GS) into three categories (2-6, 7, 8-10) may not fully use its prognostic power, as revealed by recent reports demonstrating the presence of Gleason Pattern 5 (GP5) as a strong predictor for biochemical recurrence. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical outcomes in patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) based on the presence or absence of GP5. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 718 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external-beam RT to a minimum planning target volume dose of at least 75 Gy. We assessed the impact of GP5 and that of pretreatment- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: At biopsy, 89% of patients had no GP5, and 11% (76/718) had GP5. There were no differences in age, comorbid illness, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, or the use or duration of androgen deprivation therapy between GS8 without GP5 and GS8-10 with GP5. The presence of GP5 predicted lower FFM (p < 0.002; hazard ratio [HR] 3.4 [1.7-7.1]); CSS (p < 0.0001; HR 12.9 [5.4-31]); and OS (p < 0.0001; HR 3.6 [2.0-6.5]) in comparison with GS8 (without GP5). The 8-year FFM, CSS, and OS were 89%, 98%, and 57%, respectively, for those with Gleason 8 prostate cancer without GP5 in comparison with 61%, 55%, and 31%, respectively, for those with GP5. In addition, both FFM and CSS were strongly influenced by androgen deprivation therapy given concurrently with RT. On multivariate analysis, GP5 was the strongest prognostic factor for all clinical endpoints, including OS. Conclusion: The presence of GP5 predicts for worse clinical behavior, which therefore needs to be accounted for by risk stratification schemes. Further intensification of local and/or systemic therapy may be appropriate for such patients.

  15. Gleason Pattern 5 Is the Greatest Risk Factor for Clinical Failure and Death From Prostate Cancer After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Hormonal Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Felix Y.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Phelps, Laura; Olson, Karin B.; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The division of Gleason score (GS) into three categories (2–6, 7, 8–10) may not fully use its prognostic power, as revealed by recent reports demonstrating the presence of Gleason Pattern 5 (GP5) as a strong predictor for biochemical recurrence. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical outcomes in patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) based on the presence or absence of GP5. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 718 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external-beam RT to a minimum planning target volume dose of at least 75 Gy. We assessed the impact of GP5 and that of pretreatment- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: At biopsy, 89% of patients had no GP5, and 11% (76/718) had GP5. There were no differences in age, comorbid illness, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, or the use or duration of androgen deprivation therapy between GS8 without GP5 and GS8–10 with GP5. The presence of GP5 predicted lower FFM (p < 0.002; hazard ratio [HR] 3.4 [1.7–7.1]); CSS (p < 0.0001; HR 12.9 [5.4-31]); and OS (p < 0.0001; HR 3.6 [2.0-6.5]) in comparison with GS8 (without GP5). The 8-year FFM, CSS, and OS were 89%, 98%, and 57%, respectively, for those with Gleason 8 prostate cancer without GP5 in comparison with 61%, 55%, and 31%, respectively, for those with GP5. In addition, both FFM and CSS were strongly influenced by androgen deprivation therapy given concurrently with RT. On multivariate analysis, GP5 was the strongest prognostic factor for all clinical endpoints, including OS. Conclusion: The presence of GP5 predicts for worse clinical behavior, which therefore needs to be accounted for by risk stratification schemes. Further intensification of local and/or systemic therapy may be appropriate for such patients.

  16. Effect of ablatant composition on the ablation of a fuelling pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.T.; Thomsen, K.; Piret, S.

    1988-01-01

    The single species neutral-shielding model for the ablation of a hydrogenic pellet is extended by considering the ablatant as a mixture of four species: molecular and atomic hydrogen, protons and electrons. Compared with the results of the frozen flow, (i.e. the single species molecular hydrogen gas model), results of the analysis showed that the presence of dissociation and ionization effects caused a marked difference of the ablatant state. The attenuations of the incoming electron energy and energy flux, however, are very much similar irrespective of whether the ablated flow is in a frozen or an equilibrium state. The scaling law of the pellet ablation rate with respect to the plasma state of Te, ne and the pellet radius remains the same; the ablation rate is reduced by approximately 15%. To examine the possible existence of a spherical shell around the pellet where most of the incoming electron energy is absorbed, acodmparison is made between the local electron collisional mean free path and the electron Larmor radius. A critical field at the ionization radius is evaluated. An effective spherical energyabsorbing region exists when the local field strength is below the critical value. For a plasma state of low Te and ne, (where the ablatant is hardly ionized), and for one near the thermonuclear condition (where a highly dense ablatant exists near the pellet), the effective energy absorption region is nearly spherical. 20 refs. (author)

  17. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  18. The role of metastasis-directed therapy and local therapy of the primary tumor in the management of oligometastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongchan; Park, Jee Soo; Ham, Won Sik

    2017-09-01

    Oligometastasis has been proposed as an intermediate stage of cancer spread between localized disease and widespread metastasis. Oligometastatic malignancy is now being diagnosed more frequently as the result of improvements in diagnostic modalities such as functional imaging. The importance of oligometastasis in managing metastatic prostate cancer is that it is possible to treat with a curative aim by metastasis-directed or local therapy in selected patients. Many studies have shown that these aggressive treatments lead to improved survival in other oligometastatic malignancies. However, few studies have shown definitive benefits of metastasis-directed or local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer. Review of the available studies suggests that stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) of metastatic lesions in oligorecurrent disease is a feasible and safe modality for managing oligometastatic prostate cancer. Also, stereotactic RT can delay the start of androgen deprivation therapy. Many retrospective studies of metastatic prostate cancer have shown that patients undergoing local therapy seem to have superior overall and cancer-specific survival compared with patients not receiving local therapy. Ongoing prospective randomized trials would be helpful to evaluate the role of local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer.

  19. The role of metastasis-directed therapy and local therapy of the primary tumor in the management of oligometastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongchan Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligometastasis has been proposed as an intermediate stage of cancer spread between localized disease and widespread metas-tasis. Oligometastatic malignancy is now being diagnosed more frequently as the result of improvements in diagnostic modalities such as functional imaging. The importance of oligometastasis in managing metastatic prostate cancer is that it is possible to treat with a curative aim by metastasis-directed or local therapy in selected patients. Many studies have shown that these aggressive treatments lead to improved survival in other oligometastatic malignancies. However, few studies have shown definitive benefits of metastasis-directed or local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer. Review of the available studies suggests that stereotac-tic radiotherapy (RT of metastatic lesions in oligorecurrent disease is a feasible and safe modality for managing oligometastatic prostate cancer. Also, stereotactic RT can delay the start of androgen deprivation therapy. Many retrospective studies of metastatic prostate cancer have shown that patients undergoing local therapy seem to have superior overall and cancer-specific survival compared with patients not receiving local therapy. Ongoing prospective randomized trials would be helpful to evaluate the role of local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer.

  20. Local Failure in Resected N1 Lung Cancer: Implications for Adjuvant Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, Kristin A.; Chino, Junzo P.; Berry, Mark; Ready, Neal; Boyd, Jessamy; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate actuarial rates of local failure in patients with pathologic N1 non–small-cell lung cancer and to identify clinical and pathologic factors associated with an increased risk of local failure after resection. Methods and Materials: All patients who underwent surgery for non–small-cell lung cancer with pathologically confirmed N1 disease at Duke University Medical Center from 1995–2008 were identified. Patients receiving any preoperative therapy or postoperative radiotherapy or with positive surgical margins were excluded. Local failure was defined as disease recurrence within the ipsilateral hilum, mediastinum, or bronchial stump/staple line. Actuarial rates of local failure were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox multivariate analysis was used to identify factors independently associated with a higher risk of local recurrence. Results: Among 1,559 patients who underwent surgery during the time interval, 198 met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 50 (25%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Actuarial (5-year) rates of local failure, distant failure, and overall survival were 40%, 55%, and 33%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of local failure included a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach (hazard ratio [HR], 2.5; p = 0.01), visceral pleural invasion (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04), and increasing number of positive N1 lymph nodes (HR, 1.3 per involved lymph node; p = 0.02). Chemotherapy was associated with a trend toward decreased risk of local failure that was not statistically significant (HR, 0.61; p = 0.2). Conclusions: Actuarial rates of local failure in pN1 disease are high. Further investigation of conformal postoperative radiotherapy may be warranted.

  1. Local Failure in Resected N1 Lung Cancer: Implications for Adjuvant Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Berry, Mark [Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Ready, Neal [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Boyd, Jessamy [US Oncology, Dallas, TX (United States); Yoo, David S; Kelsey, Chris R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate actuarial rates of local failure in patients with pathologic N1 non-small-cell lung cancer and to identify clinical and pathologic factors associated with an increased risk of local failure after resection. Methods and Materials: All patients who underwent surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer with pathologically confirmed N1 disease at Duke University Medical Center from 1995-2008 were identified. Patients receiving any preoperative therapy or postoperative radiotherapy or with positive surgical margins were excluded. Local failure was defined as disease recurrence within the ipsilateral hilum, mediastinum, or bronchial stump/staple line. Actuarial rates of local failure were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox multivariate analysis was used to identify factors independently associated with a higher risk of local recurrence. Results: Among 1,559 patients who underwent surgery during the time interval, 198 met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 50 (25%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Actuarial (5-year) rates of local failure, distant failure, and overall survival were 40%, 55%, and 33%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of local failure included a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach (hazard ratio [HR], 2.5; p = 0.01), visceral pleural invasion (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04), and increasing number of positive N1 lymph nodes (HR, 1.3 per involved lymph node; p = 0.02). Chemotherapy was associated with a trend toward decreased risk of local failure that was not statistically significant (HR, 0.61; p = 0.2). Conclusions: Actuarial rates of local failure in pN1 disease are high. Further investigation of conformal postoperative radiotherapy may be warranted.

  2. Bipolar radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases during laparotomy. First clinical experiences with a new multipolar ablation concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Joerg-Peter; Lehmann, Kai S; Reissfelder, Christoph; Albrecht, Thomas; Frericks, Bernd; Zurbuchen, Urte; Buhr, Heinz J

    2006-01-01

    radiofrequency using the novel multipolar ablation concept permits a safe and effective therapy for the induction of large volumes of coagulation in the local treatment of liver metastases.

  3. Local Recurrence After Uveal Melanoma Proton Beam Therapy: Recurrence Types and Prognostic Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caujolle, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: ncaujolle@aol.com [Department of Ophthalmology, Saint Roch Hospital, Nice Teaching Hospital, Nice (France); Paoli, Vincent [Department of Ophthalmology, Saint Roch Hospital, Nice Teaching Hospital, Nice (France); Chamorey, Emmanuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Protontherapy Center, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Maschi, Celia; Baillif, Stéphanie [Department of Ophthalmology, Saint Roch Hospital, Nice Teaching Hospital, Nice (France); Herault, Joël [Department of Radiation Oncology, Protontherapy Center, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Gastaud, Pierre [Department of Ophthalmology, Saint Roch Hospital, Nice Teaching Hospital, Nice (France); Hannoun-Levi, Jean Michel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Protontherapy Center, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To study the prognosis of the different types of uveal melanoma recurrences treated by proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 61 cases of uveal melanoma local recurrences on a total of 1102 patients treated by PBT between June 1991 and December 2010. Survival rates have been determined by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Prognostic factors have been evaluated by using log-rank test or Cox model. Results: Our local recurrence rate was 6.1% at 5 years. These recurrences were divided into 25 patients with marginal recurrences, 18 global recurrences, 12 distant recurrences, and 6 extrascleral extensions. Five factors have been identified as statistically significant risk factors of local recurrence in the univariate analysis: large tumoral diameter, small tumoral volume, low ratio of tumoral volume over eyeball volume, iris root involvement, and safety margin inferior to 1 mm. In the local recurrence-free population, the overall survival rate was 68.7% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 83.6% at 10 years. In the local recurrence population, the overall survival rate was 43.1% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 55% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis of death risk factors has shown a better prognosis for marginal recurrences. Conclusion: Survival rate of marginal recurrences is superior to that of the other recurrences. The type of recurrence is a clinical prognostic value to take into account. The influence of local recurrence retreatment by proton beam therapy should be evaluated by novel studies.

  4. Local Recurrence After Uveal Melanoma Proton Beam Therapy: Recurrence Types and Prognostic Consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caujolle, Jean-Pierre; Paoli, Vincent; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Maschi, Celia; Baillif, Stéphanie; Herault, Joël; Gastaud, Pierre; Hannoun-Levi, Jean Michel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To study the prognosis of the different types of uveal melanoma recurrences treated by proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 61 cases of uveal melanoma local recurrences on a total of 1102 patients treated by PBT between June 1991 and December 2010. Survival rates have been determined by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Prognostic factors have been evaluated by using log-rank test or Cox model. Results: Our local recurrence rate was 6.1% at 5 years. These recurrences were divided into 25 patients with marginal recurrences, 18 global recurrences, 12 distant recurrences, and 6 extrascleral extensions. Five factors have been identified as statistically significant risk factors of local recurrence in the univariate analysis: large tumoral diameter, small tumoral volume, low ratio of tumoral volume over eyeball volume, iris root involvement, and safety margin inferior to 1 mm. In the local recurrence-free population, the overall survival rate was 68.7% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 83.6% at 10 years. In the local recurrence population, the overall survival rate was 43.1% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 55% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis of death risk factors has shown a better prognosis for marginal recurrences. Conclusion: Survival rate of marginal recurrences is superior to that of the other recurrences. The type of recurrence is a clinical prognostic value to take into account. The influence of local recurrence retreatment by proton beam therapy should be evaluated by novel studies

  5. Morbidity and mortality of local failure after definitive therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellhammer, P.F.; Whitmore, R.B. III; Kuban, D.A.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Ladaga, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    We reviewed our experience with morbidity and mortality associated with clinical local failure after definitive therapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate by interstitial 125-iodine implantation, external beam radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. Morbid complications included unilateral ureteral obstruction; bladder obstruction and/or incontinence requiring treatment by transurethral resection, or placement of a urethral or suprapubic catheter; hematuria requiring intervention for clot evacuation or fulguration, and perineal and/or pelvic pain. Lethal complications included bilateral ureteral obstruction or bowel obstruction. We treated 108 patients with 125-iodine, 178 with external beam radiotherapy and 67 with radical prostatectomy. Clinical local failure occurred in 26 per cent of the 125-iodine, 17 per cent of the external beam radiotherapy and 12 per cent of the radical prostatectomy groups. The total incidence of local failure with 125-iodine was statistically higher than for radical prostatectomy. Stage C and poorly differentiated tumors were associated with a statistically higher incidence of local failure compared to lower stage and grade tumors. However, within each stage and grade there was no significant difference in local failure between treatment modalities. There was negligible morbidity or mortality secondary to local failure associated with stage A2, stage B1 or well differentiated tumors regardless of treatment modality. There was no difference in the morbidity and mortality between treatment modalities for stage C or poorly differentiated tumors. However, for stage B2 or moderately differentiated tumors treated by 125-iodine implantation there was a statistically greater incidence of morbidity and mortality than that associated with external beam radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy

  6. Pulmonary venous thrombosis secondary to radiofrequency ablation of the pulmonary veins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel López-Reyes

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary Vein Thrombosis (PVT is a rare and underdiagnosed entity produced by local mechanical nature mechanisms, vascular torsion or direct injury to the vein. PVT has been described in clinical cases or small multicenter series mainly in relation to pulmonary vein stenosis, metastatic carcinoma, fibrosing mediastinitis, as an early surgical complication of lung transplantation lobectomy and radiofrequency ablation performed in patients with atrial fibrillation, although in some cases the cause is not known. Case: We report the case of a 57 years old male with history of atrial fibrillation treated by radiofrequency ablation who was admitted in our center because of a two-week history of consistent pleuritic pain in the left hemithorax and low-grade hemoptysis and a lung consolidation treated as a pneumonia with antibiotic but not responding to medical therapy. In view of the poor evolution of the patient, computed tomography angiography was performed with findings of PVT and secondary venous infarction and anticoagulation therapy was optimized. At the end, pulmonary resection was performed due to hemorrhagic recurrence. Conclusion: PVT remains a rare complication of radiofrequency ablation and other procedures involving pulmonary veins. Clinical suspicion and early diagnosis is crucial because is a potentially life-threatening entity. Keywords: Venous thrombosis, Atrial fibrilation, Radiofrequency ablation, Hemoptysis, Lung consolidation, Lung infarction, Lung resection surgery

  7. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias originating from intramural foci in the left ventricular outflow tract: efficacy of sequential versus simultaneous unipolar catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takumi; Maddox, William R; McElderry, H Thomas; Doppalapudi, Harish; Plumb, Vance J; Kay, G Neal

    2015-04-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) originating from the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) sometimes require catheter ablation from the endocardial and epicardial sides for their elimination, suggesting the presence of intramural VA foci. This study investigated the efficacy of sequential and simultaneous unipolar radiofrequency catheter ablation from the endocardial and epicardial sides in treating intramural LVOT VAs. Fourteen consecutive LVOT VAs, which required sequential or simultaneous irrigated unipolar radiofrequency ablation from the endocardial and epicardial sides for their elimination, were studied. The first ablation was performed at the site with the earliest local ventricular activation and best pace map on the endocardial or epicardial side. When the first ablation was unsuccessful, the second ablation was delivered on the other surface. If this sequential unipolar ablation failed, simultaneous unipolar ablation from both sides was performed. The first ablation was performed on the epicardial side in 9 VAs and endocardial side in 5 VAs. The intramural LVOT VAs were successfully eliminated by the sequential (n=9) or simultaneous (n=5) unipolar catheter ablation. Simultaneous ablation was most likely to be required for the elimination of the VAs when the distance between the endocardial and epicardial ablation sites was >8 mm and the earliest local ventricular activation time relative to the QRS onset during the VAs of sequential unipolar radiofrequency ablation and sometimes required simultaneous ablation from both the endocardial and epicardial sides. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Systemic sclerosis and localized scleroderma--current concepts and novel targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distler, Oliver; Cozzio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic autoimmune disease with a high morbidity and mortality. Skin and organ fibrosis are key manifestations of SSc, for which no generally accepted therapy is available. Thus, there is a high unmet need for novel anti-fibrotic therapeutic strategies in SSc. At the same time, important progress has been made in the identification and characterization of potential molecular targets in fibrotic diseases over the recent years. In this review, we have selected four targeted therapies, which are tested in clinical trials in SSc, for in depths discussion of their preclinical characterization. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulators such as riociguat might target both vascular remodeling and tissue fibrosis. Blockade of interleukin-6 might be particularly promising for early inflammatory stages of SSc. Inhibition of serotonin receptor 2b signaling links platelet activation to tissue fibrosis. Targeting simultaneously multiple key molecules with the multityrosine kinase-inhibitor nintedanib might be a promising approach in complex fibrotic diseases such as SSc, in which many partially independent pathways are activated. Herein, we also give a state of the art overview of the current classification, clinical presentation, diagnostic approach, and treatment options of localized scleroderma. Finally, we discuss whether the novel targeted therapies currently tested in SSc could be used for localized scleroderma.

  9. WE-EF-BRA-12: Magnetic Resonance- Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Localized Ablation of Head and Neck Tissue Structures: A Feasibility Study in An Animal Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partanen, A; Ellens, N; Noureldine, S; Tufano, R; Burdette, E; Farahani, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is feasible in the head and neck [1]. This study aims to expand upon these findings to assess the feasibility of treatment planning and monitoring via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance using a clinical MR-guided HIFU platform. Methods: Two 31 kg pigs were anaesthetized, shaved, and positioned prone on the HIFU table (Sonalleve, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland). The necks were acoustically coupled to the integrated transducer using gel pads and degassed water. MR imaging verified acoustic coupling and facilitated target selection in the thyroid and thymus. Targets were thermally ablated with 130–200 W of acoustic power over a period of 16 s at a frequency of 1.2 MHz while being monitored through real-time, multi-planar MR-thermometry. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was used to assess treatment efficacy. Post-treatment, animals were euthanized and sonicated tissues were harvested for histology assessment. Results: MR-thermometry, post-contrast-imaging, and gross pathology demonstrated that the system was capable of causing localized thermal ablation in both the thyroid and the thymus without damaging the aerodigestive tract. In one animal, superficial bruising was observed in the ultrasound beam path. Otherwise, there were no adverse events. Analysis of the tissue histology found regions of damage consistent with acute thermal injury at the targeted locations. Conclusion: It is feasible to use a clinical MR-guided HIFU platform for extracorporeal ablation of porcine head and neck tissues. MR guidance and thermometry are sufficient to target and monitor treatment in the thyroid region, despite the presence of the inhomogeneous aerodigestive tract. Further study is necessary to assess efficacy and survival using a tumor model, and to examine what modifications should be made to the transducer positioning system and associated patient positioning aids to adapt it for clinical head and neck targets

  10. Adjuvant therapy for locally advanced renal cell cancer: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Carmen SP

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adjuvant trials have been undertaken in an attempt to reduce the risk of recurrence among patients who undergo surgical resection for locally advanced renal cancer. However, no clear benefit has been identified to date. This systematic review was conducted to examine the exact role of adjuvant therapy in renal cancer setting. Methods Randomized controlled trials were searched comparing adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy, vaccine, immunotherapy, biochemotherapy versus no active treatment after surgery among renal cell cancer patients. Outcomes were overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, and severe toxicities. Risk ratios (RR, hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was measured by I2. Different strategies of adjuvant treatment were evaluated separately. Results Ten studies (2,609 patients were included. Adjuvant therapy provided no benefits in terms of OS (HR 1.07; 95%CI 0.89 to 1.28; P = 0.48 I2 = 0% or DFS (HR 1.03; 95%CI 0.87 to 1.21; P = 0.77 I2 = 15% when compared to no treatment. No subgroup analysis (immunotherapy, vaccines, biochemotherapy and hormone therapy had relevant results. Toxicity evaluation depicted a significantly higher frequency of serious adverse events in the adjuvant group. Conclusions This analysis provided no support for the hypothesis that the agents studied provide any clinical benefit for renal cancer patients although they increase the risk of toxic effects. Randomized trials are underway to test targeted therapies, which might open a new therapeutic frontier. Until these trials yield results, no adjuvant therapy can be recommended for patients who undergo surgical resection for renal cell cancer.

  11. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms; Perkutane Thermoablation von Nierentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, J. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Passau (Germany); Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  12. Delayed postoperative radiation therapy in local control of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amar, Ali; Chedid, Helma Maria; Curioni, Otavio Alberto; Rapoport, Abrao, E-mail: arapoport@uol.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dedivitis, Rogerio Aparecido; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Brandao, Lenine Garcia [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao aulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Objective: to evaluate the effect of time between surgery and postoperative radiation therapy on local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Methods: a total of 154 patients treated between 1996 and 2007 were selected considering local recurrence rate and time of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Results: local recurrence was diagnosed in 54 (35%) patients. Radiation therapy reduced the rate of local recurrences, although with no statistical significance. The time between surgery and initiation of postoperative radiotherapy did not significantly influence the risk of local recurrence in patients referred to adjuvant treatment (p=0.49). Conclusion: in the presence of risk factors for local recurrence, a short delay in starting the adjuvant radiation therapy does not contraindicate its performance. (author)

  13. Therapy: a new nonsurgical therapy option for benign thyroid nodules?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing implementation of iodization programs, benign nodular thyroid disease will remain a prevalent therapeutic concern for decades. recent research suggests that nonsurgical therapy, including radioactive iodine, radiofrequency thermal ablation and percutaneous laser ablation, m...

  14. Local reactions to radioiodine in the treatment of thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmeister, L.A.; du Cret, R.P.; Mariash, C.N. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the rate of local complications resulting from radioiodine ablation of thyroid cancer in patients with a residual intact thyroid lobe to that in patients who had more extensive surgical treatment prior to radioiodine administration. We retrospectively studied 59 patients who had received 131I between 1979 and 1989. The patients were divided into two groups, depending on the extent of their previous surgical thyroid excision. Group 1 comprised 10 patients with a lobectomy or hemithyroidectomy before the ablative radioiodine dose, and Group 2 comprised 49 patients with more extensive thyroid excision (near-total or subtotal thyroidectomy) before the radioiodine treatment. Sixty percent of the 10 patients in Group 1 experienced some degree of neck pain or tenderness following radioiodine ablation of their residual thyroid. In one case, the local reaction was very severe and accompanied by the development of transient hyperthyroidism. There was only a 6% local complication rate in the patients who had undergone more extensive thyroid excision before ablative therapy (p less than 0.001), and none had a severe reaction. Patients with only unilateral surgical excision before radioiodine therapy have a higher rate of local complications than do patients treated with more extensive surgery prior to radioiodine ablation. If radioiodine is to be employed in such patients, they should be informed of this possible complication. Since evidence supports a dose effect in the pathogenesis of the complications, we recommend using a dose of less than 30 mCi for the initial ablation in these patients even though it may be necessary to repeat this dose to complete thyroid ablation.

  15. Local reactions to radioiodine in the treatment of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmeister, L.A.; du Cret, R.P.; Mariash, C.N.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the rate of local complications resulting from radioiodine ablation of thyroid cancer in patients with a residual intact thyroid lobe to that in patients who had more extensive surgical treatment prior to radioiodine administration. We retrospectively studied 59 patients who had received 131I between 1979 and 1989. The patients were divided into two groups, depending on the extent of their previous surgical thyroid excision. Group 1 comprised 10 patients with a lobectomy or hemithyroidectomy before the ablative radioiodine dose, and Group 2 comprised 49 patients with more extensive thyroid excision (near-total or subtotal thyroidectomy) before the radioiodine treatment. Sixty percent of the 10 patients in Group 1 experienced some degree of neck pain or tenderness following radioiodine ablation of their residual thyroid. In one case, the local reaction was very severe and accompanied by the development of transient hyperthyroidism. There was only a 6% local complication rate in the patients who had undergone more extensive thyroid excision before ablative therapy (p less than 0.001), and none had a severe reaction. Patients with only unilateral surgical excision before radioiodine therapy have a higher rate of local complications than do patients treated with more extensive surgery prior to radioiodine ablation. If radioiodine is to be employed in such patients, they should be informed of this possible complication. Since evidence supports a dose effect in the pathogenesis of the complications, we recommend using a dose of less than 30 mCi for the initial ablation in these patients even though it may be necessary to repeat this dose to complete thyroid ablation

  16. Current trends in local antibacterial therapy of periprosthetic infection and osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Bozhkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rational use of antibiotics in the treatment of orthopedic infection still presents a significant problem. Local antibiotic delivery systems enable to achieve effective concentrations of drugs in the focus of bone infection without the development of toxicity. It is the important accompaniment to systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periprosthetic infection and osteomyelitis. The data collected through the PubMed and eLIBRARY databases (http://www.ncbi.nlm. nih.gov/pubmed, 1995-2015; http://elibrary.ru, 2005-2015 years present the information about bone substitutes used for local antibiotic therapy in scientific investigations and in clinical practice. The information is submitted in accordance with the groups of materials: cements based on polymethylmethacrylate, bone grafts, demineralized bone matrix, bioceramics, natural and synthetic polymers, combined antibiotic delivery systems. The majority of these materials have only been studied experimentally and only a limited range of them is registered for use in clinical practice. Informing orthopedic surgeons about current methods of local antibiotic use is the key to the development of a modern integrated approach to the therapy of infectious complications after orthopedic surgery.

  17. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa; Rebueno, Neal C.; Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin A.; Amini, Behrang; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Li, Jing; Chang, Eric L.; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  18. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rebueno, Neal C. [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin A. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Amini, Behrang [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tannir, Nizar M. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D. [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, USC Norris Cancer Hospital, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ghia, Amol J., E-mail: ajghia@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  19. Vocal cord paralysis following I-131 ablation of a postthyroidectomy remnant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.C.; Harbert, J.C.; Dejter, S.W.; Mariner, D.R.; VanDam, J.

    1985-01-01

    Vocal cord paralysis has been reported following I-131 therapy of thyrotoxicosis and following ablation of the whole thryoid. However, this rare complication has not previously been described following I-131 ablation of a postthyroidectomy remnant. The authors report a patient who required tracheostomy for bilateral vocal cord paralysis following I-131 ablation after near-total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma

  20. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mansfield, Paul F. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92–1.01). The median V 30 (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V 20 (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V 40 (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate pathologic

  2. [The influence of drug liberation from drug forms on local therapy of infected bone cavities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süss, W; Wehr, M

    1984-09-01

    With regard to an optimum local pharmaco-therapy in infected bone cavities, in vitro examinations by means of a flow model based on the half-change method had been performed to liberate Gentamycin from globular embeddings in polymethylmethacrylate. The Gentamycin had been determined in a micro-biological manner. The release behaviour of the polymere carrier could be controlled by adding Polyethylenglycol 400 as softener or butane dioldimethacrylate as wettener. Adding 20 vol.-% of Polyethylenglycol 400, the Gentamycin release could be increased to the 8-fold, whereas the addition of 5 vol.-% of butane dioldimethacrylate resulted in a decrease amounting to 7/8 exit value.

  3. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  4. Efficacy of 131I SPECT/CT in the initial nodal staging in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma at the first ablative radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisiel, N.; Garcia-Burillo, A.; Barios, M.; Dellepiane, F.; Castell-Conesa, J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Background: after the first radioiodine ablative dose, planar Whole-Body Scanning (WBS) offers the possibility for detecting thyroid remnant, loco-regional node involvement and distant metastases. Nevertheless, available anatomic information is scarce and the high activity of thyroid remnants can interfere with the detection of cervical lymphatic nodes. Objective: to determine the additional value of the SPECT-CT over planar WBS, performed seven days after ablative treatment with 131 I, in patients who were operated on for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC). Methods: from January 2009 to December 2012, 132 patients with DTC were admitted for radio-ablation with 131 I after thyroidectomy. All of them underwent WBS seven days after ablation, and 91 had an additional SPECT-CT, 71 women and 20 men, with ages ranged from 15 to 89 years (mean, age 54 years). All patients had histological confirmed DTC (73 papillary, 17 follicular -2 cases with double tumour, papillary and follicular-, and 1 insular type). In addition to the thyroidectomy, lymph node dissection was performed in 54 patients (59%): 20 patients were classified as N0 and 29 as N1. The remaining 42 patients were classified as Nx. Planar and tomographic images were independently evaluated by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Results: 195 cervical focal uptake were observed in the 91 planar WBSs. No additional foci were observed in SPECT-CT. Findings: Planar WBS........... SPECT-CT........... Number of Foci Thyroid remnant...... Thyroid remnant..........51........... LNM...........0 Indeterminate.......... Thyroid remnant..........84............. LNM............5 LNM............ Thyroid remnant.........12............ Indeterminate.............0............ LNM..........43. Total Number of Foci............. 195. Compared to the nodal staging prior to ablation based on the histopathological diagnosis, we had an upstaging from N0 to N1 in 4 of 20 patients and from Nx to

  5. 射频消融治疗增生性瘢痕的疗效观察%Radiofrequency ablation therapy for patholo gical scar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丽萍; 王兴林; 张冷; 毕胜; 林碧文

    2014-01-01

    目的:评估射频消融治疗增生性瘢痕的临床疗效。方法选择病史在1年以上,瘢痕处于成熟期,病情稳定的增生性瘢痕患者共36例。每例选择两处瘢痕相似的部位,进行自身对照。治疗组采用射频消融祛除瘢痕;对照组不做处理。采用温哥华瘢痕量表于术后6个月和12个月对瘢痕进行评分。结果在射频消融治疗后6个月、12个月治疗组与对照组的温哥华瘢痕评分结果差异均有显著性意义(P<0.05),治疗组经射频消融治疗后,瘢痕的颜色、厚度、柔软度都得到了显著改善。结论射频消融治疗增生性瘢痕可使瘢痕颜色变淡、厚度变平,是一种理想的祛除瘢痕的方法。%Objective To evaluated the clinical efficacy of the radiofrequency ablation for pathological scar .Methods We treated the hyperplastic scar of 36 patients with radiofrequency ablation .All of the patients had were diagnosed with syrin-gomas for at least1 years and the scars were in the mature period .Two similar hyperplastic scar regions are chosen in each patient for self-comparison .The treatment group was treated by radiofrequency ablation and for the control group no any management was performed.The vancouver scar scale was tested in the 6th,12th month after the operation.Results The vancouver scar scale of the treatment group is lower than the control group in the 6th,12th month after operation , and the difference has statistical significance( P<0.05).After be treated by radiofrequency ablation , the color, thickness and soft-ness of scar had been significantly improved .Conclusion After be treated by RF ablation , the color of pathological scars would be fade , the thickness be flattening , and the contracture be alleviate .It is an ideal method to dispel scars .

  6. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD; Joyce Niland, PhD; Anna ter Veer, MS; Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD; Lily Lai, MD; Joshua E. Meyer, MD; Steven J. Nurkin, MD, MS; Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH; John M. Skibber, MD, FACS; Al B. Benson, MD; Martin R. Weiser, MD; Christopher H. Crane, MD; Karyn A. Goodman, MD, MS

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been rapidly incorporated into clinical practice because of its technological advantages over 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We characterized trends in IMRT utilization in trimodality treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network cancer centers between 2005 and 2011. Methods and materials: Using the prospective National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colorectal Cancer Database, ...

  7. Intersections between Music Education and Music Therapy: Education Reform, Arts Education, Exceptionality, and Policy at the Local Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Karen; Pasiali, Varvara

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a music teacher educator and a music therapy clinician and educator discuss special education policy and arts instruction at the district level. To illustrate the gulf between federal and local policies with regard to exceptional learners and arts instruction, we examine the intersections of music therapy and music education with…

  8. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation

  9. Bicalutamide as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to standard care of patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer: first analysis of the early prostate cancer program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, William A; Wirth, Manfred P; McLeod, David G

    2002-01-01

    We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer.......We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer....

  10. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Kouri, Mauri; Joensuu, Heikki

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Head and neck carcinomas that recur locally after conventional irradiation pose a difficult therapeutic problem. We evaluated safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of such cancers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with inoperable, recurred, locally advanced (rT3, rT4, or rN2) head and neck cancer were treated with BNCT in a prospective, single-center Phase I-II study. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 56-74 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed using the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria and adverse effects using the National Cancer Institute common toxicity grading v3.0. Intravenously administered boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F, 400 mg/kg) was used as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Ten patients received BNCT twice; 2 were treated once. Ten (83%) patients responded to BNCT, and 2 (17%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.5 and 7.6 months. The median duration of response was 12.1 months; six responses were ongoing at the time of analysis or death (range, 4.9-19.2 months). Four (33%) patients were alive without recurrence with a median follow-up of 14.0 months (range, 12.8-19.2 months). The most common acute adverse effects were mucositis, fatigue, and local pain; 2 patients had a severe (Grade 3) late adverse effect (xerostomia, 1; dysphagia, 1). Conclusions: Boron neutron capture therapy is effective and safe in the treatment of inoperable, locally advanced head and neck carcinomas that recur at previously irradiated sites

  11. High-dose rate intra-operative radiation therapy for local advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.B.; Mychalczak, B.; Enker, W.; Anderson, L.; Cohen, A.E.; Minsky, B.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to improve the local control for advanced and recurrent cancers of the rectum, we have integrated high-dose rate intra-operative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) into the treatment program. Between 11/92 and 10/95, 47 patients (pts) were treated. There were 26 males and 21 females whose ages ranged from 30-80 (median = 62) years. There were 19 pts with primary unresectable rectal cancer, and 28 pts who were treated for recurrent rectal cancer. Histology was adenocarcinoma - 45 pts, squamous cancer - 2 pts. The range of follow-up is 1-34 months (median = 14 months). The majority of primary unresectable pts received pre-operative radiation therapy (4500-5040 cGy) with chemotherapy (5-FU with Leucovorin) 4-6 weeks later, they underwent resection + HDR-IORT (1200 cGy). For the 28 pts with recurrent cancer, the majority received surgery and HDR-IORT alone because they had received prior RT. For the pts with primary unresectable disease, actuarial 2-year local control was 77%, actuarial distant metastasis-free survival was 71%, disease free survival was 66%, and overall survival was 84%. For those pts with recurrent disease, actuarial 2-year local control rate was 65%, distant metastasis-free survival was 65%, disease free survival was 47%, and overall survival was 61%. Complications occurred in 36%. There were no cases where the anatomical distribution of disease, or technical limitations prevented the adequate delivery of HDR-IORT. We conclude that this technique was most versatile, and enabled all appropriate pts to receive IORT. The preliminary data in terms of local control are encouraging, even for the poor prognostic sub-group of pts with recurrent cancer

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Sufang; Lin Shaojun; Tham, Ivan W.K.; Pan Jianji; Lu Jun; Lu, Jiade J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3–4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50–77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  13. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habr-Gama, Angelita; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; São Julião, Guilherme P.; Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B.; Perez, Rodrigo O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation

  14. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habr-Gama, Angelita, E-mail: gamange@uol.com.br [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, São Paulo (Brazil); University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo (Brazil); Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, São Paulo (Brazil); University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo (Brazil); São Julião, Guilherme P. [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, São Paulo (Brazil); Colorectal Surgery Division, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo (Brazil); Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B. [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, São Paulo (Brazil); Perez, Rodrigo O. [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, São Paulo (Brazil); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, São Paulo Branch (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation.

  15. Definitive Upfront Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Combined with Image-Guided, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IG-IMRT or IG-IMRT Alone for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chi

    Full Text Available Image-guided (IG intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT enables maximal tumor margin reduction for the sparing of organs at risk (OARs when used to treat locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with definitive chemo-radiation. It also allows for the incorporation of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR into the treatment regimen. Here, we describe our initial experience in combining definitive upfront SABR to the primary lesion with chemo-radiation delivered with conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT to the remaining regional disease; along with clinical outcome following chemo-radiation with conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT alone in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC.The clinical outcome of 29 patients with locally advanced NSCLC who underwent conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT, or definitive upfront SABR followed by IG-IMRT combined with chemotherapy (induction, concurrent, or both was retrospectively reviewed.After a median follow up of 23.7 months, the median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were 19.8 and 11.3 months, respectively. The 2 year local, regional, and distant control was 60%, 62%, and 38%, respectively. No local failure was observed in 3 patients following SABR + IG-IMRT while 6/26 patients failed locally following IG-IMRT alone. SABR + IG-IMRT was well tolerated. No ≥ grade 3 radiation-related toxicity was observed.Definitive upfront SABR followed by IG-IMRT in selected patients with locally advanced NSCLC warrants further investigation in future clinical trials, while chemo-radiation with IG-IMRT alone was well tolerated.

  16. Catheter ablation in the treatment of electrical storm: Integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Teixeira Leal

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Catheter ablation is the initial therapy for patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM and ES. The endocardial approach presents more relevant success rates than the other therapeutic methods presented.

  17. MRI evaluation following partial HIFU therapy for localized prostate cancer: A single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoquetis, L; Malavaud, B; Game, X; Beauval, J B; Portalez, D; Soulie, M; Rischmann, P

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the value of MRI for surveillance of primary hemi-HIFU therapy for localized PCa in a single-center. Patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with hemi-HIFU from October 2009 to March 2014. All patients performed MRI before focal therapy, the reader was blinded to the treatment. Oncological failure was defined as positive biopsy or biochemical recurrence (Phoenix). Twenty-five patients were treated with hemi-HIFU in one center. The median nadir PSA was 1.45±1.4ng/mL. Prostate volume decreased from 45 cc to 25 cc on MRI findings. At 20 months, none of the patients had histological recurrence. Biochemical-free survival rate was 88%. MRI evaluation had a negative predictive value of 100% on the treated area and 81% on the untreated area. PSAd≥0.1ng/mL(2) was a predictive factor for cancer on untreated area (P=0.042). MRI control at 6 months is a potentially effective evaluation of treated area after hemi-HIFU and may replace randomized biopsies if PSAd<0.1ng/mL(2) during follow-up. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Oglio, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.delloglio@gmail.com [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Boehm, Katharina [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Trudeau, Vincent [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Tian, Zhe [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Larcher, Alessandro [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Shariat, Shahrokh F. [Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital, Vienna (Austria); and others

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  19. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Boehm, Katharina; Trudeau, Vincent; Tian, Zhe; Larcher, Alessandro; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto; Shariat, Shahrokh F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  20. Loco-regional therapy for liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YE Shenglong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Loco-regional therapy, which uses imaging technologies to facilitate targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to cancers, has emerged as the most commonly used non-surgical treatment for primary liver cancer. Since the theory of loco-regional therapy was introduced, various strategies have been developed and successfully applied in clinic, including interventional radiology methods (mainly transarterial chemoembolization and local ablative methods (such as intratumoral ethanol injection, radiofrequency ablation, microwave coagulation, laser-induced thermal therapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and cryotherapy. TACE has been widely applied to treat inoperable liver cancers at intermediate and advanced stages, while the local ablative therapies have proven more suitable for small (<5 cm liver cancers. However, choosing the appropriate loco-regional therapy strategy should be carried out on an individual basis, considering the patient's particular disease condition and characteristics. To help guide such treatment decisions, this review highlights the principal indications, theory, techniques, and reported efficacies of the various loco-regional therapy strategies.

  1. Local transdermal therapy to the breast for breast cancer prevention and DCIS therapy: preclinical and clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Oukseub; Ivancic, David; Allu, Subhashini; Shidfar, Ali; Kenney, Kara; Helenowski, Irene; Sullivan, Megan E; Muzzio, Miguel; Scholtens, Denise; Chatterton, Robert T; Bethke, Kevin P; Hansen, Nora M; Khan, Seema A

    2015-12-01

    Women at high risk of breast cancer and those with carcinoma in situ need non-toxic, well-tolerated preventive interventions. One promising approach is drug delivery through the breast skin (local transdermal therapy, LTT). Our goal was to test novel drugs for LTT, to establish that LTT is applicable to non-steroidal drugs. Athymic nude rats were treated with oral tamoxifen, transdermal 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) or endoxifen gel applied daily to the axillary mammary gland for 6 weeks (Study 1). Study 2 was identical to Study 1, testing transdermal telapristone acetate (telapristone) gel versus subcutaneous implant. At euthanasia, mammary glands and blood were collected. In Study 3, consenting women requiring mastectomy were randomized to diclofenac patch applied to the abdomen or the breast for 3 days preoperatively. At surgery, eight tissue samples per breast were collected from predetermined locations, along with venous blood. Drug concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy. Mammary tissue concentrations of 4-OHT, endoxifen, and telapristone were significantly higher in the axillary glands of the gel-treated animals, compared to inguinal glands or to systemically treated animals. Plasma concentrations were similar in gel and systemically treated animals. The clinical trial showed significantly higher mammary concentrations when diclofenac was applied to the breast skin versus the abdominal skin, but concentrations were variable. These results demonstrate that lipophilic drugs can be developed for LTT; although the nude rat is suitable for testing drug permeability, delivery is systemic. In human, however, transdermal application to the breast skin provides local delivery.

  2. Clinical effects of non-ablative and ablative fractional lasers on various hair disorders: a case series of 17 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Suhyun; Choi, Min Ju; Zheng, Zhenlong; Goo, Boncheol; Kim, Do-Young; Cho, Sung Bin

    2013-04-01

    Both ablative and non-ablative fractional lasers have been applied to various uncommon hair disorders. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the clinical effects of fractional laser therapy on the course of primary follicular and perifollicular pathologies and subsequent hair regrowth. A retrospective review of 17 patients with uncommon hair disorders - including ophiasis, autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis, various secondary cicatricial alopecias, pubic hypotrichosis, frontal fibrosing alopecia, and perifolliculitis abscedens et suffodiens - was conducted. All patients had been treated with non-ablative and/or ablative fractional laser therapies. The mean clinical improvement score in these 17 patients was 2.2, while the mean patient satisfaction score was 2.5. Of the 17 subjects, 12 (70.6%) demonstrated a clinical response to non-ablative and/or ablative fractional laser treatments, including individuals with ophiasis, autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis, secondary cicatricial alopecia (scleroderma and pressure-induced alopecia), frontal fibrosing alopecia, and perifolliculitis abscedens et suffodiens. Conversely, patients with long-standing ophiasis, surgical scar-induced secondary cicatricial alopecia, and pubic hypotrichosis did not respond to fractional laser therapy. Our findings demonstrate that the use of non-ablative and/or ablative fractional lasers promoted hair growth in certain cases of uncommon hair disorders without any remarkable side effects.

  3. Retrospective analysis of multidisciplinary therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Seo, Yuji; Nakajima, Kaori; Miyano, Takashi [Asahikawa Medical Univ., Hokkaido (Japan); Kikuchi, Yuzou [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the efficacy of multidisciplinary therapy (concomitant radiotherapy and intra-arterial infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) followed by maxillectomy) in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. We reviewed 71 patient records with locally advanced but respectable carcinoma of the maxillary sinus treated by means of multidisciplinary therapy between 1978 through 1997. The clinical T factor for these patients, according to the UICC definitions (1997), was 12 for T2, 46 for T3, and 13 for T4. Twelve patients were diagnosed as node-positive at initial presentation. Intra-arterial 5-FU was delivered via a superficial temporal artery in accordance with radiotherapy, and the cumulative 5-FU dose ranged from 2,900 mg to 5,250 mg (median 5,000 mg). The total radiotherapy dose ranged from 29 Gy to 48 Gy (median 48 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Patients underwent radical maxillectomy thereafter. The 5-year overall survival rate and disease-specific survival rate of all the patients were 58% and 68%, respectively. There was no significant correlation of clinical T factor or N factor with disease-specific survival on univariate and multivariate analysis. The overall treatment-related mortality rate was 3.7%. Radiation cataract later developed in all evaluable patients whose lenses were within the treatment volume. About a half of the operable T4 patients survived over 5 years by means of the above-mentioned multidisciplinary therapy. This multidisciplinary therapy should be compared to treatment with a combination of surgery and postoperative chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  4. Retrospective analysis of multidisciplinary therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Seo, Yuji; Nakajima, Kaori; Miyano, Takashi; Kikuchi, Yuzou

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the efficacy of multidisciplinary therapy (concomitant radiotherapy and intra-arterial infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) followed by maxillectomy) in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. We reviewed 71 patient records with locally advanced but respectable carcinoma of the maxillary sinus treated by means of multidisciplinary therapy between 1978 through 1997. The clinical T factor for these patients, according to the UICC definitions (1997), was 12 for T2, 46 for T3, and 13 for T4. Twelve patients were diagnosed as node-positive at initial presentation. Intra-arterial 5-FU was delivered via a superficial temporal artery in accordance with radiotherapy, and the cumulative 5-FU dose ranged from 2,900 mg to 5,250 mg (median 5,000 mg). The total radiotherapy dose ranged from 29 Gy to 48 Gy (median 48 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Patients underwent radical maxillectomy thereafter. The 5-year overall survival rate and disease-specific survival rate of all the patients were 58% and 68%, respectively. There was no significant correlation of clinical T factor or N factor with disease-specific survival on univariate and multivariate analysis. The overall treatment-related mortality rate was 3.7%. Radiation cataract later developed in all evaluable patients whose lenses were within the treatment volume. About a half of the operable T4 patients survived over 5 years by means of the above-mentioned multidisciplinary therapy. This multidisciplinary therapy should be compared to treatment with a combination of surgery and postoperative chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  5. Heat Stress-Induced PI3K/mTORC2-Dependent AKT Signaling Is a Central Mediator of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Survival to Thermal Ablation Induced Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Thompson

    Full Text Available Thermal ablative therapies are important treatment options in the multidisciplinary care of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but lesions larger than 2-3 cm are plagued with high local recurrence rates and overall survival of these patients remains poor. Currently no adjuvant therapies exist to prevent local HCC recurrence in patients undergoing thermal ablation. The molecular mechanisms mediating HCC resistance to thermal ablation induced heat stress and local recurrence remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that the HCC cells with a poor prognostic hepatic stem cell subtype (Subtype HS are more resistant to heat stress than HCC cells with a better prognostic hepatocyte subtype (Subtype HC. Moreover, sublethal heat stress rapidly induces phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR dependent-protein kinase B (AKT survival signaling in HCC cells in vitro and at the tumor ablation margin in vivo. Conversely, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2-dependent AKT phosphorylation or direct inhibition of AKT function both enhance HCC cell killing and decrease HCC cell survival to sublethal heat stress in both poor and better prognostic HCC subtypes while mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1-inhibition has no impact. Finally, we showed that AKT isoforms 1, 2 and 3 are differentially upregulated in primary human HCCs and that overexpression of AKT correlates with worse tumor biology and pathologic features (AKT3 and prognosis (AKT1. Together these findings define a novel molecular mechanism whereby heat stress induces PI3K/mTORC2-dependent AKT survival signaling in HCC cells and provide a mechanistic rationale for adjuvant AKT inhibition in combination with thermal ablation as a strategy to enhance HCC cell killing and prevent local recurrence, particularly at the ablation margin.

  6. Management of locally recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma after prior surgery and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Mylin A.; Ballo, Matthew T.; Butler, Charles E.; Feig, Barry W.; Cormier, Janice N.; Lewis, Valerae O.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Pisters, Peter W.; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome and treatment toxicity after wide local re-excision (WLE), with or without additional radiation therapy, for patients with isolated first local recurrence of soft-tissue sarcoma arising within a previously irradiated field. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 62 consecutive patients. All patients underwent prior resection and external beam radiation. For recurrent disease, 25 patients were treated with WLE alone, and 37 patients were treated with WLE and additional radiation (45- 64 Gy). In 33 patients, the radiation was delivered via an afterloaded brachytherapy, single-plane implant. Results: The 5-year disease specific and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 65% and 73%, respectively. Local control (LC) at 5 years was 51%, and on multivariate analysis, a positive surgical resection margin (p< 0.001) was associated with a lower rate of LC. Reirradiation was not associated with improved LC; however complications requiring outpatient or surgical management were more common in patients who had undergone reirradiation (80% vs. 17%, p < 0.001). Amputation was also more common in the subgroup of patients who underwent extremity reirradiation (35% with radiation vs. 11% without, p = 0.05), although only one amputation was performed to resolve a treatment complication. Conclusion: Conservative surgery alone results in LC in a minority of patients who have failed locally after previous excision and external beam radiation. Although selection biases and small patient numbers confound the analysis, local treatment intensification with additional radiation does not clearly improve outcome after surgical excision alone, and is associated with an increase in complications

  7. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  8. Clinical application and developmental trend of radiofrequency ablation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongfeng

    2009-01-01

    For recent two decades, radiofrequency ablation technology has made great progress in the field of the treatment for neoplasm. At the very beginning, radiofrequency ablation was adopted in treating the hepatic carcinoma, and since then it has been gradually practiced in treating malignancies of lung, bone, kidney, breast, prostate and other solid tumors. Statistical report of the year 2008 has indicated that in the aspect of similar therapeutic measures radiofrequency ablation therapy for tumors holds a 9% market share. Moreover, in the coming years the clinical use of this kind of therapy for tumors will be steadily increasing by 13% every year. (authors)

  9. The potential role of respiratory motion management and image guidance in the reduction of severe toxicities following stereotactic ablative radiation therapy for patients with centrally located early stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Image guidance allows delivery of very high doses of radiation over a few fractions, known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR. This treatment is associated with excellent outcome for early stage non-small cell lung cancer and metastases to the lungs. In the delivery of SABR, central location constantly poses a challenge due to the difficulty of adequately sparing critical thoracic structures that are immediately adjacent to the tumor if an ablative dose of radiation is to be delivered to the tumor target. As of current, various respiratory motion management and image guidance strategies can be used to ensure accurate tumor target localization prior and/ or during daily treatment, which allows for maximal and safe reduction of set up margins. The incorporation of both may lead to the most optimal normal tissue sparing and the most accurate SABR delivery. Here, the clinical outcome, treatment related toxicities, and the pertinent respiratory motion management/image guidance strategies reported in the current literature on SABR for central lung tumors are reviewed.

  10. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Anna Lia; Gui, Benedetta; D’Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo; Clementi, Valeria; Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mantini, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio 1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value 2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  11. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for ablating uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lian; Chen Wenzhi; Liu Yinjiang; Hu Xiao; Zhou Kun; Chen Li; Peng Song; Zhu Hui; Zou Huiling; Bai Jin; Wang Zhibiao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation of uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with 23 uterine fibroids underwent MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, with a mean age of 39.4 ± 6.9 (20-49) years, with fibroids average measuring 6.0 ± 1.6 (range, 2.9-9.5) cm in diameter. After being compressed with a degassed water balloon on abdominal wall, MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment was performed under conscious sedation by using fentanyl and midazolam. This procedure was performed by a Haifu JM focused ultrasound tumour therapeutic system (JM2.5C, Chongqing Haifu Technology Co., Ltd., China), in combination with a 1.5-Tesla MRI system (Symphony, Siemens, Germany), which provides real-time guidance and control. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed to evaluate the efficacy of thermal ablation immediately and 3 months after HIFU treatment. The treatment time and adverse events were recorded. Results: The mean fibroid volume was 97.0 ± 78.3 (range, 12.7-318.3) cm 3 . According to the treatment plan, an average 75.0 ± 11.4% (range, 37.8-92.4%) of the fibroid volume was treated. The mean fibroid volume immediately after HIFU was 109.7 ± 93.1 (range, 11.9-389.6) cm 3 , slightly enlarged because of edema. The average non-perfused volume was 83.3 ± 71.7 (range, 7.7-282.9) cm 3 , the average fractional ablation, which was defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 76.9 ± 18.7% (range, 21.0-97.0%). There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment volume and the non-perfused volume. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 months obtained in 12 patients, the fibroid volume decreased by 31.4 ± 29.3% (range, -1.9 to 60.0%) in average, with paired t

  12. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for ablating uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lian; Chen Wenzhi [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Liu Yinjiang; Hu Xiao [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zhou Kun [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Chen Li [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Peng Song; Zhu Hui [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zou Huiling [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Bai Jin [Institute of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang Zhibiao [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Institute of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400016 (China)], E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation of uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with 23 uterine fibroids underwent MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, with a mean age of 39.4 {+-} 6.9 (20-49) years, with fibroids average measuring 6.0 {+-} 1.6 (range, 2.9-9.5) cm in diameter. After being compressed with a degassed water balloon on abdominal wall, MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment was performed under conscious sedation by using fentanyl and midazolam. This procedure was performed by a Haifu JM focused ultrasound tumour therapeutic system (JM2.5C, Chongqing Haifu Technology Co., Ltd., China), in combination with a 1.5-Tesla MRI system (Symphony, Siemens, Germany), which provides real-time guidance and control. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed to evaluate the efficacy of thermal ablation immediately and 3 months after HIFU treatment. The treatment time and adverse events were recorded. Results: The mean fibroid volume was 97.0 {+-} 78.3 (range, 12.7-318.3) cm{sup 3}. According to the treatment plan, an average 75.0 {+-} 11.4% (range, 37.8-92.4%) of the fibroid volume was treated. The mean fibroid volume immediately after HIFU was 109.7 {+-} 93.1 (range, 11.9-389.6) cm{sup 3}, slightly enlarged because of edema. The average non-perfused volume was 83.3 {+-} 71.7 (range, 7.7-282.9) cm{sup 3}, the average fractional ablation, which was defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 76.9 {+-} 18.7% (range, 21.0-97.0%). There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment volume and the non-perfused volume. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 months obtained in 12 patients, the fibroid volume decreased by 31.4 {+-} 29.3% (range, -1.9 to 60

  13. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelt, Ane L.; Pløen, John; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D 50,i , and the normalized dose-response gradient, γ 50,i . Results: A highly significant dose-response relationship was found (P=.002). For complete response (TRG1), the dose-response parameters were D 50,TRG1 = 92.0 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.3-144.9 Gy), γ 50,TRG1 = 0.982 (CI 0.533-1.429), and for major response (TRG1-2) D 50,TRG1 and 2 = 72.1 Gy (CI 65.3-94.0 Gy), γ 50,TRG1 and 2 = 0.770 (CI 0.338-1.201). Tumor size and N category both had a significant effect on the dose-response relationships. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a significant dose-response relationship for tumor regression after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer for tumor dose levels in the range of 50.4-70 Gy, which is higher than the dose range usually considered.

  14. MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merckel, Laura G.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Köhler, Max O.; Bongard, H. J. G. Desirée van den; Deckers, Roel; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Binkert, Christoph A.; Moonen, Chrit T.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

  15. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, C. M.; Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E.; Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U.; Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.; Pereira, P. L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 ± 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 ± 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 ± 13.6 min and 43.7 ± 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 ± 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 ± 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 ± 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m 2 before RF ablation vs. 47.2 ± 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m 2 after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  16. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany); Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J. [Clinic for Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH (Germany); Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  17. Value of radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kai; Ma, Kuan-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignant disease that substantially affects public health worldwide. It is especially prevalent in east Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, where the main etiology is the endemic status of chronic hepatitis B. Effective treatments with curative intent for early HCC include liver transplantation, liver resection (LR), and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). RFA has become the most widely used local thermal ablation method in recent years because of its technical ease, safety, satisfactory local tumor control, and minimally invasive nature. This technique has also emerged as an important treatment strategy for HCC in recent years. RFA, liver transplantation, and hepatectomy can be complementary to one another in the treatment of HCC, and the outcome benefits have been demonstrated by numerous clinical studies. As a pretransplantation bridge therapy, RFA extends the average waiting time without increasing the risk of dropout or death. In contrast to LR, RFA causes almost no intra-abdominal adhesion, thus producing favorable conditions for subsequent liver transplantation. Many studies have demonstrated mutual interactions between RFA and hepatectomy, effectively expanding the operative indications for patients with HCC and enhancing the efficacy of these approaches. However, treated tumor tissue remains within the body after RFA, and residual tumors or satellite nodules can limit the effectiveness of this treatment. Therefore, future research should focus on this issue. PMID:24876721

  18. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  19. Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation With Magnetically Directed Metallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy T; Tzou, Wendy S; Zheng, Lijun; Barham, Waseem; Schuller, Joseph L; Shillinglaw, Benjamin; Quaife, Robert A; Sauer, William H

    2016-05-01

    Remote heating of metal located near a radiofrequency ablation source has been previously demonstrated. Therefore, ablation of cardiac tissue treated with metallic nanoparticles may improve local radiofrequency heating and lead to larger ablation lesions. We sought to evaluate the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tissue sensitivity to radiofrequency energy. Ablation was performed using an ablation catheter positioned with 10 g of force over prepared ex vivo specimens. Tissue temperatures were measured and lesion volumes were acquired. An in vivo porcine thigh model was used to study systemically delivered magnetically guided iron oxide (FeO) nanoparticles during radiofrequency application. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological staining of ablated tissue were subsequently performed as a part of ablation lesion analysis. Ablation of ex vivo myocardial tissue treated with metallic nanoparticles resulted in significantly larger lesions with greater impedance changes and evidence of increased thermal conductivity within the tissue. Magnet-guided localization of FeO nanoparticles within porcine thigh preps was demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging and iron staining. Irrigated ablation in the regions with greater FeO, after FeO infusion and magnetic guidance, created larger lesions without a greater incidence of steam pops. Metal nanoparticle infiltration resulted in significantly larger ablation lesions with altered electric and thermal conductivity. In vivo magnetic guidance of FeO nanoparticles allowed for facilitated radiofrequency ablation without direct infiltration into the targeted tissue. Further research is needed to assess the clinical applicability of this ablation strategy using metallic nanoparticles for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Gemcitabine for Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoto, Makoto, E-mail: shinoto@saga-himat.jp [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamada, Shigeru [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yasuda, Shigeo [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saisho, Hiromitsu [Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Kaken Hospital, Chemotherapy Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Asano, Takehide; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Amano, Hodaka; Ishihara, Takeshi; Otsuka, Masayuki; Matsuda, Masamichi; Kainuma, Osamu; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Furuse, Junji; Nakagori, Toshio; Okusaka, Takuji; and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To determine, in the setting of locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the maximum tolerated dose of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) and gemcitabine dose delivered concurrently and to estimate local effect and survival. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of pancreatic invasive ductal carcinomas and radiographically unresectable disease without metastasis. Concurrent gemcitabine was administered on days 1, 8, and 15, and the dose levels were escalated from 400 to 1000 mg/m{sup 2} under the starting dose level (43.2 GyE) of C-ion RT. The dose levels of C-ion RT were escalated from 43.2 to 55.2 GyE at 12 fractions under the fixed recommended gemcitabine dose determined. Results: Seventy-six patients were enrolled. Among the 72 treated patients, dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 3 patients: grade 3 infection in 1 patient and grade 4 neutropenia in 2 patients. Only 1 patient experienced a late grade 3 gastric ulcer and bleeding 10 months after C-ion RT. The recommended dose of gemcitabine with C-ion RT was found to be 1000 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of C-ion RT with the full dose of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) was safely increased to 55.2 GyE. The freedom from local progression rate was 83% at 2 years using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. The 2-year overall survival rates in all patients and in the high-dose group with stage III (≥45.6 GyE) were 35% and 48%, respectively. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine was well tolerated and effective in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  1. Endoscopic Criteria for Evaluating Tumor Stage after Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung Su; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Byung Chang; Hong, Chang Won; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Min Ju; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2016-04-01

    Local excision may be an another option for selected patients with markedly down-staged rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT), and proper evaluation of post-CRT tumor stage (ypT) is essential prior to local excision of these tumors. This study was designed to determine the correlations between endoscopic findings and ypT of rectal cancer. In this study, 481 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgical resection between 2004 and 2013 at a single institution were evaluated retrospectively. Pathological good response (p-GR) was defined as ypT ≤ 1, and pathological minimal or no response (p-MR) as ypT ≥ 2. The patients were randomly classified according to two groups, a testing (n=193) and a validation (n=288) group. Endoscopic criteria were determined from endoscopic findings and ypT in the testing group and used in classifying patients in the validation group as achieving or not achieving p-GR. Based on findings in the testing group, the endoscopic criteria for p-GR included scarring, telangiectasia, and erythema, whereas criteria for p-MR included nodules, ulcers, strictures, and remnant tumors. In the validation group, the kappa statistic was 0.965 (p < 0.001), and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.362, 0.963, 0.654, and 0.885, respectively. The endoscopic criteria presented are easily applicable for evaluation of ypT after preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. These criteria may be used for selection of patients for local excision of down-staged rectal tumors, because patients with p-MR could be easily ruled out.

  2. Locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma: molecular pathways, treatment options and new targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Salas, Veronica; Alegre, Marta; Garcés, Joan Ramón; Puig, Lluis

    2014-06-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified as important to normal embryonic development in living organisms and it is implicated in processes including cell proliferation, differentiation and tissue patterning. Aberrant Hh pathway has been involved in the pathogenesis and chemotherapy resistance of different solid and hematologic malignancies. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and medulloblastoma are two well-recognized cancers with mutations in components of the Hh pathway. Vismodegib has recently approved as the first inhibitor of one of the components of the Hh pathway (smoothened). This review attempts to provide current data on the molecular pathways involved in the development of BCC and the therapeutic options available for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic BCC, and the new targeted therapies in development.

  3. Local delivery of hormonal therapy with silastic tubing for prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeenah; Thomas, Scott; Zhong, Allison Y; Wolfe, Alan R; Krings, Gregor; Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Pawlowska, Nela; Benet, Leslie Z; Munster, Pamela N

    2018-01-08

    Broad use of germline testing has identified an increasing number of women at risk for breast cancer with a need for effective chemoprevention. We report a novel method to selectively deliver various anti-estrogens at high drug levels to the breast tissue by implanting a device comprised of silastic tubing. Optimized tubing properties allow elution of otherwise poorly bioavailable anti-estrogens, such as fulvestrant, into mammary tissue in vitro and in vivo with levels sufficient to inhibit estrogen receptor activation and tumor cell proliferation. Implantable silastic tubing delivers fulvestrant selectively to mouse mammary fat tissue for one year with anti-tumor effects similar to those achieved with systemic fulvestrant exposure. Furthermore, local delivery of fulvestrant significantly decreases cell proliferation, as assessed by Ki67 expression, most effectively in tumor sections adjacent to tubing. This approach may thereby introduce a potential paradigm shift and offer a promising alternative to systemic therapy for prevention and early interception of breast cancer.

  4. The relationship between technical parameters of external beam radiation therapy and complications for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Shirato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Keishiro

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to review retrospectively the clinical course of chronic rectal bleeding as a complication of external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer and to analyze the relationship between technical parameters of radiation therapy and the complications. Seventy-one patients with stages A2, B and C were treated with local-field radiotherapy (total dose 52.5-66 Gy, daily dose 2.0-3.28 Gy, field area 30-81 cm 2 , number of fields 3-15 ports, planning simulations X-ray or CT-based) between 1989 and 1998 at three institutions. The protocols were consistent during this same period at these institutions. Multivariate analysis revealed pretreatment PSA and Gleason sum to be statistically significant predictors of 5 year prostatic specific antigen (PSA) relapse-free rates in a median follow-up period of 42 months (range 12-119 months). The significant risk factors for higher grading of acute morbidity were a biological equivalent dose, α/β=10 (BED 10 ) ≥65 Gy, dose per fraction ≥3.0 Gy, field area ≥42 cm 2 , fewer ports and X-ray planning simulation. However, no parameter was associated with higher grading of late morbidity. Eleven patients (15.4%) experienced a late GI complication: grade 1 (4.2%), grade 2 (9.8%), grade 3 (1.4%). The median time to occurrence of rectal bleeding was 12 months after radiotherapy and the mean duration of morbidity was 11 months. Higher total dose and dose per fraction, larger field area, fewer ports and X-ray simulation increased the grades of acute morbidity. A majority of chronic rectal bleedings were transient and responded to conservative treatment. (author)

  5. Very accelerated radiation therapy: preliminary results in locally unresectable head and neck carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourhis, Jean; Fortin, Andre; Dupuis, Olivier; Domenge, Christian; Lusinchi, Antoine; Marandas, Patrick; Schwaab, Guy; Armand, Jean Pierre; Luboinski, Bernard; Malaise, Edmond; Eschwege, Francois; Wibault, Pierre

    1995-06-15

    Purpose: To report preliminary results of a very accelerated radiation therapy Phase I/II trial in locally advanced head and squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Between 01/92 and 06/93, 35 patients with an unresectable HNSCC were entered in this study. Thirty-two (91%) had Stage IV, and 3 had Stage III disease. The mean nodal diameter, in patients with clinically involved nodes (83%), was 6.3 cm. The median Karnovsky performance status was 70. The treatment consisted of a twice daily schedule (BID) giving 62 Gy in 20 days. Results: In all cases, confluent mucositis was observed, which started about day 15 and resolved within 6 to 10 weeks. Eighty percent of patients had enteral nutritional support. The nasogastric tube or gastrostomy was maintained in these patients for a mean duration of 51.8 days. Eighteen patients (53%) were hospitalized during the course of treatment due to a poor medical status or because they lived far from the center (mean 25 days). Nineteen patients (56%) (some of whom were initially in-patients) were hospitalized posttreatment for toxicity (mean 13 days). Five patients (15%) were never hospitalized. During the follow-up period, 12 local and/or regional failures were observed. The actuarial 18-month loco-regional control rate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 45-73%). Conclusions: The dramatic shortening of radiation therapy compared to conventional schedules in our series of very advanced HNSCC resulted in: (a) severe acute mucosal toxicity, which was manageable but required intensive nutritional support in all cases; and (b) high loco-regional response rates, strongly suggesting that the time factor is likely to be critical for tumor control in this type of cancer.

  6. Low Incidence of Fatigue after Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjeev eDash

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue is a common side-effect of conventional prostate cancer radiation therapy. The increased delivery precision necessitated by the high dose per fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT offers the potential of reduce target volumes and hence the exposure of normal tissues to high radiation doses. Herein, we examine the level of fatigue associated with SBRT treatment.Methods: Forty patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated SBRT, and a minimum of 12 months follow-up were included in this analysis. Self-reported fatigue and other quality of life measures were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-SBRT.Results: Mean levels of fatigue were elevated at 1 month post-SBRT compared to baseline values (p=0.02. Fatigue at the 3-month follow-up and later were higher but not statistically significantly different compared to baseline. African-American patients reported higher fatigue post-SBRT than Caucasian patients. Fatigue was correlated with hormonal symptoms as measured by the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC quality of life questionnaire, but not with urinary, bowel, or sexual symptoms. Age, co-morbidities, smoking, prostate specific antigen (PSA levels, testosterone levels, and tumor stage were not associated with fatigue. Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate fatigue as a side-effect of SBRT. In contrast to standard radiation therapy, results suggest SBRT-related fatigue is short-term rather than a long-term side effect of SBRT. These results also suggest post-SBRT fatigue to be a more frequent complication in African-Americans than Caucasians.

  7. Local control of murine melanoma xenografts in nude mice by neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Corderoy-Buck, S.; Moore, D.E.; Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years considerable progress has been made in the development and implementation of neutron capture therapy (NCT) for the treatment of cancer. In particular, the boron analogue of the melanin precursor phenylalanine, i.e., DL-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used to demonstrate the regression and cure of Harding-Passey (HP) melanoma in syngeneic mice. However, 18 to 25% cures were obtained for neutron irradiations without boron, suggesting that the neutron dose alone plays an important role. Neutron capture therapy of B-16 melanoma xenografts in nude mice showed substantial tumor regression over 35 days, but the survival rate of NCT treated mice after 7 weeks was only 40-60%. In this paper the authors demonstrate the equivalence of the nude mouse model with a syngeneic model, using the same Harding-Passey murine melanoma line, and delineate the conditions required for maximum differential response between neutron irradiation with and without BPA administration, with complete local control as the end point

  8. Determining if pretreatment PSA doubling time predicts PSA trajectories after radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, Daniel E.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Pan, Charlie C.; Williams, Scott G.; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: To determine if pretreatment PSA doubling time (PSA-DT) can predict post-radiation therapy (RT) PSA trajectories for localized prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Three hundred and seventy-five prostate cancer patients treated with external beam RT without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were identified with an adequate number of PSA values. We utilized a linear mixed model (LMM) analysis to model longitudinal PSA data sets after definitive treatment. Post-treatment PSA trajectories were allowed to depend on the pre-RT PSA-DT, pre-RT PSA (iPSA), Gleason score (GS), and T-stage. Results: Pre-RT PSA-DT had a borderline impact on predicting the rate of PSA rise after nadir (p = 0.08). For a typical low risk patient (T1, GS ≤ 6, iPSA 10), the predicted PSA-DT post-nadir was 21% shorter for pre-RT PSA-DT 24 month (19 month vs. 24 month). Additional significant predictors of post-RT PSA rate of rise included GS (p < 0.0001), iPSA (p < 0.0001), and T-stage (p = 0.02). Conclusions: We observed a trend between rapidly rising pre-RT PSA and the post-RT post-nadir PSA rise. This effect appeared to be independent of iPSA, GS, or T-stage. The results presented suggest that pretreatment PSA-DT may help predict post-RT PSA trajectories

  9. New combined therapy of radiation and local administration of OK-432 for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Minoru; Morita, Shinroku; Tsunemoto, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    We devised new combination therapy of radiation and local administration of OK-432 and performed for 26 patients with esophageal cancer between March, 1987 and December, 1988 as a pilot study. The average age was 73 years. Among 26 patients, males were 20 and females were six. Patients were irradiated at the schedule of under 2 Gy/day and the dose of TDF (time, dose and fractionation factor) 100 totally. OK-432, 10KE was endoscopically administered around cancer lesion at the beginning of the radiotherapy, and two weeks later, 5KE was given in the same manner. Complete response was obtained in 20 out of 26 cases (77%) and partial response was obtained in the remaining six cases (23%). All six patients with tumor length less than five cm showed complete response. All 16 patients who could not eat food orally before treatment, became to take food enough orally after the treatment and could discharge in good condition. One year and two years survival rate of 26 patients by Kaplan Meier method were 67.4% and 47.2%, respectively. Six patients with tumor length less than five cm, are all alive without a sign of recurrence. This combination therapy will improve not only the response rate and the survival rate, but also the quality of life of patients with esophageal cancer. (author)

  10. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Local Failure After Primary Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hearn, Jason W.D., E-mail: hearnj@ccf.org; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Djemil, Toufik; Stephans, Kevin L.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Local failure after definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is uncommon. We report the safety and efficacy of SBRT for salvage of local failure after previous SBRT with a biologically effective dose (BED) of ≥100 Gy{sub 10}. Methods and Materials: Using an institutional review board–approved lung SBRT registry, we identified all patients initially treated for early-stage NSCLC between August 2004 and January 2012 who received salvage SBRT for isolated local failure. Failure was defined radiographically and confirmed histologically unless contraindicated. All patients were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system using ExacTrac for image guidance, and received a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} for each SBRT course. Tumor motion control involved a Bodyfix vacuum system for immobilization along with abdominal compression. Results: Of 436 patients treated from August 2004 through January 2012, we identified 22 patients with isolated local failure, 10 of whom received SBRT for salvage. The median length of follow-up was 13.8 months from salvage SBRT (range 5.3-43.5 months). Median tumor size was 3.4 cm (range 1.7-4.8 cm). Two of the 10 lesions were “central” by proximity to the mediastinum, but were outside the zone of the proximal bronchial tree. Since completing salvage, 3 patients are alive and without evidence of disease. A fourth patient died of medical comorbidities without recurrence 13.0 months after salvage SBRT. Two patients developed distant disease only. Four patients had local failure. Toxicity included grade 1-2 fatigue (3 patients) and grade 1-2 chest wall pain (5 patients). There was no grade 3-5 toxicity. Conclusions: Repeat SBRT with a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} after local failure in patients with early-stage medically inoperable NSCLC was well tolerated in this series and may represent a viable salvage strategy in select patients with peripheral tumors ≤5 cm.

  11. [A Case of Locally Advanced Thoracic Esophageal Cancer with Larynx Preservation and Curative Resection via Combined Modality Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, Mitsuru; Kimura, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Osamu; Kato, Hiroaki; Hiraki, Yoko; Tanaka, Yumiko; Yasuda, Atsushi; Shinkai, Masayuki; Imano, Motohiro; Imamoto, Haruhiko; Yasuda, Takushi

    2017-11-01

    Prognosis of locally advanced esophageal cancer is poor. The greatest prognostic factor of locally advanced esophageal cancer is a local control. We experienced a case of T4 locally advanced thoracic esophageal cancer who was successfully resected without any combined resection after multimodality therapy. A male in 75-year-old. was diagnosed with type 3 locally advanced upper thoracic esophageal cancer whose metastatic right recurrent laryngeal lymph node invaded into the trachea. Definitive chemoradiation therapy(CRT)was performed, leading to a significant shrinkage of the main tumor, but T4 lesion remained. Next, adding DCF therapy(docetaxel, CDDP and 5-FU), a relief of T4 was finally obtained. Then, salvage surgery with subtotalesophagectomy and retrosternalesophagealreconstruction with gastric tube was performed, resulting in R0 resection without any combined resection. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient has been alive without recurrence for 1 year after surgery. In locally advanced cancer, focusing on T4 downstaging, it is significantly important in terms of safety, curativity and organ preservation to perform surgery after a sure sign of T4 relief by multimodality therapy.

  12. Doing It Collaboratively! Addressing the Dilemmas of Designing Quantitative Effect Studies on Narrative Family Therapy in a Local Clinical Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbye-Ernst, Ditte; Jørring, Nina Tejs

    2017-01-01

    suggest that involving narrative clinicians and clients in the development of a research design in the local clinical context might be helpful in overcoming narrative skepticism and criticism towards quantitative effect research. It is our hope that this article will inspire more narrative therapists...... in a local clinical context. The article offers a detailed case description of implementing psychometric effect measurements on narrative family therapy and of creating a shared collaborative stance for researchers using quantitative effect measurements and clinicians using narrative therapy. Our findings......This article suggests an approach for addressing the dilemmas narrative therapists face, wanting to make narrative therapy accessible to people seeking help in contexts favoring evidence-based therapy. The approach is inspired by participatory action research and involves clinicians and clients...

  13. Percutaneous thermal ablation for stage IA non-small cell lung cancer: long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsule, Chaitan K; Sridhar, Praveen; Nair, Divya; Gupta, Avneesh; Oommen, Roy G; Ebright, Michael I; Litle, Virginia R; Fernando, Hiran C

    2017-10-01

    Surgical resection is the most effective curative therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many patients are unable to tolerate resection secondary to poor reserve or comorbid disease. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are methods of percutaneous thermal ablation that can be used to treat medically inoperable patients with NSCLC. We present long-term outcomes following thermal ablation of stage IA NSCLC from a single center. Patients with stage IA NSCLC and factors precluding resection who underwent RFA or MWA from July 2005 to September 2009 were studied. CT and PET-CT scans were performed at 3 and 6 month intervals, respectively, for first 24 months of follow-up. Factors associated with local progression (LP) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Twenty-one patients underwent 21 RFA and 4 MWA for a total of 25 ablations. Fifteen patients had T1a and six patients had T1b tumors. Mean follow-up was 42 months, median survival was 39 months, and OS at three years was 52%. There was no significant difference in median survival between T1a nodules and T1b nodules (36 vs . 39 months, P=0.29) or for RFA and MWA (36 vs . 50 months, P=0.80). Ten patients had LP (47.6%), at a median time of 35 months. There was no significant difference in LP between T1a and T1b tumors (22 vs . 35 months, P=0.94) or RFA and MWA (35 vs . 17 months, P=0.18). Median OS with LP was 32 months compared to 39 months without LP (P=0.68). Three patients underwent repeat ablations. Mean time to LP following repeat ablation was 14.75 months. One patient had two repeat ablations and was disease free at 40-month follow-up. Thermal ablation effectively treated or controlled stage IA NSCLC in medically inoperable patients. Three-year OS exceeded 50%, and LP did not affect OS. Therefore, thermal ablation is a viable option for medically inoperable patients with early stage NSCLC.

  14. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours: Report of Two Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Bonomo, Guido; Della Vigna, Paolo; Fazio, Nicola; Orsi, Franco

    2011-01-01

    We describe the use of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for ablation of two pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs; insulinomas) in two inoperable young female patients. Both suffered from episodes of severe nightly hypoglycemia that was not efficiently controlled by medical treatment. After HIFU ablation, local disease control and symptom relief were achieved without postinterventional complications. The patients remained free of symptoms during 9-month follow-up. The lesions appeared to be decreased in volume, and there was decreased enhancing pattern in the multidetector computed tomography control (MDCT). HIFU is likely to be a valid alternative for symptoms control in patients with pancreatic NETs. However, currently the procedure should be reserved for inoperable patients for whom symptoms cannot be controlled by medical therapy.

  15. Pheochromocytoma diagnosed after anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation ablation procedure: a giant in disguise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão Braga, Carlos; Ribeiro, Sílvia; Martins, Juliana; Arantes, Carina; Ramos, Vítor; Primo, João; Magalhães, Sónia; Correia, Adelino

    2014-04-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare catecholamine-producing tumor, discovered incidentally in 50% of cases. We present the case of a 44-year-old male with a history of paroxysmal palpitations. Baseline ECG, transthoracic echocardiogram and ECG stress test showed no relevant alterations. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation was detected on 24-hour Holter ECG. After antiarrhythmic therapy, the patient remained symptomatic, and was accordingly referred for electrophysiological study and atrial fibrillation ablation. Anticoagulation was initiated before the procedure. After ablation and still anticoagulated, he complained of hematospermia. The abdominal and pelvic imaging study showed a 10-cm left adrenal mass, predominantly cystic, compatible with pheochromocytoma, which was confirmed after biochemical tests (increased urine metanephrines and plasma catecholamines). Metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy scanning confirmed localized disease in the adrenal gland, excluding other uptake foci. Following appropriate preoperative management, surgical resection of the giant mass was performed successfully and without complications. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Nursing care for patients with local recurrent rectal cancer after CT-guided 125I seed implantation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Li; Wei Fan; Ren Caifeng; Tu Mingmei; Qian Guixiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing care strategy for patients with local recurrent rectal cancer who has been treated with CT-guided 125 I seed implantation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients with local recurrent rectal cancer received a series of nursing interventions, including comfort care and pain care. The clinical results were observed and analyzed. Results: The therapy was smoothly accomplished in all patients. The pain was remarkably relived and the anxiety was alleviated. No displacement of implanted 125 I seed occurred. Conclusion: For patients with local recurrent rectal cancer occurred after CT-guided 125 I seed implantation therapy, careful nursing can effectively relieve the pain and anxiety feeling,and the living quality can also be markedly improved. (authors)

  17. Multimodality therapy approaches, local and systemic treatment, compared with chemotherapy alone in recurrent glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Navarria, Pierina; Pessina, Federico; Ascolese, Anna Maria; D’Agostino, Giuseppe; Tomatis, Stefano; De Rose, Fiorenza; Villa, Elisa; Maggi, Giulia; Simonelli, Matteo; Clerici, Elena; Soffietti, Riccardo; Santoro, Armando; Cozzi, Luca; Bello, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Long-term local control in Glioblastoma is rarely achieved and nearly all patients relapse. In this study we evaluated the clinical effect of different treatment approaches in recurrent patients. Forty-three patients, with median age of 51 years were evaluated for salvage treatment: re-resection and/or re-irradiation plus chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone. Response was recorded using the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria. Hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0. Twenty-one patients underwent chemotherapy combined with local treatment, surgery and/or radiation therapy, and 22 underwent chemotherapy only. The median follow up was 7 months (range 3–28 months). The 1 and 2-years Progression Free Survival was 65 and 10 % for combined treatment and 22 and 0 % for chemotherapy alone (p < 0.01). The 1 and 2-years overall survival was 69 and 29 % for combined and 26 and 0 % for chemotherapy alone (p < 0.01). No toxicity greater than grade 2 was recorded. These data showed that in glioblastoma recurrence the combination of several approaches in a limited group of patients is more effective than a single treatment alone. This stress the importance of multimodality treatment whenever clinically feasible

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer: the Georgetown University experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Leonard N; Lei, Siyuan; Batipps, Gerald P; Kowalczyk, Keith; Bandi, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivers fewer high-dose fractions of radiation which may be radiobiologically favorable to conventional low-dose fractions commonly used for prostate cancer radiotherapy. We report our early experience using SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Patients treated with SBRT from June 2008 to May 2010 at Georgetown University Hospital for localized prostate carcinoma, with or without the use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), were included in this retrospective review of data that was prospectively collected in an institutional database. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® with doses of 35 Gy or 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Biochemical control was assessed using the Phoenix definition. Toxicities were recorded and scored using the CTCAE v.3. Quality of life was assessed before and after treatment using the Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12), the American Urological Association Symptom Score (AUA) and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) questionnaires. Late urinary symptom flare was defined as an AUA score ≥ 15 with an increase of ≥ 5 points above baseline six months after the completion of SBRT. One hundred patients (37 low-, 55 intermediate- and 8 high-risk according to the D’Amico classification) at a median age of 69 years (range, 48–90 years) received SBRT, with 11 patients receiving ADT. The median pre-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was 6.2 ng/ml (range, 1.9-31.6 ng/ml) and the median follow-up was 2.3 years (range, 1.4-3.5 years). At 2 years, median PSA decreased to 0.49 ng/ml (range, 0.1-1.9 ng/ml). Benign PSA bounce occurred in 31% of patients. There was one biochemical failure in a high-risk patient, yielding a two-year actuarial biochemical relapse free survival of 99%. The 2-year actuarial incidence rates of GI and GU toxicity ≥ grade 2 were 1% and 31%, respectively. A median baseline AUA symptom score of 8 significantly increased to 11 at 1 month (p = 0.001), however returned to

  19. Effects of endocardial microwave energy ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Climent

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Until recently the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF consisted primarily of palliation, mostly in the form of pharmacological intervention. However because of recent advances in nonpharmacologic therapies, the current expectation of patients and referring physicians is that AF will be cured, rather than palliated. In recent years there has been a rapid expansion in the availability and variety of energy sources and devices for ablation. One of these energies, microwave, has been applied clinically only in the last few years, and may be a promising technique that is potentially capable of treating a wide range of ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to review microwave energy ablation in surgical treatment of AF with special interest in histology and ultrastructure of lesions produced by this endocardial ablation procedure.

  20. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajiv, E-mail: r.kumar@neu.edu [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Belz, Jodi [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Markovic, Stacey [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niedre, Mark [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sridhar, Srinivas [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  1. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G.; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  2. An analysis of the 'costs and effectiveness' of post-mastectomy local-regional radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, L.B.; Prosnitz, L.R.; Hardenbergh, P.H.; Winer, E.T.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the 'cost/effectiveness' ratio for post-mastectomy local-regional radiation therapy (LR-XRT) for patients with breast cancer. As the risk of local-regional recurrence (LRR) is related to the number of positive axillary lymph nodes, the cost/effectiveness ratio of LR-XRT was assessed for a variable number of positive axillary nodes. For overall survival (OS), the cost per additional life-year is estimated as a function of follow-up duration. Methods/Assumptions: Literature data indicate that the risk of LRR is related to the number of positive axillary nodes (e.g. Fowble, Kuske). For example, the LRR rate is ∼10% for patients with negative nodes, increasing to ∼40% for patients with ≥4 positive nodes. Such data are used to linearly relate the number of positive nodes with the risk of LRR. Additional assumptions include: RT reduces the risk of LRR by 67%; local recurrences are treated with exision/biopsy, LR-XRT and systemic chemotherapy; half of the local recurrences are controlled locally and half will require additional salvage treatment with surgery or chemotherapy. The 5, 10 and 15 yr improvements in OS provided by LR-XRT are estimated to be 3, 7, and 10%, respectively, based on the literature (Overgaard, Ragaz, Klefstrom, Rutqvist). For each year following LR-XRT, the accrued life-years gained are estimated from the published survival curves. Professional and technical charges are used as a surrogate for costs, as follows (in thousands): LR-XRT-15; evaluation of recurrence-2; biopsy plus pathology-1; resection plus pathology-7, chemotherapy-10. Results: The cost per LRR prevented with the addition of routine post-mastectomy LR-XRT is shown, as a function of the number of positive axillary nodes. The cost per additional life-year gained with LR-XRT, as a function of follow-up duration, is shown. With increasing follow-up, the cost per life-year gained decreases as the additional life-years accrue. Conclusions: The cost per LRR

  3. Disparities in the Use of Radiation Therapy in Patients With Local-Regionally Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Steve R.; Beal, Shannon H.; Chen, Steven L.; Canter, Robert J.; Khatri, Vijay P.; Chen, Allen; Bold, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Radiation therapy (RT) is indicated for the treatment of local-regionally advanced breast cancer (BCa). Hypothesis: We hypothesized that black and Hispanic patients with local-regionally advanced BCa would receive lower rates of RT than their white counterparts. Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database was used to identify white, black, Hispanic, and Asian patients with invasive BCa and ≥10 metastatic lymph nodes diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression evaluated the relationship of race/ethnicity with use of RT. Multivariate models stratified for those undergoing mastectomy or lumpectomy. Results: Entry criteria were met by 12,653 patients. Approximately half of the patients did not receive RT. Most patients were white (72%); the remainder were Hispanic (10.4%), black (10.3%), and Asian (7.3%). On univariate analysis, Hispanics (odd ratio [OR] 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.00) and blacks (OR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70-0.89) were less likely to receive RT than whites. On multivariate analysis, blacks (OR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67-0.86) and Hispanics (OR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70-0.90) were less likely than whites to receive RT. Disparities persisted for blacks (OR 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.85) and Hispanics (OR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89) who received mastectomy, but not for those who received lumpectomy. Conclusions: Many patients with local-regionally advanced BCa do not receive RT. Blacks and Hispanics were less likely than whites to receive RT. This disparity was noted predominately in patients who received mastectomy. Future efforts at improving rates of RT are warranted. Efforts at eliminating racial/ethnic disparities should focus on black and Hispanic candidates for postmastectomy RT.

  4. Local photodynamic therapy delays recurrence of equine periocular squamous cell carcinoma compared to cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Elizabeth A; Johnson, Philip J; Delgado, Cherlene; Pearce, Jacqueline W; Moore, Cecil P

    2014-07-01

    (i) To report the successful treatment of 10 cases of equine periocular squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) with surgical excision and photodynamic therapy (PDT) using verteporfin. (ii) To evaluate time to first tumor recurrence between PDT-treated horses and horses treated with surgical excision and cryotherapy. A total of 24 equine PSCC cases were included: group 1 (n = 14) had excision and cryotherapy (1993–2003), group 2 (n = 10), excision and local PDT (2006–2010). Evaluated data: signalment, treatment method, tumor location, size, and time to first recurrence. Groups were compared via chi-square test for categorical variables and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for numeric variables. Time to tumor recurrence was examined using Kaplan–Meier product-limit survival analysis. Of 24 cases, nine breeds were affected. Mean age at treatment in years: 14 (range 5–24) in group 1; 11 (range 8–18) in group 2. Median tumor size: 163 mm2 (range 20–625 mm2) in group 1; 195 mm2 (range 45–775 mm2) in group 2. Signalment, tumor laterality, and size were not significantly different between groups. Time to recurrence was significantly different between groups (Logrank test, P = 0.0006). In group 1, 11/14 horses had tumor regrowth with median time to recurrence in months: 10 (range 1–44). In group 2 (minimum follow-up of 25 months; range 25–50), no horse demonstrated tumor recurrence after one treatment with excision and PDT. This represents the first report of local PDT using verteporfin for treatment of equine PSCC. Following surgery, the likelihood of tumor recurrence was significantly reduced with local PDT compared with cryotherapy. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  5. A comparison of laparoscopic and open surgery following pre-operative chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Toru; Inomata, Masafumi; Hiratsuka, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Although pre-operative chemoradiation therapy for advanced lower rectal cancer is a controversial treatment modality, it is increasingly used in combination with surgery. Few studies have considered the combination of chemoradiation therapy followed by laparoscopic surgery for locally advanced lower rectal cancer; therefore, this study aimed to assess the usefulness of this therapeutic combination. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with locally advanced lower rectal cancer treated by pre-operative chemoradiation therapy and surgery from February 2002 to November 2012 at Oita University. We divided patients into an open surgery group and a laparoscopic surgery group and evaluated various parameters by univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 33 patients were enrolled (open surgery group, n=14; laparoscopic surgery group, n=19). Univariate analysis revealed that compared with the open surgery group, operative time was significantly longer, whereas intra-operative blood loss and intra-operative blood transfusion requirements were significantly less in the laparoscopic surgery group. There were no significant differences in post-operative complication and recurrence rates between the two groups. According to multivariate analysis, operative time and intra-operative blood loss were significant predictors of outcome in the laparoscopic surgery group. This study suggests that laparoscopic surgery after chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer is a safe procedure. Further prospective investigation of the long-term oncological outcomes of laparoscopic surgery after chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer is required to confirm the advantages of laparoscopic surgery over open surgery. (author)

  6. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, J; Kim, J [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Kyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y [Choonhae College of Health Sciences, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  7. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest

  8. [To the issue of local treatment in combination therapy of chronic urethritis, associated with sexually transmitted infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrahmanov, R M; Fajzullina, E V; Abdrahmanov, A R; Haliullin, R R

    2015-12-01

    The article shows the high efficacy of the additional local use of the drug Miramistin in combination therapy of chronic urethritis, associated with sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In accordance with the principles of evidence-based medicine, patients were assigned to the study group (n=110) treated with conventional therapy and Miramistin, and the comparison group (n=40) treated with conventional therapy only. The between-group comparison of treatment effectiveness was carried out by matching results of the etiological healing, the changes of the endoscopic picture of the urethra, and basic clinical manifestations of STI: the degree of inflammatory reaction of urethral mucous membrane, dysuria, pain and sexual syndrome.

  9. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  10. CT-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botsa, Evanthia; Poulou, Loukia S.; Koundouraki, Antonia; Thanos, Loukas; Koutsogiannis, Ioannis; Ziakas, Panayiotis D.; Alexopoulou, Efthimia

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation is a well-accepted technique of interventional oncology in adults. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation as a minimally invasive treatment for metastatic neoplasms in children. A total of 15 radiofrequency ablation sessions were performed in 12 children and young adults (median age 9.5; range 5-18 years) with metastatic malignancies. Seven children and young adults had secondary hepatic lesions, three had pulmonary and two had bone lesions. Radiofrequency ablation was performed under conscious sedation. The median lesion size was 1.7 cm (range 1.3-2.8 cm). The median time for ablation was 8 min (range 7-10 min). Radiofrequency procedures were technically successful in all tumors. Postablation imaging immediately after, and 1 month and 3 months after radiofrequency ablation showed total necrosis in all patients. At 6-month follow-up, three patients (all with lesion size >2 cm) had local recurrence and underwent a second radiofrequency ablation session. At 2-year follow-up no patient had recurrence of the treated tumor. Post-ablation syndrome occurred in four children. No major complication occurred. CT-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation was safe and efficient for palliative treatment in our cohort of patients. (orig.)

  11. Image-guided radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, Andreas; Clasen, Stephan; Pereira, Philippe L.; Kuczyk, Markus; Schick, Fritz

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma is rising with the increased number of incidental detection of small tumours. During the past few years, percutaneous imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation has evolved as a minimally invasive treatment of small unresectable renal tumours offering reduced patient morbidity and overall health care costs. In radiofrequency ablation, thermal energy is deposited into a targeted tumour by means of a radiofrequency applicator. In recent studies, radiofrequency ablation was shown to be an effective and safe modality for local destruction of renal cell carcinoma. Radiofrequency applicator navigation can be performed via ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance guidance; however, ultrasound seems less favourable because of the absence of monitoring capabilities during ablation. On-line monitoring of treatment outcome can only be performed with magnetic resonance imaging giving the possibility of eventual applicator repositioning to ablate visible residual tumour tissue. Long-term follow-up is crucial to assess completeness of tumour ablation. New developments in ablation technology and radiological equipment will further increase the indication field for radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma. Altogether, radiofrequency ablation seems to be a promising new modality for the minimally invasive treatment of renal cell carcinoma, which was demonstrated to exhibit high short-term effectiveness. (orig.)

  12. CT-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botsa, Evanthia [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, First Pediatric Clinic, Agia Sofia Children' s Hospital, Athens (Greece); Poulou, Loukia S.; Koundouraki, Antonia; Thanos, Loukas [Sotiria General Hospital for Chest Diseases, Department of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Athens (Greece); Koutsogiannis, Ioannis [General Military Hospital NIMTS, Department of Medical Imaging, Athens (Greece); Ziakas, Panayiotis D. [Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Rhode Island Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, Providence, RI (United States); Alexopoulou, Efthimia [Attikon University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens (Greece)

    2014-11-15

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation is a well-accepted technique of interventional oncology in adults. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation as a minimally invasive treatment for metastatic neoplasms in children. A total of 15 radiofrequency ablation sessions were performed in 12 children and young adults (median age 9.5; range 5-18 years) with metastatic malignancies. Seven children and young adults had secondary hepatic lesions, three had pulmonary and two had bone lesions. Radiofrequency ablation was performed under conscious sedation. The median lesion size was 1.7 cm (range 1.3-2.8 cm). The median time for ablation was 8 min (range 7-10 min). Radiofrequency procedures were technically successful in all tumors. Postablation imaging immediately after, and 1 month and 3 months after radiofrequency ablation showed total necrosis in all patients. At 6-month follow-up, three patients (all with lesion size >2 cm) had local recurrence and underwent a second radiofrequency ablation session. At 2-year follow-up no patient had recurrence of the treated tumor. Post-ablation syndrome occurred in four children. No major complication occurred. CT-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation was safe and efficient for palliative treatment in our cohort of patients. (orig.)

  13. Phase I/II trial of single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy-boosted hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiation therapy for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael A; Hagan, Michael P; Todor, Dorin; Gilbert, Lynn; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Randolf, Jessica; Heimiller, Jeffrey; Anscher, Mitchell S

    2012-01-01

    A Phase I/II protocol was conducted to examine the toxicity and efficacy of the combination of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a single-fraction high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant. From 2001 through 2006, 26 consecutive patients were treated on the trial. The primary objective was to demonstrate a high rate of completion without experiencing a treatment-limiting toxicity. Eligibility was limited to patients with T stage ≤2b, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤20, and Gleason score ≤7. Treatment began with a single HDR fraction of 6Gy to the entire prostate and 9Gy to the peripheral zone, followed by IMRT optimized to deliver in 28 fractions with a normalized total dose of 70Gy. Patients received 50.4Gy to the pelvic lymph node. The prostate dose (IMRT and HDR) resulted in an average biologic equivalent dose >128Gy (α/β=3). Patients whose pretreatment PSA was ≥10ng/mL, Gleason score 7, or stage ≥T2b received short-term androgen ablation. Median followup was 53 months (9-68 months). There were no biochemical failures by either the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology or the Phoenix definitions. The median nadir PSA was 0.32ng/mL. All the 26 patients completed the treatment as prescribed. The rate of Grade 3 late genitourinary toxicity was 3.8% consisting of a urethral stricture. There was no other Grade 3 or 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicities. Single-fraction HDR-boosted IMRT is a safe effective method of dose escalation for localized prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary venous thrombosis secondary to radiofrequency ablation of the pulmonary veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Reyes, Raquel; García-Ortega, Alberto; Torrents, Ana; Feced, Laura; Calvillo, Pilar; Libreros-Niño, Eugenia Alejandra; Escrivá-Peiró, Juan; Nauffal, Dolores

    2018-01-01

    Pulmonary Vein Thrombosis (PVT) is a rare and underdiagnosed entity produced by local mechanical nature mechanisms, vascular torsion or direct injury to the vein. PVT has been described in clinical cases or small multicenter series mainly in relation to pulmonary vein stenosis, metastatic carcinoma, fibrosing mediastinitis, as an early surgical complication of lung transplantation lobectomy and radiofrequency ablation performed in patients with atrial fibrillation, although in some cases the cause is not known. We report the case of a 57 years old male with history of atrial fibrillation treated by radiofrequency ablation who was admitted in our center because of a two-week history of consistent pleuritic pain in the left hemithorax and low-grade hemoptysis and a lung consolidation treated as a pneumonia with antibiotic but not responding to medical therapy. In view of the poor evolution of the patient, computed tomography angiography was performed with findings of PVT and secondary venous infarction and anticoagulation therapy was optimized. At the end, pulmonary resection was performed due to hemorrhagic recurrence. PVT remains a rare complication of radiofrequency ablation and other procedures involving pulmonary veins. Clinical suspicion and early diagnosis is crucial because is a potentially life-threatening entity.

  15. NEW DIRECTION IN LOCAL THERAPY OF OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Tsvetkova,

    2014-01-01

    decreased only with the use of the active Nanoplast forte patch (p = 0.05; ANOVA two-factor analysis, and evident decreasing of pain was marked as quickly as on the 4th day of application. Due to the therapy, morning stiffness was evidently decreased and functional activity was increased in the main group. The general state of patients in accordance with their subjective assessment (p = 0.05 and with the doctor’s opinion (p = 0.01 was improved with statistic significance. Elimination and decreasing of the dose of NSAIDs took place evidently more frequently (p = 0.007; Fisher exact criterion in the group of patients that applied active Nanoplast forte patch than in the placebo group. All patients completed the study in the active therapy group. No side effects associated with application of the Nanoplast forte patch were revealed. Due to application of the Nanoplast forte patch, 50 percent of patients eliminated or decreased the dose of previously prescribed NSAIDs, while only 25 % of patients did the same in the placebo group.Conclusion. Nanoplast forte may be recommended as an efficient and safe method of local therapy of OA of the KJ.

  16. NEW DIRECTION IN LOCAL THERAPY OF OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Tsvetkova,

    2015-01-01

    decreased only with the use of the active Nanoplast forte patch (p = 0.05; ANOVA two-factor analysis, and evident decreasing of pain was marked as quickly as on the 4th day of application. Due to the therapy, morning stiffness was evidently decreased and functional activity was increased in the main group. The general state of patients in accordance with their subjective assessment (p = 0.05 and with the doctor’s opinion (p = 0.01 was improved with statistic significance. Elimination and decreasing of the dose of NSAIDs took place evidently more frequently (p = 0.007; Fisher exact criterion in the group of patients that applied active Nanoplast forte patch than in the placebo group. All patients completed the study in the active therapy group. No side effects associated with application of the Nanoplast forte patch were revealed. Due to application of the Nanoplast forte patch, 50 percent of patients eliminated or decreased the dose of previously prescribed NSAIDs, while only 25 % of patients did the same in the placebo group.Conclusion. Nanoplast forte may be recommended as an efficient and safe method of local therapy of OA of the KJ.

  17. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Moldable cork ablation material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  19. Integrated Assessment of Left Ventricular Electrical Activation and Myocardial Strain Mapping in Heart Failure Patients: A Holistic Diagnostic Approach for Endocardial Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy, Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia, and Biological Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffessanti, Francesco; Prinzen, Frits W; Conte, Giulio; Regoli, François; Caputo, Maria Luce; Suerder, Daniel; Moccetti, Tiziano; Faletra, Francesco; Krause, Rolf; Auricchio, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    This study sought to test the accuracy of strain measurements based on anatomo-electromechanical mapping (AEMM) measurements compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tagging, to evaluate the diagnostic value of AEMM-based strain measurements in the assessment of myocardial viability, and the additional value of AEMM over peak-to-peak local voltages. The in vivo identification of viable tissue, evaluation of mechanical contraction, and simultaneous left ventricular activation is currently achieved using multiple complementary techniques. In 33 patients, AEMM maps (NOGA XP, Biologic Delivery Systems, Division of Biosense Webster, a Johnson & Johnson Company, Irwindale, California) and MRI images (Siemens 3T, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) were obtained within 1 month. MRI tagging was used to determine circumferential strain (E cc ) and delayed enhancement to obtain local scar extent (%). Custom software was used to measure E cc and local area strain (LAS) from the motion field of the AEMM catheter tip. Intertechnique agreement for E cc was good (R 2  = 0.80), with nonsignificant bias (0.01 strain units) and narrow limits of agreement (-0.03 to 0.06). Scar segments showed lower absolute strain amplitudes compared with nonscar segments: E cc (median [first to third quartile]: nonscar -0.10 [-0.15 to -0.06] vs. scar -0.04 [-0.06 to -0.02]) and LAS (-0.20 [-0.27 to -0.14] vs. -0.09 [-0.14 to -0.06]). AEMM strains accurately discriminated between scar and nonscar segments, in particular LAS (area under the curve: 0.84, accuracy = 0.76), which was superior to peak-to-peak voltages (nonscar 9.5 [6.5 to 13.3] mV vs. scar 5.6 [3.4 to 8.3] mV; area under the curve: 0.75). Combination of LAS and peak-to-peak voltages resulted in 86% accuracy. An integrated AEMM approach can accurately determine local deformation and correlates with the scar extent. This approach has potential immediate application in the diagnosis, delivery of intracardiac therapies, and their

  20. Radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma: assistant techniques for difficult cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tatsuo; Minami, Yasunori; Chung, Hobyung; Hayaishi, Sousuke; Ueda, Taisuke; Tatsumi, Chie; Takita, Masahiro; Kitai, Satoshi; Hatanaka, Kinuyo; Ishikawa, Emi; Yada, Norihisa; Hagiwara, Satoru; Ueshima, Kazuomi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2010-07-01

    To confirm the safety and effectiveness of techniques to assist radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for difficult cases, we retrospectively evaluated successful treatment rates, early complications and local tumor progressions. Between June 1999 and April 2009, a total of 341 patients with 535 nodules were treated as difficult cases. Artificial pleural effusion assisted ablation was performed on 64 patients with 82 nodules. Artificial ascites-assisted ablation was performed on 11 patients with 13 nodules. Cooling by endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) tube-assisted ablation was performed on 6 patients with 8 nodules. When the tumors were not well visualized with conventional B-mode ultrasonography (US), contrast-enhanced US-assisted ablation with Levovist or Sonazoid or virtual CT sonography-assisted ablation was performed. Contrast-enhanced US-assisted ablation was performed on 139 patients with 224 nodules and virtual CT sonography-assisted ablation was performed on 121 patients with 209 nodules. In total, complete ablation was achieved in 514 of 535 (96%) nodules in difficult cases. For RFA with artificial pleural effusion, artificial ascites and ENBD, complete response was confirmed in all cases. For contrast-enhanced US- and CT sonography-assisted ablation, complete response was 95%. Early complications were recognized in 24 cases (4.5%). All cases recovered with no invasive treatment. Local tumor recurrence was investigated in 377 nodules of 245 patients, and 69 (18%) nodules were positive. Tumor recurrences in each assisted technique were 14.7% in artificial pleural effusion cases, 7% in artificial ascites, 12.5% in ENBD tube cases, 31% in virtual CT sonography, and 8.5% in contrast-enhanced US. Although local tumor progression needs to be carefully monitored, assisted techniques of RFA for difficult cases are well tolerated and expand the indications of RFA. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. The efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy on huge hepatocellular carcinoma unsuitable for other local modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Que, Jenny Y; Lin, Li-Ching; Lin, Kuei-Li; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Yu-Wei; Yang, Ching-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients with unresectable huge hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) unsuitable of other standard treatment option. Between 2009 and 2011, 22 patients with unresectable huge HCC (≧10 cm) were treated with SBRT. dose ranged from 26 Gy to 40 Gy in five fractions. Overall survival (OS) and disease-progression free survival (DPFS) were determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Tumor response and toxicities were also assessed. After a median follow-up of 11.5 month (range 2–46 months). The objective response rate was achieved in 86.3% (complete response (CR): 22.7% and partial response (PR): 63.6%). The 1-yr. local control rate was 55.56%. The 1-year OS was 50% and median survival was 11 months (range 2–46 months). In univariate analysis, Child-Pugh stage (p = 0.0056) and SBRT dose (p = 0.0017) were significant factors for survival. However, in multivariate analysis, SBRT dose (p = 0.0072) was the most significant factor, while Child-Pugh stage of borderline significance. (p = 0.0514). Acute toxicities were mild and well tolerated. This study showed that SBRT can be delivered safely to huge HCC and achieved a substantial tumor regression and survival. The results suggest this technique should be considered a salvage treatment. However, local and regional recurrence remain the major cause of failure. Further studies of combination of SBRT and other treatment modalities may be reasonable

  2. Hormonal changes after localized prostate cancer treatment. Comparison between external beam radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, J; Celma, A; Placer, J; Maldonado, X; Trilla, E; Salvador, C; Lorente, D; Regis, L; Cuadras, M; Carles, J; Morote, J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on the hypothalamic pituitary axis of 120 men with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with RP or EBRT exclusively. 120 patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. Ninety two patients underwent RP and 28 patients EBRT exclusively. We measured serum levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (T), free testosterone, and estradiol at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after treatment completion. Patients undergoing RP were younger and presented a higher prostate volume (64.3 vs. 71.1 years, p<0.0001 and 55.1 vs. 36.5 g, p<0.0001; respectively). No differences regarding serum hormonal levels were found at baseline. Luteinizing hormone and FSH levels were significantly higher in those patients treated with EBRT at three months (luteinizing hormone 8,54 vs. 4,76 U/l, FSH 22,96 vs. 8,18 U/l, p<0,0001) while T and free testosterone levels were significantly lower (T 360,3 vs. 414,83ng/dl, p 0,039; free testosterone 5,94 vs. 7,5pg/ml, p 0,018). At 12 months FSH levels remained significantly higher in patients treated with EBRT compared to patients treated with RP (21,01 vs. 8,51 U/l, p<0,001) while T levels remained significantly lower (339,89 vs. 402,39ng/dl, p 0,03). Prostate cancer treatment influences the hypothalamic pituitary axis. This influence seems to be more important when patients with prostate cancer are treated with EBRT rather than RP. More studies are needed to elucidate the role that prostate may play as an endocrine organ. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation dosimetry predicts IQ after conformal radiation therapy in pediatric patients with localized ependymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Kiehna, Erin N.; Li Chenghong; Xiong Xiaoping; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effects of radiation dose-volume distribution on the trajectory of IQ development after conformal radiation therapy (CRT) in pediatric patients with ependymoma. Methods and Materials: The study included 88 patients (median age, 2.8 years ± 4.5 years) with localized ependymoma who received CRT (54-59.4 Gy) that used a 1-cm margin on the postoperative tumor bed. Patients were evaluated with tests that included IQ measures at baseline (before CRT) and at 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months. Differential dose-volume histograms (DVH) were derived for total-brain, supratentorial-brain, and right and left temporal-lobe volumes. The data were partitioned into three dose intervals and integrated to create variables that represent the fractional volume that received dose over the specified intervals (e.g., V 0-20Gy , V 20-40Gy , V 40-65Gy ) and modeled with clinical variables to develop a regression equation to estimate IQ after CRT. Results: A total of 327 IQ tests were performed in 66 patients with infratentorial tumors and 20 with supratentorial tumors. The median follow-up was 29.4 months. For all patients, IQ was best estimated by age (years) at CRT; percent volume of the supratentorial brain that received doses between 0 and 20 Gy, 20 and 40 Gy, and 40 and 65 Gy; and time (months) after CRT. Age contributed significantly to the intercept (p > 0.0001), and the dose-volume coefficients were statistically significant (V 0-20Gy , p = 0.01; V 20-40Gy , p 40-65Gy , p = 0.04). A similar model was developed exclusively for patients with infratentorial tumors but not supratentorial tumors. Conclusion: Radiation dosimetry can be used to predict IQ after CRT in patients with localized ependymoma. The specificity of models may be enhanced by grouping according to tumor location

  4. CBCT-Guided Rapid Arc for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Silva, M. C.; Izquierdo, P.; Candal, A.; Diaz, I.; Fernandez, C.; Gesto, C.; Poncet, M.; Soto, M.; Triana, G.; Losada, C.; Marino, A.

    2013-07-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has emerged as a standard treatment option for stage I non-small cell lung cancer in patients unfit for surgery, or who refuse surgery. An increasing number of prospective phase I/II trials, as well as large single and multicenter studies have reported local control rates to be in excess of 85% for early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Volumetric arc therapy RapidArc with tumor-based image guidance technique will be presented as well as our preliminary observations. (Author)

  5. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mylona, Sophia, E-mail: mylonasophia@yahoo.com; Karagiannis, Georgios, E-mail: gekaragiannis@yahoo.gr; Patsoura, Sofia, E-mail: sofia.patsoura@yahoo.gr [Hellenic Red Cross Hospital ' Korgialenio-Benakio' (Greece); Galani, Panagiota, E-mail: gioulagalani@yahoo.com [Amalia Fleming Hospital (Greece); Pomoni, Maria, E-mail: marypomoni@gmail.com [Evgenidion Hospital (Greece); Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com [Sotiria Hospital (Greece)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  6. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mylona, Sophia; Karagiannis, Georgios; Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8–10 min at 80–110°C and a power of 90–110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n − 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  7. Increase in protoporphyrin IX after 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy is due to local re-synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Henriëtte S.; Kruijt, Bastiaan; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angélique; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2007-01-01

    Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence that is bleached during aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) increases again in time after treatment. In the present study we investigated if this increase in PpIX fluorescence after illumination is the result of local re-synthesis or of

  8. Delayed Development of Pneumothorax After Pulmonary Radiofrequency Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clasen, Stephan; Kettenbach, Joachim; Kosan, Bora; Aebert, Hermann; Schernthaner, Melanie; Kroeber, Stefan-Martin; Boemches, Andrea; Claussen, Claus D.; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute pneumothorax is a frequent complication after percutaneous pulmonary radiofrequency (RF) ablation. In this study we present three cases showing delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation in 34 patients. Our purpose is to draw attention to this delayed complication and to propose a possible approach to avoid this major complication. These three cases occurred subsequent to 44 CT-guided pulmonary RF ablation procedures (6.8%) using either internally cooled or multitined expandable RF electrodes. In two patients, the pneumothorax, being initially absent at the end of the intervention, developed without symptoms. One of these patients required chest drain placement 32 h after RF ablation, and in the second patient therapy remained conservative. In the third patient, a slight pneumothorax at the end of the intervention gradually increased and led into tension pneumothorax 5 days after ablation procedure. Underlying bronchopleural fistula along the coagulated former electrode track was diagnosed in two patients. In conclusion, delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation can occur and is probably due to underlying bronchopleural fistula, potentially leading to tension pneumothorax. Patients and interventionalists should be prepared for delayed onset of this complication, and extensive track ablation following pulmonary RF ablation should be avoided.

  9. Local therapy in localized Ewing tumors: results of 1058 patients treated in the CESS 81, CESS 86, and EICESS 92 trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, Andreas; Ahrens, Susanne; Paulussen, Michael; Kuhlen, Michaela; Koenemann, Stefan; Ruebe, Christian; Winkelmann, Winfried; Kotz, Rainer; Dunst, Juergen; Willich, Normann; Juergens, Heribert

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The impact of different local therapy approaches on local control, event-free survival, and secondary malignancies in the CESS 81, CESS 86, and EICESS 92 trials was investigated. Methods and Materials: The data of 1058 patients with localized Ewing tumors were analyzed. Wherever feasible, a surgical local therapy approach was used. In patients with a poor histologic response or with intralesional and marginal resections, this was to be followed by radiotherapy (RT). In EICESS 92, preoperative RT was introduced for patients with expected close resection margins. Definitive RT was used in cases in which surgical resection seemed impossible. In CESS 81, vincristine, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, and actinomycin D was used. In CESS 86, vincristine, adriamycin, ifosfamide, and actinomycin D was introduced for patients with central tumors or primaries >100 cm 3 . In CESS 92, etoposide, vincristine, adriamycin, ifosfamide, and actinomycin D was randomized against vincristine, adriamycin, ifosfamide, and actinomycin D in patients with primaries >100 cm 3 . Results: The rate of local failure was 7.5% after surgery with or without postoperative RT, and was 5.3% after preoperative and 26.3% after definitive RT (p=0.001). Event-free survival was reduced after definitive RT (p=0.0001). Irradiated patients represented a negatively selected population with unfavorable tumor sites. Definitive RT showed comparable local control to that of postoperative RT after intralesional resections. Patients with postoperative RT had improved local control after intralesional resections and in tumors with wide resection and poor histologic response compared with patients receiving surgery alone. Patients with marginal resections with or without postoperative radiotherapy showed comparable local control, yet the number of patients with good histologic response was higher in the latter treatment group (72.2% vs. 38.5%). Conclusion: Patients with resectable tumors after initial

  10. Self-assembled nanoformulation of methylprednisolone succinate with carboxylated block copolymer for local glucocorticoid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalov, Marat I; Đặng, Trinh; Petrova, Natalia V; Laikov, Alexander V; Luong, Duong; Akhmadishina, Rezeda A; Lukashkin, Andrei N; Abdullin, Timur I

    2018-04-01

    A new self-assembled formulation of methylprednisolone succinate (MPS) based on a carboxylated trifunctional block copolymer of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide (TBC-COOH) was developed. TBC-COOH and MPS associated spontaneously at increased concentrations in aqueous solutions to form almost monodisperse mixed micelles (TBC-COOH/MPS) with a hydrodynamic diameter of 19.6 nm, zeta potential of -27.8 mV and optimal weight ratio ∼1:6.3. Conditions for the effective formation of TBC-COOH/MPS were elucidated by comparing copolymers and glucocorticoids with different structure. The micellar structure of TBC-COOH/MPS persisted upon dilution, temperature fluctuations and interaction with blood serum components. TBC-COOH increased antiradical activity of MPS and promoted its intrinsic cytotoxicity in vitro attributed to enhanced cellular availability of the mixed micelles. Intracellular transportation and hydrolysis of MPS were analyzed using optimized liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring which showed increased level of both MPS and methylprednisolone in neuronal cells treated with the formulated glucocorticoid. Our results identify TBC-COOH/MPS as an advanced in situ prepared nanoformulation and encourage its further investigation for a potential local glucocorticoid therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry to predict local tumor control for HPPH-mediated photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Kim, Michele M.; Ong, Yi Hong; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-02-01

    This preclinical study examines four dosimetric quantities (light fluence, photosensitizer photobleaching ratio, PDT dose, and reacted singlet oxygen ([1O2]rx)) to predict local control rate (LCR) for 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide (HPPH)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT). Mice bearing radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were treated with different in-air fluences (135, 250 and 350 J/cm2) and in-air fluence rates (50, 75 and 150 mW/cm2) at 0.25 mg/kg HPPH and a drug-light interval of 24 hours using a 1 cm diameter collimated laser beam at 665 nm wavelength. A macroscopic model was used to calculate ([1O2]rx)) based on in vivo explicit dosimetry of the initial tissue oxygenation, photosensitizer concentration, and tissue optical properties. PDT dose was defined as a temporal integral of drug concentration and fluence rate (φ) at a 3 mm tumor depth. Light fluence rate was calculated throughout the treatment volume based on Monte-Carlo simulation and measured tissue optical properties. The tumor volume of each mouse was tracked for 30 days after PDT and Kaplan-Meier analyses for LCR were performed based on a tumor volume <=100 mm3, for four dose metrics: fluence, HPPH photobleaching rate, PDT dose, and ([1O2]rx)). The results of this study showed that ([1O2]rx)) is the best dosimetric quantity that can predict tumor response and correlate with LCR.

  12. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Anna Lia, E-mail: alvalentini@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Gui, Benedetta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); D' Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Clementi, Valeria [Clinical Science Development Group, GE Healthcare, Milan (Italy); Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi [OU Clinic Radiobiology, I.F.C.A. Florence (Italy); Mantini, Giovanna [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio <5:1. Cancerous metabolism (CM) was defined by choline-to-creatine ratio >1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed si