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Sample records for lobe epilepsy impact

  1. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  2. Temporal lobe epilepsy semiology.

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    Blair, Robert D G

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures) is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE). Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  3. Parietal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanova, Vicenta

    2012-10-01

    Patients with parietal lobe epilepsy (PLE) exhibit an electroclinical epilepsy syndrome that is rarely seen even at large epilepsy centers. Clinically, most patients with PLE exhibit a somatosensory aura that may include painful dysesthesias, though vertigo, aphasia, disturbances of one's body image also occur, when ictal propagation occurs from the parietal lobe to the supplementary motor area, hypermotor manifestations are noted. When temporolimbic propagation occurs, complex visual or auditory hallucinations and automatisms may appear. Scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) is often nonlocalizing. Ictal EEG is rarely localizing in PLE, and invasive EEG is often required for definitive localization and functional mapping. Recent advances in clinical neurophysiology during the evaluation of patients with refractory partial epilepsy include Ictal magnetic source imaging (MSI). Combined EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) may be useful for patients with PLE to refine the localization in patients undergoing a presurgical evaluation. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) are more concentrated inside the seizure onset zone (SOZ), indicating that they may be used as interictal scalp EEG biomarker for the SOZ. When medical therapy fails, resective epilepsy surgery can result in seizure freedom or significant reduction especially when a lesion is present.

  4. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Semiology

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    Robert D. G. Blair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE. Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  5. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

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    Nickels, Katherine C.; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.; Moseley, Brian D.; Wirrell, Elaine C.

    2012-01-01

    The temporal lobe is a common focus for epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy in infants and children differs from the relatively homogeneous syndrome seen in adults in several important clinical and pathological ways. Seizure semiology varies by age, and the ictal EEG pattern may be less clear cut than what is seen in adults. Additionally, the occurrence of intractable seizures in the developing brain may impact neurocognitive function remote from the temporal area. While many children will respond favorably to medical therapy, those with focal imaging abnormalities including cortical dysplasia, hippocampal sclerosis, or low-grade tumors are likely to be intractable. Expedient workup and surgical intervention in these medically intractable cases are needed to maximize long-term developmental outcome. PMID:22957247

  6. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

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    Katherine C. Nickels

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal lobe is a common focus for epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy in infants and children differs from the relatively homogeneous syndrome seen in adults in several important clinical and pathological ways. Seizure semiology varies by age, and the ictal EEG pattern may be less clear cut than what is seen in adults. Additionally, the occurrence of intractable seizures in the developing brain may impact neurocognitive function remote from the temporal area. While many children will respond favorably to medical therapy, those with focal imaging abnormalities including cortical dysplasia, hippocampal sclerosis, or low-grade tumors are likely to be intractable. Expedient workup and surgical intervention in these medically intractable cases are needed to maximize long-term developmental outcome.

  7. Parietal lobe epilepsy: the great imitator among focal epilepsies.

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    Ristić, Aleksandar J; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; So, Norman; Wong, Chong; Najm, Imad M

    2012-03-01

    Comprising large areas of association cortex, the parietal lobe is part of an extensive synaptic network elaborately intertwined with other brain regions. We hypothesize that such widespread projections are responsible for producing inaccurate localisation readings on scalp EEG and clinical semiology in patients with parietal lobe epilepsies, as opposed to frontal or temporal lobe epilepsies. Our study included 50 patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, who were subsequently rendered seizure-free for ≥12 months (median: 23 months) following resections limited to the frontal (n=17), temporal (n=17), or parietal (n=16) lobes. Interictal and ictal EEG data with accompanying seizure video recordings were extracted from archived files of scalp video-EEG monitoring. Two blinded raters independently reviewed the EEG according to predetermined criteria. Videos of seizures were then observed, as raters formulated their final electroclinical impression (ECI), identifying patients' abnormal neuronal activities with parietal, temporal, and frontal lobe epilepsy, or unspecified localisation. Groups did not differ significantly in demographics, age at epilepsy onset, or presence of MRI abnormalities. Interictal discharges in parietal lobe epilepsy showed the greatest magnitude of scatter outside the lobe of origin; the majority of patients with parietal lobe epilepsy had more than one spike population (pparietal lobe epilepsy cases (p=0.024). Whenever raters confidently limited their ECI to one lobar subtype, overall accuracy was excellent. Lobar classifications by ECI were highly accurate for temporal lobe epilepsy, vacillating in frontal lobe epilepsy, and least accurate in parietal lobe epilepsy subjects. Scalp EEG readings of parietal lobe epilepsy patients showed a more variable scatter of interictal discharges and a lower localisation value of ictal recordings compared to temporal and frontal lobe epilepsy subjects, suggesting an increased likelihood of

  8. Memory Functioning in Children with Epilepsy: Frontal Lobe Epilepsy, Childhood Absence Epilepsy, and Benign Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes

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    Ana Filipa Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE, childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS and the influence of epilepsy-related variables. Memory was examined in 90 children with epilepsy (each epilepsy group consisted of 30 children, aged 6–15, and compared with 30 control children. Children with FLE showed significant deficits in verbal and visual memory. In addition, type of epilepsy, earlier age at epilepsy onset, and longer active duration of epilepsy were associated with memory problems. Seizure frequency and treatment, however, did not influence memory performance. This study indicates that children with FLE show greater risk of developing memory deficits than children with CAE or BECTS, thus highlighting the importance of assessing also memory functions in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  9. Memory functioning in children with epilepsy: frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes.

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    Lopes, Ana Filipa; Monteiro, José Paulo; Fonseca, Maria José; Robalo, Conceição; Simões, Mário Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS)) and the influence of epilepsy-related variables. Memory was examined in 90 children with epilepsy (each epilepsy group consisted of 30 children), aged 6-15, and compared with 30 control children. Children with FLE showed significant deficits in verbal and visual memory. In addition, type of epilepsy, earlier age at epilepsy onset, and longer active duration of epilepsy were associated with memory problems. Seizure frequency and treatment, however, did not influence memory performance. This study indicates that children with FLE show greater risk of developing memory deficits than children with CAE or BECTS, thus highlighting the importance of assessing also memory functions in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  10. The extratemporal lobe epilepsies in the epilepsy monitoring unit

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    Dash, Deepa; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Extratemporal lobe epilepsies (ETLE) are characterized by the epileptogenic foci outside the temporal lobe. They have a wide spectrum of semiological presentation depending upon the site of origin. They can arise from frontal, parietal, occipital lobes and from hypothalamic hamartoma. We discuss in this review the semiology of different types of ETLE encountered in the epilepsy monitoring unit. PMID:24791090

  11. Impaired Facial Expression Recognition in Children with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Impact of Early Seizure Onset on Fear Recognition

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    Golouboff, Nathalie; Fiori, Nicole; Delalande, Olivier; Fohlen, Martine; Dellatolas, Georges; Jambaque, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    The amygdala has been implicated in the recognition of facial emotions, especially fearful expressions, in adults with early-onset right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study investigates the recognition of facial emotions in children and adolescents, 8-16 years old, with epilepsy. Twenty-nine subjects had TLE (13 right, 16 left) and…

  12. Impaired Facial Expression Recognition in Children with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Impact of Early Seizure Onset on Fear Recognition

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    Golouboff, Nathalie; Fiori, Nicole; Delalande, Olivier; Fohlen, Martine; Dellatolas, Georges; Jambaque, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    The amygdala has been implicated in the recognition of facial emotions, especially fearful expressions, in adults with early-onset right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study investigates the recognition of facial emotions in children and adolescents, 8-16 years old, with epilepsy. Twenty-nine subjects had TLE (13 right, 16 left) and…

  13. Profiling cytokines in temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is one of the most common types of partial epilepsy. Because about 30% of the TLE patients poorly respond to medication, identification of new drug targets to treat TLE is imperative. This requires detailed knowledge of the pathophysiology of TLE . The aim of this thesis

  14. Ictal EEG modifications in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Pelliccia, Veronica; Mai, Roberto; Francione, Stefano; Gozzo, Francesca; Sartori, Ivana; Nobili, Lino; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Pizzanelli, Chiara; Tassi, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common type of epilepsy in adults with medically intractable, localisation-related epilepsy, amenable to surgery. Together with clinical and neuroimaging data, presurgical ictal scalp-EEG findings are often sufficient to define the epileptogenic zone. It is widely believed that ictal scalp-EEG findings in temporal lobe epilepsy are represented by 5-9-Hz lateralised rhythmic theta activity or 2-5-Hz lateralised rhythmic delta activity. On the basis of experimental models and experience with intra-cerebral EEG recordings, the pattern of low-voltage fast activity is considered to be the electrophysiological hallmark of the epileptogenic zone. We reviewed the ictal scalp-EEG data relating to 111 seizures in 47 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who underwent video-EEG recordings during presurgical work-up. We found that 35 patients (74.4%) showed flattening, low-voltage fast activity or fast activity as the initial EEG pattern. When visible, the rhythmic delta or theta activity followed the fast activity. Low-voltage fast activity, flattening or fast activity occurs in the majority of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and represents the main ictal EEG pattern. Low-voltage fast activity (or similar) is also identifiable as the initial ictal EEG pattern in scalp-EEG recordings.

  15. Neuropsychological profile in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Marques, Daniela; Ferreira, Naide; Horácio, Góis; Reis, Alexandra; Jacinto, Gonçalo

    2013-01-01

    The temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common type of refractory epilepsy in adults. There is a wide consensus regarding the commitment of memory in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. However, the consensus is not as widespread with respect to the other functions such as attention, executive functions, language and intellectual performance. For this study we analyzed retrospectively a group of 76 patients with refractory epilepsy, 48 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy ...

  16. Monocarboxylate transporters in temporal lobe epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Fredrik; Eid, Tore; Bergersen, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects approximately 1 % of the general population, making it one of the most common disorders of the central nervous system. Furthermore, up to 40 % of all patients with epilepsy cannot control their seizures with current medications. More...... efficacious treatments for medication refractory epilepsy are therefore needed. A better understanding of the mechanisms that cause this disorder is likely to facilitate the discovery of such treatments. Impairment in cerebral energy metabolism has been proposed as a possible causative factor...... in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), which is one of the most common types of medication-refractory epilepsies in adults. In this review, we will discuss some of the current hypotheses regarding the possible causal relationship between brain energy metabolism and TLE. Emphasis will be placed...

  17. Perirhinal cortex and temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Giuseppe eBiagini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The perirhinal cortex – which is interconnected with several limbic structures and is intimately involved in learning and memory - plays major roles in pathological processes such as the kindling phenomenon of epileptogenesis and the spread of limbic seizures. Both features may be relevant to the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that represents the most refractory adult form of epilepsy with up to 30% of patients not achieving adequate seizure control. Compared to other limbic structures such as the hippocampus or the entorhinal cortex, the perirhinal area remains understudied and, in particular, detailed information on its dysfunctional characteristics remains scarce; this lack of information may be due to the fact that the perirhinal cortex is not grossly damaged in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in models mimicking this epileptic disorder. However, we have recently identified in pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats the presence of selective losses of interneuron subtypes along with increased synaptic excitability. In this review we: (i highlight the fundamental electrophysiological properties of perirhinal cortex neurons; (ii briefly stress the mechanisms underlying epileptiform synchronization in perirhinal cortex networks following epileptogenic pharmacological manipulations; and (iii focus on the changes in neuronal excitability and cytoarchitecture of the perirhinal cortex occurring in the pilocarpine model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Overall, these data indicate that perirhinal cortex networks are hyperexcitable in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that this condition is associated with a selective cellular damage that is characterized by an age-dependent sensitivity of interneurons to precipitating injuries, such as status epilepticus.

  18. Impact of hippocampal subfield histopathology in episodic memory impairment in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Comper, Sandra Mara; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Corso, Jeana Torres; Gaça, Larissa Botelho; Noffs, Maria Helena Silva; Lancellotti, Carmen Lúcia Penteado; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze preoperative visual and verbal episodic memories in a homogeneous series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) submitted to corticoamygdalohippocampectomy and its association with neuronal cell density of each hippocampal subfield. The hippocampi of 72 right-handed patients were collected and prepared for histopathological examination. Hippocampal sclerosis patterns were determined, and neuronal cell density was calculated. Preoperatively, two verbal and two visual memory tests (immediate and delayed recalls) were applied, and patients were divided into two groups, left and right MTLE (36/36). There were no statistical differences between groups regarding demographic and clinical data. Cornu Ammonis 4 (CA4) neuronal density was significantly lower in the right hippocampus compared with the left (p=0.048). The groups with HS presented different memory performance - the right HS were worse in visual memory test [Complex Rey Figure, immediate (p=0.001) and delayed (p=0.009)], but better in one verbal task [RAVLT delayed (p=0.005)]. Multiple regression analysis suggested that the verbal memory performance of the group with left HS was explained by CA1 neuronal density since both tasks were significantly influenced by CA1 [Logical Memory immediate recall (p=0.050) and Logical Memory and RAVLT delayed recalls (p=0.004 and p=0.001, respectively)]. For patients with right HS, both CA1 subfield integrity (p=0.006) and epilepsy duration (p=0.012) explained Complex Rey Figure immediate recall performance. Ultimately, epilepsy duration also explained the performance in the Complex Rey Figure delayed recall (p<0.001). Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1) hippocampal subfield was related to immediate and delayed recalls of verbal memory tests in left HS, while CA1 and epilepsy duration were associated with visual memory performance in patients with right HS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Aura in temporal lobe epilepsy: clinical and electroencephalographic correlation.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy were evaluated for their aura and the site of EEG abnormality. Autonomic and psychic auras were more frequently associated with right-sided temporal lobe lesions in 290 patients.

  20. OCCIPITAL LOBE EPILEPSY OR MIGRAINE HEADACHE

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    Skrijelj Fadil E

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occipital lobe epilepsies are rarely met in clinical practice, but when they occur, they can be misdiagnosed as migraine-like headache. Their prevalence ranges from 5%to 10% of all epilepsies. Seizures can occur at any age; etiologically speaking they can be symptomatic, cryptogenic and idiopathic (most often onsetis in childhood. Clinical symptomatology is manifested by partial epileptic seizures in the sense of visual elementary and/or complex manifestations, palinopsia, amaurosis, tonic head deviation, bulbus, nistagmus and headache. Propagation discharge to neighbour areas (temporal, parietal and frontal is a frequent occurrence appearing with complex partial seizures frequently finishing with secondary generalized tonic-clonic (GTC seizures. Case report: We are presenting a17-year-old male patient who has suffered from attacks of visual problemswith headache since 10 years of age. All the time it is treated as a migraine headache. During the last attack of headache the patient also had a loss of consciousness, EEG that was performed for the first time evidenced epileptic discharges of the occipital area. The therapy also included treatment with antiepileptic drug pregabalin resulting in seizure withdrawal. Conclusion: The appearance of visual symptoms followed by headache is most frequently qualified as migraine triggered headache. However, when antimigraine therapy does not give favorable results epileptic headache should be suspected, with obligatory performance of EEG recording. Occipital lobe epilepsy often presents diagnostic dilemmas due to clinical manifestations that are similar to that of non-migraine headache.

  1. Dynamic perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Dupont, Patrick; Paesschen, Wim van [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Zaknun, John J. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Maes, Alex [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); AZ Groeninge, Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Locharernkul, Chaichon [Chulalongkorn University, Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Bangkok (Thailand); Vasquez, Silvia; Carpintiero, Silvina [Fleni Instituto de Investigaciones Neurologicas, Nuclear Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bal, C.S. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); Ospedale Maggiore, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    To investigate dynamic ictal perfusion changes during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We investigated 37 patients with TLE by ictal and interictal SPECT. All ictal injections were performed within 60 s of seizure onset. Statistical parametric mapping was used to analyse brain perfusion changes and temporal relationships with injection time and seizure duration as covariates. The analysis revealed significant ictal hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral temporal lobe extending to subcortical regions. Hypoperfusion was observed in large extratemporal areas. There were also significant dynamic changes in several extratemporal regions: ipsilateral orbitofrontal and bilateral superior frontal gyri and the contralateral cerebellum and ipsilateral striatum. The study demonstrated early dynamic perfusion changes in extratemporal regions probably involved in both propagation of epileptic activity and initiation of inhibitory mechanisms. (orig.)

  2. PET imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Semah, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, DSV-CEA, 91 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    The research projects on epilepsy addressed two main issues: the pathophysiology of the inter-ictal hypo-metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy and the role of the basal ganglia in the control of seizure. Our research projects focused primarily on temporal lobe epilepsy: The pathophysiology of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism and its correlation with the epileptogenic network was investigated in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Inter-ictal hypo-metabolism is commonly found in mesio-temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) but its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that metabolic changes reflect the preferential networks involved in ictal discharges. We analyzed the topography of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism according to electro-clinical patterns in 50 patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and consistent features of MTLE. Based on electro-clinical correlations we identified 4 groups:1) mesial group characterized by mesial seizure onset without evidence of early spread beyond the temporal lobe; 2) anterior mesio-lateral group (AML) with early anterior spread, involving the anterior lateral temporal cortex and insulo-fronto-opercular areas; 3) widespread mesio-lateral group (WML) with widespread spread, involving both anterior and posterior lateral temporal and peri-sylvian areas; 4) bi-temporal group (BT) with early contralateral temporal spread. Results of FDG-PET imaging in each group were compared to control subjects using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM99). MRI data and surgical outcome in each group were compared to metabolic findings. Hypo-metabolism was limited to the hippocampal gyrus, the temporal pole and the insula in the mesial group. Gradual involvement of the lateral temporal cortex, the insula and the peri-sylvian areas was observed in the AML and WML groups. The BT group differed from the others by mild bi-temporal involvement, bilateral insular hypo-metabolism and longer epilepsy duration. MRI

  3. Psychosis in temporal lobe epilepsy: atypical presentation.

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    Gandhi, Priya; Ogunyemi, Boluwaji; MacDonald, Andrea; Gadit, Amin

    2012-01-18

    A 55-year-old lady was admitted following a concern raised by family members who had noticed a change in behaviour in terms of declining mood, paranoia with expression of belief that she was being bugged, also reported smelling perfume and after shave lotion. She had a prior diagnosis of bipolar mood disorder and was on lithium but remained no-compliant with her prescribed medication in the 10 weeks before admission. Upon admission, necessary investigations were performed including CT scan and EEG. Her CT was normal but EEG was grossly abnormal. Neurology consultation was sought and a sleep deprived EEG and MRI was ordered. Meanwhile, carbamezipine was commenced in view of the change in diagnosis to that of temporal lobe epilepsy. The patient responded very well to this regime and improved in all spheres. She was finally discharged with follow-up appointments with both neurology and psychiatry clinics.

  4. Isolated Hyperreligiosity in a Patient with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Rocio Garcia-Santibanez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old man with history of temporal lobe epilepsy presented to the emergency department with hyperreligiosity after medication noncompliance. After medications were resumed, he returned to baseline. Many famous prophets are believed to have suffered epilepsy. Waxman and Geschwind described a group of traits in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy consisting of hyperreligiosity, hypergraphia, altered sexual behavior, aggressiveness, preoccupation with details, and circumstantiality. The incidence of religious experiences ranges from 0.3 to 3.1 percent in patients with epilepsy. Religious experiences can be ictal, interictal, or postictal. Treatment is aimed at the underlying seizure etiology.

  5. Cognitive impairments in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Mahgol Tavakoli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings indicated that WMS-III and WAIS-R can differentiate patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy from normal subjects. However, the obtained cognitive profile could not differentiate between the right and the left TLE.

  6. Decision-making in temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijl, S.G.

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is a successful treatment option for patients with drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. To decide whether patients are surgery candidates, a complex presurgical work-up is performed, starting with basic diagnostic tests (patient history, MRI, video EEG monitoring), followed by

  7. Role of Electroencephalography in Presurgical Evaluation of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Seetharam Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery remains a therapeutic option for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Comprehensive presurgical evaluation includes electroencephalography (EEG and video EEG in identifying patients who are likely to benefit from surgery. Here, we discuss in detail the utility of EEG in presurgical evaluation of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy along with illustrative cases.

  8. Extrahippocampal Desynchronization in Nonlesional Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Jesús Pastor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is traditionally associated with both hypersynchronous activity in the form of interictal epileptic discharges and hippocampal sclerosis, recent findings suggest that desynchronization also plays a central role in the dynamics of this pathology. The objective of this work is to show the imbalance existing between mesial activities in patients suffering from mesial TLE, with normal mesial structures. Foramen ovale recordings from six patients with mesial TLE and one with lateral TLE were analyzed through a cluster analysis and synchronization matrices. None of the patients present findings in the MRI presurgical evaluation. Numerical analysis was carried out in three different situations: awake and sleep interictal and also during the preictal stage. High levels of desynchronization ipsilateral to the epileptic side were present in mesial TLE patients. Low levels of desynchronization were present in the lateral TLE patient during the interictal stage and almost zero in the preictal stage. Implications of these findings in relation with seizure spreading are discussed.

  9. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    John D. Rolston

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy continue to have seizures despite medical therapy. For these patients, one recourse is surgical resection of the mesial temporal lobe, with its attendant risks. Noninvasive treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery is under active investigation as a possible alternative to open surgery. Accumulated evidence from multiple studies shows radiosurgery to be comparable in outcomes to surgical resection. A definitive randomized, controlled trial, the Radiosurgery or Open Surgery for Epilepsy (ROSE trial, is currently underway, and further investigation of this promising treatment is crucial in our advancement of alternative therapies to treat refractory epilepsy.

  10. On the psychopathology of unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Feddersen, B; Herzer, R; Hartmann, U; Gaab, M R; Runge, U

    2005-02-01

    Personality adjustment of patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was investigated in the light of special characteristics of the epilepsy process, psychosocial stressors, and the cognitive status of the patients. Thirty-seven patients with medically intractable unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (16-55 years of age; 20 right temporal and 17 left temporal foci) were examined with standardized personality inventories (FPI, STAI, IPC, TSK) supplemented by a rating scale evaluated by the neuropsychologist (GEWLE). Patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy were characterized by increased emotional dependency, less externally judged composedness, increased depressive drive and mood, increased nervousness, increased search for information and exchange of disease experience, and greater tendency to persevere (P psychotherapeutic strategies.

  11. Reversible antisocial behavior in ventromedial prefrontal lobe epilepsy.

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    Trebuchon, Agnès; Bartolomei, Fabrice; McGonigal, Aileen; Laguitton, Virginie; Chauvel, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Frontal lobe dysfunction is known to be associated with impairment in social behavior. We investigated the link between severe pharmacoresistant frontal lobe epilepsy and antisocial trait. We studied four patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy involving the prefrontal cortex, presenting abnormal interictal social behavior. Noninvasive investigations (video-EEG, PET, MRI) and intracerebral recording (stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG)) were performed as part of a presurgical assessment. Comprehensive psychiatric and cognitive evaluation was performed pre- and postoperatively for frontal lobe epilepsy, with at least 7years of follow-up. All patients shared a characteristic epilepsy pattern: (1) chronic severe prefrontal epilepsy with daily seizures and (2) an epileptogenic zone as defined by intracerebral recording involving the anterior cingulate cortex, ventromedial PFC, and the posterior part of the orbitofrontal cortex, with early propagation to contralateral prefrontal and ipsilateral medial temporal structures. All patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria (DSM-IV) of antisocial personality disorder, which proved to be reversible following seizure control. Pharmacoresistant epilepsy involving a prefrontal network is associated with antisocial personality. We hypothesize that the occurrence of frequent seizures in this region over a prolonged period produces functional damage leading to impaired prefrontal control of social behavior. This functional damage is reversible since successful epilepsy surgery markedly improved antisocial behavior in these patients. The results are in line with previous reports of impairment of social and moral behavior following ventromedial frontal lobe injury.

  12. A Review of the Epidemiology of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Jose F. Téllez-Zenteno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial-onset epilepsies account for about 60% of all adult epilepsy cases, and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the most common type of partial epilepsy referred for epilepsy surgery and often refractory to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. Little is known about the epidemiology of TLE, because it requires advanced neuroimaging, positive EEG, and appropriate clinical semiology to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, recently recognized incidentally detected mesial temporal sclerosis in otherwise healthy individuals and benign temporal epilepsy indicate that the true epidemiology of TLE is underestimated. Our current knowledge on the epidemiology of TLE derives from data published from tertiary referral centers and/or inferred from population-based studies dealing with epilepsy. This article reviews the following aspects of the epidemiology of TLE: definitions, studies describing epidemiological rates, methodological observations, the interpretation of available studies, and recommendations for future studies.

  13. Refractory Lesional Parietal Lobe Epilepsy: Clinical, Electroencephalographic and Neurodiagnostic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurşun, Oğuzhan; Karataş, Hülya; Dericioğlu, Neşe; Saygi, Serap

    2016-09-01

    Specialized centers, in the management and surgical treatment of medically refractory epilepsy, emphasize the importance of differentiating the varieties of localization related epilepsies. There has been considerable recent interest in temporal and frontal lobe epileptic syndromes and less attention has been paid to parietal and occipital lobe epilepsies. Here we report the clinical, electroencephalographic and neuroimaging characteristics of 46 patients with medically refractory lesional parietal lobe epilepsy who have been followed up for 1-10 years. In this study auras were reported in 78.3% of the patients and included sensory symptoms (72.2%), headache (36.1%), nausea and vomiting (36.1%), psychic symptoms (36.1%) and visual symptoms (16.6%). The most common ictal behavioral changes were paresthesia (69.6%) and focal clonic activity (39.1%). Tonic posture, various automatisms, head deviation, staring, sensation of pain and speech disturbances occurred to a lesser extent. Simple partial seizures were present in 69.6%. Complex partial seizures occurred in 43.5% and secondary generalized tonic clonic seizures were reported in 58.7% of the patients. Interictal routine EEG disclosed abnormal background activity in 1/3 of the patients. Nonlocalising epileptiform abnormalities were found in 34.8% of the patients. EEG findings were normal in 34.8% of the patients. The most common presumed etiologic factors were as follows: posttraumatic encephalomalacia, stroke, tumor, malformation of cortical development, atrophy, and arteriovenous malformation. Clinical, electrophysiological and neuroimaging features of the lesional symptomatic partial epilepsy patients may help us to localize the seizure focus in some patients with cryptogenic partial epilepsy. So that, the timing decision of the parietal lobe sampling with more invasive techniques like intracranial electrodes prior to epilepsy surgery would be easier.

  14. Relevance of the glutathione system in temporal lobe epilepsy: evidence in human and experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Pérez-Cruz, Claudia; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Sampieri, Aristides; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with diseases that are systemic as well as diseases that affect the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, and temporal lobe epilepsy represents an estimated 40% of all epilepsy cases. Currently, evidence from human and experimental models supports the involvement of oxidative stress during seizures and in the epileptogenesis process. Hence, the aim of this review was to provide information that facilitates the processing of this evidence and investigate the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this specific pathology.

  15. [Kumagusu Minakata with temporal lobe epilepsy: a pathographic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengoku, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Kumagusu Minakata (1867-1941), a Japanese genius devoted to natural history and folklore, is famous for his immense range of works (including 50 monographs in 'Nature') and his discovery of several varieties of mycetozoa. His diary and the observations of other persons reveal that he was affected by several grand mal epileptic seizures, and he complained himself of frequent déjà vu experiences which he called promnesia according to Myers. Promnesia means, for example, "I have lived through all this before, and I know what will happen this next minute." Minakata also had this rare type of aural sign. MRI analysis of his postmortem brain found evidence of right hippocampal atrophy. This result showed that he had temporal lobe epilepsy with focus of the right side, and this coincides with his déjà vu experiences which were the aura of the loss of consciousness. However, he did not notice that these were aural signs, and he also complained of memory disturbances due to frequent déjà vu. His behavioral characteristics were peculiar, and those of Dostoyevsky who also had temporal lobe epilepsy were similar. Temporal lobe epilepsies may influence behavioral patterns which control the emotions. As a positive point, some patients with temporal lobe epilepsy can exhibit their primordial mental actions and perform persistent works.

  16. Memory, Metamemory and Their Dissociation in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Charlotte E.; Andres, Pilar; Broks, Paul; Noad, Rupert; Sadler, Martin; Coker, Debbie; Mazzoni, Giuliana

    2010-01-01

    Patients with temporal-lobe epilepsy (TLE) present with memory difficulties. The aim of the current study was to determine to what extent these difficulties could be related to a metamemory impairment. Fifteen patients with TLE and 15 matched healthy controls carried out a paired-associates learning task. Memory recall was measured at intervals of…

  17. Brain Regions Underlying Word Finding Difficulties in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance.…

  18. Brain Regions Underlying Word Finding Difficulties in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance.…

  19. Memory, Metamemory and Their Dissociation in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Charlotte E.; Andres, Pilar; Broks, Paul; Noad, Rupert; Sadler, Martin; Coker, Debbie; Mazzoni, Giuliana

    2010-01-01

    Patients with temporal-lobe epilepsy (TLE) present with memory difficulties. The aim of the current study was to determine to what extent these difficulties could be related to a metamemory impairment. Fifteen patients with TLE and 15 matched healthy controls carried out a paired-associates learning task. Memory recall was measured at intervals of…

  20. Executive Functioning and Dysfunctional Schema Modes in Individuals with Frontal Lobe Lesion and Temporal Lobe Epilepsy; Mega Case Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabir Zaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was to investigate the executive functioning like selective attention, cognitive flexibility, processing speed and executive processing abilities in individuals with frontal lobe lesion and temporal lobe epilepsy by using a tool Stroop Neuropsychological Screening Test [1]. The study also tried to explore emotional problems, cognitive state, specific behavioral responses and coping strategies of individuals with frontal lobe lesion and temporal lobe epilepsy. The present study was also designed to develop the reflective understanding of dysfunctional and healthy modes of individuals of frontal lobe lesion and temporal lobe epilepsy measure through Schema Mode Inventory Urdu version [2]. The sample of the present study consisted of 08 cases 04 cases related to frontal lobe lesion and 04 cases of temporal lobe epilepsy. Our finding indicated that the individuals of frontal lobe lesion and temporal lobe epilepsy were found significantly engaged in dysfunctional modes, such as Child Modes, Maladaptive and Punitive Parents Modes. On Stroop Test the Standard Deviation of individuals with frontal lobe lesion (74.18 and temporal lobe epilepsy (59.25 both the values are below the standard value (98 which shows the significant level. The Stroop Test measure executive functioning like selective attention executive processing, cognitive flexibility and inhibition control all these qualities are low and poor in individuals with frontal lobe lesion and temporal lobe epilepsy. The individuals with frontal lobe lesion and temporal lobe epilepsy were engaged in dysfunctional modes such as Child Modes, Maladaptive and Punitive Parent Modes are positively associated with executive functioning. Individuals with dysfunctional schema modes are lower score on Stroop test.

  1. Executive Functioning and Dysfunctional Schema Modes in Individuals with Frontal Lobe Lesion and Temporal Lobe Epilepsy; Mega Case Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sabir Zaman

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to investigate the executive functioning like selective attention, cognitive flexibility, processing speed and executive processing abilities in individuals with frontal lobe lesion and temporal lobe epilepsy by using a tool Stroop Neuropsychological Screening Test [1]. The study also tried to explore emotional problems, cognitive state, specific behavioral responses and coping strategies of individuals with frontal lobe lesion and temporal lobe epilepsy. The present stu...

  2. Seizure semiology identifies patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Anna Mira; Feddersen, Berend; Tezer, F Irsel; Hartl, Elisabeth; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-01-01

    Laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy is usually defined by EEG and imaging results. We investigated whether the analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena identifies bilateral independent temporal lobe seizure onset. We investigated the seizure semiology in 17 patients in whom invasive EEG-video-monitoring documented bilateral temporal seizure onset. The results were compared to 20 left and 20 right consecutive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients who were seizure free after anterior temporal lobe resection. The seizure semiology was analyzed using the semiological seizure classification with particular emphasis on the sequence of seizure phenomena over time and lateralizing seizure phenomena. Statistical analysis included chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Bitemporal lobe epilepsy patients had more frequently different seizure semiology (100% vs. 40%; psemiology for the identification of bilateral TLE was high (100%) with a specificity of 60%. Lateralizing seizure phenomena had a low sensitivity (59%) but a high specificity (89%). The combination of lateralizing seizure phenomena and different seizure semiology showed a high specificity (94%) but a low sensitivity (59%). The analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena adds important clinical information to identify patients with bilateral TLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Temporal lobe epilepsy manifesting as alexia with agraphia for kanji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kengo; Ogawa, Nobuhiro

    2011-11-01

    Alexia with agraphia results from lesions of the left angular gyrus or the left posteroinferior temporal lobe. In Japanese or Korean persons, lesions of the latter cause alexia with agraphia for ideograms. We describe a case of alexia with agraphia for kanji (Japanese ideograms) caused by temporal lobe epilepsy. After generalized convulsions, a 32-year-old man noticed that he had difficulty in reading and writing kanji, although he could read and write kana (Japanese syllabograms). His EEG showed frequent sharp waves on the left occipitotemporal region. MRI of the brain revealed a hyperintense lesion on the left hippocampus. Single-photon-emission computed tomography revealed marked hyperperfusion at the left hippocampus and the left posteroinferior temporal cortex. Antiepileptic drugs improved his alexia with agraphia for kanji. This is the first report describing alexia with agraphia for kanji caused by temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Adult absence semiology misinterpreted as mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Rebecca; Chiota-McCollum, Nicole; Tatum, William

    2014-12-01

    Correct diagnosis of seizure type and epilepsy syndrome is the foundation for appropriate antiepileptic drug selection. Inappropriate medication choices occur in the treatment of generalized epilepsy and may aggravate some seizure types, including absence seizures, potentially leading to pseudo-drug resistance. Fortunately, a correct diagnosis of absence seizures is usually not difficult, though rarely demonstrates electroclinical overlap with focal seizures. EEG can be especially misleading when secondary bilateral synchronous discharges occur in patients with focal seizures. However, the semiology of focal seizures associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy has a characteristic and consistent semiology that is the mark of this common epilepsy syndrome in adulthood. We recently encountered a 53-year-old female with refractory seizures and a semiology strongly suggesting mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Instead of focal seizures, prolonged absence seizures were validated by video-EEG monitoring and she became seizure-free after a change to broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs. This case further expands our understanding of the complexity of semiology in electroclinical classification and the spectrum that may occur in adult absence seizures. It serves to underscore the need for ictal EEG recordings and the importance of concordance with the clinical course during the pre-surgical evaluation of patients with lesions and drug-resistant epilepsy. [Published with video sequences].

  5. Electroencephalography in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Javidan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG has an important role in the diagnosis and classification of epilepsy. It can provide information for predicting the response to antiseizure drugs and to identify the surgically remediable epilepsies. In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE seizures could originate in the medial or lateral neocortical temporal region, and many of these patients are refractory to medical treatment. However, majority of patients have had excellent results after surgery and this often relies on the EEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data in presurgical evaluation. If the scalp EEG data is insufficient or discordant, invasive EEG recording with placement of intracranial electrodes could identify the seizure focus prior to surgery. This paper highlights the general information regarding the use of EEG in epilepsy, EEG patterns resembling epileptiform discharges, and the interictal, ictal and postictal findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using scalp and intracranial recordings prior to surgery. The utility of the automated seizure detection and computerized mathematical models for increasing yield of non-invasive localization is discussed. This paper also describes the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of EEG for seizure recurrence after withdrawal of medications following seizure freedom with medical and surgical therapy.

  6. Electroencephalography in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidan, Manouchehr

    2012-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) has an important role in the diagnosis and classification of epilepsy. It can provide information for predicting the response to antiseizure drugs and to identify the surgically remediable epilepsies. In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures could originate in the medial or lateral neocortical temporal region, and many of these patients are refractory to medical treatment. However, majority of patients have had excellent results after surgery and this often relies on the EEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in presurgical evaluation. If the scalp EEG data is insufficient or discordant, invasive EEG recording with placement of intracranial electrodes could identify the seizure focus prior to surgery. This paper highlights the general information regarding the use of EEG in epilepsy, EEG patterns resembling epileptiform discharges, and the interictal, ictal and postictal findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using scalp and intracranial recordings prior to surgery. The utility of the automated seizure detection and computerized mathematical models for increasing yield of non-invasive localization is discussed. This paper also describes the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of EEG for seizure recurrence after withdrawal of medications following seizure freedom with medical and surgical therapy. PMID:22957235

  7. Natural History of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Antecedents and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Garima; Prasad, Asuri N.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy represents the largest group of patients with treatment resistant/medically intractable epilepsy undergoing epilepsy surgery. The underpinnings of common forms of TLE in many instances begin in early life with the occurrence of an initial precipitating event. The first epileptic seizure often occurs after a variable latency period following this event. The precise natural history and progression following the first seizure to the development of TLE, its subsequent resolution through spontaneous remission or the development of treatment resistant epilepsy remain poorly understood. Our present understanding of the role played by these initial events, the subsequent latency to development of temporal lobe epilepsy, and the emergence of treatment resistance remains incomplete. A critical analysis of published data suggest that TLE is a heterogeneous condition, where the age of onset, presence or absence of a lesion on neuroimaging, the initial precipitating event, association with febrile seizures, febrile status epilepticus, and neurotropic viral infections influence the natural history and outcome. The pathways and processes through which these variables coalesce into a framework will provide the basis for an understanding of the natural history of TLE. The questions raised need to be addressed in future prospective and longitudinal observational studies. PMID:22937237

  8. Natural History of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Antecedents and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Shukla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy represents the largest group of patients with treatment resistant/medically intractable epilepsy undergoing epilepsy surgery. The underpinnings of common forms of TLE in many instances begin in early life with the occurrence of an initial precipitating event. The first epileptic seizure often occurs after a variable latency period following this event. The precise natural history and progression following the first seizure to the development of TLE, its subsequent resolution through spontaneous remission or the development of treatment resistant epilepsy remain poorly understood. Our present understanding of the role played by these initial events, the subsequent latency to development of temporal lobe epilepsy, and the emergence of treatment resistance remains incomplete. A critical analysis of published data suggest that TLE is a heterogeneous condition, where the age of onset, presence or absence of a lesion on neuroimaging, the initial precipitating event, association with febrile seizures, febrile status epilepticus, and neurotropic viral infections influence the natural history and outcome. The pathways and processes through which these variables coalesce into a framework will provide the basis for an understanding of the natural history of TLE. The questions raised need to be addressed in future prospective and longitudinal observational studies.

  9. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study mapping the episodic memory encoding network in temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sidhu, Meneka K; Stretton, Jason; Winston, Gavin P.; Bonelli, Silvia; Centeno, Maria; Vollmar, Christian; Symms, Mark; Thompson, Pamela J; Koepp, Matthias J; Duncan, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated reorganization of memory encoding networks within the temporal lobe in temporal lobe epilepsy, but little is known of the extra-temporal networks in these patients. We investigated the temporal and extra-temporal reorganization of memory encoding networks in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and the neural correlates of successful subsequent memory formation. We studied 44 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sc...

  10. Lithium therapy in comorbid temporal lobe epilepsy and cycloid psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paul; Kashiviswanath, Sridhar; Huynh, Alison; Allha, Naveen; Piaggio, Ken; Sahoo, Saddichha; Gupta, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of post-ictal psychosis has foundered on uncertainty in diagnosis of psychotic phenotypes, and equivocal efficacy of first and second generation antipsychotics. This article presents a case history of comorbid temporal lobe epilepsy and psychosis, suggests the applicability of the continental, cycloid psychosis diagnostic conceptualization to post-ictal psychoses, and demonstrates the efficacy of lithium in their treatment. Clinical studies of comorbidity of epilepsy and psychosis offer great potential as a basis for modelling brain–mind relationships, and neuropsychiatric nosology, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:28031853

  11. Somnambulism Due to Temporal Lobe Epilepsy - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Somnambulism (sleep walking is a disorder of arousal that falls under the parasomnia group. It is more common in children than in adults. (1. The onset of sleep walking in adult life is most unusual and suggests the presence of secondary causes rather than a primary sleep disorder (1. We report a 30-year-old male who presented with repeated episodes of sleep waling possibly due to nocturnal temporal lobe epilepsy.

  12. Memory in children with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Catarina A. Guimarães

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, memory deficit is not so well understood as it is in adults. The aim of this study was to identify and describe memory deficits in children with symptomatic TLE, and to verify the influence of epilepsy variables on memory. We evaluated 25 children with TLE diagnosed on clinical, EEG and MRI findings. Twenty-five normal children were compared with the patients. All children underwent a neuropsychological assessment to estimate intellectual level, attention, visual perception, handedness, and memory processes (verbal and visual: short-term memory, learning, and delayed recall. The results allowed us to conclude: besides memory deficits, other neuropsychological disturbances may be found in children with TLE such as attention, even in the absence of overall cognitive deficit; the earlier onset of epilepsy, the worse verbal stimuli storage; mesial lesions correlate with impairment in memory storage stage while neocortical temporal lesions correlate with retrieval deficits.

  13. Depression in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Eleonora Borges Gonçalves

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the comorbidity of depressive disorders in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. METHOD: We evaluated 25 consecutive patients with refractory TLE (16 women and 9 men, using semi-structured psychiatric interviews, according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10, and the Beck Depression Inventory. RESULTS: Seventeen of 25 patients (68% had depressive disorder: 6 with dysthymia, three with major depressive episodes and 8 with recurrent depressive disorders. Two (8% were diagnosed with mixed anxiety and depression. Only 5 of 17 patients (29.4% were previously diagnosed with depressive disorder and received prior antidepressant treatment. Duration of epilepsy was significantly higher in patients with depressive disorder (p=0.016, but there was no relationship between depression and seizure frequency. CONCLUSION: This study confirmed that depressive disorders are common and underdiagnosed in patients with TLE refractory to AEDs. Patients with longer duration of epilepsy are at higher risk of having depression.

  14. Metabolic changes in occipital lobe epilepsy with automatisms

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    Chong H Wong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Some studies suggest that the pattern of glucose hypometabolism relates not only to the ictal-onset zone, but also reflects seizure propagation. We investigated metabolic changes in patients with occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE that may reflect propagation of ictal discharge during seizures with automatisms.Methods: Fifteen patients who had undergone epilepsy surgery for intractable OLE and had undergone interictal Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET between 1994 and 2004 were divided into two groups (with and without automatisms during seizure. Significant regions of hypometabolism were identified by comparing 18F-FDG-PET results from each group with 16 healthy controls by using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 2.Key Findings: Significant hypometabolism was confined largely to the epileptogenic occipital lobe in the patient group without automatisms. In patients with automatisms, glucose hypometabolism extended from the epileptogenic occipital lobe into the ipsilateral temporal lobe.Significance: We identified a distinctive hypometabolic pattern that was specific for OLE patients with automatisms during a seizure. This finding supports the postulate that seizure propagation is a cause of glucose hypometabolism beyond the region of seizure onset.

  15. Unusual ictal foreign language automatisms in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Naing Ko; Lee, Sang Kun

    2014-12-01

    The distinct brain regions could be specifically involved in different languages and the differences in brain activation depending on the language proficiency and on the age of language acquisition. Speech disturbances are observed in the majority of temporal lobe complex motor seizures. Ictal verbalization had significant lateralization value: 90% of patients with this manifestation had seizure focus in the non-dominant temporal lobe. Although, ictal speech automatisms are usually uttered in the patient's native language, ictal speech foreign language automatisms are unusual presentations of non-dominent temporal lobe epilepsy. The release of isolated foreign language area could be possible depending on the pattern of ictal spreading of non-dominant hemisphere. Most of the case reports in ictal speech foreign language automatisms were men. In this case report, we observed ictal foreign language automatisms in middle age Korean woman.

  16. Accelerated cognitive decline in a rodent model for temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, Sandra; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Rijkers, Kim; Lagiere, Melanie; Bogaarts, Jan G.; Blokland, Arjan; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Hoogland, Govert; Vles, Johan S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive impairment is frequently observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. It is hypothesized that cumulative seizure exposure causes accelerated cognitive decline in patients with epilepsy. We investigated the influence of seizure frequency on cognitive decline in a rodent

  17. Social inference deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy and lobectomy: risk factors and neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Melanie; St-Laurent, Marie; Barnett, Alexander; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2015-05-01

    In temporal lobe epilepsy and lobectomy, deficits in emotion identification have been found consistently, but there is limited evidence for complex social inference skills such as theory of mind. Furthermore, risk factors and the specific neural underpinnings of these deficits in this population are unclear. We investigated these issues using a comprehensive range of social inference tasks (emotion identification and comprehension of sincere, deceitful and sarcastic social exchanges) in individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy or lobectomy (n = 87). We observed deficits across patient groups which were partly related to the presence of mesial temporal lobe sclerosis, early age of seizure onset and left lobectomy. A voxel-based morphometry analysis conducted in the pre-operative group confirmed the importance of the temporal lobe by showing a relationship between left hippocampal atrophy and overall social inference abilities, and between left anterior neocortex atrophy and sarcasm comprehension. These findings are in keeping with theoretical proposals that the hippocampus is critical for binding diverse elements in cognitive domains beyond canonical episodic memory operations, and that the anterior temporal cortex is a convergence zone of higher-order perceptual and emotional processes, and of stored representations. As impairments were frequent, we require further investigation of this behavioural domain and its impact on the lives of people with epilepsy.

  18. Recurrent diarrhea as a manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Murai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A woman with temporal lobe epilepsy manifesting with repeated episodes of sudden diarrhea and loss of consciousness is reported. A 63-year-old, right-handed female presented with chief complaints of sudden diarrhea and loss of consciousness for almost three decades. The first attack occurred in her 30s, and similar attacks repeated several times in a year. Her attacks comprised abrupt abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, sudden emergence of old memories relating to when she had played with her brother in her childhood, and loss of consciousness during defecation. She had no convulsion or automatism and fully recovered in a few minutes. Every time she was transferred to emergency hospital by ambulance, she had examinations such as blood test, head computed tomography, electrocardiogram, abdominal ultrasound, and electroencephalography (EEG, but no specific diagnosis was made. On admission to our hospital, vital signs, neurological examination, and blood tests did not show abnormal findings. During long-term video-EEG monitoring for 40 h, she had no habitual event. Interictal EEG showed intermittent irregular delta waves and sharp regional transients in the left anterio-midtemporal area. Sharp transients were not as outstanding from background activities as to be defined as epileptiform discharges, but they were reproducible in morphology and distribution and appeared not only in sleep but also in wakefulness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was unremarkable. Single-photon emission computed tomography showed a decrease of blood flow in the left frontal and temporal lobes. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale—III showed a decline of verbal comprehension. We concluded that the patient was suffering from partial epilepsy originating from the left temporal lobe. Carbamazepine markedly improved her seizures. Temporal lobe epilepsy can manifest with diverse autonomic symptoms and signs. Abdominal sensations often herald the onset of epileptic seizures

  19. Spatial memory deficits in juvenile rats with pilocarpine induced temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Orbán-Kis K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most frequent forms of epilepsy in humans is temporal lobe epilepsy. Characteristic to this form of the disease is the frequent pharmacoresistance and the association with behavioural disorders and cognitive impairment. The objective of our study was to establish the degree of cognitive impairment in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy after an initial epileptogenic exposure but before of the onset of the effect of long-duration epilepsy.

  20. Organization and control of epileptic circuits in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, A; Maroso, M; Soltesz, I

    2016-01-01

    When studying the pathological mechanisms of epilepsy, there are a seemingly endless number of approaches from the ultrastructural level-receptor expression by EM-to the behavioral level-comorbid depression in behaving animals. Epilepsy is characterized as a disorder of recurrent seizures, which are defined as "a transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain" (Fisher et al., 2005). Such abnormal activity typically does not occur in a single isolated neuron; rather, it results from pathological activity in large groups-or circuits-of neurons. Here we choose to focus on two aspects of aberrant circuits in temporal lobe epilepsy: their organization and potential mechanisms to control these pathological circuits. We also look at two scales: microcircuits, ie, the relationship between individual neurons or small groups of similar neurons, and macrocircuits, ie, the organization of large-scale brain regions. We begin by summarizing the large body of literature that describes the stereotypical anatomical changes in the temporal lobe-ie, the anatomical basis of alterations in microcircuitry. We then offer a brief introduction to graph theory and describe how this type of mathematical analysis, in combination with computational neuroscience techniques and using parameters obtained from experimental data, can be used to postulate how microcircuit alterations may lead to seizures. We then zoom out and look at the changes which are seen over large whole-brain networks in patients and animal models, and finally we look to the future.

  1. Memory Rehabilitation Strategies in Nonsurgical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Felice, Alessandra; Alderighi, Marzia; Martinato, Matteo; Grisafi, Davide; Bosco, Anna; Thompson, Pamela J; Sander, Josemir W; Masiero, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    People with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who have not undergone epilepsy surgery often complain of memory deficits. Cognitive rehabilitation is employed as a remedial intervention in clinical settings, but research is limited and findings concerning efficacy and the criteria for choosing different approaches have been inconsistent. We aimed to appraise existing evidence on memory rehabilitation in nonsurgical individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy and to ascertain the effectiveness of specific strategies. A scoping review was preferred given the heterogeneous nature of the interventions. A comprehensive literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, Scholars Portal/PSYCHinfo, Proceedings First, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses identified articles published in English before February 2016. The search retrieved 372 abstracts. Of 25 eligible studies, six were included in the final review. None included pediatric populations. Strategies included cognitive training, external memory aids, brain training, and noninvasive brain stimulation. Selection criteria tended to be general. Overall, there was insufficient evidence to make definitive conclusions regarding the efficacy of traditional memory rehabilitation strategies, brain training, and noninvasive brain stimulation. The review suggests that cognitive rehabilitation in nonsurgical TLE is underresearched and that there is a need for a systematic evaluation in this population.

  2. Emotion recognition in temporal lobe epilepsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Giulia; Meletti, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    There is increasing interest in the understanding of emotion recognition deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common form of focal epilepsies. There are conflicting reports about impairments for different emotions in right and left temporal lobe epilepsy patients. A systematic review and a narrative synthesis was conducted for studies investigating emotion recognition (ER) in TLE. Embase, MEDLINE, PsychINFO and Pubmed were searched from 1990 to March 2015 and reference lists were reviewed. 996 citations were identified and 43 studies were finally included. ER deficits are consistently observed across studies. A fear recognition deficit is always reported, followed by deficits in sadness and disgust recognition. Deficits are observed across visual and auditory domains. Conflicting evidence is present concerning the severity of ER deficits in right and left TLE. Studies on anterior temporal lobectomy report data similar to that observed in pre-surgical patients. Current evidence supports the conclusion that recognition of negative emotions is commonly impaired in TLE, particularly for fear, and in the visual domain. Future work should focus on more ecologically valid test, on longitudinal studies to assess the role of anterior temporal lobectomy, and to correlate ER measures to social functioning in everyday life.

  3. Memory Rehabilitation Strategies in Nonsurgical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Felice, Alessandra; Alderighi, Marzia; Martinato, Matteo; Grisafi, Davide; Bosco, Anna; Thompson, Pamela J; Sander, Josemir W; Masiero, Stefano

    2017-02-15

    People with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who have not undergone epilepsy surgery often complain of memory deficits. Cognitive rehabilitation is employed as a remedial intervention in clinical settings, but research is limited and findings concerning efficacy and the criteria for choosing different approaches have been inconsistent. We aimed to appraise existing evidence on memory rehabilitation in nonsurgical individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy and to ascertain the effectiveness of specific strategies. A scoping review was preferred given the heterogeneous nature of the interventions. A comprehensive literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, Scholars Portal/PSYCHinfo, Proceedings First, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses identified articles published in English before February 2016. The search retrieved 372 abstracts. Of 25 eligible studies, six were included in the final review. None included pediatric populations. Strategies included cognitive training, external memory aids, brain training, and noninvasive brain stimulation. Selection criteria tended to be general. Overall, there was insufficient evidence to make definitive conclusions regarding the efficacy of traditional memory rehabilitation strategies, brain training, and noninvasive brain stimulation. The review suggests that cognitive rehabilitation in nonsurgical TLE is underresearched and that there is a need for a systematic evaluation in this population.

  4. Childhood onset temporal lobe epilepsy: Beyond hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Mühlebner, Angelika; Breu, Markus; Kasprian, Gregor; Schmook, Maria T; Stefanits, Harald; Scholl, Theresa; Samueli, Sharon; Gröppel, Gudrun; Dressler, Anastasia; Prayer, Daniela; Czech, Thomas; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Feucht, Martha

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal Sclerosis (HS) is widely recognized as a significant underlying cause of drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in adults. In contrast, HS is a rare finding in pediatric surgical series, and a higher incidence of HS associated with cortical dysplasia (i.e. FCD type IIIa according to the new ILAE classification) than in adult series has been reported. Data about the electro-clinical characteristics of this subgroup are scarce. We studied 15 children and adolescents with drug-resistant TLE and HS who had anterior temporal lobe resection at our center with regard to electroclinical characteristics, MRI features and histopathology. Children in whom histopathology was consistent with Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) type IIIa (n = 7) were compared with those who had HS only (n = 8). Clinical characteristics associated with this highly selective subset of patients with FCD type IIIa were: the presence of febrile seizures during infancy, a shorter duration of active epilepsy and a lower age at epilepsy surgery. In addition, there were non-significant trends towards more extended abnormalities on both EEG and neuroimaging. We were, however, not able to find group differences with respect to neuropathologic subtyping of the HS. We present the first detailed description and comprehensive data analysis of children with FCD type IIIa. According to our results, this patient group seems to show a distinct clinical phenotype. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Déjà Experiences in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Nathan A. Illman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, déjà vu has been linked to seizure activity in temporal lobe epilepsy, and clinical reports suggest that many patients experience the phenomenon as a manifestation of simple partial seizures. We review studies on déjà vu in epilepsy with reference to recent advances in the understanding of déjà vu from a cognitive and neuropsychological standpoint. We propose a decoupled familiarity hypothesis, whereby déjà vu is produced by an erroneous feeling of familiarity which is not in keeping with current cognitive processing. Our hypothesis converges on a parahippocampal dysfunction as the locus of déjà vu experiences. However, several other temporal lobe structures feature in reports of déjà vu in epilepsy. We suggest that some of the inconsistency in the literature derives from a poor classification of the various types of déjà experiences. We propose déjà vu/déjà vécu as one way of understanding déjà experiences more fully. This distinction is based on current models of memory function, where déjà vu is caused by erroneous familiarity and déjà vécu by erroneous recollection. Priorities for future research and clinical issues are discussed.

  6. Stability of synchronization clusters and seizurability in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Agostina Palmigiano

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Identification of critical areas in presurgical evaluations of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy is the most important step prior to resection. According to the "epileptic focus model", localization of seizure onset zones is the main task to be accomplished. Nevertheless, a significant minority of epileptic patients continue to experience seizures after surgery (even when the focus is correctly located, an observation that is difficult to explain under this approach. However, if attention is shifted from a specific cortical location toward the network properties themselves, then the epileptic network model does allow us to explain unsuccessful surgical outcomes. METHODS: The intraoperative electrocorticography records of 20 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy were analyzed in search of interictal synchronization clusters. Synchronization was analyzed, and the stability of highly synchronized areas was quantified. Surrogate data were constructed and used to statistically validate the results. Our results show the existence of highly localized and stable synchronization areas in both the lateral and the mesial areas of the temporal lobe ipsilateral to the clinical seizures. Synchronization areas seem to play a central role in the capacity of the epileptic network to generate clinical seizures. Resection of stable synchronization areas is associated with elimination of seizures; nonresection of synchronization clusters is associated with the persistence of seizures after surgery. DISCUSSION: We suggest that synchronization clusters and their stability play a central role in the epileptic network, favoring seizure onset and propagation. We further speculate that the stability distribution of these synchronization areas would differentiate normal from pathologic cases.

  7. GABAERGIC ALTERATIONS IN NEOCORTEX OF PATIENTS WITH PHARMACORESISTANT TEMPORAL LOBE EPILEPSY CAN EXPLAIN THE COMORBIDITY OF ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION: THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF CLINICAL FACTORS

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    Luisa Lilia Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is a chronic neurodegenerative disease with a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Temporal neocortex contributes to either seizure propagation or generation in TLE, a situation that has been associated with alterations of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA system. On the other hand, an impaired neurotransmission mediated by GABA in temporal neocortex has also been involved with the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. In spite of these situations, the role of the necortical GABA system in the comorbidity of TLE and mood disorders has not been investigated. The present study was designed to identify alterations in the GABA system such as: binding to GABAA and GABAB receptors and benzodiazepine site, the tissue content of GABA and the expression of the mRNA encoding the α1-6, β1-3 and γ GABAA subunits, in the temporal neocortex of surgically treated patients with TLE with and without anxiety and/or depression. Neocortex of patients with TLE and comorbid anxiety and/or depression showed increased expression of the mRNA encoding the γ2-subunit, reduced GABAB-induced G protein activation in spite of elevated GABAB binding, and lower tissue content of GABA when compared to autopsy controls. Some of these changes significantly correlated with seizure frequency and duration of epilepsy. The results obtained suggest a dysfunction of the GABAergic neurotransmission in temporal neocortex of patients with TLE and comorbid anxiety and/or depression that could be also influenced by clinical factors such as seizure frequency and duration of illness.

  8. GABAergic alterations in neocortex of patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy can explain the comorbidity of anxiety and depression: the potential impact of clinical factors.

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    Rocha, Luisa; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Escalante-Santiago, David; Feria-Romero, Iris Angélica; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Cisneros-Franco, José Miguel; Buentello-García, Ricardo Masao; Cienfuegos, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease with a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Temporal neocortex contributes to either seizure propagation or generation in TLE, a situation that has been associated with alterations of the γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) system. On the other hand, an impaired neurotransmission mediated by GABA in temporal neocortex has also been involved with the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. In spite of these situations, the role of the necortical GABA system in the comorbidity of TLE and mood disorders has not been investigated. The present study was designed to identify alterations in the GABA system such as binding to GABAA and GABAB receptors and benzodiazepine site, the tissue content of GABA and the expression of the mRNA encoding the α1-6, β1-3, and γ GABAA subunits, in the temporal neocortex of surgically treated patients with TLE with and without anxiety, and/or depression. Neocortex of patients with TLE and comorbid anxiety and/or depression showed increased expression of the mRNA encoding the γ2-subunit, reduced GABAB-induced G-protein activation in spite of elevated GABAB binding, and lower tissue content of GABA when compared to autopsy controls. Some of these changes significantly correlated with seizure frequency and duration of epilepsy. The results obtained suggest a dysfunction of the GABAergic neurotransmission in temporal neocortex of patients with TLE and comorbid anxiety and/or depression that could be also influenced by clinical factors such as seizure frequency and duration of illness.

  9. Shorter epilepsy duration is associated with better seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

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    Lucas Crociati Meguins

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the influence of patient’s age and seizure onset on surgical outcome of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Method A retrospective observational investigation performed from a cohort of patients from 2000 to 2012. Results A total of 229 patients were included. One-hundred and eleven of 179 patients (62% were classified as Engel I in the group with < 50 years old, whereas 33 of 50 (66% in the group with ≥ 50 years old group (p = 0.82. From those Engel I, 88 (61% reported epilepsy duration inferior to 10 years and 56 (39% superior to 10 years (p < 0.01. From the total of patients not seizure free, 36 (42% reported epilepsy duration inferior to 10 years and 49 (58% superior to 10 years (p < 0.01. Conclusion Patients with shorter duration of epilepsy before surgery had better postoperative seizure control than patients with longer duration of seizures.

  10. The role of presurgical EEG parameters and of reoperation for seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Schmeiser, B; Zentner, J; Steinhoff, B J; Brandt, A; Schulze-Bonhage, A; Kogias, E; Hammen, T

    2017-10-01

    After surgery for intractable mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) seizures recur in 30-40%. One predictor for seizure recurrence is the distribution of seizure onset and interictal epileptiform discharges (IED). Our study focused on lateralization and extent of epileptiform activity regarding postoperative seizure persistence and the effect of reoperation. This study comprises 426 consecutive patients operated for intractable mTLE. Impact of preoperative seizure onset and IED on the persistence of seizures and results of reoperation were analyzed. One year after surgery, 27% of patients with mTLE experienced persistent seizures (Engel II-IV). Preoperative bilateral seizure onset in EEG was predictive for postoperative seizure recurrence (Engel II-IV: 64%). Seizure foci and IED exceeding the temporal lobe in the ipsilateral hemisphere were not found to be associated with worse seizure outcome (Engel I: 72% and 75%) compared to patients with seizure foci confined to the ipsilateral temporal lobe (Engel I: 75% and 76%). Moreover, IED exceeding the affected temporal lobe in the ipsilateral hemisphere or even bilateral IED did not negatively affect seizure freedom if seizure onset was strictly limited to the affected temporal lobe (Engel I: 85% and 65%, respectively). 60% of patients reoperated in the ipsilateral temporal lobe for persistent seizures became seizure free. Preoperative bilateral ictal foci are a negative predictor for seizure outcome. Contrarily, IED exceeding the affected temporal lobe in the ipsilateral hemisphere or even bilateral IED had favorable seizure outcome if seizure onset is strictly limited to the affected temporal lobe. Reoperation for seizure persistence constitutes a promising therapeutic option. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Language Mapping in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children: Special Considerations

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    de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Wang, An; Hayman-Abello, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in children is a slightly different entity than TLE in adults not only because of its semiology and pathology but also because of the different approach to surgical treatment. Presurgical investigations for eloquent cortex, especially language, must take these differences into account. Most diagnostic tests were created for adults, and many of the assessment tools need to be adapted for children because they are not just small adults. This paper will highlight the specific challenges and solutions in mapping language in a pediatric population with TLE. PMID:22957246

  12. Relevance of the Glutathione System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Evidence in Human and Experimental Models

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    Noemí Cárdenas-Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, which is a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with diseases that are systemic as well as diseases that affect the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, and temporal lobe epilepsy represents an estimated 40% of all epilepsy cases. Currently, evidence from human and experimental models supports the involvement of oxidative stress during seizures and in the epileptogenesis process. Hence, the aim of this review was to provide information that facilitates the processing of this evidence and investigate the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this specific pathology.

  13. Relevance of the Glutathione System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Evidence in Human and Experimental Models

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    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Pérez-Cruz, Claudia; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Sampieri, Aristides; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with diseases that are systemic as well as diseases that affect the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, and temporal lobe epilepsy represents an estimated 40% of all epilepsy cases. Currently, evidence from human and experimental models supports the involvement of oxidative stress during seizures and in the epileptogenesis process. Hence, the aim of this review was to provide information that facilitates the processing of this evidence and investigate the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this specific pathology. PMID:25538816

  14. Subregional Mesiotemporal Network Topology Is Altered in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

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    Bernhardt, Boris C; Bernasconi, Neda; Hong, Seok-Jun; Dery, Sebastian; Bernasconi, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most frequent drug-resistant epilepsy in adults and commonly associated with variable degrees of mesiotemporal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Analyses of inter-regional connectivity have unveiled disruptions in large-scale cortico-cortical networks; little is known about the topological organization of the mesiotemporal lobe, the limbic subnetwork central to the disorder. We generated covariance networks based on high-resolution MRI surface-shape descriptors of the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and amygdala in 134 TLE patients and 45 age- and sex-matched controls. Graph-theoretical analysis revealed increased path length and clustering in patients, suggesting a shift toward a more regularized arrangement; findings were reproducible after split-half assessment and across 2 parcellation schemes. Analysis of inter-regional correlations and module participation showed increased within-structure covariance, but decreases between structures, particularly with regards to the hippocampus and amygdala. While higher clustering possibly reflects topological consequences of axonal sprouting, decreases in interstructure covariance may be a consequence of disconnection within limbic circuitry. Preoperative network parameters, specifically the segregation of the ipsilateral hippocampus, predicted long-term seizure freedom after surgery.

  15. High-frequency oscillations and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Lévesque, Maxime; Shiri, Zahra; Chen, Li-Yuan; Avoli, Massimo

    2017-01-20

    The interest of epileptologists has recently shifted from the macroscopic analysis of interictal spikes and seizures to the microscopic analysis of short events in the EEG that are not visible to the naked eye but are observed once the signal has been filtered in specific frequency bands. With the use of new technologies that allow multichannel recordings at high sampling rates and the development of computer algorithms that permit the automated analysis of extensive amounts of data, it is now possible to extract high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) between 80 and 500Hz from the EEG; HFOs have been further categorised as ripples (80-200Hz) and fast ripples (250-500Hz). Within the context of epileptic disorders, HFOs should reflect the pathological activity of neural networks that sustain seizure generation, and could serve as biomarkers of epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. We review here the presumptive cellular mechanisms of ripples and fast ripples in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. We also focus on recent findings regarding the occurrence of HFOs during epileptiform activity observed in in vitro models of epileptiform synchronization, in in vivo models of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in epileptic patients. Finally, we address the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on HFOs and raise some questions and issues related to the definition of HFOs.

  16. Long term changes in the visual fields of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy using vigabatrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardus, P; Verduin, WM; Postma, G; Stilma, JS; Berendschot, TTJM; van Veelen, CWM

    2000-01-01

    Aim-To study the long term changes in the concentric contraction of the visual field in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy on vigabatrin medication. Methods-Repeated Goldmann visual field examinations were compared in 27 patients with drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and concentric contractio

  17. Clinical characteristics of patients with benign nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Kim J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Jiyeon Kim,1 Seong Hoon Kim,2 Sung Chul Lim,2 Woojun Kim,2 Young-Min Shon3 1Department of Neurology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, College of Medicine, Korea University, Ansan, 2Department of Neurology, Catholic Neuroscience Institute, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, 3Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Purpose: To evaluate the evolution of nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE-NL in patients treated exclusively with antiepileptic drugs and to elucidate clinical phenotypes related to the prognosis of these patients.Methods: Clinical, radiological, and electroencephalographic (EEG findings in 84 patients with TLE-NL were reviewed. A good response group (GRG and a poor response group (PRG were defined if the duration of their seizure-free period was >1 year, or <1 year, respectively.Results: There were 46 (54.8% patients in the GRG and 38 (45.2% patients in the PRG. The number of antiepileptic drugs administered was significantly lower in the GRG than that in the PRG (1.3±0.8 vs 2.8±1.0, respectively; P<0.05. The GRG had a significantly older age of onset than the PRG and a lower occurrence of initial precipitating events, such as febrile seizures, central nervous system infection, and head trauma (P<0.05. The prevalence of EEG abnormality, presence of aura, generalized seizures, and automatism was less frequently observed in the GRG (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of automatism and initial precipitating events were significantly associated with a poor prognosis (P<0.05.Conclusion: In contrast to the commonly assumed intractability of TLE, we found that more than 54% of patients with TLE-NL achieved a long seizure-free period. Older age at onset of TLE-NL was associated with a better prognosis. However, the presence of automatism and initial precipitating events were related to a poor prognosis. Future prospective

  18. Corpora amylacea in temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis

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    Ribeiro Marlise de Castro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal sclerosis (HS is the commonest pathology in epileptic patients undergoing temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. Beside, there are an increased density of corpora amylacea (CA founded in 6 to 63% of those cases. OBJECTIVE: verify the presence of CA and the clinical correlates of their occurrence in a consective series of patients undergoing temporal surgery with diagnosis of HS. METHOD: We reviewed 72 hippocampus specimens from January 1997 to July 2000. Student's t test for independent, samples, ANOVA and Tukey test were performed for statistical analysis. RESULTS: CA were found in 35 patients (49%, whose mean epilepsy duration (28.7 years was significantly longer than that group of patients without CA (19.5 years, p= 0.001. Besides, when CA were found, duration was also significantly correlated with distribution within hippocampus: 28.7 years with diffuse distribution of CA, 15.4 with exclusively subpial and 17.4 years with distribution subpial plus perivascular (p= 0.001. CONCLUSION: Our findings corroborate the presence of CA in patients with HS and suggest that a longer duration of epilepsy correlate with a more distribution of CA in hippocampus.

  19. Molecular characterization of febrile seizures and temporal lobe epilepsy : towards unraveling epileptogenesis and febrile seizure susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gassen, K.L.I. van

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that is characterized by recurrent seizures and affects about 1% of the population worldwide. Epilepsy can occur because of a genetic predisposition, because of acquired factors or because of a combination between the two (multifactorial). Temporal lobe epilepsy

  20. Emotion recognition and social cognition in temporal lobe epilepsy and the effect of epilepsy surgery.

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    Amlerova, Jana; Cavanna, Andrea E; Bradac, Ondrej; Javurkova, Alena; Raudenska, Jaroslava; Marusic, Petr

    2014-07-01

    The abilities to identify facial expression from another person's face and to attribute mental states to others refer to preserved function of the temporal lobes. In the present study, we set out to evaluate emotion recognition and social cognition in presurgical and postsurgical patients with unilateral refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of TLE surgery and to identify the main risk factors for impairment in these functions. We recruited 30 patients with TLE for longitudinal data analysis (14 with right-sided and 16 with left-sided TLE) and 74 patients for cross-sectional data analysis (37 with right-sided and 37 with left-sided TLE) plus 20 healthy controls. Besides standard neuropsychological assessment, we administered an analog of the Ekman and Friesen test and the Faux Pas Test to assess emotion recognition and social cognition, respectively. Both emotion recognition and social cognition were impaired in the group of patients with TLE, irrespective of the focus side, compared with healthy controls. The performance in both tests was strongly dependent on the intelligence level. Beyond intelligence level, earlier age at epilepsy onset, longer disease duration, and history of early childhood brain injury predicted social cognition problems in patients with TLE. Epilepsy surgery within the temporal lobe seems to have neutral effect on patients' performances in both domains. However, there are a few individual patients who appear to be at risk of postoperative decline, even when seizure freedom is achieved following epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impaired executive functions in experimental model of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Fabiane Ochai Ramos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The present study aimed to investigate cognitive and behavioural changes consistent with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD -like behavior in male Wistar rats with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Method Male Wistar rats at 25 day of age were submitted to animal model of TLE by pilocarpine injection (350 mg/kg, ip and a control group received saline 0.9%. The animals were continuously video monitored up to the end of experiments. The behavioural tests (open field, elevated plus maze and operant conditioning box started from 60 days postnatal. Results Animals with TLE exhibited elevated locomotor activity, reduced level of anxiety-related behavior, impulsivity and impaired visuospatial working memory. Conclusion Taken as a whole, we concluded that animals with TLE exhibited some cognitive and behavioural changes consistent with ADHD-like behavior.

  2. Multimodality medical image database for temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad A.; Elisevich, Kost

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a human brain multi-modality database for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy. The focus of the paper is on content-based image management, navigation and retrieval. Several medical image-processing methods including our newly developed segmentation method are utilized for information extraction/correlation and indexing. The input data includes T1-, T2-Weighted and FLAIR MRI and ictal/interictal SPECT modalities with associated clinical data and EEG data analysis. The database can answer queries regarding issues such as the correlation between the attribute X of the entity Y and the outcome of a temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. The entity Y can be a brain anatomical structure such as the hippocampus. The attribute X can be either a functionality feature of the anatomical structure Y, calculated with SPECT modalities, such as signal average, or a volumetric/morphological feature of the entity Y such as volume or average curvature. The outcome of the surgery can be any surgery assessment such as non-verbal Wechsler memory quotient. A determination is made regarding surgical candidacy by analysis of both textual and image data. The current database system suggests a surgical determination for the cases with relatively small hippocampus and high signal intensity average on FLAIR images within the hippocampus. This indication matches the neurosurgeons expectations/observations. Moreover, as the database gets more populated with patient profiles and individual surgical outcomes, using data mining methods one may discover partially invisible correlations between the contents of different modalities of data and the outcome of the surgery.

  3. [Microtumor presenting with temporal lobe epilepsy--a case report].

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    Ide, M; Jimbo, M; Yamamoto, M; Tanaka, N; Takeyama, E; Kubo, O

    1988-04-01

    A 15-year-old girl was admitted to our clinic on July 16, 1985 with the epilepsy which had been resistant to various anticonvulsant therapies. At the age of 10 years automatism seizure, characterized by purposeless movement of arms and head of which the patient was unaware, began to occur and became as frequent as two to three times each day. From the age of 13 years, there were also grand mal seizures several times a year in spite of medical treatment. She had normal delivery and no history of febrile convulsion. There was no family history of epilepsy or mental disease. When examined on admission, she had normal personality and intelligence. There was no neurological abnormality. She complained of sleepiness and hirsutiness. Fit of automatism occurred two to three times a day during admission, though the blood levels of anticonvulsant drugs such as phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine reached to therapeutic concentration. EEG examination including infratemporal lead recording showed right temporal spike focus. But all the neuroradiological studies such as skull X-rays, CT, cerebral angiography and magnetic resonance imaging failed to show abnormal finding. Right temporal lobectomy was carried out under general anesthesia on Aug 22, 1985, and anterior two-thirds of the middle and the inferior temporal gyri were resected deeply to anterior hippocampus. To the naked eye, no abnormal finding was noted during the operation. In the surgical specimen, macroscopically nothing abnormal was found. Microscopically, serial sections of the lobe revealed clusters of oligodendroglial cells in cortical to subcortical region of the medial basal part of the temporal lobe.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Natural evolution from idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in an untreated young patient.

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    Bonini, Francesca; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinan; Fanella, Martina; Morano, Alessandra; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy (IPOE) is an idiopathic localization-related epilepsy characterized by age-related onset, specific mode of precipitation, occipital photic-induced seizures--frequently consisting of visual symptoms--and good prognosis. This uncommon epilepsy, which usually starts in childhood or adolescence, has rarely been observed in families in which idiopathic generalized epilepsy also affects other members. We describe a nuclear family in which the proband showed electro-clinical features of idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy in childhood, which subsequently evolved into absences and a single generalized tonico-clonic seizure in early adolescence. His mother had features suggestive of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. This case illustrates a continuum between focal and generalized entities in the spectrum of the so-called idiopathic (genetically determined) epileptic syndromes. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hush sign: a new clinical sign in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Bilir, Erhan; Erdem, Atilla; Gomceli, Yasemin B; Kurt, G Semiha; Serdaroglu, Ayse

    2005-05-01

    Neurologists have been analyzing the clinical behaviors that occur during seizures for many years. Several ictal behaviors have been defined in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Ictal behaviors are especially important in the evaluation of epilepsy surgery candidates. We propose a new lateralizing sign in TLE originating from the nondominant hemisphere-the "hush" sign. Our patients were 30- and 21-year old women (Cases 1 and 2, respectively). Their epileptogenic foci were localized to the right mesial temporal region after noninvasive presurgical investigations. Case 1 had no cranial MRI abnormality, whereas cranial MRI revealed right hippocampal atrophy in Case 2. These women repeatedly moved their right index fingers to their mouth while puckering their lips during complex partial seizures. We have named this ictal behavior the "hush" sign. Anterior temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy was performed in both patients, and pathological examinations revealed hippocampal sclerosis. The "hush" sign no longer occurred after seizures were controlled. They were seizure free as of 30 and 31 months of follow-up, respectively. We believe that the "hush" sign may be supportive of a diagnosis of TLE originating from the nondominant hemisphere. This sign may occur as a result of ictal activation of a specific brain region in this hemisphere.

  6. Hsp60 response in experimental and human temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Colangeli, Roberto; Orban, Gergely; Pierucci, Massimo; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Lo Bello, Margherita; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Bucchieri, Fabio; Pomara, Cristoforo; Valentino, Mario; Muscat, Richard; Benigno, Arcangelo; Zummo, Giovanni; de Macario, Everly Conway; Cappello, Francesco; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Macario, Alberto J L

    2015-03-24

    The mitochondrial chaperonin Hsp60 is a ubiquitous molecule with multiple roles, constitutively expressed and inducible by oxidative stress. In the brain, Hsp60 is widely distributed and has been implicated in neurological disorders, including epilepsy. A role for mitochondria and oxidative stress has been proposed in epileptogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here, we investigated the involvement of Hsp60 in TLE using animal and human samples. Hsp60 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus, measured by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, was increased in a rat model of TLE. Hsp60 was also increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons somata and neuropil and hippocampus proper (CA3, CA1) of the epileptic rats. We also determined the circulating levels of Hsp60 in epileptic animals and TLE patients using ELISA. The epileptic rats showed circulating levels of Hsp60 higher than controls. Likewise, plasma post-seizure Hsp60 levels in patients were higher than before the seizure and those of controls. These results demonstrate that Hsp60 is increased in both animals and patients with TLE in affected tissues, and in plasma in response to epileptic seizures, and point to it as biomarker of hippocampal stress potentially useful for diagnosis and patient management.

  7. Long-term memory deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramoni-Negre, E; Lambert, I; Bartolomei, F; Felician, O

    Memory complaints and deficits are common in patients with epilepsy, especially temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), where memory-related brain structures are directly involved in the epileptic process. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in delineating memory impairment in TLE, challenging the traditional neuropsychological approach of the disorder. In particular, several lines of evidence have suggested that, beyond the apparent deficit demonstrable by standardized neuropsychological evaluations, TLE may also negatively interact with long-term memory, producing considerable loss of information of the patient's autobiographical history and an inability to maintain newly acquired information over a period of time. These observations have led to the development of innovative assessment techniques, and prompted a new domain of investigation focused on the relationships between interictal epileptiform activities and the integrity of anatomo-functional systems. The present paper reviews the available evidence for long-term memory deficits in TLE with respect to remote and very long-term memory, and discusses their putative pathophysiological mechanisms and the developing potential strategies to improve memory functioning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative Lateralizing Ability of Multimodality MRI in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Karabekir Ercan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective is to compare lateralizing ability of three quantitative MR (qMRI modalities to depict changes of hippocampal architecture with clinical entities in temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods. We evaluated 14 patients with clinical and EEG proven diagnosis of unilateral TLE and 15 healthy volunteers. T1-weighted 3D dataset for volumetry, single-voxel 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI were performed for bilateral hippocampi of all subjects. Results. Individual volumetric measurements provided accurate lateralization in 85% of the patients, spectroscopy in 57%, and DTI in 57%. Higher lateralization ratios were acquired combining volumetry-spectroscopy (85%, spectroscopy-DTI (85%, and volumetry-DTI (100%. Significantly decreased NAA/(Cho+Cr ratios (p=0.002 and increased FA (p=0.001 values were obtained in ipsilateral to epileptogenic hippocampus. Duration of epilepsy and FA values showed a significant negative correlation (p=0.016, r=-0.847. The history of febrile convulsion associated with ipsilateral increased ADC values (p=0.015, r=0.851 and reduced NAA/(Cho+Cr ratios (p=0.047, r=-761. Conclusion. Volumetry, MRS, and DTI studies provide complementary information of hippocampal pathology. For lateralization of epileptogenic focus and preoperative examination, volumetry-DTI combination may be indicative of diagnostic accuracy.

  9. Comparative Lateralizing Ability of Multimodality MRI in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Ercan, Karabekir; Bilir, Erhan; Zan, Elcin; Arslan, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective is to compare lateralizing ability of three quantitative MR (qMRI) modalities to depict changes of hippocampal architecture with clinical entities in temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods. We evaluated 14 patients with clinical and EEG proven diagnosis of unilateral TLE and 15 healthy volunteers. T1-weighted 3D dataset for volumetry, single-voxel 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed for bilateral hippocampi of all subjects. Results. Individual volumetric measurements provided accurate lateralization in 85% of the patients, spectroscopy in 57%, and DTI in 57%. Higher lateralization ratios were acquired combining volumetry-spectroscopy (85%), spectroscopy-DTI (85%), and volumetry-DTI (100%). Significantly decreased NAA/(Cho+Cr) ratios (p = 0.002) and increased FA (p = 0.001) values were obtained in ipsilateral to epileptogenic hippocampus. Duration of epilepsy and FA values showed a significant negative correlation (p = 0.016, r = −0.847). The history of febrile convulsion associated with ipsilateral increased ADC values (p = 0.015, r = 0.851) and reduced NAA/(Cho+Cr) ratios (p = 0.047, r = −761). Conclusion. Volumetry, MRS, and DTI studies provide complementary information of hippocampal pathology. For lateralization of epileptogenic focus and preoperative examination, volumetry-DTI combination may be indicative of diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27974864

  10. Somatosensory and pharyngolaryngeal auras in temporal lobe epilepsy surgeries.

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    Weil, Alexander G; Surbeck, Werner; Rahme, Ralph; Bouthillier, Alain; Harroud, Adil; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Somatosensory (SSA) and pharyngolaryngeal auras (PLA) may suggest an extratemporal onset (e.g., insula, second somatosensory area). We sought to determine the prognostic significance of SSA and PLA in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Methods. Retrospective review of all patients operated for refractory TLE at our institution between January 1980 and July 2007 comparing outcome between patients with SSA/PLA to those without. Results. 158 patients underwent surgery for pharmacoresistant TLE in our institution. Eleven (7%) experienced SSA/PLA as part of their seizures. All but one had lesional (including hippocampal atrophy/sclerosis) TLE. Compared to patients without SSA or PLA, these patients were older (P = 0.049), had a higher prevalence of early ictal motor symptoms (P = 0.022) and prior CNS infection (P = 0.022), and were less likely to have a localizing SPECT study (P = 0.025). A favorable outcome was achieved in 81.8% of patients with SSA and/or PLA and 90.4% of those without SSA or PLA (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Most patients with pharmacoresistant lesional TLE appear to have a favorable outcome following temporal lobectomy, even in the presence of SSA and PLA.

  11. Seizure semiology of lesional frontal lobe epilepsies in children.

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    Battaglia, D; Lettori, D; Contaldo, I; Veredice, C; Sacco, A; Vasco, J; Martinelli, D; Chieffo, D; Tartaglione, T; Colosimo, C; Di Rocco, C; Guzzetta, F

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the semiology of seizures in children with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) and to compare them with other paediatric cohorts described in the literature as well as with adult counterparts. We analysed 174 registered seizures of 18 cases under 12 years with lesional epilepsy whose frontal origin was defined by the concordance of neuroimaging and ictal electrographic findings, and confirmed by surgery in the six cases operated on. Seizures were generally short, with a high daily frequency and usually related to sleep. The most characteristic semiological pattern consisted of complex motor seizures, particularly hypermotor. Often seizures corresponded to a mixture of different semiological patterns (tonic, gelastic, automotor, hypermotor, versive) presenting in the same seizure, often as a unique type in the same patient. With regard to several aspects the semiology of FLE in our cohort looks like that reported in adult series, in particular as to the frequency of complex motor seizures. However, our cohort was also characterised by a more protean array of seizure semiology, stressing the occurrence of seizures typically present in adults (versive and complex motor) and of some seizure patterns more characteristic in children such as epileptic spasms; moreover, the rare occurrence of secondarily generalised tonic clonic seizures (SGTCS) was confirmed.

  12. Minimally invasive surgical approaches for temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Chang, Edward F.; Englot, Dario J.; Vadera, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Surgery can be a highly effective treatment for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The emergence of minimally invasive resective and nonresective treatment options has led to interest in epilepsy surgery among patients and providers. Nevertheless, not all procedures are appropriate for all patients, and it is critical to consider seizure outcomes with each of these approaches, as seizure freedom is the greatest predictor of patient quality of life. Standard anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) remains the gold standard in the treatment of TLE, with seizure freedom resulting in 60–80% of patients. It is currently the only resective epilepsy surgery supported by randomized controlled trials and offers the best protection against lateral temporal seizure onset. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy techniques preserve the lateral cortex and temporal stem to varying degrees and can result in favorable rates of seizure freedom but the risk of recurrent seizures appears slightly greater than with ATL, and it is not clear whether neuropsychological outcomes are improved with selective approaches. Stereotactic radiosurgery presents an opportunity to avoid surgery altogether, with seizure outcomes now under investigation. Stereotactic laser thermo-ablation allows destruction of the mesial temporal structures with low complication rates and minimal recovery time, and outcomes are also under study. Finally, while neuromodulatory devices such as responsive neurostimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation have a role in the treatment of certain patients, these remain palliative procedures for those who are not candidates for resection or ablation, as complete seizure freedom rates are low. Further development and investigation of both established and novel strategies for the surgical treatment of TLE will be critical moving forward, given the significant burden of this disease. PMID:26017774

  13. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with childhood febrile seizure.

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    Asadi-Pooya, A A; Nei, M; Rostami, C; Sperling, M R

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the demographic and clinical manifestations of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy (MTS-TLE) with childhood febrile seizure (FS) and establishing the potential differences as compared to those without FS. We also investigated the surgery outcome in these two groups of patients. In this retrospective study, all patients with a clinical diagnosis of drug-resistant TLE due to mesial temporal sclerosis, who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, were recruited. Patients were prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. Postsurgical outcome was classified into two groups; seizure-free or relapsed. Clinical manifestations and outcome were compared between patients with MTS-TLE with FS and those without FS. Two hundred and sixty-two patients were eligible for this study. One hundred and seventy patients (64.9%) did not have FS in their childhood, while 92 patients (35.1%) reported experiencing FS in their childhood. Demographic and clinical characteristics of these two groups of patients were not different. Postoperative seizure outcome was not statistically different between these two groups of patients (P = 0.19). When MTS is the pathological substrate of TLE, clinical manifestations and response to surgical treatment of patients are very similar in patients with history of febrile seizure in their childhood compared to those without such an experience. In other words, when the subgroup of patients with MTS-TLE and drug-resistant seizures is examined history of childhood febrile seizure loses its value as a distinguishing factor in characteristics or predictive factor for surgery outcome. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Episodic and Semantic Autobiographical Memory in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Claudia P. Múnera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autobiographical memory (AM is understood as the retrieval of personal experiences that occurred in specific time and space. To date, there is no consensus on the role of medial temporal lobe structures in AM. Therefore, we investigated AM in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE patients. Twenty TLE patients candidates for surgical treatment, 10 right (RTLE and 10 left (LTLE, and 20 healthy controls were examined with a version of the Autobiographical Interview adapted to Spanish language. Episodic and semantic AM were analyzed during five life periods through two conditions: recall and specific probe. AM scores were compared with clinical and cognitive data. TLE patients showed lower performance in episodic AM than healthy controls, being significantly worst in RTLE group and after specific probe. In relation to semantic AM, LTLE retrieved higher amount of total semantic details compared to controls during recall, but not after specific probe. No significant differences were found between RTLE and LTLE, but a trend towards poorer performance in RTLE group was found. TLE patients obtained lower scores for adolescence period memories after specific probe. Our findings support the idea that the right hippocampus would play a more important role in episodic retrieval than the left, regardless of a temporal gradient.

  15. Controlled recall of verbal material in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Hudson, John M; Flowers, Kenneth A; Roberts, Kathrine A

    2009-09-01

    This study used a guided process-dissociation procedure to examine the contribution of controlled and automatic uses of memory to a cued-recall task in 24 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE: 12 left-sided; 12 right-sided), and 12 neurotypical controls. In an inclusion task, participants attempted to complete three-letter word stems using previously studied words, in an exclusion task they aimed to avoid using studied words to complete stems. Patients with left TLE produced fewer target completions under inclusion conditions. Completion rates were not significantly different under exclusion conditions. Estimates derived from process dissociation calculations, confirmed that the cued-recall deficit in left TLE patients arose entirely from impairment in controlled memory processes. There were no group differences in the estimates of automatic processes. Recognition judgements of stems corresponding to studied words did not differ between the groups. Overall the results support the view that controlled and automatic memory processes are mediated by separable neural systems. Hippocampal and related structures within the left MTL are more important than corresponding right hemisphere structures for the controlled retrieval of verbal material. In contrast, the findings from this study do not suggest that the left and right temporal lobes make a differential contribution to automatic memory processing. The theoretical and clinical relevance of these findings are discussed.

  16. Executive Functions in Chronic Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Laura Zamarian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus as to whether mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE leads to executive function deficits. In this study, we adopted an extensive neuropsychological test battery and assessed different executive functions in chronic, unilateral MTLE. Performance of MTLE patients was compared with that of healthy peers and with normative data. Several MTLE patients had scores below cut-off or below the 10th percentile of normative data. Scores of the whole patient group were overall in the average range of normative data. Relative to controls, MTLE patients performed poorly in tests of working memory, cognitive flexibility, categorical verbal fluency, set-shifting, categorization, and planning. These findings raise an important methodological issue as they suggest that executive function deficits in chronic MTLE may be individually variable and that their assessment should include different tests. Deficits in chronic MTLE are not limited to temporal lobe functions, such as memory, but may extend to extra temporal cognitive domains, such as executive functions.

  17. Levetiracetam reduces abnormal network activations in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Wandschneider, Britta; Stretton, Jason; Sidhu, Meneka; Centeno, Maria; Kozák, Lajos R.; Symms, Mark; Thompson, Pamela J.; Duncan, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We used functional MRI (fMRI) and a left-lateralizing verbal and a right-lateralizing visual-spatial working memory (WM) paradigm to investigate the effects of levetiracetam (LEV) on cognitive network activations in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Methods: In a retrospective study, we compared task-related fMRI activations and deactivations in 53 patients with left and 54 patients with right TLE treated with (59) or without (48) LEV. In patients on LEV, activation patterns were correlated with the daily LEV dose. Results: We isolated task- and syndrome-specific effects. Patients on LEV showed normalization of functional network deactivations in the right temporal lobe in right TLE during the right-lateralizing visual-spatial task and in the left temporal lobe in left TLE during the verbal task. In a post hoc analysis, a significant dose-dependent effect was demonstrated in right TLE during the visual-spatial WM task: the lower the LEV dose, the greater the abnormal right hippocampal activation. At a less stringent threshold (p < 0.05, uncorrected for multiple comparisons), a similar dose effect was observed in left TLE during the verbal task: both hippocampi were more abnormally activated in patients with lower doses, but more prominently on the left. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that LEV is associated with restoration of normal activation patterns. Longitudinal studies are necessary to establish whether the neural patterns translate to drug response. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that in patients with drug-resistant TLE, levetiracetam has a dose-dependent facilitation of deactivation of mesial temporal structures. PMID:25253743

  18. Seizures accelerate forgetting in patients with left-sided temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Jokeit, H; Daamen, M; Zang, H; Janszky, J; Ebner, A

    2001-07-10

    Ten patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy performed a word-position association learning task every 24 hours during video EEG monitoring. On 55 occasions recall performance was tested 30 minutes and 24 hours after the initial learning phase. Patients with left- but not right-sided temporal lobe epilepsy exhibited impaired retention of word position if a seizure had occurred during the preceding 24-hour interval. Seizures may impair the consolidation of memory in patients with left-sided temporal lobe epilepsy beyond the chronic memory deficits caused by the underlying pathology.

  19. Circadian rhythm and profile in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Aya Fukuda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study intended to compare the circadian rhythm and circadian profile between patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Method We enrolled 16 patients with JME and 37 patients with TLE from the Outpatient Clinic of UNICAMP. We applied a questionnaire about sleep-wake cycle and circadian profile. Results Fourteen (87% out of 16 patients with JME, and 22 out of 37 (59% patients with TLE reported that they would sleep after seizure (p < 0.05. Three (19% patients with JME, and 17 (46% reported to be in better state before 10:00 AM (p < 0.05. Conclusion There is no clear distinct profile and circadian pattern in patients with JME in comparison to TLE patients. However, our data suggest that most JME patients do not feel in better shape early in the day.

  20. Are Absence Epilepsy and Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy System Epilepsies of the Sleep/Wake System?

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    Halász, Péter

    2015-01-01

    System epilepsy is an emerging concept interpreting major nonlesional epilepsies as epileptic dysfunctions of physiological systems. I extend here the concept of reflex epilepsy to epilepsies linked to input dependent physiological systems. Experimental and clinical reseach data were collected to create a coherent explanation of underlying pathomechanism in AE and NFLE. We propose that AE should be interpreted as epilepsy linked to the corticothalamic burst-firing mode of NREM sleep, released by evoked vigilance level oscillations characterized by reactive slow wave response. In the genetic variation of NFLE the ascending cholinergic arousal system plays an essential role being in strong relationship with a gain mutation of the nicotinic acethylcholin receptors, rendering the arousal system hyperexcitable. I try to provide a more unitary interpretation for the variable seizure manifestation integrating them as different degree of pathological arosuals and alarm reactions. As a supporting hypothesis the similarity between arousal parasomnias and FNLE is shown, underpinned by overlaping pathomechanism and shared familiarity, but without epileptic features. Lastly we propose that both AE and NFLE are system epilepsies of the sleep-wake system representing epileptic disorders of the antagonistic sleep/arousal network. This interpretation may throw new light on the pathomechanism of AE and NFLE. PMID:26175547

  1. Loss of cholecystokinin-containing terminals in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Sun, Chengsan; Sun, Jianli; Erisir, Alev; Kapur, Jaideep

    2014-02-01

    Altered GABA-mediated inhibition is proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Previous studies have demonstrated a loss of somatostatin-containing GABAergic interneurons innervating granule cells in epileptic animals. However, the reorganization of synapses between interneurons and granule cells has not been investigated. We studied synapse organization in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using continuous hippocampal stimulation. The distribution of axon terminals and inhibitory synapses on granule cell dendrites was studied using a combination of immunohistochemistry and pre-embedding electron microscopy techniques. A whole-cell patch-clamp technique was applied to study the functional changes in GABAergic input from different interneurons. In epileptic animals, the density of cholecystokinin (CCK)-immunoreactive (IR) fibers and α2 subunit containing GABAA receptors in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus was reduced. Quantitative immuno-electron microscopy study revealed that the ratio of CCK-containing symmetric synapses to the total symmetric synapses was reduced. The frequency of GABAergic synaptic currents (sIPSC) was decreased and their amplitude was increased. The inhibitory effect of the activation of cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors was also reduced in epileptic animals. Isolation of CCK- and parvalbumin (PV)-containing GABAergic inputs by N- and P/Q-type calcium channel blockers respectively suggested that GABA release from CCK-containing interneurons was selectively reduced in epileptic rats. This study found that there was a loss of CCK-containing GABAergic synapses to granule cells both morphologically and functionally. These studies add to our understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to altering GABAergic inhibition of granule cells in TLE.

  2. Lateralizing value of semiology in medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Dupont, S; Samson, Y; Nguyen-Michel, V-H; Zavanone, C; Navarro, V; Baulac, M; Adam, C

    2015-12-01

    Analysing the clinical characteristics of seizures constitutes a fundamental aspect of the presurgical evaluation of patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), the most frequent form of focal epilepsy accessible to surgery. We sought to retrospectively determine whether objective manifestations could have a reliable lateralizing value in a large population of MTLE-HS patients and if their presence could help to identify those patients who would be seizure free after surgery. We analysed the frequency and predictive lateralizing value of objective ictal and postictal signs in 391 patients with MTLE-HS (183 left/208 right). Data were derived from chart review and not from blinded videoEEG analysis. Correlation between the presence of reliable lateralizing signs and postoperative outcome was performed in a subgroup of 302 patients who underwent surgery. Contralateral dystonic posturing was the most frequent and reliable lateralizing sign that correctly lateralized the focus in 96% of patients. Unilateral head/eye deviation was noted in 42% of the patients and predicted unilateral focus in 67%. Ipsilateral postictal nose wiping, contralateral clonus and hypokinesia correctly lateralized the focus in 75%, 81%, respectively, and 100 of patients but were less frequently depicted. Postictal aphasia was a strong lateralizing sign for left MLE-HS. The presence of reliable lateralizing signs was not a predictor of seizure freedom. Seizure semiology is a simple tool that may permit reliable lateralization of the seizure focus in MTLE-HS. The presence of reliable lateralizing signs is not associated with a better postoperative outcome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Exercise-induced seizures and lateral asymmetry in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Jordan T. Kamel

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Exercise may be an underrecognized form of reflex epilepsy, which tended to be refractory to both medical and surgical interventions in our patients. Almost all patients in our cohort had seizures localizing to the left temporal lobe. We discuss potential mechanisms by which exercise may precipitate seizures, and its relevance regarding our understanding of temporal lobe epilepsy and lateralization of seizures. Recognition of, as well as advice regarding avoidance of, known triggers forms an important part of management of these patients.

  4. Disrupted causal connectivity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Gong-Jun Ji

    Full Text Available Although mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE is characterized by the pathological changes in mesial temporal lobe, function alteration was also found in extratemporal regions. Our aim is to investigate the information flow between the epileptogenic zone (EZ and other brain regions. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI data were recorded from 23 patients with left mTLE and matched controls. We first identified the potential EZ using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF of RS-fMRI signal, then performed voxel-wise Granger causality analysis between EZ and the whole brain. Relative to controls, patients demonstrated decreased driving effect from EZ to thalamus and basal ganglia, and increased feedback. Additionally, we found an altered causal relation between EZ and cortical networks (default mode network, limbic system, visual network and executive control network. The influence from EZ to right precuneus and brainstem negatively correlated with disease duration, whereas that from the right hippocampus, fusiform cortex, and lentiform nucleus to EZ showed positive correlation. These findings demonstrate widespread brain regions showing abnormal functional interaction with EZ. In addition, increased ALFF in EZ was positively correlated with the increased driving effect on EZ in patients, but not in controls. This finding suggests that the initiation of epileptic activity depends not only on EZ itself, but also on the activity emerging in large-scale macroscopic brain networks. Overall, this study suggests that the causal topological organization is disrupted in mTLE, providing valuable information to understand the pathophysiology of this disorder.

  5. Perfusion network shift during seizures in medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Karen M Sequeira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE is associated with limbic atrophy involving the hippocampus, peri-hippocampal and extra-temporal structures. While MTLE is related to static structural limbic compromise, it is unknown whether the limbic system undergoes dynamic regional perfusion network alterations during seizures. In this study, we aimed to investigate state specific (i.e. ictal versus interictal perfusional limbic networks in patients with MTLE. METHODS: We studied clinical information and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images obtained with intravenous infusion of the radioactive tracer Technetium- Tc 99 m Hexamethylpropyleneamine Oxime (Tc-99 m HMPAO during ictal and interictal state confirmed by video-electroencephalography (VEEG in 20 patients with unilateral MTLE (12 left and 8 right MTLE. Pair-wise voxel-based analyses were used to define global changes in tracer between states. Regional tracer uptake was calculated and state specific adjacency matrices were constructed based on regional correlation of uptake across subjects. Graph theoretical measures were applied to investigate global and regional state specific network reconfigurations. RESULTS: A significant increase in tracer uptake was observed during the ictal state in the medial temporal region, cerebellum, thalamus, insula and putamen. From network analyses, we observed a relative decreased correlation between the epileptogenic temporal region and remaining cortex during the interictal state, followed by a surge of cross-correlated perfusion in epileptogenic temporal-limbic structures during a seizure, corresponding to local network integration. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that MTLE is associated with a state specific perfusion and possibly functional organization consisting of a surge of limbic cross-correlated tracer uptake during a seizure, with a relative disconnection of the epileptogenic temporal lobe in the interictal period. This

  6. Clinical analysis on benign temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis

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    Xiang-shu HU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the drug response of patients with benign temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS, and to summarize the clinical characteristics of patients with good drug response. Methods A total of 46 benign TLE-HS patients who were treated by anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs and followed-up for at least 2 years with seizure-free periods longer than 12 months were enrolled in benign TLE-HS group and 51 AEDs-resistant patients were enrolled in control group. Demographic data, early sudden damage factor, family history of epilepsy, clinical symptoms, interictal EEG abnormality, side of hippocamal sclerosis and drug strategy were noted and compared between 2 groups. Multivariate forward Logistic regression was used to analyze the influencing factors of good drug response to TLE-HS. Results Age of onset (P = 0.041, duration (P = 0.001, history of febrile seizure (P = 0.019, initial seizure frequency (P = 0.001 and drug strategy (P = 0.000 were statistically different between 2 groups. Age, sex, perinatal injury, encephalitis, traumatic brain injury (TBI, family history of epilepsy, status epilepticus (SE, cognitive impairment, mental disturbance, seizure type, aura, interictal EEG abnormality and side of hippocamal sclerosis were not statistically different between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. History of febrile seizure was risk factor for benign TLE-HS (OR = 3.405, 95%CI: 1.080-10.737; P = 0.037, while low initial seizure frequency (OR = 0.275, 95% CI: 0.100-0.758; P = 0.013 and monotherapy (OR = 0.135, 95% CI: 0.049-0.373; P = 0.000 were protective factors for good drug response. Conclusions Benign TLE - HS often occurs in late adolescence. In the early stage, seizure frequency is low and the occurrence of febrile seizure is rare. Monotherapy of carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine may achieve good therapeutic effect. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.10.012

  7. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy caused by a mutation in the GATOR1 complex gene NPRL3.

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    Korenke, Georg-Christoph; Eggert, Marlene; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in NPRL3, one of three genes that encode proteins of the mTORC1-regulating GATOR1 complex, have recently been reported to cause cortical dysplasia with focal epilepsy. We have now analyzed a multiplex epilepsy family by whole exome sequencing and identified a frameshift mutation (NM_001077350.2; c.1522delG; p.E508Rfs*46) within exon 13 of NPRL3. This truncating mutation causes an epilepsy phenotype characterized by early childhood onset of mainly nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The penetrance in our family was low (three affected out of six mutation carriers), compared to families with either ion channel- or DEPDC5-associated familial nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The absence of apparent structural brain abnormalities suggests that mutations in NPRL3 are not necessarily associated with focal cortical dysplasia but might be able to cause epilepsy by different, yet unknown pathomechanisms.

  8. Hippocampography Guides Consistent Mesial Resections in Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Marcus C. Ng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The optimal surgery in lesional neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy is unknown. Hippocampal electrocorticography maximizes seizure freedom by identifying normal-appearing epileptogenic tissue for resection and minimizes neuropsychological deficit by limiting resection to demonstrably epileptogenic tissue. We examined whether standardized hippocampal electrocorticography (hippocampography guides resection for more consistent hippocampectomy than unguided resection in conventional electrocorticography focused on the lesion. Methods. Retrospective chart reviews any kind of electrocorticography (including hippocampography as part of combined lesionectomy, anterolateral temporal lobectomy, and hippocampectomy over 8 years . Patients were divided into mesial (i.e., hippocampography and lateral electrocorticography groups. Primary outcome was deviation from mean hippocampectomy length. Results. Of 26 patients, fourteen underwent hippocampography-guided mesial temporal resection. Hippocampography was associated with 2.6 times more consistent resection. The range of hippocampal resection was 0.7 cm in the mesial group and 1.8 cm in the lateral group (p=0.01. 86% of mesial group versus 42% of lateral group patients achieved seizure freedom (p=0.02. Conclusions. By rationally tailoring excision to demonstrably epileptogenic tissue, hippocampography significantly reduces resection variability for more consistent hippocampectomy than unguided resection in conventional electrocorticography. More consistent hippocampal resection may avoid overresection, which poses greater neuropsychological risk, and underresection, which jeopardizes postoperative seizure freedom.

  9. Psychoses in drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Jensen, I; Larsen, J K

    1979-10-01

    In the survey of 74 Danish patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who underwent temporal lobectomy, a total of 20 patients were psychotic. Nine of these became psychotic during the follow-up period, six of them after cessation of their epileptic seizures. There were 13 schizophrenia-like psychoses, six paranoid delusional and depressive psychoses, and one childhood psychosis. Operation was on the right side in 39 and on the left side in 35 patients. When the various psychotic groups were compared with each other or with the nonpsychotic patients, the side of operation was not found to be statistically important. The patients with psychoses were older at operation and showed a higher rate of focal lesions in the resected specimens. Although more psychotic patients were bright or normally gifted, and had achieved a higher standard of schooling than nonpsychotic patients, their social status after operation was inferior. Surgery had no effect on psychosis present preoperatively nor on its possible postoperative onset. The diagnosis of psychosis was not considered to be contraindication to temporal lobectomy.

  10. Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus of Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

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    Zhong, Qin; Ren, Bo-Xu; Tang, Feng-Ru

    2016-02-01

    The mobilization of endogenous neural stem cells in order to substitute lost neurons in the adult brain may reduce the negative effects of patients with chronic neurodegenerative diseases. However, abnormal neurogenesis may be harmful and could lead to the worsening of patients' symptoms. In the brains of patients and animal models with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), increased newly generated neurons in the subgranular zone (SGZ) at early stages after brain insults have been speculated to be involved in epileptogenesis. However, this argument is unsupported by evidence showing that (1) hippocampal neurogenesis is reduced at chronic stages of intractable TLE, (2) decreased neurogenesis is involved in epileptogenesis, and (3) spontaneous recurrent seizures occur before newly generated neurons are integrated into hippocampal neural pathways. Therefore, the hypothesis of increased neurogenesis in epileptogenesis may need to be re-evaluated. In this paper, we systemically reviewed brain neurogenesis and relevant molecules in the regulation of neurogenesis in SGZ. We aimed to update researchers and epileptologists on current progresses on pathophysiological changes of neurogenesis at different stages of TLE in patients and animal models of TLE. The interactions among neurogenesis, epileptogenesis and cognitive impairment, and molecules' mechanism involved in neurogenesis would also be discussed. Future research directions are proposed at the end of this paper.

  11. Semantic Processing Impairment in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Amanda G. Jaimes-Bautista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impairment in episodic memory system is the best-known cognitive deficit in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Recent studies have shown evidence of semantic disorders, but they have been less studied than episodic memory. The semantic dysfunction in TLE has various cognitive manifestations, such as the presence of language disorders characterized by defects in naming, verbal fluency, or remote semantic information retrieval, which affects the ability of patients to interact with their surroundings. This paper is a review of recent research about the consequences of TLE on semantic processing, considering neuropsychological, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging findings, as well as the functional role of the hippocampus in semantic processing. The evidence from these studies shows disturbance of semantic memory in patients with TLE and supports the theory of declarative memory of the hippocampus. Functional neuroimaging studies show an inefficient compensatory functional reorganization of semantic networks and electrophysiological studies show a lack of N400 effect that could indicate that the deficit in semantic processing in patients with TLE could be due to a failure in the mechanisms of automatic access to lexicon.

  12. Diffusion tensor imaging in medial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ai-hong; LI Kun-cheng; YU Chun-shui; WANG Yu-ping; XUE Su-fang

    2006-01-01

    Background Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a noninvasive imaging technique for the assessment of theintegrity of cerebral tissues. This study was undertaken to assess the changes of diffusion indices of hippocampalformation (HF) in patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE).Methods Fourteen patients with MTLE and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated. Mean diffusivity (MD) andfractional anisotropy (FA) from the symmetrical-voxel sampling regions of the anterior HF were calculated in allsubjects. The MD and FA values were compared across the groups.Results No significant differences of MD and FA values were noted between right and left HF in the controls.In the patient group, MD significantly increased in the HF ipsilateral to the lesioned side [(9.27±1.09)×10-4mm2/s], compared with the values in the contralateral HF [(8.20±0.59)×10-4 mm2/s] (t = 4.479, P = 0.001) andhealthy subjects [(7.58±0.51)×10-4 mm2/s] (P<0.001), but no significant differences were found in FA. Whencompared with the controls, patients had a significantly higher MD inthe contralateral HF (P<0.05), but thedifference in FA was not statistically significant.Conclusions DTI could detect hippocampal abnormality in patients with MTLE. This technique may be helpfulfor preoperative evaluation of such patients.

  13. Memory for emotional material in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múnera, Claudia P; Lomlomdjian, Carolina; Terpiluk, Verónica; Medel, Nancy; Solís, Patricia; Kochen, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Several studies suggest that highly emotional information could facilitate long-term memory encoding and consolidation processes via an amygdala-hippocampal network. Our aim was to assess emotional perception and episodic memory for emotionally arousing material in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who are candidates for surgical treatment. We did this by using an audiovisual paradigm. Forty-six patients with medically resistant TLE (26 with left TLE and 20 with right TLE) and 19 healthy controls were assessed with a standard narrative test of emotional memory. The experimental task consisted of sequential picture slides with an accompanying narrative depicting a story that has an emotional central section. Subjects were asked to rate their emotional arousal reaction to each stimulus after the story was shown, while emotional memory (EM) was assessed a week later with a multiple choice questionnaire and a visual recognition task. Our results showed that ratings for emotional stimuli for the patients with TLE were significantly higher than for neutral stimuli (p=0.000). It was also observed that patients with TLE recalled significantly less information from each slide compared with controls, with a trend to lower scores on the questionnaire task for the group with LTLE, as well as poorer performance on the visual recognition task for the group with RLTE. Emotional memory was preserved in patients with RTLE despite having generally poorer memory performance compared with controls, while it was found to be impaired in patients with LTLE.

  14. Carbamazepine inhibits angiotensin I-converting enzyme, linking it to the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, S S; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, M G; Guimarães, P B; Wasinski, F; Pereira, F E G; Canzian, M; Centeno, R S; Carrete, H; Yacubian, E M; Carmona, A K; Vieira, R F F; Nakaie, C R; Sabatini, R A; Perosa, S R; Bacurau, R F P; Gouveia, T L F; Gallo, G; Würtele, M; Cavalheiro, E A; Silva, J A; Pesquero, J B; Araujo, R C

    2012-01-01

    We find that a common mutation that increases angiotensin I-converting enzyme activity occurs with higher frequency in male patients suffering from refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. However, in their brains, the activity of the enzyme is downregulated. As an explanation, we surprisingly find that carbamazepine, commonly used to treat epilepsy, is an inhibitor of the enzyme, thus providing a direct link between epilepsy and the renin–angiotensin and kallikrein–kinin systems. PMID:22832858

  15. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy after Refractory Status Epilepticus: An Illustrative Case and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Boyd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available New onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE is a relatively newly defined disease entity, where otherwise healthy individuals develop unrelenting seizures that do not respond to conventional anticonvulsant therapy and may require months of therapy with anesthetic drugs. We have described a case of NORSE who subsequently developed mesial temporal lobe sclerosis (MTS and recurrent temporal lobe seizures. We discuss the possible pathophysiological mechanisms by which refractory seizures may contribute to the development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE.

  16. Progressive white matter changes following anterior temporal lobe resection for epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Winston, Gavin P.; Jason Stretton; Sidhu, Meneka K; Symms, Mark R.; Duncan, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resection (ATLR) is an effective treatment for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Widespread abnormalities in diffusion parameters involving the ipsilateral temporal lobe white matter and extending into extratemporal white matter have been shown in cross-sectional studies in TLE. However longitudinal changes following surgery have been less well addressed. We systematically assess diffusion changes in white matter in patients with TLE in comparison to controls bef...

  17. Temporal lobe origin is common in patients who have undergone epilepsy surgery for hypermotor seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Amir M; Azar, Nabil J; Lagrange, Andre H; McLean, Michael; Singh, Pradumna; Sonmezturk, Hasan; Konrad, Peter; Neimat, Joseph; Abou-Khalil, Bassel

    2016-11-01

    Hypermotor seizures are most often reported from the frontal lobe but may also have temporal, parietal, or insular origin. We noted a higher proportion of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy in our surgical cohort who had hypermotor seizures. We evaluated the anatomic localization and surgical outcome in patient with refractory hypermotor seizures who had epilepsy surgery in our center. We identified twenty three patients with refractory hypermotor seizures from our epilepsy surgery database. We analyzed demographics, presurgical evaluation including semiology, MRI, PET scan, interictal/ictal scalp video-EEG, intracranial recording, and surgical outcomes. We evaluated preoperative variables as predictors of outcome. Most patients (65%) had normal brain MRI. Intracranial EEG was required in 20 patients (86.9%). Based on the presurgical evaluation, the resection was anterior temporal in fourteen patients, orbitofrontal in four patients, cingulate in four patients, and temporoparietal in one patient. The median duration of follow-up after surgery was 76.4months. Fourteen patients (60%) had been seizure free at the last follow up while 3 patients had rare disabling seizures. Hypermotor seizures often originated from the temporal lobe in this series of patients who had epilepsy surgery. This large proportion of temporal lobe epilepsy may be the result of a selection bias, due to easier localization and expected better outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy. With extensive presurgical evaluation, including intracranial EEG when needed, seizure freedom can be expected in the majority of patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Increased expression of Notch1 in temporal lobe epilepsy:animal models and clinical evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xijin Liu; Zhiyong Yang; Yaping Yin; Xuejun Deng

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with astrogliosis. Notch1 signaling can induce astrogliosis in glioma. However, it remains unknown whether Notch1 signaling is involved in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. This study investigated the presence of Notch1, hairy and enhancer of split-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the temporal neocortex and hippocampus of lithium-pilocar-pine-treated rats. The presence of Notch1 and hairy and enhancer of split-1 was also explored in brain tissues of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. Quantitative electroencephalo-gram analysis and behavioral observations were used as auxiliary measures. Results revealed that the presence of Notch1, hairy and enhancer of split-1, and glial ifbrillary acidic protein were en-hanced in status epilepticus and vehicle-treated spontaneous recurrent seizures rats, but remain unchanged in the following groups:control, absence of either status epilepticus or spontaneous recurrent seizures, and zileuton-treated spontaneous recurrent seizures. Compared with patient control cases, the presences of Notch1 and hairy and enhancer of split-1 were upregulated in the temporal neocortex of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. Therefore, these results suggest that Notch1 signaling may play an important role in the onset of temporal lobe epilepsy via astrogliosis. Furthermore, zileuton may be a potential therapeutic strategy for temporal lobe epilepsy by blocking Notch1 signaling.

  19. Longer epilepsy duration and multiple lobe involvement predict worse seizure outcomes for patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy associated with neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Crociati Meguins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To investigate the surgical outcomes of temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS and neurocysticercosis (NCC. Methods A retrospective investigation of patients with TLE-HS was conducted in a tertiary center. Results Seventy-nine (62.2%, 37 (29.1%, 6 (4.7%, and 5 (3.9% patients were Engel class I, II, III, and IV, respectively. Fifty-two (71.2% patients with epilepsy durations ≤ 10 years prior to surgery were seizure-free 1 year after the operation compared to 27 (50.0% patients with epilepsy durations > 10 years (p = 0.0121. Forty-three (72.9% patients with three or fewer lobes affected by NCC were seizure-free one year after the operation, and 36 (52.9% patients with more than three involved lobes were seizure-free after surgery (p = 0.0163. Conclusions Longer epilepsy durations and multiple lobe involvement predicted worse seizure outcomes in TLE-HS plus NCC patients.

  20. Disrupted Ipsilateral Network Connectivity in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Vega-Zelaya

    Full Text Available The current practice under which patients with refractory epilepsy are surgically treated is based mainly on the identification of specific cortical areas, mainly the epileptogenic zone, which is believed to be responsible for generation of seizures. A better understanding of the whole epileptic network and its components and properties is required before more effective and less invasive therapies can be developed. The aim of the present study was to partially characterize the evolution of the functional network during the preictal-ictal transition in partial seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE.Scalp and foramen ovale (FOE recordings from twenty-two TLE patients were analyzed under the complex network perspective. The density of links, average path length, average clustering coefficient, and modularity were calculated during the preictal and the ictal stages. Both linear-Pearson correlation-and non-linear-phase synchronization-measures were used as proxies of functional connectivity between the electrode locations areas. The transition from one stage to the other was evaluated in the whole network and in the mesial sub-networks. The results were compared with a voltage-dependent measure, namely, the spectral entropy.Changes in the global functional network during the transition from the preictal to the ictal stage show, in the linear case, that in sixteen cases (72.7% the density of the links increased during the seizure, with a decrease in the average path length in fifteen cases (68.1%. There was also a preictal and ictal imbalance in functional connectivity during both stages (77.2% to 86.3%. The SE dropped during the seizure in 95.4% of the cases, but did not show any tendency towards lateralization. When using the nonlinear measure of functional connectivity, the phase synchronization, similar results were obtained.In TLE patients, the transition to the ictal stage is accompanied by increasing global synchronization and a

  1. Temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai-Yoshida, Emi; Ogihara, Masaaki; Ozawa, Miwa; Nozaki, Taiki; Morino, Michiharu; Manabe, Atsushi; Hosoya, Ryota

    2013-07-01

    Of 71 acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors at our hospital over the past 10 years, 2 children developed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). This is the first report to describe the clinical course of MTLE-HS observed longitudinally by EEG and MRI. Patient 1 experienced a seizure during chemotherapy involving intrathecal methotrexate. Postseizure MRI suggested methotrexate encephalopathy or leukemic invasion. Anticonvulsant therapy was initiated; subsequent EEGs and MRIs revealed normal results. Three years after chemotherapy, a diffuse, irregular spike-and-wave pattern was observed on interictal EEG. Five years after chemotherapy, the patient developed MTLE-HS comprising complex partial seizures, typical temporal spikes on EEG, and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Patient 2 did not experience seizures during chemotherapy. Four years later, the patient started experiencing complex partial seizures, and a diffuse, irregular spike-and-wave pattern was observed on interictal EEG. A clinical picture of MTLE-HS developed 2 years later. In both patients, nonspecific EEG abnormalities (ie, diffuse, irregular spike-and-wave activity) preceded the appearance of HS on MRI by 2 years, suggesting an insidious advance of HS during the latent period. Such atypical EEG findings may indicate MTLE-HS during follow-up of leukemia patients. MTLE-HS develops several years after an initial precipitating incident such as prolonged seizures, central nervous system infection, and brain trauma. In our cases, the initial precipitating incident may have been chemotherapy and/or prolonged seizures. Thus, MTLE-HS associated with leukemia may not be as rare as generally believed. A large cohort study of late neurologic complications is warranted.

  2. Did Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky suffer from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christian R; Novikov, Vladimir P I; Regard, Marianne; Siegel, Adrian M

    2005-07-01

    Many scientific authors--among them famous names such as Henri Gastaut or Sigmund Freud--dealt with the question from what kind of epilepsy Fyodor Mikhailovitch Dostoevsky (1821-1881) might had suffered. Because of the tight interplay between Dostoevsky's literary work and his own disease we throw light on the author's epilepsy against the background of his epileptic fictional characters. Moreover, we attempt to classify Dostoevsky's epilepsy on the basis of his bibliography, language, and literary work.

  3. Relation of callosal structure to cognitive abilities in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSchneider

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to analyse the influence of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE on the morphology of the corpus callosum (CC and its relation to cognitive abilities. More specifically, we investigated correlations between intellectual abilities and callosal morphology, while additionally exploring the modulating impact of (a side of seizure onset (b age of disease onset.For this reason a large representative sample of patients with hippocampal sclerosis (n=79; 35 males; 44 females; age: 18-63 years with disease onset ranging from 0 to 50 years of age, and consisting of 46 left and 33 right TLE patients was recruited. Intelligence was measured using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised (WAIS-R.To get localizations of correlations with high anatomic precision, callosal morphology was examined using computational mesh-based modeling methods, applied to anatomical brain MRI scans.Intellectual performance was positively associated with callosal thickness in anterior and midcallosal callosal regions, with anterior parts being slightly more affected by age of disease onset and side of seizure onset than posterior parts. Earlier age at onset of epilepsy was associated with lower thickness in anterior and midcallosal regions. In addition, laterality of seizure onset had a significant influence on anterior CC morphology, with left hemispheric origin having stronger effects.We found that in TLE, anterior and midcallosal CC morphology are related to cognitive performance. The findings support recent findings of detrimental effects of early onset mTLE on anterior brain regions and of a distinct effect particularly of left TLE on frontal lobe functioning and structure. The causal nature of the relationship remains an open question, i.e., whether CC morphology impacts IQ development or whether IQ development impacts CC morphology, or both.

  4. Relation of callosal structure to cognitive abilities in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christine; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Luders, Eileen; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W; Elger, Christian; Weber, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to analyze the influence of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) on the morphology of the corpus callosum (CC) and its relation to cognitive abilities. More specifically, we investigated correlations between intellectual abilities and callosal morphology, while additionally exploring the modulating impact of (a) side of seizure onset (b) age of disease onset. For this reason a large representative sample of patients with hippocampal sclerosis (n = 79; 35 males; 44 females; age: 18-63 years) with disease onset ranging from 0 to 50 years of age, and consisting of 46 left and 33 right mTLE-patients was recruited. Intelligence was measured using the Wechsler-Adult Intelligence Scale Revised. To get localizations of correlations with high anatomic precision, callosal morphology was examined using computational mesh-based modeling methods, applied to anatomical brain MRI scans. Intellectual performance was positively associated with callosal thickness in anterior and midcallosal callosal regions, with anterior parts being slightly more affected by age of disease onset and side of seizure onset than posterior parts. Earlier age at onset of epilepsy was associated with lower thickness in anterior and midcallosal regions. In addition, laterality of seizure onset had a significant influence on anterior CC morphology, with left hemispheric origin having stronger effects. We found that in mTLE, anterior and midcallosal CC morphology are related to cognitive performance. The findings support recent findings of detrimental effects of early onset mTLE on anterior brain regions and of a distinct effect particularly of left mTLE on frontal lobe functioning and structure. The causal nature of the relationship remains an open question, i.e., whether CC morphology impacts IQ development or whether IQ development impacts CC morphology, or both.

  5. Use of statistical parametric mapping of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET in frontal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, M.; Amthauer, H.; Luedemann, L.; Hartkop, E.; Ruf, J.; Gutberlet, M.; Bertram, H.; Felix, R.; Venz, St. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Universitaetsklinikum Charite, Med. Fakultaet der Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany); Merschhemke, M.; Meencke, H.-J. [Epilepsie-Zentrum Berlin-Brandenburg am Ev. Krkh. Koenigin Elisabeth Herzberge, Berlin (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    Aim: Evaluation of the use of statistical parametrical mapping (SPM) of FDG-PET for seizure lateralization in frontal lobe epilepsy. Patients: 38 patients with suspected frontal lobe epilepsy supported by clinical findings and video-EEG monitoring. Method: Statistical parametrical maps were generated by subtraction of individual scans from a control group, formed by 16 patients with negative neurological/psychiatric history and no abnormalities in the MR scan. The scans were also analyzed visually as well as semiquantitatively by manually drawn ROIs. Results: SPM showed a better accordance to the results of surface EEG monitoring compared with visual scan analysis and ROI quantification. In comparison with intracranial EEG recordings, the best performance was achieved by combining the ROI based quantification with SPM analysis. Conclusion: These findings suggest that SPM analysis of FDG-PET data could be a useful as complementary tool in the evaluation of seizure focus lateralization in patients with supposed frontal lobe epilepsy. (orig.)

  6. Hilar somatostatin interneuron loss reduces dentate gyrus inhibition in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Gabrielle; Balgooyen, Laura; Mattis, Joanna; Deisseroth, Karl; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2016-06-01

    In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, seizures usually start in the hippocampus, and dentate granule cells are hyperexcitable. Somatostatin interneurons are a major subpopulation of inhibitory neurons in the dentate gyrus, and many are lost in patients and animal models. However, surviving somatostatin interneurons sprout axon collaterals and form new synapses, so the net effect on granule cell inhibition remains unclear. The present study uses optogenetics to activate hilar somatostatin interneurons and measure the inhibitory effect on dentate gyrus perforant path-evoked local field potential responses in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. In controls, light activation of hilar somatostatin interneurons inhibited evoked responses up to 40%. Epileptic pilocarpine-treated mice exhibited loss of hilar somatostatin interneurons and less light-induced inhibition of evoked responses. These findings suggest that severe epilepsy-related loss of hilar somatostatin interneurons can overwhelm the surviving interneurons' capacity to compensate by sprouting axon collaterals. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Downregulation of BK channel expression in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco Otalora, Luis F.; Hernandez, Eder F.; Arshadmansab, Massoud F.; rancisco, Sebastian F; Willis, Michael; Ermolinsky, Boris; Zarei, Masoud; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R.

    2008-01-01

    In the hippocampus, BK channels are preferentially localized in presynaptic glutamatergic terminals including mossy fibers where they are thought to play an important role regulating excessive glutamate release during hyperactive states. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK, MaxiK, Slo) have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic epilepsy. However, the role of BK channels in acquired mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) remains unknown. Here we used immu...

  8. GINGIVAL ENLARGEMENT ASSOCIATED WITH NOCTURNAL FRONTAL LOBE EPILEPSY. A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma ANAMIKA; Munjal VIDHI

    2012-01-01

    „Epilepsy” refers to a group of neurological disorders characterized by chronic, recurrent, paroxysmal seizure activity. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by brief, recurring seizures produ‑ ced in the frontal lobes of the brain, often while the patient is sleeping, and also by clusters of brief motor seizures. Seizure disorders may affect the dental status and oral health of patients. Epileptic drugs lead to gingival hyper‑ plasi...

  9. Temporal lobe epilepsy following maintenance electroconvulsive therapy-Electrical kindling in the human brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Alexander; Gardner, Helen; Wilson, Ian; Rolfe, Tim; Archer, John

    2016-11-01

    Maintenance electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is sometimes prescribed for refractory psychiatric conditions. We describe five patients who received maintenance ECT and developed florid temporal epileptiform abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) despite no history of epilepsy and normal neuroimaging. All patients had received regular ECT for at least 8 months. Three patients had clinical events consistent with epileptic seizures, and video-EEG monitoring captured electrographic seizures in two patients. After cessation of ECT the EEGs normalized in all patients, and no further clinical seizures occurred. Maintenance ECT may predispose to epilepsy with a seizure focus in the temporal lobe. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Targeting the endocannabinoid system in the amygdala kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Hannes; Soerensen, Jonna; Wotjak, Carsten T; Potschka, Heidrun

    2011-07-01

    The endocannabinoid system can be considered as a putative target to affect ictogenesis as well as the generation of a hyperexcitable epileptic network. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of a CB1 receptor agonist (WIN55.212-2) and of an inhibitor of the enzymatic degradation of the endocannabinoid anandamide (fatty acid hydrolase inhibitor URB597) in the amygdala kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Only minor effects on seizure thresholds and seizure parameters without a clear dose-dependency were observed in fully kindled mice. When evaluating the impact on kindling acquisition, WIN55.212-2 significantly delayed the progression of seizure severity. In contrast, URB597 did not affect the development of seizures in the kindling paradigm. Analysis of cell proliferation and neurogenesis during the kindling process revealed that URB597 significantly reduced the number of newborn neurons. These data give first evidence that CB1-receptor activation might render a disease-modifying approach. Future studies are necessary that further analyze the role of CB1 receptors and to confirm the efficacy of CB1-receptor agonists in other models of chronic epilepsy.

  11. Memory rehabilitation and brain training for surgical temporal lobe epilepsy patients: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorenhof, Loes; Baxendale, Sallie; Smith, Natalie; Thompson, Pam

    2012-04-01

    The short term impact of a memory rehabilitation programme on verbal memory test performance and subjective ratings of memory in everyday life was assessed in healthy controls and left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) surgical patients. The intervention involved training in the use of external and internal memory support strategies. Half of the sample in addition undertook computerised brain training exercises as homework. LTLE patients were seen either before surgery or 3-6 months after their operation. Improvements in verbal memory were observed in both groups. An effect of brain training was recorded but this did not occur in a consistent direction. Subjective ratings of memory indicated improvements that were significant for the LTLE group but not the controls. Positive changes in the memory outcome measures were associated with improvements in mood. Pre-operative memory rehabilitation was not associated with better outcomes than post-operative intervention. Further research is needed to explore the persistence of the changes observed and to explore if pre-operative rehabilitation offsets post-operative memory decline. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE , “déjà vu” phenomenon and religious experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda M. Deme

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A lot of controversies appear regarding temporal lobe epilepsy to bridge the gap between religion and neuroscience. TLE was described in literature in 1869 by Russian writer Dostoievski (who suffered from epilepsy, in his work ”The Idiot”, when the hero Prince Myshkin described his epileptic feelings of sublime sacredness of the inner light. Neurotheology is the science trying to understand the brain activities and to find an integration in religion concepts. TLE aura or psychic crisis is defined by simple or complex hallucinations, mystic divine experience, unpleasant experience of fear and déjà vu phenomenon. Neppe and Funkhouser (2006 described the notion as already seen, but it means also already heard,met, heard or visited. The“déjà vu” phenomenon is always a subjective experience which can appear in normal subjects or in pathologic states like TLE, schizophrenia or other types of psychosis. It can also be a subjective paranormal experience. Neppe’s definition is now universally used, defined as ‘any subjectively inappropriate impression of familiarity of the present experience with an undefined past’ (Neppe, 1983. Déjà vu has an impact on neuroscience and descriptions from history and literature and the multitude of descriptions from experiences demand various scientific explanations.

  13. Preoperative automated fibre quantification predicts postoperative seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Simon S; Glenn, G Russell; Weber, Bernd; Kreilkamp, Barbara A K; Jensen, Jens H; Helpern, Joseph A; Wagner, Jan; Barker, Gareth J; Richardson, Mark P; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    Approximately one in every two patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy will not be rendered completely seizure-free after temporal lobe surgery. The reasons for this are unknown and are likely to be multifactorial. Quantitative volumetric magnetic resonance imaging techniques have provided limited insight into the causes of persistent postoperative seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The relationship between postoperative outcome and preoperative pathology of white matter tracts, which constitute crucial components of epileptogenic networks, is unknown. We investigated regional tissue characteristics of preoperative temporal lobe white matter tracts known to be important in the generation and propagation of temporal lobe seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy, using diffusion tensor imaging and automated fibre quantification. We studied 43 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis and 44 healthy controls. Patients underwent preoperative imaging, amygdalohippocampectomy and postoperative assessment using the International League Against Epilepsy seizure outcome scale. From preoperative imaging, the fimbria-fornix, parahippocampal white matter bundle and uncinate fasciculus were reconstructed, and scalar diffusion metrics were calculated along the length of each tract. Altogether, 51.2% of patients were rendered completely seizure-free and 48.8% continued to experience postoperative seizure symptoms. Relative to controls, both patient groups exhibited strong and significant diffusion abnormalities along the length of the uncinate bilaterally, the ipsilateral parahippocampal white matter bundle, and the ipsilateral fimbria-fornix in regions located within the medial temporal lobe. However, only patients with persistent postoperative seizures showed evidence of significant pathology of tract sections located in the ipsilateral dorsal fornix and in the contralateral parahippocampal white matter bundle

  14. Factors Predictive of Seizure Outcome in New-Onset Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A community-based cohort of 77 children with new-onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE were followed prospectively and reviewed at 7 and 14 years after seizure onset, and clinical, EEG, and neuroimaging findings and seizure outcome are reported from the Royal Children's Hospital and University of Melbourne, Australia, and Starship Children's Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.

  15. Fluoxetine Restores Spatial Learning but Not Accelerated Forgetting in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkas, Lisa; Redhead, Edward; Taylor, Matthew; Shtaya, Anan; Hamilton, Derek A.; Gray, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Learning and memory dysfunction is the most common neuropsychological effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, and because the underlying neurobiology is poorly understood, there are no pharmacological strategies to help restore memory function in these patients. We have demonstrated impairments in the acquisition of an allocentric spatial task,…

  16. Treatment of Proper Name Retrieval Deficits in an Individual with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkina, Irene; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Silkes, JoAnn P.; Phatak, Vaishali; Kendall, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Studies investigating language deficits in individuals with left temporal-lobe epilepsy have consistently demonstrated impairments in proper name retrieval. The aim of this Phase I rehabilitation study was to investigate the effects of a linguistically distributed word retrieval treatment on proper name retrieval in an individual with…

  17. Treatment of Proper Name Retrieval Deficits in an Individual with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkina, Irene; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Silkes, JoAnn P.; Phatak, Vaishali; Kendall, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Studies investigating language deficits in individuals with left temporal-lobe epilepsy have consistently demonstrated impairments in proper name retrieval. The aim of this Phase I rehabilitation study was to investigate the effects of a linguistically distributed word retrieval treatment on proper name retrieval in an individual with…

  18. Fluoxetine Restores Spatial Learning but Not Accelerated Forgetting in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkas, Lisa; Redhead, Edward; Taylor, Matthew; Shtaya, Anan; Hamilton, Derek A.; Gray, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Learning and memory dysfunction is the most common neuropsychological effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, and because the underlying neurobiology is poorly understood, there are no pharmacological strategies to help restore memory function in these patients. We have demonstrated impairments in the acquisition of an allocentric spatial task,…

  19. Atorvastatin treatment during epileptogenesis in a rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, E.A.; Holtman, L.; Aronica, E.; Schmitz, L.J.M.; Wadman, W.J.; Gorter, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that blood-brain barrier leakage together with inflammation could contribute to epileptogenesis and seizure progression in a rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy. Because statins have been shown to reduce blood-brain barrier permeability and inflammation in neurological di

  20. Hippocampal GABA transporter distribution in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, O.; Karaca, U.; Andrade, P.; Nijs, L. de; Kusters, B.; Peeters, A.; Dings, J.; Pannek, H.; Ebner, A.; Rijkers, K.; Hoogland, G.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine hippocampal expression of neuronal GABA-transporter (GAT-1) and glial GABA-transporter (GAT-3) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). METHODS: Hippocampal sections were immunohistochemically stained for GABA-transporter 1 and GABA-transpor

  1. Hippocampal subregion-specific microRNA expression during epileptogenesis in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, J.A.; Iyer, A.; White, I.; Colzi, A.; van Vliet, E.A.; Sisodiya, S.; Aronica, E.

    2014-01-01

    Since aberrant miRNA expression has been implicated in numerous brain diseases, we studied miRNA expression and miRNA regulation of important signaling pathways during temporal lobe epileptogenesis in order to identify possible targets for epilepsy therapy. The temporal profile of miRNA expression w

  2. Zinc-induced collapse of augmented inhibition by GABA in a temporal lobe epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, E H; Otis, T S; Mody, I

    1996-01-19

    In the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy, several physiological indicators of inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus are consistent with an augmented, rather than a diminished, inhibition. In brain slices obtained from epileptic (kindled) rats, the excitatory drive onto inhibitory interneurons was increased and was paralleled by a reduction in the presynaptic autoinhibition of GABA release. This augmented inhibition was sensitive to zinc most likely after a molecular reorganization of GABAA receptor subunits. Consequently, during seizures, inhibition by GABA may be diminished by the zinc released from aberrantly sprouted mossy fiber terminals of granule cells, which are found in many experimental models of epilepsy and in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

  3. MRI and brain spect findings in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and normal CT scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carrilho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy clinically documented by several abnormal interictal surface EEGs with typical unitemporal epileptiform activity and a normal CT scan were studied. Interictal99mTC HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI were performed in all subjects. Abnormalities were shown in 61.5% of MRI (n=16 and 65.4% of SPECT (n=17. Hippocampal atrophy associated to a high signal on T2-weighted MRI slices suggesting mesial temporal sclerosis was the main finding (n=12; 75% of abnormal MRI. MRI correlated well to surface EEG in 50% (n=13. There was also a good correlation between MRI and SPECT in 30.7% (n=8. SPECT and EEG were in agreement in 57.7% (n=l5. MRI, SPECT and EEG were congruent in 26.9% (n=7. These results support the usefulness of interictal brain SPECT and MRI in detecting lateralized abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. On the other hand, in two cases, interictal SPECT correlated poorly with surface EEG. This functional method should not be used isolately in the detection of temporal lobe foci. MRI is more useful than CT as a neuroimaging technique in temporal lobe epilepsy. It may detect small structural lesions and mesial temporal lobe sclerosis which are not easily seen with traditional CT scanning.

  4. Seizure outcomes after resective surgery for extra-temporal lobe epilepsy in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Breshears, Jonathan D; Sun, Peter P; Chang, Edward F; Auguste, Kurtis I

    2013-08-01

    While temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common epilepsy syndrome in adults, seizures in children are more often extratemporal in origin. Extra-temporal lobe epilepsy (ETLE) in pediatric patients is often medically refractory, leading to significantly diminished quality of life. Seizure outcomes after resective surgery for pediatric ETLE vary tremendously in the literature, given diverse patient and epilepsy characteristics and small sample sizes. The authors performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies including 10 or more pediatric patients (age ≤ 19 years) published over the last 20 years examining seizure outcomes after resective surgery for ETLE, excluding hemispherectomy. Thirty-six studies were examined. These 36 studies included 1259 pediatric patients who underwent resective surgery for ETLE. Seizure freedom (Engel Class I outcome) was achieved in 704 (56%) of these 1259 patients postoperatively, and 555 patients (44%) continued to have seizures (Engel Class II-IV outcome). Shorter epilepsy duration (≤ 7 years, the median value in this study) was more predictive of seizure freedom than longer (> 7 years) seizure history (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-2.14), suggesting that earlier intervention may be beneficial. Also, lesional epilepsy was associated with better seizure outcomes than nonlesional epilepsy (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.19-1.49). Other predictors of seizure freedom included an absence of generalized seizures (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.18-2.35) and localizing ictal electroencephalographic findings (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.24-1.93). In conclusion, seizure outcomes after resective surgery for pediatric ETLE are less favorable than those associated with temporal lobectomy, but seizure freedom may be more common with earlier intervention and lesional epilepsy etiology. Children with continued debilitating seizures despite failure of multiple medication trials should be referred to a comprehensive pediatric epilepsy center

  5. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy in a Chinese Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengyuan Che; Youyi Wei; Xueyuan Heng; Qingxi Fu; Jianzhang Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Serotonin(5-hydroxytryptamine,5-HT)influences the cortical and subcortical excitatory/inhibitory balance and participates in the pathophysiological processes of epilepsy.The serotonin transporter(5-HTT)is the most important factor in serotonin inactivation.We tested whether 5-HTT polymorphisms are involved in the pathogenesis of epilepsy in Chinese Han population.We did not find a significant difference in the frequencies of genotypes and alleles in the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region(5-HTTLPR)in patients with non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy and normal controls(P > 0.05).Frequencies of the 5-HTT intren 2 variable number tandem repeat(5-HTTVNTR)12/12 genotype and allele 12 were higher in the patients with non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy than normal controls(P < 0.01).The odds ratio of affecting non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy was1.435(95% Cl,1.096 1.880)in patients carrying allele 12(P < 0.05).Although the 5-HTFLPR may not be a genetic locus of non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy in Chinese Han population,allele 12 in the 5-HTFVNTR may correlate with non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy.The Stin2.12 allele and12/12 genotype could be predisposing to non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy.

  6. [Cognitive function related to temporal lobe epilepsy: advances in research on new cognitive function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Mitsuhiko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2013-05-01

    The importance of neuropsychological examinations in epilepsy care and, especially, in epilepsy surgery is centered on the following roles: they offer a means to confirm the epileptic focus by multi-modal preoperative assessments and they help to assess postoperative functional changes based on preoperative cognitive functions. Furthermore, assessments of the cognitive functions of patients with epilepsy using various tests aid in providing comprehensive medical care. Thus far, research on cognitive functions related to temporal lobe epilepsy has focused on memory, language, and general intelligence. However, the concept of social cognitive function has been recently proposed in the field of neuropsychology. This cognitive function, proposed by Brothers in 1990, is a collective term for functions needed in social life; these include functions required to interpret the expressions, feelings, and intentions of others and to form and maintain smooth human relationships while making decisions necessary for self-survival. These functions mainly involve facial expression recognition and decision-making. Findings of research on neural mechanisms underlying social cognitive functions have emphasized the roles of the cerebral limbic system, such as the amygdalo-hippocampal complexes, and the emotional system in the ventromedial prefrontal area. Studies on social cognitive functions in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy are being pursued currently. Early-onset right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is the key substrate determining a severe deficit in recognizing emotional facial expressions and decision-making. In the future, neuropsychological examinations of social cognition, in addition to those of global intelligence, memory, and verbal function, will contribute to the provision of comprehensive medical care to patients with epilepsy.

  7. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F C; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C; Bray, Isabella M; Reynolds, James P; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L; Henshall, David C

    2015-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain.

  8. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F.C.; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C.; Bray, Isabella M.; Reynolds, James P.; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. PMID

  9. Evaluation of intense physical effort in subjects with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Fabio; Scorza, Fúlvio Alexandre; de Albuquerque, Marly; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2009-12-01

    People with epilepsy have been discouraged from participating in physical activity due to the fear that it will exacerbate seizures. Although the beneficial effect of aerobic exercise in people with epilepsy, little objective evidence regarding the intensity of exercise has been reported. We investigated the effect of incremental physical exercise to exhaustion in people with epilepsy. Seventeen persons with temporal lobe epilepsy and twenty one control healthy subjects participated in this study. Both groups were submitted to echo-color-doppler and electrocardiogram at rest and during physical effort. None of patients reported seizures during physical effort or in the recovery period of ergometric test. Both groups presented physiological heart rate and blood pressure responses during the different stages of the ergometric test. Only few patients presented electrocardiography or echocardiography alterations at rest or during effort. In conclusion, this work suggests that physical effort to exhaustion is not a seizure-induced component.

  10. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study on patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senzaki, Akira; Okubo, Yoshiro; Matsuura, Masato; Toru, Michio (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Abe, Tetsuo; Asai, Kunihiko; Moriiwa, Motoi

    1993-09-01

    In 30 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who had no visual abnormality on either CT or MRI, cerebral changes especially in the mesial temporal region were examined. The findings were compared with those in 20 normal volunteers. In epileptic patients, the mesial temporal region was significantly smaller and T1-weighted values in this region were significantly higher, as compared with the controls. In the group of epilepsy, atrophy especially in the hippocampal and tonsillar regions and increased water content were suggested. Regarding the bilateral difference in the size of the mesial temporal region, there was no significant difference between the group of epilepsy and the control group. The group of epilepsy seemed to have bilateral changes in the mesial temporal region. In 9 patients with the present or past history of organic delusional (schizophrenia-like) disorder, the coronal section of the third ventricle was significantly large, suggesting the likelihood of structural changes surrounding the third ventricle. (N.K.).

  11. Neurocysticercosis and microscopic hippocampal dysplasia in a patient with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Alexandre Valotta; Martins, Heloise Helena; Marques, Carolina Mattos; Yacubian, Elza Marcia Targas; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Carrete, Henrique; da Silva Centeno, Ricardo; Stavale, João Norberto; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão

    2006-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that neurocysticercosis (NC) is the main cause of symptomatic epilepsy in developing countries. The association between NC and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) has been reported by several authors. Recent data have shown that the presence of NC does not influence the clinical and pathological profile in MTLE patients and suggest that not all cysticercotic lesions are inevitably epileptogenic. We describe a 50-years-old woman with partial seizures due to NC which evolve to MTLE. The patient was submitted to a corticoamygdalohippocampectomy to treat refractory epilepsy. An immunohistochemical study using neuronal markers was made on hippocampal formation. Besides the typical aspects of Ammon's horn sclerosis (AHS), the microscopic examination demonstrates cellular features of hippocampal malformation including dysmorphic neurons and focal bilamination of granular cell layer. We suggest that, in this case, a developmental disorder lowered the threshold for the NC-induced seizures and contributed to the establishment of refractory epilepsy.

  12. Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008481 Application of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation to the temporal lobe epilepsy with bilateral hippocampal sclerosis: an fMRI study. ZHANG Zhiqiang(张志强), et al.Dept Med Imaging, Clin Sch, Med Coll, Nanjing Univ, Nanjing 210002.Natl Med J China 2008;88(23):1594-1598. Objective To study the changes of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of the resting-fMRI in the mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) with

  13. Expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in hippocampus of rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Li-ping

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 protein in hippocampus of rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy after status epilepticus (SE and explore its function in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods Rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy was induced by lithium chloride (LiCl-pilocarpine. Total protein was extracted from hippocampus and rat brain slices were obtained at different time points (0, 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 h and 7, 10, 30, 50 d after SE. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining were used for detection of the expression of TLR4 in the hippocampus. Results The results of Western blotting showed the TLR4 protein expression at 0, 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 h and 7, 10, 30 d after SE was higher than that in the control group (P 0.05. Conclusion TLR4 protein was mainly expressed in cytoplasm of pyramidal cells in CA3 area of hippocampus. TLR4 protein expression in the hippocampus was increased in varying degrees at different observation time points after SE, indicating that TLR4 may play an important role in the development of epilepsy.

  14. Drug-resistant parietal lobe epilepsy: clinical manifestations and surgery outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Marjan; Sperling, Michael R; Rabiei, Amin H; Asadi-Pooya, Ali A

    2017-03-01

    We reviewed a large surgical cohort to investigate the clinical manifestations, EEG and neuroimaging findings, and postoperative seizure outcome in patients with drug-resistant parietal lobe epilepsy (PLE). All drug-resistant PLE patients, who were investigated for epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center between 1986 and 2015, were identified. Demographic data, seizure data, EEG recordings, brain MRI, pathological findings, and postsurgical seizure outcome were reviewed. In total, 18 patients (11 males and seven females) were identified. Sixteen patients (88%) had tonic-clonic seizures, 12 (66%) had focal seizures with impaired awareness, and 13 (72%) described auras. Among 15 patients who had brain MRI, 14 patients (93%) had parietal lobe lesions. Only three of 15 patients (20%) who had interictal scalp EEG recordings showed parietal interictal spikes. Of 12 patients with available ictal surface EEG recordings, only three patients (25%) had parietal ictal EEG onset. After a mean follow-up duration of 8.6 years, 14 patients (77.7%) showed a favourable postoperative seizure outcome. In patients with PLE, semiology and EEG may be misleading and brain MRI is the most valuable tool to localize the epileptogenic zone. Postsurgical seizure outcome was favourable in our patients with drug-resistant parietal lobe epilepsy.

  15. Temporal lobe epilepsy and surgery selectively alter the dorsal, not the ventral, default-mode network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Gaelle Eve; Skidmore, Christopher; Evans, James; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R; Pustina, Dorian; Tracy, Joseph I

    2014-01-01

    The default-mode network (DMN) is a major resting-state network. It can be divided in two distinct networks: one is composed of dorsal and anterior regions [referred to as the dorsal DMN (dDMN)], while the other involves the more posterior regions [referred to as the ventral DMN (vDMN)]. To date, no studies have investigated the potentially distinct impact of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) on these networks. In this context, we explored the effect of TLE and anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) on the dDMN and vDMN. We utilized two resting-state fMRI sessions from left, right TLE patients (pre-/post-surgery) and normal controls (sessions 1/2). Using independent component analysis, we identified the two networks. We then evaluated for differences in spatial extent for each network between the groups, and across the scanning sessions. The results revealed that, pre-surgery, the dDMN showed larger differences between the three groups than the vDMN, and more particularly between right and left TLE than between the TLE patients and controls. In terms of change post-surgery, in both TLE groups, the dDMN also demonstrated larger changes than the vDMN. For the vDMN, the only changes involved the resected temporal lobe for each ATL group. For the dDMN, the left ATL group showed post-surgical increases in several regions outside the ictal temporal lobe. In contrast, the right ATL group displayed a large reduction in the frontal cortex. The results highlight that the two DMNs are not impacted by TLE and ATL in an equivalent fashion. Importantly, the dDMN was the more affected, with right ATL having a more deleterious effects than left ATL. We are the first to highlight that the dDMN more strongly bears the negative impact of TLE than the vDMN, suggesting there is an interaction between the side of pathology and DM sub-network activity. Our findings have implications for understanding the impact TLE and subsequent ATL on the functions implemented by the distinct DMNs.

  16. Temporal lobe epilepsy and surgery selectively alter the dorsal, not the ventral, default-mode network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle Eve Doucet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The default-mode network (DMN is a major resting-state network. It can be divided in 2 distinct networks: one is composed of dorsal and anterior regions (referred to as the dorsal DMN, dDMN, while the other involves the more posterior regions (referred to as the ventral DMN, vDMN. To date, no studies have investigated the potentially distinct impact of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE on these networks. In this context, we explored the effect of TLE and anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL on the dDMN and vDMN. We utilized 2 resting-state fMRI sessions from left, right TLE patients (pre-/post-surgery and normal controls (NCs, sessions 1/2. Using independent component analysis, we identified the 2 networks. We then evaluated for differences in spatial extent for each network between the groups, and across the scanning sessions. The results revealed that, pre-surgery, the dDMN showed larger differences between the three groups than the vDMN, and more particularly between right and left TLE than between the TLE patients and controls. In terms of change post-surgery, in both TLE groups, the dDMN also demonstrated larger changes than the vDMN. For the vDMN, the only changes involved the resected temporal lobe for each ATL group. For the dDMN, the left ATL group showed post-surgical increases in several regions outside the ictal temporal lobe. In contrast, the right ATL group displayed a large reduction in the frontal cortex. The results highlight that the 2 DMNs are not impacted by TLE and ATL in an equivalent fashion. Importantly, the dDMN was the more affected, with right ATL having a more deleterious effects on the dDMN than left ATL. We are the first to highlight that the dDMN more strongly bears the negative impact of TLE than the vDMN, suggesting there is an interaction between the side of pathology and DM subnetwork activity. Our findings have implications for understanding the impact TLE and subsequent ATL on the functions implemented by the distinct

  17. Temporal lobe epilepsy and aura with happiness and pleasure: report of two cases and literature revision

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The authors present two cases of temporal lobe epilepsy with happiness and pleasure during the seizure. Discussing the rarity of these clinical findings, the concept of epileptic aura is historically reviewed with special attention to Dostoievski's epilepsy and its descriptions by the medical literature. São apresentados 2 casos de epilepsia do lobo temporal nos quais os pacientes apresentam sensações de alegria e prazer durante a crise. Os autores analisam a evolução do conceito de aura e...

  18. MRI in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy; Correlation between MRI findings and clinical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Kazuhiro (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-04-01

    The present study investigated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in temporal lobe epilepsy and correlated them with clinical variables, such as age, illness duration, past history, and the frequency of seizure. Cerebral MRI was performed in 45 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy of unknown etiology, using a 0.5 T and/or a 1.5 T MRI systems. The temporal lobe was seen as high signal intensity on T2-weighted images and/or proton density-weighted images in 6 patients, although it was missed on CT and T1-weighted images. The high intensity area seemed to reflect sclerosis of the temporal lobe. This finding was significantly associated with partial seizure. Of these patients, 3 had a history of febrile convulsions. Ten patients had slight dilatation of the inferior horn of the lateral ventricle. They were significantly old at the time of onset and examination, as compared with those without dilatation. Furthermore, 6 patients with unilateral dilatation were significantly younger than the other 4 with bilateral dilatation. Nine patients had small multiple high signal areas in white matter, mainly in the parietal lobe, which suggested vascular origin. These patients were significantly old at the time of onset and examination, as compared with those having no such findings. In depicting high signal intensity areas, a 1.5 T MRI system was not always superior to a 0.5 T MRI system. Proton density-weighted images were better than T2-weighted images in some patients. (N.K.).

  19. In search of optimal DBS paradigms to treat epilepsy: bilateral versus unilateral hippocampal stimulation in a rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nieuwenhuyse, B.; Raedt, R.; Delbeke, J.; Wadman, W.J.; Boon, P; Vonck, K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In many temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients both hippocampi are seizure onset zones. These patients are unsuitable candidates for epilepsy surgery but may be amenable to hippocampal deep brain stimulation (DBS). The optimal DBS parameters for these patients are unknown. Recent observat

  20. GINGIVAL ENLARGEMENT ASSOCIATED WITH NOCTURNAL FRONTAL LOBE EPILEPSY. A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma ANAMIKA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available „Epilepsy” refers to a group of neurological disorders characterized by chronic, recurrent, paroxysmal seizure activity. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by brief, recurring seizures produ‑ ced in the frontal lobes of the brain, often while the patient is sleeping, and also by clusters of brief motor seizures. Seizure disorders may affect the dental status and oral health of patients. Epileptic drugs lead to gingival hyper‑ plasia, namely tissue enlargement, caused by an increased number of cells.

  1. Postoperative seizure freedom does not normalize altered connectivity in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccotta, Luigi; Lopez, Mayra A; Adeyemo, Babatunde; Ances, Beau M; Day, Brian K; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Dowling, Joshua L; Leuthardt, Eric C; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Hogan, Robert Edward

    2017-08-03

    Specific changes in the functional connectivity of brain networks occur in patients with epilepsy. Yet whether such changes reflect a stable disease effect or one that is a function of active seizure burden remains unclear. Here, we longitudinally assessed the connectivity of canonical cognitive functional networks in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), both before and after patients underwent epilepsy surgery and achieved seizure freedom. Seventeen patients with intractable TLE who underwent epilepsy surgery with Engel class I outcome and 17 matched healthy controls took part in the study. The functional connectivity of a set of cognitive functional networks derived from typical cognitive tasks was assessed in patients, preoperatively and postoperatively, as well as in controls, using stringent methods of artifact reduction. Preoperatively, functional networks in TLE patients differed significantly from healthy controls, with differences that largely, but not exclusively, involved the default mode and temporal/auditory subnetworks. However, undergoing epilepsy surgery and achieving seizure freedom did not lead to significant changes in network connectivity, with postoperative functional network abnormalities closely mirroring the preoperative state. This result argues for a stable chronic effect of the disease on brain connectivity, with changes that are largely "burned in" by the time a patient with intractable TLE undergoes epilepsy surgery, which typically occurs years after the initial diagnosis. The result has potential implications for the treatment of intractable epilepsy, suggesting that delaying surgical intervention that may achieve seizure freedom may lead to functional network changes that are no longer reversible by the time of epilepsy surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Triple pathological findings in a surgically amenable patient with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumin Tong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS is a well-recognized cause of intractable epilepsy; however, coexistence with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD is less common. Middle fossa epidermoid cysts are rare and may involve the temporal lobe. Most epidermoids are clinically silent, slow-growing, and seldom associated with overt symptomatology, including seizures. We describe a patient with multiple comorbidities including left MTS and a large epidermoid cyst involving the left quadrigeminal plate cistern compressing upon the cerebellar vermis and tail of the left hippocampus, resulting in refractory left temporal lobe epilepsy. The patient underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy. The surgical pathology demonstrated a third pathological finding of left temporal FCD type Ia. The patient has been seizure-free since the surgery. This case provides additional information with regard to the understanding of epileptogenicity and surgical planning in patients with MTS and epidermoid cysts.

  3. Ictal singing due to right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy involving a bihemispheric network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Mi; Kang, Joong Koo; Park, Ga Young; Oh, Jung Su; Kim, Jae Seung

    2013-01-01

    Singing is a rare ictal symptom of focal epilepsy. Here, we report a case of a right-handed patient who demonstrated ictal singing due to right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Subtraction ictal SPECT coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) performed during ictal singing demonstrated areas of hyperperfusion in the bilateral frontal regions (more prominent in the left frontal lobe), bilateral subcortical regions, insular cortices, and bilateral cerebellum in addition to the right temporal area. An intracranial EEG revealed that an ictal singing episode commenced after an ictal rhythm from the right temporal area was propagated to the contralateral side of the left hemisphere. These findings suggest that the symptomatogenic zone for ictal singing includes neural networks from the frontal and temporal regions of both hemispheres rather than specific cortical areas even when the epileptogenic zone is located in the right mesial temporal area, as evidenced in this patient.

  4. Potential role of a cognitive rehabilitation program following left temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Vasconcelos Geraldi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Research into memory and epilepsy has focused on measuring problems and exploring causes with limited attention directed at the role of neuropsychological rehabilitation in alleviating post-operative memory difficulties. Objectives To assess the effects of a memory rehabilitation program in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy following surgery. Methods Twenty-four patients agreed to participate and 18 completed the study; nine received memory rehabilitation while nine had no input and were designated as controls. Verbal learning efficiency, naming abilities, memory subjective ratings, ecological activity measures and a language fMRI paradigm were used as outcome measures. Results Improved verbal learning and naming test performance, increase in memory strategy use and improved self-perception were observed following the rehabilitation. Changes in fMRI activation patterns were seen in the rehabilitation group over the long term. Conclusion The findings support the potential role of a cognitive rehabilitation program following left temporal lobe surgery.

  5. Functional and Structural Correlates of Memory in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Alexander J.; Park, Min Tae M.; Pipitone, Jon; Chakravarty, M Mallar; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) often show material-specific memory impairment (verbal for left, visuospatial for right hemisphere), which can be exacerbated following surgery aimed at the epileptogenic regions of medial and anterolateral temporal cortex. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that characterization of structural and functional integrity of these regions using MRI can aid in prediction of post-surgical risk of further memory decline. We investigat...

  6. Functional and structural correlates of memory in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander James Barnett; Park, Min Tae M.; Jon ePipitone; M. Mallar Chakravarty; Mary Pat eMcAndrews

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) often show material-specific memory impairment (verbal for left, visuospatial for right hemisphere) which can be exacerbated following surgery aimed at the epileptogenic regions of medial and anterolateral temporal cortex. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that characterization of structural and functional integrity of these regions using MRI can aid in prediction of post-surgical risk of further memory decline. We investigat...

  7. Chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Milan; Avagyan, Hripsime; Merino, Jose Joaquin; Bernas, Michael; Valdivia, Juan; Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Witte, Marlys; Weinand, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To identify the upstream signals of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), we evaluated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy brain tissues of 13 TLE patients and 5 control patients regarding expression of chemokines and cell-cycle proteins. The chemokine RANTES (CCR5) and other CC-chemokines and apoptotic markers (caspase-3, -8, -9) were expressed in lateral temporal cortical and hippocampal neurons of TLE patients, but not in neurons of control cases. The chemokine RANTES is usually found in cytoplasmic and extracellular locations. However, in TLE neurons, RANTES was displayed in an unusual location, the neuronal nuclei. In addition, the cell-cycle regulatory transcription factor E2F1 was found in an abnormal location in neuronal cytoplasm. The pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokine interleukin-1β were expressed both in neurons of patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy and from cerebral trauma. The vessels showed fibrin leakage, perivascular macrophages and expression of IL-6 on endothelial cells. In conclusion, the cytoplasmic effects of E2F1 and nuclear effects of RANTES might have novel roles in neuronal apoptosis of TLE neurons and indicate a need to develop new medical and/or surgical neuroprotective strategies against apoptotic signaling by these molecules. Both RANTES and E2F1 signaling are upstream from caspase activation, thus the antagonists of RANTES and/or E2F1 blockade might be neuroprotective for patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The results have implications for the development of new medical and surgical therapies based on inhibition of chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22444245

  8. Visuo-spatial memory tests in right temporal lobe epilepsy foci: clinical validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Ilona; Wendling, Anne-Sophie; Manning, Lilianne; Steinhoff, Bernhard J

    2012-03-01

    To examine the appropriateness of visual memory tests as an identification method for right mesial temporal lobe dysfunctions in an epilepsy patient group and to study the relationship and possible overlap with non-memory cognitive domains and demographic variables. Eighty preoperative candidates with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) were examined using the "Corsi Block-Tapping Test", "Diagnosticum für Cerebralschädigung" (DCS), the path subtest of the "Verbaler und Visueller Merkfähigkeitstest" (VVM), and the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test (ROCF). Factorial analyses were performed on raw scores to determine the effect of epilepsy-related variables, interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) and presence of cortical dysgenesis, on visual and verbal memory parameters. Sensitivity, specificity and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated based on normative data. Furthermore, Spearman correlations between memory and non-memory cognitive tasks were performed. The scores for test sensitivity and specificity and the ROC curves illustrate the tests' poor capacity to lateralize the functional deficit zone even when epilepsy-related factors, such as cortical dysgenesis or presence of contralateral IEDs were controlled. Significant correlations were found between the visual memory measures and nonverbal reasoning, processing speed, attentional flexibility, and visual planning. These neuropsychological tests are not sensitive enough to lateralize the epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy patients since in addition to learning and consolidation processes, they measure additional cognitive domains. These results have implications for clinical neuropsychologists, in terms of test choice and the interpretation in the context of presurgical diagnostics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. BDNF modifies hippocampal KCC2 and NKCC1 expression in a temporal lobe epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Sanaz; Mehrabi, Soraya; Soleimani, Mansooreh; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Shahrokhi, Amene; Mostafavi, Hossein; Hayat, Parisa; Barati, Mahmood; Mehdizadeh, Hajar; Rahmanzadeh, Reza; Hadjighassem, Mahmoud Reza; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory GABA actions, induced by altered expression of chloride transporters (KCC2/NKCC1), can contribute to seizure generation in temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present study, we evaluated whether BDNF administration can affect KCC2/NKCC1 expression, ictogenesis and behavioral alterations in this paradigm. Status epilepticus was induced in male rats with pilocarpine, followed by a treatment of either a single high dose or multiple injections of BDNF during the latent phase of temporal lobe epilepsy. Chloride transporters expression, spontaneous recurrent seizures, and hyperexcitability post-seizural behaviors were evaluated after treatment. NKCC1 protein expression was markedly upregulated, whereas that of KCC2 was significantly downregulated in epileptic hippocampi compared to intact controls. Application of BDNF (both single high dose and multiple injections) increased KCC2 expression in epileptic hippocampi, while NKCC1 expression was downregulated exclusively by the single high dose injection of BDNF. Development of spontaneous recurrent seizures was delayed but not prevented by the treatment, and hyperexcitability behaviors were ameliorated for a short period of time. To prevent GABA-A mediated depolarization and design appropriate treatment strategies for temporal lobe epilepsy, chloride transporters can be considered as a target. Future studies are warranted to investigate any possible therapeutic effects of BDNF via altering chloride transporters expression.

  10. Affectivity and Subjective Memory in Patients with Intractable Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Zaldivar Bermúdez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: in the literature related to intractable medial temporal lobe epilepsy, some divergence is observed in terms of the factors that may be leading to memory complaints in patients with this condition. Objective: to identify the relationship between some manifestations of affectivity and subjective memory in patients with intractable medial temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods: a case series study was conducted in 32 patients aged 15 to 60 years treated at the International Center for Neurological Restoration from January 2008 through September 2011. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, State-Trait Depression Inventory and Questionnaire of Memory Efficiency were applied. The variables studied were anxiety, depression and subjective memory. Descriptive statistics and the Spearman correlation were used to process the data. Results: a prevalence of mean levels of state-trait anxiety and state depression was observed; however, trait depression reached high levels. Patients reported complaints about their memory functioning. A negative relationship between trait depression and subjective memory (r = -0.36, p <0.05 was obtained.Conclusion: some manifestations of affectivity (anxiety and depression, subjective memory impairment regardless of the lateralization of the ictal onset zone, and the relationship between trait depression and subjective memory were observed in patients with intractable medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  11. Anomalous expression of chloride transporters in the sclerosed hippocampus of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Cai; Libai Yang; Jueqian Zhou; Dan Zhu; Qiang Guo; Ziyi Chen; Shuda Chen; Liemin Zhou

    2013-01-01

    The Na+-K+-Cl– cotransporter 1 and K+-Cl– cotransporter 2 regulate the levels of intracellular chloride in hippocampal cells. Impaired chloride transport by these proteins is thought to be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Imbalance in the relative expression of these two proteins can lead to a collapse of Cl– homeostasis, resulting in a loss of gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic inhibition and even epileptiform discharges. In this study, we investigated the expression of Na+-K+-Cl– cotransporter 1 and K+-Cl– cotransporter 2 in the sclerosed hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, using western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Compared with the histologically normal hippocampus, the sclerosed hippocampus showed increased Na+-K+-Cl– cotransporter 1 expression and decreased K+-Cl– cotransporter 2 expression, especially in CA2 and the dentate gyrus. The change was more prominent for the Na+-K+-Cl– cotransporter 1 than for the K+-Cl– cotransporter 2. These experimental findings indicate that the balance between intracellular and extracellular chloride may be disturbed in hippocampal sclerosis, contributing to the hyperexcitability underlying epileptic seizures. Changes in Na+-K+-Cl– cotransporter 1 expression seems to be the main contributor. Our study may shed new light on possible therapies for patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

  12. Pharmacodynamics of remifentanil. Induced intracranial spike activity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Hogenhaven, Hans; Lee, Andrea P

    2017-01-01

    Patients with medically refractory epilepsy may benefit from resective epilepsy surgery. However even the best centers experience surgical failures. It is therefore important to find techniques that may aid in neurosurgical planning of epileptic focus resection. Recordings of electrical brain...... activity in the temporal neocortex and hippocampus. We examined 65 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy during surgery, prior to resection. We used a 20-lead grid on the cortex and a 4-lead strip in the lateral ventricle on the hippocampus. At least two 3-min periods of ECoG were recorded - before...... that remifentanil potentiates spike activity is in agreement with previous findings from smaller studies. Furthermore, we were able to describe the pharmacodynamics of the remifentanil effect on spike activity. Peri-operative provocation with remifentanil may play a future role in guiding neurosurgical intervention...

  13. [Surgical treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy: a series of forty-three cases analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Murilo S; Rocha, Samanta B; Kowacs, Pedro A; Andrade, Nelson O; Santos, Heraldo L; Narata, Ana Paula; Bacchi, Ana Paula; Silva, Erasmo B; Simão, Cristiane; Hunhevicz, Sonival C

    2005-09-01

    Forty-three patients with epilepsy resistant to drug therapy were submitted to temporal lobe epilepsy surgery at the Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba, from 1998 to 2003. Thirty-nine patients (90.6%) had mesial temporal sclerosis, and four had brain tumors. According to Engel's rating, 83.7% from 37 patients with complete postoperative evaluation were classified as Class I (free of disabling seizure). Postoperative complications (18.6%) were evaluated, with one case of surgical wound infection, one case of hydrocephalus, one case of cerebrospinal fluid fistula, two cases of transient palsy of the trochlear nerve and one case of transient hemiparesis. No death related to epilepsy surgery was found in our study.

  14. A Review on the Pathophysiology of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: from Neuroplasticity to Neuronal Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán L. Pereno

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused and tries to introduce the reader in the basic concepts of the epilepsy, specially of the temporal lobe epilepsy. From the knowledge provided by different animal models, it’s introduced to the physiopathology of this type of epilepsy recognizing the participation of two systems of neurotransmition: the gabaergic and glutamatergic. It is known that an excess of glutamate has as a consequence neuronal death, this is the excitotoxicity. It’s enumerated different reports that, although they sometimes proved contradictory results, the majority find neuronal death in areas of the limbic system after a status epilepticus in experimental animals.Finally, since the brain is not immutable to this death, the principal concepts of the neuroplasticidad are review, providing reports that demonstrate that plastic processes happen in epileptic brains, both in the hippocampus and in the amygdala.

  15. Effects of eugenol on granule cell dispersion in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Lee, Dong-Seok; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2015-09-01

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD), a structural abnormality, is characteristic of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Eugenol (EUG) is an essential component of medicinal herbs and is suggested to exert anticonvulsant activity. However, it is unclear whether EUG ameliorates the abnormal morphological changes in granule cells induced by epileptic insults. In the present study, we examined whether intraperitoneal injection of EUG attenuated increased seizure activity and GCD following intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid (KA). Our results showed that EUG significantly increased the seizure threshold, resulting in delayed seizure onset, and reduced GCD in KA-induced epilepsy. Moreover, EUG treatment significantly attenuated KA-induced activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is involved in GCD development, in the dentate gyrus (DG). These results suggest that EUG may have beneficial effects in the treatment of epilepsy through its ability to inhibit GCD via suppression of KA-induced mTORC1 activation in the hippocampal DG in vivo.

  16. Asynchronous distributed multielectrode microstimulation reduces seizures in the dorsal tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sharanya Arcot; Rolston, John D.; McCracken, Courtney E.; Potter, Steve M.; Gross, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Electrical brain stimulation has shown promise for reducing seizures in drug-resistant epilepsy, but the electrical stimulation parameter space remains largely unexplored. New stimulation parameters, electrode types, and stimulation targets may be more effective in controlling seizures compared to currently available options. Hypothesis We hypothesized that a novel electrical stimulation approach involving distributed multielectrode microstimulation at the epileptic focus would reduce seizure frequency in the tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods We explored a distributed multielectrode microstimulation (DMM) approach in which electrical stimulation was delivered through 15 33-µm-diameter electrodes implanted at the epileptic focus (dorsal hippocampus) in the rat tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Results We show that hippocampal theta (6–12 Hz brain oscillations) is decreased in this animal model during awake behaving conditions compared to control animals (p16.66 Hz/per electrode), in contrast, had a tendency to increase seizure frequency. Conclusions These results indicate that DMM could be new effective approach to therapeutic brain stimulation for reducing seizures in epilepsy. PMID:26607483

  17. Occipital lobe epilepsy presenting as Charles Bonnet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Vargas, Damaris; Cienki, John J

    2012-11-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome describes visual field or acuity loss with complex hallucinations. This typically occurs in the elderly with preexisting visual impairment. We describe a patient who presented to the emergency department with acute hemianopsia and intermittent complex hallucinations. A 57-year-old man was referred for visual field loss and hallucinations. Chief complaint was “seeing little heads of people” and a right-sided visual loss. The patient was alert, oriented, and able to repeat and name and had fluent speech. On cranial nerve examination, he had 20/20 visual acuity and right homonymous hemianopsia. The patient had normal laboratory examination and electrocardiogram results. Results of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head with contrast were negative. Standard 30-minute electroencephalography revealed near-continuous epileptiform discharges in the left occipital lobe. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of new-onset seizure presenting as Charles Bonnet syndrome.

  18. Adult-onset temporal lobe epilepsy, cognitive decline, multi-antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy: Two case studies ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Sadan, Ofer; Seyman, Estelle; Ash, Elissa L.; Kipervasser, Svetlana; Neufeld, Miri Y.

    2013-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is defined by the coexistence of encephalopathy and antithyroid antibodies. We report two cases of adult-onset temporal lobe epilepsy with subacute cognitive decline, high titers of antithyroid antibodies, multi-antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity, and good response to immunomodulatory treatment. The relevance of multidrug hypersensitivity in the setting of adult-onset epilepsy and the importance of searching for autoimmune causes for epilepsy are discussed.

  19. Aspects of Oral Language, Speech, and Written Language in Subjects with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy of Difficult Control

    OpenAIRE

    Berberian,Ana Paula; Hopker,Christiane; Mazzarotto,Ingrid; Cunha, Jenane; Guarinello, Ana Cristina; Massi,Giselle; Crippa, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction About 50 million people have epilepsy and 30% of them have epilepsy that does not respond to properly conducted drug treatment. Objective Verify the incidence of language disorders in oral language, speech, and written language of subjects with difficult to control temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and compare the occurrence of these disorders in subjects before and after surgery. Methods Cross-sectional study with quantitative analysis, exploratory type. A questionnaire for data...

  20. Temporal lobe epilepsy and social behavior: an animal model for autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Joao Carlos M; Moura, Paula J; Cysneiros, Roberta M; Colugnati, Diego B; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Scorza, Fulvio A; Xavier, Gilberto F; Zilbovicius, Monica; Mercadante, Marcos T

    2008-07-01

    Social behavior depends on the integrity of social brain circuitry. The temporal lobe is an important part of the social brain, and manifests morphological and functional alterations in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Rats with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), induced with pilocarpine, were subjected to a social discrimination test that has been used to investigate potential animal models of ASD, and the results were compared with those for the control group. Rats with TLE exhibited fewer social behaviors than controls. No differences were observed in nonsocial behavior between groups. The results suggest an important role for the temporal lobe in regulating social behaviors. This animal model might be used to explore some questions about ASD pathophysiology.

  1. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry of white matter in medial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Aihong [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053 (China); Li Kuncheng [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053 (China)], E-mail: Likuncheng@vip.sina.com; Li Lin; Shan Baoci [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Wang Yuping; Xue Sufang [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences (China)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze whole-brain white matter changes in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Materials and methods: We studied 23 patients with MTLE and 13 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on T1-weighted 3D datasets. The seizure focus was right sided in 11 patients and left sided in 12. The data were collected on a 1.5 T MR system and analyzed by SPM 99 to generate white matter density maps. Results: Voxel-based morphometry revealed diffusively reduced white matter in MTLE prominently including bilateral frontal lobes, bilateral temporal lobes and corpus callosum. White matter reduction was also found in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in the left MTLE group. Conclusion: VBM is a simple and automated approach that is able to identify diffuse whole-brain white matter reduction in MTLE.

  2. Dysmorphic neurons in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Alexandre Valotta; Houzel, Jean Christophe; Targas Yacubian, Elza Marcia; Carrete, Henrique; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Priel, Margareth Rose; Martins, Heloise Helena; Oliveira, Ivanilson; Garzon, Eliana; Stavale, João Norberto; da Silva Centeno, Ricardo; Machado, Helio; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão

    2006-02-09

    We studied morphologic characteristics of dysmorphic neurons in the hippocampus of seven patients with medically intractable TLE and compare histological, clinical, and imaging features with ten TLE patients with classical hippocampal sclerosis without abnormal cells. Such dysmorphic neurons were observed in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and were characterized by giant or misshapen cells with abnormal cytoskeletal structure and atypical dendritic processes that resembled the dysmorphic neurons from cortical dysplasias. Specimens with dysmorphic cells also contained other cytoarchitectural abnormalities including bilamination of the dentate granular cell layer (four out seven cases), and the presence of Cajal-Retzius cells in the dentate gyrus or Ammon's horn (five out seven cases). There were no statistically significant differences regarding the age at onset, duration of epilepsy, and hippocampal asymmetry ratio between patients with or without dysmorphic cells. Nevertheless, it is interesting to note that a higher proportion of patients with dysmorphic neurons continued to present auras after surgery, when compared with patients without those cells.

  3. Age-dependent seizure semiology in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarasi, András; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Janszky, József; Janszky, Imre; Rásonyi, György; Kelemen, Anna; Halász, Péter

    2007-09-01

    To examine the effects of age on different aspects of temporal lobe seizure semiology. We performed a video analysis of 605 archived seizures from 155 consecutive patients (age 10 months to 49 years) selected by seizure freedom after temporal lobectomy. Eighty patients had hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Beside semiological seizure classification, we assessed age dependency of several axes of seizure semiology: (1) aura, (2) number of different lateralizing signs, occurrence of ictal (3) emotional signs, (4) autonomic symptoms, (5) automatisms, and (6) secondary generalization as well as (7) the ratio of motor seizure components. From the 155 patients, 117 reported aura, 39 had ictal emotional signs, 51 had autonomic symptoms, 130 presented automatisms, while 18 patients showed secondary generalization at least once during their seizures. Altogether 369 (median: 2/patient) different lateralizing signs were recorded. Frequency of HS (p semiology. Conversely, other aspects (aura, emotional, and autonomic signs) are independent of the maturation process. This is the first report investigating age dependency of epileptic seizure semiology comparing all age groups.

  4. Temporal lobe epilepsy and focal cortical dysplasia in children: A tip to find the abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Luca; Whitehead, Matthew T; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Sepeta, Leigh N; Oluigbo, Chima O; Havens, Kathryn; Freilich, Emily R; Schreiber, John M; Gaillard, William D

    2017-01-01

    To demonstrate an association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and pathologic characteristics in children who had surgery for medically refractory epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). We retrospectively studied 110 children who had epilepsy surgery. Twenty-seven patients with FCD were included. Thirteen had temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and 14 had extra-temporal lobe epilepsy (ETLE). Three patients had associated mesial temporal sclerosis. Preoperative 3T MRIs interleaved with nine controls were blindly re-reviewed and categorized according to signal alteration. Pathologic specimens were classified according to the 2011 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and compared to MRI studies. Rates of pathology subtypes differed between TLE and ETLE (χ(2) (3) = 8.57, p = 0.04). FCD type I was more frequent in TLE, whereas FCD type II was more frequent in ETLE. In the TLE group, nine patients had temporal tip abnormalities. They all exhibited gray-white matter blurring with decreased myelination and white matter hyperintense signal. Blurring involved the whole temporal tip, not just the area of dysplasia. These patients were less likely to demonstrate cortical thickening compared to those without temporal tip findings (χ(2) (1) = 9.55, p = 0.002). Three of them had FCD Ib, three had FCD IIa, two had FCD IIIa, and one had FCD IIb; MRI features could not entirely distinguish between FCD subtypes. TLE patients showed more pronounced findings than ETLE on MRI (χ(2) (1) = 11.95, p = 0.003, odds ratio [OR] 18.00). In all cases of FCD, isolated blurring was more likely to be associated with FCD II, whereas blurring with decreased myelination was seen with FCD I (χ(2) (6) = 13.07, p = 0.042). Our study described associations between MRI characteristics and pathology in children with FCD and offered a detailed analysis of temporal lobe tip abnormalities and FCD subtypes in children with TLE. These findings may contribute to the

  5. Social cognition dysfunctions in patients with epilepsy: Evidence from patients with temporal lobe and idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realmuto, Sabrina; Zummo, Leila; Cerami, Chiara; Agrò, Luigi; Dodich, Alessandra; Canessa, Nicola; Zizzo, Andrea; Fierro, Brigida; Daniele, Ornella

    2015-06-01

    Despite an extensive literature on cognitive impairments in focal and generalized epilepsy, only a few number of studies specifically explored social cognition disorders in epilepsy syndromes. The aim of our study was to investigate social cognition abilities in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Thirty-nine patients (21 patients with TLE and 18 patients with IGE) and 21 matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. All subjects underwent a basic neuropsychological battery plus two experimental tasks evaluating emotion recognition from facial expression (Ekman-60-Faces test, Ek-60F) and mental state attribution (Story-based Empathy Task, SET). In particular, the latter is a newly developed task that assesses the ability to infer others' intentions (i.e., intention attribution - IA) and emotions (i.e., emotion attribution - EA) compared with a control condition of physical causality (i.e., causal inferences - CI). Compared with HCs, patients with TLE showed significantly lower performances on both social cognition tasks. In particular, all SET subconditions as well as the recognition of negative emotions were significantly impaired in patients with TLE vs. HCs. On the contrary, patients with IGE showed impairments on anger recognition only without any deficit at the SET task. Emotion recognition deficits occur in patients with epilepsy, possibly because of a global disruption of a pathway involving frontal, temporal, and limbic regions. Impairments of mental state attribution specifically characterize the neuropsychological profile of patients with TLE in the context of the in-depth temporal dysfunction typical of such patients. Impairments of socioemotional processing have to be considered as part of the neuropsychological assessment in both TLE and IGE in view of a correct management and for future therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Machine Learning Approach for the Outcome Prediction of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFelipe-Oroquieta, Jesús; Kastanauskaite, Asta; de Sola, Rafael G.; DeFelipe, Javier; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is effective in reducing both the number and frequency of seizures, particularly in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Nevertheless, a significant proportion of these patients continue suffering seizures after surgery. Here we used a machine learning approach to predict the outcome of epilepsy surgery based on supervised classification data mining taking into account not only the common clinical variables, but also pathological and neuropsychological evaluations. We have generated models capable of predicting whether a patient with TLE secondary to hippocampal sclerosis will fully recover from epilepsy or not. The machine learning analysis revealed that outcome could be predicted with an estimated accuracy of almost 90% using some clinical and neuropsychological features. Importantly, not all the features were needed to perform the prediction; some of them proved to be irrelevant to the prognosis. Personality style was found to be one of the key features to predict the outcome. Although we examined relatively few cases, findings were verified across all data, showing that the machine learning approach described in the present study may be a powerful method. Since neuropsychological assessment of epileptic patients is a standard protocol in the pre-surgical evaluation, we propose to include these specific psychological tests and machine learning tools to improve the selection of candidates for epilepsy surgery. PMID:23646148

  7. Machine learning approach for the outcome prediction of temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Armañanzas

    Full Text Available Epilepsy surgery is effective in reducing both the number and frequency of seizures, particularly in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of these patients continue suffering seizures after surgery. Here we used a machine learning approach to predict the outcome of epilepsy surgery based on supervised classification data mining taking into account not only the common clinical variables, but also pathological and neuropsychological evaluations. We have generated models capable of predicting whether a patient with TLE secondary to hippocampal sclerosis will fully recover from epilepsy or not. The machine learning analysis revealed that outcome could be predicted with an estimated accuracy of almost 90% using some clinical and neuropsychological features. Importantly, not all the features were needed to perform the prediction; some of them proved to be irrelevant to the prognosis. Personality style was found to be one of the key features to predict the outcome. Although we examined relatively few cases, findings were verified across all data, showing that the machine learning approach described in the present study may be a powerful method. Since neuropsychological assessment of epileptic patients is a standard protocol in the pre-surgical evaluation, we propose to include these specific psychological tests and machine learning tools to improve the selection of candidates for epilepsy surgery.

  8. Computer aided diagnosis and localization of lateralized temporal lobe epilepsy using interictal FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Thomas Kerr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Interictal FDG-PET (iPET is a core tool for localizing the epileptogenic focus, potentially before structural MRI, that does not require rare and transient epileptiform discharges or seizures on EEG. The visual interpretation of iPET is challenging and requires years of epilepsy-specific expertise. We have developed an automated computer-aided diagnostic (CAD tool that has the potential to work both independent of and synergistically with expert analysis. Our tool operates on distributed metabolic changes across the whole brain measured by iPET to both diagnose and lateralize temporal lobe epilepsy. When diagnosing left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE or right TLE (RTLE versus non-epileptic seizures (NES, our accuracy in reproducing the results of the gold standard long term video-EEG monitoring was 82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 69-90% or 88% (95% CI 76-94%, respectively. The classifier that both diagnosed and lateralized the disease had overall accuracy of 76% (95% CI 66-84%, where 89% (95% CI 77-96% of patients correctly identified with epilepsy were correctly lateralized. When identifying LTLE, our CAD tool utilized metabolic changes across the entire brain. By contrast, only temporal regions and the right frontal lobe cortex, were needed to identify RTLE accurately, a finding consistent with clinical observations and indicative of a potential pathophysiological difference between RTLE and LTLE. The goal of CADs is to complement—not replace—expert analysis. In our dataset, the accuracy of manual analysis of iPET (~80% was similar to CAD. The square correlation between our CAD tool and manual analysis, however, was only 30%, indicating that our CAD tool does not recreate manual analysis. The addition of clinical information to our CAD, however, did not substantively change performance. These results suggest that automated analysis might provide clinically valuable information to focus treatment more effectively.

  9. Electro-clinical characteristics and postoperative outcome of medically refractory tumoral temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda Samhita

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Very few studies have specifically addressed surgical treatment and outcome of patients with tumor-related temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. AIM: To define the postoperative seizure outcome and the factors that influenced the outcome of patients with tumor-related TLE. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We selected patients whose surgical pathology revealed a temporal lobe neoplasm and who had completed > 1 year of postoperative follow-up. We reviewed the clinical, EEG, radiological and pathological data, and the seizure outcome of these patients and assessed the factors that influenced the outcome. RESULTS: Out of the 409 patients who underwent surgery for refractory TLE during the 8-year study period, there were 34 (8.3% patients with temporal lobe neoplasms. The median age at surgery was 20 years and the median duration of epilepsy prior to surgery was 9.0 years. MRI revealed tumor in the mesial location in 21 (61.8% patients. Interictal and ictal epileptiform EEG abnormalities were localized to the side of th lesion in the majority. Mesial temporal lobe structures were included in the resection, if they were involved by the tumor; otherwise, lesionectomy alone was performed. During a median follow-up of 4 years, 27 (79% patients were completely seizure-free. The only factor that predicted long-term seizure-free outcome was being seizure-free during the first two postoperative years. CONCLUSIONS: Our results emphasize the fact that in patients with tumoral TLE, when the seizures are medically refractory, surgery offers potential for cure of epilepsy in the majority.

  10. Ictal and postictal semiology in patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řehulka, Pavel; Doležalová, Irena; Janoušová, Eva; Tomášek, Martin; Marusič, Petr; Brázdil, Milan; Kuba, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy is characterized by evidence of seizure onset independently in both temporal lobes. The main aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with evidence of independent bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (biTLE) can be identified noninvasively on the basis of seizure semiology analysis. Thirteen patients with biTLE, as defined by invasive EEG, were matched with 13 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (uniTLE). In all 26 patients, the frequency of predefined clusters of ictal and periictal signs were evaluated: ictal motor signs (IMSs), periictal motor signs (PIMSs), periictal vegetative signs (PIVSs), the frequency of early oroalimentary automatisms (EOAs), and the duration of postictal unresponsiveness (PU). Some other noninvasive and clinical data were also evaluated. A lower frequency of IMSs was noted in the group with biTLE (patients = 46.2%, seizures = 20.7%) than in the group with uniTLE (patients = 92.3%, seizures = 61.0%) (p = 0.030; p < 0.001, respectively). The individual IMS average per seizure was significantly lower in the group with biTLE (0.14; range = 0-1.0) than in the group with uniTLE (0.80; range = 0-2.6) (p = 0.003). Postictal unresponsiveness was longer than 5 min in more patients (75.0%) and seizures (42.9%) in the group with biTLE than in the group with uniTLE (patients = 30.8%, seizures = 18.6%) (p = 0.047; p = 0.002). The frequency of EOAs, PIMSs, PIVSs, and other clinical data did not differ significantly. There is a lower frequency of ictal motor signs and longer duration of postictal unresponsiveness in patients with biTLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Memory outcomes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

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    Shah, Urvashi; Desai, Aishani; Ravat, Sangeeta; Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Godge, Yogesh; Sawant, Neena; Jain, Mayuri; Jain, Neeraj

    2016-12-01

    Decline in verbal memory after dominant mesial temporal lobe surgery is a concern. Outcomes primarily reported by group data analysis do not address issues of practice effects and measurement errors and also do not provide information about individual meaningful change after surgery. Reliable Change Indices (RCI's) are regarded to be robust statistical methods for reporting individual change and have not been hitherto derived in patient populations in India. Report memory outcomes for patients after surgery using group data as well as RCI score analyses using RCI scores derived in a control patient population. Retrospective data analysis of 106 selected patients who underwent Anterior Temporal Lobectomy (ATL) surgery. RCI scores derived from a control group of 44 non-operated patients. Outcomes based on score shifts on the various measures of two verbal and visual memory tests. Group mean score analysis revealed no significant shifts in verbal or visual memory scores after left ATL, but significant improvements in verbal memory after right ATL. RCI score analysis revealed decline and improvements in a small percentage of patients for both left and right ATL groups. Percentage of patients showing decline was much less than reported in western literature although percentage improved was comparable. Differences in decline percentage may be due to RCI scores and clinical characteristics of our sample (impaired pre-operative functioning, majority seizure free post surgery, moderate hippocampal sclerosis, early onset, long duration of seizures). Group analyses mask individual change. Therefore, to report memory outcomes and counsel patients about relative risk-benefits of surgery, RCI scores derived from our patient populations should be used. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Opioid System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Functional Role and Therapeutic Potential

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    Johannes Burtscher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy is considered to be one of the most common and severe forms of focal epilepsies. Patients often develop cognitive deficits and emotional blunting along the progression of the disease. The high incidence of resistance to antiepileptic drugs and a frequent lack of admissibility to surgery poses an unmet medical challenge. In the urgent quest of novel treatment strategies, neuropeptides are interesting candidates, however, their therapeutic potential has not yet been exploited. This review focuses on the functional role of the endogenous opioid system with respect to temporal lobe epilepsy, specifically in the hippocampus. The role of dynorphins and kappa opioid receptors (KOPr as modulators of neuronal excitability is well understood: both the reduced release of glutamate as well of postsynaptic hyperpolarization were shown in glutamatergic neurons. In line with this, low levels of dynorphin in humans and mice increase the risk of epilepsy development. The role of enkephalins is not understood so well. On one hand, some agonists of the delta opioid receptors (DOPr display pro-convulsant properties probably through inhibition of GABAergic interneurons. On the other hand, enkephalins play a neuro-protective role under hypoxic or anoxic conditions, most probably through positive effects on mitochondrial function. Despite the supposed absence of endorphins in the hippocampus, exogenous activation of the mu opioid receptors (MOPr induces pro-convulsant effects. Recently-expanded knowledge of the complex ways opioid receptors ligands elicit their effects (including biased agonism, mixed binding, and opioid receptor heteromers, opens up exciting new therapeutic potentials with regards to seizures and epilepsy. Potential adverse side effects of KOPr agonists may be minimized through functional selectivity. Preclinical data suggest a high potential of such compounds to control seizures, with a strong predictive validity toward human

  13. The Opioid System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Functional Role and Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtscher, Johannes; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is considered to be one of the most common and severe forms of focal epilepsies. Patients often develop cognitive deficits and emotional blunting along the progression of the disease. The high incidence of resistance to antiepileptic drugs and a frequent lack of admissibility to surgery poses an unmet medical challenge. In the urgent quest of novel treatment strategies, neuropeptides are interesting candidates, however, their therapeutic potential has not yet been exploited. This review focuses on the functional role of the endogenous opioid system with respect to temporal lobe epilepsy, specifically in the hippocampus. The role of dynorphins and kappa opioid receptors (KOPr) as modulators of neuronal excitability is well understood: both the reduced release of glutamate as well of postsynaptic hyperpolarization were shown in glutamatergic neurons. In line with this, low levels of dynorphin in humans and mice increase the risk of epilepsy development. The role of enkephalins is not understood so well. On one hand, some agonists of the delta opioid receptors (DOPr) display pro-convulsant properties probably through inhibition of GABAergic interneurons. On the other hand, enkephalins play a neuro-protective role under hypoxic or anoxic conditions, most probably through positive effects on mitochondrial function. Despite the supposed absence of endorphins in the hippocampus, exogenous activation of the mu opioid receptors (MOPr) induces pro-convulsant effects. Recently-expanded knowledge of the complex ways opioid receptors ligands elicit their effects (including biased agonism, mixed binding, and opioid receptor heteromers), opens up exciting new therapeutic potentials with regards to seizures and epilepsy. Potential adverse side effects of KOPr agonists may be minimized through functional selectivity. Preclinical data suggest a high potential of such compounds to control seizures, with a strong predictive validity toward human patients. The

  14. Does the patient's hand hold the key to preventing secondary generalization in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy?

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    Uchida, Carina Gonçalves Pedroso; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; de Araújo Filho, Gerardo Maria; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to analyze the impact of ictal dystonic posturing (DP) in postoperative seizure outcome and to assess the influence of DP in generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS) occurrence during video-EEG monitoring of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis. The impact of DP on surgical outcome remains controversial. Moreover, DP has been recently associated with brain networks avoiding GTCS occurrence. Five hundred twenty-seven seizures of 171 patients who were submitted to standard anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) between 2002 and 2010, with at least one year of post-surgical follow-up, were retrospectively analyzed and classified as with or without DP and as evolving or not to GTCS. The ictal semiologic correlates of DP, timing elapsed since precedent seizure and antiepileptic drug (AED) intake before each seizure were evaluated. Seizure outcome after ATL was assessed according to Engel's scale. Fifty-eight out of 171 patients (34%) exhibited ictal DP, of which 91.5% were always unilateral and contralateral to the operated side. DP was related to shorter seizures (p=0.007) and a much lower likelihood of the seizure evolving to GTCS (p=0.001), even during AED withdrawal (p=0.002). There was no association between DP and prognosis regarding seizure control as the result of the surgical resection, either in patients with shorter or in those with longer period of follow-up. Our data support the hypothesis that DP reflects a brain network activation that helps avoid GTCS, even during AED withdrawal.

  15. Functional connectivity estimated from intracranial EEG predicts surgical outcome in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Arun R Antony

    Full Text Available This project aimed to determine if a correlation-based measure of functional connectivity can identify epileptogenic zones from intracranial EEG signals, as well as to investigate the prognostic significance of such a measure on seizure outcome following temporal lobe lobectomy. To this end, we retrospectively analyzed 23 adult patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE who underwent an invasive stereo-EEG (SEEG evaluation between January 2009 year and January 2012. A follow-up of at least one year was required. The primary outcome measure was complete seizure-freedom at last follow-up. Functional connectivity between two areas in the temporal lobe that were sampled by two SEEG electrode contacts was defined as Pearson's correlation coefficient of interictal activity between those areas. SEEG signals were filtered between 5 and 50 Hz prior to computing this correlation. The mean and standard deviation of the off diagonal elements in the connectivity matrix were also calculated. Analysis of the mean and standard deviation of the functional connections for each patient reveals that 90% of the patients who had weak and homogenous connections were seizure free one year after temporal lobectomy, whereas 85% of the patients who had stronger and more heterogeneous connections within the temporal lobe had recurrence of seizures. This suggests that temporal lobectomy is ineffective in preventing seizure recurrence for patients in whom the temporal lobe is characterized by weakly connected, homogenous networks. This pilot study shows promising potential of a simple measure of functional brain connectivity to identify epileptogenicity and predict the outcome of epilepsy surgery.

  16. Frontal gray matter abnormalities predict seizure outcome in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy patients

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    Gaelle E. Doucet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing more reliable predictors of seizure outcome following temporal lobe surgery for intractable epilepsy is an important clinical goal. In this context, we investigated patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE before and after temporal resection. In detail, we explored gray matter (GM volume change in relation with seizure outcome, using a voxel-based morphometry (VBM approach. To do so, this study was divided into two parts. The first one involved group analysis of differences in regional GM volume between the groups (good outcome (GO, e.g., no seizures after surgery; poor outcome (PO, e.g., persistent postoperative seizures; and controls, N = 24 in each group, pre- and post-surgery. The second part of the study focused on pre-surgical data only (N = 61, determining whether the degree of GM abnormalities can predict surgical outcomes. For this second step, GM abnormalities were identified, within each lobe, in each patient when compared with an ad hoc sample of age-matched controls. For the first analysis, the results showed larger GM atrophy, mostly in the frontal lobe, in PO patients, relative to both GO patients and controls, pre-surgery. When comparing pre-to-post changes, we found relative GM gains in the GO but not in the PO patients, mostly in the non-resected hemisphere. For the second analysis, only the frontal lobe displayed reliable prediction of seizure outcome. 81% of the patients showing pre-surgical increased GM volume in the frontal lobe became seizure free, post-surgery; while 77% of the patients with pre-surgical reduced frontal GM volume had refractory seizures, post-surgery. A regression analysis revealed that the proportion of voxels with reduced frontal GM volume was a significant predictor of seizure outcome (p = 0.014. Importantly, having less than 1% of the frontal voxels with GM atrophy increased the likelihood of being seizure-free, post-surgery, by seven times. Overall, our results suggest

  17. Association between Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms with Childhood Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Pei Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D (VD is implicated in multiple aspects of human physiology and vitamin D receptor (VDR polymorphisms are associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Although VD deficiency is highly prevalent in epilepsy patients and converging evidence indicates a role for VD in the development of epilepsy, no data is available on the possible relationship between epilepsy and genetic variations of VDR. In this study, 150 controls and 82 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE were genotyped for five common VDR polymorphisms (Cdx-2, FokI, BsmI, ApaI and TaqI by the polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction method. Our results revealed that the frequency of FokI AC genotype was significantly higher in the control group than in the patients (p = 0.003, OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.21–0.73, whereas the AA genotype of ApaI SNP was more frequent in patients than in controls (p = 0.018, OR = 2.92, 95% CI = 1.2–7.1. However, no statistically significant association was found between Cdx-2, BsmI and TaqI polymorphisms and epilepsy. Additionally, in haplotype analysis, we found the haplotype GAT (BsmI/ApaI/TaqI conferred significantly increased risk for developing TLE (p = 0.039, OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.02–2.56. As far as we know, these results firstly underline the importance of VDR polymorphisms for the genetic susceptibility to epilepsy.

  18. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

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    Joeri eVan Liefferinge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3, the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT, the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA transporter (VGAT in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  19. Frontal lobe epilepsy with atypical seizure semiology resembling shuddering attacks or wet dog shake seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahodova, Alena; Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir; Kudr, Martin; Kyncl, Martin; Zamecnik, Josef; Tichy, Michal

    2012-03-01

    We report a girl with a drug-resistant frontal lobe epilepsy caused by focal cortical dysplasia, who exhibited uncommon seizures. The seizures consisted of shoulder or whole body shuddering after a short psychic aura and face grimacing. Consciousness was fully preserved. The seizures resembled "wet dog shake" seizures described in rat models of epilepsy or shuddering attacks in infants. EEG findings were inconclusive, however, MRI showed a clear dysplastic lesion in the right frontal mesial and polar structures. The patient underwent an extended lesionectomy guided by neuronavigation and intraoperative electrocorticography. Focal cortical dysplasia type Ib was histologically confirmed and the patient has been seizure-free for the three years following resection. [Published with video sequences].

  20. Absence of gender effect on amygdala volume in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ivaldo; Lin, Katia; Jackowski, Andrea P; Centeno, Ricardo da Silva; Pinto, Magali L; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza M; Amado, Débora

    2010-11-01

    Sexual dimorphism has already been described in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). This study evaluated the effect of gender on amygdala volume in patients with TLE-MTS. One hundred twenty-four patients with refractory unilateral or bilateral TLE-MTS who were being considered for epilepsy surgery underwent a comprehensive presurgical evaluation and MRI. Amygdalas of 67 women (27 with right; 32 with left, and 8 with bilateral TLE) and 57 men (22 with right, 30 with left, and 5 with bilateral TLE) were manually segmented. Significant ipsilateral amygdala volume reduction was observed for patients with right and left TLE. No gender effect on amygdala volume was observed. Contralateral amygdalar asymmetry was observed for patients with right and left TLE. Although no gender effect was observed on amygdala volume, ipsilateral amygdala volume reductions in patients with TLE might be related to differential rates of cerebral maturation between hemispheres.

  1. Insular epilepsy: similarities to temporal lobe epilepsy case report Epilepsia insular: similaridades à epilepsia do lobo temporal - relato de caso

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    ARTHUR CUKIERT

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Insular epilepsy has been rarely reported and its clinical and electrographic features are poorly understood. The electrographic study of the insula is difficult since it is hidden from the brain surface by the frontal and temporal lobe. A 48 years-old woman started having simple partial autonomic and complex partial seizures with automatisms and ictal left arm paresis 8 years prior to admission. Seizure's frequency was 1 per week. Pre-operative EEG showed a right temporal lobe focus. Neuropsychological testing disclosed right fronto-temporal dysfunction. MRI showed a right anterior insular cavernous angioma. Intraoperative ECoG obtained after spliting of the sylvian fissure showed independent spiking from the insula and temporal lobe and insular spikes that spread to the temporal lobe. The cavernous angioma and the surrounding gliotic tissue were removed and the temporal lobe was left in place. Post-resection ECoG still disclosed independent temporal and insular spiking with a lower frequency. The patient has been seizure-free since surgery. Insular epilepsy may share many clinical and electroencephalographic features with temporal lobe epilepsy.A epilepsia insular tem sido raramente relatada e suas características clínicas e eletrencefalográficas são pobremente conhecidas. O estudo eletrográfico da ínsula é difícil já que ela se encontra recoberta pelos lobos frontal e temporal. Uma paciente, de 48 anos, começou a ter crises parciais simples autonômicas e crises parciais complexas com automatismos e paresia crítica de membro superior esquerdo 8 anos antes desta internação. A frequência de crises era de 1/semana . O EEG pré-operatório mostrou foco temporal direito. Testagem neuropsicológica demonstrou disfunção fronto-temporal direita. RMN demonstrou cavernoma insular anterior direito. A eletrocorticografia intraoperatória obtida após a abertura da fissura sylviana demonstrou a presença de espículas independentes na

  2. Gene expression variance in hippocampal tissue of temporal lobe epilepsy patients corresponds to differential memory performance.

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    Bungenberg, Julia; Surano, Natascha; Grote, Alexander; Surges, Rainer; Pernhorst, Katharina; Hofmann, Andrea; Schoch, Susanne; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Becker, Albert J

    2016-02-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a severe brain disorder affecting particularly young adults. TLE is frequently associated with memory deterioration and neuronal damage of the hippocampal formation. It thereby reveals striking parallels to neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). TLE patients differ with respect to their cognitive performance, but currently little is known about relevant molecular-genetic factors. Here, we correlated differential memory performance of pharmacoresistant TLE patients undergoing neurosurgery for seizure control with in-vitro findings of their hippocampal tissues. We analyzed mRNA transcripts and subsequently promoter variants specifically altered in brain tissue of individuals with 'very severe' memory impairment. TLE patients (n=79) were stratified according to preoperative memory impairment using an established four-tiered grading system ranging from 'average' to 'very severely'. Multimodal cluster analyses revealed molecules specifically associated with synaptic function and abundantly expressed in TLE patients with very impaired memory performance. In a subsequent promoter analysis, we found the single nucleotide polymorphism rs744373 C-allele to be associated with high mRNA levels of bridging integrator 1 (BIN1)/Amphiphysin 2, i.e. a major component of the endocytotic machinery and located in a crucial genetic AD risk locus. Using in vitro luciferase transfection assays, we found that BIN1 promoter activation is genotype dependent and strongly increased by reduced binding of the transcriptional repressor TGIF. Our data indicate that poor memory performance in patients with TLE strongly corresponds to distinctly altered neuronal transcript signatures, which - as demonstrated for BIN1 - can correlate with a particular allelic promoter variant. Our data suggest aberrant transcriptional signaling to significantly impact synaptic dynamics in TLE resulting in impaired memory performance and may serve as basis for

  3. Mitochondrial respiration deficits driven by reactive oxygen species in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; Fulton, Ruth; Shimizu, Takahiko; Day, Brian; Patel, Manisha

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic alterations have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but whether or not they have a functional impact on cellular energy producing pathways (glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation) is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine if alterations in cellular bioenergetics occur using real-time analysis of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates in an animal model of TLE. We hypothesized that increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiated by epileptogenic injury result in impaired mitochondrial respiration. We established methodology for assessment of bioenergetic parameters in isolated synaptosomes from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at various times in the kainate (KA) model of TLE. Deficits in indices of mitochondrial respiration were observed at time points corresponding with the acute and chronic phases of epileptogenesis. We asked if mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction occurred as a result of increased mitochondrial ROS and if it could be attenuated in the KA model by pharmacologically scavenging ROS. Increased steady-state ROS in mice with forebrain-specific conditional deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2(fl/fl)NEX(Cre/Cre)) in mice resulted in profound deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Pharmacological scavenging of ROS with a catalytic antioxidant restored mitochondrial respiration deficits in the KA model of TLE. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration deficits occur in experimental TLE and ROS mechanistically contribute to these deficits. Furthermore, this study provides novel methodology for assessing cellular metabolism during the entire time course of disease development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Ictal Gerstmann's syndrome in a patient with symptomatic parietal lobe epilepsy].

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    Shimotake, Akihiro; Fujita, Youshi; Ikeda, Akio; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Jun; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2008-03-01

    A 34-year-old man with astrocytoma in the left parietal lobe had symptomatic partial epilepsy, and he presented transient episodes of acalculia, agraphia and finger agnosia. Occasionally he had difficulty in finding appropriate letters when making an e-mail, and difficulty in writing and calculation. Neurological examinations revealed ictal symptoms of Gerstmann's syndrome without right to left disorientation. No other higher cortical dysfunction or neurological deficits were noted. Scalp EEGs showed frequent, regional ictal discharges in the left parietal area lasting for 60-240 seconds. These clinico-electrographical observations strongly support that epileptic seizures produced a loss of cortical higher function manifesting Gerstmann's syndrome.

  5. Choking at Night: A Case of Opercular Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Geetanjali Rathore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Frontal lobe seizures have a tendency to occur in sleep and in most cases occur exclusively insleep; these individuals are said to have nocturnal frontal lobe (NFLE. NFLE can be difficult to distinguish clinically from various other sleep disorders, particularly parasomnias, which also present with paroxysmal motor activity in sleep. Interictal and ictal EEG findings are frequently unremarkable or nonspecific in both parasomnias and NFLE making the diagnosis even more difficult. Nocturnal epilepsy should be suspected in patients with paroxysmal events at night characterized by high frequency, repetition, extrapyramidal features, and marked stereotypy of attacks. Here we present a 13-year-old female who was extensively worked up for choking episodes at night. On repeat video EEG she was found to have frontal opercular seizures. Once on Carbamazepine, her seizures completely resolved.

  6. Exaltation in temporal lobe epilepsy: neuropsychiatric symptom or portal to the divine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Niall; Whitley, Rob

    2014-09-01

    Religiosity is a prominent feature of the Geschwind syndrome, a behavioural pattern found in some cases of temporal lobe epilepsy. Since the 1950s, when Wilder Penfield induced spiritual feelings by experimental manipulation of the temporal lobes, development of brain imaging technology has revealed neural correlates of intense emotional states, spurring the growth of neurotheology. In their secular empiricism, psychiatry, neurology and psychology are inclined to pathologise deviant religious expression, thereby reinforcing the dualism of objective and phenomenal worlds. Considering theological perspectives and the idea of cosmic consciousness, the authors urge a holistic approach to the spiritual events of epileptic aura, potentially leading to a deeper understanding of the mind and its transcendent potential.

  7. Long-term consolidation of declarative memory: insight from temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramoni, Eve; Felician, Olivier; Barbeau, Emmanuel J; Guedj, Eric; Guye, Maxime; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Ceccaldi, Mathieu

    2011-03-01

    Several experiments carried out with a subset of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy have demonstrated normal memory performance at standard delays of recall (i.e. minutes to hours) but impaired performance over longer delays (i.e. days or weeks), suggesting altered long-term consolidation mechanisms. These mechanisms were specifically investigated in a group of five adult-onset pharmaco-sensitive patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, exhibiting severe episodic memory complaints despite normal performance at standardized memory assessment. In a first experiment, the magnitude of autobiographical memory loss was evaluated using retrograde personal memory tasks based on verbal and visual cues. In both conditions, results showed an unusual U-shaped pattern of personal memory impairment, encompassing most of the patients' life, sparing however, periods of the childhood, early adulthood and past several weeks. This profile was suggestive of a long-term consolidation impairment of personal episodes, adequately consolidated over 'short-term' delays but gradually forgotten thereafter. Therefore, in a subsequent experiment, patients were submitted to a protocol specifically devised to investigate short and long-term consolidation of contextually-bound experiences (episodic memory) and context-free information (semantic knowledge and single-items). In the short term (1 h), performance at both contextually-free and contextually-bound memory tasks was intact. After a 6-week delay, however, contextually-bound memory performance was impaired while contextually-free memory performance remained preserved. This effect was independent of task difficulty and the modality of retrieval (recall and recognition). Neuroimaging studies revealed the presence of mild metabolic changes within medial temporal lobe structures. Taken together, these results show the existence of different consolidation systems within declarative memory. They suggest that mild medial temporal lobe dysfunction

  8. Altered functional connectivity and small-world in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Wei Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The functional architecture of the human brain has been extensively described in terms of functional connectivity networks, detected from the low-frequency coherent neuronal fluctuations that can be observed in a resting state condition. Little is known, so far, about the changes in functional connectivity and in the topological properties of functional networks, associated with different brain diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated alterations related to mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging on 18 mTLE patients and 27 healthy controls. Functional connectivity among 90 cortical and subcortical regions was measured by temporal correlation. The related values were analyzed to construct a set of undirected graphs. Compared to controls, mTLE patients showed significantly increased connectivity within the medial temporal lobes, but also significantly decreased connectivity within the frontal and parietal lobes, and between frontal and parietal lobes. Our findings demonstrated that a large number of areas in the default-mode network of mTLE patients showed a significantly decreased number of connections to other regions. Furthermore, we observed altered small-world properties in patients, along with smaller degree of connectivity, increased n-to-1 connectivity, smaller absolute clustering coefficients and shorter absolute path length. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that the mTLE alterations observed in functional connectivity and topological properties may be used to define tentative disease markers.

  9. Different emotional disturbances in two experimental models of temporal lobe epilepsy in rats.

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    Marion Inostroza

    Full Text Available Affective symptoms such as anxiety and depression are frequently observed in patients with epilepsy. The mechanisms of comorbidity of epilepsy and affective disorders, however, remain unclear. Diverse models are traditionally used in epilepsy research, including the status epilepticus (SE model in rats, which are aimed at generating chronic epileptic animals; however, the implications of different SE models and rat strains in emotional behaviors has not been reported. To address this issue, we examined the emotional sequelae of two SE models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE--the lithium-pilocarpine (LIP model and the kainic acid (KA model--in two different rat strains (Wistar and Sprague-Dawley, which differ significantly in the pattern and extent of TLE-associated brain lesions. We found differences between LIP- and KA-treated animals in tests for depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors, as well as differences in plasma corticosterone levels. Whereas only LIP-treated rats displayed increased motivation to consume saccharin, both SE models led to reduced motivation for social contact, with LIP-treated animals being particularly affected. Evaluation of behavior in the open field test indicated very low levels of anxiety in LIP-treated rats and a mild decrease in KA-treated rats compared to controls. After exposure to a battery of behavioral tests, plasma corticosterone levels were increased only in LIP-treated animals. This hyperactivity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis was highly correlated with performance in the open field test and the social interaction test, suggesting that comorbidity of epilepsy and emotional behaviors might also be related to other factors such as HPA axis function. Our results indicate that altered emotional behaviors are not inherent to the epileptic condition in experimental TLE; instead, they likely reflect alterations in anxiety levels related to model-dependent dysregulation of the HPA axis.

  10. MBD3 expression and DNA binding patterns are altered in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Bednarczyk; Dębski, Konrad J.; Anna M. Bot; Katarzyna Lukasiuk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine involvement of MBD3 (methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 3), a protein involved in reading DNA methylation patterns, in epileptogenesis and epilepsy. We used a well-characterized rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy that is triggered by status epilepticus, evoked by electrical stimulation of the amygdala. Stimulated and sham-operated animals were sacrificed 14 days after stimulation. We found that MBD3 transcript was present in neurons, oligodendrocyte...

  11. Layer-specific modulation of entorhinal cortical excitability by presubiculum in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Abbasi, Saad; Sanjay S Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of epilepsy in adults and is often refractory to antiepileptic medications. The medial entorhinal area (MEA) is affected in TLE but mechanisms underlying hyperexcitability of MEA neurons require further elucidation. Previous studies suggest that inputs from the presubiculum (PrS) contribute to MEA pathophysiology. We assessed electrophysiologically how PrS influences MEA excitability using the rat pilocarpine model of TLE. PrS-MEA connectiv...

  12. Impact of Epilepsy Surgery on Motor Performance

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of epilepsy surgery on motor performance of 37 children (ages 1 month to 15 years with refractory seizures was evaluated at the Wilhelmina University Children's Hospital, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

  13. Increased interictal cerebral glucose metabolism in a cortical-subcortical network in drug naive patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, M; Lucignani, G; Del Sole, A; Grana, C; Bressi, S; Minicucci, F; Messa, C; Canevini, M P; Fazio, F

    1995-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) has been used to assess the pattern of cerebral metabolism in different types of epilepsies. However, PET with [18F]FDG has never been used to evaluate drug naive patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy, in whom the mechanism of origin and diffusion of the epileptic discharge may differ from that underlying other epilepsies. In a group of patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy, never treated with antiepileptic drugs, evidence has been found of significant interictal glucose hypermetabolism in a bilateral neural network including the temporal lobes, thalami, basal ganglia, and cingular cortices. The metabolism in these areas and frontal lateral cortex enables the correct classification of all patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and controls by discriminant function analysis. Other cortical areas--namely, frontal basal and lateral, temporal mesial, and cerebellar cortices--had bilateral increases of glucose metabolism ranging from 10 to 15% of normal controls, although lacking stringent statistical significance. This metabolic pattern could represent a pathophysiological state of hyperactivity predisposing to epileptic discharge generation or diffusion, or else a network of inhibitory circuits activated to prevent the diffusion of the epileptic discharge. PMID:7561924

  14. The Performance of Ictal Brain SPECT for Localizing Epileptogenic Foci in Temporal Lobe epilepsies

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    Kim, Eun Sil; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Sang Kun; Chung, Chun Kee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    Anterior temporal lobectomy has become a widely used respective surgery in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsies. Prerequisites of this resection include the accurate localization of the epileptogenic focus and the determination that the proposed resection would not result in unacceptable postoperative memory or language deficits. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of ictal SPECT compared to MRI findings for localization of epileptogenic foci in this group of patients. 11 patients who had been anterior temporal oral lobectomy were evaluated with ictal {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT and MRI. MRI showed 8/11(73%) concordant lesion to the side of surgery and ictal SPECT also showed 8/11(73%) concordant hyperperfusion. In 3 cases with incorrect or nonlocalizing findings of MRI, ictal SPECT showed concordant hyperperfusion. In 2 cases confirmed by pre-resectional invasive EEG, MRI showed bilateral and contralateral lesion but ictal SPECT showed concordant hyperperfusion. 3 delayed injection of ictal SPECT showed discordant hyperperfusion. Thus, ictal SPECT was a useful method for localizing epileptogenic foci in temporal lobe epilepsies and appeared complementay to MRI.

  15. Dopamine abnormalities in the neocortex of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luisa; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Mújica, Mario; Cisneros-Franco, José Miguel; López-Gómez, Mario; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Frías-Soria, Christian Lizette; Segovia-Vila, José; Borsodi, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate different variables of the dopaminergic system in the temporal cortex of surgically treated patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) associated with mesial sclerosis (MTLE, n=12) or with cerebral tumor or lesion (n=8). In addition, we sought to identify dopaminergic abnormalities in those patients with epilepsy that had comorbid anxiety and depression. Specifically, we investigated changes in dopamine and its metabolites, D1 and D2 receptors, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter. Results obtained from patients with epilepsy were compared with those found in experiments using autopsy material. The neocortex of patients with MTLE demonstrated high D1 expression (1680%, p<0.05) and binding (layers I-II, 31%, p<0.05; layers V-VI, 28%, p<0.05), and decreased D2 expression (77%, p<0.05). The neocortex of patients with TLE secondary to cerebral tumor or lesion showed high expression of D1 receptors (1100%, p<0.05), and D2-like induced activation of G proteins (layers I-II, 503%; layers III-IV, 557%; layers V-VI, 964%, p<0.05). Both epileptic groups presented elevated binding to the dopamine transporter and low tissue content of dopamine and its metabolites. Analysis revealed the following correlations: a) D1 receptor binding correlated negatively with seizure onset age and seizure frequency, and positively with duration of epilepsy; b) D2 receptor binding correlated positively with age of seizure onset and negatively with duration of epilepsy; c) dopamine transporter binding correlated positively with duration of epilepsy and frequency of seizures; d) D2-like induced activation of G proteins correlated positively with the age of patients. When compared with autopsies and patients with anxiety and depression, patients without neuropsychiatric disorders showed high D2-like induced activation of G proteins, an effect that correlated positively with age of patient and seizure onset age, and negatively with duration of

  16. Assessing hippocampal functional reserve in temporal lobe epilepsy: A multi-voxel pattern analysis of fMRI data

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    Bonnici, Heidi M; Sidhu, Meneka; Chadwick, Martin J.; Duncan, John S.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Assessing the functional reserve of key memory structures in the medial temporal lobes (MTL) of pre-surgical patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains a challenge. Conventional functional MRI (fMRI) memory paradigms have yet to fully convince of their ability to confidently assess the risk of a post-surgical amnesia. An alternative fMRI analysis method, multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA), focuses on the patterns of activity across voxels in specific brain regions...

  17. Mortality in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy at a tertiary center in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Machado, René; Benjumea-Cuartas, Vanessa; Santos-Santos, Aisel; Sosa-Dubón, Miguel Amilcar; García-Espinosa, Arlety; Andrade-Gutierrez, Greisys

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk of mortality in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Eligible patients included all adults referred to the National Institute of Neurology (NIN) in Havana, Cuba. All patients were followed up for 9 years. All analyses were made with the data available at the last follow-up. The frequency of death related to refractory TLE was analyzed taking into account the total number of patients included in the study. We analyzed the causes of death for each case. Multivariate analysis was made to determine the specific variables related to the death. All values were statistically significant if p<0.05. Six out of 117 patients died during follow-up. Fifty percent of patients died because of suicide. Only the presence of aura, specifically experiential psychic auras, and prodromal depressive disorders were associated significantly with the deaths (p<0.05). Patients who died had a higher concern about their seizures than patients who were still alive at last follow-up (p<0.01); they also had a poor perception of the overall QOL (p<0.01); and they were more concerned about the possible medication side effects than patients who did not die (p<0.05). Logistic regression provided only one variable related to the deaths in our cohort in multivariate analysis: presence of prodromal depressive disorder. The causes of death in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy were similar to those documented in the general population of patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

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    Andrea eBecchetti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE is a focal epilepsy with attacks typically arising in the frontal lobe during non rapid eye movement (NREM sleep. It is characterized by clusters of complex and stereotyped hypermotor seizures, frequently accompanied by sudden arousals. Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms may be also observed. Approximately 12% of the ADNFLE families carry mutations on genes coding for subunits of the heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs. This is consistent with the widespread expression of these receptors, particularly the α4β2* subtype, in the neocortex and thalamus. However, understanding how mutant nAChRs lead to partial frontal epilepsy is far from being straightforward because of the complexity of the cholinergic regulation in both developing and mature brains. The relation with the sleep-waking cycle must be also explained. We discuss some possible pathogenetic mechanisms in the light of recent advances about the nAChR role in prefrontal regions as well as the studies carried out in murine models of ADNFLE. Functional evidence points to alterations in prefrontal GABA release, and the synaptic unbalance probably arises during the cortical circuit maturation. Although most of the available functional evidence concerns mutations on nAChR subunit genes, other genes have been recently implicated in the disease, such as KCNT1 (coding for a Na+-dependent K+ channel, DEPD5 (Dishevelled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin Domain-containing protein 5, and CRH (Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone. Overall, the uncertainties about both the etiology and the pathogenesis of ADNFLE point to the current gaps in our knowledge the regulation of neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex.

  19. Plasma cysteine/cystine redox couple disruption in animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Li-Ping Liang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently the field of epilepsy lacks peripheral blood-based biomarkers that could predict the onset or progression of chronic seizures following an epileptogenic injury. Thiol/disulfide ratios have been shown to provide a sensitive means of assessing the systemic redox potential in tissue and plasma. In this study, we utilized a rapid, simple and reliable method for simultaneous determination of several thiol-containing amino acids in plasma using HPLC with electrochemical detection in kainic acid (KA and pilocarpine rat models of epilepsy. In contrast to GSH and GSSG levels, the levels of cysteine (Cys were decreased by 42% and 62% and cystine (Cyss were increased by 46% and 23% in the plasma of KA- and pilocarpine-injected rats, respectively after 48 h. In chronically epileptic rats, plasma cysteine was decreased by 40.4% and 37.7%, and plasma GSSG increased by 33.8% and 35.0% following KA and pilocarpine, respectively. Treatment of rats with a catalytic antioxidant, 60 min after KA or pilocarpine significant attenuated the decrease of plasma Cys/Cyss ratios at the 48 h time point in both models. These observations suggest that the decreased cysteine and ratio of Cys/Cyss in plasma could potentially serve as redox biomarkers in temporal lobe epilepsy.

  20. Autoradiography reveals selective changes in serotonin binding in neocortex of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Rocha, Luisa; Lorigados-Pedre, Lourdes; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Morales-Chacón, Lilia; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; García-Maeso, Iván; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Estupiñán, Bárbara; Quintana, Christian

    2007-08-15

    The main goal of the present study was to evaluate binding to serotonin in the neocortex surrounding the epileptic focus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Binding to 5-HT, 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(4), 5-HT(7) receptors and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) in T1-T2 gyri of 15 patients with MTLE and their correlations with clinical data, neuronal count and volume were determined. Autopsy material acquired from subjects without epilepsy (n=6) was used as control. The neocortex from MTLE patients demonstrated decreased cell count in layers III-IV (21%). No significant changes were detected on the neuronal volume. Autoradiography experiments showed the following results: reduced 5-HT and 5-HT(1A) binding in layers I-II (24% and 92%, respectively); enhanced 5-HT(4) binding in layers V-VI (32%); no significant changes in 5-HT(7) binding; reduced 5-HTT binding in all layers (I-II, 90.3%; III-IV, 90.3%, V-VI, 86.9%). Significant correlations were found between binding to 5-HT(4) and 5-HT(7) receptors and age of seizure onset, duration of epilepsy and duration of antiepileptic treatment. The present results support an impaired serotoninergic transmission in the neocortex surrounding the epileptic focus of patients with MTLE, a situation that could be involved in the initiation and propagation of seizure activity.

  1. Animal models for mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy: The end of a misunderstanding?

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    Depaulis, A; Hamelin, S

    2015-03-01

    The fact that epilepsy consists in multiple heterogeneous syndromes with different etiologies and different symptoms is insufficiently taken into account in current animal models. This is in particular the case when modeling mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) for which clinical, electrophysiological, histological and pharmacological features have been well described in the clinic but only partially reproduced in most rodent models. In this review, we report the data of our recent survey of european neurologists with expertise in epilepsy. The answers of 82 of them (out of 258) indicated that seizures with mild behavioral signs, hippocampal sclerosis and focal discharges were the three most critical features to be considered when developing an animal model of MTLE. We then examined how these features are reproduced in three different types of animal models of MTLE depending on their induction: (i) generalized convulsive status epilepticus; (ii) hyperthermic seizures in immature animals and (iii) focal status epilepticus. Among them, only rodent models resulting from the induction of a focal status epilepticus appear to present most characteristics of human MTLE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. MRI changes and complement activation correlate with epileptogenicity in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharatishvili, Irina; Shan, Zuyao Y; She, David T; Foong, Samuel; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Reutens, David C

    2014-03-01

    The complex pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy includes neuronal and glial pathology, synaptic reorganization, and an immune response. However, the spatio-temporal pattern of structural changes in the brain that provide a substrate for seizure generation and modulate the seizure phenotype is yet to be completely elucidated. We used quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study structural changes triggered by status epilepticus (SE) and their association with epileptogenesis and with activation of complement component 3 (C3). SE was induced by injection of pilocarpine in CD1 mice. Quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging and T2 relaxometry was performed using a 16.4-Tesla MRI scanner at 3 h and 1, 2, 7, 14, 28, 35, and 49 days post-SE. Following longitudinal MRI examinations, spontaneous recurrent seizures and interictal spikes were quantified using continuous video-EEG monitoring. Immunohistochemical analysis of C3 expression was performed at 48 h, 7 days, and 4 months post-SE. MRI changes were dynamic, reflecting different outcomes in relation to the development of epilepsy. Apparent diffusion coefficient changes in the hippocampus at 7 days post-SE correlated with the severity of the evolving epilepsy. C3 activation was found in all stages of epileptogenesis within the areas with significant MRI changes and correlated with the severity of epileptic condition.

  3. Sialyltransferase ST3Gal IV deletion protects against temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimontri, Paitoon; Endo, Shogo; Sakamoto, Toshiro; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Kurosaka, Akira; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Kato, Keiko

    2014-12-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) often becomes refractory, and patients with TLE show a high incidence of psychiatric symptoms, including anxiety and depression. Therefore, it is necessary to identify molecules that were previously unknown to contribute to epilepsy and its associated disorders. We previously found that the sialyltransferase ST3Gal IV is up-regulated within the neural circuits through which amygdala-kindling stimulation propagates epileptic seizures. In contrast, this study demonstrated that kindling stimulation failed to evoke epileptic seizures in ST3Gal IV-deficient mice. Furthermore, approximately 80% of these mice failed to show tonic-clonic seizures with stimulation, whereas all littermate wild-type mice showed tonic-clonic seizures. This indicates that the loss of ST3Gal IV does not cause TLE in mice. Meanwhile, ST3Gal IV-deficient mice exhibited decreased acclimation in the open field test, increased immobility in the forced swim test, enhanced freezing during delay auditory fear conditioning, and sleep disturbances. Thus, the loss of ST3Gal IV modulates anxiety-related behaviors. These findings indicate that ST3Gal IV is a key molecule in the mechanisms underlying anxiety - a side effect of TLE - and may therefore also be an effective target for treating epilepsy, acting through the same circuits. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Dream recall frequency and content in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentes, Carla; Costa, João; Peralta, Rita; Pires, Joana; Sousa, Paula; Paiva, Teresa

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate morning dream recall frequency and content in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Fifty-two patients with pharmacoresistant TLE submitted to a written dream diary during five consecutive days and continuous video-electroencephalographic (video-EEG) monitoring. A matched control group of 41 healthy subjects completed the same diary at home. The number of recalled dreams (including long dreams) and nonrecalled dream mentation were collected, and the Dream Recall Rate (DRR) was calculated. Hall and Van de Castle dream content analysis was performed. Greater than 70% of patients with TLE (37 of 52) recall their dreams, but DRR rate in these patients is lower than in controls (p ≤ 0.001). Dream recall does not appear to be influenced by the presence of neuropsychological deficits nor seizure frequency. In dreams descriptions, TLE patients (vs. controls) have a higher percentage of familiarity in settings and fewer dreams with at least one success. Onirical activity of patients with TLE is different from that of healthy subjects. Our results support the role of mesial and neocortical temporal structures in dream experience. The selective activation of dysfunctional mesial structures may be responsible for some of the observed variability. However, dream content changes can also mirror social and psychological comorbidities of patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Auras in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

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    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-05-15

    We investigated auras in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). We also investigated the clinical differences between patients with MTS and abdominal auras and those with MTS and non-mesial temporal auras. All patients with drug-resistant TLE and unilateral MTS who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from 1986 through 2014 were evaluated. Patients with good postoperative seizure outcome were investigated. One hundred forty-nine patients (71 males and 78 females) were studied. Thirty-one patients (20.8%) reported no auras, while 29 patients (19.5%) reported abdominal aura, and 30 patients (20.1%) reported non-mesial temporal auras; 16 patients (10.7%) had sensory auras, 11 patients (7.4%) had auditory auras, and five patients (3.4%) reported visual auras. A history of preoperative tonic-clonic seizures was strongly associated with non-mesial temporal auras (odds ratio 3.8; 95% CI: 1.15-12.98; p=0.02). About one-fifth of patients who had MTS in their MRI and responded well to surgery reported auras that are historically associated with non-mesial temporal structures. However, the presence of presumed non-mesial temporal auras in a patient with MTS may herald a more widespread epileptogenic zone.

  6. Temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in children versus adults: from etiologies to outcomes

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    Yun-Jin Lee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the most common type of medically intractable epilepsy in adults and children, and mesial temporal sclerosis is the most common underlying cause of TLE. Unlike in the case of adults, TLE in infants and young children often has etiologies other than mesial temporal sclerosis, such as tumors, cortical dysplasia, trauma, and vascular malformations. Differences in seizure semiology have also been reported. Motor manifestations are prominent in infants and young children, but they become less obvious with increasing age. Further, automatisms tend to become increasingly complex with age. However, in childhood and especially in adolescence, the clinical manifestations are similar to those of the adult population. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy can lead to excellent postoperative seizure outcome in adults, but favorable results have been seen in children as well. Anterior temporal lobectomy may prove to be a more successful surgery than amygdalohippocampectomy in children with intractable TLE. The presence of a focal brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging is one of the most reliable independent predictors of a good postoperative seizure outcome. Seizure-free status is the most important predictor of improved psychosocial outcome with advanced quality of life and a lower proportion of disability among adults and children. Since the brain is more plastic during infancy and early childhood, recovery is promoted. In contrast, long epilepsy duration is an important risk factor for surgically refractory seizures. Therefore, patients with medically intractable TLE should undergo surgery as early as possible.

  7. Elemental spatial and temporal association formation in left temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Christopher F A Benjamin

    Full Text Available The mesial temporal lobe (MTL is typically understood as a memory structure in clinical settings, with the sine qua non of MTL damage in epilepsy being memory impairment. Recent models, however, understand memory as one of a number of higher cognitive functions that recruit the MTL through their reliance on more fundamental processes, such as "self-projection" or "association formation". We examined how damage to the left MTL influences these fundamental processes through the encoding of elemental spatial and temporal associations. We used a novel fMRI task to image the encoding of simple visual stimuli, either rich or impoverished, in spatial or spatial plus temporal information. Participants included 14 typical adults (36.4 years, sd. 10.5 years and 14 patients with left mesial temporal lobe damage as evidenced by a clinical diagnosis of left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and left MTL impairment on imaging (34.3 years, sd. 6.6 years. In-scanner behavioral performance was equivalent across groups. In the typical group whole-brain analysis revealed highly significant bilateral parahippocampal activation (right > left during spatial associative processing and left hippocampal/parahippocampal deactivation in joint spatial-temporal associative processing. In the left TLE group identical analyses indicated patients used MTL structures contralateral to the seizure focus differently and relied on extra-MTL regions to a greater extent. These results are consistent with the notion that epileptogenic MTL damage is followed by reorganization of networks underlying elemental associative processes. In addition, they provide further evidence that task-related fMRI deactivation can meaningfully index brain function. The implications of these findings for clinical and cognitive neuropsychological models of MTL function in TLE are discussed.

  8. Relation of sorting impairment to hippocampal damage in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnoli, A R

    2001-01-01

    One hundred and twelve patients with left (n=65) or right (n=47) temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), associated with mesial or lateral temporal lobe lesion, were compared to 53 patients with left (n=30) or right (n=23) frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), in order to explore the contributions of hippocampal lesions and of memory deficits to sorting impairment. Thirty-six healthy subjects of similar age and education were controls. The Modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (MWCST) was used to explore sorting ability. The two-syllable word span and consistent long-term retrieval from the selective reminding procedure for word-list learning were used to evaluate memory. Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices and Attentive Matrices served to control for abstract reasoning and attention. Left FLE patients and TLE patients with left hippocampal sclerosis were significantly impaired on MWCST, short-term memory, and word learning. TLE patients with other left hippocampal lesions were also impaired on MWCST, although not significantly so. Analysis of individual scores showed that 42% of TLE patients with left hippocampal sclerosis, 14% of TLE patients with other hippocampal lesions, 63% of left FLE patients, and 30% of right FLE patients were impaired on the MWCST. In patients with left hippocampal sclerosis, MWCST score was associated with the learning score provided by the selective reminding procedure and Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices score, whereas in FLE patients, MWCST score was associated with Attentive Matrices score. These results suggest that only some TLE patients, i.e. those with hippocampal damage, may be expected to be impaired on card sorting. The impaired sorting ability of these TLE patients may be due to involvement of the hippocampal function in forming associations or in registering new information.

  9. DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF INTERICTAL DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED IMAGING IN EVALUATION OF INTRACTABLE TEMPORAL LOBE EPILEPSY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Wang; Saying-Li; Min Chen; Cheng Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the ability of interictal diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to localize the temporal lobe of seizure origin and to predict postoperative seizure control in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE).Methods Twenty-seven patients with intractable TLE considered for surgery and 19 healthy volunteers were studied with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DWL Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of bilateral hippocampi in both TLE patients and control subjects were obtained. Lateralization to either temporal lobe with hippoeampal ADC was based on the threshold values derived from ± 1 SD of fight/left ratios in normal subjects. And the postoperative pathology was reviewed.Results Hippocampal ADCs were higher on the side of surgery compared with those on the contralateral side as well as the ipsilateral side in control subjects [ resected side ( 109. 8±7.3 ) × 10-5 cm2/s, contralateral side (91.7±4. 7) × 10-5 cm2/s, control subjects (81.6±5.2) × 10-5 cm2/s, all P 0.05 ).Conclusions Conventional MRI is a sensitive method to detect hippocampal sclerosis. Accuracy of the right/left hip-pocampal ADC ratio for lateralizing to the side of surgery is very high, but it isn't a better predictor of surgical outcome.

  10. Effect of pregabalin on apoptotic regulatory genes in hippocampus of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy

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    ZHANG Yi-dan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of pregabalin on the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of chronic epileptic rats induced by pilocarpine, to explore the anti-epileptic pharmacology mechanism of pregabalin, and its anti-apoptotic effect on hippocampal neurons of rats. Methods The model of chronic temporal lobe epileptic rats induced by lithium-pilocarpine was established, then the rats in pregabalin treatment group received intraperitoneal injection of pregabalin (40 mg/kg once daily for three weeks. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of all rats was detected by immunohistochemical technique and Western blotting. Results Compared with normal saline group rats, the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy was significantly increased (P = 0.000, for all. Pregabalin can down-regulate the expression of Bax and up-regulate the expression of Bcl-2 in hippocampus of rats compared to model group rats (P = 0.000, for all. Conclusion Pregabalin may have the effects of inhibiting cell apoptosis and protecting neurons through lowing Bax level and increasing Bcl-2 level in hippocampus of chronic temporal lobe epileptic rats.

  11. Non-invasive examinations successfully select patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy for anterior temporal lobectomy

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    Morioka, Takato; Nishio, Shunji; Kawamura, Tadao; Fukui, Kimiko; Sasaki, Masayuki; Fukui, Masashi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences

    2001-06-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 8 patients with intractable medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) who underwent the anterior temporal lobectomy with hippocampectomy (ATL) without invasive examinations such as chronic subdural electrode recording. Five patients had a history of febrile convulsion. While all 8 patients had oral automatism, automatism of ipsilateral limbs with dystonic posture of contralateral limbs was demonstrated in 2 patients. Bilateral temporal paroxysmal activities on interictal EEG was observed in 4 patients and all patients had clear ictal onset zone on unilateral anterior temporal region. MRI demonstrated unilateral hippocampal sclerosis in 5 cases. Interictal FDG-PET depicted hypometabolism of the unilateral temporal lobe in all cases, however, ECD-SPECT failed to reveal the hypoperfusion of the unilateral temporal lobe in a case. Postoperatively, 7 cases became seizure free, and one had rare seizure. Non-invasive examinations, especially ictal EEG and concordant FDG-PET findings, in patients with oral automatism in seizure semiology, successfully select patients with MTLE for ATL. (author)

  12. Predicting Surgery Targets in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy through Structural Connectome Based Simulations.

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    Frances Hutchings

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is a prevalent neurological disorder resulting in disruptive seizures. In the case of drug resistant epilepsy resective surgery is often considered. This is a procedure hampered by unpredictable success rates, with many patients continuing to have seizures even after surgery. In this study we apply a computational model of epilepsy to patient specific structural connectivity derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI of 22 individuals with left TLE and 39 healthy controls. We validate the model by examining patient-control differences in simulated seizure onset time and network location. We then investigate the potential of the model for surgery prediction by performing in silico surgical resections, removing nodes from patient networks and comparing seizure likelihood post-surgery to pre-surgery simulations. We find that, first, patients tend to transit from non-epileptic to epileptic states more often than controls in the model. Second, regions in the left hemisphere (particularly within temporal and subcortical regions that are known to be involved in TLE are the most frequent starting points for seizures in patients in the model. In addition, our analysis also implicates regions in the contralateral and frontal locations which may play a role in seizure spreading or surgery resistance. Finally, the model predicts that patient-specific surgery (resection areas chosen on an individual, model-prompted, basis and not following a predefined procedure may lead to better outcomes than the currently used routine clinical procedure. Taken together this work provides a first step towards patient specific computational modelling of epilepsy surgery in order to inform treatment strategies in individuals.

  13. Seizure semiology and electroencephalography in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Rui-Juan; Sun, Zhen-Rong; Cui, Tao; Shao, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to discuss the clinical features of seizure semiology and electroencephalography (EEG) in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Children with lesional TLE received presurgical evaluation for intractable epilepsy. They were followed up for more than one year after temporal lobectomy. We reviewed the medical history and video-EEG monitoring of children with TLE to analyze the semiology of seizures and EEG findings and compared the semiology of seizures and EEG findings of childhood TLE and adult TLE. A total of 84 seizures were analyzed in 11 children (aged 23-108 months). The age of seizure onset was from 1 month to 26 months (a mean of 17.6 months). All of the patients exhibited prominent motor manifestations including epileptic spasm, tonic seizure, and unilateral clonic seizure. Seven children manifested behavioral arrest similar to an automotor seizure in adult TLE but with a shorter duration and higher frequency. The automatisms were typically orofacial, whereas manual automatisms were rarely observed. The EEG recordings revealed that diffuse discharge patterns were more common in younger children, whereas focal or unilateral patterns were more typical in older children. All of the patients were seizure-free after temporal lobectomy with more than one-year follow-up. All of the children had a mental development delay or regression; however, there was improvement after surgery, especially in those with surgery performed early. In contrast to TLE in adults, young children with lesional TLE probably represent a distinct nosological and probably less homogeneous syndrome. Although they had generalized clinical and electrographic features, resective epilepsy surgery should be considered as early as possible to obtain seizure control and improvement in mental development. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. What does diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tell us about cognitive networks in temporal lobe epilepsy?

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    Leyden, Kelly M; Kucukboyaci, N Erkut; Puckett, Olivia K; Lee, Davis; Loi, Richard Q; Paul, Brianna; McDonald, Carrie R

    2015-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has provided considerable insight into our understanding of epilepsy as a network disorder, revealing subtle alterations in white matter microstructure both proximal and distal to the epileptic focus. These white matter changes have been shown to assist with lateralizing the seizure focus, as well as delineating the location/anatomy of key white matter tracts (i.e., optic radiations) for surgical planning. However, only recently have studies emerged describing the utility of DTI for probing cognitive networks in patients with epilepsy and for examining the structural plasticity within these networks both before and after epilepsy surgery. Here, we review the current literature describing the use of DTI for understanding language and memory networks in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), as well as the extant literature on networks associated with executive functioning and global intelligence. Studies of memory and language reveal a complex network of frontotemporal fibers that contribute to naming and fluency performance in TLE, and demonstrate that these networks appear to undergo adaptive changes in response to surgical intervention. Although studies of executive functioning and global intelligence have been less conclusive, there is accumulating evidence that aberrant communication between frontoparietal and medial temporal networks may underlie working memory impairment in TLE. More recently, multimodal imaging studies have provided evidence that disruptions within these white matter networks co-localize with functional changes observed on functional MRI. However, structure-function associations are not entirely coherent and may breakdown in patients with TLE, especially those with a left-sided seizure focus. Although the reasons for discordant findings are unclear, small sample sizes, heterogeneity within patient populations and limitations of the current tensor model may account for contradictory and null findings

  15. Predicting Surgery Targets in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy through Structural Connectome Based Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Hutchings

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is a prevalent neurological disorder resulting in disruptive seizures. In the case of drug resistant epilepsy resective surgery is often considered. This is a procedure hampered by unpredictable success rates, with many patients continuing to have seizures even after surgery. In this study we apply a computational model of epilepsy to patient specific structural connectivity derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI of 22 individuals with left TLE and 39 healthy controls. We validate the model by examining patient-control differences in simulated seizure onset time and network location. We then investigate the potential of the model for surgery prediction by performing in silico surgical resections, removing nodes from patient networks and comparing seizure likelihood post-surgery to pre-surgery simulations. We find that, first, patients tend to transit from non-epileptic to epileptic states more often than controls in the model. Second, regions in the left hemisphere (particularly within temporal and subcortical regions that are known to be involved in TLE are the most frequent starting points for seizures in patients in the model. In addition, our analysis also implicates regions in the contralateral and frontal locations which may play a role in seizure spreading or surgery resistance. Finally, the model predicts that patient-specific surgery (resection areas chosen on an individual, model-prompted, basis and not following a predefined procedure may lead to better outcomes than the currently used routine clinical procedure. Taken together this work provides a first step towards patient specific computational modelling of epilepsy surgery in order to inform treatment strategies in individuals.

  16. DIFFERENCES IN INTERICTAL PERFUSION PATTERNS BETWEEN REFRACTORY AND NON-REFRACTORY TEMPORAL LOBE EPILEPSIES EVALUATED WITH FAIR AT 3.0T

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui You; Jing-jing Lu; Lian-kun Ren; Xiao-zhen Li; Feng Feng; Chun-ling Meng; Zheng-yu Jin

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the difference in interictal perfusion patterns between refractory and non-refractory temporal lobe epilepsies evaluated with flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) sequence.Methods Nine patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy,21 patients with non-refractory temporal lobe epilepsy,and 13 normal volunteers underwent FAIR MR scanning.The relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in bilateral hemispheres and mesial temporal lobes were measured.And we also calculated the asymmetry index (AI) values.Results The AI values of bilateral hemispheres in refractory and non-refractory epilepsy patients were both significantly different from those of volunteers (P=0.012 and 0.029,respectively).There was significant difference in AI values of bilateral mesial temporal lobes between non-refractory epilepsy patients and volunteers (P=0.049),while no significant difference between refractory epilepsy patients and volunteers.Conclusions The hypoperfusion pattern of interictal refractory temporal lobe epilepsy patients is different from that of non-refractory patients.Although the hypoperfusion tends to extend out of temporal lobes in all patients,the refractory epilepsy patients have a preference of bilateral mesial temporal hypoperfusion,which may be valuable for evaluating prognosis.

  17. Brain-responsive neurostimulation in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Eric B; Skarpaas, Tara L; Gross, Robert E; Goodman, Robert R; Barkley, Gregory L; Bazil, Carl W; Berg, Michael J; Bergey, Gregory K; Cash, Sydney S; Cole, Andrew J; Duckrow, Robert B; Edwards, Jonathan C; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Goldman, Alicia M; Gwinn, Ryder P; Heck, Christianne; Herekar, Aamar; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Jobst, Barbara C; King-Stephens, David; Labar, Douglas R; Leiphart, James W; Marsh, W Richard; Meador, Kimford J; Mizrahi, Eli M; Murro, Anthony M; Nair, Dileep R; Noe, Katherine H; Park, Yong D; Rutecki, Paul A; Salanova, Vicenta; Sheth, Raj D; Shields, Donald C; Skidmore, Christopher; Smith, Michael C; Spencer, David C; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Tatum, William; Van Ness, Paul C; Vossler, David G; Wharen, Robert E; Worrell, Gregory A; Yoshor, Daniel; Zimmerman, Richard S; Cicora, Kathy; Sun, Felice T; Morrell, Martha J

    2017-06-01

    Evaluate the seizure-reduction response and safety of mesial temporal lobe (MTL) brain-responsive stimulation in adults with medically intractable partial-onset seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin. Subjects with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) were identified from prospective clinical trials of a brain-responsive neurostimulator (RNS System, NeuroPace). The seizure reduction over years 2-6 postimplantation was calculated by assessing the seizure frequency compared to a preimplantation baseline. Safety was assessed based on reported adverse events. There were 111 subjects with MTLE; 72% of subjects had bilateral MTL onsets and 28% had unilateral onsets. Subjects had one to four leads placed; only two leads could be connected to the device. Seventy-six subjects had depth leads only, 29 had both depth and strip leads, and 6 had only strip leads. The mean follow-up was 6.1 ± (standard deviation) 2.2 years. The median percent seizure reduction was 70% (last observation carried forward). Twenty-nine percent of subjects experienced at least one seizure-free period of 6 months or longer, and 15% experienced at least one seizure-free period of 1 year or longer. There was no difference in seizure reduction in subjects with and without mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), bilateral MTL onsets, prior resection, prior intracranial monitoring, and prior vagus nerve stimulation. In addition, seizure reduction was not dependent on the location of depth leads relative to the hippocampus. The most frequent serious device-related adverse event was soft tissue implant-site infection (overall rate, including events categorized as device-related, uncertain, or not device-related: 0.03 per implant year, which is not greater than with other neurostimulation devices). Brain-responsive stimulation represents a safe and effective treatment option for patients with medically intractable epilepsy, including patients with unilateral or bilateral MTLE who are not candidates for

  18. Extent of mossy fiber sprouting in patients with mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy correlates with neuronal cell loss and granule cell dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeiser, Barbara; Zentner, Josef; Prinz, Marco; Brandt, Armin; Freiman, Thomas M

    2017-01-01

    The most frequent finding in temporal lobe epilepsy is hippocampal sclerosis, characterized by selective cell loss of hippocampal subregions CA1 and CA4 as well as mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) towards the supragranular region and granule cell dispersion. Although selective cell loss is well described, its impact on mossy fiber sprouting and granule cell dispersion remains unclear. In a single center series, we examined 319 human hippocampal specimens, collected in a 15-years period. Hippocampal specimens were stained for neuronal loss, granule cell dispersion (Wyler scale I-IV, Neu-N, HE) and mossy fiber sprouting (synaptoporin-immunohistochemistry). For seizure outcome Engel score I-IV was applied. In Wyler I and II specimens, mossy fibers were found along their natural projection exclusively in CA4 and CA3. In Wyler III and IV, sprouting of mossy fibers into the molecular layer and a decrease of mossy fibers in CA4 and CA3 was detected. Mean granule cell dispersion was extended from 121μm to 185μm and correlated with Wyler III-IV as well as mossy fiber sprouting into the molecular layer. Wyler grade, mossy fiber sprouting and granule cell dispersion correlated with longer epilepsy duration, late surgery and higher preoperative seizure frequency. Parameters analyzed above did not correlate with postoperative seizure outcome. Mossy fiber sprouting might be a compensatory phenomenon of cell death of the target neurons in CA4 and CA3 in Wyler III-IV. Axonal reorganization of granule cells is accompanied by their migration and is correlated with the severity of cell loss and epilepsy duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. MRI-based brain structure volumes in temporal lobe epilepsy patients and their unaffected siblings: a preliminary study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scanlon, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the heritability of brain structure may be useful in simplifying complicated genetic studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). A preliminary study is presented to determine if volume deficits of candidate brain structures present at a higher rate in unaffected siblings than controls subjects.

  20. Identification of febrile seizure susceptibility genes : studies in mouse chromosome substitution strains and temporal lobe epilepsy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, E.V.S.

    2010-01-01

    Febrile Seizures (FS) are the most common seizure type in children and recurrent FS are a risk factor for developing temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Although the mechanisms underlying FS are largely unknown, recent family, twin and animal studies indicate that genetics are important in FS

  1. Identification of febrile seizure susceptibility genes : studies in mouse chromosome substitution strains and temporal lobe epilepsy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, E.V.S.

    2010-01-01

    Febrile Seizures (FS) are the most common seizure type in children and recurrent FS are a risk factor for developing temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Although the mechanisms underlying FS are largely unknown, recent family, twin and animal studies indicate that genetics are important in FS susceptibili

  2. Community structure analysis of transcriptional networks reveals distinct molecular pathways for early- and late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy with childhood febrile seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Moreira-Filho

    Full Text Available Age at epilepsy onset has a broad impact on brain plasticity and epilepsy pathomechanisms. Prolonged febrile seizures in early childhood (FS constitute an initial precipitating insult (IPI commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. FS-MTLE patients may have early disease onset, i.e. just after the IPI, in early childhood, or late-onset, ranging from mid-adolescence to early adult life. The mechanisms governing early (E or late (L disease onset are largely unknown. In order to unveil the molecular pathways underlying E and L subtypes of FS-MTLE we investigated global gene expression in hippocampal CA3 explants of FS-MTLE patients submitted to hippocampectomy. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs were obtained for the E and L patient groups. A network-based approach for GCN analysis was employed allowing: i the visualization and analysis of differentially expressed (DE and complete (CO - all valid GO annotated transcripts - GCNs for the E and L groups; ii the study of interactions between all the system's constituents based on community detection and coarse-grained community structure methods. We found that the E-DE communities with strongest connection weights harbor highly connected genes mainly related to neural excitability and febrile seizures, whereas in L-DE communities these genes are not only involved in network excitability but also playing roles in other epilepsy-related processes. Inversely, in E-CO the strongly connected communities are related to compensatory pathways (seizure inhibition, neuronal survival and responses to stress conditions while in L-CO these communities harbor several genes related to pro-epileptic effects, seizure-related mechanisms and vulnerability to epilepsy. These results fit the concept, based on fMRI and behavioral studies, that early onset epilepsies, although impacting more severely the hippocampus, are associated to compensatory mechanisms, while in late MTLE development the brain is less

  3. Community structure analysis of transcriptional networks reveals distinct molecular pathways for early- and late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy with childhood febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Bertonha, Fernanda Bernardi; Iamashita, Priscila; Silva, Filipi Nascimento; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Silva, Alexandre Valotta; Castro, Luiz Henrique Martins; Wen, Hung-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    Age at epilepsy onset has a broad impact on brain plasticity and epilepsy pathomechanisms. Prolonged febrile seizures in early childhood (FS) constitute an initial precipitating insult (IPI) commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). FS-MTLE patients may have early disease onset, i.e. just after the IPI, in early childhood, or late-onset, ranging from mid-adolescence to early adult life. The mechanisms governing early (E) or late (L) disease onset are largely unknown. In order to unveil the molecular pathways underlying E and L subtypes of FS-MTLE we investigated global gene expression in hippocampal CA3 explants of FS-MTLE patients submitted to hippocampectomy. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs) were obtained for the E and L patient groups. A network-based approach for GCN analysis was employed allowing: i) the visualization and analysis of differentially expressed (DE) and complete (CO) - all valid GO annotated transcripts - GCNs for the E and L groups; ii) the study of interactions between all the system's constituents based on community detection and coarse-grained community structure methods. We found that the E-DE communities with strongest connection weights harbor highly connected genes mainly related to neural excitability and febrile seizures, whereas in L-DE communities these genes are not only involved in network excitability but also playing roles in other epilepsy-related processes. Inversely, in E-CO the strongly connected communities are related to compensatory pathways (seizure inhibition, neuronal survival and responses to stress conditions) while in L-CO these communities harbor several genes related to pro-epileptic effects, seizure-related mechanisms and vulnerability to epilepsy. These results fit the concept, based on fMRI and behavioral studies, that early onset epilepsies, although impacting more severely the hippocampus, are associated to compensatory mechanisms, while in late MTLE development the brain is less able to

  4. Differences in sleep architecture between left and right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Miki; Jin, Kazutaka; Kato, Kazuhiro; Itabashi, Hisashi; Iwasaki, Masaki; Kakisaka, Yosuke; Nakasato, Nobukazu

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether seizure lateralization affects sleep macrostructure in patients with left and right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is shorter in patients with right hemispheric cerebral infarction than with left. We retrospectively analyzed data from 16 patients with TLE (6 men and 10 women aged 34.9 ± 11.4 years) who underwent polysomnography as well as long-term video electroencephalography. Ten patients were diagnosed with left TLE and six patients with right TLE. Sleep stages and respiratory events were scored based on the American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. Sleep and respiratory parameters were compared between the patient groups. Percentage of REM stage sleep was significantly (p sleep in patients with left TLE sharply contrasts with the previous report of shorter REM sleep in patients with right cerebral infarction. Laterality of the irritative epileptic focus versus destructive lesion may have different effects on the sleep macrostructures.

  5. Seizures beget seizures in temporal lobe epilepsies: the boomerang effects of newly formed aberrant kainatergic synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Crepel, Valérie; Represa, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Do temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures in adults promote further seizures? Clinical and experimental data suggest that new synapses are formed after an initial episode of status epilepticus, however their contribution to the transformation of a naive network to an epileptogenic one has been debated. Recent experimental data show that newly formed aberrant excitatory synapses on the granule cells of the fascia dentate operate by means of kainate receptor-operated signals that are not present on naive granule cells. Therefore, genuine epileptic networks rely on signaling cascades that differentiate them from naive networks. Recurrent limbic seizures generated by the activation of kainate receptors and synapses in naive animals lead to the formation of novel synapses that facilitate the emergence of further seizures. This negative, vicious cycle illustrates the central role of reactive plasticity in neurological disorders.

  6. Blood DNA methylation pattern is altered in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hong-Yu; Feng, Li; Kang, Jin; Luo, Zhao-Hui; Xiao, Wen-Biao; Long, Li-Li; Yan, Xiao-Xin; Zhou, Luo; Xiao, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a common epileptic disorder; little is known whether it is associated with peripheral epigenetic changes. Here we compared blood whole genomic DNA methylation pattern in MTLE patients (n = 30) relative to controls (n = 30) with the Human Methylation 450 K BeadChip assay, and explored genes and pathways that were differentially methylated using bioinformatics profiling. The MTLE and control groups showed significantly different (P drug metabolism, with the most distinct ones included SLC34A2, CLCN6, CLCA4, CYP3A43, CYP3A4 and CYP2C9. Among the MTLE patients, panels of genes also appeared to be differentially methylated relative to disease duration, resistance to anti-epileptics and MRI alterations of hippocampal sclerosis. The peripheral epigenetic changes observed in MTLE could be involved in certain disease-related modulations and warrant further translational investigations. PMID:28276448

  7. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WMS-III in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Nancy J; Strauss, Esther; Chelune, Gordon J; Hermann, Bruce P; Hunter, Michael; Loring, David W; Martin, Roy C; Sherman, Elisabeth M S

    2003-03-01

    Five competing models specifying the factor structure underlying the Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (D. Wechsler, 1997b) primary subtest scores were evaluated in a sample of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (N = 254). Models specifying separate immediate and delayed constructs resulted in inadmissible parameter estimates and model specification error. There were negligible goodness-of-fit differences between a 3-factor model of working memory, auditory memory, and visual memory and a nested--more parsimonious--2-factor model of working memory and general memory. The results suggest that specifying a separate visual memory factor provides little advantage for this sample--an unexpected finding in a population with lateralized dysfunction, for which one might have predicted separate auditory and visual memory dimensions.

  8. Spatio-Temporal Structuring of Brain Activity - Description of Interictal EEG in Paediatric Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

    CERN Document Server

    Bunk, W; Kluger, G; Springer, S

    2009-01-01

    A method for the quantitative assessment of spatio-temporal structuring of brain activity is presented. This approach is employed in a longitudinal case study of a child with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) and tested against an age-matched control group. Several correlation measures that are sensitive to linear and/or non-linear relations in multichannel scalp EEG are combined with an hierarchical cluster algorithm. Beside a quantitative description of the overall degree of synchronization the spatial relations are investigated by means of the cluster characteristics. The chosen information measures not only demonstrate their suitability in the characterization of the ictal and interictal phases but they also follow the course of delayed recovery of the psychiatric symptomatology during successful medication. The results based on this single case study suggest testing this approach for quantitative control of therapy in an extended clinical trial.

  9. Dentate gyrus expression of nestin-immunoreactivity in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, L; Konopka, H; Escobar, E; Acuña, A; Oddo, S; Solís, P; Seoane, E; Kochen, S

    2015-04-01

    Granule cells pathology in dentate gyrus, have received considerable attention in terms of understanding the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the nestin (an intermediate filament protein expressed by newly formed cells), immunoreactivity (IR) in granular cells layers of hippocampal tissue extirpated during epilepsy surgical procedure, in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Hippocampal sections of 16 patients with hippocampal sclerosis and drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy were processed using immunoperoxidase with antibody to nestin. Archival material from 8 normal post-mortem hippocampus, were simultaneously processed. Reactive area for nestin-IR, the total number of positive nestin cells per field (20×), and the MGV (mean gray value) was determined by computerized image analysis (ImageJ), and compared between groups. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. Nestin-IR cells were found in granule cells layers of both controls and patients. Larger reactive somas (p dentate gyrus may reflect changes in dentate gyrus neuroplasticity associated to chronic temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Further studies are required to determine the clinical implications on memory an emotional alterations such as depression. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Neuronal death in the neocortex of drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorigados Pedre, L; Orozco Suárez, S; Morales Chacón, L; García Maeso, I; Estupiñán Diaz, B; Bender del Busto, J E; Pavón Fuentes, N; Paula Piñero, B; Rocha Arrieta, L

    2008-11-01

    Introduction. Participation of apoptotic death mechanisms in drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (DRTLE) is currently under great debate. We have investigated if there is neuronal loss and the immunodetection to different markers in neocortical tissue death in eigth patients with DRTLE. The neocortexes of five patients deceased due to non-neurological causes, paired in age and gender were evaluated as control tissue. Methods. The evaluation of neuronal loss was made by means of a stereological study and with immunohistochemical techniques with the synaptophysin marker. Immunopositivity to different apoptotic markers (annexin V, caspase 3 and 8, bcl-2 and p53) and detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation (TUNEL) were analyzed and double labeling with synaptophysin was performed in every case. The results were evaluated with confocal microscope and analyzed with the Zeiss LSM 5 Image Browser Program, 2.80.1113 (Germany). Results. A statistically significant decrease in the total number of cells (p < 0.05) and the synaptophysin cells+ (p<0.01) in the neocortex (layer IV) of the patients with DRTLE when compared with the control tissue was found. No significant differences were found in the apoptotic markers bcl-2, p53, caspase 3 and 8 for any of the neocortex layers while there was a statistically significant increase in the number of TUNEL cells+ (p<0.05) and annexin V+ (p<0.05) in the neocortical layer IV of the patients. Conclusions. This group of evidence speaks in favor of the existence of an effect on the neuronal number in the neocortex layer IV that may be associated with noncaspase dependent apoptotic death process, without being able to rule out death by necrosis. Key words: Drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Apoptosis. Necrosis. Neuronal loss. Neurología 2008;23(9):555-565.

  11. Neurocognitive and Seizure Outcomes of Selective Amygdalohippocampectomy versus Anterior Temporal Lobectomy for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mansouri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To report our institutional seizure and neuropsychological outcomes for a series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE undergoing anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL or selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SelAH between 2004 and 2011. Methods. A retrospective study of patients with mTLE was conducted. Seizure outcome was reported using time-to-event analysis. Cognitive outcome was reported using the change principal in component factor scores, one each, for intellectual abilities, visuospatial memory, and verbal memory. The Boston Naming Test was used for naming assessment. Language dominant and nondominant resections were compared separately. Student’s t-test was used to assess statistical significance. Results. Ninety-six patients (75 ATL, 21 SelAH were included; fifty-four had complete neuropsychological follow-up. Median follow-up was 40.5 months. There was no statistically significant difference in seizure freedom or any of the neuropsychological outcomes, although there was a trend toward greater postoperative decline in naming in the dominant hemisphere group following ATL. Conclusion. Seizure and neuropsychological outcomes did not differ for the two surgical approaches which is similar to most prior studies. Given the theoretical possibility of SelAH sparing language function in patients with epilepsy secondary to mesial temporal sclerosis and the limited high-quality evidence creating equipoise, a multicenter randomized clinical trial is warranted.

  12. Microstructural Integrity of Early- vs. Late-Myelinating White Matter Tracts in Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chu-Yu; Tabesh, Ali; Benitez, Andreana; Helpern, Joseph A; Jensen, Jens H; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) exhibit structural brain damage involving gray (GM) and white matter (WM). The mechanisms underlying tissue loss in MTLE are unclear and may be associated with a combination of seizure excitotoxicity and WM vulnerability. The goal of this study was to investigate whether late-myelinating WM tracts are more vulnerable to injury in MTLE compared with early-myelinating tracts. Methods Diffusional kurtosis imaging scans were obtained from 25 patients with MTLE and from 36 matched healthy controls. Diffusion measures from regions of interest (ROIs) for both late- and early-myelinating WM tracts were analyzed. Regional Z-scores were computed with respect to normal controls to compare WM in early-myelinating tracts versus late-myelinating tracts. Key Findings We observed that late-myelinating tracts exhibited a larger decrease in mean, axial and radial kurtosis compared with early-myelinating tracts. We also observed that the change in radial kurtosis was more pronounced in late-myelinating tracts ipsilateral to the side of seizure onset. Significance These results suggest a developmentally based preferential susceptibility of late-myelinating WM tracts to damage in MTLE. Brain injury in epilepsy may be due to the pathological effects of seizures in combination with regional WM vulnerability. PMID:24032670

  13. Scale invariance properties of intracerebral EEG improve seizure prediction in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kais Gadhoumi

    Full Text Available Although treatment for epilepsy is available and effective for nearly 70 percent of patients, many remain in need of new therapeutic approaches. Predicting the impending seizures in these patients could significantly enhance their quality of life if the prediction performance is clinically practical. In this study, we investigate the improvement of the performance of a seizure prediction algorithm in 17 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy by means of a novel measure. Scale-free dynamics of the intracerebral EEG are quantified through robust estimates of the scaling exponents--the first cumulants--derived from a wavelet leader and bootstrap based multifractal analysis. The cumulants are investigated for the discriminability between preictal and interictal epochs. The performance of our recently published patient-specific seizure prediction algorithm is then out-of-sample tested on long-lasting data using combinations of cumulants and state similarity measures previously introduced. By using the first cumulant in combination with state similarity measures, up to 13 of 17 patients had seizures predicted above chance with clinically practical levels of sensitivity (80.5% and specificity (25.1% of total time under warning for prediction horizons above 25 min. These results indicate that the scale-free dynamics of the preictal state are different from those of the interictal state. Quantifiers of these dynamics may carry a predictive power that can be used to improve seizure prediction performance.

  14. Pathophysiogenesis of Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Is Prevention of Damage Antiepileptogenic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curia, G.; Lucchi, C.; Vinet, J.; Gualtieri, F.; Marinelli, C.; Torsello, A.; Costantino, L.; Biagini*,, G.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is frequently associated with hippocampal sclerosis, possibly caused by a primary brain injury that occurred a long time before the appearance of neurological symptoms. This type of epilepsy is characterized by refractoriness to drug treatment, so to require surgical resection of mesial temporal regions involved in seizure onset. Even this last therapeutic approach may fail in giving relief to patients. Although prevention of hippocampal damage and epileptogenesis after a primary event could be a key innovative approach to TLE, the lack of clear data on the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to TLE does not allow any rational therapy. Here we address the current knowledge on mechanisms supposed to be involved in epileptogenesis, as well as on the possible innovative treatments that may lead to a preventive approach. Besides loss of principal neurons and of specific interneurons, network rearrangement caused by axonal sprouting and neurogenesis are well known phenomena that are integrated by changes in receptor and channel functioning and modifications in other cellular components. In particular, a growing body of evidence from the study of animal models suggests that disruption of vascular and astrocytic components of the blood-brain barrier takes place in injured brain regions such as the hippocampus and piriform cortex. These events may be counteracted by drugs able to prevent damage to the vascular component, as in the case of the growth hormone secretagogue ghrelin and its analogues. A thoroughly investigation on these new pharmacological tools may lead to design effective preventive therapies. PMID:24251566

  15. Relating Cortical Atrophy in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Graph Diffusion-Based Network Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnour, Farras; Mueller, Susanne; Raj, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is characterized by stereotyped origination and spread pattern of epileptogenic activity, which is reflected in stereotyped topographic distribution of neuronal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both epileptogenic activity and atrophy spread appear to follow white matter connections. We model the networked spread of activity and atrophy in TLE from first principles via two simple first order network diffusion models. Atrophy distribution is modeled as a simple consequence of the propagation of epileptogenic activity in one model, and as a progressive degenerative process in the other. We show that the network models closely reproduce the regional volumetric gray matter atrophy distribution of two epilepsy cohorts: 29 TLE subjects with medial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS), and 50 TLE subjects with normal appearance on MRI (TLE-no). Statistical validation at the group level suggests high correlation with measured atrophy (R = 0.586 for TLE-MTS, R = 0.283 for TLE-no). We conclude that atrophy spread model out-performs the hyperactivity spread model. These results pave the way for future clinical application of the proposed model on individual patients, including estimating future spread of atrophy, identification of seizure onset zones and surgical planning. PMID:26513579

  16. Relating Cortical Atrophy in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Graph Diffusion-Based Network Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnour, Farras; Mueller, Susanne; Raj, Ashish

    2015-10-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is characterized by stereotyped origination and spread pattern of epileptogenic activity, which is reflected in stereotyped topographic distribution of neuronal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both epileptogenic activity and atrophy spread appear to follow white matter connections. We model the networked spread of activity and atrophy in TLE from first principles via two simple first order network diffusion models. Atrophy distribution is modeled as a simple consequence of the propagation of epileptogenic activity in one model, and as a progressive degenerative process in the other. We show that the network models closely reproduce the regional volumetric gray matter atrophy distribution of two epilepsy cohorts: 29 TLE subjects with medial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS), and 50 TLE subjects with normal appearance on MRI (TLE-no). Statistical validation at the group level suggests high correlation with measured atrophy (R = 0.586 for TLE-MTS, R = 0.283 for TLE-no). We conclude that atrophy spread model out-performs the hyperactivity spread model. These results pave the way for future clinical application of the proposed model on individual patients, including estimating future spread of atrophy, identification of seizure onset zones and surgical planning.

  17. Functional connectivity MRI and post-operative language performance in temporal lobe epilepsy: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravatà, Emanuele; Sestieri, Carlo; Colicchio, Gabriella; Colosimo, Cesare; Romani, Gian Luca; Caulo, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    Anterior temporal lobectomy is an effective treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy of temporal origin, although new language impairment may develop after surgery. Since correlations between functional connectivity (FC) MRI of the language network and verbal-IQ performance before surgery have recently been reported, we investigated the existence of correlations between the preoperative FC of the language network and post-operative verbal-IQ decline. FC between nodes of the language network of the two hemispheres (Interhemispheric-FC) and within nodes of the left hemisphere (LH-FC) and language lateralization indexes were estimated in five right-handed patients with non-tumoral left temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing anterior temporal lobectomy. Correlations between preoperative FC measures and lateralization indexes, and the post-operative (12 months) neuropsychological verbal-IQ decline were investigated. Verbal-IQ decline was inversely correlated with the degree of left lateralization and directly correlated with the strength of Interhemispheric-FC. No significant correlation was found between LH-FC and post-operative verbal-IQ change. The results from this limited number of patients suggest that a stronger preoperative connectivity between homologue regions, associated with the absence of a definite hemispheric lateralization, appears to be an unfavorable prognostic biomarker.

  18. Physiopathogenetic Interrelationship between Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy and NREM Arousal Parasomnias

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    Halász, Péter; Kelemen, Anna; Szűcs, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Aims. To build up a coherent shared pathophysiology of NFLE and AP and discuss the underlying functional network. Methods. Reviewing relevant published data we point out common features in semiology of events, relations to macro- and microstructural dynamism of NREM sleep, to cholinergic arousal mechanism and genetic aspects. Results. We propose that pathological arousals accompanied by confused behavior with autonomic signs and/or hypermotor automatisms are expressions of the frontal cholinergic arousal function of different degree, during the condition of depressed cognition by frontodorsal functional loss in NREM sleep. This may happen either if the frontal cortical Ach receptors are mutated in ADNFLE (and probably also in genetically not proved nonlesional cases as well), or without epileptic disorder, in AP, assuming gain in receptor functions in both conditions. This hypothesis incorporates the previous “liberation theory” of Tassinari and the “state dissociation hypothesis” of Bassetti and Terzaghi). We propose that NFLE and IGE represent epileptic disorders of the two antagonistic twin systems in the frontal lobe. NFLE is the epileptic facilitation of the ergotropic frontal arousal system whereas absence epilepsy is the epileptic facilitation of burst-firing working mode of the spindle and delta producing frontal thalamocortical throphotropic sleep system. Significance. The proposed physiopathogenesis conceptualize epilepsies in physiologically meaningful networks. PMID:22953061

  19. Clinical utility of 11C-flumazenil positron emission tomography in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Padma M

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 11C-flumazenil (FMZ positron emission tomography (PET is a new entrant into the armamentarium for pre-surgical evaluation of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. AIMS: To analyze the clinical utility of FMZ PET to detect lesional and remote cortical areas of abnormal benzodiazepine receptor binding in relation to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 2-Deoxy-2 [18F] fluoro-D-glucose, (18F FDG PET, electrophysiological findings and semiology of epilepsy in patients with intractable TLE. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients underwent a high resolution MRI, prolonged Video-EEG monitoring before 18F FDG and 11C FMZ PET studies. Regional cortical FMZ PET abnormalities were defined on co-registered PET images using an objective method based on definition of areas of abnormal asymmetry (asymmetry index {AI}>10%. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Prospective. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Student′s "t" test. RESULTS: Twenty patients (Mean age: 35.2 years [20-51]; M:F=12:8 completed the study. Mean age at seizure onset was 10.3 years (birth-38 years; mean duration, 23.9 years (6-50 years. Concordance with the MRI lesion was seen in 10 patients (nine with hippocampal sclerosis and one with tuberous sclerosis. In the other 10, with either normal or ambiguous MRI findings, FMZ and FDG uptake were abnormal in all, concordant with the electrophysiological localization of the epileptic foci. Remote FMZ PET abnormalities (n=18 were associated with early age of seizure onset (P=0.005 and long duration of epilepsy (P=0.01. CONCLUSIONS: FMZ-binding asymmetry is a sensitive method to detect regions of epileptic foci in patients with intractable TLE.

  20. The effect of medial temporal lobe epilepsy on visual memory encoding.

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    Gregory, A M; Nenert, R; Allendorfer, J B; Martin, R; Kana, R K; Szaflarski, J P

    2015-05-01

    Effective visual memory encoding, a function important for everyday functioning, relies on episodic and semantic memory processes. In patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), memory deficits are common as the structures typically involved in seizure generation are also involved in acquisition, maintenance, and retrieval of episodic memories. In this study, we used group independent component analysis (GICA) combined with Granger causality analysis to investigate the neuronal networks involved in visual memory encoding during a complex fMRI scene-encoding task in patients with left MTLE (LMTLE; N=28) and in patients with right MTLE (RMTLE; N=18). Additionally, we built models of memory encoding in LMTLE and RMTLE and compared them with a model of healthy memory encoding (Nenert et al., 2014). For those with LMTLE, we identified and retained for further analyses and model generation 7 ICA task-related components that were attributed to four different networks: the frontal and posterior components of the DMN, visual network, auditory-insular network, and an "other" network. For those with RMTLE, ICA produced 9 task-related components that were attributed to the somatosensory and cerebellar networks in addition to the same networks as in patients with LMTLE. Granger causality analysis revealed group differences in causality relations within the visual memory network and MTLE-related deviations from normal network function. Our results demonstrate differences in the networks for visual memory encoding between those with LMTLE and those with RMTLE. Consistent with previous studies, the organization of memory encoding is dependent on laterality of seizure focus and may be mediated by functional reorganization in chronic epilepsy. These differences may underlie the observed differences in memory abilities between patients with LMTLE and patients with RMTLE and highlight the modulating effects of epilepsy on the network for memory encoding.

  1. Hippocampal CA3 transcriptome signature correlates with initial precipitating injury in refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Silvia Y Bando

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prolonged febrile seizures constitute an initial precipitating injury (IPI commonly associated with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (RMTLE. In order to investigate IPI influence on the transcriptional phenotype underlying RMTLE we comparatively analyzed the transcriptomic signatures of CA3 explants surgically obtained from RMTLE patients with (FS or without (NFS febrile seizure history. Texture analyses on MRI images of dentate gyrus were conducted in a subset of surgically removed sclerotic hippocampi for identifying IPI-associated histo-radiological alterations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA microarray analysis revealed that CA3 global gene expression differed significantly between FS and NFS subgroups. An integrative functional genomics methodology was used for characterizing the relations between GO biological processes themes and constructing transcriptional interaction networks defining the FS and NFS transcriptomic signatures and its major gene-gene links (hubs. Co-expression network analysis showed that: i CA3 transcriptomic profiles differ according to the IPI; ii FS distinctive hubs are mostly linked to glutamatergic signalization while NFS hubs predominantly involve GABAergic pathways and neurotransmission modulation. Both networks have relevant hubs related to nervous system development, what is consistent with cell genesis activity in the hippocampus of RMTLE patients. Moreover, two candidate genes for therapeutic targeting came out from this analysis: SSTR1, a relevant common hub in febrile and afebrile transcriptomes, and CHRM3, due to its putative role in epilepsy susceptibility development. MRI texture analysis allowed an overall accuracy of 90% for pixels correctly classified as belonging to FS or NFS groups. Histological examination revealed that granule cell loss was significantly higher in FS hippocampi. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CA3 transcriptional signatures and dentate gyrus morphology fairly

  2. Enhanced expression of potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Karlócai, Mária R; Wittner, Lucia; Tóth, Kinga; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Katarova, Zoja; Rásonyi, György; Erőss, Loránd; Czirják, Sándor; Halász, Péter; Szabó, Gábor; Payne, John A; Kaila, Kai; Freund, Tamás F

    2016-09-01

    Synaptic reorganization in the epileptic hippocampus involves altered excitatory and inhibitory transmission besides the rearrangement of dendritic spines, resulting in altered excitability, ion homeostasis, and cell swelling. The potassium-chloride cotransporter-2 (KCC2) is the main chloride extruder in neurons and hence will play a prominent role in determining the polarity of GABAA receptor-mediated chloride currents. In addition, KCC2 also interacts with the actin cytoskeleton which is critical for dendritic spine morphogenesis, and for the maintenance of glutamatergic synapses and cell volume. Using immunocytochemistry, we examined the cellular and subcellular levels of KCC2 in surgically removed hippocampi of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients and compared them to control human tissue. We also studied the distribution of KCC2 in a pilocarpine mouse model of epilepsy. An overall increase in KCC2-expression was found in epilepsy and confirmed by Western blots. The cellular and subcellular distributions in control mouse and human samples were largely similar; moreover, changes affecting KCC2-expression were also alike in chronic epileptic human and mouse hippocampi. At the subcellular level, we determined the neuronal elements exhibiting enhanced KCC2 expression. In epileptic tissue, staining became more intense in the immunopositive elements detected in control tissue, and profiles with subthreshold expression of KCC2 in control samples became labelled. Positive interneuron somata and dendrites were more numerous in epileptic hippocampi, despite severe interneuron loss. Whether the elevation of KCC2-expression is ultimately a pro- or anticonvulsive change, or both-behaving differently during ictal and interictal states in a context-dependent manner-remains to be established.

  3. Altered FMRI connectivity dynamics in temporal lobe epilepsy might explain seizure semiology.

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    Laufs, Helmut; Rodionov, Roman; Thornton, Rachel; Duncan, John Sydney; Lemieux, Louis; Tagliazucchi, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can be conceptualized as a network disease. The network can be characterized by inter-regional functional connectivity, i.e., blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal correlations between any two regions. However, functional connectivity is not constant over time, thus computing correlation at a given time and then at some later time could give different results (non-stationarity). We hypothesized (1) that non-stationarities can be induced by epilepsy (e.g., interictal epileptic activity) increasing local signal variance and that (2) these transient events contribute to fluctuations in connectivity leading to pathological functioning, i.e., TLE semiology. We analyzed fMRI data from 27 patients with TLE and 22 healthy controls focusing on EEG-confirmed wake epochs only to protect against sleep-induced connectivity changes. Testing hypothesis (1), we identified brain regions where the BOLD signal variance was significantly greater in TLE than in controls: the temporal pole - including the hippocampus. Taking the latter as the seed region and testing hypothesis (2), we calculated the time-varying inter-regional correlation values (dynamic functional connectivity) to other brain regions and found greater connectivity variance in the TLE than the control group mainly in the precuneus, the supplementary and sensorimotor, and the frontal cortices. We conclude that the highest BOLD signal variance in the hippocampi is highly suggestive of a specific epilepsy-related effect. The altered connectivity dynamics in TLE patients might help to explain the hallmark semiological features of dyscognitive seizures including impaired consciousness (precuneus, frontal cortex), sensory disturbance, and motor automatisms (sensorimotor cortices, supplementary motor cortex). Accounting for the non-stationarity and state-dependence of functional connectivity are a prerequisite in the search for potential connectivity-derived biomarkers in TLE.

  4. Altered fMRI connectivity dynamics in temporal lobe epilepsy might explain seizure semiology

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    Helmut eLaufs

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE can be conceptualized as a network disease. The network can be characterized by inter-regional functional connectivity, i.e. blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal correlations between any two region pairs. However, functional connectivity is not constant over time, thus computing correlation at a given time and then at some later time could give different results (non-stationarity. We hypothesized (1 that non-stationarities can be induced by epilepsy (e.g. interictal epileptic activity increasing local signal variance and that (2 these transient events contribute to fluctuations in connectivity leading to pathological functioning, i.e. TLE semiology. We analyzed fMRI data from 27 patients with TLE and 22 healthy controls focusing on EEG-confirmed wake epochs only to protect against sleep-induced connectivity changes. Testing hypothesis (1, we identified brain regions where the BOLD signal variance was significantly greater in TLE than in controls: the temporal pole - including the hippocampus. Taking the latter as the seed region and testing hypothesis (2 we calculated the time-varying interregional correlation values (dynamic functional connectivity to other brain regions and found greater connectivity variance in the TLE than the control group mainly in the precuneus, the supplementary and sensori-motor and the frontal cortices.We conclude that the highest BOLD signal variance in the hippocampi is highly suggestive of a specific epilepsy-related effect. The altered connectivity dynamics in TLE patients might help to explain the hallmark semiological features of dyscognitive seizures including impaired consciousness (precuneus, frontal cortex, sensory disturbance and motor automatisms (sensorimotor cortices, supplementary motor cortex. Accounting for the non-stationarity and state-dependence of functional connectivity are a prerequisite in the search for potential connectivity-derived biomarkers in TLE.

  5. Brain SPECT in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison between visual analysis and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping)

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    Amorim, Barbara Juarez; Ramos, Celso Dario; Santos, Allan Oliveira dos; Lima, Mariana da Cunha Lopes de; Camargo, Edwaldo Eduardo; Etchebehere, Elba Cristina Sa de Camargo, E-mail: juarezbarbara@hotmail.co [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Radiology; Min, Li Li; Cendes, Fernando [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Neurology

    2010-04-15

    Objective: to compare the accuracy of SPM and visual analysis of brain SPECT in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Method: interictal and ictal SPECTs of 22 patients with MTLE were performed. Visual analysis were performed in interictal (VISUAL(inter)) and ictal (VISUAL(ictal/inter)) studies. SPM analysis consisted of comparing interictal (SPM(inter)) and ictal SPECTs (SPM(ictal)) of each patient to control group and by comparing perfusion of temporal lobes in ictal and interictal studies among themselves (SPM(ictal/inter)). Results: for detection of the epileptogenic focus, the sensitivities were as follows: VISUAL(inter)=68%; VISUAL(ictal/inter)=100%; SPM(inter)=45%; SPM(ictal)=64% and SPM(ictal/inter)=77%. SPM was able to detect more areas of hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion. Conclusion: SPM did not improve the sensitivity to detect epileptogenic focus. However, SPM detected different regions of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion and is therefore a helpful tool for better understand pathophysiology of seizures in MTLE. (author)

  6. Electrophysiological and auditory behavioral evaluation of individuals with left temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Rocha, Caroline Nunes; Miziara, Carmen Silvia Molleis Galego; Manreza, Maria Luiza Giraldes de; Schochat, Eliane

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the repercussions of left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) for subjects with left mesial temporal sclerosis (LMTS) in relation to the behavioral test-Dichotic Digits Test (DDT), event-related potential (P300), and to compare the two temporal lobes in terms of P300 latency and amplitude. We studied 12 subjects with LMTS and 12 control subjects without LMTS. Relationships between P300 latency and P300 amplitude at sites C3A1,C3A2,C4A1, and C4A2, together with DDT results, were studied in inter-and intra-group analyses. On the DDT, subjects with LMTS performed poorly in comparison to controls. This difference was statistically significant for both ears. The P300 was absent in 6 individuals with LMTS. Regarding P300 latency and amplitude, as a group, LMTS subjects presented trend toward greater P300 latency and lower P300 amplitude at all positions in relation to controls, difference being statistically significant for C3A1 and C4A2. However, it was not possible to determine laterality effect of P300 between affected and unaffected hemispheres.

  7. Using multivariate data reduction to predict postsurgery memory decline in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    St-Laurent, Marie; McCormick, Cornelia; Cohn, Mélanie; Mišić, Bratislav; Giannoylis, Irene; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2014-02-01

    Predicting postsurgery memory decline is crucial to clinical decision-making for individuals with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) who are candidates for temporal lobe excisions. Extensive neuropsychological testing is critical to assess risk, but the numerous test scores it produces can make deriving a formal prediction of cognitive change quite complex. In order to benefit from the information contained in comprehensive memory assessment, we used principal component analysis (PCA) to simplify neuropsychological test scores (presurgical and pre- to postsurgical change) obtained from a cohort of 56 patients with mTLE into a few easily interpretable latent components. We next performed discriminant analyses using presurgery latent components to categorize seizure laterality and then regression analyses to assess how well presurgery latent components could predict postsurgery memory decline. Finally, we validated the predictive power of these regression models in an independent sample of 18 patients with mTLE. Principal component analysis identified three significant latent components that reflected IQ, verbal memory, and visuospatial memory, respectively. Together, the presurgery verbal and visuospatial memory components classified 80% of patients with mTLE correctly according to their seizure laterality. Furthermore, the presurgery verbal memory component predicted postsurgery verbal memory decline, while the presurgery visuospatial memory component predicted visuospatial memory decline. These regression models also predicted postsurgery memory decline successfully in the independent cohort of patients with mTLE. Our results demonstrate the value of data reduction techniques in identifying cognitive metrics that can characterize laterality of damage and risk of postoperative decline.

  8. Neuroimaging for patient selection for medial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: Part 1 Structural neuroimaging.

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    Stylianou, Petros; Hoffmann, Chen; Blat, Ilan; Harnof, Sagi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of part one of this review is to present the structural neuroimaging techniques that are currently used to evaluate patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and to discuss their potential to define patient eligibility for medial temporal lobe surgery. A PubMed query, using Medline and Embase, and subsequent review, was performed for all English language studies published after 1990, reporting neuroimaging methods for the evaluation of patients with TLE. The extracted data included demographic variables, population and study design, imaging methods, gold standard methods, imaging findings, surgical outcomes and conclusions. Overall, 56 papers were reviewed, including a total of 1517 patients. This review highlights the following structural neuroimaging techniques: MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, tractography, electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography. The developments in neuroimaging during the last decades have led to remarkable improvements in surgical precision, postsurgical outcome, prognosis, and the rate of seizure control in patients with TLE. The use of multiple imaging methods provides improved outcomes, and further improvements will be possible with future studies of larger patient cohorts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Xing, Wu; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xie, Fangfang; Liao, Weihua [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital of Central South Univ., Changsha (China)], e-mail: doctoring@sina.com

    2013-02-15

    Background: Accurately locatithe epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is important in clinical practice. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have been widely used in the lateralization of TLE, but both have limitations. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging can accurately and reliably reflect differences in cerebral blood flow and volume. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in TLE. Material and Methods: Conventional MRI and DSC-MRI scanning was performed in 20 interictal cases of TLE and 20 healthy volunteers. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes of the TLE cases and healthy control groups were calculated. The differences in the perfusion asymmetry indices (AIs), derived from the rCBV and rCBF of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes, were pared between the two groups. Results: In the control group, there were no statistically significant differences between the left and right sides in terms of rCBV (left 1.55 {+-} 0.32, right 1.57 {+-} 0.28) or rCBF (left 99.00 {+-} 24.61, right 100.38 {+-} 23.46) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes. However, in the case group the ipsilateral rCBV and rCBF values (1.75 {+-} 0.64 and 96.35 {+-} 22.63, respectively) were markedly lower than those of the contralateral side (2.01 {+-} 0.79 and 108.56 {+-} 26.92; P < 0.05). Both the AI of the rCBV (AIrCBV; 13.03 {+-} 10.33) and the AI of the rCBF (AIrCBF; 11.24 {+-} 8.70) of the case group were significantly higher than that of the control group (AIrCBV 5.55 {+-} 3.74, AIrCBF 5.12 {+-} 3.48; P < 0.05). The epileptogenic foci of nine patients were correctly lateralized using the 95th percentile of the AIrCBV and AIrCBF of the control group as the normal upper limits. Conclusion: In

  10. A novel kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy in rhesus monkeys induced by Coriaria lactone.

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    Hong, Zhen; Yang, Tian-Hua; Tang, Ming-Hai; Zhang, Heng; Li, Hong-Xia; Chen, Lei; Chen, Qin; Zhou, Dong

    2013-12-01

    One of the major challenges in developing novel therapeutics for human epileptic disorders derives from the limitation of knowledge of the processes by which epilepsy is generated (epileptogenesis). Furthermore, the inability to obtain human samples at the early stage of epilepsy hinders studies designed to further understand epileptogenesis. Thus, an effective animal model is critical for studies investigating this process. The purpose of this study was to establish a new primate kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) as an animal model of epileptogenesis. Here, repeated injections of Coriaria lactone (CL) at a subthreshold dose elicited partial seizures that culminated in secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures. The sequence of events and features of the behaviors observed in this model simulated those observed in human TLE. Electroencephalogram monitoring revealed the temporal lobe origins of the epileptiform potentials, which were consistent with the behavioral changes observed. A total of 7 rhesus monkeys (78%) were kindled with a median of 48 (41 to 60) CL injections. Both the seizure-induction and mortality rates were dose-dependent. A CL injection at 1.50mg/kg showed the lowest animal mortality rate (0%) and the highest seizure-induction rate (100%). Extensive kindling by CL injections with a median of 97 injections (overkindling) subsequently resulted in the recurrence of spontaneous seizures in rhesus monkeys with frequency patterns that were similar to those observed in human TLE. In addition, rhesus monkeys subjected to large numbers of kindling stimuli displayed mitochondrial damage and astrocyte activation in a pattern that was similar to the neuropathological changes characteristic of human TLE. Thus, a kindling TLE model in rhesus monkeys representing a primate animal model of epileptogenesis was established for the first time using repeated intramuscular injections of Coriaria lactone. This model was easily and efficiently performed

  11. Cerebral Hemispheric Lateralization Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis May Affect Interictal Cardiovascular Autonomic Functions in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Rokia Ghchime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is linked to the autonomic nervous system dysfunctions. Seizures alter the function of different systems such as the respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and urogenital systems. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible factors which may be involved in interictal cardiovascular autonomic function in temporal lobe epilepsy with complex partial seizures, and with particular attention to hippocampal sclerosis. The study was conducted in 30 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (19 with left hippocampal sclerosis, 11 with right hippocampal sclerosis. All subjects underwent four tests of cardiac autonomic function: heart rate changes in response to deep breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure variations throughout resting activity and during hand grip, mental stress, and orthostatic tests. Our results show that the right cerebral hemisphere predominantly modulates sympathetic activity, while the left cerebral hemisphere mainly modulates parasympathetic activity, which mediated tachycardia and excessive bradycardia counterregulation, both of which might be involved as a mechanism of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients (SUDEP.

  12. Bostezo y epilepsia del lóbulo temporal Yawning and temporal lobe epilepsy

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    S. Muchnik

    2003-04-01

    particular de epilepsia temporal.Temporal lobe epilepsy is a partial epileptic disorder in which mesial structures are responsible for the principal ictal symptoms. Its characteristic feature is the recurrence of simple and complex partial seizures, associated with postictal confusion and amnesia of the event. The facilitating effect of NREM sleep on the propagation of the seizure, as well as the sleep abnormalities provoked by epilepsy were evident in our two patients. Yawning is a physiological reflex induced by arousal and drowsiness and may appear in different neurological conditions. Its relation with epilepsy of limbic origen has been rarely reported. We describe in a 95 year old male patient, the occurrence of yawning followed by complex partial seizure during a state of drowsiness. His EEG showed independent bilateral interictal foci of temporal sharp waves and after being medicated with carbamazepine 400mg/day, the episode did not recur. Another patient, a 17 year old female, displayed complex partial seizures and secondarily generalized seizures with yawning during the posictal period, after naps. The EEG was normal and her polysomnography showed bilateral synchronous temporal spikes and slow waves with secondarily generalization during stage 2 of NREM sleep that produce paroxysmal microarousals and increased stages 1 and 2 of NREM sleep and REM sleep diminished. After being medicated with divalproex sodium 750 mg/day, she suffered no futher seizures. Temporal lobe epilepsy, sleep- wake cycles and yawning seem not only to share the same anatomic structures but also the same neurochemical mechanisms. The fact that endogenous opiods are considered as part of a protective system that stop and prevent seizures may allow us to postulate that yawning would be the expression of the endogenous opiods induced mechanisms that stop and prevent the recurrence of the temporal lobe epilepsy. Another hypothesis may be that this is only a particular form of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  13. "Tell me how do I feel"--emotion recognition and theory of mind in symptomatic mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Broicher, Sarah D; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Grunwald, Thomas; Krämer, Günter; Kurthen, Martin; Jokeit, Hennric

    2012-01-01

    Specific interictal personality characteristics in epilepsy, sometimes referred to as "Waxman-Geschwind Syndrome", have been recognized for centuries and extensively described. Despite the persevering clinical impression that patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsies (MTLE) suffer from problems in communication and interpersonal relations, uncertainties and controversies remain as to the precise origin of these psychosocial difficulties. Here, we investigated social-cognitive and decision-making abilities using a set of tasks that combine behavioural and psychological measures of social and emotional variables to answer the question of whether patients with MTLE are specifically impaired in social cognition compared to both an epilepsy and a healthy control group. MTLE patients, an epilepsy control group (extra-MTLE; patients with epilepsy, not originating within the frontal or mesial temporal lobe) and healthy controls (HC) were assessed according to their general cognitive status as well as with our Social Cognition Battery, which included tests of basic processes of social cognition, theory of mind, decision making, and various aspects of psychopathology and quality of life. MTLE patients were significantly impaired compared to HC on most measures of the Social Cognition Battery. MTLE patients were predominantly impaired in general emotion recognition compared to extra-MTLE patients. Performance in the epilepsy control group, although not significantly differing from performance in either the MTLE or the healthy control group, lay between these two groups. MTLE can be considered a significant risk factor for the development of deficits in social cognition beyond weaknesses that might be associated with epilepsy as a stigmatized chronic neurological disorder. The presence of deficits in social cognition may explain various behavioural symptoms that have historically driven concepts such as "epileptic personality" or "interictal personality disorder" and may

  14. The Research on the Memory Impairment in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy P atients%颞叶癫痫患者记忆损害的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞志鹏; 王文敏; 王荪

    2002-01-01

    Objective: This paper reviewed recent resear ch on memory impairments in temporal lobe epilepsy patients, including clinical features of spatial, ver bal, visual and semantic memory disorders, as well as their mechanisms and clini cal significance.

  15. Down-regulation of BK channel expression in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Pacheco Otalora, Luis F; Hernandez, Eder F; Arshadmansab, Massoud F; Francisco, Sebastian; Willis, Michael; Ermolinsky, Boris; Zarei, Masoud; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R

    2008-03-20

    In the hippocampus, BK channels are preferentially localized in presynaptic glutamatergic terminals including mossy fibers where they are thought to play an important role regulating excessive glutamate release during hyperactive states. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK, MaxiK, Slo) have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic epilepsy. However, the role of BK channels in acquired mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) remains unknown. Here we used immunohistochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), Western immunoblotting and RT-PCR to investigate the expression pattern of the alpha-pore-forming subunit of BK channels in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats obtained by the pilocarpine model of MTLE. All epileptic rats experiencing recurrent spontaneous seizures exhibited a significant down-regulation of BK channel immunostaining in the mossy fibers at the hilus and stratum lucidum of the CA3 area. Quantitative analysis of immunofluorescence signals by LSCM revealed a significant 47% reduction in BK channel immunofluorescent signals in epileptic rats when compared to age-matched non-epileptic control rats. These data correlate with a similar reduction in BK channel protein levels and transcripts in the cortex and hippocampus. Our data indicate a seizure-related down-regulation of BK channels in chronically epileptic rats. Further functional assays are necessary to determine whether altered BK channel expression is an acquired channelopathy or a compensatory mechanism affecting the network excitability in MTLE. Moreover, seizure-mediated BK down-regulation may disturb neuronal excitability and presynaptic control at glutamatergic terminals triggering exaggerated glutamate release and seizures.

  16. Dystrophin Distribution and Expression in Human and Experimental Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Hendriksen, Ruben G. F.; Schipper, Sandra; Hoogland, Govert; Schijns, Olaf E. M. G.; Dings, Jim T. A.; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Vles, Johan S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dystrophin is part of a protein complex that connects the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. In addition to its role in muscle tissue, it functions as an anchoring protein within the central nervous system such as in hippocampus and cerebellum. Its presence in the latter regions is illustrated by the cognitive problems seen in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Since epilepsy is also supposed to constitute a comorbidity of DMD, it is hypothesized that dystrophin plays a role in neuronal excitability. Here, we aimed to study brain dystrophin distribution and expression in both, human and experimental temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Method: Regional and cellular dystrophin distribution was evaluated in both human and rat hippocampi and in rat cerebellar tissue by immunofluorescent colocalization with neuronal (NeuN and calbindin) and glial (GFAP) markers. In addition, hippocampal dystrophin levels were estimated by Western blot analysis in biopsies from TLE patients, post-mortem controls, amygdala kindled (AK)-, and control rats. Results: Dystrophin was expressed in all hippocampal pyramidal subfields and in the molecular-, Purkinje-, and granular cell layer of the cerebellum. In these regions it colocalized with GFAP, suggesting expression in astrocytes such as Bergmann glia (BG) and velate protoplasmic astrocytes. In rat hippocampus and cerebellum there were neither differences in dystrophin positive cell types, nor in the regional dystrophin distribution between AK and control animals. Quantitatively, hippocampal full-length dystrophin (Dp427) levels were about 60% higher in human TLE patients than in post-mortem controls (p < 0.05), whereas the level of the shorter Dp71 isoform did not differ. In contrast, AK animals showed similar dystrophin levels as controls. Conclusion: Dystrophin is ubiquitously expressed by astrocytes in the human and rat hippocampus and in the rat cerebellum. Hippocampal full-length dystrophin (Dp427) levels are upregulated

  17. The influence of seizure frequency on anterograde and remote memory in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Voltzenlogel, Virginie; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Hirsch, Edouard; Manning, Liliann

    2014-10-01

    Seizure frequency, although considered as an important factor in memory impairment in mesial temporal epilepsy (mTLE), is mostly confounded with other clinical variables, making it unclear to what extent recurrent seizures actually interfere with memory. The present study focuses on the influence of seizure frequency, studied as a main variable, on anterograde and remote memory. Seventy-one patients with unilateral mTLE were divided into two subgroups, as a function of their seizure frequency (monthly versus weekly seizures). Other seizure-related variables were controlled, namely, lateralisation and type of lesion, age at onset, years of ongoing seizures, etiologic factors, and number of AED. A comprehensive neuropsychological examination, including anterograde memory (verbal and non verbal recognition memory and free recall) tasks together with a large range of tests exploring different domains of remote memory, was carried out. Despite similar results on IQ, executive functions and attention, the low seizure-frequency group performed significantly better than the high seizure-frequency group on anterograde memory tests. Loss of autobiographical episodes and public-events memory, concomitant with spared personal semantic knowledge, was observed in both patient groups compared with healthy subjects. A worsening effect of high seizure frequency was recorded for autobiographical incidents and news-events memory, but unexpectedly, not for memory for famous people. The study of seizure frequency as the main variable leads us to suggest that high seizure frequency, itself, potentiates the effects of mesial temporal lobe damage on episodic memory deficits. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Administration of simvastatin after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus restrains chronic temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Chuncheng Xie

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the effect of chronic administration of simvastatin immediately after status epilepticus (SE on rat brain with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. First, we evaluated cytokines expression at 3 days post KA-lesion in hippocampus and found that simvastatin-treatment suppressed lesion-induced expression of interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Further, we quantified reactive astrocytosis using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP staining and neuron loss using Nissl staining in hippocampus at 4-6 months after KA-lesion. We found that simvastatin suppressed reactive astrocytosis demonstrated by a significant decrease in GFAP-positive cells, and attenuated loss of pyramidal neurons in CA3 and interneurons in dentate hilar (DH. We next assessed aberrant mossy fiber sprouting (MFS that is known to contribute to recurrence of spontaneous seizure in epileptic brain. In contrast to the robust MFS observed in saline-treated animals, the extent of MFS was restrained by simvastatin in epileptic rats. Attenuated MFS was related to decreased neuronal loss in CA3 and DH, which is possibly a mechanism underlying decreased hippocampal susceptibility in animal treated with simvastatin. Electronic encephalography (EEG was recorded during 4 to 6 months after KA-lesion. The frequency of abnormal spikes in rats with simvastatin-treatment decreased significantly compared to the saline group. In summary, simvastatin treatment suppressed cytokines expression and reactive astrocytosis and decreased the frequency of discharges of epileptic brain, which might be due to the inhibition of MFS in DH. Our study suggests that simvastatin administration might be a possible intervention and promising strategy for preventing SE exacerbating to chronic epilepsy.

  19. A meta-analysis on progressive atrophy in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: Time is brain?

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    Caciagli, Lorenzo; Bernasconi, Andrea; Wiebe, Samuel; Koepp, Matthias J; Bernasconi, Neda; Bernhardt, Boris C

    2017-08-01

    It remains unclear whether drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is associated with cumulative brain damage, with no expert consensus and no quantitative syntheses of the available evidence. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of MRI studies on progressive atrophy, searching PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE databases for cross-sectional and longitudinal quantitative MRI studies on drug-resistant TLE. We screened 2,976 records and assessed eligibility of 248 full-text articles. Forty-two articles met the inclusion criteria for quantitative evaluation. We observed a predominance of cross-sectional studies, use of different clinical indices of progression, and high heterogeneity in age-control procedures. Meta-analysis of 18/1 cross-sectional/longitudinal studies on hippocampal atrophy (n = 979 patients) yielded a pooled effect size of r = -0.42 for ipsilateral atrophy related to epilepsy duration (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.51 to -0.32; p atrophy (n = 1,504 patients) indicated that >80% of articles reported duration-related progression in extratemporal cortical and subcortical regions. Detailed analysis of study design features yielded low to moderate levels of evidence for progressive atrophy across studies, mainly due to dominance of cross-sectional over longitudinal investigations, use of diverse measures of seizure estimates, and absence of consistent age control procedures. While the neuroimaging literature is overall suggestive of progressive atrophy in drug-resistant TLE, published studies have employed rather weak designs to directly demonstrate it. Longitudinal multicohort studies are needed to unequivocally differentiate aging from disease progression. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Amygdalohippocampotomy for mesial temporal lobe sclerosis: Epilepsy outcome 5 years after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Ferreira, Antonio; Rainha-Campos, Alexandre; Franco, Ana; Pimentel, Jose; Bentes, Carla; Peralta, Ana-Rita; Morgado, Carlos

    2017-08-29

    The goal of the present study is the evaluation of the long-term clinical outcome of epilepsy in patients with mesial temporal lobe sclerosis (MTLS) submitted to amygdalohippocampotomy (AHCo). AHCo consists of the lateral ablation of the amygdala and the peri-hippocampal disconnection instead of amygdalohippocampectomy (AHC), which involves the removal of both structures. We previously reported the short-term results of AHCo, so we here present the long-term results (> 5 years of follow-up) of the patients operated on with AHCo. Since 2007, 35 patients (22 females) aged 20-61 years (mean: 42 years) were operated on with the AHCo technique, 17 patients on the left side and 18 on the right. Of these patients, 21 (14 females) have been followed up > 5 years (5 to 7.5 years, mean 6.5 years). We compare the present results with those observed shortly after surgery and with the patients operated on with AHC. In all 21 cases, the diagnosis was mesial temporal lobe sclerosis (histology confirmed in 20), 11 on the left side and 10 on the right. Epilepsy results after 5 years were good/very good in 18 patients (85.7%), with Engel class IA-B in 15 (71.4%) and II in 3 (14.3%), and bad in 3 patients, with Engel Class III in 2 (9.5%) and class IV in 1 (4.8%). Concerning morbidity, one patient had hemiparesis (hypertensive capsular hemorrhage 24 h after surgery), two verbal memory worsening, two quadrantanopia and three late depression that was reversed with medication. Comparatively, the AHC long-term results were 87% Engel class I, 8% Engel class II and 5% Engel class III-IV. The morbidity was equally small. The good/very good results of AHCo 5 years after surgery are 86%, which is not distinct from the AHC results. So AHCo seems to be effective and potentially safer than AHC in long-term follow-up.

  1. The impact of epilepsy on Graham Greene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, E H

    2001-08-01

    As a young man, Graham Greene (1904-1991) experienced several episodes of loss of consciousness, which were confidently diagnosed as epilepsy by a Harley Street specialist who saw him on two occasions during the 1920s. The diagnosis was initially concealed from him by his family and the specialist, but when it was revealed, it had a profound effect such that he contemplated suicide. He was particularly concerned about his impending marriage and the risk of having children. His anxiety was not relieved by being told that the famous author, Dostoevsky, had epilepsy. Graham Greene is the only public figure in the United Kingdom, of whom I am aware, who has admitted and discussed the impact of epilepsy, even though this was more than 40 years later when there was some doubt about the diagnosis.

  2. Graph Theoretical Analysis of Structural Neuroimaging in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with and without Psychosis.

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    Daichi Sone

    Full Text Available Psychosis is one of the most important psychiatric comorbidities in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, and its pathophysiology still remains unsolved. We aimed to explore the connectivity differences of structural neuroimaging between TLE with and without psychosis using a graph theoretical analysis, which is an emerging mathematical method to investigate network connections in the brain as a small-world system.We recruited 11 TLE patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS presenting psychosis or having a history of psychosis (TLE-P group. As controls, 15 TLE patients with unilateral HS without any history of psychotic episodes were also recruited (TLE-N group. For graph theoretical analysis, the normalized gray matter images of both groups were subjected to Graph Analysis Toolbox (GAT. As secondary analyses, each group was compared to 14 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects.The hub node locations were found predominantly in the ipsilateral hemisphere in the TLE-N group, and mainly on the contralateral side in the TLE-P group. The TLE-P group showed significantly higher characteristic path length, transitivity, lower global efficiency, and resilience to random or targeted attack than those of the TLE-N group. The regional comparison in betweenness centrality revealed significantly decreased connectivity in the contralateral temporal lobe, ipsilateral middle frontal gyrus, and bilateral postcentral gyri in the TLE-P group. The healthy subjects showed well-balanced nodes/edges distributions, similar metrics to TLE-N group except for higher small-worldness/modularity/assortativity, and various differences of regional betweenness/clustering.In TLE with psychosis, graph theoretical analysis of structural imaging revealed disrupted connectivity in the contralateral hemisphere. The network metrics suggested that the existence of psychosis can bring vulnerability and decreased efficiency of the whole-brain network. The sharp differences in

  3. Evaluation of feature selection algorithms for classification in temporal lobe epilepsy based on MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chunren; Guo, Shengwen; Cheng, Lina; Wang, Wensheng; Wu, Kai

    2017-02-01

    It's very important to differentiate the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients from healthy people and localize the abnormal brain regions of the TLE patients. The cortical features and changes can reveal the unique anatomical patterns of brain regions from the structural MR images. In this study, structural MR images from 28 normal controls (NC), 18 left TLE (LTLE), and 21 right TLE (RTLE) were acquired, and four types of cortical feature, namely cortical thickness (CTh), cortical surface area (CSA), gray matter volume (GMV), and mean curvature (MCu), were explored for discriminative analysis. Three feature selection methods, the independent sample t-test filtering, the sparse-constrained dimensionality reduction model (SCDRM), and the support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE), were investigated to extract dominant regions with significant differences among the compared groups for classification using the SVM classifier. The results showed that the SVM-REF achieved the highest performance (most classifications with more than 92% accuracy), followed by the SCDRM, and the t-test. Especially, the surface area and gray volume matter exhibited prominent discriminative ability, and the performance of the SVM was improved significantly when the four cortical features were combined. Additionally, the dominant regions with higher classification weights were mainly located in temporal and frontal lobe, including the inferior temporal, entorhinal cortex, fusiform, parahippocampal cortex, middle frontal and frontal pole. It was demonstrated that the cortical features provided effective information to determine the abnormal anatomical pattern and the proposed method has the potential to improve the clinical diagnosis of the TLE.

  4. Specific Resting-state Brain Networks in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Mona eManeshi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied with fMRI differences in resting-state networks between patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE and healthy subjects. To avoid any a priori hypothesis, we use a data-driven analysis assessing differences between groups independently of structures involved. Shared and specific independent component analysis (SSICA is an exploratory method based on independent component analysis, which performs between-group network comparison. It extracts and classifies components (networks in those common between groups and those specific to one group. Resting fMRI data was collected from 10 healthy subjects and 10 MTLE patients. SSICA was applied multiple times with altered initializations and different numbers of specific components. This resulted in many components specific to patients and to controls. Spatial clustering identified the reliable resting-state networks among all specific components in each group. For each reliable specific network, power spectrum analysis was performed on reconstructed time series to estimate connectivity in each group and differences between groups. Two reliable networks, corresponding to statistically significant clusters robustly detected with clustering were labelled as specific to MTLE and one as specific to the control group. The most reliable MTLE network included hippocampus and amygdala bilaterally. The other MTLE network included the postcentral gyri and temporal poles. The control-specific network included bilateral precuneus, anterior cingulate, thalamus, parahippocampal gyrus. Results indicated that the two MTLE networks show increased connectivity in patients whereas the control-specific network shows decreased connectivity in patients. Our findings complement results from seed-based connectivity analysis (Pittau et al., 2012. The pattern of changes in connectivity between mesial temporal lobe structures and other areas may help us understand the cognitive impairments often reported in

  5. A Prediction Algorithm for Drug Response in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Based on Clinical and Genetic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Alves, Mariana S; Secolin, Rodrigo; Carvalho, Benilton S; Yasuda, Clarissa L; Bilevicius, Elizabeth; Alvim, Marina K M; Santos, Renato O; Maurer-Morelli, Claudia V; Cendes, Fernando; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia

    2017-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common form of adult epilepsy in surgical series. Currently, the only characteristic used to predict poor response to clinical treatment in this syndrome is the presence of hippocampal sclerosis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in genes encoding drug transporter and metabolism proteins could influence response to therapy. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate whether combining information from clinical variables as well as SNPs in candidate genes could improve the accuracy of predicting response to drug therapy in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. For this, we divided 237 patients into two groups: 75 responsive and 162 refractory to antiepileptic drug therapy. We genotyped 119 SNPs in ABCB1, ABCC2, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 genes. We used 98 additional SNPs to evaluate population stratification. We assessed a first scenario using only clinical variables and a second one including SNP information. The random forests algorithm combined with leave-one-out cross-validation was used to identify the best predictive model in each scenario and compared their accuracies using the area under the curve statistic. Additionally, we built a variable importance plot to present the set of most relevant predictors on the best model. The selected best model included the presence of hippocampal sclerosis and 56 SNPs. Furthermore, including SNPs in the model improved accuracy from 0.4568 to 0.8177. Our findings suggest that adding genetic information provided by SNPs, located on drug transport and metabolism genes, can improve the accuracy for predicting which patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy are likely to be refractory to drug treatment, making it possible to identify patients who may benefit from epilepsy surgery sooner.

  6. A Prediction Algorithm for Drug Response in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Based on Clinical and Genetic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Benilton S.; Bilevicius, Elizabeth; Alvim, Marina K. M.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia

    2017-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common form of adult epilepsy in surgical series. Currently, the only characteristic used to predict poor response to clinical treatment in this syndrome is the presence of hippocampal sclerosis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in genes encoding drug transporter and metabolism proteins could influence response to therapy. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate whether combining information from clinical variables as well as SNPs in candidate genes could improve the accuracy of predicting response to drug therapy in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. For this, we divided 237 patients into two groups: 75 responsive and 162 refractory to antiepileptic drug therapy. We genotyped 119 SNPs in ABCB1, ABCC2, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 genes. We used 98 additional SNPs to evaluate population stratification. We assessed a first scenario using only clinical variables and a second one including SNP information. The random forests algorithm combined with leave-one-out cross-validation was used to identify the best predictive model in each scenario and compared their accuracies using the area under the curve statistic. Additionally, we built a variable importance plot to present the set of most relevant predictors on the best model. The selected best model included the presence of hippocampal sclerosis and 56 SNPs. Furthermore, including SNPs in the model improved accuracy from 0.4568 to 0.8177. Our findings suggest that adding genetic information provided by SNPs, located on drug transport and metabolism genes, can improve the accuracy for predicting which patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy are likely to be refractory to drug treatment, making it possible to identify patients who may benefit from epilepsy surgery sooner. PMID:28052106

  7. Developing a comprehensive presurgical functional MRI protocol for patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: a pilot study

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    Deblaere, K.; Vandemaele, P.; Achten, E. [MRI Department -1 K12, Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Backes, W.H.; Hofman, P.; Wilmink, J. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Maastricht, Postbus 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Boon, P.A.; Vonck, K. [Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Boon, P. [Department of Medical Psychology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Troost, J. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Vermeulen, J. [S.E.I.N Heemstede, Psychological Laboratory, Achterweg 5, 2103 SW Heemstede (Netherlands); Aldenkamp, A. [Epilepsy Center ' Kempenhaeghe' , Postbus 61, 5900 AB Heeze (Netherlands)

    2002-08-01

    Our aim was to put together and test a comprehensive functional MRI (fMRI) protocol which could compete with the intracarotid amytal (IAT) or Wada test for the localisation of language and memory function in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The protocol was designed to be performed in under 1 h on a standard 1.5 tesla imager. We used five paradigms to test nine healthy right-handed subjects: complex scene-encoding, picture-naming, reading, word-generation and semantic-decision tasks. The combination of these tasks generated two activation maps related to memory in the mesial temporal lobes, and three language-related maps of activation in a major part of the known language network. The functional maps from the encoding and naming tasks showed typical and symmetrical posterior mesial temporal lobe activation related to memory in all subjects. Only four of nine subjects also showed symmetrical anterior hippocampal activation. Language lateralisation was best with the word generation and reading paradigms and proved possible in all subjects. The reading paradigm enables localisation of language function in the left anterior temporal pole and middle temporal gyrus, areas typically resected during epilepsy surgery. The combined results of this comprehensive f MRI protocol are adequate for a comparative study with the IAT in patients with epilepsy being assessed for surgery. (orig.)

  8. The correlation between ictal semiology and magnetoencephalographic localization in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xintong; Rampp, Stefan; Weigel, Daniel; Kasper, Burkhard; Zhou, Dong; Stefan, Hermann

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of ictal semiology with localization and/or lateralization by magnetoencephalography (MEG). Seven patients from the Neurology Department of the University Hospital Erlangen who underwent resective surgery for frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) with an Engel 1a outcome were investigated retrospectively. MEG localizations were classified according to five compartments (separate or combined) of the frontal lobe: frontal basal (FB), frontal lateral (FL), frontal polar (FP), frontal mesial (FM), and frontal precentral (FPr). On the basis of previous studies that investigated the value of ictal semiology in localization and lateralization, we compared the experiential localization and/or lateralization of the epileptogenic region deduced from ictal semiology, that is, both seizure history and ictal video/EEG monitoring, with MEG localization. It is easier to determine lateralization than localization from ictal semiology because of the variety of signs and fast propagation in FLE. All of the patients had specific MEG localizations according to favorable postoperative outcome. Three patients had MEG foci associated with ictal semiology; in another four, the MEG localization was adjacent to the estimated area suggested by ictal semiology. Head version signs could be observed in all compartments of the frontal lobe: clonic in FB and FP areas; postural in FPr, FL, and FM areas; hypermotor in FB, FP, FPr, and FM areas; sensation aura in FB, FL, and FM areas; and automatisms in FP, FPr, and FL areas. All patients had concordant lateralizing and limited valuable locating information from ictal semiology, but no complete correlation with MEG foci. Ictal semiology may indicate the involvement of a symptomatogenic brain region during a seizure, but extent of seizure onset in central motor or sensorimotor area is not reliable enough to indicate the seizure onset zone and favorable postoperative outcome in FLE. MEG provided specific

  9. Relationship of number of seizures recorded on video-EEG to surgical outcome in refractory medial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Rup Kamal Sainju

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Surgical planning for refractory medial temporal lobe epilepsy (rMTLE relies on seizure localization by ictal electroencephalography (EEG. Multiple factors impact the number of seizures recorded. We evaluated whether seizure freedom correlated to the number of seizures recorded, and the related factors. METHODS: We collected data for 32 patients with rMTLE who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy. Primary analysis evaluated number of seizures captured as a predictor of surgical outcome. Subsequent analyses explored factors that may seizure number. RESULTS: Number of seizures recorded did not predict seizure freedom. More seizures were recorded with more days of seizure occurrence (p<0.001, seizure clusters (p<0.011 and poorly localized seizures (PLSz (p=0.004. Regression modeling showed a trend for subjects with fewer recorded poorly localized seizures to have better surgical outcome (p=0.052. CONCLUSIONS: Total number of recorded seizures does not predict surgical outcome. Patients with more PLSz may have worse outcome.

  10. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 4p associated with mild mental retardation, epilepsy and polymicrogyria of the left temporal lobe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, R S; Hansen, C P; Jackson, G D

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present a 38-year-old woman with an interstitial deletion of 4p15.1-15.3, mild mental retardation, epilepsy and polymicrogyria adjacent to an arachnoid cyst of the left temporal lobe. The deletion was ascertained through array-comparative genome hybridization screening of patien...... described in this study were similar but not identical to the previously reported cases with 4p15 interstitial deletions. This finding indicates the presence of one or more genes involved in brain development and epilepsy in this chromosome region.......In this study, we present a 38-year-old woman with an interstitial deletion of 4p15.1-15.3, mild mental retardation, epilepsy and polymicrogyria adjacent to an arachnoid cyst of the left temporal lobe. The deletion was ascertained through array-comparative genome hybridization screening of patients...... with epilepsy and brain malformations. To date, about 35 patients with cytogenetically visible deletions involving 4p15 and without Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome have been described, but the extent of the deletions has not been determined in the majority of these cases. The clinical manifestations of the patient...

  11. Reporting a Remarkable Visual Illusion Due to Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and an Unusual Response to Lamotrigine

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    Mostafavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Visual illusions and hallucinations may accompany a wide variety of disorders with many various etiologies; therefore, they are nonspecific phenomena. In a partial seizure, a localized hyper synchronous neuronal discharge evolving into a partial seizure affecting a particular cortical region or cerebral subsystem can give rise to psychotic symptoms like visual hallucination. This case study introduces a patient with metamorphopsia, a rare visual illusion, that was treated with lamotrigine. Case Presentation This case study introduces a 34-year-old man with a history of falling. After a while, his seizures became accompanied with aura and, during the attack, he saw people and objects as bloody. He was asymptomatic between the attacks, with no visceral feeling and with dysphoric mood and borderline IQ. He was resistant to various treatments. After 6 months administration of lamotrigine, he has not had any seizure attacks and the psychotic symptoms have improved. Conclusions The psychotic symptoms due to temporal lobe epilepsy can be resolved with lamotrigine administration.

  12. Hippocampal internal architecture and postoperative seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkommos, Samia; Weber, Bernd; Niehusmann, Pitt; Volmering, Elisa; Richardson, Mark P; Goh, Yen Y; Marson, Anthony G; Elger, Christian; Keller, Simon S

    2016-02-01

    Semi-quantitative analysis of hippocampal internal architecture (HIA) on MRI has been shown to be a reliable predictor of the side of seizure onset in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postoperative seizure outcome and preoperative semi-quantitative measures of HIA. We determined HIA on high in-plane resolution preoperative T2 short tau inversion recovery MR images in 79 patients with presumed unilateral mesial TLE (mTLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS) who underwent amygdalohippocampectomy and postoperative follow up. HIA was investigated with respect to postoperative seizure freedom, neuronal density determined from resected hippocampal specimens, and conventionally acquired hippocampal volume. HIA ratings were significantly related to some neuropathological features of the resected hippocampus (e.g. neuronal density of selective CA regions, Wyler grades), and bilaterally with preoperative hippocampal volume. However, there were no significant differences in HIA ratings of the to-be-resected or contralateral hippocampus between patients rendered seizure free (ILAE 1) compared to those continuing to experience seizures (ILAE 2-5). This work indicates that semi-quantitative assessment of HIA on high-resolution MRI provides a surrogate marker of underlying histopathology, but cannot prospectively distinguish between patients who will continue to experience postoperative seizures and those who will be rendered seizure free. The predictive power of HIA for postoperative seizure outcome in non-lesional patients with TLE should be explored. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Patterns of seizure control in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampus sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, Ana Carolina; Campos, Brunno M; Bergo, Felipe P G; Kubota, Bruno Y; Yasuda, Clarissa L; Morita, Marcia E; Guerreiro, Carlos A M; Cendes, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) may present unstable pattern of seizures. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence of relapse-remitting seizures in MTLE with (MTLE-HS) and without (MTLE-NL) hippocampal sclerosis. We evaluated 172 patients with MTLE-HS (122) or MTLE-NL (50). Relapse-remitting pattern was defined as periods longer than two years of seizure-freedom intercalated with seizure recurrence. "Infrequent seizures" was considered as up to three seizures per year and "frequent seizures" as any period of seizures higher than that. Thirty-seven (30%) MTLE-HS and 18 (36%) MTLE-NL patients had relapse-remitting pattern (X2, p = 0.470). This was more common in those with infrequent seizures (X2, p seizure remission between the first and second decade of life (X2, p = 0.06). Similar proportion of MTLE-HS or MTLE-NL patients present relapse-remitting seizures and this occurs more often in those with infrequent seizures.

  14. Patterns of seizure control in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampus sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Coan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE may present unstable pattern of seizures. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence of relapse-remitting seizures in MTLE with (MTLE-HS and without (MTLE-NL hippocampal sclerosis. Method We evaluated 172 patients with MTLE-HS (122 or MTLE-NL (50. Relapse-remitting pattern was defined as periods longer than two years of seizure-freedom intercalated with seizure recurrence. “Infrequent seizures” was considered as up to three seizures per year and “frequent seizures” as any period of seizures higher than that. Results Thirty-seven (30% MTLE-HS and 18 (36% MTLE-NL patients had relapse-remitting pattern (X2, p = 0.470. This was more common in those with infrequent seizures (X2, p < 0.001. Twelve MTLE-HS and one MTLE-NL patients had prolonged seizure remission between the first and second decade of life (X2, p = 0.06. Conclusion Similar proportion of MTLE-HS or MTLE-NL patients present relapse-remitting seizures and this occurs more often in those with infrequent seizures.

  15. Assessing a Metacognitive Account of Associative Memory Impairments in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Nathan A. Illman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has pointed to a deficit in associative recognition in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Associative recognition tasks require discrimination between various combinations of words which have and have not been seen previously (such as old-old or old-new pairs. People with TLE tend to respond to rearranged old-old pairs as if they are “intact” old-old pairs, which has been interpreted as a failure to use a recollection strategy to overcome the familiarity of two recombined words into a new pairing. We examined this specific deficit in the context of metacognition, using postdecision confidence judgements at test. We expected that TLE patients would show inappropriate levels of confidence for associative recognition. Although TLE patients reported lower confidence levels in their responses overall, they were sensitive to the difficulty of varying pair types in their judgements and gave significantly higher confidence ratings for their correct answers. We conclude that a strategic deficit is not at play in the associative recognition of people with TLE, insofar as they are able to monitor the status of their memory system. This adds to a growing body of research suggesting that recollection is impaired in TLE, but not metacognition.

  16. NREM parasomnias: arousal disorders and differentiation from nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, M; Ferini-Strambi, L

    2000-09-01

    Parasomnias emerging from NREM sleep such as sleep walking, sleep terrors and confusional arousals are considered arousal disorders. Nocturnal video-polysomnography is the gold standard to diagnosing and differentiating parasomnias from other arousals with atypical motor behaviors such as nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE). This form of nocturnal seizures with prominent dystonic-dyskinetic components, in some cases genetic, has been recently identified by means of detailed video-analysis of movements during sleep. The clinical picture of parasomnias (with onset in early childhood, rare episodes of long duration, absence of stereotypy, general disappearance after puberty) is different from that of NFLE (which first occurs between the age of 10 and 20, manifests frequent complex and repetitive behaviors of short duration excluding rare prolonged seizures, nocturnal agitation, some daytime complaints such as fatigue or sleepiness, persistence into adulthood). Patients show no difference from classical sleep parameters whilst microstructure analysis shows sleep instability and arousal fluctuations in parasomnias and NFLE. In children as well, at least in our experience, the differential diagnosis between the two disorders is difficult and requires one or more complete nocturnal video-polygraphic recording. In any case the diagnosis of NFLE should be considered in children with nocturnal motor episodes or nocturnal motor agitation, when the attacks persist; this diagnosis is probably more frequent than expected.

  17. Assessing a Metacognitive Account of Associative Memory Impairments in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Steven; Souchay, Céline; Moulin, Chris J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has pointed to a deficit in associative recognition in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Associative recognition tasks require discrimination between various combinations of words which have and have not been seen previously (such as old-old or old-new pairs). People with TLE tend to respond to rearranged old-old pairs as if they are “intact” old-old pairs, which has been interpreted as a failure to use a recollection strategy to overcome the familiarity of two recombined words into a new pairing. We examined this specific deficit in the context of metacognition, using postdecision confidence judgements at test. We expected that TLE patients would show inappropriate levels of confidence for associative recognition. Although TLE patients reported lower confidence levels in their responses overall, they were sensitive to the difficulty of varying pair types in their judgements and gave significantly higher confidence ratings for their correct answers. We conclude that a strategic deficit is not at play in the associative recognition of people with TLE, insofar as they are able to monitor the status of their memory system. This adds to a growing body of research suggesting that recollection is impaired in TLE, but not metacognition. PMID:27721992

  18. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of semantic verbal fluency in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes-Bautista, A G; Rodríguez-Camacho, M; Martínez-Juárez, I E; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Y

    2017-08-29

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) perform poorly on semantic verbal fluency (SVF) tasks. Completing these tasks successfully involves multiple cognitive processes simultaneously. Therefore, quantitative analysis of SVF (number of correct words in one minute), conducted in most studies, has been found to be insufficient to identify cognitive dysfunction underlying SVF difficulties in TLE. To determine whether a sample of patients with TLE had SVF difficulties compared with a control group (CG), and to identify the cognitive components associated with SVF difficulties using quantitative and qualitative analysis. SVF was evaluated in 25 patients with TLE and 24 healthy controls; the semantic verbal fluency test included 5 semantic categories: animals, fruits, occupations, countries, and verbs. All 5 categories were analysed quantitatively (number of correct words per minute and interval of execution: 0-15, 16-30, 31-45, and 46-60seconds); the categories animals and fruits were also analysed qualitatively (clusters, cluster size, switches, perseverations, and intrusions). Patients generated fewer words for all categories and intervals and fewer clusters and switches for animals and fruits than the CG (P.05). Our results suggest an association between SVF difficulties in TLE and difficulty activating semantic networks, impaired strategic search, and poor cognitive flexibility. Attention, inhibition, and working memory are preserved in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Temporal Cortex Morphology in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients and Their Asymptomatic Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusaini, Saud; Whelan, Christopher D; Doherty, Colin P; Delanty, Norman; Fitzsimons, Mary; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L

    2016-03-01

    Temporal cortex abnormalities are common in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE+HS) and believed to be relevant to the underlying mechanisms. In the present study, we set out to determine the familiarity of temporal cortex morphologic alterations in a cohort of MTLE+HS patients and their asymptomatic siblings. A surface-based morphometry (SBM) method was applied to process MRI data acquired from 140 individuals (50 patients with unilateral MTLE+HS, 50 asymptomatic siblings of patients, and 40 healthy controls). Using a region-of-interest approach, alterations in temporal cortex morphology were determined in patients and their asymptomatic siblings by comparing with the controls. Alterations in temporal cortex morphology were identified in MTLE+HS patients ipsilaterally within the anterio-medial regions, including the entorhinal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, and temporal pole. Subtle but similar pattern of morphology changes with a medium effect size were also noted in the asymptomatic siblings. These localized alterations were related to volume loss that appeared driven by shared contractions in cerebral cortex surface area. These findings indicate that temporal cortex morphologic alterations are common to patients and their asymptomatic siblings and suggest that such localized traits are possibly heritable.

  20. Resting state functional network disruptions in a kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravnoor Singh Gill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the graph topological properties of brain networks derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in a kainic acid induced model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE in rats. Functional connectivity was determined by temporal correlation of the resting-state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD signals between two brain regions during 1.5% and 2% isoflurane, and analyzed as networks in epileptic and control rats. Graph theoretical analysis revealed a significant increase in functional connectivity between brain areas in epileptic than control rats, and the connected brain areas could be categorized as a limbic network and a default mode network (DMN. The limbic network includes the hippocampus, amygdala, piriform cortex, nucleus accumbens, and mediodorsal thalamus, whereas DMN involves the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, auditory and temporal association cortex, and posterior parietal cortex. The TLE model manifested a higher clustering coefficient, increased global and local efficiency, and increased small-worldness as compared to controls, despite having a similar characteristic path length. These results suggest extensive disruptions in the functional brain networks, which may be the basis of altered cognitive, emotional and psychiatric symptoms in TLE.

  1. Evaluation of Heart Rate Variation Analysis during Rest and Tilting in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Hanna Ansakorpi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate spectral heart rate (HR variation using short-term ECG recordings at rest and during the tilt table test. Methods. The values of spectral components of total power (TP, high-frequency power (HF, low-frequency power (LF and LF: HF ratio were measured at rest and during the head-up tilt in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and their control subjects. Results. Compared to the control subjects, patients with TLE had lower HF (<0.05 and LF : HF ratio (<0.05 at rest and lower TP (<0.001, HF (<0.05, and LF (<0.05 during the head-up tilt. Upon changing from supine to standing position TP (<0.05 and LF (<0.05 were attenuated in patients with TLE compared to the control subjects. Conclusion. These results suggest that spectral analysis of HR variation from ECG recordings of short duration may add value to assessment of autonomic nervous system function using autonomic cardiac tests in patients with TLE.

  2. WMS-III performance in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: group differences and individual classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, N; Strauss, E; Chelune, G J; Loring, D W; Martin, R C; Hermann, B P; Sherman, E; Hunter, M

    2001-11-01

    The utility of the WMS-III in detecting lateralized impairment was examined in a large sample of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods of analysis included evaluation of group means on the various indexes and subtest scores, the use of ROC curves, and an examination of Auditory-Visual Index discrepancy scores. In addition, performance on immediate and delayed indexes in the auditory and the visual modality was compared within each group. Of the WMS-III scores, the Auditory-Visual Delayed Index difference score appeared most sensitive to side of temporal dysfunction, although patient classification rates were not within an acceptable range to have clinical utility. The ability to predict laterality based on statistically significant index score differences was particularly weak for those with left temporal dysfunction. The use of unusually large discrepancies led to improved prediction, however, the rarity of such scores in this population limits their usefulness. Although the utility of the WMS-III in detecting laterality may be limited in preoperative cases, the WMS-III may still hold considerable promise as a measure of memory in documenting baseline performance and in detecting those that may be at risk following surgery.

  3. Qualitative analysis of WMS-III Logical Memory and Visual Reproduction in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacritz, L H; Barnard, H D; Van Ness, P; Agostini, M; Diaz-Arrastia, R; Cullum, C M

    2004-06-01

    Clinical observation of performance on the Logical Memory (LM) and Visual Reproduction (VR) subtests from the WMS-III has revealed some variability in retention rates across stories and figures. This paper examined the degree to which this variability occurs in lateralized temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in comparison to a matched group from the WMS-III standardization sample, and explored whether analysis of qualitative aspects of LM and VR performance yield additional lateralizing information in TLE. Analysis of LM and VR scaled scores revealed differences between the TLE groups for LM, but not VR scores. All subjects benefited from repetition of LM Story B, with greater improvement in story retention in the Left versus Right TLE group. Variability in VR recall across figures was seen in all groups, with a bimodal distribution of retention rates for each figure and a sizable percentage of each group completely forgetting two or more figures. These results suggest that more careful analysis of individual LM story performance may be useful in some patients with TLE, whereas variability in VR retention across figures is common and should not be over interpreted.

  4. Ictal central apnea and bradycardia in temporal lobe epilepsy complicated by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nishimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 12-year-old boy who developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with daily complex partial seizures (CPS and monthly generalized seizures. Moreover, he frequently snored while asleep since early childhood. Polysomnography (PSG revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea with apnea–hypopnea index (AHI of 37.8/h. Video-PSG with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG recording captured two ictal apneic episodes during sleep, without any motor manifestations. The onset of rhythmic theta activity in the midtemporal area on EEG was preceded by the onset of apnea by several seconds and disappeared soon after cessation of central apnea. One episode was accompanied by ictal bradycardia of <48 beats/min which persisted for 50 s beyond the end of epileptic activity. After treatment with carbamazepine and tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, the seizures were well controlled and AHI decreased to 2.5/h. Paroxysmal discharges also disappeared during this time. Uncontrolled TLE complicated by sleep apnea should be evaluated for the presence of ictal central apnea/bradycardia.

  5. Predicting the laterality of temporal lobe epilepsy from PET, MRI, and DTI: A multimodal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian Pustina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-surgical evaluation of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE relies on information obtained from multiple neuroimaging modalities. The relationship between modalities and their combined power in predicting the seizure focus is currently unknown. We investigated asymmetries from three different modalities, PET (glucose metabolism, MRI (cortical thickness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI; white matter anisotropy in 28 left and 30 right TLE patients (LTLE and RTLE. Stepwise logistic regression models were built from each modality separately and from all three combined, while bootstrapped methods and split-sample validation verified the robustness of predictions. Among all multimodal asymmetries, three PET asymmetries formed the best predictive model (100% success in full sample, >95% success in split-sample validation. The combinations of PET with other modalities did not perform better than PET alone. Probabilistic classifications were obtained for new clinical cases, which showed correct lateralization for 7/7 new TLE patients (100% and for 4/5 operated patients with discordant or non-informative PET reports (80%. Metabolism showed closer relationship with white matter in LTLE and closer relationship with gray matter in RTLE. Our data suggest that metabolism is a powerful modality that can predict seizure laterality with high accuracy, and offers high value for automated predictive models. The side of epileptogenic focus can affect the relationship of metabolism with brain structure. The data and tools necessary to obtain classifications for new TLE patients are made publicly available.

  6. A functional MRI study of language networks in left medial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Aihong, E-mail: yuaihong163@tom.com [Department of Radiology, the 4th Medical College of Peking University, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing 100035 (China); Wang Xiaoyi; Xu Guoqing [Beijing Normal University, State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing 100875 (China); Li Yongjie [Beijing Institute of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053 (China); Qin Wen; Li Kuncheng [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences (China); Wang, Yuping [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the abnormality of language networks in left medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) using fMRI. Materials and methods: Eight patients with left MTLE and 15 healthy subjects were evaluated. An auditory semantic judgment (AJ) paradigm was used. The fMRI data were collected on a 3T MR system and analyzed by AFNI (analysis of functional neuroimages) to generate the activation map. Results: Behavioral data showed that the reaction time of the left MTLE patients was significantly longer than that of controls on the AJ task (t = -3.396, P < 0.05). The left MTLE patients also exhibited diffusively decreased activation in the AJ task. Right hemisphere dominance of Broca's and Wernicke's areas was demonstrated in left MTLE patients. Conclusions: Long-term activation of spikes in left MTLE patients results in language impairment, which is associated with an abnormality of the brain neural network.

  7. Does angiogenesis play a role in the establishment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benini, Ruba; Roth, Raquel; Khoja, Zehra; Avoli, Massimo; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-04-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a focal epileptic disorder that is frequently associated with hippocampal sclerosis. This study investigated whether blocking angiogenesis prevents the development of seizures and hippocampal atrophy in the pilocarpine rat model of MTLE. To block angiogenesis, a subset of animals were given sunitinib orally. Continuous video recordings were performed to identify seizures. Brains were then extracted and sectioned, and hippocampal surfaces and angiogenesis were assessed. After a latent period of 6.6 ± 2.6 days, the sham-treated pilocarpine rats presented convulsive seizures, while the pilocarpine rats treated with sunitinib did not develop seizures. Sham-treated pilocarpine rats but not sunitinib-treated pilocarpine rats had significantly smaller hippocampi. Endothelial cell counts in sham-treated pilocarpine rats were significantly greater than in controls and sunitinib-treated pilocarpine rats. Blocking angiogenesis immediately following the initial insult in this animal model prevented thus angiogenesis and hippocampal atrophy and averted the development of clinical seizures.

  8. Hippocampus shape analysis for temporal lobe epilepsy detection in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Zohreh; Azmi, Reza

    2016-03-01

    There are evidences in the literature that Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) causes some lateralized atrophy and deformation on hippocampus and other substructures of the brain. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), due to high-contrast soft tissue imaging, is one of the most popular imaging modalities being used in TLE diagnosis and treatment procedures. Using an algorithm to help clinicians for better and more effective shape deformations analysis could improve the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In this project our purpose is to design, implement and test a classification algorithm for MRIs based on hippocampal asymmetry detection using shape and size-based features. Our method consisted of two main parts; (1) shape feature extraction, and (2) image classification. We tested 11 different shape and size features and selected four of them that detect the asymmetry in hippocampus significantly in a randomly selected subset of the dataset. Then, we employed a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to classify the remaining images of the dataset to normal and epileptic images using our selected features. The dataset contains 25 patient images in which 12 cases were used as a training set and the rest 13 cases for testing the performance of classifier. We measured accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of, respectively, 76%, 100%, and 70% for our algorithm. The preliminary results show that using shape and size features for detecting hippocampal asymmetry could be helpful in TLE diagnosis in MRI.

  9. Ictal kissing: a release phenomenon in non-dominant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Razi M; Eder, Katherine; Rosenow, Joshua; Macken, Michael P; Schuele, Stephan U

    2010-12-01

    A variety of ictal automatisms with strong emotional elements have been described. Ictal kissing has not been well characterized and may provide useful clinical information and insight into the mechanisms of stereotyped ictal behaviour. Three of 220 patients (1.4%) admitted for video EEG monitoring between 7/2006 and 6/2009 with ictal kissing were identified. Clinical, neurophysiological and imaging data were reviewed and correlated. All patients were right-handed women with a longstanding history and findings consistent with right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Multiple habitual events were recorded for each patient, characterized by staring, oral automatisms and amnesia. In addition, partial preservation of responsiveness and speech were seen during seizures in all three patients. The first two patients showed kissing behaviour triggered by interactions during seizure testing. The last patient had six seizures overnight and developed spontaneous kissing behaviour in the ictal and post-ictal period of her later events, associated with hyperorality and sexual disinhibition. Our series supports the findings of two prior cases, of one male and one female, which reported IK behaviour associated with TLE and lateralizing to the non-dominant hemisphere. This behaviour has not been described in simple partial seizures or seen with electrical cortical stimulation suggesting that it represents a release phenomenon rather than activation of distinct symptomatogenic cortex. This is also supported by the fact that ictal kissing can occur within the spectrum of seizure-induced Kluver-Bucy syndrome and may extend into the post-ictal period.

  10. MRI in temporal lobe epilepsy. Correlation between EEG, SPECT and clinical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesugi, Hideji; Onuma, Teiichi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Ishida, Shiro [National Center Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    The relationship between MRI, SPECT, EEG and clinical features in temporal lobe epilepsy was investigated. Subjects were 162 patients (84 males, 78 females) whose average age was 38.1{+-}12.1 years. SPECT was carried out in 45 patients. The results were as follows: abnormal MR images were obtained in 36% of the group without epileptic discharge, and in 42% of the group with temporal spikes. There was no correlation between epileptic discharge in EEG and MRI abnormality. The lateralities of epileptic discharge and MRI were in disagreement in 9 of 39 patients (23%), indicating that determining the epileptic focus from scalp EEG was difficult. There was no correlation between the basic activity in EEG and abnormality in MRI. The rate of abnormal SPECT (89%) was higher than that of abnormal MRI (40%). The rate of the group with ictal automatism (52%) was higher than that of the group without ictal automatism (35%). The rate of abnormal MR images was high in the group with encephalitis (73%). The rate was higher in the group with febrile convulsion (62%) than in the group without it (28%). The rate of the abnormal MR images was higher in the group with a seizure frequency of at least several mal/month (48%) than in the group with a seizure frequency of less than several mal/year (29%). (author).

  11. Concomitant fractional anisotropy and volumetric abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy: cross-sectional evidence for progressive neurologic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon S Keller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and associated hippocampal sclerosis (TLEhs there are brain abnormalities extending beyond the presumed epileptogenic zone as revealed separately in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies. However, little is known about the relation between macroscopic atrophy (revealed by volumetric MRI and microstructural degeneration (inferred by DTI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For 62 patients with unilateral TLEhs and 68 healthy controls, we determined volumes and mean fractional anisotropy (FA of ipsilateral and contralateral brain structures from T1-weighted and DTI data, respectively. We report significant volume atrophy and FA alterations of temporal lobe, subcortical and callosal regions, which were more diffuse and bilateral in patients with left TLEhs relative to right TLEhs. We observed significant relationships between volume loss and mean FA, particularly of the thalamus and putamen bilaterally. When corrected for age, duration of epilepsy was significantly correlated with FA loss of an anatomically plausible route - including ipsilateral parahippocampal gyrus and temporal lobe white matter, the thalamus bilaterally, and posterior regions of the corpus callosum that contain temporal lobe fibres - that may be suggestive of progressive brain degeneration in response to recurrent seizures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Chronic TLEhs is associated with interrelated DTI-derived and volume-derived brain degenerative abnormalities that are influenced by the duration of the disorder and the side of seizure onset. This work confirms previously contradictory findings by employing multi-modal imaging techniques in parallel in a large sample of patients.

  12. Transsylvian selective amygdalohippocampectomy for treatment of medial temporal lobe epilepsy: Surgical technique and operative nuances to avoid complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Kovanda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of different surgical techniques are effective for treatment of drug-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy. Of these, transsylvian selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SA, which was originally developed to maximize temporal lobe preservation, is arguably the most technically demanding to perform. Recent studies have suggested that SA may result in better neuropsychological outcomes with similar postoperative seizure control as standard anterior temporal lobectomy, which involves removal of the lateral temporal neocortex. Methods: In this article, the authors describe technical nuances to improve the safety of SA. Results: Wide sylvian fissure opening and use of neuronavigation allows an adequate exposure of the amygdala and hippocampus through a corticotomy within the inferior insular sulcus. Avoidance of rigid retractors and careful manipulation and mobilization of middle cerebral vessels will minimize ischemic complications. Identification of important landmarks during amygdalohippocampectomy, such as the medial edge of the tentorium and the third nerve within the intact arachnoid membranes covering the brainstem, further avoids operator disorientation. Conclusion: SA is a safe technique for resection of medial temporal lobe epileptogenic foci leading to drug-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  13. The Personal Impact of Epilepsy Scale (PIES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert S; Nune, George; Roberts, Sanford E; Cramer, Joyce A

    2015-01-01

    The impact of epilepsy is manifest by effects related to seizures and side effects of therapy and comorbidities such as depression. This report describes the development of a brief patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument, the Personal Impact of Epilepsy Scale (PIES), to measure the influence of epilepsy overall and in each of these domains. Instrument development followed standard procedures and an FDA Guidance. People with epilepsy were surveyed with open-ended questions to derive major themes of their concerns, resulting in 4 key areas: seizures, side effects, comorbidities, and overall quality of life (QOL). A preliminary set of 152 questions was based on these themes and completed by 50 patients, age 42.7 (range: 21-71) years, concurrent with comparator instruments, including the NH Seizure Severity Scale (NHSSS), the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP), the Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-31) scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Epilepsy Foundation Depression: A Checklist. A multiple regression model indicated which PIES measures were associated with scores from the comparator instruments. Questions in each of the domains were selected for correlations and nonduplication. Test-retest consistency at a 3-day interval was completed by 38 subjects and a final set of questions constructed. The final question set comprised 25 items: 9 about characteristics of seizures, 7 about medication side effects, 8 about comorbidities, and 1 about overall quality of life. All items had 5 response choices (0-4), with higher scores reflecting more negative status. A total of 46 subjects completed the 25 questions. Cronbach's alpha was 0.87, indicating good internal consistency. Each of the three domains correlated well with the overall QOL item. The questions pertaining to seizures correlated with the NHSSS, the side effect questions with the LAEP, and the comorbidity questions with the QOLIE-31. The PIES provides a simple, brief PRO measure as a profile of

  14. Mesial temporal lobe morphology in intractable pediatric epilepsy: so-called hippocampal malrotation, associated findings, and relevance to presurgical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, James L; Awwad, Reem; Greiner, Hansel M; Vannest, Jennifer J; Miles, Lili; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Diagnostic criteria for hippocampal malrotation (HIMAL) on brain MRI typically include a rounded hippocampus, vertical collateral sulcus, and architectural blurring. Relationship to epileptogenesis remains speculative, and usefulness for surgical guidance is unknown. The study was performed to determine the prevalence of hippocampal rotational anomalies in a cohort of pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy undergoing evaluation for surgery and to determine the significance of this finding in the context of surgical planning. METHODS Forty-eight surgically treated children with intractable epilepsy were compared with matched healthy subjects; reviewers were blinded to surgical side. Each temporal lobe was evaluated for rounded hippocampus, blurring, vertical collateral sulcus, wide choroidal fissure, enlarged temporal horn, low fornix, hippocampal signal, and findings of hippocampal sclerosis. A mesial temporal lobe (MTL) score was calculated by summing the number of features, and the collateral sulcus angle (CSA) was measured in each temporal lobe. Surgical side, pathological diagnosis, and imaging findings elsewhere in the brain were tabulated. Presence of HIMAL, associated imaging features, and MTL score were compared between sides, between epilepsy and control groups, in relationship to side of surgery, and in relationship to postoperative outcome. RESULTS Only 3 epilepsy patients (6.2%) and no controls exhibited all 3 features of HIMAL (p = 0.12). Eight of 48 (16.7%) epilepsy versus 2 of 48 (4.6%) control subjects had both a rounded hippocampus and vertical collateral sulcus (suggesting HIMAL) (p = 0.045). In control and epilepsy subjects, most findings were more prevalent on the left, and the left CSA was more vertical (p Epilepsy subjects had higher MTL scores (z = -2.95, p = 0.002) and more acute CSAs (p = 0.04) than controls. Only lateralizing raw MTL score had a significant association with surgical side (p = 0.03, OR 7.33); however, this

  15. Excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 in temporal lobe and hippocampus in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarac, Sinan; Afzal, Shoaib; Broholm, Helle;

    2009-01-01

    extra-cellular clearance of glutamate by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT-1 to EAAT-5). EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 are mainly expressed on astroglial cells for the reuptake of glutamate from the extra-cellular space. We have studied the expression of EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 in the hippocampus and temporal lobe...

  16. Defining regions of interest using cross-frequency coupling in extratemporal lobe epilepsy patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirgis, Mirna; Chinvarun, Yotin; del Campo, Martin; Carlen, Peter L.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Clinicians identify seizure onset zones (SOZs) for resection in an attempt to localize the epileptogenic zone (EZ), which is the cortical tissue that is indispensible for seizure generation. An automated system is proposed to objectively localize this EZ by identifying regions of interest (ROIs). Methods. Intracranial electroencephalogram recordings were obtained from seven patients presenting with extratemporal lobe epilepsy and the interaction between neuronal rhythms in the form of phase-amplitude coupling was investigated. Modulation of the amplitude of high frequency oscillations (HFOs) by the phase of low frequency oscillations was measured by computing the modulation index (MI). Delta- (0.5-4 Hz) and theta- (4-8 Hz) modulation of HFOs (30-450 Hz) were examined across the channels of a 64-electrode subdural grid. Surrogate analysis was performed and false discovery rates were computed to determine the significance of the modulation observed. Mean MI values were subjected to eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) and channels defining the ROIs were selected based on the components of the eigenvector corresponding to the largest eigenvalue. ROIs were compared to the SOZs identified by two independent neurologists. Global coherence values were also computed. Main results. MI was found to capture the seizure in time for six of seven patients and identified ROIs in all seven. Patients were found to have a poorer post-surgical outcome when the number of EVD-selected channels that were not resected increased. Moreover, in patients who experienced a seizure-free outcome (i.e., Engel Class I) all EVD-selected channels were found to be within the resected tissue or immediately adjacent to it. In these Engel Class I patients, delta-modulated HFOs were found to identify more of the channels in the resected tissue compared to theta-modulated HFOs. However, for the Engel Class IV patient, the delta-modulated HFOs did not identify any of the channels in the resected

  17. The evaluation of FDG-PET imaging for epileptogenic focus localization in patients with MRI positive and MRI negative temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gok, Beril [Drexel University, Department of Radiology, Mercy Catholic Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Jallo, George [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Hayeri, Reza [Drexel University, Department of Radiology, Mercy Catholic Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wahl, Richard [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Aygun, Nafi [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-05-15

    We studied the contribution of interictal FDG-PET ([18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography) in epileptic focus identification in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with positive, equivocal and negative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ninety-eight patients who underwent surgical treatment for drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy after neuropsychological evaluation, scalp video EEG monitoring, FDG-PET, MRI and/or long-term intracranial EEG and with >12 months clinical follow-up were included in this study. FDG-PET findings were compared to MRI, histopathology, scalp video EEG and long-term intracranial EEG monitoring. FDG-PET lateralized the seizure focus in 95 % of MRI positive, 69 % of MRI equivocal and 84 % of MRI negative patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the surgical outcomes among the groups with Engel class I and II outcomes achieved in 86 %, 86 %, 84 % of MRI positive, equivocal and negative temporal lobe epilepsy patients, respectively. The patients with positive unilateral FDG-PET demonstrated excellent postsurgical outcomes, with 96 % Engel class I and II. Histopathology revealed focal lesions in 75 % of MRI equivocal, 84 % of MRI positive, and 23 % of MRI negative temporal lobe epilepsy cases. FDG-PET is an accurate noninvasive method in lateralizing the epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy, especially in patients with normal or equivocal MRIs, or non-lateralized EEG monitoring. Very subtle findings in MRI are often associated with histopathological lesions and should be described in MRI reports. The patients with negative or equivocal MRI temporal lobe epilepsy are good surgical candidates with comparable postsurgical outcomes to patients with MRI positive temporal lobe epilepsy. (orig.)

  18. Identification of pre-spike network in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahla L Faizo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seizures and inter-ictal spikes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE affect a network of brain regions rather than a single epileptic focus. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI studies have demonstrated a functional network in which hemodynamic changes are time-locked to spikes. However, whether this reflects the propagation of neuronal activity from a focus, or conversely the activation of a network linked to spike generation remains unknown. The functional connectivity changes prior to spikes may provide information about the connectivity changes that lead to the generation of spikes. We used EEG-fMRI to investigate functional connectivity changes immediately prior to the appearance of inter-ictal spikes on EEG in MTLE patients.Methods/principal findings: 15 MTLE patients underwent continuous EEG-fMRI during rest. Spikes were identified on EEG and three 10s epochs were defined relative to spike onset: spike (0s to 10s, pre-spike (-10s to 0s and rest (-20s to -10s, with no previous spikes in the preceding 45s. Significant spike-related activation in the hippocampus ipsilateral to the seizure focus was found compared to the pre-spike and rest epochs. The peak voxel within the hippocampus ipsilateral to the seizure focus was used as a seed region for functional connectivity analysis in the three conditions. A significant change in functional connectivity patterns was observed before the appearance of electrographic spikes. Specifically, there was significant loss of coherence between both hippocampi during the pre-spike period compared to spike and rest states.Conclusion/significance: In keeping with previous findings of abnormal inter-hemispheric hippocampal connectivity in MTLE, our findings specifically link reduced connectivity to the period immediately before spikes. This brief decoupling is consistent with a deficit in mutual (inter-hemispheric hippocampal inhibition that may predispose to spike generation.

  19. Remote preoperative tonic-clonic seizures do not influence outcome after surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Rabiei, Amin H; Gracely, Edward J; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-10-15

    Tonic-clonic seizures are associated with greater chance of seizure relapse after anterior temporal lobectomy. We investigated whether the interval between the last preoperative tonic-clonic seizure and surgery relates to seizure outcome in patients with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). In this retrospective study, patients were prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. Postsurgical outcome was categorized as seizure freedom or relapse. The relationship between surgical outcome and the interval between the last preoperative tonic-clonic seizure and surgery was investigated. One-hundred seventy-one patients were studied. Seventy nine (46.2%) patients experienced tonic-clonic seizures before surgery. Receiver operating characteristic curve of timing of the last preoperative tonic-clonic seizure was a moderate indicator to anticipate surgery failure (area under the curve: 0.657, significance; 0.016). The best cutoff that maximizes sensitivity and specificity was 27months; with a sensitivity of 0.76 and specificity of 0.60. Cox-Mantel analysis confirmed that the chance of becoming free of seizures after surgery in patients with no or remote history of preoperative tonic-clonic seizures was significantly higher compared with patients with a recent history (i.e., in 27months before surgery) (p=0.0001). The more remote the occurrence of preoperative tonic-clonic seizures, the better the postsurgical seizure outcome, with at least a two year gap being more favorable. A recent history of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient with MTLE may reflect more widespread epileptogenicity extending beyond the borders of mesial temporal structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. MRI and EEG as long-term seizure outcome predictors in familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Marcia E; Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Betting, Luiz E; Pacagnella, Denise; Conz, Livia; Barbosa, Patricia Horn; Maurer-Morelli, Claudia Vianna; Costa, Andre Luiz F; Kobayashi, Eliane; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando

    2012-12-11

    To evaluate the natural history and outcome predictors in familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (FMTLE). We conducted a longitudinal study of 103 individuals from 17 FMTLE families (mean follow-up: 7.6 years). We divided subjects into 3 groups: FMTLE (n = 53), unclassified seizure (n = 18), and asymptomatics (n = 32). We divided FMTLE patients into 3 subgroups: seizure-free (n = 19), infrequent (n = 17) seizures, and frequent (n = 17) seizures and further reclassified them into favorable and poor outcome. We defined hippocampal atrophy (HA) by visual MRI analysis and performed volumetry in those who had 2 MRIs. FMTLE patients with infrequent seizures evolved to either frequent seizures (17.6%) or seizure freedom (23.5%). In the seizure-free group, most remained seizure-free and 21% developed infrequent seizures. All patients with frequent seizures remained in the same status or underwent surgery. Twelve percent of the asymptomatics and 22% of the unclassified-seizure group evolved to FMTLE with infrequent seizures. Predictive factors of poor outcome were presence of HA (p = 0.0192) and interictal epileptiform discharges (p = 0.0174). The relationship between initial precipitating incidents and clinical outcome was not significant although a tendency was observed (p = 0.055). Use of antiepileptic drugs and secondary generalized seizures during the patient's lifetime did not predict poor outcome. We observed progression of HA only in the group with frequent seizures. Most patients with FMTLE continued in the same clinical status. However, patients with frequent seizures had progression of HA and none improved except those who underwent surgery. Interictal epileptiform discharges and HA predicted poorer outcome in FMTLE, and there was a tendency in favor of initial precipitating incidents as outcome predictors.

  1. Multivariate pattern analysis reveals anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Peng Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated differences of clinical signs and functional brain network organizations between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, but the anatomical connectivity differences underlying functional variance between the left and right mTLE remain uncharacterized. We examined 43 (22 left, 21 right mTLE patients with hippocampal sclerosis and 39 healthy controls using diffusion tensor imaging. After the whole-brain anatomical networks were constructed for each subject, multivariate pattern analysis was applied to classify the left mTLE from the right mTLE and extract the anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mTLE patients. The classification results reveal 93.0% accuracy for the left mTLE versus the right mTLE, 93.4% accuracy for the left mTLE versus controls and 90.0% accuracy for the right mTLE versus controls. Compared with the right mTLE, the left mTLE exhibited a different connectivity pattern in the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum. The majority of the most discriminating anatomical connections were located within or across the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum, thereby indicating that these disease-related anatomical network alterations may give rise to a portion of the complex of emotional and memory deficit between the left and right mTLE. Moreover, the orbitofrontal gyrus, cingulate cortex, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, which exhibit high discriminative power in classification, may play critical roles in the pathophysiology of mTLE. The current study demonstrated that anatomical connectivity differences between the left mTLE and the right mTLE may have the potential to serve as a neuroimaging biomarker to guide personalized diagnosis of the left and right mTLE.

  2. Characteristics of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis plus neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Marino M; Velasco, Tonicarlo R; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Alexandre, Veriano; Araujo, David; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Carlotti, Carlos G; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Sakamoto, Américo C

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations suggest that neurocysticercosis (NCC) might act as an initial precipitating injury (IPI) causing mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). A total of 191 patients from Brazil, a country in which NCC is endemic, were surgically treated for MTLE-HS, and subsequent findings for patients with MTLE-HS were compared with those of patients with MTLE-HS plus NCC. Seventy-one patients (37,2%) presented chronic findings of NCC (cNCC). MTLE-HS plus cNCC was significantly more common in women (O.R.=2.45; 95%CI=1.30-4.60; p=0.005), in patients with no history of classical forms of IPI (O.R.=2.67; 95%CI=1.37-5.18; p=0.004), and in those with bi-temporal interictal spikes on video-EEG (O.R.=2.00; 95%CI=1.07-3.73; p=0.03). Single cNCC lesions were observed to occur significantly more often on the same side as hippocampal sclerosis, a finding suggesting an anatomical relationship between NCC and MTLE-HS. Taken together, our results suggest that NCC may be a marker, or contributes to or even causes MTLE-HS. Based on our findings, we propose two distinct, non-excluding, and potentially synergistic mechanisms involved in the development of MTLE-HS in NCC, one of them being inflammatory-mediated, while the other is electrogenic-mediated. Taken together, our observations may provide further evidence suggesting a role of NCC in the genesis or development of MTLE-HS.

  3. Metal maps of sclerotic hippocampi of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opačić, Miloš; Ristić, Aleksandar J; Savić, Danijela; Šelih, Vid Simon; Živin, Marko; Sokić, Dragoslav; Raičević, Savo; Baščarević, Vladimir; Spasojević, Ivan

    2017-02-22

    The loss of metal homeostasis has been implicated in the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (mTLE-HS). Here we applied laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry imaging to establish the spatial distribution of Zn, Fe, Cu and Mn in coronal sections of hippocampi of four patients with drug-resistant mTLE-HS who underwent amygdalohippocampectomy. Detailed maps of the metal concentrations in the different morphological areas/layers were built and analyzed. The highest level of Zn (>20 μg g(-1)) was found in mossy fiber-rich regions - cornu ammonis field 4 (CA4), gyrus dentatus, and CA3. The distribution of Fe appears to reflect the routes of the main intrahippocampal blood vessels. The highest concentrations of Cu (>10 μg g(-1)) and Mn (>15 μg g(-1)) were observed in regions/layers with neuron somata - subiculum, CA4, gyrus dentatus, and stratum pyramidale (SPy) in CA1 and CA2. Alveus and other regions with axons and dendrites generally showed lower levels of Zn, Cu, and Mn. The Cu concentration was decreased in the areas of total neuronal loss in SPy in CA1 (9.73 ± 0.91 μg g(-1)), compared to the subiculum (13.32 ± 1.29 μg g(-1); p = 0.043). The Cu and Mn concentrations correlated positively with neuron density in the SPy in CA1 (R = 0.629, p < 0.001; and R = 0.391, p = 0.004). These results provide a deeper insight into hippocampal metabolism of metals, and pave the road for identifying the components of the mechanism of epileptogenesis among Cu and Mn transporters and metalloproteins.

  4. A metisergide no tratamento da epilepsia temporal Methysergide in the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Jorge Armbrust-Figueiredo

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available A metisergide (butanolamida do ácido 1-metil-lisérgico foi empregada experimentalmente em 78 pacientes com epilepsia psicomotora e com alterações focais (ondas "sharp" de projeção em um dos lobos temporais, no EEG. Foram usadas doses diárias de 2 a 6 mg, associadas a 0,1 g de fenobarbital. Dos 78 pacientes, 59 responderam de maneira favorável ao tratamento, sendo que 47 deixaram de sofrer crises e 12 apresentaram diminuição acentuada da freqüência e intensidade das crises. As manifestações psíquicas também melhoraram com o tratamento, ao contrário do que geralmente acontece com outras drogas. As alterações eletrencefalográficas desapareceram ou melhoraram em 64% dos pacientes. Reações secundárias ocorreram em 39 dos pacientes, na fase inicial do tratamento, e foram de curta duração, desaparecendo espontâneamente.Methysergide (1-methyl-lysergic acid butanolamide was used experimentally in 78 patients with psychomotor epilepsy and with focal abnormal activity (sharp waves in one of the temporal lobes, in the EEG. The usual dosage of methysergide was 2 to 6 mg daily (only 36 patients received more than 2 mg daily and every patient received fenobarbital 0.1 g daily also. Out of the 78 patients, 59 responded well to the treatment; 47 were free of seizures and in 12 there was decrease in frequency and severity of seizures. Psychic symptoms also decreased with the use of methysergide. The EEG was improved in 27 per cent of patients and became normal in 37 per cent, after twelve months of treatment. Slight side effects were reported by 39 pacients but they disappeared in a few days.

  5. Relationship between imaging and pathological features and clinical factors in surgical cases of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesugi, Hideji; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Onuma, Teiichi [National Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Arai, Nobutaka; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Maehara, Taketoshi; Yanashita, Akira

    1998-03-01

    The relationships between imaging, pathology and presumed causes in surgical cases of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was studied. The subject was 62 patients. MRI, PET and SPECT were performed. Hematoxylin and eosin was used for pathological judgement. On MRI, mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was detected in 48 of 52 patients (92%); 32 (62%) had high-signal intensity on T2-weighted images; 31 (60%) had atrophy {l_brace}23 (44%) had high-signal intensity on T2+atrophy{r_brace}; 5 (10%) had calcified lesions; and 2 (4%) had cystic lesions. On PET and SPECT, abnormal cerebral blood flow was noted in 33 of 36 (92%). On pathological findings (61 cases), Ammon`s horn sclerosis (AHS), tumors, gliosis in lateral temporal and meningeal inflammatory finding were detected in 42 (69%), 10 (23%) and 8 (13%) cases, respectively, whereas 2 showed no abnormalities. The 2 patients with normal pathology showed both high-signal intensity and atrophy on MRI. The presumed causes of TLE were encephalitis/meningitis and/or suspected of these diseases in 15 patients (24%), injuries at birth in 5 (8%), and none in 42 (68%). The presumed causes in the 43 patients with AHS were encephalitis/meningitis in 11, injuries at birth in 3, and none in 29. Of the 15 patients in whom encephalitis/meningitis was estimated as the causes of TLE, only 6 (40%) had pathological evidence of meningeal inflammatory finding. Of the 42 patients in whom cause could not be determined, 2 had pathological evidence of meningeal inflammatory finding. (K.H.)

  6. Abnormalities of hippocampal signal intensity in patients with familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Coan A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE is associated with hippocampal atrophy and hippocampal signal abnormalities. In our series of familial MTLE (FMTLE, we found a high proportion of hippocampal abnormalities. To quantify signal abnormalities in patients with FMTLE we studied 152 individuals (46 of them asymptomatic with FMTLE. We used NIH-Image® for volumetry and signal quantification in coronal T1 inversion recovery and T2 for all cross-sections of the hippocampus. Values diverging by 2 or more SD from the control mean were considered abnormal. T2 hippocampal signal abnormalities were found in 52% of all individuals: 54% of affected subjects and 48% of asymptomatic subjects. T1 hippocampal signal changes were found in 34% of all individuals: 42.5% of affected subjects and 15% of asymptomatic subjects. Analysis of the hippocampal head (first three slices revealed T2 abnormalities in 73% of all individuals (74% of affected subjects and 72% of asymptomatic subjects and T1 abnormalities in 59% (67% of affected subjects and 41% of asymptomatic subjects. Affected individuals had smaller volumes than controls (P < 0.0001. There was no difference in hippocampal volumes between asymptomatic subjects and controls, although 39% of asymptomatic patients had hippocampal atrophy. Patients with an abnormal hippocampal signal (133 individuals had smaller ipsilateral volume, but no linear correlation could be determined. Hippocampal signal abnormalities in FMTLE were more frequently found in the hippocampal head in both affected and asymptomatic family members, including those with normal volumes. These results indicate that subtle abnormalities leading to an abnormal hippocampal signal in FMTLE are not necessarily related to seizures and may be determined by genetic factors.

  7. Amygdala enlargement in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without hippocampal sclerosis

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    Ana Carolina Coan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE without MRI abnormalities (MTLE-NL represent a challenge for definition of underlying pathology and for presurgical evaluation. In a recent study we observed significant amygdala enlargement in 14% of MTLE patients with MRI signs of HS. Areas of gray matter volume (GMV increase could represent structural abnormalities related to the epileptogenic zone or part of a developmental abnormality. Our objective was to look for undetected areas of increased GMV in MTLE-NL using post processing MRI techniques to better understand the pathophysiology of this condition.Methods: We evaluated 66 patients with MTLE-NL on visual analysis and 82 controls. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM group analysis was performed with VBM8/SPM8 looking for areas of increased GMV. We then performed automatic amygdala volumetry using Freesurfer software and T2 relaxometry to confirm VBM findings.Results: VBM group-analysis demonstrated increased amygdala volume in the MTLE-NL group compared to controls. Individual volumetric analysis confirmed amygdala enlargement (AE in eight (12% patients. Overall, from all patients with AE and defined epileptic focus, four (57% had the predominant increased volume ipsilateral to the epileptic focus. These results were cross-validated by a secondary VBM analysis including subgroups of patients according to the volumetric data. T2 relaxometry demonstrated no amygdala hyperintense signal in any individual with significant amygdala enlargement. There were no clinical differences between patients with and without AE.Discussion: This exploratory study demonstrates the occurrence of AE in 12% of patients with MTLE-NL. This finding supports the hypothesis that there might be a subgroup of patients with MTLE-NL in which the enlarged amygdala could be related to the epileptogenic process. Further studies are necessary but this finding could be of great importance in the understanding of MTLE-NL.

  8. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor-mediated cyclic nucleotide gated channelopathy in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shawn; Flynn, Corey; Dubé, Celine; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Ghestem, Antoine; Esclapez, Monique; Bernard, Christophe; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enduring, abnormal expression and function of the ion channel hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-AMP gated channel type 1 (HCN1) occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We examined the underlying mechanisms, and queried if interfering with these mechanisms could modify disease course. Methods Experimental TLE was provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (SE), HCN1 channel repression was examined at mRNA, protein and functional levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was employed to identify the transcriptional mechanism of repressed hcn1 expression, and the basis for their endurance. Physical interaction of the repressor, NRSF, was abolished using decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Video-EEG recordings were performed to assess the onset and initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Results Levels of NRSF and its physical binding to the hcn1 gene were augmented after SE, resulting in repression of hcn1 expression and HCN1-mediated currents (Ih), and reduced Ih-dependent resonance in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites. Chromatin changes typical of enduring, epigenetic gene repression were apparent at the hcn1 gene within a week after SE. Administration of decoy ODNs comprising the NRSF DNA-binding sequence (NRSE) in vitro and in vivo, reduced NRSF binding to hcn1, prevented its repression and restored Ih function. In vivo, decoy NRSE-ODN treatment restored theta rhythm and altered the initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Interpretation Acquired HCN1 channelopathy derives from NRSF-mediated transcriptional repression that endures via chromatin modification and may provide insight into the mechanisms of a number of channelopathies that co-exist with, and may contribute to, the conversion of a normal brain into an epileptic one. PMID:21905079

  9. A macaque model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy induced by unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic Acid.

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    Ning Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In order to better investigate the cause/effect relationships of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, we hereby describe a new non-human primate model of mTLE. METHODS: Ten macaques were studied and divided into 2 groups: saline control group (n = 4 and kainic acid (KA injection group (n = 6. All macaques were implanted bilaterally with subdural electrodes over temporal cortex and depth electrodes in CA3 hippocampal region. KA was stereotaxically injected into the right hippocampus of macaques. All animals were monitored by video and electrocorticography (ECoG to assess status epilepticus (SE and subsequent spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS. Additionally, in order to evaluate brain injury produced by SE or SRS, we used both neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance image (MRI & magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, and histological pathology, including Nissl stainning and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP immunostaining. RESULTS: The typical seizures were observed in the KA-injected animal model. Hippocampal sclerosis could be found by MRI & MRS. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining and GFAP immunostaining showed neuronal loss, proliferation of glial cells, formation of glial scars, and hippocampal atrophy. Electron microscopic analysis of hippocampal tissues revealed neuronal pyknosis, partial ribosome depolymerization, an abnormal reduction in rough endoplasmic reticulum size, expansion of Golgi vesicles and swollen star-shaped cells. Furthermore, we reported that KA was able to induce SE followed by SRS after a variable period of time. Similar to human mTLE, brain damage is confined to the hippocampus. Accordingly, hippocampal volume is in positive correlations with the neuronal cells count in the CA3, especially the ratio of neuron/glial cell. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that a model of mTLE can be developed in macaques by intra-hippocampal injection of KA. Brain damage is confined to the hippocampus which

  10. Combined effect between two functional polymorphisms of SLC6A12 gene is associated with temporal lobe epilepsy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jingyun Li; Hua Lin; Fenghe Niu; Xilin Zhu; Ning Shen; Xin Wang; Liping Li; Aihua Liu; Xiaopan Wu; Wei Sun; Yuping Wang; Ying Liu

    2015-12-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common epilepsy subtype with complex genetic structure. A recent study in four populations (Ireland, UK, Australia and Finland) reported an allelic association between betaine/GABA transporter-1 (-1 or 612) and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. To demonstrate the association between 612 gene polymorphisms and TLE, TaqMan method was used to genotype five single-nucleotide polymorphisms of 612 gene in 358 TLE patients and 596 nonepileptic control subjects of Chinese Han origin. Real-time PCR was used to detect the effects of variations on gene expression associated with TLE. Though, the single-marker analysis did not demonstrate allelic association with TLE, rs542736–rs557881 interaction showed significant association. The 612 expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were significantly higher in TLE patients than in control subjects and were correlated to rs542736 G–rs557881 A haplotypes. Our preliminary results suggested combined effect of two common polymorphisms on SLC6A12 gene may be associated with TLE, but the precise mechanism needs further investigation.

  11. Presurgical language mapping in epilepsy: Using fMRI of reading to identify functional reorganization in a patient with long-standing temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Layla Gould

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 55-year-old, right-handed patient with intractable left temporal lobe epilepsy, who previously had a partial left temporal lobectomy. The patient could talk during seizures, suggesting that he might have language dominance in the right hemisphere. Presurgical fMRI localization of language processing including reading of exception and regular words, pseudohomophones, and dual meaning words confirmed the clinical hypothesis of right language dominance, with only small amounts of activation near the planned surgical resection and, thus, minimal eloquent cortex to avoid during surgery. Postoperatively, the patient was rendered seizure-free without speech deficits.

  12. Abnormal expression of stathmin 1 in brain tissue of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy and a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fenghua; Hu, Yida; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Qiong; Zhang, Xiaogang; Luo, Jing; Xu, Yali; Wang, Xuefeng

    2012-09-01

    Microtubule dynamics have been shown to contribute to neurite outgrowth, branching, and guidance. Stathmin 1 is a potent microtubule-destabilizing factor that is involved in the regulation of microtubule dynamics and plays an essential role in neurite elongation and synaptic plasticity. Here, we investigate the expression of stathmin 1 in the brain tissues of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and experimental animals using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and western blotting. We obtained 32 temporal neocortex tissue samples from patients with intractable TLE and 12 histologically normal temporal lobe tissues as controls. In addition, 48 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, including one control group and five groups with epilepsy induced by lithium chloride-pilocarpine. Hippocampal and temporal lobe tissues were obtained from control and epileptic rats on Days 1, 7, 14, 30, and 60 after kindling. Stathmin 1 was mainly expressed in the neuronal membrane and cytoplasm in the human controls, and its expression levels were significantly higher in patients with intractable TLE. Moreover, stathmin 1 was also expressed in the neurons of both the control and the experimental rats. Stathmin 1 expression was decreased in the experimental animals from 1 to 14 days postseizure and then significantly increased at Days 30 and 60 compared with the control group. Many protruding neuronal processes were observed in the TLE patients and in the chronic stage epileptic rats. These data suggest that stathmin 1 may participate in the abnormal network reorganization of synapses and contribute to the pathogenesis of TLE.

  13. Altered local spontaneous activity in frontal lobe epilepsy: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Li, Hechun; He, Zhongqiong; Jiang, Sisi; Klugah-Brown, Benjamin; Chen, Lin; Wang, Pu; Tan, Song; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the local spatiotemporal consistency of spontaneous brain activity in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). Eyes closed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected from 19 FLE patients and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. A novel measure, named FOur-dimensional (spatiotemporal) Consistency of local neural Activities (FOCA) was used to assess the spatiotemporal consistency of local spontaneous activity (emphasizing both local temporal homogeneity and regional stability of brain activity states). Then, two-sample t test was performed to detect the FOCA differences between two groups. Partial correlations between the FOCA values and durations of epilepsy were further analyzed. Compared with controls, FLE patients demonstrated increased FOCA in distant brain regions including the frontal and parietal cortices, as well as the basal ganglia. The decreased FOCA was located in the temporal cortex, posterior default model regions, and cerebellum. In addition, the FOCA measure was linked to the duration of epilepsy in basal ganglia. Our study suggested that alterations of local spontaneous activity in frontoparietal cortex and basal ganglia was associated with the pathophysiology of FLE; and the abnormality in frontal and default model regions might account for the potential cognitive impairment in FLE. We also presumed that the FOCA measure had potential to provide important insights into understanding epilepsy such as FLE.

  14. Historical Risk Factors Associated with Seizure Outcome After Surgery for Drug-Resistant Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the possible influence of risk factors on seizure outcome after surgery for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). This retrospective study recruited patients with drug-resistant MTS-TLE who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and were followed for a minimum of 1 year. Patients had been prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. After surgery outcome was classified into 2 groups: seizure-free or relapsed. The possible risk factors influencing long-term outcome after surgery were investigated. A total of 275 patients with MTS-TLE were studied. Two thirds of the patients had Engel's class 1 outcome and 48.4% of the patients had sustained seizure freedom, with no seizures since surgery. Patients with a history of tonic-clonic seizures in the year preceding surgery were more likely to experience seizure recurrence (odds ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval 1.19-4.80; P = 0.01). Gender, race, family history of epilepsy, history of febrile seizure, history of status epilepticus, duration of disease before surgery, intelligence quotient, and seizure frequency were not predictors of outcome. Many patients with drug-resistant MTS-TLE respond favorably to surgery. It is critical to distinguish among different types and etiologies of TLE when predicting outcome after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biopsychosocial approaches to a patient with vomiting of 10 years' duration – a case of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Kitamura Kana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vomiting is commonly encountered in clinical medicine. When organic gastrointestinal, metabolic, and brain diseases are ruled out, many cases are considered to be functional. We experienced an adult patient with epilepsy whose main symptom was vomiting. Biopsychosocial approaches were needed to control the symptoms. Case presentation A 26-year-old female with a 10-year history of persistent vomiting was found to have temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Throughout this time, during which the vomiting had become part of a vicious cycle, her epilepsy was poorly controlled by medication. Biopsychosocial approaches were employed successfully and the patient subsequently undertook training to become a home-helper, started a job, and was able to leave her parents' house and live independently. All of her symptoms resolved after she became self-sufficient. Discussion Vomiting without impaired consciousness is seldom considered to be a manifestation of epilepsy. Difficulty in recording an electroencephalogram (EEG because of the presence of persistent vomiting delayed the diagnosis. The improvement of symptoms was thought to have been due to the patient's emotional stabilization and physical improvement, which may have stabilized the limbic system. Conclusion When an illness persists for many years and conditioning and a vicious cycle occur secondarily, systematic biopsychosocial approaches are needed in addition to general treatment. Also, secondary symptoms make the diagnosis more difficult when efforts at treatment are ineffective.

  16. Aspects of Oral Language, Speech, and Written Language in Subjects with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy of Difficult Control

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    Berberian, Ana Paula

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction About 50 million people have epilepsy and 30% of them have epilepsy that does not respond to properly conducted drug treatment. Objective Verify the incidence of language disorders in oral language, speech, and written language of subjects with difficult to control temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and compare the occurrence of these disorders in subjects before and after surgery. Methods Cross-sectional study with quantitative analysis, exploratory type. A questionnaire for data collection was administered covering the following aspects: oral language, speech complaints, and writing production and comprehension. Criteria for inclusion of subjects were a diagnosis of TLE refractory to drug treatment and at least 4 years of schooling. Results The sample of 63 patients with TLE was divided into two groups: presurgical (n = 31 and postsurgical (n = 32. In the postsurgical group, there was a higher frequency of left lobectomy (75% than right (25%. Conclusion Statistical analysis was performed with the chi-square test (significance level of 0.05. Complaints related to speech-language attention were more predominant in postsurgical subjects. Analysis of oral language, speech, and written language in subjects with epilepsy who underwent temporal lobectomy or not showed findings consistent with symptoms related to transient aphasia, with the presence of paraphasias, as well as changes in speech prosody and melody. These symptoms appeared more associated with recurrence after having a temporal lobectomy.

  17. Aspects of Oral Language, Speech, and Written Language in Subjects with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy of Difficult Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberian, Ana Paula; Hopker, Christiane; Mazzarotto, Ingrid; Cunha, Jenane; Guarinello, Ana Cristina; Massi, Giselle; Crippa, Ana

    2015-10-01

    Introduction About 50 million people have epilepsy and 30% of them have epilepsy that does not respond to properly conducted drug treatment. Objective Verify the incidence of language disorders in oral language, speech, and written language of subjects with difficult to control temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and compare the occurrence of these disorders in subjects before and after surgery. Methods Cross-sectional study with quantitative analysis, exploratory type. A questionnaire for data collection was administered covering the following aspects: oral language, speech complaints, and writing production and comprehension. Criteria for inclusion of subjects were a diagnosis of TLE refractory to drug treatment and at least 4 years of schooling. Results The sample of 63 patients with TLE was divided into two groups: presurgical (n = 31) and postsurgical (n = 32). In the postsurgical group, there was a higher frequency of left lobectomy (75%) than right (25%). Conclusion Statistical analysis was performed with the chi-square test (significance level of 0.05). Complaints related to speech-language attention were more predominant in postsurgical subjects. Analysis of oral language, speech, and written language in subjects with epilepsy who underwent temporal lobectomy or not showed findings consistent with symptoms related to transient aphasia, with the presence of paraphasias, as well as changes in speech prosody and melody. These symptoms appeared more associated with recurrence after having a temporal lobectomy.

  18. Increased expression of interleukin 17 in the cortex and hippocampus from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiao-Jiang; Sun, Fei-Ji; Wang, Yu; Luo, Xiao-Qin; Lei, Peng; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Di; Li, Zhi-Yun; Yang, Hui

    2016-09-15

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most common form of focal epilepsies in adults and proinflammatory cytokines have long been thought to play an important role in pathogenesis and epileptogenicity. In the present study, we investigated the levels and expression patterns of the interleukin 17 (IL-17) system in temporal neocortex and hippocampus from 24 patients with MTLE and 8 control (Ctr) samples. We found that IL-17 and IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) were clearly upregulated in MTLE at both mRNA and protein levels, compared with Ctr. Immunostaining indicated that neurons, astrocytes, microglia and endothelial cells of blood vessels are the major sources of IL-17. These findings suggest that IL-17 system may be involved in the pathogenesis and epileptogenicity of MTLE.

  19. Accelerated long-term forgetting in temporal lobe epilepsy: evidence of improvement after left temporal pole lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallassi, Roberto; Sambati, Luisa; Poda, Roberto; Stanzani Maserati, Michelangelo; Oppi, Federico; Giulioni, Marco; Tinuper, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    Accelerated long term forgetting (ALF) is a characteristic cognitive aspect in patients affected by temporal lobe epilepsy that is probably due to an impairment of memory consolidation and retrieval caused by epileptic activity in hippocampal and parahippocampal regions. We describe a case of a patient with TLE who showed improvement in ALF and in remote memory impairment after an anterior left temporal pole lobectomy including the uncus and amygdala. Our findings confirm that impairment of hippocampal functioning leads to pathological ALF, whereas restoration of hippocampal functioning brings ALF to a level comparable to that of controls.

  20. Palilalia, echolalia, and echopraxia-palipraxia as ictal manifestations in a patient with left frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yang-Je; Han, Sang-Don; Song, Sook Keun; Lee, Byung In; Heo, Kyoung

    2009-06-01

    Palilalia is a relatively rare pathologic speech behavior and has been reported in various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. We encountered a case of palilalia, echolalia, and echopraxia-palipraxia as ictal phenomena of left frontal lobe epilepsy. A 55-year-old, right-handed man was admitted because of frequent episodes of rapid reiteration of syllables. Video-electroencephalography monitoring revealed stereotypical episodes of palilalia accompanied by rhythmic head nodding and right-arm posturing with ictal discharges over the left frontocentral area. He also displayed echolalia or echopraxia-palipraxia, partially responding to an examiner's stimulus. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed encephalomalacia on the left superior frontal gyrus and ictal single photon emission computed tomography showed hyperperfusion just above the lesion, corresponding to the left supplementary motor area (SMA), and subcortical nuclei. This result suggests that the neuroanatomic substrate involved in the generation of these behaviors as ictal phenomena might exist in the SMA of the left frontal lobe.

  1. Right fronto-limbic atrophy is associated with reduced empathy in refractory unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Rankin, Katherine P; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Kurthen, Martin; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-11-01

    Refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most frequent focal epilepsy and is often accompanied by deficits in social cognition including emotion recognition, theory of mind, and empathy. Consistent with the neuronal networks that are crucial for normal social-cognitive processing, these impairments have been associated with functional changes in fronto-temporal regions. However, although atrophy in unilateral MTLE also affects regions of the temporal and frontal lobes that underlie social cognition, little is known about the structural correlates of social-cognitive deficits in refractory MTLE. In the present study, a psychometrically validated empathy questionnaire was combined with whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate the relationship between self-reported affective and cognitive empathy and gray matter volume in 55 subjects (13 patients with right MTLE, 9 patients with left MTLE, and 33 healthy controls). Consistent with the brain regions underlying social cognition, our results show that lower affective and cognitive empathy was associated with smaller volume in predominantly right fronto-limbic regions, including the right hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus, fusiform gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and in the bilateral midbrain. The only region that was associated with both affective and cognitive empathy was the right mesial temporal lobe. These findings indicate that patients with right MTLE are at increased risk for reduced empathy towards others' internal states and they shed new light on the structural correlates of impaired social cognition frequently accompanying refractory MTLE. In line with previous evidence from patients with neurodegenerative disease and stroke, the present study suggests that empathy depends upon the integrity of right fronto-limbic and brainstem regions and highlights the importance of the right mesial temporal lobe and midbrain

  2. Expression of EF-Tumt and EF-Tsmt in brain tissues of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Lu; Qi-Chang Zeng; Qin Wang; Ya-Hui Huang; Qiong Peng

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the expression of EF-Tumt and EF-Tsmt in brain tissue of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Methods:From January 2013 to January 2015, a total of 62 patients with MTLE who were treated with anterior temporal lobe resection in the Department of neurosurgery in Hunan Brain Hospital were selected and classified as the case group, at the same time, 48 patients with brain trauma were chosen and considered to be the control group. The expression of EF-Tumt and EF-Tsmt was detected and compared between the two groups. Results:EF-Tumt positive particles and EF-Tsmt positive particles were noticed in the mitochondria and cytoplasm of brain tissues of the medial temporal lobe in the two groups by election microscopic observation, and the number of the two types of positive particles in the case group was significantly more than that in the control group (P<0.05);similarly, EF-Tumt positive cells and EF-Tsmt positive cells were also observed in the neurons and astrocytes of brain tissues of the medial temporal lobe in the two groups by election microscopic observation, and the number of the above-mentioned positive cells in the case group was also significantly larger than that in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions:The expression intensities of EF-Tsmt and EF-Tumt in patients with MTLE are higher than these in patients without epilepsy. Therefore, EF-Tsmt and EF-Tumt play important roles in MTLE.

  3. Learning and memory and its relationship with the lateralization of epileptic focus in subjects with temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fuentes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background : In medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, previous studies addressing the hemispheric laterality of epileptogenic focus and its relationship with learning and memory processes have reported controversial findings. Objective : To compare the performance of MTLE patients according to the location of the epileptogenic focus on the left (MTLEL or right temporal lobe (MTLER on tasks of episodic learning and memory for verbal and visual content. Methods : One hundred patients with MTLEL and one hundred patients with MTLER were tested with the following tasks: the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT and the Logical Memory-WMS-R to evaluate verbal learning and memory; and the Rey Visual Design Learning Test (RVDLT and the Visual Reproduction-WMS-R to evaluate visual learning and memory. Results : The MTLEL sample showed significantly worse performance on the RAVLT (p < 0.005 and on the Logical Memory tests (p < 0.01 than MTLER subjects. However, there were no significant between-group differences in regard to the visual memory tests. Discussion : Our findings suggest that verbal learning and memory abilities are dependent on the structural and functional integrity of the left temporal lobe, while visual abilities are less dependent on the right temporal lobe.

  4. Auditory aura in nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy: a red flag to suspect an extra-frontal epileptogenic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Lorenzo; Bisulli, Francesca; Nobili, Lino; Tassi, Laura; Licchetta, Laura; Mostacci, Barbara; Stipa, Carlotta; Mainieri, Greta; Bernabè, Giorgia; Provini, Federica; Tinuper, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    To describe the anatomo-electro-clinical findings of patients with nocturnal hypermotor seizures (NHS) preceded by auditory symptoms, to evaluate the localizing value of auditory aura. Our database of 165 patients with nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) diagnosis confirmed by videopolysomnography (VPSG) was reviewed, selecting those who reported an auditory aura as the initial ictal symptom in at least two NHS during their lifetime. Eleven patients were selected (seven males, four females). According to the anatomo-electro-clinical data, three groups were identified. Group 1 [defined epileptogenic zone (EZ)]: three subjects were studied with stereo-EEG. The EZ lay in the left superior temporal gyrus in two cases, whereas in the third case seizures arose from a dysplastic lesion located in the left temporal lobe. One of these three patients underwent left Heschl's gyrus resection, and is currently seizure-free. Group 2 (presumed EZ): three cases in which a presumed EZ was identified; in the left temporal lobe in two cases and in the left temporal lobe extending to the insula in one subject. Group 3 (uncertain EZ): five cases had anatomo-electro-clinical correlations discordant. This work suggests that auditory aura may be a helpful anamnestic feature suggesting an extra-frontal seizure origin. This finding could guide secondary investigations to improve diagnostic definition and selection of candidates for surgical treatment. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of depression in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: A pilot study of cognitive behavioral therapy vs. selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orjuela-Rojas, Juan Manuel; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Ruiz-Chow, Angel; Crail-Melendez, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    There is a high prevalence of depression in patients with epilepsy, which negatively impacts their quality of life (QOL) and seizure control. Currently, the first-line of treatment for depression in patients with epilepsy is based on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The main objective of this pilot study was to compare cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) versus SSRIs for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Seven patients who received group CBT were compared with eight patients treated with SSRIs. All were diagnosed with MDD and TLE. Patients were assessed at baseline before treatment and at six and 12weeks during treatment with the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Scale of 31 items (QOLIE 31), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Seizure records were also taken on a monthly basis. After 12weeks of treatment, both groups showed improved QOL and reduced severity of depression symptoms. There were no statistically significant group differences in the final scores for the BDI (p=0.40) and QOLIE 31 (p=0.72), although the effect size on QOL was higher for the group receiving CBT. In conclusion, the present study suggests that both CBT and SSRIs may improve MDD and QOL in patients with TLE. We found no significant outcome differences between both treatment modalities. These findings support further study using a double-blind controlled design to demonstrate the efficacy of CBT and SSRIs in the treatment of MDD and QOL in patients with TLE.

  6. Age at onset and seizure frequency affect white matter diffusion coefficient in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Szilvia A; Horváth, Réka; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Barsi, Péter; John, Flóra; Horváth, Andrea; Kovács, Norbert; Bogner, Péter; Ábrahám, Hajnalka; Bóné, Beáta; Gyimesi, Csilla; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József

    2016-08-01

    In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), structural abnormalities are present not only in the hippocampus but also in the white matter with ipsilateral predominance. Although the timing of epilepsy onset is commonly associated with clinical and semiological dissimilarities, limited data exist regarding white matter diffusion changes with respect to age at epilepsy onset. The aim of this study was to investigate diffusion changes in the white matter of patients with unilateral MTLE-HS with respect to clinical parameters and to compare them with an age- and sex-matched healthy control group. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were derived using monoexponential approaches from 22 (11 early and 11 late age at onset) patients with unilateral MTLE-HS and 22 age- and sex-matched control subjects after acquiring diffusion-weighted images on a 3T MRI system. Data were analyzed using two-tailed t-tests and multiple linear regression models. In the group with early onset MTLE-HS, ADC was significantly elevated in the ipsilateral hemispheric (p=0.04) and temporal lobe white matter (p=0.01) compared with that in controls. These differences were not detectable in late onset MTLE-HS patients. Apparent diffusion coefficient of the group with early onset MTLE-HS was negatively related to age at epilepsy onset in the ipsilateral hemispheric white matter (p=0.03) and the uncinate fasciculus (p=0.03), while in patients with late onset MTLE-HS, ADC was no longer dependent on age at epilepsy onset itself but rather on the seizure frequency in the ipsilateral uncinate fasciculus (p=0.03). Such diffusivity pattern has been associated with chronic white matter degeneration, reflecting myelin loss and higher extracellular volume which are more pronounced in the frontotemporal regions and also depend on clinical features. In the group with early onset MTLE-HS, the timing of epilepsy seems to be the major cause of white matter abnormalities while in late

  7. SPECT and MRI study in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy caused by hippocampal sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le GUAN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the changes of hippocampus blood perfusion and hippocampal volume in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE caused by hippocampal sclerosis (HS using single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT and MRI, so as to explore the effect on localization of epileptogenic focus in TLE patients.  Methods Eighteen TLE patients and 3 healthy controls underwent 99Tcm-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99Tcm-ECD SPECT. Eighteen TLE patients and 21 healthy controls were performed MRI. The relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF and hippocampal volume were calculated and compared between 2 groups. The correlation between rCBF in ipsilateral hippocampus and hippocampal volume of TLE patients was analyzed. Results SPECT showed rCBF in ipsilateral hippocampus [(46.04 ± 7.94 ml/(100 g·min] was significantly decreased compared with contralateral hippocampus in TLE patients [(54.76 ± 9.62 ml/(100 g·min; t = -2.966, P = 0.005] and bilateral hippocampus in healthy controls [(64.87 ± 7.28 ml/(100 g·min; t = -4.824, P = 0.000]. The volume of ipsilateral hippocampus [(1.69 ± 0.39 cm3] was significantly smaller than that of contralateral hippocampus in TLE patients [(2.68 ± 0.41 cm3; t = -7.410, P = 0.000] and bilateral hippocampus in healthy controls [(3.50 ± 0.39 cm3; t = -16.340, P = 0.000]. The rCBF of ipsilateral hippocampus had positive correlation with the volume of corresponding hippocampus in TLE patients (r = 0.394, P = 0.017.  Conclusions Both rCBF and the volume of ipsilateral hippocampus were reduced in patients with TLE caused by HS, and there was positive correlation between the two. It was helpful for preoperative localization of epileptogenic focus to combine SPECT with MRI. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.11.007

  8. Distúrbios do sono na epilepsia do lobo temporal Sleep disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Ângela Vilela de Almeida

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A presença de distúrbios do sono e macroestrutura do sono foi avaliada em 39 pacientes com epilepsia do lobo temporal (ELT. Sonolência foi a queixa mais frequente (85%, seguida por despertares noturnos (75%, história de crise epiléptica durante o sono (69% e dificuldade de iniciar o sono (26%. As parassonias, síndrome de pernas inquietas, apnéia de sono e movimentos periódicos de membros inferiores foram os distúrbios de sono mais frequentes. Principais alterações da arquitetura de sono foram: fragmentação do sono, aumento do número de mudanças de estágios (100% e do tempo acordado após o início do sono (77% e redução do sono REM (92%. Houve correlação inversa entre a escala de sonolência de Epworth e o teste de latências múltiplas de sono (p The objective of this study was to evaluate sleep macrostructure and sleep disturbance in a group of 39 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Patients completed questionnaires to evaluate their sleep and subjective daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS] and undergone Polysomnography and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT. Daytime sleepiness was the most frequent complaint (85%, followed by wakefulness during sleep, history of seizures during sleep (75% and initial insomnia (26%. Parassomnias (67%, obstructive sleep apneas (13%, restless legs syndrome (15% and periodic limb movements (5% were the most frequent sleep disorders. The most frequent changes of sleep patterns were: sleep architecture fragmentation (100%, decreased amount of REM sleep (92% and increase in time awake after sleep onset (77%. There were significative correlations between the ESS and the MSLT (p<0,05. In conclusion, TLE patients have fragmented sleep with increased sleep stages shifts, increased number of awakenings and in time awake after sleep onset. REM sleep was decreased. Daytime sleepiness was the most frequent complaint in TLE patients.

  9. Emotional declarative memory assessment of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and patients submitted to mesial temporal lobectomy Avaliação da memória declarativa emocional em pacientes com epilepsia temporal mesial e pacientes submetidos à lobectomia temporal mesial

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epileptic seizures generate cognitive and behavioral impacts in individuals who suffer from epilepsy. Declarative memory is one of the cognitive functions that can be affected by epileptic seizures. The main objective of this work was to investigate neurocognitive function, especially the emotional working memory of patients with unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, and that of patients submitted to unilateral mesial temporal lobectomy. A face recognition test that can simult...

  10. Altered hippocampal myelinated fiber integrity in a lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy: a histopathological and stereological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuanzhen; Xiong, Jiajia; Hu, Jun; Kong, Min; Cheng, Li; Chen, Hengsheng; Li, Tingsong; Jiang, Li

    2013-07-19

    The damage of white matter, primarily myelinated fibers, in the central nervous system (CNS) of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients has been recently reported. However, limited data exist addressing the types of changes that occur to myelinated fibers inside the hippocampus as a result of TLE. The current study was designed to examine this issue in a lithium-pilocarpine rat model. Investigated by electroencephalography (EEG), Gallyas silver staining, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, and stereological methods, the results showed that hippocampal myelinated fibers of the epilepsy group were degenerated with significantly less myelin basic protein (MBP) expression relative to those of control group rats. Stereological analysis revealed that the total volumes of hippocampal formation, myelinated fibers, and myelin sheaths in the hippocampus of epilepsy group rats were decreased by 20.43%, 49.16%, and 52.60%, respectively. In addition, epilepsy group rats showed significantly greater mean diameters of myelinated fibers and axons, whereas the mean thickness of myelin sheaths was less, especially for small axons with diameters from 0.1 to 0.8µm, compared to control group rats. Finally, the total length of the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of epilepsy group rats was significantly decreased by 56.92%, compared to that of the control group, with the decreased length most prominent for myelinated fibers with diameters from 0.4 to 0.8µm. This study is the first to provide experimental evidence that the integrity of hippocampal myelinated fibers is negatively affected by inducing epileptic seizures with pilocarpine, which may contribute to the abnormal propagation of epileptic discharge.

  11. A cross-sectional MRI study of brain regional atrophy and clinical characteristics of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Applying a cross-sectional design, we set out to further characterize the significance of extrahippocampal brain atrophy in a large sample of \\'sporadic\\' mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE+HS). By evaluating the influence of epilepsy chronicity on structural atrophy, this work represents an important step towards the characterization of MRI-based volumetric measurements as genetic endophenotypes for this condition. METHODS: Using an automated brain segmentation technique, MRI-based volume measurements of several brain regions were compared between 75 patients with \\'sporadic\\' MTLE+HS and 50 healthy controls. Applying linear regression models, we examined the relationship between structural atrophy and important clinical features of MTLE+HS, including disease duration, lifetime number of partial and generalized seizures, and history of initial precipitating insults (IPIs). RESULTS: Significant volume loss was detected in ipsilateral hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, and cerebral white matter (WM). In addition, contralateral hippocampal and bilateral cerebellar grey matter (GM) volume loss was observed in left MTLE+HS patients. Hippocampal, amygdalar, and cerebral WM volume loss correlated with duration of epilepsy. This correlation was stronger in patients with prior IPIs history. Further, cerebral WM, cerebellar GM, and contralateral hippocampal volume loss correlated with lifetime number of generalized seizures. CONCLUSION: Our findings confirm that multiple brain regions beyond the hippocampus are involved in the pathogenesis of MTLE+HS. IPIs are an important factor influencing the rate of regional atrophy but our results also support a role for processes related to epilepsy chronicity. The consequence of epilepsy chronicity on candidate brain regions has important implications on their application as genetic endophenotypes.

  12. Homeostasis or channelopathy? Acquired cell type-specific ion channel changes in temporal lobe epilepsy and their antiepileptic potential

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    Jakob eWolfart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurons continuously adapt the expression and functionality of their ion channels. For example, exposed to chronic excitotoxicity, neurons homeostatically downscale their intrinsic excitability. In contrast, the ‘acquired channelopathy’ hypothesis suggests that proepileptic channel characteristics develop during epilepsy. We review cell type-specific channel alterations under different epileptic conditions and discuss the potential of channels that undergo homeostatic adaptations, as targets for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. Most of the relevant studies have been performed on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, a widespread AED-refractory, focal epilepsy. The TLE patients, who undergo epilepsy surgery, frequently display hippocampal sclerosis (HS, which is associated with degeneration of cornu ammonis subfield 1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs. Although the resected human tissue offers insights, controlled data largely stem from animal models simulating different aspects of TLE and other epilepsies. Most of the cell type-specific information is available for CA1 PCs and dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs. Between these two cell types, a dichotomy can be observed: while DG GCs acquire properties decreasing the intrinsic excitability (in TLE models and patients with HS, CA1 PCs develop channel characteristics increasing intrinsic excitability (in TLE models without HS only. However, thorough examination of data on these and other cell types reveals the coexistence of protective and permissive intrinsic plasticity within neurons. These mechanisms appear differentially regulated, depending on the cell type and seizure condition. Interestingly, the same channel molecules that are upregulated in DG GCs during HS-related TLE, appear as promising targets for future AEDs and gene therapies. Hence, GCs provide an example of homeostatic ion channel adaptation which can serve as a primer when designing novel anti-epileptic strategies.

  13. Focal cortical dysplasia of the temporal lobe with late-onset partial epilepsy: serial quantitative MRI

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    Rademacher, J.; Seitz, R.J. [Department of Neurology, Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Aulich, A. [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Reifenberger, G. [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kiwit, J.C.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Langen, K.J.; Schmidt, D. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    We describe serial studies of focal cortical dysplasia causing temporal lobe seizures and progressive aphasia in a 54-year-old woman. Initially, MRI volumetry of the temporal lobes showed significant left cortical thickening corresponding to an elevated aminoacid uptake in the left temporoparietal and inferior frontal cortex on SPECT using 3-[{sup 123}I]iodo-{alpha}-methyl-l-tyrosine (IMT). After 1 year there was severe shrinkage of the left temporal lobe, possibly the result of recurrent complex partial seizures. (orig.)

  14. Distinctive Structural and Effective Connectivity Changes of Semantic Cognition Network across Left and Right Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaotong; Shang, Kun; Wang, Xiaocui; Wang, Peipei; Shan, Yongzhi; Lu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of language impairment in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients is common and left mTLE patients always exhibit a primary problem with access to names. To explore different neuropsychological profiles between left and right mTLE patients, the study investigated both structural and effective functional connectivity changes within the semantic cognition network between these two groups and those from normal controls. We found that gray matter atrophy of left mTLE patients was more severe than that of right mTLE patients in the whole brain and especially within the semantic cognition network in their contralateral hemisphere. It suggested that seizure attacks were rather targeted than random for patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) in the dominant hemisphere. Functional connectivity analysis during resting state fMRI revealed that subregions of the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) in the left HS patients were no longer effectively connected. Further, we found that, unlike in right HS patients, increased causal linking between ipsilateral regions in the left HS epilepsy patients cannot make up for their decreased contralateral interaction. It suggested that weakened contralateral connection and disrupted effective interaction between subregions of the unitary, transmodal hub of the ATL may be the primary cause of anomia in the left HS patients. PMID:28018680

  15. Prognostic factors for seizure outcome in patients with MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Yao; Hu, Wenhan; Shao, Xiaoqiu; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Kai

    2016-05-01

    To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify predictors of postoperative seizure freedom in patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative temporal lobe epilepsy. Publications were screened from electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE), epilepsy archives, and bibliographies of relevant articles that were written in English. We recorded all possible risk factors that might predict seizure outcome after surgery. We calculated odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of predictors for postoperative seizure freedom. Heterogeneity was assessed with I(2). All meta-analyses were performed using Review Manager. Epilepsy duration (OR=2.57, 95% CI=1.21-5.47, pseizure freedom after surgery. However, the positron emission tomography (PET) results were not predictive of postoperative seizure freedom (OR=2.11, 95% CI=0.95-4.65, p=0.06, I(2)=0). No significant difference in seizure freedom was observed between the positive and negative pathology groups (OR=1.36, 95% CI=0.70-2.63, p=0.36, I(2)=0). A shorter epilepsy duration and scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) signals localized precisely in the temporal lobe predicted a better seizure outcome in patients with MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rhythmic ictal nonclonic hand (RINCH) motions in temporal lobe epilepsy: invasive EEG findings, incidence, and lateralizing value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuba, Robert; Musilová, Klára; Vojvodič, Nikola; Tyrlíková, Ivana; Rektor, Ivan; Brázdil, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The main purpose of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the incidence and lateralization value of rhythmic ictal nonclonic hand (RINCH) motions in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), who were classified as Engel I at least 2 years after epilepsy surgery. We analyzed the distribution of ictal activity at the time of RINCH appearance in patients in whom RINCH motions were present during invasive EEG monitoring. A group of 120 patients was included in this study. In total, we reviewed 491 seizures: 277 seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) associated with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS group) and 214 in TLE caused by other lesions (TLE-OTH group). We analyzed 29 patients (79 of the seizures) during invasive EEG monitoring. Fisher's exact test and binomial test were used for the statistical analysis. RINCH motions were observed in 24 out of 120 patients (20%) and in 48 out of 491 seizures (9.8%). There was no significant difference between the occurrence of RINCH motions in patients with TLE-HS and in patients with TLE-OTH, or between gender, right/left-sided TLE, and language dominant/nondominant TLE. RINCH motions were contralateral to the seizure onset in 83.3% of patients and 91.7% of seizures (p=0.0015; pictal activity. In 3 seizures, we observed time-locked epileptic activation associated with the appearance of RINCH motions, i.e., in the orbitofrontal cortex in 2 seizures and in both the orbitofrontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus in 1 seizure. RINCH motions are a relatively frequent ictal sign in patients with TLE. They have a high lateralizing value in these patients, occurring contralateral to the ictal onset. RINCH motions usually occur after the spread of ictal activity beyond the temporal lobe, and their appearance is usually associated with the presence of ictal activity in various regions of the contralateral frontal lobe, mainly the orbitofrontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus. This is the first study analysing

  17. Connectivity and tissue microstructural alterations in right and left temporal lobe epilepsy revealed by diffusion spectrum imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemkaddem, Alia; Daducci, Alessandro; Kunz, Nicolas; Lazeyras, François; Seeck, Margitta; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Vulliémoz, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Focal epilepsy is increasingly recognized as the result of an altered brain network, both on the structural and functional levels and the characterization of these widespread brain alterations is crucial for our understanding of the clinical manifestation of seizure and cognitive deficits as well as for the management of candidates to epilepsy surgery. Tractography based on Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows non-invasive mapping of white matter tracts in vivo. Recently, diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), based on an increased number of diffusion directions and intensities, has improved the sensitivity of tractography, notably with respect to the problem of fiber crossing and recent developments allow acquisition times compatible with clinical application. We used DSI and parcellation of the gray matter in regions of interest to build whole-brain connectivity matrices describing the mutual connections between cortical and subcortical regions in patients with focal epilepsy and healthy controls. In addition, the high angular and radial resolution of DSI allowed us to evaluate also some of the biophysical compartment models, to better understand the cause of the changes in diffusion anisotropy. Global connectivity, hub architecture and regional connectivity patterns were altered in TLE patients and showed different characteristics in RTLE vs LTLE with stronger abnormalities in RTLE. The microstructural analysis suggested that disturbed axonal density contributed more than fiber orientation to the connectivity changes affecting the temporal lobes whereas fiber orientation changes were more involved in extratemporal lobe changes. Our study provides further structural evidence that RTLE and LTLE are not symmetrical entities and DSI-based imaging could help investigate the microstructural correlate of these imaging abnormalities.

  18. Topiramate and its effect on fMRI of language in patients with right or left temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Allendorfer, Jane B

    2012-05-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is well recognized for its negative effects on cognition, language performance and lateralization results on the intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP). But, the effects of TPM on functional MRI (fMRI) of language and the fMRI signals are less clear. Functional MRI is increasingly used for presurgical evaluation of epilepsy patients in place of IAP for language lateralization. Thus, the goal of this study was to assess the effects of TPM on fMRI signals. In this study, we included 8 patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy (RTLE) and 8 with left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) taking TPM (+TPM). Matched to them for age, handedness and side of seizure onset were 8 patients with RTLE and 8 with LTLE not taking TPM (-TPM). Matched for age and handedness to the patients with TLE were 32 healthy controls. The fMRI paradigm involved semantic decision/tone decision task (in-scanner behavioral data were collected). All epilepsy patients received a standard neuropsychological language battery. One sample t-tests were performed within each group to assess task-specific activations. Functional MRI data random-effects analysis was performed to determine significant group activation differences and to assess the effect of TPM dose on task activation. Direct group comparisons of fMRI, language and demographic data between patients with R/L TLE +TPM vs. -TPM and the analysis of the effects of TPM on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal were performed. Groups were matched for age, handedness and, within the R/L TLE groups, for the age of epilepsy onset/duration and the number of AEDs/TPM dose. The in-scanner language performance of patients was worse when compared to healthy controls - all pTPM vs. -TPM showed significant fMRI signal differences between groups (increases in left cingulate gyrus and decreases in left superior temporal gyrus in the patients with LTLE +TPM; increases in the right BA 10 and left visual cortex and decreases in the left BA

  19. MBD3 expression and DNA binding patterns are altered in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Joanna; Dębski, Konrad J; Bot, Anna M; Lukasiuk, Katarzyna

    2016-09-21

    The aim of the present study was to examine involvement of MBD3 (methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 3), a protein involved in reading DNA methylation patterns, in epileptogenesis and epilepsy. We used a well-characterized rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy that is triggered by status epilepticus, evoked by electrical stimulation of the amygdala. Stimulated and sham-operated animals were sacrificed 14 days after stimulation. We found that MBD3 transcript was present in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes in both control and epileptic animals. We detected the nuclear localization of MBD3 protein in neurons, mature oligodendrocytes, and a subpopulation of astrocytes but not in microglia. Amygdala stimulation significantly increased the level of MBD3 immunofluorescence. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry and Western blot revealed that MBD3 in the adult brain assembles the NuRD complex, which also contains MTA2, HDAC2, and GATAD2B. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with deep sequencing, we observed differences in the occupancy of DNA regions by MBD3 protein between control and stimulated animals. This was not followed by subsequent changes in the mRNA expression levels of selected MBD3 targets. Our data demonstrate for the first time alterations in the MBD3 expression and DNA occupancy in the experimental model of epilepsy.

  20. Naringin attenuates granule cell dispersion in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hannah; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Morphological abnormalities of the dentate gyrus (DG) are an important phenotype in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We recently reported that naringin, a bioflavonoid in grapefruit and citrus fruits, exerts beneficial effects in the kainic acid (KA) mouse model of epilepsy. We found that naringin treatment reduced seizure activities and decreased autophagic stress and neuroinflammation in the hippocampus following in vivo lesion with KA. However, it remains unclear whether naringin may also attenuate seizure-induced morphological changes in the DG, collectively known as granule cell dispersion (GCD). To clarify whether naringin treatment reduces GCD, we evaluated the effects of intraperitoneal injection of naringin on GCD and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), an important regulator of GCD, following intrahippocampal injection of KA. Our results showed that naringin treatment significantly reduced KA-induced GCD and mTORC1 activation, which was confirmed by assessing the phosphorylated form of the mTORC1 substrate, 4E-BP1, in the hippocampus. These results suggest that naringin treatment may help prevent epilepsy-induced hippocampal injury by inhibiting mTORC1 activation and thereby reducing GCD in the hippocampus in vivo.

  1. Type of preoperative aura may predict postsurgical outcome in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    As the initial symptoms of epileptic seizures, many types of auras have significant localizing or lateralizing value. In this study, we hypothesized that the type of aura may predict postsurgical outcome in patients with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). In this retrospective study, all patients with a clinical diagnosis of medically refractory TLE due to unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis who underwent epilepsy surgery at the Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were recruited. Patients were prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. Postsurgical outcome was classified into two groups: seizure freedom or relapse. Outcome was compared between seven groups of patients according to their preoperative auras. Two hundred thirty-seven patients were studied. The chance of becoming free of seizures after surgery in patients with abdominal aura was 65.1%, while in other patients, this was 43.3% (P=0.01). In two-by-two comparisons, no other significant differences were observed. Patients with medically refractory TLE-MTS who reported abdominal auras preceding their seizures fared better postoperatively with regard to seizure control compared with those who did not report auras, which may indicate bitemporal dysfunction, and to patients with other auras, which may indicate a widespread epileptogenic zone in the latter group of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison and spacial correlation of interictal HMPAO-SPECT and FDG-PET in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coubes, P; Awad, I A; Antar, M; Magdinec, M; Sufka, B

    1993-06-01

    The respective contribution of interictal HMPAO-SPECT and FDG-PET to the imaging of the epileptogenic zone in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy is not known. Ten consecutive patients with drug resistant focal epilepsy of temporal lobe origin were studied with prolonged noninvasive video-EEG monitoring, magnetic resonance imaging, interictal FDG-PET and HMPAO-SPECT. Five patients demonstrated unitemporal and 5 patients bitemporal interictal and/or ictal EEG epileptiform abnormalities. We developed a 3-dimensional semiquantitative method for interpretation and comparison of FDG-PET and HMPAO-SPECT using a 15-compartment model of the temporal lobe. In all 5 patients with unilateral epileptogenicity, interictal hypometabolism and hypoperfusion were recorded on the side of the EEG abnormalities without discrepancy between PET and SPECT. The severity and the extent of focal abnormalities were consistently greater on PET than on SPECT, in agreement with previously well documented better 'sensitivity' of PET. Among the 5 patients with bitemporal epileptogenicity, results of SPECT and PET were convergent in only 2 cases. In this group, SPECT abnormalities appeared more profound but either SPECT or PET were not constantly correlated with the side of predominant EEG epileptogenicity. Abnormalities on PET and SPECT were more frequently limited to mesiobasal structures among cases with unilateral epileptogenicity and tended to involve neocortical structures in bitemporal cases. We conclude that interictal FDG-PET and HMPAO-SPECT provide the same type of information on the side of the epileptogenic zone in cases with clearly unilateral epileptogenicity, with abnormalities more intense and more extensive on PET.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Verbal memory decline is less frequent at 10 years than at 2 years after temporal lobe surgery for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson-Roswall, Lena; Malmgren, Kristina; Engman, Elisabeth; Samuelsson, Hans

    2012-08-01

    We investigated individual short- and long-term verbal memory changes after temporal lobe resection for epilepsy. Fifty-one patients (23 operated on the speech-dominant temporal lobe, DTL and 28 on the non-dominant temporal lobe, NDTL) were tested on learning/immediate recall and delayed recall of word-list and word-pairs preoperatively, 2 years postoperatively and 10years postoperatively. Changes were defined using reliable change indices of 23 healthy controls assessed at corresponding intervals. Fewer patients had reliable declines at 10 years than at 2 years (DTL: 13-35% vs 35-44%; NDTL: 0-4% vs 7-21%). Four DTL patients (17%) had reliable declines in ≥2 tests at 10-year follow-up. More NDTL patients had improvement at 10 years than at 2 years (18-30% vs 4-22%). The only risk factor for decline both short and long term was DTL resection. In conclusion, most patients had stable verbal memory postoperatively. A few DTL patients had a lasting decline at long-term follow-up, but more patients showed partial recovery, especially in the NDTL group.

  4. Impact of Childhood Epilepsy on the Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerim Fazlıoglu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Whole family is affected when an illness appears in the family or when there is an uncertainty regarding the health of a member. Symptoms, therapy, course of the disorder, constraint of the daily activities and long term effects of childhood chronic diseases deeply impact health and structure of the families. Diagnosis of a chronic disease in children presents as a significant psychological and psychosocial risk factor to the parents and other family members. Despite these known facts, psychosocial problems of parents of epileptic children are often ignored and not even questioned. These parents frequently have to leave their jobs or ask for their elderly relatives to look after their children. This situation could lead to major financial and social problems, weakening in intrafamilial communication and disruption in family harmony. Childhood epilepsy brings a great strain on family’s resources as other chronic diseases do and alter the life of significant others. According to biopsychosocial model, schemas in family relations influence the psychological process of the family members while the biopsychosocial process of the sick individual affect the functionality of the family. In other words, epilepsy affects not only the sick individual but also the family union. The family has to face many problems after definite diagnosis of epilepsy. Majority of the studies conducted on this issue mainly focused on the quality of life and family relations of the sick child, whereas only a few studies searched for possible burden and resulting problems of family members caused by epilepsy. Physicians in charge should not only focus on physical and mental health of the sick children but also on the problems of other members in the family bearing in mind psychosocial influences of the disorder on them. Additionally, preventive methods should be administered to protect the family from developing mental health problems. A multidiscipline training program

  5. Caregiver Burden in Epilepsy: Determinants and Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Karakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Caregiver burden (CB in epilepsy constitutes an understudied area. Here we attempt to identify the magnitude of this burden, the factors associated with it, and its impact to caregiver quality of life (QOL. Methods. 48 persons with epilepsy (PWE underwent video-EEG monitoring and their caregivers completed questionnaires providing demographic, disease-related, psychiatric, cognitive, sleep, QOL, and burden information. Results. On regression analysis, higher number of antiepileptic drugs, poorer patient neuropsychological performance, lower patient QOL score, and lower caregiver education level were associated with higher CB. Time allocated to patient care approximated but did not attain statistical significance. A moderate inverse correlation between CB and caregiver QOL physical component summary score and a stronger inverse correlation between CB and caregiver QOL mental component summary score were seen. Conclusion. In a selected cohort of PWE undergoing video-EEG monitoring, we identified modest degree of CB, comparable to that reported in the literature for other chronic neurological conditions. It is associated with specific patient and caregiver characteristics and has a negative effect on caregiver QOL.

  6. Clinical and electrophysiological findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis, based on the recent histopathological classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezer, F Irsel; Xasiyev, Farid; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Bilginer, Burcak; Oguz, Kader Karli; Saygi, Serap

    2016-11-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is a common pathology in MTLE, patients may show different surgical outcomes and clinical features. The 2013 ILAE classification subdivides HS into 3 types (HS type 1: severe neuronal loss and gliosis predominantly in CA1 and CA4 regions; - HS type 2: CA1 predominant; HS type 3: CA4 predominant) and includes "gliosis only, as no-HS". The association of clinical and electrophysiological findings with different HS types has not been reported previously in detail. 48 patients who had undergone temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy due to mesial TLE-HS between February 2014 and February 2016 were included. The patients were divided into five groups: patients with HS ILAE type 1, HS ILAE type 2, HS ILAE type 3, FCD type IIIa, or gliosis/no HS. The correlation between HS ILAE types and clinical/EEG findings in patients with MTLE due to HS was investigated. Of the 48 patients 30 were male. In 23 patients, the resection was on the left side (48%). Three patients had only gliosis, 25 patients had HS ILAE type 1, 7 had HS ILAE type 2, and 4 had HS ILAE type 3. Nine of the 48 patients had cortical lamination abnormalities in the temporal lobe associated with HS (FCD type IIIa). All patients were seizure free for early follow up. There was no association between type of HS in terms of duration of epilepsy, onset age of epilepsy, lateralized or localized semiological findings, or interictal/ictal EEG findings. Family history of epilepsy or SGTCSs were statistically more frequent in patients with types 2 and 3 HS and status epilepticus was more frequent in patients with HS-FCD type IIIa. The patients with HS types 2 and 3 have more frequent SGTCS or status epilepticus as well as increased family history of epilepsy. These findings can be helpful in understanding the epileptogenicity-prognoses of HS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect of Alpha-Lipoic Acid on Learning and Memory Deficit in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Narges Karimi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder in which patients experience spontaneous recurrent seizures and deficiency in learning and memory. Although the most commonly recommended therapy is drug treatment, some patients do not achieve adequate control of their seizures on existing drugs. New medications with novel mechanisms of action are needed to help those patients whose seizures are resistant to currently-available drugs. While alpha-lipoic acid as a antioxidant has some neuroprotective properties, but this action has not been investigated in models of epilepsy. Therefore, the protective effect of pretreatment with alpha-lipoic acid was evaluated in experimental model of temporal lobe epilepsy in male rats. Methods: In the present study, Wistar male rats were injected intrahippocampally with 0.9% saline(Sham-operated group, kainic acid(4 μg alone, or α-lipoic acid (25mg and 50mg/kg in association with kainic acid(4μg. We performed behavior monitoring(spontaneous seizure, learning and memory by Y-maze and passive avoidance test, intracranial electroencepholography (iEEG recording, histological analysis, to evaluate the anti- epilepsy effect of α-lipoic acid in kainate-induced epileptic rats.   Results: Behavior data showed that the kainate rats exhibit spontaneous seizures, lower spontaneous alternation score inY-maze tasks (p<0.01, impaired retention and recall capability in the passive avoidance test (p<0.05. Administration of alpha-lipoic acid, in both doses, significantly decrease the number of spontaneous seizures, improved alternation score in Y-maze task (p<0.005 and impaired retention and recall capability in the passive avoidance test (p<0.01 in kainite rats. Moreover, lipoic acid could improve the lipid peroxidation and nitrite level and superoxid dismutase activity.Conclusion: This study indicates that lipoic acid pretreatment attenuates kainic acid-induced impairment of short-term spatial memory in rats

  8. Definition of the epileptogenic zone in a patient with non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy arising from the dominant hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najm, Imad M; Naugle, Richard; Busch, Robyn M; Bingaman, William; Lüders, Hans

    2006-08-01

    Pharmacoresistant epilepsy arising from the dominant temporal region in patients with intact memory and normal anatomical imaging, presents major challenges in the preoperative definition of the epileptogenic zone, and the planning of the extent of the surgical resection. We report on the case of a 42-year-old, right-handed male who presented with recurrent daily seizures that were resistant to antiepileptic drugs. Multiple, non-invasive (scalp) video-EEG evaluations revealed focal epilepsy arising from the left fronto-temporal region. Multiple high resolution MRIs that were performed at multiple Epilepsy Centers failed to show any abnormality. Fluoro-deoxyglucose PET scan showed extensive, left antero-mesial temporal hypometabolism, and ictal SPECT showed increased perfusion in the left insula in addition to the left mesial and anterior temporal pole. Neuropsychological testing and intracarotid methohexital testing revealed excellent memory to the left, dominant side. A two-stage invasive evaluation with subdural grid electrodes followed by depth electrode recordings allowed the localization of the epileptogenic region to the temporal pole. A selective resection of the left temporal pole (that spared the hippocampal formation) resulted in a seizure-free outcome (one year follow-up) with no significant consequences on memory function. We conclude that targeted, invasive recording techniques should be used for the accurate localization and delineation of the extent of the epileptogenic zone in cases of suspected, non-lesional, dominant hemisphere, temporal lobe epilepsy with preserved memory function. The use of the staged invasive approach may increase the chances for memory (function) sparing through tailored, temporal resection.

  9. Changes in functional integration with the non-epileptic temporal lobe of patients with unilateral mesiotemporal epilepsy.

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    Nicola Trotta

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate epilepsy-induced changes in effective connectivity between the non-epileptic amygdalo-hippocampal complex (AHC and the rest of the brain in patients with unilateral mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS. METHODS: Thirty-three patients with unilateral MTLE associated with HS (20 females, mean age: 36 years, 19 left HS and 33 adult controls matched for age and gender underwent (18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET. Right-HS patients' FDG-PET data were flipped to obtain a left-epileptic-focus-lateralized group of patients. Voxels of interest (VOI were selected within the cytoarchitectonic probabilistic maps of the non-epileptic AHC (probability level  = 100%, SPM8 Anatomy toolbox v1.7. Patients and controls were compared using VOI metabolic activity as covariate of interest to search for epilepsy-induced changes in the contribution of the non-epileptic AHC to the level of metabolic activity in other brain areas. Age, gender, duration of epilepsy, seizure type and frequency were used as covariates of no-interest for connectivity analyses. KEY FINDINGS: Significant decrease in effective connectivity was found between the non-epileptic AHC and ventral prefrontal cortical areas bilaterally, as well as with the temporal pole and the posterior cingulate cortex contralateral to HS. Significant increase in connectivity was found between the non-epileptic AHC and midline structures, such as the anterior cingulate and dorsal medial prefrontal cortices, as well as the temporo-parietal junction bilaterally. Connectivity analyses also revealed a preserved positive connectivity between the non-epileptic and the epileptic AHC in the patients' group. SIGNIFICANCE: This study evidences epilepsy-induced changes in connectivity between the non-epileptic AHC and some limbic and default mode network areas. These changes in connectivity probably account for emotional, cognitive and

  10. A locus identified on chromosome18p11.31 is associated with hippocampal abnormalities in a family with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Claudia Vianna Maurer-Morelli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify the region harboring a putative candidate gene associated with hippocampal abnormalities (HAb in a family with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. Genome-wide scan was performed in one large kindred with MTLE using a total of 332 microsatellite markers at ~12cM intervals. An additional 13 markers were genotyped in the candidate region. Phenotypic classes were defined according to the presence of hippocampal atrophy and/or hyperintense hippocampal T2 signal detected on magnetic resonance imaging. We identified a significant positive LOD score on chromosome 18p11.31 with a Zmax of 3.12 at D18S452. Multipoint LOD scores and haplotype analyses localized the candidate locus within a 6cM interval flanked by D18S976 and D18S967. We present here evidence that HAb, which were previously related mainly to environmental risk factors, may be influenced by genetic predisposition. This finding may have major impact in the study of the mechanisms underlying abnormalities in mesial temporal lobe structures and their relationship with MTLE.

  11. Expression and Cellular Distribution of Major Vault Protein: A Putative Marker for Pharmacoresistance in a Rat Model for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet van, E.A.; Aronica, E.; Redeker, S.; Gorter, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Purpose: Because drug transporters might play a role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR), we investigated the expression of a vesicular drug transporter, the major vault protein (MVP), in a rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods: By using real-time polymerase chain react

  12. Epilepsy associated with Leukoaraiosis mainly affects temporal lobe: a casual or causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Sara; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Beghi, Ettore; Sofia, Vito; Mumoli, Laura; Labate, Angelo; Cianci, Vittoria; Fatuzzo, Daniela; Bellavia, Marina Angela; Arcudi, Luciano; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    To compare anatomo-electro-clinical findings between patients with epilepsy associated with leukoaraiosis only (EAL) and patients with a well-defined vascular lesion, i.e. post-stroke epilepsy (PSE). Two hundred eighty-three subjects with epilepsy and cerebrovascular disease, consecutively seen in our epilepsy centres from January 2000 to March 2014, were retrospectively considered. Inclusion criteria were: history of one or more unprovoked seizures and MRI evidence of one or more vascular lesions. Exclusion criteria were: inadequate neuroimaging data, coexistence of nonvascular lesions, and psychogenic seizures. Subjects were divided in two groups: PSE and EAL, based onclinical and MRI findings. Epileptogenic focus was identified according to ictal semiology and EEG findings. In PSE group, coherence between the vascular lesion(s) and epileptogenic focus was scored as likely or unlikely. One hundred seventeen subjects were included: 58 had PSE, 59 EAL. Coherence was identified as likely in 38 (95%) and unlikely in 2 (5%). At univariate analysis, abnormal EEG and frontal localization were associated with a lower EAL probability [odds ratio (OR) 0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.15-0.87, p=0.02 and OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.04-0.37, pepilepsy predominates. In EAL, causal relationship between vascular lesions and epilepsy is not straightforward, and the role of adjunctive factors needs to be elucidated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes in memory function in children and young adults with temporal lobe epilepsy: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Linda M; Mahdavi, Niloufar; Anderson, Vicki A; Harvey, A Simon

    2012-03-01

    This longitudinal study explored change in memory function from childhood to young adulthood in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The 24 participants (11 left TLE; 13 right TLE) had a mean age of 16.10 years (SD=4.13 years), and 14 had undergone surgery since initial assessment. Contrary to baseline, verbal memory deficits were lateralized (leftcomplex non-verbal memory task (p=.05), with the right but not the left group improving. A three-way time-by-laterality-by-surgery interaction was significant for delayed facial recognition (p=.05), with surgical groups improving irrespective of laterality. Non-surgical groups remained stable, although there was a trend for the right to improve and the left to decline. Results were independent of seizure variables, mood and IQ and suggest that memory in left TLE tends to remain stable over time and improve in right TLE.

  14. Parasomnias and nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE): lights and shadows--controversial points in the differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisulli, Francesca; Vignatelli, Luca; Provini, Federica; Leta, Chiara; Lugaresi, Elio; Tinuper, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is characterized by seizures with complex, often bizarre, violent behaviour arising only or mainly during sleep. These unusual seizures and their occurrence during sleep are often accompanied by normal EEG tracings and neuroradiological findings, making it difficult to distinguish NFLE seizures from other non-epileptic nocturnal paroxysmal events, namely parasomnias. NFLE was described for the first time in 1981, but, as its epileptic origin was controversial, the condition was called nocturnal paroxysmal dystonia. Even though many aspects of parasomnias and NFLE have been clarified in the last two decades, the problem of differential diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians. This paper discusses some controversial points still under debate. The difficulties in distinguishing nocturnal epileptic seizures from parasomnias reflect just one aspect of the intriguing issue of the pathophysiological relationships between all types of paroxysmal motor behaviours during sleep.

  15. WMS-III Logical Memory performance after a two-week delay in temporal lobe epilepsy and control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brian D

    2006-11-01

    Conventional memory assessment may fail to identify memory dysfunction that is characterized by intact recall for a relatively brief period but rapid forgetting thereafter. This study assessed immediate memory and retention after 30-minute and two-week delays in a control group (n = 25) and a group of individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, n = 25). For raw free recall, thematic unit, and recognition memory scores from the Wechsler Memory Scale-3rd ed. (WMS-III) Logical Memory (LM) subtest, there were no group x trial interactions and the TLE group performed significantly worse than the controls on all trials. At the individual level, none of the patients (0%) demonstrated isolated free recall impairment at the two-week delay when raw scores were analyzed, and one patient (4%) but also five controls (20%) did so when percent retention scores were examined. In summary, TLE patients did not demonstrate disproportionate forgetting over two weeks on a widely used story memory test.

  16. Granule cell dispersion is not a predictor of surgical outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Neves, Rafael Scarpa; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Caboclo, Luís Otávio; Lancellotti, Carmen; Marinho, Taissa Ferrari; Hamad, Ana Paula; Marinho, Murilo; Centeno, Ricardo; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Targas Yacubian, Elza Márcia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of a series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was to analyze the association of granule cell dispersion (GCD) with surgical prognosis, patterns of MTS and clinical data. Hippocampal specimens from 66 patients with MTLE and unilateral MTS and from 13 controls were studied. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patients' clinical data, types of MTS and surgical outcome were reviewed. GCD occurred in 45.5% of cases and was not correlated with clinical variable. More severe neuronal loss was observed in patients with GCD. Except for MTS Type 2 - observed only in four no- GCD patients - groups did not differ with respect to the types of MTS. Surgical outcome was similar in both groups. In conclusion, GCD was associated with the degree of hippocampal cell loss, but was not a predictor of surgical outcome.

  17. Epilepsia do lobo temporal com aura de prazer: relato de caso Temporal lobe epilepsy with aura of pleasure: case report

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Relatamos o caso de uma paciente com epilepsia do lobo temporal e "sensação de orgasmo" como aura epiléptica. Há controvérsia na literatura a respeito da existência do prazer e do êxtase como manifestação de aura epiléptica. Neste caso, ficou evidenciada a presença da aura de prazer, através da investigação clínica, eletrencefalograma e remissão das crises com a terapêutica adotada (fenitoína).We report on a woman with temporal lobe epilepsy and "orgasm sensation" like an epileptic aura. Lite...

  18. Multimedia human brain database system for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy with content-based image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad A.; Elisevich, Kost

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a human brain multimedia database for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy. The focus of the paper is on content-based image management, navigation and retrieval. Several medical image-processing methods including our newly developed segmentation method are utilized for information extraction/correlation and indexing. The input data includes T1-, T2-Weighted MRI and FLAIR MRI and ictal and interictal SPECT modalities with associated clinical data and EEG data analysis. The database can answer queries regarding issues such as the correlation between the attribute X of the entity Y and the outcome of a temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. The entity Y can be a brain anatomical structure such as the hippocampus. The attribute X can be either a functionality feature of the anatomical structure Y, calculated with SPECT modalities, such as signal average, or a volumetric/morphological feature of the entity Y such as volume or average curvature. The outcome of the surgery can be any surgery assessment such as memory quotient. A determination is made regarding surgical candidacy by analysis of both textual and image data. The current database system suggests a surgical determination for the cases with relatively small hippocampus and high signal intensity average on FLAIR images within the hippocampus. This indication pretty much fits with the surgeons" expectations/observations. Moreover, as the database gets more populated with patient profiles and individual surgical outcomes, using data mining methods one may discover partially invisible correlations between the contents of different modalities of data and the outcome of the surgery.

  19. Recent seizure activity alters motor organization in frontal lobe epilepsy as revealed by task-based fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Kristine E; Gaxiola-Valdez, Ismael; Mainprize, David; Grossi, Matthew; Goodyear, Bradley G; Federico, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    Patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) commonly demonstrate motor impairments, suggesting that frontal lobe seizures affect motor function. However, the underlying mechanisms of these deficits are not known, nor has any study systematically examined motor organization in these patients. We therefore examined cortical motor organization in a group of adult patients with FLE, using task-based fMRI. Eleven right FLE patients, six left FLE patients, and ten control subjects underwent task-based fMRI. Two tasks were performed using the right and left hands separately, and both hands together. The first task was a finger-tapping task and the second task was a more complex coordination task. Functional MR data were compared between patient groups and controls. A laterality index of brain activation was also calculated between the epileptic and healthy hemisphere to determine hemispheric dominance during task performance to explore its relationship with a variety of patient-specific epilepsy factors. Overall, right FLE patients demonstrated decreased BOLD activity in the epileptic hemisphere and increased BOLD activity in the healthy hemisphere compared to controls (pseizure in both patient groups (right FLE: rs=0.779, left FLE: rs=0.943). Patients that had experienced a recent seizure relied more on the sensorimotor cortex of the healthy hemisphere during task performance, compared to those that were relatively seizure free (pseizure freedom. These results demonstrate the presence of seizure-related alteration of cortical motor organization in FLE, which may underlie the motor deficits seen in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Induces Intrinsic Alterations in Na Channel Gating in Layer II Medial Entorhinal Cortex Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, Nicholas J.; Merrick, Ellen C.; Nigam, Aradhya; Kalmar, Christopher L.; Baheti, Aparna R.; Bertram, Edward H.; Patel, Manoj K.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy involving the limbic structures of the temporal lobe. Layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex (EC) form the major excitatory input into the hippocampus via the perforant path and consist of non-stellate and stellate neurons. These neurons are spared and hyper-excitable in TLE. The basis for the hyper-excitability is likely multifactorial and may include alterations in intrinsic properties. In a rat model of TLE, medial EC (mEC) non-stellate and stellate neurons had significantly higher action potential (AP) firing frequencies than in control. The increase remained in the presence of synaptic blockers, suggesting intrinsic mechanisms. Since sodium (Na) channels play a critical role in AP generation and conduction we sought to determine if Na channel gating parameters and expression levels were altered in TLE. Na channel currents recorded from isolated mEC TLE neurons revealed increased Na channel conductances, depolarizing shifts in inactivation parameters and larger persistent (INaP) and resurgent (INaR) Na currents. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed increased staining of Nav1.6 within the axon initial segment and Nav1.2 within the cell bodies of mEC TLE neurons. These studies provide support for additional intrinsic alterations within mEC layer II neurons in TLE and implicate alterations in Na channel activity and expression, in part, for establishing the profound increase in intrinsic membrane excitability of mEC layer II neurons in TLE. These intrinsic changes, together with changes in the synaptic network, could support seizure activity in TLE. PMID:20946956

  1. Epilepsy: Impact upon Severely and Profoundly Handicapped Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Fred; Dykes, Mary K.

    1982-01-01

    The paper synthesizes information about epilepsy (definition and categories of seizures, types of seizures, and treatment) and notes its impact upon persons with severe/profound handicaps. The need for a transdisciplinary team in case management is cited. (CL)

  2. The “Natural” History of Medically Treated Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: What Can an Evidence-Based Approach Tell Us?

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    Colin Bruce Josephson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We systematically reviewed the literature to describe the “natural” history of medically treated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. No population-based studies recruiting incident cases of TLE irrespective of age exist. Prospective, population-based studies were limited to those recruiting only childhood-onset TLE or those reporting TLE as a subgroup of cohorts of focal epilepsies. Few studies have been performed in the “MRI era” limiting information on natural history secondary to specific pathologies. Available data suggests that TLE is highly variable, with unpredictable transient remissions and low rates of seizure freedom (30 to 50%. Etiology and failure of first and second drug seem to be the most important predictors for treatment prognosis. The role of initial precipitating injuries remains speculative, as imaging information of related events is either missing or conflicting. Prospective cohorts of new-onset TLE with long-term followup using advanced MRI techniques, timely EEG recordings, and assessments of psychiatric comorbidities are needed.

  3. Contribution of Aberrant GluK2-Containing Kainate Receptors to Chronic Seizures in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Angélique Peret

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kainate is a potent neurotoxin known to induce acute seizures. However, whether kainate receptors (KARs play any role in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is not known. In TLE, recurrent mossy fiber (rMF axons form abnormal excitatory synapses onto other dentate granule cells that operate via KARs. The present study explores the pathophysiological implications of KARs in generating recurrent seizures in chronic epilepsy. In an in vitro model of TLE, seizure-like activity was minimized in mice lacking the GluK2 subunit, which is a main component of aberrant synaptic KARs at rMF synapses. In vivo, the frequency of interictal spikes and ictal discharges was strongly reduced in GluK2−/− mice or in the presence of a GluK2/GluK5 receptor antagonist. Our data show that aberrant GluK2-containing KARs play a major role in the chronic seizures that characterize TLE and thus constitute a promising antiepileptic target.

  4. Pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy modifies histamine turnover and H3 receptor function in the human hippocampus and temporal neocortex.

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    Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Cuéllar-Herrera, Manola; Velasco, Ana Luisa; Velasco, Francisco; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Carmona, Francia; Guevara, Rosalinda; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio; Rocha, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate the tissue content of tele-methylhistamine (t-MeHA) and histamine as well as H3 receptor (H3 Rs) binding and activation of the heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding αi/o proteins (Gαi/o) coupled to these receptors in the hippocampus and temporal neocortex of patients (n = 10) with pharmacoresistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Patients with MTLE showed elevated tissue content of t-MeHA in the hippocampus. Analyses revealed that a younger age at seizure onset was correlated with a higher tissue content of t-MeHA, lower H3 R binding, and lower efficacy of Gαi/o protein activation in the hippocampus. We conclude that the hippocampus shows a reduction in the H3 R function associated with enhanced histamine. In contrast, the temporal neocortex displayed a high efficacy of H3 Rs Gαi/o protein activation that was associated with low tissue contents of histamine and t-MeHA. These results indicate an overactivation of H3 Rs leading to decreased histamine in the temporal neocortex. However, this situation was lessened in circumstances such as a longer duration of epilepsy or higher seizure frequency. It is concluded that decrease in H3 Rs function and enhanced levels of histamine may contribute to the epileptic activity in the hippocampus and temporal neocortex of patients with pharmacoresistant MTLE.

  5. Increased expression of BDNF transcript with exon VI in hippocampi of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Martínez-Levy, G A; Rocha, L; Lubin, F D; Alonso-Vanegas, M A; Nani, A; Buentello-García, R M; Pérez-Molina, R; Briones-Velasco, M; Recillas-Targa, F; Pérez-Molina, A; San-Juan, D; Cienfuegos, J; Cruz-Fuentes, C S

    2016-02-01

    A putative role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in epilepsy has emerged from in vitro and animal models, but few studies have analyzed human samples. We assessed the BDNF expression of transcripts with exons I (BDNFI), II (BDNFII), IV (BDNFIV) and VI (BDNFVI) and methylation levels of promoters 4 and 6 in the hippocampi of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) (n=24). Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and pre-surgical pharmacological treatment were considered as clinical independent variables. A statistical significant increase for the BDNFVI (p<0.05) was observed in TLE patients compared to the autopsy control group (n=8). BDNFVI was also increased in anxiety/depression TLE (N=4) when compared to autopsies or to the remaining group of patients (p<0.05). In contrast, the use of the antiepileptic drug Topiramate (TPM) (N=3) was associated to a decrease in BDNFVI expression (p<0.05) when compared to the remaining group of patients. Methylation levels at the BDNF promoters 4 and 6 were similar between TLE and autopsies and in relation to the use of either Sertraline (SRT) or TPM. These results suggest an up-regulated expression of a specific BDNF transcript in patients with TLE, an effect that seems to be dependent on the use of specific drugs.

  6. Naringenin ameliorates kainic acid-induced morphological alterations in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Park, Jungha; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Shin, Won-Ho; Bae, Young-Seuk; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-10-19

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is a morphological alteration characteristic of temporal lobe epilepsy. Recently, we reported that treatment with naringin, a flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, reduced spontaneous recurrent seizures by inhibiting kainic acid (KA)-induced GCD and neuronal cell death in mouse hippocampus, suggesting that naringin might have beneficial effects for preventing epileptic events in the adult brain. However, it is still unclear whether the beneficial effects of naringin treatment are mediated by the metabolism of naringin into naringenin in the KA-treated hippocampus. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated whether intraperitoneal injections of naringenin could mimic naringin-induced effects against GCD caused by intrahippocampal KA injections in mice. Our results showed that treatment with naringenin delayed the onset of KA-induced seizures and attenuated KA-induced GCD by inhibiting activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in both neurons and reactive astrocytes in the DG. In addition, its administration attenuated the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) from microglial activation in the DG following KA treatment. These results suggest that naringenin may be an active metabolite of naringin and help prevent the progression of epileptic insults in the hippocampus in vivo; therefore, naringenin may be a beneficial metabolite of naringin for the treatment of epilepsy.

  7. Kinin B1 and B2 receptors are overexpressed in the hippocampus of humans with temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Perosa, Sandra Regina; Argañaraz, Gustavo Adolfo; Goto, Eduardo Massatoshi; Costa, Luciana Gilbert Pessoa; Konno, Ana Carla; Varella, Pedro Paulo Vasconcellos; Santiago, Joselita Ferreira Carvalho; Pesquero, João Bosco; Canzian, Mauro; Amado, Debora; Yacubian, Elza Marcia; Carrete, Henrique; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Silva, Jose Antonio; Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça Naffah

    2007-01-01

    Molecular biology tools have been employed to investigate the participation of peptides in human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Active polypeptides and their receptors have been related to several brain processes, such as inflammation, apoptosis, brain development, K(+) and Ca(2+) channels' activation, cellular growth, and induction of neuronal differentiation. Previous works have shown a neuroprotector effect for kinin B2 receptor and a deleterious, pro-epileptogenic action for kinin B1 receptor in animal models of TLE. The present work was delineated to analyze the kinin B1 and B2 receptors expression in the hippocampus of patients presenting refractory mesial TLE. The hippocampi were removed during the patients surgery in a procedure used for seizure control and compared with tissues obtained after autopsy. Nissl staining was performed to study the tissue morphology and immunohistochemistry, and Western blot was used to compare the distribution and levels of both receptors in the hippocampus. In addition, real time PCR was employed to analyze the gene expression of these receptors. Nissl staining showed sclerotic hippocampi with hilar, granular, and pyramidal cell loss in TLE patients. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses showed increased expression of kinin B1 and B2 receptors but the real-time PCR data demonstrated increased mRNA level only for kinin B2 receptors, when compared with controls. These data show for the first time a relationship between human TLE and the kallikrein-kinin system, confirming ours previous results, obtained from experimental models of epilepsy.

  8. Plasticity of Y1 and Y2 receptors and neuropeptide Y fibers in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtinger, S; Pirker, S; Czech, T; Baumgartner, C; Ransmayr, G; Sperk, G

    2001-08-01

    Marked expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its Y2 receptors in hippocampal mossy fibers has been reported in animal models of epilepsy. Because NPY can suppress glutamate release by activating presynaptic Y2 receptors, these changes have been proposed as an endogenous protective mechanism. Therefore, we investigated whether similar changes in the NPY system may also take place in human epilepsy. We investigated Y1 and Y2 receptor binding and NPY immunoreactivity in hippocampal specimens that were obtained at surgery from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and in autopsy controls. Significant increases in Y2 receptor binding (by 43-48%) were observed in the dentate hilus, sectors CA1 to CA3, and subiculum of specimens with, but not in those without, hippocampal sclerosis. On the other hand, Y1 receptor binding was significantly reduced (by 62%) in the dentate molecular layer of sclerotic specimens. In the same patients, the total lengths of NPY immunoreactive (NPY-IR) fibers was markedly increased (by 115-958%) in the dentate molecular layer and hilus, in the stratum lucidum of CA3, and throughout sectors CA1 to CA3 and the subiculum, as compared with autopsies. In nonsclerotic specimens, increases in lengths of NPY-IR fibers were more moderate and statistically not significant. NPY mRNA was increased threefold in hilar interneurons of sclerotic and nonsclerotic specimens. It is suggested that abundant sprouting of NPY fibers, concomitant upregulation of Y2 receptors, and downregulation of Y1 receptors in the hippocampus of patients with Ammon's horn sclerosis may be endogenous anticonvulsant mechanisms.

  9. Effects of Swimming Exercise on Limbic and Motor Cortex Neurogenesis in the Kainate-Lesion Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Vasavi R. Gorantla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is a common neurological disease and antiseizure medication is often inadequate for preventing apoptotic cell death. Aerobic swimming exercise (EX augments neurogenesis in rats when initiated immediately in the postictal period. This study tests the hypothesis that aerobic exercise also augments neurogenesis over the long term. Male Wistar rats (age of 4 months were subjected to chemical lesioning using KA and to an EX intervention consisting of a 30 d period of daily swimming for 15 min, in one experiment immediately after KA lesioning (immediate exposure and in a second experiment after a 60 d period of normal activity (delayed exposure. Morphometric counting of neuron numbers (NN and dendritic branch points and intersections (DDBPI was performed in the CA1, CA3, and dentate regions of hippocampus, in basolateral nucleus of amygdala, and in several areas of motor cortex. EX increased NN and DDBPI in the normal control and the KA-lesioned rats in all four limbic and motor cortex areas studied, after both immediate and 60 d delayed exposures to exercise. These findings suggest that, after temporal lobe epileptic seizures in rats, swimming exercise may improve neural plasticity in areas of the brain involved with emotional regulation and motor coordination, even if the exercise treatment is delayed.

  10. Late onset temporal lobe epilepsy with MRI evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis following acute neurocysticercosis. Case report

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    Kobayashi, Eliane; Guerreiro, Carlos A.M.; Cendes, Fernando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Neurologia]. E-mail: fcendes@unicamp.br

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in a patient with new onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and acute neurocysticercosis with multiple cysts. A 56 years old man with new onset headache, Simple Partial Seizures and Complex Partial Seizures underwent CT scan and lumbar puncture as diagnose proceeding. Multiple cysts and meningitis were identified, with a positive immunology for cysticercosis. Seizures were recorded over the left temporal region in a routine EEG. Treatment with al bendazole was performed for 21 days, with clinical improvement and seizure remission after 4 months. An MRI scan 11 months after treatment, showed complete resolution of those cystic lesions and a left hippocampal atrophy (HA) with hyperintense T2 signal. The presence of HA and hyperintense T 2 signal in this patient has not, to date, been associated with a poor seizure control. Conclusions: This patient presented with MRI evidence of left MTS after new onset partial seizures of left temporal lobe origin. Although we did not have a previous MRI scan, it is likely that this hippocampal abnormality was due to the acute inflammatory response to cysticercosis associated to repeated partial seizures. This suggests that acute neurocysticercosis associated with repeated seizures may cause MTS and late onset TLE. (author)

  11. Heterotopias, cortical dysplasias and glioneural tumors participate in cognitive processing in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschstein, T.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Grunwald, T.; Pezer, N.; Urbach, H.; Blumcke, I.; Roost, D. van; Lehnertz, K.; Elger, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    Focal brain lesions such as cortical dysplasia and glioneural tumors generate epileptic activity and thus may be synaptically connected with normal cortex. To test this hypothesis, we compared event-related potentials recorded directly from the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and a dysplastic lesion in e

  12. Frequent seizures are associated with a network of gray matter atrophy in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Ana C Coan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with hippocampal sclerosis (HS have diffuse subtle gray matter (GM atrophy detectable by MRI quantification analyses. However, it is not clear whether the etiology and seizure frequency are associated with this atrophy. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence of GM atrophy and the influence of seizure frequency in patients with TLE and either normal MRI (TLE-NL or MRI signs of HS (TLE-HS. METHODS: We evaluated a group of 172 consecutive patients with unilateral TLE-HS or TLE-NL as defined by hippocampal volumetry and signal quantification (122 TLE-HS and 50 TLE-NL plus a group of 82 healthy individuals. Voxel-based morphometry was performed with VBM8/SPM8 in 3T MRIs. Patients with up to three complex partial seizures and no generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the previous year were considered to have infrequent seizures. Those who did not fulfill these criteria were considered to have frequent seizures. RESULTS: Patients with TLE-HS had more pronounced GM atrophy, including the ipsilateral mesial temporal structures, temporal lobe, bilateral thalami and pre/post-central gyri. Patients with TLE-NL had more subtle GM atrophy, including the ipsilateral orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral thalami and pre/post-central gyri. Both TLE-HS and TLE-NL showed increased GM volume in the contralateral pons. TLE-HS patients with frequent seizures had more pronounced GM atrophy in extra-temporal regions than TLE-HS with infrequent seizures. Patients with TLE-NL and infrequent seizures had no detectable GM atrophy. In both TLE-HS and TLE-NL, the duration of epilepsy correlated with GM atrophy in extra-hippocampal regions. CONCLUSION: Although a diffuse network GM atrophy occurs in both TLE-HS and TLE-NL, this is strikingly more evident in TLE-HS and in patients with frequent seizures. These findings suggest that neocortical atrophy in TLE is related to the ongoing seizures and epilepsy duration, while thalamic

  13. Ictal vomiting as a sign of temporal lobe epilepsy confirmed by stereo-EEG and surgical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrafusa, Nicola; de Palma, Luca; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Trivisano, Marina; Marras, Carlo Efisio; Vigevano, Federico; Specchio, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Vomiting is uncommon in patients with epilepsy and has been reported in both idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies. It is presumed to originate in the anterior part of the temporal lobe or insula. To date, 44 cases of nonidiopathic focal epilepsy and seizures associated with ictal vomiting have been reported. Of the 44 cases, eight were studied using invasive exploration (3 stereo-EEG/5 subdural grids). Here, we report a 4-year-and-7-month-old patient with a history of febrile convulsion in the second year of life and who developed episodes of vomiting and complex partial seizures at 3 years of age. Scalp EEG showed no electrical modification during vomiting while the complex partial seizure displayed a clear right temporal origin. Brain MR showed hippocampal volume reduction with mild diffuse blurring of the temporal lobe. Stereoelectroencephalography study confirmed the mesiotemporal origin of the seizures and showed that the episodes of vomiting were strictly related to an ictal discharge originating in the mesial temporal structures without insular diffusion. The patient is now seizure-free (18 months) after removal of the right anterior and mesial temporal structures. In all the reported patients, seizures seemed to start in mesial temporal structures. The grid subgroup is more homogeneous, and the most prominent characteristic (4/5) is the involvement of both mesial and lateral temporal structures at the time of vomiting. In the S-EEG group, there is evidence of involvement of either the anterior temporal structures alone (2/3) or both insular cortices (1/3). Our case confirms that vomiting could occur when the ictal discharge is limited to the anterior temporal structure without insular involvement. Regarding the pathophysiology of vomiting, the role of subcortical structures such as the dorsal vagal complex and the central pattern generators (CPG) located in the reticular area is well established. Vomiting as an epileptic phenomenon seems to be related to

  14. Frequent Seizures Are Associated with a Network of Gray Matter Atrophy in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with or without Hippocampal Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, Ana C.; Campos, Brunno M.; Yasuda, Clarissa L.; Kubota, Bruno Y.; Bergo, Felipe PG.; Guerreiro, Carlos AM.; Cendes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) have diffuse subtle gray matter (GM) atrophy detectable by MRI quantification analyses. However, it is not clear whether the etiology and seizure frequency are associated with this atrophy. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence of GM atrophy and the influence of seizure frequency in patients with TLE and either normal MRI (TLE-NL) or MRI signs of HS (TLE-HS). Methods We evaluated a group of 172 consecutive patients with unilateral TLE-HS or TLE-NL as defined by hippocampal volumetry and signal quantification (122 TLE-HS and 50 TLE-NL) plus a group of 82 healthy individuals. Voxel-based morphometry was performed with VBM8/SPM8 in 3T MRIs. Patients with up to three complex partial seizures and no generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the previous year were considered to have infrequent seizures. Those who did not fulfill these criteria were considered to have frequent seizures. Results Patients with TLE-HS had more pronounced GM atrophy, including the ipsilateral mesial temporal structures, temporal lobe, bilateral thalami and pre/post-central gyri. Patients with TLE-NL had more subtle GM atrophy, including the ipsilateral orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral thalami and pre/post-central gyri. Both TLE-HS and TLE-NL showed increased GM volume in the contralateral pons. TLE-HS patients with frequent seizures had more pronounced GM atrophy in extra-temporal regions than TLE-HS with infrequent seizures. Patients with TLE-NL and infrequent seizures had no detectable GM atrophy. In both TLE-HS and TLE-NL, the duration of epilepsy correlated with GM atrophy in extra-hippocampal regions. Conclusion Although a diffuse network GM atrophy occurs in both TLE-HS and TLE-NL, this is strikingly more evident in TLE-HS and in patients with frequent seizures. These findings suggest that neocortical atrophy in TLE is related to the ongoing seizures and epilepsy duration, while thalamic atrophy is more

  15. Relationship between remnant hippocampus and amygdala and memory outcomes after stereotactic surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Malikova H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hana Malikova,1,2,* Lenka Kramska,3,* Zdenek Vojtech,4,5 Jan Sroubek,6 Jiri Lukavsky,7 Roman Liscak8 1Department of Radiology, Na Homolce Hospital, 2Institute of Anatomy, Second Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague, 3Department of Clinical Psychology, Na Homolce Hospital, 4Department of Neurology, Na Homolce Hospital, 5Department of Neurology, 3rd Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague, 6Department of Neurosurgery, Na Homolce Hospital, 7Institute of Psychology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 8Department of Radiation and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Na Homolce Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and purpose: Mesial temporal structures play an important role in human memory. In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, seizure activity is generated from the same structures. Surgery is the definitive treatment for medically intractable MTLE. In addition to standard temporal lobe microsurgical resection, stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy (SAHE is used as an alternative MTLE treatment. While memory impairments after standard epilepsy surgery are well known, it has been shown that memory decline is not a feature of SAHE. The aim of the present study was to correlate the volume of the remnant hippocampus and amygdala in patients treated by SAHE with changes in memory parameters.Materials and methods: Thirty-seven MTLE patients treated by SAHE (ten right, 27 left were included. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging examinations including hippocampal and amygdalar volumetry and neuropsychological evaluation preoperatively and 1 year after surgery.Results: Using Spearman correlation analyses, larger left-sided hippocampal reductions were associated with lower verbal memory performance (ρ=-0.46; P=0.02. On the contrary, improvement of global memory quotient (MQ was positively correlated with larger right-sided hippocampal reduction (ρ=0.66; P=0

  16. Neuroaminidase reduces interictal spikes in a rat temporal lobe epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, Dmytro; Zhao, Qian; Kleen, Jonathan K; Lenck-Santini, Pierre Pascal; Adstamongkonkul, Dusit; Isaeva, Elena; Holmes, Gregory L

    2011-03-01

    Interictal spikes have been implicated in epileptogenesis and cognitive dysfunction in epilepsy. Unfortunately, antiepileptic drugs have shown poor efficacy in suppressing interictal discharges; novel therapies are needed. Surface charge on neuronal membranes provides a novel target for abolishing interictal spikes. This property can be modulated through the use of neuraminidase, an enzyme that decreases the amount of negatively charged sialic acid. In the present report we determined whether applying neuraminidase to brains of rats with a history of status epilepticus would reduce number of interictal discharges. Following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, rats received intrahippocampal injections of neuraminidase, which significantly decreased the number of interictal spikes recorded in the CA1 region. This study provides evidence that sialic acid degradation can reduce the number of interictal spikes. Furthermore, the results suggest that modifying surface charge created by negatively charged sialic acid may provide new opportunities for reducing aberrant epileptiform events in epilepsy.

  17. Temporal lobe epilepsy causes selective changes in mu opioid and nociceptin receptor binding and functional coupling to G-proteins in human temporal neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luisa; Orozco-Suarez, Sandra; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Villeda-Hernandez, Juana; Gaona, Andres; Páldy, Eszter; Benyhe, Sandor; Borsodi, Anna

    2009-09-01

    There is no information concerning signal transduction mechanisms downstream of the opioid/nociceptin receptors in the human epileptic brain. The aim of this work was to evaluate the level of G-proteins activation mediated by DAMGO (a mu receptor selective peptide) and nociceptin, and the binding to mu and nociceptin (NOP) receptors and adenylyl cyclase (AC) in neocortex of patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy associated with mesial sclerosis (MTLE) or secondary to tumor or vascular lesion showed enhanced [3H]DAMGO and [3H]forskolin binding, lower DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding and no significant changes in nociceptin-stimulated G-protein. [3H]Nociceptin binding was lower in patients with MTLE. Age of seizure onset correlated positively with [3H]DAMGO binding and DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding, whereas epilepsy duration correlated negatively with [3H]DAMGO and [3H]nociceptin binding, and positively with [3H]forskolin binding. In conclusion, our present data obtained from neocortex of epileptic patients provide strong evidence that a) temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with alterations in mu opioid and NOP receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors, and b) clinical aspects may play an important role on these receptor changes.

  18. Temporal lobe epilepsy: its association with psychiatric impairment and appropriate dental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, A H; Cummings, J L

    1989-09-01

    Temporal lobe seizures are manifested by aberrant experiences, automatic behavior, or both. In addition, approximately 40% of the patients who have had the disease for more than 15 years exhibit significant personality disorders, mood changes, or psychoses in the periods between seizures (interictal phase). Recognition that these characterologic manifestations are components of the underlying neurologic disorder allows for a more rational approach to the provision of dental care.

  19. Down-regulation of Pin1 in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients and Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lan; Zhang, Yanke; Chen, Guojun; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhu, Binglin

    2017-02-27

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (Pin1) is a unique PPIase belonging to the parvulin family, and it isomerizes peptide bond between phospho-(Ser/Thr) and Pro. Pin1 has been linked to the pathogenesis of various human diseases; however, its exact biological functions remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to explore the expression pattern of Pin1 in patients with refractory epilepsy and in a chronic pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Using Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis, we found that Pin1 protein was mainly distributed in neurons, demonstrated by colocalization with the dendritic marker, MAP2. However, the expression of Pin1 decreased remarkably in epileptic patients and experimental mice. Furthermore, the reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation analysis showed that Pin1 interacted with NR2A and NR2B-containing NMDA receptors not AMPA receptors in epileptic mouse models. Our results are the first to indicate that the expression of Pin1 in epileptic brain tissue could play important roles in epilepsy.

  20. Reduced mature microRNA levels in association with dicer loss in human temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Ross C McKiernan

    Full Text Available Hippocampal sclerosis (HS is a common pathological finding in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and is associated with altered expression of genes controlling neuronal excitability, glial function, neuroinflammation and cell death. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNAs, function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and are critical for normal brain development and function. Production of mature miRNAs requires Dicer, an RNAase III, loss of which has been shown to cause neuronal and glial dysfunction, seizures, and neurodegeneration. Here we investigated miRNA biogenesis in hippocampal and neocortical resection specimens from pharmacoresistant TLE patients and autopsy controls. Western blot analysis revealed protein levels of Dicer were significantly lower in certain TLE patients with HS. Dicer levels were also reduced in the hippocampus of mice subject to experimentally-induced epilepsy. To determine if Dicer loss was associated with altered miRNA processing, we profiled levels of 380 mature miRNAs in control and TLE-HS samples. Expression of nearly 200 miRNAs was detected in control human hippocampus. In TLE-HS samples there was a large-scale reduction of miRNA expression, with 51% expressed at lower levels and a further 24% not detectable. Primary transcript (pri-miRNAs expression levels for several tested miRNAs were not different between control and TLE-HS samples. These findings suggest loss of Dicer and failure of mature miRNA expression may be a feature of the pathophysiology of HS in patients with TLE.

  1. Corpora amylacea deposition in the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: A new role for an old gene?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE is the most common medically refractory epilepsy syndrome in adults, and hippocampal sclerosis (HS is the most frequently encountered lesion in patients with MTLE. Premature accumulation of corpora amylacea (CoA, which plays an important role in the sequestration of toxic cellular metabolites, is found in the hippocampus of 50-60% of the patients who undergo surgery for medically refractory MTLE-HS. However, the etiopathogenesis and clinical importance of this phenomenon are still uncertain. The ABCB1 gene product P-glycoprotein (P-gp plays a prominent role as an antiapoptotic factor in addition to its efflux transporter function. ABCB1 polymorphism has been found to be associated with downregulation of P-gp expression. We hypothesized that a similar polymorphism will be found in patients with CoA deposition, as the polymorphism predisposes the hippocampal neuronal and glial cells to seizure-induced excitotoxic damage and CoA formation ensues as a buffer response. Materials and Methods: We compared five single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene Ex06+139C/T (rs1202168, Ex 12 C1236T (rs1128503, Ex 17-76T/A (rs1922242, Ex 21 G2677T/A (rs2032582, Ex26 C3435T (rs1045642 among 46 MTLE-HS patients of south Indian ancestry with and without CoA accumulation. Results: We found that subjects carrying the Ex-76T/A polymorphism (TA genotype had a five-times higher risk of developing CoA accumulation than subjects without this genotype (Odds ratio 5.0, 95% confidence intervals 1.34-18.55; P = 0.016. Conclusion: We speculate that rs1922242 polymorphism results in the downregulation of P-gp function, which predisposes the hippocampal cells to seizure-induced apoptosis, and CoA gets accumulated as a buffer response.

  2. Treatment of Epilepsy with Bipolar Electro-coagulation: An Analysis of Cortical Blood Flow and Histological Change in Temporal Lobe

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    Zhi-Qiang Cui; Guo-Ming Luan; Jian Zhou; Feng Zhai; Yu-Guang Guan; Min Bao

    2015-01-01

    Background:Bipolar electro-coagulation has a reported efficacy in treating epilepsy involving functional cortex by pure electro-coagulation or combination with resection.However,the mechanisms of bipolar electro-coagulation are not completely known.We studied the acute cortical blood flow and histological changes after bipolar electro-coagulation in 24 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.Methods:Twenty-four patients were consecutively enrolled,and divided into three groups according to the date of admission.The regional cortical blood flow (rCBF),electrocorticography,the depth of cortex damage,and acute histological changes (H and E staining,neuronal staining and neurofilament (NF) staining) were analyzed before and after the operation.The t-test analysis was used to compare the rCBF before and after the operation.Results:The rCBF after coagulation was significantly reduced (P < 0.05).The spikes were significantly reduced after electro-coagulation.For the temporal cortex,the depth of cortical damage with output power of 2-9 W after electro-coagulation was 0.34 ± 0.03,0.48 ± 0.06,0.69 ± 0.06,0.84 ± 0.09,0.98 ± 0.08,1.10 ± 0.1 l,1.11 ± 0.09,and 1.22 ± 0.11 mm,respectively.Coagulation with output power of 4-5 W completely damaged the neurons and NF protein in the molecular layer,external granular layer,and external pyramidal layer.Conclusions:The electro-coagulation not only destroyed the neurons and NF protein,but also reduced the rCBF.We concluded that the injuries caused by electro-coagulation would prevent horizontal synchronization and spread of epileptic discharges,and partially destroy the epileptic focus.

  3. Synaptic kainate receptors in interplay with INaP shift the sparse firing of dentate granule cells to a sustained rhythmic mode in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artinian, Julien; Peret, Angélique; Marti, Geoffrey; Epsztein, Jérôme; Crépel, Valérie

    2011-07-27

    Dentate granule cells, at the gate of the hippocampus, use coincidence detection of synaptic inputs to code afferent information under a sparse firing regime. In both human patients and animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy, mossy fibers sprout to form an aberrant glutamatergic network between dentate granule cells. These new synapses operate via long-lasting kainate receptor-mediated events, which are not present in the naive condition. Here, we report that in chronic epileptic rat, aberrant kainate receptors in interplay with the persistent sodium current dramatically expand the temporal window for synaptic integration. This introduces a multiplicative gain change in the input-output operation of dentate granule cells. As a result, their sparse firing is switched to an abnormal sustained and rhythmic mode. We conclude that synaptic kainate receptors dramatically alter the fundamental coding properties of dentate granule cells in temporal lobe epilepsy.

  4. Animal models of epilepsy for the development of antiepileptogenic and disease-modifying drugs. A comparison of the pharmacology of kindling and post-status epilepticus models of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2002-06-01

    Control of epilepsy has primarily focused on suppressing seizure activity by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) after epilepsy has developed. AEDs have greatly improved the lives of people with epilepsy. However, the belief that AEDs, in addition to suppressing seizures, alter the underlying epileptogenic process and, in doing so, the course of the disease and its prognosis, is not supported by the current clinical and experimental data. An intriguing possibility is to control acquired epilepsy by preventing epileptogenesis, the process by which the brain becomes epileptic. A number of AEDs have been evaluated in clinical trials to test whether they prevent epileptogenesis in humans, but to date no drug has been shown to be effective in such trials. Thus, there is a pressing need for drugs that are truly antiepileptogenic to either prevent epilepsy or alter its natural course. For this purpose, animal models of epilepsy are an important prerequisite. There are various animal models with chronic brain dysfunctions thought to reflect the processes underlying human epilepsy. Such chronic models of epilepsy include the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), post-status models of TLE in which epilepsy develops after a sustained status epilepticus, and genetic models of different types of epilepsy. Currently, the kindling model and post-status models, such as the pilocarpine or kainate models, are the most widely used models for studies on epileptogenic processes and on drug targets by which epilepsy can be prevented or modified. Furthermore, the seizures in these models can be used for testing of antiepileptic drug effects. A comparison of the pharmacology of chronic models with models of acute (reactive or provoked) seizures in previously healthy (non-epileptic) animals, such as the maximal electroshock seizure test, demonstrates that drug testing in chronic models of epilepsy yields data which are more predictive of clinical efficacy and adverse effects, so that

  5. GABAA-current rundown of temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with repetitive activation of GABAA “phasic” receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Eleonora; Roseti, Cristina; Maiolino, Francesca; Fucile, Sergio; Martinello, Katiuscia; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Aronica, Eleonora; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Miledi, Ricardo; Simonato, Michele; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    A study was made of the “rundown” of GABAA receptors, microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes from surgically resected brain tissues of patients afflicted with drug-resistant human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). Cell membranes, isolated from mTLE neocortex specimens, were injected into frog oocytes that rapidly incorporated functional GABAA receptors. Upon repetitive activation with GABA (1 mM), “epileptic” GABAA receptors exhibited a GABAA-current (IGABA) rundown that was significantly enhanced by Zn2+ (≤250 μM), and practically abolished by the high-affinity GABAA receptor inverse agonist SR95531 (gabazine; 2.5–25 μM). Conversely, IGABA generated by “control” GABAA receptors microtransplanted from nonepileptic temporal lobe, lesional TLE, or authoptic disease-free tissues remained stable during repetitive stimulation, even in oocytes treated with Zn2+. We conclude that rundown of mTLE epileptic receptors depends on the presence of “phasic GABAA receptors” that have low sensitivity to antagonism by Zn2+. Additionally, we found that GABAA receptors, microtransplanted from the cerebral cortex of adult rats exhibiting recurrent seizures, caused by pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, showed greater rundown than control tissue, an event also occurring in patch-clamped rat pyramidal neurons. Rundown of epileptic rat receptors resembled that of human mTLE receptors, being enhanced by Zn2+ (40 μM) and sensitive to the antiepileptic agent levetiracetam, the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and the phosphatase blocker okadaic acid. Our findings point to the rundown of GABAA receptors as a hallmark of TLE and suggest that modulating tonic and phasic mTLE GABAA receptor activity may represent a useful therapeutic approach to the disease. PMID:18083839

  6. Auras and clinical features in temporal lobe epilepsy: a new approach on the basis of voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria Teresa Castilho Garcia; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; da Silva, Henrique Hattori; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2010-05-01

    MRI investigations in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) have demonstrated structural abnormalities extending beyond ipsilateral hippocampus which may be studied through voxel-based morphometry (VBM). We investigated brain morphology related to clinical features in patients with refractory TLE with MTS using VBM. One hundred patients with unilateral TLE with MTS (59 left) and 30 controls were enrolled. VBM5 was employed to analyze (1) hemispheric damage, (2) influence of initial precipitating injury (IPI): 23 patients with febrile seizures and 19 with status epilepticus, and (3) types of auras classified as: mesial, including psychic auras (19 patients); anterior mesio-lateral, as autonomic symptoms, specially epigastric auras (27 patients) and neocortical, which included auditory, vertiginous, somatosensory and visual auras (16 patients). (1) Left TLE patients presented more widespread gray matter volume (GMV) reductions affecting ipsilateral hippocampus, temporal neocortex, insula and also left uncus, precentral gyrus, thalamus, parietal lobule, cuneus and bilateral cingulum. (2) Febrile seizures group presented ipsilateral GMV reductions in hippocampus, neocortical temporal, frontal and occipital cortices, insula and cingulum. Status epilepticus group presented more widespread GMV reductions involving temporal and extratemporal lobes. (3) Patients with mesial auras showed significant ipsilateral GMV reductions in hippocampus and amygdala, particularly right TLE group, who presented greater extension of GMV reduction in the entorhinal cortex. Significant reductions in hippocampus, amygdala and insula were seen in patients with anterior mesio-lateral auras. This study evaluated a large number of TLE-MTS patients showing structural damage extending beyond hippocampus, and different types of IPI associated with the extension of brain damage. Subtypes of auras are related to different clusters of areas of GMV reductions in

  7. Effects of Swimming Exercise on Learning and Memory in the Kainate-Lesion Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorantla, Vasavi Rakesh; Pemminati, Sudhakar; Bond, Vernon; Meyers, Dewey G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An aerobic exercise (Ex) augments neurogenesis and may ameliorate learning and memory deficits in the rat Kainic Acid (KA) model of temporal lobe epilepsy in the short-term but whether it reverses learning and memory deficits after a substantial period of delay remains unclear. Aim This study tests the hypothesis that aerobic Ex attenuates the learning and memory deficits associated with kainate seizures in the long-term. Materials and Methods A total of 60 rats were subjected to chemical lesioning using KA and to an Ex intervention consisting of a 30 days period of daily swimming for 15 min, immediately after KA lesioning (immediate exposure) or after a 60 days period of normal activity (delayed exposure). We evaluated spatial learning on a T-maze test, expressed as percentage of correct responses. We evaluated memory on a passive-avoidance test, expressed as time spent in a compartment in which the rats were previously exposed to an aversive stimulus. Results Ex increases the percentage of correct responses, percentage bias, and number of alternations, associated with the T-maze testing for the normal control, sham-operated control and kainate-lesioned animals after both immediate and delayed exposures to Ex. Ex decreased the time exposed to the aversive stimulus in the smaller compartment of the two-compartment passive-avoidance test, also for the normal control, sham-operated control and kainate-lesioned animals after both immediate and delayed exposures to Ex. Conclusion These findings suggest that, after temporal lobe epileptic seizures in rats, swimming exercise may attenuate the learning and memory deficits, even if the exercise treatment is delayed. PMID:28050361

  8. Network excitability in a model of chronic temporal lobe epilepsy critically depends on SK channel-mediated AHP currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Robert; Kirschstein, Timo; Brehme, Hannes; Porath, Katrin; Mikkat, Ulrike; Köhling, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons generate an after-hyperpolarization (AHP) whose medium component is thought to be generated by small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SK channels). Neuronal excitability is increased in epilepsy, and the AHP in turn is fundamentally involved in regulation of cellular excitability. We therefore investigated the involvement of the SK channel-mediated AHP in controlling cell and network excitability in the pilocarpine model epilepsy. Both acutely isolated CA1 pyramidal cells and isolated hippocampal slices were investigated in terms of the impact of SK channel-mediated AHP on hyperexcitability. Our findings show that pilocarpine-treated chronically epileptic rats exhibit significantly reduced SK channel-mediated hyperpolarizing outward current which was accompanied by a significant decrease in the somatic AHP. Paradoxically, inhibiting SK channels strongly exacerbated 0-Mg(2+)-induced epileptiform activity in slices from pilocarpine-treated animals, while having a significantly smaller effect in control tissue. This suggests that in chronically epileptic tissue, network excitability very critically depends on the remaining SK-channel mediated AHP. Additional real-time RT-PCR and semiquantitative Western blot experiments revealed that both the SK2 channel transcript and protein were significantly downregulated in the epileptic CA1 region. We conclude that SK2 channels are down-regulated in chronic epilepsy underlying the impaired SK channel function in CA1 pyramidal cells, and a further reduction of the remaining critical mass of SK channels results in an acute network decompensation.

  9. The lateralizing value of versive seizures in occipital lobe epilepsy%偏转发作在枕叶癫痫中的定侧价值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史建国; 高军; 董亚南; 杜斌; 彭洪海; 方向

    2014-01-01

    Objective To clarify the value of versive seizures in lateralizing and localizing the epileptogenic zone in patients with occipital lobe epilepsy. Methods We studied 9 occipital lobe epilepsy patients with at least one versive seizure recorded during preoperative noninvasive video-EEG monitoring, who underwent occipital lobe resection, and were followed postoperatively for 1-2 years. The videotaped versive seizures were analyzed to compare the direction of version and the side of surgical resection in each patient. Moreover, we examined other motor symptoms associated with version. Results 35 versive seizures were analyzed. The direction of version was always contralateral to the side of resection. Among accompanying motor symptoms, partial somatomotor manifestations were observed in only five patients. Conclusion Versive seizure is a reliable lateralizing sign indicating contralateral epileptogenic zone in occipital lobe epilepsy. Since versive seizures were accompanied by partial somatomotor manifestations in less than half of the patients, it is suggested that the mechanism of version in occipital lobe epilepsy is different from that in frontal lobe epilepsy.%目的:证实偏转发作在枕叶癫痫中的定位定侧价值。方法我们研究9例伴有偏转发作的枕叶癫痫手术治疗患者,应用视频脑电监测记录癫痫发作,术后随访1~2年,分析每例患者的偏转发作与手术侧别,另外还研究其他发作形式与偏转发作的联系。结果9例患者共记录到35次偏转发作,偏转方向均指向病变对侧,此外,枕叶癫痫偏转发作较少伴随部分运动发作。结论枕叶癫痫中偏转发作具有明确的定侧价值,同时,与额叶癫痫相比,枕叶偏转发作具有不同的发作机制。

  10. Interictal brain SPECT in patients with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy; SPECT cerebral interictal em pacientes com epilepsia do lobo temporal de dificil controle

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    Andraus, Maria Emilia Cosenza

    2000-06-01

    The brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is s functional neuroimaging method that can detect localized changes in cerebral blood flow. The temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common epileptic syndrome in adults, and more than 50% are medically refractory. The SPECT can contribute to investigation of epileptogenic focus and is one of the methods of pre-surgical evaluation of these patients. (author)

  11. Differentiation and Functional Incorporation of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived GABAergic Interneurons in the Dentate Gyrus of Mice with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Maisano, Xu; Litvina, Elizabeth; Tagliatela, Stephanie; Aaron, Gloster B.; Grabel, Laura B.; Naegele, Janice R

    2012-01-01

    Cell therapies for neurological disorders require an extensive knowledge of disease-associated neuropathology and procedures for generating neurons for transplantation. In many patients with severe acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the dentate gyrus exhibits sclerosis and GABAergic interneuron degeneration. Mounting evidence suggests that therapeutic benefits can be obtained by transplanting fetal GABAergic progenitors into the dentate gyrus in rodents with TLE, but the scarcity of human...

  12. A functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of theory of mind impairments in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennion, Sophie; Delbeuck, Xavier; Koelkebeck, Katja; Brion, Marine; Tyvaert, Louise; Plomhause, Lucie; Derambure, Philippe; Lopes, Renaud; Szurhaj, William

    2016-12-01

    Although patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) are known to have theory of mind (ToM) impairments, the latter's neural functional bases have yet to be explored. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to gain insights into the neural dysfunction associated with ToM impairments in patients with mTLE. Twenty-five patients (12 and 13 with right and left mTLE, respectively) and 25 healthy controls performed the "animated shapes" task during fMRI. This complex ToM task requires both explicit reasoning about mental states and implicit processing of information on biological motion and action. The animated shapes evoke both ToM and non-ToM interaction perception, and the corresponding neural activation patterns were compared. Behavioral performance (i.e. categorization of the interactions) was also recorded. Relative to healthy controls, both patients with right and left mTLE were impaired in categorizing ToM interactions. The fMRI results showed that both patients with right and left mTLE had less intense neural activation (relative to controls) in regions involved in the implicit component of ToM processes (i.e. the fusiform gyrus in patients with right mTLE and the supplementary motor area in patients with left mTLE). In patients with right mTLE, we also observed more intense activation (relative to controls) in regions involved in the explicit component of ToM processes (i.e. the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex); age at onset of epilepsy also mediated activation in regions involved in the explicit component (i.e. the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and the temporoparietal junction). Patients with left mTLE displayed greater activation of the contralateral mesial regions (relative to controls); we speculate that this may correspond to the deployment of a compensatory mechanism. This study provides insights into the disturbances of the implicit/explicit ToM neural network in patients with mTLE. These impairments in the ToM neural network

  13. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensations, emotions, and behavior or sometimes convulsions, muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness. The epilepsies have many ... sensations, emotions, and behavior or sometimes convulsions, muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness. The epilepsies have many ...

  14. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters ... may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, ...

  15. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of epilepsy medicines Use of alcohol or other recreational drugs Other considerations: People with epilepsy should wear medical ... panel Dementia Diabetes Encephalitis Head injury - first aid HIV/AIDS Meningitis Neurosyphilis Phenylketonuria Prerenal azotemia Seizures Stroke ...

  16. Peri-ictal water drinking and other ictal vegetative symptoms: Localizing and lateralizing the epileptogenic zone in temporal lobe epilepsy? Two case reports and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errguig, L; Lahjouji, F; Belaidi, H; Jiddane, M; Elkhamlichi, A; Dakka, T; Ouazzani, R

    2013-11-01

    Peri-ictal behavior disorders can be helpful in localizing and lateralizing seizure onset in partial epilepsies, especially those originating in the temporal lobe. In this paper, we present the case of two right-handed women aged 36 and 42 years who presented with partial seizures of mesial temporal type. Both of the patients had drug resistant epilepsy and undergone presurgical evaluation tests including brain magnetic resonance imaging, video-EEG monitoring and neuropsychological testing. The two patients had hippocampal sclerosis in the right temporal lobe and exhibited PIWD behavior concomitant with right temporal lobe discharges documented during video-EEG recordings. Anterior temporal lobectomy was performed in one case with an excellent outcome after surgery. The patient was free of seizures at 3 years follow-up. We reviewed other publications of peri-ictal autonomic symptoms considered to have a lateralizing significance, such as peri-ictal vomiting, urinary urge, ictal pilo-erection. Clinicians should search for these symptoms, even if not spontaneously reported by the patient, because they are often under-estimated, both by the patients themselves and by physicians. Additionally, patients with lateralizing auras during seizures have a significantly better outcome after epilepsy surgery than those without lateralizing features.

  17. Spatio-temporal Expression Study of Phosphorylated 70-kDa Ribosomal S6 Kinase (p70S6k)in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-liang Xing; Long-ze Sha; Yuan Yao; Yan Shen; Li-wen Wu; Qi Xu

    2012-01-01

    To determine the spatio-temporal expression of p70S6k activation in hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.Methods Temporal lobe epilepsy model was established by stereotaxically unilateral and intrahippocampal injection of kainite acid (KA) in adult male C57BL/6 mice.Latent and chronic epileptogenesis were represented by mice 5 days after KA injection (n=5) and mice 5 weeks after KA injection (n=8),respectively.Control mice (n=5) were injected with saline.Immunohistochemical assays were performed on brain sections of the mice.Results Hippocampus both ipsilateral and contralateral to the KA injection displayed significantly up-regulated pS6 immunoreactivity in dispersed granule cells in 5-day and 5-week model mice.Conclusion The activation of p70S6k is mainly located in the dentate gyrus in KA-induced mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy,indicating that the activation may be related with the disperse degree and hypertrophy of granule cells.

  18. [Prince Liev Nikoláievitch Míchkin ("The Idiot", Fiódor Dostoevsky) and the interictal personality syndrome of temporal lobe epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Mendes, Mirian Fabíola Studart Gurgel

    2004-06-01

    Russian romancist Fiódor Dostoevsky's composition, besides its extraordinary literary value, has a special importance for neurologists and epileptologists. The writer, who suffered of epilepsy, transmitted in his texts the epileptic's universe and how the patient is perceived by the society. His novels had great influence on how epilepsy is perceived by western culture. The romance "The Idiot" has as protagonist Prince Liev Nikoláievitch Míchkin, a epileptic with remarkable personality. Considering the propose made by Geschwind-Waxman (1975) of a interictal personality syndrome in temporal lobe epilepsy, this article intends to discuss the behavioral alterations in epileptic patient, from Míchkin, the main character in Fiódor Dostoevsky's "The Idiot".

  19. Screening LGI1 in a cohort of 26 lateral temporal lobe epilepsy patients with auditory aura from Turkey detects a novel de novo mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesim, Yesim F; Uzun, Gunes Altiokka; Yucesan, Emrah; Tuncer, Feyza N; Ozdemir, Ozkan; Bebek, Nerses; Ozbek, Ugur; Iseri, Sibel A Ugur; Baykan, Betul

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (ADLTE) is an autosomal dominant epileptic syndrome characterized by focal seizures with auditory or aphasic symptoms. The same phenotype is also observed in a sporadic form of lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE), namely idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF). Heterozygous mutations in LGI1 account for up to 50% of ADLTE families and only rarely observed in IPEAF cases. In this study, we analysed a cohort of 26 individuals with LTLE diagnosed according to the following criteria: focal epilepsy with auditory aura and absence of cerebral lesions on brain MRI. All patients underwent clinical, neuroradiological and electroencephalography examinations and afterwards they were screened for mutations in LGI1 gene. The single LGI1 mutation identified in this study is a novel missense variant (NM_005097.2: c.1013T>C; p.Phe338Ser) observed de novo in a sporadic patient. This is the first study involving clinical analysis of a LTLE cohort from Turkey and genetic contribution of LGI1 to ADLTE phenotype. Identification of rare LGI1 gene mutations in sporadic cases supports diagnosis as ADTLE and draws attention to potential familial clustering of ADTLE in suggestive generations, which is especially important for genetic counselling.

  20. Cognitive function fifty-six years after surgical treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jane Banks

    2014-01-01

    Our investigation at 56 postoperative years focused on cognitive skills, with some emphasis on learning and memory; a clinical examination was also performed, and the anatomical extent of the resection was determined on 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Four age- and IQ-appropriate women were tested as healthy control subjects. The patient showed material-specific impairments in language and verbal memory compared with the control subjects and also compared with her own earlier performance, but her performance on other cognitive tasks did not differ from that of the control subjects. Thus, her specific deficits had worsened over time, and she was also impaired compared with healthy individuals of her age, but her deficits remained confined to the verbal sphere, consistent with her temporal lobe seizure focus and surgery.

  1. Interleukin (IL)1beta, IL-1alpha, and IL-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphisms in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemoto, K; Kawasaki, J; Miyamoto, T; Obayashi, H; Nishimura, M

    2000-05-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1beta, are known to modulate effects of neurotoxic neurotransmitters discharged during excitation or inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). They also regulate development of glial scars at sites of CNS injury. To elucidate a genetic predisposition of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS+), we studied polymorphisms in the IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) genes in 50 patients with TLE-HS+ and in 112 controls. Fifty-three patients who had TLE without HS were also examined (TLE-HS-) as disease controls. The distribution of the biallelic polymorphism in the promoter region at position -511 of the IL-1beta gene (IL-1B-511) was significantly different both between TLE-HS+ patients and controls and between TLE-HS+ and TLE-HS- patients. The differences were due to overrepresentation of the homozygotes for IL-1B-511*2, which is suggested to be a high producer of IL-1beta, in TLE-HS+ patients compared with both controls and TLE-HS- patients. In contrast, there was no difference between TLE-HS- patients and controls. Our data suggest that, in the homozygotes for IL-IB-511*2, minor events in development such as febrile convulsions could set up a cascade leading to HS.

  2. Significant discrepancies between immediate and delayed WMS-III indices are rare in temporal lobe epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brian D; Hermann, Bruce P; Seidenberg, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Initial factor analysis of Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III) standardization data resulted in a five-factor model that included separate immediate (IMM) and delayed (DEL) memory factors for auditory (AUD) and visual (VIS) memory. However, recent factor analyses that revealed three factors--AUD, VIS, and working memory--were discovered to be more accurate. Continued use of separate WMS-III IMM and DEL indices has been recommended because future studies with clinical groups might support this distinction. Data from this investigation of 88 temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients suggested separate IMM and DEL WMS-III indices are not necessary in this population. Results were as follows: 1) There was no significant difference between the IMM and DEL indices for AUD or VIS memory. 2) The percentage of individuals with a significant difference between the IMM and DEL indices (IMM minus DEL >11 or WMS-III IMM and DEL memory subtest scores to form AUD and VIS memory indices is appropriate for TLE patients.

  3. Evaluation of behavioral parameters and mortality in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy induced by intracerebroventricular pilocarpine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Ceja, Laura; Pardo-Peña, Kenia; Ventura-Mejía, Consuelo

    2014-06-06

    The pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a useful tool that is used to investigate the mechanisms underlying the generation and maintenance of seizures. Although this model has been modified significantly to reduce mortality and to promote the appearance of spontaneous recurrent seizures, to date, no detailed evaluation has been performed of the behavioral parameters and mortality in TLE induced by intracerebroventricular pilocarpine administration; therefore, this was the goal of the present study. A single dose of pilocarpine hydrochloride (2.4 mg in a total volume of 2 µl) was injected into the right lateral brain ventricle of rats; the convulsive behavior was rated using the Racine scale and the mortality was analyzed in these animals. We found that 30-90 min after animals received intracerebroventricular pilocarpine injections, 73% developed status epilepticus (SE) with an activity score of 4/5 on the Racine scale. Moreover, these seizures were associated with the propagation of epileptiform activity to different hippocampal regions. Of the animals that developed SE, spontaneous recurrent seizures were observed in 32.5% at different times after SE induction. A 35% mortality rate was observed, which included animals that died during pilocarpine injection and after SE induction. On the basis of these findings, and given the observed latency between the insult (SE induction by pilocarpine injection) and the manifestation of spontaneous recurrent seizures, we propose that this model is a useful tool for basic biomedical research of SE and TLE.

  4. Kallikrein 1 is overexpressed by astrocytes in the hippocampus of patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, associated with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Priscila Santos Rodrigues; Perosa, Sandra Regina; Arganãraz, Gustavo Adolfo; Yacubian, Elza Márcia; Carrete, Henrique; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Varella, Pedro Paulo Vasconcellos; Santiago, Joselita Ferreira Carvalho; Canzian, Mauro; Silva, Jose Antonio; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Amado, Débora; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça Naffah

    2011-03-01

    Kallikrein 1 (hK1) is a tissue enzyme responsible for kinin release in inflammatory cascade. This study was delineated to study the distribution and the co-localization of hK1 and kinin B1 and B2 receptors with glial and/or neuronal proteins markers, in the hippocampus of patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, associated with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS), comparing with control tissues. Hippocampal levels of KLK1 mRNA were also measured. hK1, kinin B1 and B2 receptors, NeuN and GFAP were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy and KLK1 mRNA was quantified with real time PCR. Increased expression of hK1 by astrocytes co-localized with GFAP was found, contrasting with kinin B1 and B2 receptors, which were co-localized with NeuN in the sclerotic hippocampus. In addition, KLK1 mRNA was also up-regulated in same tissues. These data suggest an overexpression of kallikrein-kinin system and a neuron-glia interaction in the inflammatory process present in refractory TLE-HS.

  5. Alteration of Interictal Brain Activity in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in the Left Dominant Hemisphere: A Resting-State MEG Study

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    Haitao Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resting MEG activities were compared between patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE and normal controls. Using SAMg2, the activities of MEG data were reconstructed and normalized. Significantly elevated SAMg2 signals were found in LTLE patients in the left temporal lobe and medial structures. Marked decreases of SAMg2 signals were found in the wide extratemporal lobe regions, such as the bilateral visual cortex. The study also demonstrated a positive correlation between the seizure frequency and brain activities of the abnormal regions after the multiple linear regression analysis. These results suggested that the aberrant brain activities not only were related to the epileptogenic zones, but also existed in other extratemporal regions in patients with LTLE. The activities of the aberrant regions could be further damaged with the increase of the seizure frequency. Our findings indicated that LTLE could be a multifocal disease, including complex epileptic networks and brain dysfunction networks.

  6. Epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Kjær, Troels W

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy affects around 33,000 people in Denmark. The classification of the epilepsies is currently under revision and the clinical course of the disease depends on the underlying aetiology. Diagnostic evaluation includes EEG and often long-term video-EEG monitoring to ensure the diagnosis and clas......-sification. More than two thirds of patients with epilepsy can obtain complete seizure control. The remainders, counting around 12.000 patients in Denmark, having medical refractory epilepsy should be considered for other treatment options; epilepsy surgery or other non-pharmacological treatment....

  7. Age-dependent consequences of seizures and the development of temporal lobe epilepsy in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, C; da Silva Fernandes, M J; Nehlig, A

    2001-01-01

    The age-related functional changes underlying epileptogenesis remain to be clarified. In the present study, we explored the correlation between metabolic changes, neuronal damage and epileptogenesis during the acute, silent and chronic phases following status epilepticus (SE) induced by lithium-pilocarpine (Li-Pilo) in 10- (P10), 21-day-old (P21) and adult rats. Local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (LCMRglcs) were measured by the [14C]2-deoxyglucose method during SE, the silent period and the interictal phase of the chronic period. Neurodegeneration was assessed by cresyl violet staining. During SE, LCMRglcs dramatically increased at all ages mainly in forebrain vulnerable regions. During the silent phase, in P21 and adult rats, metabolic decreases were recorded in damaged forebrain regions involved in the genesis and propagation of seizures 14 days after SE. At the end of the silent phase, P21 and adult rats exhibited metabolic increases in intact brainstem areas involved in the remote control of epilepsy. During the interictal phase of the chronic period, LCMRglcs decreased in damaged forebrain areas of adult and P21 rats that were not spontaneously epileptic, while LCMRglcs were similar to control levels in epileptic P21 rats. In P10 rats, there was no damage and no metabolic consequences at any time after SE. In conclusion, the process of epileptogenesis and its functional consequences differ in P21 and adult rats. The factors underlying these age-related differences remain to be explored. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Reversible MRI abnormalities in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: a case report

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    Chiara Pizzanelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The question regarding  the existence of abnormalities in the neuroimaging exams immediately after status epilecticus or epileptic seizures, but showing complete reversibility after a proper antiepileptic therapy, has long been debated. The first reports attempting to demonstrate their existence date back to the 1980s, and relied upon computed tomography as the imaging method of choice. After the introduction of MRI, a more appropriate characterization of these abnormalities was obtained along with the description of their most frequent features: (a T2 signal hyperintensity in the white matter and, occasionally, (b reduced apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC and increased signal in DWI sequences.The MRI abnormalities induced by epileptic activity pose a broad differential diagnosis including infections, inflammatory autoimmune encephalopathies, neoplasms. It remains a diagnosis of exclusion and requires proper diagnostic iter in order to reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention.In this case report, a thorough presentation will be outlined about MRI alterations in the left mesial temporal lobe, which resulted completely reversible after a proper antiepileptic therapy.

  9. Abnormal interictal gamma activity may manifest a seizure onset zone in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Andrei V; Murro, Anthony M; Meador, Kimford J

    2011-04-01

    Even though recent studies have suggested that seizures do not occur suddenly and that before a seizure there is a period with an increased probability of seizure occurrence, neurophysiological mechanisms of interictal and pre-seizure states are unknown. The ability of mathematical methods to provide much more sensitive tools for the detection of subtle changes in the electrical activity of the brain gives promise that electrophysiological markers of enhanced seizure susceptibility can be found even during interictal periods when EEG of epilepsy patients often looks 'normal'. Previously, we demonstrated in animals that hippocampal and neocortical gamma-band rhythms (30-100 Hz) intensify long before seizures caused by systemic infusion of kainic acid. Other studies in recent years have also drawn attention to the fast activity (>30 Hz) as a possible marker of epileptogenic tissue. The current study quantified gamma-band activity during interictal periods and seizures in intracranial EEG (iEEG) in 5 patients implanted with subdural grids/intracranial electrodes during their pre-surgical evaluation. In all our patients, we found distinctive (abnormal) bursts of gamma activity with a 3 to 100 fold increase in power at gamma frequencies with respect to selected by clinicians, quiescent, artifact-free, 7-20 min "normal" background (interictal) iEEG epochs 1 to 14 hours prior to seizures. Increases in gamma activity were largest in those channels which later displayed the most intensive electrographic seizure discharges. Moreover, location of gamma-band bursts correlated (with high specificity, 96.4% and sensitivity, 83.8%) with seizure onset zone (SOZ) determined by clinicians. Spatial localization of interictal gamma rhythms within SOZ suggests that the persistent presence of abnormally intensified gamma rhythms in the EEG may be an important tool for focus localization and possibly a determinant of epileptogenesis.

  10. Persistent sodium current in subicular neurons isolated from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugdenhil, Martin; Hoogland, Govert; van Veelen, Cornelis W M; Wadman, Wytse J

    2004-05-01

    The persistent sodium current is a common target of anti-epileptic drugs and contributes to burst firing. Intrinsically burst firing subicular neurons are involved in the generation and spread of epileptic activity. We measured whole-cell sodium currents in pyramidal neurons isolated from the subiculum resected in drug-resistant epileptic patients and in rats. In half of the cells from both patients and rats, the sodium current inactivated within 500 ms at -30 mV. Others displayed a tetrodotoxin-sensitive slowly or non-inactivating sodium current of up to 53% of the total sodium current amplitude. Compared with the transient sodium current in the same cells, this persistent sodium current activated with normal kinetics but its voltage-dependent activation occurred 7 mV more hyperpolarized. Depolarizing voltage steps that lasted 10 s completely inactivated the persistent sodium current. Its voltage dependence did not differ from that of the transient sodium current but its slope was less steep. The voltage dependence and kinetics of the persistent sodium current in cells from patients were not different from that in subicular cells from rats. The current density and the relative amplitude contribution were 3-4 times greater in neurons from drug-resistant epilepsy patients. The abundant presence of persistent sodium current in half of the subicular neurons could lead to a larger number of neurons with intrinsic burst firing. The extraordinarily large amplitude of the persistent sodium current in this subset of subicular neurons might explain why these patients are susceptible to seizures and hard to treat pharmacologically.

  11. Stigmatization and social impacts of epilepsy in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Pelin Dogan; Atakli, Dilek; Yuksel, Burcu; Guveli, Betul Tekin; Sari, Huseyin

    2015-09-01

    Stigma associated with epilepsy has negative effects on psychosocial outcomes, affecting the lives of people with epilepsy (PWE). Obtaining basic social rights can be difficult compared to the general population. The aim of our study was to evaluate the perceived stigma among PWE and social attitude towards the disease and to compare the social measures with the general population in Turkey. A self-completed questionnaire consisting of demographic details and items about attitudes and perceived stigmatization was developed. Participants consisted of patients with various types of seizures who were randomly chosen from the epilepsy outpatient clinic. They were requested to complete the questionnaire. Questionnaires were obtained from 330 PWE. One hundred forty individuals (43.3%) out of 323 reported feeling stigmatized. The marriage and total fertility rates were below the national rates of Turkey. Keeping their epilepsy as a secret from society was prevalent. Although the education rate was not below the national rate, unemployment rate was high, and the average monthly wage was significantly lower than that of the general population. The majority thought that their families were protective towards them. Only 2 of the 330 participants were living alone. The present study supports the perception of stigma associated with epilepsy and its negative impact on the lives of PWE in Turkey. Clearly, more research is needed to understand the reasons for stigma and how to decrease its impact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathophysiology of mood disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy Fisiopatologia dos transtornos de humor na epilepsia do lobo temporal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmyla Kandratavicius

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There is accumulating evidence that the limbic system is pathologically involved in cases of psychiatric comorbidities in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE patients. Our objective was to develop a conceptual framework describing how neuropathological, neurochemical and electrophysiological aspects might contribute to the development of psychiatric symptoms in TLE and the putative neurobiological mechanisms that cause mood disorders in this patient subgroup. METHODS: In this review, clinical, experimental and neuropathological findings, as well as neurochemical features of the limbic system were examined together to enhance our understanding of the association between TLE and psychiatric comorbidities. Finally, the value of animal models in epilepsy and mood disorders was discussed. CONCLUSIONS:TLE and psychiatric symptoms coexist more frequently than chance would predict. Alterations and neurotransmission disturbance among critical anatomical networks, and impaired or aberrant plastic changes might predispose patients with TLE to mood disorders. Clinical and experimental studies of the effects of seizures on behavior and electrophysiological patterns may offer a model of how limbic seizures increase the vulnerability of TLE patients to precipitants of psychiatric symptoms.OBJETIVO: Há evidências crescentes do envolvimento do sistema límbico nas comorbidades psiquiátricas associadas à epilepsia do lobo temporal (ELT. Nosso objetivo foi descrever o panorama atual das alterações neuropatológicas, neuroquímicas e eletrofisiológicas que podem contribuir para o desenvolvimento de sintomas psiquiátricos na ELT e explorar possíveis mecanismos neurobiológicos que podem levar ao aparecimento das desordens de humor nesse subgrupo de pacientes. MÉTODOS: Achados clínicos, de modelos experimentais e neuropatológicos foram revistos, assim como características neuroquímicas do sistema límbico foram examinadas em conjunto para auxiliar

  13. Impact of Modal Parameters on Milling Process Chatter Stability Lobes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhongqun; LIU Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Modals of the machine/tool and machine/part system are the principal factors affecting the stability of a milling process. Based on the modeling of chatter stability of milling process, the influence of modal parameters on chatter stability lobes independently or jointly has been analyzed by simulation. Peak-to-valley specific value, lobe coefficient and the corresponding calculation formula have been put forward. General laws and steps of modal simplification for multimodality system have been summarized.

  14. Depressão permanente e disritmia do lobo temporal Permanent depression and temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Eneida Baptistete Matarazzo

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available Após revisão bibliográfica a respeito da depressão de origem epilética, a autora conclui que são citadas as formas pré-ictal, ictal, pós-ictal e inter-ictal. Esta última, denominada por Grecu e Kalman "depressão temporal episódica", é descrita como tendo duração de horas, dias ou semanas. No presente trabalho são analisados 2 casos com depressão episódica, 1 com depressão duradoura (3 anos e posteriormente episódica, e um outro com depressão duradoura (13 anos. O estudo clínico comparativo dos 4 casos, o resultado eletrencefalográfico e a resposta ao tratamento antiepilético permitem concluir que tanto as manifestações episódicas como as duradouras tinham etiologia epilética, sendo a disritmia localizada na área temporal. Baseada no estudo fenomenológico dos casos, a autora admite a hipótese de que as depressões epiléticas tenham quadro clínico característico que permite distingui-las das depressões de outra etiologia e sugere para as formas duradouras a denominação "depressão temporal permanente".Making a bibliographic review about epileptic depression, the Author found that ictal, pre, post-ictal and inter-ictal forms are described. The last one, named by Grecu and Kalman "Episodic temporal depression", is accepted as lasting for hours, days or weeks. The present work analyses two patients with episodic depression, one with permanent (3 years and later episodic form and another one with permanent depression only (13 years. The comparative study of the 4 patients, the EEG results and the effect of antiepileptic treatment permise to conclude that even the episodic and the permanent depression were of epileptic etiology, with temporal lobe localisation. Based on the symptomatology found in the 4 patients, the Author admits the hypothesis that the epileptic depression is characteristic and that it should be possible to distinghish it, clinically, from other depressions. It is suggested, for this permanent form

  15. Comparison of IMP-SPECT findings to subtest scores of Wechsler intelligence adult Scale-Revised in temporal lobe epilepsy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Rumiko; Uejima, Masahiko; Kaneko, Yuko; Miyamoto, Yuriko; Watabe, Manabu; Takahashi, Ruriko; Niwa, Shin-ichi; Shishido, Fumio [Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    In this study, 40 temporal lobe epilepsy patients were assessed, using the Laterality Index (LI) of ROI values in IMP-SPECT findings, Wechsler adult intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and subtest scores. LIs of the frontal, temporal and occipital lobes were calculated as follows: the ROI values on the right side were subtracted from those on the left, and the results was divided by the sum of the ROI values on the right and left sides. The individual subtest scores on WAIS-R were standardized by all evaluation scores in order to exclude the influence of differences in intelligence level as much as possible. The results were as follows: there was a positive correlation (r=0.74, p<0.001) between LI values and the performance in Arithmetic in the left temporal lobe hypoperfusion group. And there was a positive correlation (r=0.50, p<0.02) between LI values and the performance in Vocabulary in the left temporal lobe hypoperfusion group. In the right occipital lobe hypoperfusion group, there was a negative correlation (r=-O.44, p

  16. Validation of suitable reference genes for expression studies in different pilocarpine-induced models of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Thalita Ewellyn Batista Sales Marques

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that the reference gene in a RT-qPCR should be properly validated to ensure that gene expression is unaffected by the experimental condition. We investigated eight potential reference genes in two different pilocarpine PILO-models of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE performing a stability expression analysis using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKepeer softwares. Then, as a validation strategy, we conducted a relative expression analysis of the Gfap gene. Our results indicate that in the systemic PILO-model Actb, Gapdh, Rplp1, Tubb2a and Polr1a mRNAs were highly stable in hippocampus of rats from all experimental and control groups, whereas Gusb revealed to be the most variable one. In fact, we observed that using Gusb for normalization, the relative mRNA levels of the Gfap gene differed from those obtained with stable genes. On the contrary, in the intrahippocampal PILO-model, all softwares included Gusb as a stable gene, whereas B2m was indicated as the worst candidate gene. The results obtained for the other reference genes were comparable to those observed for the systemic Pilo-model. The validation of these data by the analysis of the relative expression of Gfap showed that the upregulation of the Gfap gene in the hippocampus of rats sacrificed 24 hours after status epilepticus (SE was undetected only when B2m was used as the normalizer. These findings emphasize that a gene that is stable in one pathology model may not be stable in a different experimental condition related to the same pathology and therefore, the choice of reference genes depends on study design.

  17. Correlation between IL-10 and microRNA-187 expression in epileptic rat hippocampus and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Walid A. Alsharafi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence is emerging that microRNAs (miRs are key regulators controlling neuroinflammatory processes, which are known to play a potential role in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. The aim of the present study was to investigate the dynamic expression pattern of interleukin (IL–10 as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and miR-187 and post-transcriptional inflammation-related miRNA in the hippocampus of a rat model of status epilepticus (SE and patients with TLE. We performed a real-time quantitative PCR and western blot on rat hippocampus (2 hours, 7 days, 21 days and 60 days following pilocarpine-induced SE, and on hippocampus obtained from TLE patients and normal controls. To detect the relationship between IL-10 and miR-187 on neurons, lipopolysaccharide (LPS and IL-10-stimulated neurons were prepared. Furthermore, we identified the effect of antagonizing of miR-187 by its antagomir on IL-10 secretion. Here we reported that that IL-10 secretion and miR-187 expression levels are inversely correlated after SE.. In patients with TLE, the expression levels of IL-10 was also significantly upregulated, whereas miR-187 expression was significantly downregulated. Moreover, miR-187 expression was significantly reduced following IL-10 stimulation in an IL-10–dependent manner. On the other hand, antagonizing miR-187 reduced the production of IL-10 in hippocampal tissues of rat model of SE. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of miR-187 in the physiological regulation of IL-10 anti-inflammatory responses and elucidate the role of neuro-inflammation in the pathogenesis of TLE. Therefore, modulation of the IL-10 / miR-187 axis may be a new therapeutic approach for TLE.

  18. Expressional analysis of the astrocytic Kir4.1 channel in a pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yuki; Harada, Yuya; Mukai, Takahiro; Shimizu, Saki; Okuda, Aoi; Fujimoto, Megumi; Ono, Asuka; Sakagami, Yoshihisa; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2013-01-01

    The inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channel Kir4.1 in brain astrocytes mediates spatial K(+) buffering and regulates neural activities. Recent studies have shown that loss-of-function mutations in the human gene KCNJ10 encoding Kir4.1 cause epileptic seizures, suggesting a close relationship between the Kir4.1 channel function and epileptogenesis. Here, we performed expressional analysis of Kir4.1 in a pilocarpine-induced rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to explore the role of Kir4.1 channels in modifying TLE epileptogenesis. Treatment of rats with pilocarpine (350 mg/kg, i.p.) induced acute status epilepticus, which subsequently caused spontaneous seizures 7-8 weeks after the pilocarpine treatment. Western blot analysis revealed that TLE rats (interictal condition) showed significantly higher levels of Kir4.1 than the control animals in the cerebral cortex, striatum, and hypothalamus. However, the expression of other Kir subunits, Kir5.1 and Kir2.1, remained unaltered. Immunohistochemical analysis illustrated that Kir4.1-immunoreactivity-positive astrocytes in the pilocarpine-induced TLE model were markedly increased in most of the brain regions examined, concomitant with an increase in the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes. In addition, Kir4.1 expression ratios relative to the number of astrocytes (Kir4.1-positive cells/GFAP-positive cells) were region-specifically elevated in the amygdala (i.e., medial and cortical amygdaloid nuclei) and sensory cortex. The present study demonstrated for the first time that the expression of astrocytic Kir4.1 channels was elevated in a pilocarpine-induced TLE model, especially in the amygdala, suggesting that astrocytic Kir4.1 channels play a role in modifying TLE epileptogenesis, possibly by acting as an inhibitory compensatory mechanism.

  19. Expressional analysis of the astrocytic Kir4.1 channel in a pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epilepsy model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki eNagao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The inwardly-rectifying potassium (Kir channel Kir4.1 in brain astrocytes mediates spatial K+ buffering and regulates neural activities. Recent studies have shown that loss-of-function mutations in the human gene KCNJ10 encoding Kir4.1 cause epileptic seizures, suggesting a close relationship between the Kir4.1 channel function and epileptogenesis. Here, we performed expressional analysis of Kir4.1 in a pilocarpine-induced rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE to explore the role of Kir4.1 channels in modifying TLE epileptogenesis. Treatment of rats with pilocarpine (350 mg/kg, i.p. induced acute status epilepticus, which subsequently caused spontaneous seizures 7–8 weeks after the pilocarpine treatment. Western blot analysis revealed that TLE rats (interictal condition showed significantly higher levels of Kir4.1 than the control animals in the cerebral cortex, striatum and hypothalamus. However, the expression of other Kir subunits, Kir5.1 and Kir2.1, remained unaltered. Immunohistochemical analysis illustrated that Kir4.1-immunoreactivity-positive astrocytes in the pilocarpine-induced TLE model were markedly increased in most of the brain regions examined, concomitant with an increase in the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-positive astrocytes. In addition, Kir4.1 expression ratios relative to the number of astrocytes (Kir4.1-positive cells/GFAP-positive cells were region-specifically elevated in the amygdala (i.e., medial and cortical amygdaloid nuclei and sensory cortex. The present study demonstrated for the first time that the expression of astrocytic Kir4.1 channels was elevated in a pilocarpine-induced TLE model, especially in the amygdala, suggesting that astrocytic Kir4.1 channels play a role in modifying TLE epileptogenesis, possibly by acting as an inhibitory compensatory mechanism.

  20. Expressional analysis of the astrocytic Kir4.1 channel in a pilocarpine–induced temporal lobe epilepsy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yuki; Harada, Yuya; Mukai, Takahiro; Shimizu, Saki; Okuda, Aoi; Fujimoto, Megumi; Ono, Asuka; Sakagami, Yoshihisa; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2013-01-01

    The inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channel Kir4.1 in brain astrocytes mediates spatial K+ buffering and regulates neural activities. Recent studies have shown that loss-of-function mutations in the human gene KCNJ10 encoding Kir4.1 cause epileptic seizures, suggesting a close relationship between the Kir4.1 channel function and epileptogenesis. Here, we performed expressional analysis of Kir4.1 in a pilocarpine-induced rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to explore the role of Kir4.1 channels in modifying TLE epileptogenesis. Treatment of rats with pilocarpine (350 mg/kg, i.p.) induced acute status epilepticus, which subsequently caused spontaneous seizures 7–8 weeks after the pilocarpine treatment. Western blot analysis revealed that TLE rats (interictal condition) showed significantly higher levels of Kir4.1 than the control animals in the cerebral cortex, striatum, and hypothalamus. However, the expression of other Kir subunits, Kir5.1 and Kir2.1, remained unaltered. Immunohistochemical analysis illustrated that Kir4.1-immunoreactivity-positive astrocytes in the pilocarpine-induced TLE model were markedly increased in most of the brain regions examined, concomitant with an increase in the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes. In addition, Kir4.1 expression ratios relative to the number of astrocytes (Kir4.1-positive cells/GFAP-positive cells) were region-specifically elevated in the amygdala (i.e., medial and cortical amygdaloid nuclei) and sensory cortex. The present study demonstrated for the first time that the expression of astrocytic Kir4.1 channels was elevated in a pilocarpine-induced TLE model, especially in the amygdala, suggesting that astrocytic Kir4.1 channels play a role in modifying TLE epileptogenesis, possibly by acting as an inhibitory compensatory mechanism. PMID:23922547

  1. MRI characterization of temporal lobe epilepsy using rapidly measurable spatial indices with hemisphere asymmetries and gender features

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    Datta, Siddhartha; Chakrabarti, Nilkanta [University of Calcutta, Department of Physiology and UGC-CPEPA Centre for ' ' Electro-physiological and Neuro-imaging studies including Mathematical Modelling' ' , Kolkata (India); Sarkar, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Sumit; Basu, Swadhapriya [IPGME and R, SSKM Hospital, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Kolkata (India); Mulpuru, Sai Krishna [National Brain Research Centre, National Neuro-Imaging Facility, Manesar (India); Tiwary, Basant K. [Pondicherry University, Centre for Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry (India); Roy, Prasun Kumar [National Brain Research Centre, Computational Neuroimaging Division, Manesar (India); National Brain Research Centre, Clinical Neuroscience Unit, Gurgaon (India)

    2015-09-15

    The paucity of morphometric markers for hemispheric asymmetries and gender variations in hippocampi and amygdalae in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) calls for better characterization of TLE by finding more useful prognostic MRI parameter(s). T1-weighted MRI (3 T) morphometry using multiple parameters of hippocampus-parahippocampus (angular and linear measures, volumetry) and amygdalae (volumetry) including their hemispheric asymmetry indices (AI) were evaluated in both genders. The cutoff values of parameters were statistically estimated from measurements of healthy subjects to characterize TLE (57 patients, 55 % male) alterations. TLE had differential categories with hippocampal atrophy, parahippocampal angle (PHA) acuteness, and several other parametric changes. Bilateral TLE categories were much more prevalent compared to unilateral TLE categories. Female patients were considerably more disposed to bilateral TLE categories than male patients. Male patients displayed diverse categories of unilateral abnormalities. Few patients (both genders) had combined bilateral appearances of hippocampal atrophy, amygdala atrophy, PHA acuteness, and increase in hippocampal angle (HA) where medial distance ratio (MDR) varied among genders. TLE had gender-specific and hemispheric dominant alterations in AI of parameters. Maximum magnitude of parametric changes in TLE includes (a) AI increase in HA of both genders, (b) HA increase (bilateral) in female patients, and (c) increase in ratio of amygdale/hippocampal volume (unilateral, right hemispheric), and AI decrease in MDR, in male patients. Multiparametric MRI studies of hippocampus and amygdalae, including their hemispheric asymmetry, underscore better characterization of TLE. Rapidly measurable single-slice parameters (HA, PHA, MDR) can readily delineate TLE in a time-constrained clinical setting, which contrasts with customary three-dimensional hippocampal volumetry that requires many slice computation. (orig.)

  2. An investigation of EEG dynamics in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy using the maximum Lyapunov exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sandeep P.; Shiau, Deng-Shan; Principe, Jose C.; Iasemidis, Leonidas D.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Norman, Wendy M.; Carney, Paul R.; Sackellares, J. Chris

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) recordings in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) has revealed characteristic dynamical features that distinguish the interictal, ictal, and postictal states and inter-state transitions. Experimental investigations into the mechanisms underlying these observations require the use of an animal model. A rat TLE model was used to test for differences in iEEG dynamics between well-defined states and to test specific hypotheses: 1) the short-term maximum Lyapunov exponent (STLmax), a measure of signal order, is lowest and closest in value among cortical sites during the ictal state, and highest and most divergent during the postictal state; 2) STLmax values estimated from the stimulated hippocampus are the lowest among all cortical sites; and 3) the transition from the interictal to ictal state is associated with a convergence in STLmax values among cortical sites. iEEGs were recorded from bilateral frontal cortices and hippocampi. STLmax and T-index (a measure of convergence/divergence of STLmax between recorded brain areas) were compared among the four different periods. Statistical tests (ANOVA and multiple comparisons) revealed that ictal STLmax was lower (p < 0.05) than other periods, STLmax values corresponding to the stimulated hippocampus were lower than those estimated from other cortical regions, and T-index values were highest during the postictal period and lowest during the ictal period. Also, the T-index values corresponding to the preictal period were lower than those during the interictal period (p < 0.05). These results indicate that a rat TLE model demonstrates several important dynamical signal characteristics similar to those found in human TLE and support future use of the model to study epileptic state transitions. PMID:19100262

  3. Hippocampal atrophy on MRI is predictive of histopathological patterns and surgical prognosis in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Corso, Jeana Torres; Garcia, Maria Teresa Fernandes Castilho; Gaça, Larissa Botelho; Comper, Sandra Mara; Lancellotti, Carmen Lúcia Penteado; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Carrete, Henrique; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2016-12-01

    To correlate hippocampal volumes obtained from brain structural imaging with histopathological patterns of hippocampal sclerosis (HS), in order to predict surgical outcome. Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with HS were selected. Clinical data were assessed pre-operatively and surgical outcome in the first year post surgery. One block of mid hippocampal body was selected for HS classification according to ILAE criteria. NeuN-immunoreactive cell bodies were counted within hippocampal subfields, in four randomly visual fields, and cell densities were transformed into z-score values. FreeSurfer processing of 1.5T brain structural images was used for subcortical and cortical volumetric estimation of the ipsilateral hippocampus. Univariate analysis of variance and Pearson's correlation test were applied for statistical analyses. Sixty-two cases (31 female, 32 right HS) were included. ILAE type 1 HS was identified in 48 patients, type 2 in eight, type 3 in two, and four had no-HS. Better results regarding seizure control, i.e. ILAE 1, were achieved by patients with type 1 HS (58.3%). Patients with types 1 and 2 had smaller hippocampal volumes compared to those with no-HS (p<0.001 and p=0.004, respectively). Positive correlation was encountered between hippocampal volumes and CA1, CA3, CA4, and total estimated neuronal densities. CA2 was the only sector which did not correlate its neuronal density with hippocampal volume (p=0.390). This is the first study correlating hippocampal volume on MRI submitted to FreeSurfer processing with ILAE patterns of HS and neuronal loss within each hippocampal subfield, a fundamental finding to anticipate surgical prognosis for patients with drug-resistant MTLE and HS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in the sensitivity of GABAA current rundown to drug treatments in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Pierangelo eCifelli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, the most common epileptic syndrome in adults, is still unsatisfactory, as one third of the patients are or become refractory to antiepileptic agents. Refractoriness may depend upon drug-induced alterations, but the disease per se may also undergo a progressive evolution that affects the sensitivity to drugs. mTLE has been shown to be associated with a dysfunction of the inhibitory signaling mediated by GABAA receptors. In particular, the repetitive activation of GABAA receptors produces a use-dependent decrease (rundown of the evoked currents (IGABA, which is markedly enhanced in the hippocampus and cortex of drug-resistant mTLE patients. This phenomenon has been also observed in the pilocarpine model, where the increased IGABA rundown is observed in the hippocampus at the time of the first spontaneous seizure, then extends to the cortex and remains constant in the chronic phase of the disease. Here, we examined the sensitivity of IGABA to pharmacological modulation. We focused on the antiepileptic agent levetiracetam and on the neurotrophin BDNF, which were previously reported to attenuate mTLE-induced increased rundown in the chronic human tissue. In the pilocarpine model, BDNF displayed a paramount effect, decreasing rundown in the hippocampus at the time of the first seizure, as well as in the hippocampus and cortex in the chronic period. In contrast, levetiracetam did not affect rundown in the hippocampus, but attenuated it in the cortex. Interestingly, this effect of levetiracetam was also observed on the still unaltered rundown observed in the cortex at the time of the first spontaneous seizure. These data suggest that the sensitivity of GABAA receptors to pharmacological interventions undergoes changes during the natural history of mTLE, implicating that the site of seizure initiation and the timing of treatment may highly affect the therapeutic outcome.

  5. Complex network analysis of CA3 transcriptome reveals pathogenic and compensatory pathways in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Silvia Yumi Bando

    Full Text Available We previously described - studying transcriptional signatures of hippocampal CA3 explants - that febrile (FS and afebrile (NFS forms of refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy constitute two distinct genomic phenotypes. That network analysis was based on a limited number (hundreds of differentially expressed genes (DE networks among a large set of valid transcripts (close to two tens of thousands. Here we developed a methodology for complex network visualization (3D and analysis that allows the categorization of network nodes according to distinct hierarchical levels of gene-gene connections (node degree and of interconnection between node neighbors (concentric node degree. Hubs are highly connected nodes, VIPs have low node degree but connect only with hubs, and high-hubs have VIP status and high overall number of connections. Studying the whole set of CA3 valid transcripts we: i obtained complete transcriptional networks (CO for FS and NFS phenotypic groups; ii examined how CO and DE networks are related; iii characterized genomic and molecular mechanisms underlying FS and NFS phenotypes, identifying potential novel targets for therapeutic interventions. We found that: i DE hubs and VIPs are evenly distributed inside the CO networks; ii most DE hubs and VIPs are related to synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability whereas most CO hubs, VIPs and high hubs are related to neuronal differentiation, homeostasis and neuroprotection, indicating compensatory mechanisms. Complex network visualization and analysis is a useful tool for systems biology approaches to multifactorial diseases. Network centrality observed for hubs, VIPs and high hubs of CO networks, is consistent with the network disease model, where a group of nodes whose perturbation leads to a disease phenotype occupies a central position in the network. Conceivably, the chance for exerting therapeutic effects through the modulation of particular genes will be higher if these genes

  6. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor-mediated hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channelopathy in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    McClelland, Shawn; Flynn, Corey; Dubé, Celine; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Ghestem, Antoine; Esclapez, Monique; Bernard, Christophe; Baram, Tallie Z

    2011-09-01

    Enduring, abnormal expression and function of the ion channel hyperpolarization-activated cyclic adenosine monophosphate gated channel type 1 (HCN1) occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We examined the underlying mechanisms, and investigated whether interfering with these mechanisms could modify disease course. Experimental TLE was provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (SE). HCN1 channel repression was examined at mRNA, protein, and functional levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was employed to identify the transcriptional mechanism of repressed HCN1 expression, and the basis for their endurance. Physical interaction of the repressor, NRSF, was abolished using decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Video/electroencephalographic recordings were performed to assess the onset and initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Levels of NRSF and its physical binding to the Hcn1 gene were augmented after SE, resulting in repression of HCN1 expression and HCN1-mediated currents (I(h) ), and reduced I(h) -dependent resonance in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites. Chromatin changes typical of enduring, epigenetic gene repression were apparent at the Hcn1 gene within a week after SE. Administration of decoy ODNs comprising the NRSF DNA-binding sequence (neuron restrictive silencer element [NRSE]), in vitro and in vivo, reduced NRSF binding to Hcn1, prevented its repression, and restored I(h) function. In vivo, decoy NRSE ODN treatment restored theta rhythm and altered the initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Acquired HCN1 channelopathy derives from NRSF-mediated transcriptional repression that endures via chromatin modification and may provide insight into the mechanisms of a number of channelopathies that coexist with, and may contribute to, the conversion of a normal brain into an epileptic one. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  7. Rosiglitazone Suppresses In Vitro Seizures in Hippocampal Slice by Inhibiting Presynaptic Glutamate Release in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

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    Shi-Bing Wong

    Full Text Available Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor whose agonist, rosiglitazone has a neuroprotective effect to hippocampal neurons in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slice preparations treated in Mg2+ free medium can induce ictal and interictal-like epileptiform discharges, which is regarded as an in vitro model of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. We applied rosiglitazone in hippocampal slices treated in Mg2+ free medium. The effects of rosiglitazone on hippocampal CA1-Schaffer collateral synaptic transmission were tested. We also examined the neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone toward NMDA excitotoxicity on cultured hippocampal slices. Application of 10 μM rosiglitazone significantly suppressed amplitude and frequency of epileptiform discharges in CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not block the effect of rosiglitazone on suppressing discharge frequency, but reverse the effect on suppressing discharge amplitude. Application of rosiglitazone suppressed synaptic transmission in the CA1-Schaffer collateral pathway. By miniature excitatory-potential synaptic current (mEPSC analysis, rosiglitazone significantly suppressed presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This phenomenon can be reversed by pretreating PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Also, rosiglitazone protected cultured hippocampal slices from NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. The protective effect of 10 μM rosiglitazone was partially antagonized by concomitant high dose GW9662 treatment, indicating that this effect is partially mediated by PPARγ receptors. In conclusion, rosiglitazone suppressed NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform discharges by inhibition of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Rosiglitazone protected hippocampal slice from NMDA excitotoxicity partially by PPARγ activation. We suggest that rosiglitazone could be a potential agent to treat patients with TLE.

  8. Heart rate variability in cyclic alternating pattern during sleep in healthy and Nocturnal Front Lobe Epilepsy patients.

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    Dorantes, Guadalupe; Méndez, Martín; Alba, Alfonso; Gonzaáez, J S; Parrino, Liborio; Milioli, G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess heart rate variability (HRV) during the cyclic alternating pattern, which is a sleep phenomenon, composed by cortical events that interrupt the basal oscillation of the NREM sleep stage. These cortical events are called A-phases and classified into three subtypes: A1, A2, A3. In addition, a comparison between healthy and Nocturnal Front Lobe Epilepsy (NFLE) patients was carried out. HRV was assessed by means of a time-varying autoregressive (TVAR) model with an adaptive filtering prediction scheme and by the time-varying square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences (RMSSD) of the RR intervals. For each A-phase, two signal segments were evaluated, the first one before the onset of the A-phase and the second one after the onset of the A-phase. An increase in the sympathetic outflow was suggested by higher values of low-frequency (LF) power in the three A-phases after the onset of A-phases, where A3-phases showed the largest changes. Increases in LF power were related with increases in heart rate in the same signal segments. These differences were found in both healthy and NFLE patients. LF/HF ratio and normalized LF power in A1-phases resulted significantly higher in NFLE patients in comparison with healthy subjects, which could suggest that there is a shift in the sympatho-vagal balance towards a more sympathetically mediated control of heart rate involving A1-phases in NFLE patients.

  9. MRI characterization of temporal lobe epilepsy using rapidly measurable spatial indices with hemisphere asymmetries and gender features.

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    Datta, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Sumit; Mulpuru, Sai Krishna; Basu, Swadhapriya; Tiwary, Basant K; Chakrabarti, Nilkanta; Roy, Prasun Kumar

    2015-09-01

    The paucity of morphometric markers for hemispheric asymmetries and gender variations in hippocampi and amygdalae in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) calls for better characterization of TLE by finding more useful prognostic MRI parameter(s). T1-weighted MRI (3 T) morphometry using multiple parameters of hippocampus-parahippocampus (angular and linear measures, volumetry) and amygdalae (volumetry) including their hemispheric asymmetry indices (AI) were evaluated in both genders. The cutoff values of parameters were statistically estimated from measurements of healthy subjects to characterize TLE (57 patients, 55% male) alterations. TLE had differential categories with hippocampal atrophy, parahippocampal angle (PHA) acuteness, and several other parametric changes. Bilateral TLE categories were much more prevalent compared to unilateral TLE categories. Female patients were considerably more disposed to bilateral TLE categories than male patients. Male patients displayed diverse categories of unilateral abnormalities. Few patients (both genders) had combined bilateral appearances of hippocampal atrophy, amygdala atrophy, PHA acuteness, and increase in hippocampal angle (HA) where medial distance ratio (MDR) varied among genders. TLE had gender-specific and hemispheric dominant alterations in AI of parameters. Maximum magnitude of parametric changes in TLE includes (a) AI increase in HA of both genders, (b) HA increase (bilateral) in female patients, and (c) increase in ratio of amygdale/hippocampal volume (unilateral, right hemispheric), and AI decrease in MDR, in male patients. Multiparametric MRI studies of hippocampus and amygdalae, including their hemispheric asymmetry, underscore better characterization of TLE. Rapidly measurable single-slice parameters (HA, PHA, MDR) can readily delineate TLE in a time-constrained clinical setting, which contrasts with customary three-dimensional hippocampal volumetry that requires many slice computation.

  10. The Visual Word Form Area remains in the dominant hemisphere for language in late-onset left occipital lobe epilepsies: A postsurgery analysis of two cases.

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    Lopes, Ricardo; Nunes, Rita Gouveia; Simões, Mário Rodrigues; Secca, Mário Forjaz; Leal, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    Automatic recognition of words from letter strings is a critical processing step in reading that is lateralized to the left-hemisphere middle fusiform gyrus in the so-called Visual Word Form Area (VWFA). Surgical lesions in this location can lead to irreversible alexia. Very early left hemispheric lesions can lead to transfer of the VWFA to the nondominant hemisphere, but it is currently unknown if this capability is preserved in epilepsies developing after reading acquisition. In this study, we aimed to determine the lateralization of the VWFA in late-onset left inferior occipital lobe epilepsies and also the effect of surgical disconnection from the adjacent secondary visual areas. Two patients with focal epilepsies with onset near the VWFA underwent to surgery for epilepsy, with sparing of this area. Neuropsychology evaluations were performed before and after surgery, as well as quantitative evaluation of the speed of word reading. Comparison of the surgical localization of the lesion, with the BOLD activation associated with the contrast of words-strings, was performed, as well as a study of the associated main white fiber pathways using diffusion-weighted imaging. Neither of the patients developed alexia after surgery (similar word reading speed before and after surgery) despite the fact that the inferior occipital surgical lesions reached the neighborhood (less than 1cm) of the VWFA. Surgeries partly disconnected the VWFA from left secondary visual areas, suggesting that pathways connecting to the posterior visual ventral stream were severely affected but did not induce alexia. The anterior and superior limits of the resection suggest that the critical connection between the VWFA and the Wernicke's Angular Gyrus cortex was not affected, which is supported by the detection of this tract with probabilistic tractography. Left occipital lobe epilepsies developing after reading acquisition did not produce atypical localizations of the VWFA, even with foci in the

  11. An fMRI study of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with different pathological basis using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation analysis

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    Wei WEI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the distinction of abnormal brain activity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE with hippocampal sclerosis (HS or other pathogical basis, and to discuss their underlying pathophysiological mechanism in mTLE.  Methods Thirty mTLE patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (mTLE-HS and 30 mTLE patients with occupying lesion in unilateral temporal lobe (mTLE-OL were investigated by comparing with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. MRI data were collected using a Siemens 3.0T scanner, and all of the participants were studied using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF analysis of resting state fMRI. A cost-function modification was used for image preprocessing, then the difference of extratemporal mALFF changes between the two groups of mTLE patients were analyzed with two-sample t test, and the correlation between mALFF and epilepsy duration of mTLE were also investigated.  Results In the resting state, mTLE-HS patients and mTLE-OL patients all showed significant changes in mALFF in extratemporal structures, but the distribution patterns of changes in brain were different. Compared with mTLE-HS, the mTLE-OL patients showed increased mALFF in bilateral inferior parietal lobes, precuneus, angular gyrus, middle and posterior cingulate gyrus and contralateral middle temporal gyrus, while mALFF reducing was observed in contralateral postcentral gyrus, bilateral middle occipital gyrus and cerebellum (P < 0.05, AlphaSim corrected, that is to say, the default mode network (DMN in mTLE-HS were inhibited more seriously than in mTLE-OL patients. Correlation analysis showed that no significant correlation was found between mALFF and epilepsy duration in mTLE-HS patients; mALFF in bilateral middle and posterior cingulate gyrus was positively correlated with epilepsy duration in mTLE-OL patients (r = 0.687, P = 0.000, while mALFF in bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus was negatively correlated with epilepsy duration (r

  12. Slowly Evolving Trends in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Management at London Health Sciences Centre

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    Blume, Warren T.

    2013-01-01

    Although the advent of MRI impacted significantly our presurgical investigation, ictal semiology with interictal and ictal EEG has clearly retained its roles in localizing epileptogenesis. MRI-identified lesions considered epileptogenic on semiological and electroencephalographic grounds have increased the likelihood of resective surgery effectiveness whereas a nonlesional MRI would diminish this probability. Ictal propagation and the interplay between its source and destination have emerged as a significant component of seizure evaluation over the past 30 years. PMID:23533736

  13. Perceived impact of epilepsy in teaching hospitals of Tehran University

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    Sasan Moshirzadeh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epileptic seizures would result inembarrassment in society and have some negative impacton the patients’ social activities. The aim of this study was toshow the perceived impact of epilepsy by patients ondifferent aspect of their social activities includingoccupation, marriage and education.Methods: We studied 179 epileptic patients aged 16 yearsand over using face to face interview. Nine domainsincluding relation to spouses, relation to family members,social life, general health, interpersonal communicationsand friendships, feelings about success, hope for future,ordinary life and cope with others were considered.Results: One hundred and seven men and 72 women werestudied. Nearly 78% of the patients had generalized tonicclonicseizures. More than half of the patients believed thatepilepsy had affected their social life and activities. Generalhealth was negatively affected by this disease more thanany other item. This may be due to uncontrolled attacks ortaking medications. About 15.5% of married and 39% of thesingle patients considered epilepsy as an obstacle to marrywith their ideal spouses and more than half of the employedpersons considered epilepsy as an obstacle for their jobpromotions.Conclusion: Epilepsy frequently impacts on several aspectsof life. The disease negatively affects social life and activities,overall health, feelings about self, ability to work in paidemployments, relationship with spouses, friends, andother family members, future plans, standards of livingand ambitions of epileptic patients. Decreasing suchimpacts should be considered as an important part oftreatment and proper management can certainlyincrease various aspects of life in these patients.

  14. An unusual association of headache, epilepsy, and late-onset Kleist’s pseudodepression syndrome in frontal lobe cavernoma of the cerebral left hemisphere

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    Chirchiglia D

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Domenico Chirchiglia,1 Attilio Della Torre,1 Domenico Murrone,2 Pasquale Chirchiglia,3 Rosa Marotta4 1Department of Neurosurgery, Neurophysiopathology Unit, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, Catanzaro, 2Neurosurgery Department, Di Venere Hospital, Bari, 3School of Medicine, University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, 4Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: Cerebral cavernous angioma or cavernoma is a benign vascular malformation, usually asymptomatic. It is infrequent and often its discovery is incidental, a so-called incidentaloma. However, these lesions can be symptomatic, causing headaches, epilepsy, cerebral hemorrhage and other neurological signs depending on the brain area involved. Frontal localization is responsible for psychiatric disorders, particularly the prefrontal region, leading to prefrontal syndrome, a condition common in all frontal lobe tumors. Psychopathological syndrome can be depression-type, pseudodepression syndrome or maniac-type, pseudomaniac syndrome. Surgical treatment of lesions like this may not always be possible due to their location in eloquent areas. In this study, we describe an unusual association of migraine-like headache, epilepsy and frontal lobe pseudodepression late-onset syndrome in the same patient. We have considered this case interesting mainly for the rarity of both a headache with migraine features and for the late onset of pseudodepression syndrome. Pathophysiology underlying migraine-like headache and that concerning the late-onset pseudodepression frontal lobe syndrome seems to be unclear. This case leads to further hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for headache syndromes and psychopathological disorders, in the specific case when caused by a cerebral frontal lobe lesion. Keywords: cerebral cavernoma, cavernous angioma, headache, frontal syndrome, pseudodepression syndrome 

  15. Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008115 Effect of commonly used antiepileptic drugs on cognitive functions of rats with pentylenetetrazol-induced epilepsy. WANG Xiaopeng(王晓鹏), et al. Dept Neurol, 2nd Hosp, Hebei Med Univ, Shijiazhuang 050000. Shanghai Med J 2007;30(12):920-923. Objective To observe the effect of antiepileptic drugs on the cognitive functions of rats with induced epilepsy. Methods Seventy male SD rats in their puberty were randomized into 7 groups,

  16. Surviving mossy cells enlarge and receive more excitatory synaptic input in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Zhang, Wei; Thamattoor, Ajoy K; LeRoy, Christopher; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    Numerous hypotheses of temporal lobe epileptogenesis have been proposed, and several involve hippocampal mossy cells. Building on previous hypotheses we sought to test the possibility that after epileptogenic injuries surviving mossy cells develop into super-connected seizure-generating hub cells. If so, they might require more cellular machinery and consequently have larger somata, elongate their dendrites to receive more synaptic input, and display higher frequencies of miniature excitatory synaptic currents (mEPSCs). To test these possibilities pilocarpine-treated mice were evaluated using GluR2-immunocytochemistry, whole-cell recording, and biocytin-labeling. Epileptic pilocarpine-treated mice displayed substantial loss of GluR2-positive hilar neurons. Somata of surviving neurons were 1.4-times larger than in controls. Biocytin-labeled mossy cells also were larger in epileptic mice, but dendritic length per cell was not significantly different. The average frequency of mEPSCs of mossy cells recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin and bicuculline was 3.2-times higher in epileptic pilocarpine-treated mice as compared to controls. Other parameters of mEPSCs were similar in both groups. Average input resistance of mossy cells in epileptic mice was reduced to 63% of controls, which is consistent with larger somata and would tend to make surviving mossy cells less excitable. Other intrinsic physiological characteristics examined were similar in both groups. Increased excitatory synaptic input is consistent with the hypothesis that surviving mossy cells develop into aberrantly super-connected seizure-generating hub cells, and soma hypertrophy is indirectly consistent with the possibility of axon sprouting. However, no obvious evidence of hyperexcitable intrinsic physiology was found. Furthermore, similar hypertrophy and hyper-connectivity has been reported for other neuron types in the dentate gyrus, suggesting mossy cells are not unique in this regard. Thus

  17. Evaluating the feasibility of measures of motor threshold and cortical silent period as predictors of outcome after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

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    Karadaş, Omer; Ipekdal, H İlker; Erdoğan, Ersin; Gökçil, Zeki; Odabaşi, Zeki

    2011-12-01

    Although it is well known that ES alters cortical excitability, little is known about the relationship between ES outcome and cortical excitability. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been successfully used to evaluate cortical excitability in epilepsy patients. The present study aimed to assess the value of the motor threshold (MT) and cortical silent period (CSP) as predictors of the outcome of temporal lobe epilepsy surgery (TLES). Epileptic foci in the epilepsy patients were identified via video-electroencephalography (v-EEG) monitoring, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET), and neurophysiological testing. MT, CSP-150, and CSP-max were measured in 10 epilepsy patients on both the ipsilateral and contralateral side of the epileptic focus 1 week before and 3 months after TLES. Pre- and post-operative MT and CSP measurements were compared, and the results were interpreted based on the clinical outcome of TLES. Mean follow-up period was 28.8 months. In all, 8 patients were seizure-free post TLES, whereas in 2 patients seizures persisted. No significant differences were observed in ipsilateral or contralateral hemisphere MT measurements before and after surgery. Both CSP-150 and CSP-max values in the non-focal hemispheres decreased in the 8 patients that were seizure-free post TLES, whereas no differences were observed in the 2 patients with seizures that persisted post TLES. The present findings indicate that monitoring pre- and post-TLES CSP changes may be predictive of the early clinical o