WorldWideScience

Sample records for lmc wr stars

  1. LM1-64: a Newly Reported Lmc-Pn with WR Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, M.; Olguin, L.; Ruiz, M. T.; Torres-Peimbert, S.

    1993-05-01

    The object LM1-64 was reported by Lindsay & Mullan (1963, Irish Astron. J., 5, 51) as a probable PN in the LMC. Optical and UV spectra taken by us confirm that suggestion. LM1-64 is a high excitation planetary nebulae which shows evidence of having a WC central star. Broad stellar emission at lambda 4650 is detected in the optical spectrum obtained with the CTIO 4m telescope, in 1989. A UV spectrum in the range from 1200 Angstroms to 2000 Angstroms was obtained with IUE in 1990. We have measured all the emission line fluxes available and determined values for the physical conditions and chemical abundances of the nebular ionized gas. The derived values are T(OIII) = 14000K, log He/H = 11.05, log C/H = 9.48, log O/H = 8.55 and log Ne/H = 7.94. LM1-64 shows a large C enhancement in the envelope as result of the central star activity, while He, O and Ne are comparable to the average values reported for the LMC-PNe (Monk, Barlow & Clegg, 1988, MNRAS, 234, 583). We have estimated the He II Zanstra temperature of the central star to be ~ 80,000 K. This temperature is much higher than the values reported for the known LMC-PNe with WR nucleus that Monk et al. have classified as W4 to W8. The only other high temperature WR nucleus in a LMC-PN is N66 which recently showed evidence of undergoing a WR episode (Torres-Peimbert, Ruiz, Peimbert & Pe\\ na, 1993, IAU Symp. 155, eds. A. Acker & R. Weinberger, in press).

  2. Discovery of a new Wolf-Rayet star using SAGE-LMC

    OpenAIRE

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Chené, A. -N.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Schnurr, O.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first-ever discovery of an extragalactic Wolf-Rayet (WR)star with Spitzer. A new WR star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) was revealed via detection of its circumstellar shell using 24 {\\mu}m images obtained in the framework of the Spitzer Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-LMC). Subsequent spectroscopic bservations with the Gemini South resolved the central star in two components, one of which is a WN3b+abs star, while the second one is a B0V star. We consider the lo...

  3. WR stars with ring nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutukov, A.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that most of usually apparently single nitrogen WR stars with ring emission nebulae around them (WN + Neb) are a probable product of the evolution of a massive close binary with initial masses of components exceeding approximately 20 solar masses. (Auth.)

  4. Discovery of a New Wolf-Rayet Star Using SAGE-LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Chené, A.-N.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Schnurr, O.

    2012-12-01

    We report the first-ever discovery of an extragalactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) star with Spitzer. A new WR star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) was revealed via detection of its circumstellar shell using 24 μm images obtained in the framework of the Spitzer Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-LMC). Subsequent spectroscopic observations with the Gemini South resolved the central star in two components, one of which is a WN3b+abs star, while the second one is a B0 V star. We consider the lopsided brightness distribution over the circumstellar shell as an indication that the WR star is a runaway and use this interpretation to identify a possible parent cluster of the star.

  5. Carbon stars in lmc clusters revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Leo Alberto; Chiosi, Cesare

    1996-01-01

    Examining the available data for AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) clusters, we address the question about the mass interval of low- and intermediate-mass stars which eventually evolve into carbon stars (C stars) during the TP-AGB phase. We combine the data compiled by Frogel, Mould & Blanco (1990) - near infrared photometry and spectral classification for luminous AGB stars in clusters - with the ages for individual clusters derived from independent methods. The resulting distrib...

  6. H/He ratios for WN stars in the LMC and the galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, D.N.; Conti, P.S.

    1982-01-01

    In the visible, most of the He II lines of WR stars are due to the Pickering series (n-4). Though there are significant problems with using the Pickering decrement the authors have utilized it to find H/He ratios for 21 WN stars in the LMC, and 38 stars in the Galaxy. They have additionally extended the analysis to include the derivation of the H/He ratio if the lines are optically thick. (Auth.)

  7. A dust shell around the early-type Wolf-Ryate star WR 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.M.; Hucht, K.A. van der; Bouchet, P.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared photometry of the WC4-type Wolf-Rayet star WR 19 (LS 3) in 1988-90 shows evidence for an expanding dust shell in its wind, similar to those observed from late-type WR stars like WR 48a (WC8), WR 140 (WC7+04) and WR 137 (WC7+). This demonstrates that dust formation by Wolf-Rayet stars is not restricted to later WC subtypes and is more common than hitherto supposed. (author)

  8. WR 120bb and WR 120bc: a pair of WN9h stars with possibly interacting circumstellar shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgemeister, S.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Todt, H.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2013-03-01

    Two optically obscured Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars have been recently discovered by means of their infrared (IR) circumstellar shells, which show signatures of interaction with each other. Following the systematics of the WR star catalogues, these stars obtain the names WR 120bb and WR 120bc. In this paper, we present and analyse new near-IR, J-, H- and K-band spectra using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmosphere code. For that purpose, the atomic data base of the code has been extended in order to include all significant lines in the near-IR bands. The spectra of both stars are classified as WN9h. As their spectra are very similar the parameters that we obtained by the spectral analyses hardly differ. Despite their late spectral subtype, we found relatively high stellar temperatures of 63 kK. The wind composition is dominated by helium, while hydrogen is depleted to 25 per cent by mass. Because of their location in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm, WR 120bb and WR 120bc appear highly reddened, A_{K_s} ≈ 2 mag. We adopt a common distance of 5.8 kpc to both stars, which complies with the typical absolute K-band magnitude for the WN9h subtype of -6.5 mag, is consistent with their observed extinction based on comparison with other massive stars in the region, and allows for the possibility that their shells are interacting with each other. This leads to luminosities of log ({textit {L}/L}_{odot }) = 5.66 and 5.54 for WR 120bb and WR 120bc, with large uncertainties due to the adopted distance. The values of the luminosities of WR 120bb and WR 120bc imply that the immediate precursors of both stars were red supergiants (RSG). This implies in turn that the circumstellar shells associated with WR 120bb and WR 120bc were formed by interaction between the WR wind and the dense material shed during the preceding RSG phase.

  9. Physical Properties of the LMC Eclipsing Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prsa, Andrej; Devinney, E. J.; Guinan, E. F.; Engle, S. G.; DeGeorge, M.

    2009-01-01

    To date, three independent studies have devised an automatic procedure to analyse and extract the principal parameters of 2581 detached eclipsing binary stars from the OGLE photometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC): Devor (2005), Tamuz et al. (2006), and Prsa et al. (2008). For time efficiency, Devor used a simple model of two spherical, limb-darkened stars without tidal or reflection physics. Tamuz et al.'s approach employs a more realistic EBOP model, which is still limited in handling proximity physics. Our study used a back-propagating neural network that was trained on the light curves computed by a modern Wilson-Devinney code. The three approaches are confronted and correlations in the results are sought that indicate the degree of reliability of the obtained results. A database of solutions consistent across all three studies is presented. We assess the suitability of each method for other morphology types (i.e. semi-detached and overcontact binaries) and we overview the practical limitations of these methods for the upcoming survey data. This research is supported by NFS/RUI Grant No. AST-05-07542, which we gratefully acknowledge.

  10. The various scenarios leading to WR stars: Their relative importance and the role of mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, A.

    1982-01-01

    Over the last 40 years WR stars have been associated with almost all possible evolutionary stages. The author lists 7 scenarios which may be considered as most relevant in view of recent surface abundance determinations. He then considers the importance of mass loss in WR formation and discusses properties of binary WR which suggest that formation is dependent on metallicity and thus galactic location. The role of internal mixing in WR formation is also considered. Mass loss on the MS is shown only to be able to explain a minute fraction of the observed WR stars, whereas internal mixing by shear instability has, for all stellar masses, a larger effect on MS evolution than mass loss. (Auth./C.F.)

  11. Mass loss from Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Recent results relating to the stellar winds and mass loss rates of the WR stars are reviewed, emphasising new data and their interpretation acquired at UV, IR and Radio wavelengths. The subject is discussed under the headings: physical and chemical properties of WR stars (effective temperatures and radiative luminosities; masses; chemical abundances); velocity, ionisation and excitation structure of WR winds; mass loss rates of WR stars; mass loss properties of WR stars in the LMC; comparisons with theoretical models of mass loss; ring nebulae around WR stars; conclusions. (author)

  12. A new ejecta shell surrounding a Wolf-Rayet star in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Donald R.; Chu, You-Hua

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained CCD spectra of newly discovered shell-like nebulae around the WN4 star Breysacher 13 and the WN1 star Breysacher 2 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The shell around Br 13 shows definite signs of enrichment in both nitrogen and helium, having much stronger (N II) and He I emission lines than are seen in typical LMC H II regions. From the measured electron temperature of about 17,000 K in the shell, we derive He/H and N/O abundance ratios which are factors of 2 and more than 10 higher, respectively, than the average LMC interstellar values. The derived oxygen abundance in the Br 13 shell is down by a factor of 8 compared to the local LMC interstellar medium (ISM); however, the derived electron temperature is affected by the presence of an incomplete shock arising from the interaction of the stellar wind with photoionized material. This uncertainty does not affect the basic conclusion that the Br 13 shell is enriched by processed material from the Wolf-Rayet star. In contrast, the shell around Br 2 shows no clear evidence of enrichment. The nebular spectrum is characterized by extremely strong (O III) and He II emission and very weak (N II). We derive normal He, O, and N abundances from our spectrum. This object therefore appears to be simply a wind-blown structure associated with a relatively dense cloud near the Wolf-Rayet star, although the very high-ionization state of the gas is unusual for a nebula associated with a Wolf-Rayet star.

  13. Analysis of a selected sample of RR Lyrae stars in the LMC from OGLE-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bing-Qiu; Jiang Bi-Wei; Yang Ming

    2013-01-01

    A systematic study of RR Lyrae stars is performed using a selected sample of 655 objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with long-term observations and numerous measurements from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment III project. The phase dispersion method and linear superposition of the harmonic oscillations are used to derive the pulsation frequency and properties of light variation. It is found that a dichotomy exists in Oosterhoff Type I and Oosterhoff Type II for RR Lyrae stars in the LMC. Due to our strict criteria for identifying a frequency, a lower limit for the incidence rate of Blazhko modulation in the LMC is estimated in various subclasses of RR Lyrae stars. For fundamental-mode RR Lyrae stars, the rate of 7.5% is smaller than the previous result. In the case of the first-overtone RR Lyrae variables, the rate of 9.1% is relatively high. In addition to the Blazhko variables, 15 objects are identified to pulsate in the fundamental/first-overtone double mode. Furthermore, four objects show a period ratio around 0.6, which makes them very likely to be rare pulsators in the fundamental/second-overtone double mode. (research papers)

  14. The infrared emission features in the spectrum of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 48a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiar, JE; Peeters, E; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first detection of unidentified infrared (UIR) emission features at similar to6.4 and 7.9 mum in the spectrum of the dusty WC8 Wolf-Rayet star WR 48a. Based on the H-deficient nature of WC stars, we attribute the emission features to large carbonaceous molecules or amorphous carbon

  15. Spectral Identification of New Galactic cLBV and WR Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, G. S.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Beletsky, Y.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have undertaken a near-IR spectral survey of stars associated with compact nebulae recently revealed by the Spitzer and WISE imaging surveys. These circumstellar nebulae, produced by massive evolved stars, display a variety of symmetries and shapes and are often only evident at mid-IR wavelengths. Stars associated with ˜50 of these nebulae have been observed. We also obtained recent spectra of previously confirmed (known) luminous blue variables (LBVs) and candidate LBVs (cLBVs). The spectral similarity of the stars observed when compared directly to known LBVs and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars indicate many are newly identified cLBVs, with a few being newly discovered WR stars, mostly of WN8-9h spectral type. These results suggest that a large population of previously unidentified cLBVs and related transitional stars reside in the Galaxy and confirm that circumstellar nebulae are inherent to most (c)LBVs.

  16. WR 110: A SINGLE WOLF-RAYET STAR WITH COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS IN ITS WIND?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chene, A.-N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Fahed, R.; St-louis, N.; Muntean, V.; Chevrotiere, A. De La; Cameron, C.; Matthews, J. M.; Gamen, R. C.; Lefevre, L.; Rowe, J. F.; Guenther, D. B.; Kuschnig, R.; Weiss, W. W.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.

    2011-01-01

    A 30 day contiguous photometric run with the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) satellite on the WN5-6b star WR 110 (HD 165688) reveals a fundamental periodicity of P = 4.08 ± 0.55 days along with a number of harmonics at periods P/n, with n ∼ 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and a few other possible stray periodicities and/or stochastic variability on timescales longer than about a day. Spectroscopic radial velocity studies fail to reveal any plausible companion with a period in this range. Therefore, we conjecture that the observed light-curve cusps of amplitude ∼0.01 mag that recur at a 4.08 day timescale may arise in the inner parts, or at the base, of a corotating interaction region (CIR) seen in emission as it rotates around with the star at constant angular velocity. The hard X-ray component seen in WR 110 could then be a result of a high velocity component of the CIR shock interacting with the ambient wind at several stellar radii. Given that most hot, luminous stars showing CIRs have two CIR arms, it is possible that either the fundamental period is 8.2 days or, more likely in the case of WR 110, there is indeed a second weaker CIR arm for P = 4.08 days, that occurs ∼two-thirds of a rotation period after the main CIR. If this interpretation is correct, WR 110 therefore joins the ranks with three other single WR stars, all WN, with confirmed CIR rotation periods (WR 1, WR 6, and WR 134), albeit with WR 110 having by far the lowest amplitude photometric modulation. This illustrates the power of being able to secure intense, continuous high-precision photometry from space-based platforms such as MOST. It also opens the door to revealing low-amplitude photometric variations in other WN stars, where previous attempts have failed. If all WN stars have CIRs at some level, this could be important for revealing sources of magnetism or pulsation in addition to rotation periods.

  17. NGC 1866: First Spectroscopic Detection of Fast-rotating Stars in a Young LMC Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupree, A. K.; Dotter, A.; Johnson, C. I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P. [Australian National University, The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bailey, J. I. III [Leiden Observatory, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Crane, J. D. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Mateo, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Olszewski, E. W. [The University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic observations were taken of 29 extended main-sequence turnoff (eMSTO) stars in the young (∼200 Myr) Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) cluster, NGC 1866, using the Michigan/ Magellan Fiber System and MSpec spectrograph on the Magellan -Clay 6.5 m telescope. These spectra reveal the first direct detection of rapidly rotating stars whose presence has only been inferred from photometric studies. The eMSTO stars exhibit H α emission (indicative of Be-star decretion disks), others have shallow broad H α absorption (consistent with rotation ≳150 km s{sup −1}), or deep H α core absorption signaling lower rotation velocities (≲150 km s{sup −1}). The spectra appear consistent with two populations of stars—one rapidly rotating, and the other, younger and slowly rotating.

  18. A Chandra grating observation of the dusty Wolf-Rayet star WR 48a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhekov, Svetozar A. [Space Research and Technology Institute, Akad. G. Bonchev Str., bl.1, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Gagné, Marc [Department of Geology and Astronomy, West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States); Skinner, Stephen L., E-mail: szhekov@space.bas.bg, E-mail: mgagne@wcupa.edu, E-mail: stephen.skinner@colorado.edu [CASA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We present results of a Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 48a. These are the first high-resolution spectra of this object in X-ray. Blueshifted centroids of the spectral lines of ∼ – 360 km s{sup –1} and line widths of 1000-1500 km s{sup –1} (FWHM) were deduced from the analysis of the line profiles of strong emission lines. The forbidden line of Si XIII is strong and not suppressed, indicating that the rarified 10-30 MK plasma forms far from strong sources of far-ultraviolet emission, most likely in a wind collision zone. Global spectral modeling showed that the X-ray spectrum of WR 48a suffered higher absorption in the 2012 October Chandra observation compared with a previous 2008 January XMM-Newton observation. The emission measure of the hot plasma in WR 48a decreased by a factor ∼3 over the same period of time. The most likely physical picture that emerges from the analysis of the available X-ray data is that of colliding stellar winds in a wide binary system with an elliptical orbit. We propose that the unseen secondary star in the system is another WR star or perhaps a luminous blue variable.

  19. A BINARY ORBIT FOR THE MASSIVE, EVOLVED STAR HDE 326823, A WR+O SYSTEM PROGENITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, N. D.; Gies, D. R.; Williams, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The hot star HDE 326823 is a candidate transition-phase object that is evolving into a nitrogen-enriched Wolf-Rayet star. It is also a known low-amplitude, photometric variable with a 6.123 day period. We present new, high- and moderate-resolution spectroscopy of HDE 326823, and we show that the absorption lines show coherent Doppler shifts with this period while the emission lines display little or no velocity variation. We interpret the absorption line shifts as the orbital motion of the apparently brighter star in a close, interacting binary. We argue that this star is losing mass to a mass gainer star hidden in a thick accretion torus and to a circumbinary disk that is the source of the emission lines. HDE 326823 probably belongs to a class of objects that produce short-period WR+O binaries.

  20. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. I. METHODS AND FIRST RESULTS: 41 NEW WR STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Gerke, Jill; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene; Villar-Sbaffi, Alfredo; Stanonik, Kathryn; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of new Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in our Galaxy via large-scale narrowband optical surveys has been severely limited by dust extinction. Recent improvements in infrared technology have made narrowband-broadband imaging surveys viable again. We report a new J, K, and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg 2 of the plane of the Galaxy, spanning 150 degrees in Galactic longitude and reaching 1 degree above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 173 WR star candidates we have discovered 41 new WR stars, 15 of type WN and 26 of type WC. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with K-band spectra, and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. A few of the new WR stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new WR stars is seen to follow that of previously known WR stars along the spiral arms of the Galaxy. Tentative radial velocities were also measured for most of the new WR stars.

  1. Searching for WR stars in I Zw 18 -- The origin of HeII emission

    OpenAIRE

    de Mello, Duilia; Schaerer, Daniel; Heldmann, Jennifer; Leitherer, Claus

    1998-01-01

    I Zw 18 is the most metal poor star-forming galaxy known and is an ideal laboratory to probe stellar evolution theory at low metallicities. Using archival HST WFPC2 imaging and FOS spectroscopy we were able to improve previous studies. We constructed a continuum free HeII map, which was used to identify Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars recently found by ground-based spectroscopy and to locate diffuse nebular emission. Most of the HeII emission is associated with the NW stellar cluster, clearly displaced...

  2. The Wolf-Rayet stars in 30 Doradus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnick, J.

    1982-01-01

    The second brightest giant HII region in the sky is the 30 Doradus nebula in the LMC. This cluster contains many WR stars and may be one of the best objects where general ideas about the origin and evolution of WR stars can be tested. The author briefly describes observations of WR stars in 30 Doradus and discusses the implications for Wolf-Rayet evolutionary theories. (Auth.)

  3. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. GOING FAINTER: 71 MORE NEW W-R STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shara, Michael M.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zurek, David [American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street and Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succ. C-V, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Gerke, Jill [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent, E-mail: mshara@amnh.org, E-mail: jfaherty@amnh.org, E-mail: dzurek@amnh.org, E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: gerke@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: artigau@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.ca [Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Pavillon Vachon, Quebec City, QC, G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    We are continuing a J, K and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg{sup 2} of the plane of the Galaxy, searching for new Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Our survey spans 150 Degree-Sign in Galactic longitude and reaches 1 Degree-Sign above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 (due to severe crowding) within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission-line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 146 relatively bright W-R star candidates, we have re-examined 11 previously known WC and WN stars and discovered 71 new W-R stars, 17 of type WN and 54 of type WC. Our latest image analysis pipeline now picks out W-R stars with a 57% success rate. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with the K-band spectra and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Some of the new W-R stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new W-R stars is beginning to trace the locations of massive stars along the distant spiral arms of the Milky Way.

  4. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. GOING FAINTER: 71 MORE NEW W-R STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, René; Gerke, Jill; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    We are continuing a J, K and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg 2 of the plane of the Galaxy, searching for new Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Our survey spans 150° in Galactic longitude and reaches 1° above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 (due to severe crowding) within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission-line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 146 relatively bright W-R star candidates, we have re-examined 11 previously known WC and WN stars and discovered 71 new W-R stars, 17 of type WN and 54 of type WC. Our latest image analysis pipeline now picks out W-R stars with a 57% success rate. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with the K-band spectra and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Some of the new W-R stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new W-R stars is beginning to trace the locations of massive stars along the distant spiral arms of the Milky Way.

  5. Color excesses, intrinsic colors, and absolute magnitudes of Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacca, W.D.; Torres-Dodgen, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    A new method of determining the color excesses of WR stars in the Galaxy and the LMC has been developed and is used to determine the excesses for 44 Galactic and 32 LMC WR stars. The excesses are combined with line-free, narrow-band spectrophotometry to derive intrinsic colors of the WR stars of nearly all spectral subtypes. No correlation of UV spectral index or intrinsic colors with spectral subtype is found for the samples of single WN or WC stars. There is evidence that early WN stars in the LMC have flatter UV continua and redder intrinsic colors than early WN stars in the Galaxy. No separation is found between the values derived for Galactic WC stars and those obtained for LMC WC stars. The intrinsic colors are compared with those calculated from model atmospheres of WR stars and generally good agreement is found. Absolute magnitudes are derived for WR stars in the LMC and for those Galactic WR stars located in clusters and associations for which there are reliable distance estimates. 78 refs

  6. Coupling hydrodynamics with comoving frame radiative transfer. I. A unified approach for OB and WR stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, A. A. C.; Hamann, W.-R.; Todt, H.; Hainich, R.; Shenar, T.

    2017-07-01

    Context. For more than two decades, stellar atmosphere codes have been used to derive the stellar and wind parameters of massive stars. Although they have become a powerful tool and sufficiently reproduce the observed spectral appearance, they can hardly be used for more than measuring parameters. One major obstacle is their inconsistency between the calculated radiation field and the wind stratification due to the usage of prescribed mass-loss rates and wind-velocity fields. Aims: We present the concepts for a new generation of hydrodynamically consistent non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (non-LTE) stellar atmosphere models that allow for detailed studies of radiation-driven stellar winds. As a first demonstration, this new kind of model is applied to a massive O star. Methods: Based on earlier works, the PoWR code has been extended with the option to consistently solve the hydrodynamic equation together with the statistical equations and the radiative transfer in order to obtain a hydrodynamically consistent atmosphere stratification. In these models, the whole velocity field is iteratively updated together with an adjustment of the mass-loss rate. Results: The concepts for obtaining hydrodynamically consistent models using a comoving-frame radiative transfer are outlined. To provide a useful benchmark, we present a demonstration model, which was motivated to describe the well-studied O4 supergiant ζPup. The obtained stellar and wind parameters are within the current range of literature values. Conclusions: For the first time, the PoWR code has been used to obtain a hydrodynamically consistent model for a massive O star. This has been achieved by a profound revision of earlier concepts used for Wolf-Rayet stars. The velocity field is shaped by various elements contributing to the radiative acceleration, especially in the outer wind. The results further indicate that for more dense winds deviations from a standard β-law occur.

  7. A search for β Cephei variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds: motivation and first results for the LMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterken, C.; Jerzykiewicz, M.

    1988-01-01

    Motivation for starting a programme of detecting and investigating β Cephei variables in the Magellanic Clouds is given. Differential photoelectric observations are then reported of six LMC stars which fall in the instability strip defined by the galactic β Cephei variables. Three programme stars are found to exhibit short-term brightness variations. One of them, showing a sinusoidal light-curve with an amplitude (half-range) equal to 0.0070 ± 0.0011 mag and a period equal to about 5 hr, is a promising β Cephei candidate. In the case of the other two variable programme stars, the interpretation of the results is less straightforward. The remaining three programme stars are shown to be constant on a short time-scale, two to within ± 0.010 mag, and one to within ± 0.005 magn. (author)

  8. REVEALING THE ASYMMETRY OF THE WIND OF THE VARIABLE WOLF-RAYET STAR WR1 (HD 4004) THROUGH SPECTROPOLARIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Louis, N., E-mail: stlouis@astro.umontreal.ca [Département de physique and Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Québec (CRAQ), Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, high quality spectropolarimetric observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR1 (HD 4004) obtained with ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are presented. All major emission lines present in the spectrum show depolarization in the relative Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I. From the behavior of the amount of line depolarization as a function of line strength, the intrinsic continuum light polarization of WR1 is estimated to be P/I = 0.443% ± 0.028% with an angle of θ = –26.°2. Although such a level of polarization could in principle be caused by a wind flattened by fast rotation, the scenario in which it is a consequence of the presence of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind is preferred. This is supported by previous photometric and spectroscopic observations showing periodic variations with a period of 16.9 days. This is now the third WR star thought to exhibit CIRs in its wind that is found to have line depolarization. Previous authors have found a strong correlation between line depolarization and the presence of an ejected nebula, which they interpret as a sign that the star has relatively recently reached the WR phase since the nebula are thought to dissipate very fast. In cases where the presence of CIRs in the wind is favored to explain the depolarization across spectral lines, the above-mentioned correlation may indicate that those massive stars have only very recently transited from the previous evolutionary phase to the WR phase.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star clusters automatically detected in the LMC (Bitsakis+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsakis, T.; Bonfini, P.; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, R. A.; Ramirez-Siordia, V. H.; Bruzual, G.; Charlot, S.; Maravelias, G.; Zaritsky, D.

    2018-03-01

    The archival data used in this work were acquired from several diverse large surveys, which mapped the Magellanic Clouds at various bands. Simons+ (2014AdSpR..53..939S) composed a mosaic using archival data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) at the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band (λeff=2275Å). The mosaic covers an area of 15deg2 on the LMC. the central ~3x1deg2 of the LMC (the bar-region) was later observed by the Swift Ultraviolet-Optical Telescope (UVOT) Magellanic Clouds Survey (SUMAC; Siegel+ 2014AJ....148..131S). The optical data used here are from the Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS; Zaritsky+ 2004, J/AJ/128/1606). These authors observed the central 64deg2 of the LMC with 3.8-5.2 minute exposures at the Johnson U, B, V, and Gunn i filters of the Las Campanas Swope Telescope. Meixner+ (2006, J/AJ/132/2268) performed a uniform and unbiased imaging survey of the LMC (called Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution, or SAGE), covering the central 7deg2 with both the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope. (1 data file).

  10. Detached dust shell around Wolf-Rayet star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borissova, J.; Amigo, P.; Kurtev, R. [Departamento de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030 (Chile); Kumar, M. S. N. [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Chené, A.-N. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North A' ohoku Place Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Minniti, D., E-mail: jura.borissova@uv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Facultad de Física, Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of a detached dust shell around the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036 is reported. This shell is uncovered through the Spitzer-MIPS 24 μm image, where it appears brightest, and it is invisible at shorter wavelengths. Using new APEX observations and other data available from the literature, we have estimated some of the shell parameters: the inner and outer radii of 0.15 and 0.90 pc, respectively; the overall systemic velocity of the molecular {sup 12}CO(3 → 2) emission of –45.7 ± 2.3 km s{sup –1}; an expansion velocity of the gas of 16.3 ± 1 km s{sup –1}; the dust temperature and opacity of 122 ± 12 K and 1.04, respectively; and an age of 2.8 × 10{sup 4} yr. The WR star displays some cyclic variability. The mass computed for the WR60-6 nebula indicates that the material was probably ejected during its previous stages of evolution. In addition, we have identified a bright spot very close to the shell, which can be associated with the Midcourse Space Experiment source G312.13+00.20.

  11. The MACHO Project LMC Variable Star Inventory. VIII. The Recent Star Formation History of the Large Magellanic Cloud from the Cepheid Period Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R.A.; Alves, D.R.; Axelrod, T.S.; Becker, A.C.; Bennett, D.P.; Bersier, D.F.; Cook, K.H.; Freeman, K.C.; Griest, K.; Guern, J.A.; Lehner, M.; Marshall, S.L.; Minniti, D.; Peterson, B.A.; Pratt, M.R.; Quinn, P.J.; Rodgers, A.W.; Stubbs, C.W.

    1999-01-01

    We present an analysis of the period distribution of about 1800 Cepheids in the LMC, based on data obtained by the MACHO microlensing experiment and on a previous catalog by C. H. Payne Gaposchkin. Using stellar evolution and pulsation models, we construct theoretical period-frequency distributions that are compared with the observations. These models reveal that a significant burst of star formation has occurred recently in the LMC (∼1.15x10 8 yr). We also show that during the last ∼10 8 yr, the main center of star formation has been propagating from southeast to northwest along the bar. We find that the evolutionary masses of Cepheids are still smaller than pulsation masses by ∼7% and that the red edge of the Cepheid instability strip could be slightly bluer than indicated by theory. There are approximately 600 Cepheids with periods below ∼2.5 days that cannot be explained by evolution theory. We suggest that they are anomalous Cepheids and that a number of these stars are double-mode Cepheids. copyright copyright 1999. The American Astronomical Society

  12. LMC clusters: young

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    The young globular clusters of the LMC have ages of 10 7 -10 8 y. Their masses and structure are similar to those of the smaller galactic globular clusters. Their stellar mass functions (in the mass range 6 solar masses to 1.2 solar masses) vary greatly from cluster to cluster, although the clusters are similar in total mass, age, structure and chemical composition. It would be very interesting to know why these clusters are forming now in the LMC and not in the Galaxy. The author considers the 'young globular' or 'blue populous' clusters of the LMC. The ages of these objects are 10 7 to 10 8 y, and their masses are 10 4 to 10 5 solar masses, so they are populous enough to be really useful for studying the evolution of massive stars. The author concentrates on the structure and stellar content of these young clusters. (Auth.)

  13. LMC X-1: A New Spectral Analysis of the O-star in the Binary and Surrounding Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, E. A.; Russell, D. M.; Ritter, A.; Filipović, M. D.; Kaper, L.; Grieve, K.; O'Brien, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    We provide new observations of the LMC X-1 O star and its extended nebula structure using spectroscopic data from VLT/UVES as well as Hα imaging from the Wide Field Imager on the Max Planck Gesellschaft/European Southern Observatory 2.2 m telescope and ATCA imaging of the 2.1 GHz radio continuum. This nebula is one of the few known to be energized by an X-ray binary. We use a new spectrum extraction technique that is superior to other methods used to obtain both radial velocities and fluxes. This provides an updated spatial velocity of ≃ 21.0 +/- 4.8 km s-1 for the O star. The slit encompasses both the photo-ionized and shock-ionized regions of the nebula. The imaging shows a clear arc-like structure reminiscent of a wind bow shock in between the ionization cone and shock-ionized nebula. The observed structure can be fit well by the parabolic shape of a wind bow shock. If an interpretation of a wind bow shock system is valid, we investigate the N159-O1 star cluster as a potential parent of the system, suggesting a progenitor mass of ˜60 M ⊙ for the black hole. We further note that the radio emission could be non-thermal emission from the wind bow shock, or synchrotron emission associated with the jet-inflated nebula. For both wind- and jet-powered origins, this would represent one of the first radio detections of such a structure.

  14. On the Baldwin effect of He II emission lines in WR (WN) stars

    OpenAIRE

    van Gent, J. I.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; de Koter, A.; Morris, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the equivalent width of He ii emission lines and the monochromatic continuum luminosity at the line wavelength in the spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars. Model stellar atmospheres and spectra are used to show that the equivalent width inversely correlates with the monochromatic continuum luminosity. We find the effect in Wolf-Rayet star models over a large range of stellar parameters. The effect is shown to be connected to density differences among Wolf-Rayet star...

  15. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN THE LMC. I. N159 AND N160 COMPLEXES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Jones, Terry J.; Gehrz, Robert D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy 116 Church St SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Helton, L. Andrew [USRA–SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We present images and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in three star-forming H ii regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud: N159A, N159 Papillon, and N160. We use photometry from SOFIA/FORCAST at 25.3–37.1 μ m to constrain model fits to the SEDs and determine luminosities, ages, and dust content of the embedded YSOs and their local environments. By placing these sources on mid-infrared color–magnitude and color–color diagrams, we analyze their dust properties and consider their evolutionary status. Since each object in the FORCAST images has an obvious bright near-infrared counterpart in Spitzer Space Telescope images, we do not find any evidence for new, very cool, previously undiscovered Class 0 YSOs. Additionally, based on its mid-infrared colors and model parameters, N159A is younger than N160 and the Papillon. The nature of the first extragalactic protostars in N159, P1, and P2, is also discussed.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of Wolf-Rayet stars. V - Optical spectrophotometry of the emission lines in Small Magellanic Cloud stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, P.S.; Garmany, C.D.; Massey, P.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of the strongest emission-line features for the eight known WR stars in the SMC is presented. Seven are relatively early WN types; and one is a WO. These are compared to stars of similar spectral types in the Galaxy and the LMC. The hydrogen-burning CNO cycle equilibrium nitrogen abundance with respect to helium appears to be similar to that in WN stars of the Galaxy and LMC even though the SMC objects presumably began their lives with appreciably smaller CNO content. 28 refs

  17. Infrared analysis of LMC superbubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verter, F.; Dwek, E.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers are analyzing three superbubbles in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), cataloged by Meaburn (1980) as LMC-1, LMC-4 (a.k.a. Shapley Constellation III), and LMC-5. Superbubbles are the largest infrared sources in the disks of external galaxies. Their expansion requires multiple supernovae from successive generations of star formation. In LMC superbubbles, the grains swept up by shocks and winds represent an interstellar medium (ISM) whose abundances are quite different from the Galaxy. By applying the Dwek (1986) grain model, we can derive the composition and size spectrum of the grains. The inputs to this model are the dust emission in the four Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) bands and the interstellar radiation field (ISRF) that provides the heating. The first step in the project is to derive the ISRF for star-forming regions on the periphery of superbubbles. Researchers are doing this by combining observations at several wavelengths to determine the energy budget of the region. They will use a UV image to trace the ionizing stellar radiation that escapes, an H alpha image to trace the ionizing stellar radiation that is absorbed by gas, and the four IRAS images to trace the stellar radiation, both ionizing and non-ionizing, that is absorbed by dust. This multi-wavelength approach has the advantages that we do not have to assume the shape of the IMF or the extinction of the source

  18. Classification of ISO SWS 01 spectra of proto-planetary nebulae: a search for precursors of planetary nebulae with [WR] central stars

    OpenAIRE

    Szczerba, R.; Stasi{ń}ska, G.; Siódmiak, N.; Górny, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed ISO SWS 01 observations for 61 proto-planetary nebulae candidates and classified their spectra according to their dominant chemistry. On the basis of our classification and the more general classification of SWS 01 spectra by Kraemer et al. (2002) we discuss the connection between proto-planetary nebulae candidates and planetary nebulae, with emphasis on possible precursors of planetary nebulae with [WR] central stars.

  19. Spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars. I - Continuum energy distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Patrick W.; Brownsberger, Kenneth R.; Conti, Peter S.; Massey, Philip; Vacca, William D.

    1993-01-01

    All available low-resolution IUE spectra are assembled for Galactic, LMC, and SMC W-R stars and are merged with ground-based optical and NIR spectra in order to collate in a systematic fashion the shapes of these energy distributions over the wavelength range 0.1-1 micron. They can be consistently fitted by a power law of the form F(lambda) is approximately equal to lambda exp -alpha over the range 1500-9000 A to derive color excesses E(B-V) and spectral indices by removing the 2175-A interstellar absorption feature. The WN star color excesses derived are found to be in good agreement with those of Schmutz and Vacca (1991) and Koesterke et al. (1991). Significant heterogeneity in spectral index values was generally seen with any given subtype, but the groups consisting of the combined set of Galactic and LMC W-R stars, the separate WN and WC sequences, and the Galactic and LMC W-R stars all showed a striking and consistent Gaussian-like frequency distribution of values.

  20. XMM-Newton Detection of Hard X-Ray Emission in the Nitrogen-Type Wolf-Rayet Star WR 110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Güdel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner

    2002-06-01

    We have used the excellent sensitivity of XMM-Newton to obtain the first high-quality X-ray spectrum of a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star that is not known to be a member of a binary system. Our target, the nitrogen-type star WR 110 (HD 165688), was also observed and detected with the Very Large Array at four different frequencies. The radio flux density increases with frequency according to a power law Sν~ν+0.64+/-0.10, in very good agreement with the behavior expected for free-free wind emission. The radio data give an ionized mass-loss rate M=4.9×10-5 Msolar yr-1 for an assumed spherical constant-velocity wind. The undispersed CCD X-ray spectra reveal strong emission lines from He-like ions of Mg, Si, and S. The emission measure distribution shows a dominant contribution from cool plasma with a characteristic temperature kTcool~0.5 keV (~6 MK). Little or no excess absorption of this cool component above the value expected from the visual extinction is present. We conclude that the bulk of the cool plasma detected by XMM-Newton lies at hundreds of stellar radii or more if the wind is approximately spherical and homogeneous, but it could lie closer to the star if the wind is clumped. If the cool plasma is due to instability-driven wind shocks, then typical shock velocities are vs~340-550 km s-1 and the average filling factor of X-ray-emitting gas in the wind is no larger than f~10-6. A surprising result is the unambiguous detection of a hard X-ray component that is clearly seen in the hard-band images and the spectra. This hard component accounts for about half of the observed flux and can be acceptably fitted by a hot, optically thin thermal plasma or a power-law model. If the emission is thermal, then a temperature kThot>=3 keV is derived. Such high temperatures are not predicted by current instability-driven wind shock models, and a different mechanism is thus required to explain the hard X-rays. We examine several possible mechanisms and show that the hard emission

  1. Spectra of the Wolf-Rayet stars in 30 Doradus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, P.S.

    1982-01-01

    The central cluster of the 30 Doradus complex in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) contains at least a dozen Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars of the nitrogen sequence according to Melnick (1978). In addition to the six stars previously identified by Feast, Thackeray and Wesselinck (1960), Melnick identified an additional six using an Echele spectrograph on the 1.52 m telescope at La Silla. The author has obtained high resolution spectra of ten of these stars and discusses the spectral types. (Auth.)

  2. THE DISCOVERY OF A RARE WO-TYPE WOLF-RAYET STAR IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Morrell, Nidia, E-mail: kneugent@lowell.edu, E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu, E-mail: nmorrell@lco.cl [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile)

    2012-12-01

    While observing OB stars within the most crowded regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud, we happened upon a new Wolf-Rayet (WR) star in Lucke-Hodge 41, the rich OB association that contains S Doradus and numerous other massive stars. At first glance the spectrum resembled that of a WC4 star, but closer examination showed strong O VI {lambda}{lambda}3811, 34 lines, leading us to classify it as a WO4. This is only the second known WO in the LMC, and the first known WO4 (the other being a WO3). This rarity is to be expected due to these stars' short lifespans as they represent the most advanced evolutionary stage in a massive star's lifetime before exploding as supernovae. This discovery shows that while the majority of WRs within the LMC have been discovered, there may be a few WRs left to be found.

  3. THE DISCOVERY OF A RARE WO-TYPE WOLF–RAYET STAR IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip; Morrell, Nidia

    2012-01-01

    While observing OB stars within the most crowded regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud, we happened upon a new Wolf-Rayet (WR) star in Lucke-Hodge 41, the rich OB association that contains S Doradus and numerous other massive stars. At first glance the spectrum resembled that of a WC4 star, but closer examination showed strong O VI λλ3811, 34 lines, leading us to classify it as a WO4. This is only the second known WO in the LMC, and the first known WO4 (the other being a WO3). This rarity is to be expected due to these stars' short lifespans as they represent the most advanced evolutionary stage in a massive star's lifetime before exploding as supernovae. This discovery shows that while the majority of WRs within the LMC have been discovered, there may be a few WRs left to be found.

  4. Dense molecular clumps associated with the Large Magellanic Cloud supergiant shells LMC 4 and LMC 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Kosuke; Mizuno, Norikazu [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 133-0033 (Japan); Minamidani, Tetsuhiro [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, 462-2 Nobeyama Minamimaki-mura, Minamisaku-gun, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Onishi, Toshikazu; Muraoka, Kazuyuki [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Kawamura, Akiko; Muller, Erik; Tatematsu, Ken' ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Miura, Rie E.; Ezawa, Hajime [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Dawson, Joanne [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Tosaki, Tomoka [Joetsu University of Education, Yamayashiki-machi, Joetsu, Niigata 943-8512 (Japan); Sakai, Takeshi [Graduate School of Informatics and Engineering, The University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Tsukagoshi, Takashi [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Tanaka, Kunihiko [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo, E-mail: kosuke.fujii@nao.ac.jp [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of supergiant shells (SGSs) and their interaction on dense molecular clumps by observing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) star-forming regions N48 and N49, which are located between two SGSs, LMC 4 and LMC 5. {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2, 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 1-0) observations with the ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward these regions. A clumpy distribution of dense molecular clumps is revealed with 7 pc spatial resolution. Large velocity gradient analysis shows that the molecular hydrogen densities (n(H{sub 2})) of the clumps are distributed from low to high density (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) and their kinetic temperatures (T {sub kin}) are typically high (greater than 50 K). These clumps seem to be in the early stages of star formation, as also indicated from the distribution of Hα, young stellar object candidates, and IR emission. We found that the N48 region is located in the high column density H I envelope at the interface of the two SGSs and the star formation is relatively evolved, whereas the N49 region is associated with LMC 5 alone and the star formation is quiet. The clumps in the N48 region typically show high n(H{sub 2}) and T {sub kin}, which are as dense and warm as the clumps in LMC massive cluster-forming areas (30 Dor, N159). These results suggest that the large-scale structure of the SGSs, especially the interaction of two SGSs, works efficiently on the formation of dense molecular clumps and stars.

  5. LMC - research group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Anna Marie

    2012-01-01

    Beskrivelse af Sektionen for Food+Design ved Aalborg Universitet i årsrapport 2011 for LMC, Levnedsmiddel Centeret (Danish Centre for Advanced Food Studies). Herunder beskrivelse af målsætning, fokusområder, forsknings-metoder og eksterne samarbejder....

  6. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey IV. WR 62-2, a new very massive star in the core of the VVV CL041 cluster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chene, A.-N.; Alegria, S.R.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Hervé, Anthony; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 584, December (2015), A31/1-A31/8 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02385S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : open clusters and associations * VVV CL041 * massive star s Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  7. Revealing evolved massive stars with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Fabrika, S.

    2010-06-01

    Massive evolved stars lose a large fraction of their mass via copious stellar wind or instant outbursts. During certain evolutionary phases, they can be identified by the presence of their circumstellar nebulae. In this paper, we present the results of a search for compact nebulae (reminiscent of circumstellar nebulae around evolved massive stars) using archival 24-μm data obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. We have discovered 115 nebulae, most of which bear a striking resemblance to the circumstellar nebulae associated with luminous blue variables (LBVs) and late WN-type (WNL) Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We interpret this similarity as an indication that the central stars of detected nebulae are either LBVs or related evolved massive stars. Our interpretation is supported by follow-up spectroscopy of two dozen of these central stars, most of which turn out to be either candidate LBVs (cLBVs), blue supergiants or WNL stars. We expect that the forthcoming spectroscopy of the remaining objects from our list, accompanied by the spectrophotometric monitoring of the already discovered cLBVs, will further increase the known population of Galactic LBVs. This, in turn, will have profound consequences for better understanding the LBV phenomenon and its role in the transition between hydrogen-burning O stars and helium-burning WR stars. We also report on the detection of an arc-like structure attached to the cLBV HD 326823 and an arc associated with the LBV R99 (HD 269445) in the LMC. Partially based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Centre, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC). E-mail: vgvaram@mx.iki.rssi.ru (VVG); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK); fabrika@sao.ru (SF)

  8. A modern search for Wolf-Rayet stars in the Magellanic Clouds: First results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, Philip; Neugent, Kathryn F. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Morrell, Nidia [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601 La Serena (Chile); Hillier, D. John, E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu, E-mail: kneugent@lowell.edu, E-mail: nmorrell@lco.cl, E-mail: hillier@pitt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics, and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    Over the years, directed surveys and incidental spectroscopy have identified 12 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and 139 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), numbers which are often described as 'essentially complete'. Yet, new WRs are discovered in the LMC almost yearly. We have therefore initiated a new survey of both Magellanic Clouds using the same interference-filter imaging technique previously applied to M31 and M33. We report on our first observing season, in which we have successfully surveyed ∼15% of our intended area of the SMC and LMC. Spectroscopy has confirmed nine newly found WRs in the LMC (a 6% increase), including one of WO-type, only the third known in that galaxy and the second to be discovered recently. The other eight are WN3 stars that include an absorption component. In two, the absorption is likely from an O-type companion, but the other six are quite unusual. Five would be classified naively as 'WN3+O3 V', but such a pairing is unlikely given the rarity of O3 stars, the short duration of this phase (which is incommensurate with the evolution of a companion to a WN star), and because these stars are considerably fainter than O3 V stars. The sixth star may also fall into this category. CMFGEN modeling suggests these stars are hot, bolometrically luminous, and N-rich like other WN3 stars, but lack the strong winds that characterize WNs. Finally, we discuss two rare Of?p stars and four Of supergiants we found, and propose that the B[e] star HD 38489 may have a WN companion.

  9. Wolf-Rayet stars in the Magellanic Clouds: Spectroscopic binaries and masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, A.F.J.

    1982-01-01

    Repeated spectra to V-mag 13.0 (13.5) have been obtained since 1978 for the 25 (5) brightest WR stars in the LMC (SMC). More than half of these are orbiting spectroscopic binaries, mainly SB1 for the luminous subclasses WN6-9, and SB2 for the rest. Together with galactic data, the Cloud SB2's lead to a correlation between mass ratio WR/OB and WR spectral subclass for each of the WN and WC sequences. This correlation is interpreted as an evolutionary sequence in which the peeling-off process of the strong stellar wind exposes successively hotter regions and eventually converts WN to WC at a point in time which appears to depend on the ambient metal abundance. (Auth.)

  10. E2 - an intermediate-age LMC cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schommer, R.A.; Olszewski, E.W.; Aaronson, M.; Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ)

    1986-01-01

    A color-magnitude diagram is presented for the faint star cluster E2, located near the tip of the Magellanic Stream. The main-sequence turnoff, a few giants, and a giant clump can be discerned. Comparisons with VandenBerg models show E2 to be a 1.5 Gyr old cluster with abundance Z of about 0.01 at the distance of the LMC, and thus similar to the more populous intermediate-age LMC clusters. The existence of cluster formation at a large distance from the LMC center (E2 is at almost 8 deg radius) is discussed in the context of the star-formation history, structure, and kinematics of the outer halo of the Large Magellanic Cloud. 42 references

  11. Spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars - Intrinsic colors and absolute magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Dodgen, Ana V.; Massey, Philip

    1988-01-01

    Absolute spectrophotometry of about 10-A resolution in the range 3400-7300 A have been obtained for southern Wolf-Rayet stars, and line-free magnitudes and colors have been constructed. The emission-line contamination in the narrow-band ubvr systems of Westerlund (1966) and Smith (1968) is shown to be small for most WN stars, but to be quite significant for WC stars. It is suggested that the more severe differences in intrinsic color from star to star of the same spectral subtype noted at shorter wavelengths are due to differences in atmospheric extent. True continuum absolute visual magnitudes and intrinsic colors are obtained for the LMC WR stars. The most visually luminous WN6-WN7 stars are found to be located in the core of the 30 Doradus region.

  12. The Evolution and Physical Parameters of WN3/O3s: A New Type of Wolf–Rayet Star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Hillier, D. John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Morrell, Nidia, E-mail: kneugent@lowell.edu, E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu, E-mail: hillier@pitt.edu, E-mail: nmorrell@lco.cl [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile)

    2017-05-20

    As part of a search for Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars in the Magellanic Clouds, we have discovered a new type of WR star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These stars have both strong emission lines, as well as He ii and Balmer absorption lines and spectroscopically resemble a WN3 and O3V binary pair. However, they are visually too faint to be WN3+O3V binary systems. We have found nine of these WN3/O3s, making up ∼6% of the population of LMC WRs. Using cmfgen, we have successfully modeled their spectra as single stars and have compared the physical parameters with those of more typical LMC WNs. Their temperatures are around 100,000 K, a bit hotter than the majority of WN stars (by around 10,000 K), though a few hotter WNs are known. The abundances are what you would expect for CNO equilibrium. However, most anomalous are their mass-loss rates, which are more like that of an O-type star than a WN star. While their evolutionary status is uncertain, their low mass-loss rates and wind velocities suggest that they are not products of homogeneous evolution. It is possible instead that these stars represent an intermediate stage between O stars and WNs. Since WN3/O3 stars are unknown in the Milky Way, we suspect that their formation depends upon metallicity, and we are investigating this further by a deep survey in M33, which possesses a metallicity gradient.

  13. THE VLT-FLAMES TARANTULA SURVEY: THE FASTEST ROTATING O-TYPE STAR AND SHORTEST PERIOD LMC PULSAR-REMNANTS OF A SUPERNOVA DISRUPTED BINARY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufton, P. L.; Dunstall, P. R.; Fraser, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Evans, C. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Brott, I. [University of Vienna, Department of Astronomy, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Cantiello, M.; Langer, N. [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); De Koter, A.; Sana, H. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); De Mink, S. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Henault-Brunet, V.; Taylor, W. D. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Howarth, I. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lennon, D. J. [ESA, Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Markova, N., E-mail: p.dufton@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy with NAO, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 136, 4700 Smoljan (Bulgaria)

    2011-12-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of an extremely rapidly rotating late O-type star, VFTS102, observed during a spectroscopic survey of 30 Doradus. VFTS102 has a projected rotational velocity larger than 500 km s{sup -1} and probably as large as 600 km s{sup -1}; as such it would appear to be the most rapidly rotating massive star currently identified. Its radial velocity differs by 40 km s{sup -1} from the mean for 30 Doradus, suggesting that it is a runaway. VFTS102 lies 12 pc from the X-ray pulsar PSR J0537-6910 in the tail of its X-ray diffuse emission. We suggest that these objects originated from a binary system with the rotational and radial velocities of VFTS102 resulting from mass transfer from the progenitor of PSR J0537-691 and the supernova explosion, respectively.

  14. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Carnes, B.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-05-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL {times} BALB/c F{sub 1} female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a {sup 60}Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  15. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Carnes, B.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL [times] BALB/c F[sub 1] female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a [sup 60]Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  16. Pinwheel Nebula around WR 98a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier; Tuthill; Danchi

    1999-11-10

    We present the first near-infrared images of the dusty Wolf-Rayet star WR 98a. Aperture-masking interferometry has been utilized to recover images at the diffraction limit of the Keck I telescope, less, similar50 mas at 2.2 µm. Multiepoch observations spanning about 1 yr have resolved the dust shell into a "pinwheel" nebula, the second example of a new class of dust shell first discovered around WR 104 by Tuthill, Monnier, & Danchi. Interpreting the collimated dust outflow in terms of an interacting winds model, the binary orbital parameters and apparent wind speed are derived: a period of 565+/-50 days, a viewing angle of 35&j0;+/-6 degrees from the pole, and a wind speed of 99+/-23 mas yr-1. This period is consistent with a possible approximately 588 day periodicity in the infrared light curve, linking the photometric variation to the binary orbit. Important implications for binary stellar evolution are discussed by identifying WR 104 and WR 98a as members of a class of massive, short-period binaries whose orbits were circularized during a previous red supergiant phase. The current component separation in each system is similar to the diameter of a red supergiant, which indicates that the supergiant phase was likely terminated by Roche lobe overflow, leading to the present Wolf-Rayet stage.

  17. WR 143: A Wolf-Rayet Binary

    OpenAIRE

    Varricatt, Watson P.; Ashok, Nagarhalli M.

    2005-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy and photometry of the Wolf-Rayet Star WR 143 (HD 195177) were obtained in the $JHK$ photometric bands. High resolution spectra observed in the J and H bands exhibit narrow 1.083-micron He I line and the H I Pa Beta and the Brackett series lines in emission superposed on the broad emission line spectrum of the Wolf-Rayet star, giving strong indications of the presence of a companion. From the narrow emission lines observed, the companion is identified to be an early-...

  18. Wolf-Rayet stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahade, J

    1981-12-01

    Aspects of the problems of the Wolf-Rayet stars related to their chemical composition, their evolutionary status, and their apparent dichotomy in two spectral sequences are discussed. Dogmas concerning WR stars are critically discussed, including the belief that WR stars lack hydrogen, that they are helium stars evolved from massive close binaries, and the existence of a second WR stage in which the star is a short-period single-lined binary. The relationship of WR stars with planetary nebulae is addressed, as is the membership of these stars in clusters and associations. The division of WR stars into WN and WC sequences is considered, questioning the reasonability of accounting for WR line formation in terms of abundance differences.

  19. The ROSAT All-Sky Survey view of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, W.; Denner, K.; Kahabka, P.; Pakull, M.; Schaeidt, S.

    1996-01-01

    During the Rosat all sky survey, centered on the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), 516 X-ray sources were detected. The field was covered from July 1990 to January 1991. The X-ray parameters of the sources, involving position, count rates, hardness ratios, extent, and time variability during the observations, are discussed. Identifications with objects from optical, radio and infrared wavelength allow the LMC candidates to be separated from the foreground stars and the background objects.

  20. The origin of Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doom, C.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reviews the origin of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, with emphasis on the so-called Population I WR stars which are associated with the young and luminous stellar population. A description is given of the observational characteristics i.e. classification, luminosities composition, etc. of WR stars. The origin and evolution of WR stars is described, including the single, binary, subtypes and ratio WR/O. The interaction of the WR stars with their environment is discussed with respect to the energy deposition and composition anomalies. A brief account of the discovery of WR stars in other galaxies is given. Finally, some of the main issues in the research into the structure and evolution of WR stars are outlined. (U.K.)

  1. The Search for Wolf-Rayet Stars in IC10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Katie; Crowther, Paul; Archer, Isabelle

    2017-11-01

    We present a deep imaging and spectroscopic survey of the Local Group starburst galaxy IC10 using Gemini North/GMOS to unveil the global Wolf-Rayet population. It has previously been suggested that for IC10 to follow the WC/WN versus metallicity dependence seen in other Local Group galaxies, a large WN population must remain undiscovered. Our search revealed 3 new WN stars, and 5 candidates awaiting confirmation, providing little evidence to support this claim. We also compute an updated nebular derived metallicity of log(O/H)+12=8.40 +/- 0.04 for the galaxy using the direct method. Inspection of IC10 WR average line luminosities show these stars are more similar to their LMC, rather than SMC counterparts.

  2. WO-Type Wolf-Rayet Stars: the Last Hurrah of the Most Massive Stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip

    2014-10-01

    WO-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are considered the final evolutionary stage of the highest mass stars, immediate precursors to Type Ic (He-poor) core-collapse supernovae. These WO stars are rare, and until recently only 6 were known. Our knowledge about their physical properties is mostly based on a single object, Sand 2 in the LMC. It was the only non-binary WO star both bright and unreddened enough that its FUV and NUV spectra could be obtained by FUSE and HST/FOS. A non-LTE analysis showed that Sand 2 is very hot and its (C+O)/He abundance ratio is higher than that found in WC-type WRs, suggesting it is indeed highly evolved. However, the O VI resonance doublet in the FUV required a considerably cooler temperature (120,000 K) model than did the optical O VI lines (170,000 K). Further, the enhanced chemical abundances did not match the predictions of stellar evolutionary models. Another non-LTE study found a 3x higher (C+O)/He abundance ratio and a cooler temperature. We have recently discovered two other bright, single, and lightly reddened WOs in the LMC, allowing us to take a fresh look at these important objects. Our newly found WOs span a range in excitation type, from WO1 (the highest) to WO4 (the lowest). Sand 2 is intermediate (WO3). We propose to use COS to obtain FUV and NUV data of all three stars for as comprehensive a study as is currently possible. These UV data will be combined with our optical Magellan spectra for a detailed analysis with CMFGEN with the latest atomic data. Knowing the degree of chemical evolution of these WO stars is crucial to determining their evolutionary status, and thus in understanding the final stages of the most massive stars.

  3. Evolution of LMC/M33-mass dwarf galaxies in the EAGLE simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shi; Cautun, Marius; Deason, Alis J.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Theuns, Tom

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the population of dwarf galaxies with stellar masses similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and M33 in the EAGLE galaxy formation simulation. In the field, galaxies reside in haloes with stellar-to-halo mass ratios of 1.03^{+0.50}_{-0.31}× 10^{-2} (68% confidence level); systems like the LMC, which have an SMC-mass satellite, reside in haloes about 1.3 times more massive, which suggests an LMC halo mass at infall, M_{200}=3.4^{+1.8}_{-1.2}× 10^{11}{ M_⊙ } (68% confidence level). The colour distribution of dwarfs is bimodal, with the red galaxies (g - r > 0.6) being mostly satellites. The fraction of red LMC-mass dwarfs is 15% for centrals, and for satellites this fraction increases rapidly with host mass: from 10% for satellites of Milky Way (MW)-mass haloes to nearly 90% for satellites of groups and clusters. The quenching timescale, defined as the time after infall when half of the satellites have acquired red colours, decreases with host mass from >5 Gyrs for MW-mass hosts to 2.5 Gyrs for cluster mass hosts. The satellites of MW-mass haloes have higher star formation rates and bluer colours than field galaxies. This is due to enhanced star formation triggered by gas compression shortly after accretion. Both the LMC and M33 have enhanced recent star formation that could be a manifestation of this process. After infall into their MW-mass hosts, the g - r colours of LMC-mass dwarfs become bluer for the first 2 Gyrs, after which they rapidly redden. LMC-mass dwarfs fell into their MW-mass hosts only relatively recently, with more than half having an infall time of less than 3.5 Gyrs.

  4. Measurement of WR-2721, WR-1065, and WR-33278 in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahey, R.C.; Newton, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase was used in developing two new assays for WR-2721; one involved simple spectrophotometric titration with Ellman's reagent and the other was based upon HPLC analysis of a monobromobimane derivative. Both methods have acceptable results when applied to whole plasma. Assays for WR-1065 and disulfide forms of the drug were also developed but were found to give unreliable results with whole plasma owing to apparent rapid reaction of these drug forms with plasma constituents. The methods were applied to the analysis of blood samples in rat 0-70 min after i.v. injection of WR-2721

  5. OGLE II Eclipsing Binaries In The LMC: Analysis With Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinney, Edward J.; Prsa, A.; Guinan, E. F.; DeGeorge, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Eclipsing Binaries (EBs) via Artificial Intelligence (EBAI) Project is applying machine learning techniques to elucidate the nature of EBs. Previously, Prsa, et al. applied artificial neural networks (ANNs) trained on physically-realistic Wilson-Devinney models to solve the light curves of the 1882 detached EBs in the LMC discovered by the OGLE II Project (Wyrzykowski, et al.) fully automatically, bypassing the need for manually-derived starting solutions. A curious result is the non-monotonic distribution of the temperature ratio parameter T2/T1, featuring a subsidiary peak noted previously by Mazeh, et al. in an independent analysis using the EBOP EB solution code (Tamuz, et al.). To explore this and to gain a fuller understanding of the multivariate EBAI LMC observational plus solutions data, we have employed automatic clustering and advanced visualization (CAV) techniques. Clustering the OGLE II data aggregates objects that are similar with respect to many parameter dimensions. Measures of similarity for example, could include the multidimensional Euclidean Distance between data objects, although other measures may be appropriate. Applying clustering, we find good evidence that the T2/T1 subsidiary peak is due to evolved binaries, in support of Mazeh et al.'s speculation. Further, clustering suggests that the LMC detached EBs occupying the main sequence region belong to two distinct classes. Also identified as a separate cluster in the multivariate data are stars having a Period-I band relation. Derekas et al. had previously found a Period-K band relation for LMC EBs discovered by the MACHO Project (Alcock, et al.). We suggest such CAV techniques will prove increasingly useful for understanding the large, multivariate datasets increasingly being produced in astronomy. We are grateful for the support of this research from NSF/RUI Grant AST-05-75042 f.

  6. Hydrodynamical models of supernova SN 1987 A in the LMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassberg, E.K.; Imshennik, V.S.; Nadezhin, D.K.; Utrobin, V.P.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the properties of SN 1987A in LMC can be described well by hydrodynamical models of explosions of compact massive stars. In accordance with these models, the mass of the expelled envelope the presupernova radius and the total energy of explosion are evaluated for SN 1987A to be ∼ 16M Sun , ∼ 30R Sun , and ∼ 3.10 51 erg, respectively. The progenitor of supernova remnant Cas A may be considered as the prototype to the SN 1987A in our own Galaxy. In other galaxies, this subtype of supernovae can be represented by SN 1948B in NGC6946. If energy of explosion transfers from collapsed core of the star to the envelope within timescale less than 1 hour, then delay Δt ∼ 3 hours between the neutrino pulse and the steep rise of optical luminosity of SN 1987A does not contradict with scenario of explosions of compact massive stars

  7. THE PREVALENCE AND IMPACT OF WOLF–RAYET STARS IN EMERGING MASSIVE STAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Massey, Philip, E-mail: krs9tb@virginia.edu [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    We investigate Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.{sup 4} We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ∼50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.

  8. A new survey of nebulae around Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars in the northern sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Grant J.; Chu, You-Hua

    1993-01-01

    Interference filter CCD images have been obtained in H-alpha and forbidden O III 5007 A for 62 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars, representing a complete survey of nebulae around Galactic W-R stars in the northern sky. We find probable new ring nebulae around W-R stars number 113, 116 and 132, and possible new ring nebulae around W-R stars number 133 and 153. All survey images showing nebulosities around W-R stars are presented in this paper. New physical information is derived from the improved images of known ring nebulae. The absence of ring nebulae around most W-R stars is discussed.

  9. Near-Field Cosmology with Resolved Stellar Populations Around Local Volume LMC Stellar-Mass Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Sand, David J.; Willman, Beth; Brodie, Jean P.; Crnojevic, Denija; Forbes, Duncan; Hargis, Jonathan R.; Peter, Annika; Pucha, Ragadeepika; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Strader, Jay

    2018-06-01

    We discuss our ongoing observational program to comprehensively map the entire virial volumes of roughly LMC stellar mass galaxies at distances of ~2-4 Mpc. The MADCASH (Magellanic Analog Dwarf Companions And Stellar Halos) survey will deliver the first census of the dwarf satellite populations and stellar halo properties within LMC-like environments in the Local Volume. Our results will inform our understanding of the recent DES discoveries of dwarf satellites tentatively affiliated with the LMC/SMC system. This program has already yielded the discovery of the faintest known dwarf galaxy satellite of an LMC stellar-mass host beyond the Local Group, based on deep Subaru+HyperSuprimeCam imaging reaching ~2 magnitudes below its TRGB, and at least two additional candidate satellites. We will summarize the survey results and status to date, highlighting some challenges encountered and lessons learned as we process the data for this program through a prototype LSST pipeline. Our program will examine whether LMC stellar mass dwarfs have extended stellar halos, allowing us to assess the relative contributions of in-situ stars vs. merger debris to their stellar populations and halo density profiles. We outline the constraints on galaxy formation models that will be provided by our observations of low-mass galaxy halos and their satellites.

  10. Wolf-Rayet stars in open clusters and associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstroem, I.; Stenholm, B.

    1982-01-01

    The authors have made a search for line-of-sight coincidences between WR stars and open clusters using the new catalogue of galactic WR stars (van der Hucht et al., 1981, called the HCLS catalogue) and the catalogue of open cluster data (Lyngaa and Lundstroem, 1980). As a measure of the separation they used the angular distance between the WR star and the cluster centre expressed with the cluster angular radius, r', as unit. By comparing the results found from the real angular distributions of WR stars and open clusters with those found if the WR stars were redistributed by changing signs in their latitudes, it is concluded that the majority of WR stars with separations less than 3r' are true cluster members. For larger separations only a few stars can be expected to be members. The authors have therefore limited their investigation to those WR stars that were found within 5r' from an open cluster. (Auth.)

  11. A MODERN SEARCH FOR WOLF–RAYET STARS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS. II. A SECOND YEAR OF DISCOVERIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, Philip; Neugent, Kathryn F. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Morrell, Nidia, E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu, E-mail: kneugent@lowell.edu, E-mail: nmorrell@lco.cl [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-07-01

    The numbers and types of evolved massive stars found in nearby galaxies provide an exacting test of stellar evolution models. Because of their proximity and rich massive star populations, the Magellanic Clouds have long served as the linchpins for such studies. Yet the continued accidental discoveries of Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars in these systems demonstrate that our knowledge is not as complete as usually assumed. Therefore, we undertook a multi-year survey for WRs in the Magellanic Clouds. Our results from our first year (reported previously) confirmed nine new LMC WRs. Of these, six were of a type never before recognized, with WN3-type emission combined with O3-type absorption features. Yet these stars are 2–3 mag too faint to be WN3+O3 V binaries. Here we report on the second year of our survey, including the discovery of four more WRs, two of which are also WN3/O3s, plus two “slash” WRs. This brings the total of known LMC WRs to 152, 13 (8.2%) of which were found by our survey, which is now ∼60% complete. We find that the spatial distribution of the WN3/O3s is similar to that of other WRs in the LMC, suggesting that they are descended from the same progenitors. We call attention to the fact that 5 of the 12 known SMC WRs may in fact be similar WN3/O3s rather than the binaries they have often assumed to be. We also discuss our other discoveries: a newly discovered Onfp-type star, and a peculiar emission-line object. Finally, we consider the completeness limits of our survey.

  12. Subluminous Wolf-Rayet stars: Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heap, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    The author has used the fact that some central stars are WR stars and others are say, O stars, as a focal point for his presentation. In attempting to answer this question he has considered how the properties of WR-type central stars differ from those of O-type stars. The study begins with the classification and calibration of WR spectra, then goes on to the physical properties of WR-type central stars, and at the end returns to the question of what distinguishes a Wolf-Rayet star. The observational data for central stars are neither complete nor precise. Nevertheless, they suggest that what distinguishes a WR central star is not so much its present physical properties (e.g. temperature, gravity), but rather, its fundamental properties (initial and evolutionary history). (Auth.)

  13. Adverse effects of the radioprotector WR2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairnie, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    S-2-(3-Aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) has radioprotective properties, but it is also toxic - in man it causes nausea and vomiting. Since radiation also causes nausea and vomiting it is important to know whether WR2721 would increase or decrease the likelihood of nausea and vomiting after radiation. This question was investigated in rats using the phenomenon of aversion to the taste of saccharin, which is readily inducible and is understood to be controlled in rats by the same pathways that control nausea and vomiting in man. The taste aversion was induced by giving 0.2 Gy 60 Co γ radiation 30 min after drinking 0.1% saccharin, or WR2721 immediately after the saccharin, or giving both radiation and WR2721. There were appropriate controls. In sham-irradiated rats, WR2721 (40 or 200 mg/kg, but not 8 mg/kg) produced a significant taste aversion. When WR2721 (40 or 200 mg/kg) was given immediately after the saccharin to irradiated rats it increased the taste aversion significantly, but it did not have any effect at 8 mg/kg. It was concluded that at doses which were optimal for radioprotection (approx.200 mg/kg) or lower, WR2721 increased in rats the taste aversion induced by radiation. By inference if conditioned taste aversion is an appropriate paradigm, WR2721 would increase nausea and vomiting in man induced by radiation

  14. Pharmacokinetics of WR-1065 in mouse tissue following treatment with WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utley, J.F.; Seaver, N.; Newton, G.L.; Fahey, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065) were measured in tissues of Balb/c mouse bearing EMT 6 tumors at time intervals ranging from 5 min to 48 hr after i.v. injection of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioate (WR-2721) at 500 mg per kg. In all tissues examined (liver, kidney, lung, heart, muscle, brain, tumor, spleen, and salivary gland), maximal WR-1065 levels occurred 5-15 min after injection, with levels in liver, kidney, lung, and salivary gland exceeding one μmole per gm. The post-maximum decline in WR-1065 varied markedly with tissue, lung exhibiting a 6-fold drop by 30 min and salivary gland falling only 15% after 3 hr. In a mouse treated with carbon-14 labeled WR-2721 it was found after 15 min that WR-1065 accounted for over half of the total drug in all tissues except tumor, where it accounted for a third of the total drug. There was no evidence that GSH levels were substantially altered by WR-2721 treatment. The results provide the first direct evidence supporting the widely held view that WR-2721 treatment results in intracellular WR-1065 and they demonstrate that high levels of WR-1065 occur very soon after i.v. injection

  15. A D'-type symbiotic binary in the planetary nebula SMP LMC 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iłkiewicz, Krystian; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Miszalski, Brent; Kozłowski, Szymon; Udalski, Andrzej

    2018-05-01

    SMP LMC 88 is one of the planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We identify in its spectrum Raman scattered O VI lines at 6825 and 7083 Å. This unambiguously classifies the central object of the nebula as a symbiotic star (SySt). We identified the cold component to be a K-type giant, making this the first D'-type (yellow) SySt discovered outside the Galaxy. The photometric variability in SMP LMC 88 resembles the orbital variability of Galactic D'-type SySt with its low amplitude and sinusoidal light-curve shape. The SySt classification is also supported by the He I diagnostic diagram.

  16. How massive the Wolf-Rayet stars are

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemela, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    If the Wolf-Rayet stars are produced by the evolution of massive stars with mass loss (Paczynski 1967, Conti 1976) from O stars to WN stars and thereafter to WC stars, then we may expect to observe a correlation of decreasing mean masses in the same sense as the evolution. Information about the masses of WR stars are obtained from studies of binary systems with WR components. (Auth.)

  17. Spitzer observations of large amplitude variables in the LMC and IC 1613

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitelock Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3.6 and 4.5 ìm characteristics of asymptotic giant branch variables in the LMC and IC 1613 are discussed. For C-rich Mira variables there is a very clear periodluminosity-colour relation, where the [3.6] . [4.5] colour is associated with the amount of circumstellar material and correlated with the pulsation amplitude. The [4.5] periodluminosity relation for dusty stars is approximately one mag brighter than for their naked counterparts with comparable periods.

  18. Optical and near-IR study of LMC HII region N11AB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    N11 (DEM 34), complex HII region located about 4 degrees from the center of the LMC bar, is a very interesting giant interstellar shell. It has a complicated structure and motion. It is located on the edge of an HI concentration. This is the progress report of the study of its two components, A and B at the optical and near-IR wavelengths to investigate stars, dust and ionized gas associated with them. N11A is a compact high-excitation blob and N11B is a bright HII region in this complex, which embeds OB association Lucke-Hodge 10

  19. The mass of the black hole in the X-ray binary LMC X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubekerov, M. K.; Antokhina, E. A.; Gostev, N. Yu.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Shimansky, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    A dynamical estimate of the mass of the black hole in the LMC X-1 binary system is obtained in the framework of a Roche model for the optical star, based on fitting of the He I 4471 Å and He II 4200 Å absorption lines assuming LTE. The mass of the black hole derived from the radial-velocity curve for the He II 4200 Å line is m x = 10.55 M ⊙, close to the value found earlier based on a model with two point bodies [1].

  20. The mass of the black hole in LMC X-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosz, Jerome A. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Steiner, James F.; McClintock, Jeffrey E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Buxton, Michelle M.; Bailyn, Charles D. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Steeghs, Danny [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK and Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Guberman, Alec [Byram Hills High School, 12 Tripp Lane, Armonk, NY 10504 (United States); Torres, Manuel A. P., E-mail: jorosz@mail.sdsu.edu, E-mail: jsteiner@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jem@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: michelle.buxton@yale.edu, E-mail: charles.bailyn@yale.edu, E-mail: D.T.H.Steeghs@warwick.ac.uk, E-mail: alec.guberman@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: M.Torres@sron.nl [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-10-20

    We analyze a large set of new and archival photometric and spectroscopic observations of LMC X-3 to arrive at a self-consistent dynamical model for the system. Using echelle spectra obtained with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle instrument on the 6.5 m Magellan Clay telescope and the UVES instrument on the second 8.2 m Very Large Telescope, we find a velocity semiamplitude for the secondary star of K {sub 2} = 241.1 ± 6.2 km s{sup –1}, where the uncertainty includes an estimate of the systematic error caused by X-ray heating. Using the spectra, we also find a projected rotational velocity of V {sub rot}sin i = 118.5 ± 6.6 km s{sup –1}. From an analysis of archival B and V light curves as well as new B and V light curves from the SMARTS 1.3 m telescope, we find an inclination of i = 69.°84 ± 0.°37 for models that do not include X-ray heating and an inclination of i = 69.°24 ± 0.°72 for models that incorporate X-ray heating. Adopting the latter inclination measurement, we find masses of 3.63 ± 0.57 M {sub ☉} and 6.98 ± 0.56 M {sub ☉} for the companion star and the black hole, respectively. We briefly compare our results with earlier work and discuss some of their implications.

  1. Eclipses and dust formation by WC9 type Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Visual photometry of 16 WC8-9 dust-making Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars during 2001-2009 was extracted from the All-Sky Automated Survey All Star Catalogue (ASAS-3) to search for eclipses attributable to extinction by dust formed in clumps in our line of sight. Data for a comparable number of dust-free WC6-9 stars were also examined to help characterize the data set. Frequent eclipses were observed from WR 104, and several from WR 106, extending the 1994-2001 studies by Kato et al., but not supporting their phasing the variations in WR 104 with its `pinwheel' rotation period. Only four other stars showed eclipses, WR 50 (one of the dust-free stars), WR 69, WR 95 and WR 117, and there may have been an eclipse by WR 121, which had shown two eclipses in the past. No dust eclipses were shown by the `historic' eclipsers WR 103 and WR 113. The atmospheric eclipses of the latter were observed but the suggestion by David-Uraz et al. that dust may be partly responsible for these is not supported. Despite its frequent eclipses, there is no evidence in the infrared images of WR 104 for dust made in its eclipses, demonstrating that any dust formed in this process is not a significant contributor to its circumstellar dust cloud and suggesting that the same applies to the other stars showing fewer eclipses.

  2. Chemical protection against gastrointestinal radiation injury in mice by WR 2822, WR 2823, or WR 109342 after 4 MeV x ray or fission neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, A.M.; Sigdestad, C.P.

    1982-01-01

    Three compounds were tested for their radioprotective properties against the effects of 4 MeV X rays or fission neutron irradiation. The endpoints tested were lethality, intestinal crypt survival, and DNA synthesizing cellularity. Two of the compounds tested; S-2(4-aminobutylamino) ethylphosphorothioc acid (WR 2822) and the aminopentylamino derivative (WR 109342). All drugs were administered via intraperitoneal injections at their approximately maximum tolerated dose. WR 2822 was shown to have a slight protective effect against X rays and neutrons. The dose modification factor (DMF) for gastrointestinal death (LD/sub 50(6)/) was 1.23 for X rays and 1.51 for neutrons. The assay for intestinal crypt survival produced DMF's of 1.44 (X rays) and 1.4 (neutrons). WR 2823 also showed a protective action in these assays. The DMF for LD/sub 50(6)/ was 1.32 (X rays) and 1.42 (neutrons). WR 109342 was found to be extremely toxic and had no significant protective effects. All three drugs were more toxic and demonstrated less protection in most of these assays than the benchmark radioprotective agent WR 2721, although WR 2822 protected against lethal effects of fission neutrons almost as well as WR 2721. Both WR 2822 and WR 2823 produced greater protection in the crypt survival assays for fission neutron irradiation than WR 2721

  3. The MACHO Project HST Follow-Up: The Large Magellanic Cloud Microlensing Source Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C.A.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Berkeley; Drake, A.J.; /Caltech; Cook, K.H.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Berkeley; Bennett, D.P.; /Caltech /Notre Dame U.; Popowski, P.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst.; Dalal, N.; /Toronto U.; Nikolaev, S.; /LLNL, Livermore; Alcock, C.; /Caltech /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Axelrod, T.S.; /Arizona U.; Becker, A.C. /Washington U., Seattle; Freeman, K.C.; /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek; Geha, M.; /Yale U.; Griest, K.; /UC, San Diego; Keller, S.C.; /LLNL, Livermore; Lehner, M.J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Taipei, Inst. Astron. Astrophys.; Marshall, S.L.; /SLAC; Minniti, D.; /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Vatican Astron. Observ.; Pratt, M.R.; /Aradigm, Hayward; Quinn, P.J.; /Western Australia U.; Stubbs, C.W.; /UC, Berkeley /Harvard U.; Sutherland, W.; /Oxford U. /Oran, Sci. Tech. U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst. /McMaster U.

    2009-06-25

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 photometry of 13 microlensed source stars from the 5.7 year Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) survey conducted by the MACHO Project. The microlensing source stars are identified by deriving accurate centroids in the ground-based MACHO images using difference image analysis (DIA) and then transforming the DIA coordinates to the HST frame. None of these sources is coincident with a background galaxy, which rules out the possibility that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample is contaminated with misidentified supernovae or AGN in galaxies behind the LMC. This supports the conclusion that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample has only a small amount of contamination due to non-microlensing forms of variability. We compare the WFPC2 source star magnitudes with the lensed flux predictions derived from microlensing fits to the light curve data. In most cases the source star brightness is accurately predicted. Finally, we develop a statistic which constrains the location of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) microlensing source stars with respect to the distributions of stars and dust in the LMC and compare this to the predictions of various models of LMC microlensing. This test excludes at {approx}> 90% confidence level models where more than 80% of the source stars lie behind the LMC. Exotic models that attempt to explain the excess LMC microlensing optical depth seen by MACHO with a population of background sources are disfavored or excluded by this test. Models in which most of the lenses reside in a halo or spheroid distribution associated with either the Milky Way or the LMC are consistent which these data, but LMC halo or spheroid models are favored by the combined MACHO and EROS microlensing results.

  4. The Properties of Long Period Variables in the LMC from MACHO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, O J; Hawley, S L; Cook, K H

    2008-05-06

    We present a new analysis of the long period variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud from the MACHO Variable Star Catalog. Three-quarters of our sample of evolved, variable stars have periodic light curves. We characterize the stars in our sample using the multiple periods found in their frequency spectra. Additionally, we use single-epoch 2MASS measurements to construct the average infrared light curves for different groups of these stars. Comparison with evolutionary models shows that stars on the RGB or the Early AGB often show non-periodic variability, but begin to pulsate with periods on the two shortest period-luminosity sequences (1 & 2) when they brighten to K{sub s} {approx} 13. The stars on the Thermally Pulsing AGB are more likely to pulsate with longer periods that lie on the next two P-L sequences (3 & 4), including the sequence associated with the Miras in the LMC. The Petersen diagram and its variants show that multi-periodic stars on each pair of these sequences (3 & 4, and 1 & 2), typically pulsate with periods associated only with that pair. The periods in these multi-periodic stars become longer and stronger as the star evolves. We further constrain the mechanism behind the long secondary periods (LSPs) seen in half of our sample, and find that there is a close match between the luminosity functions of the LSP stars and all of the stars in our sample, and that these star's pulsation amplitudes are relatively wavelength independent. Although this is characteristic of stellar multiplicity, the large number of these variables is problematic for that explanation.

  5. The first optical spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars in M101 revealed with Gemini/GMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pledger, J. L.; Shara, M. M.; Wilde, M.; Crowther, P. A.; Long, K. S.; Zurek, D.; Moffat, A. F. J.

    2018-01-01

    Deep narrow-band Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of the iconic spiral galaxy M101 has revealed over a thousand new Wolf-Rayet (WR) candidates. We report spectrographic confirmation of 10 He II-emission line sources hosting 15 WR stars. We find WR stars present at both sub- and super-solar metallicities with WC stars favouring more metal-rich regions compared to WN stars. We investigate the association of WR stars with H II regions using archival HST imaging and conclude that the majority of WR stars are in or associated with H II regions. Of the 10 emission lines sources, only one appears to be unassociated with a star-forming region. Our spectroscopic survey provides confidence that our narrow-band photometric candidates are in fact bona fide WR stars, which will allow us to characterize the progenitors of any core-collapse supernovae that erupt in the future in M101.

  6. PROBING WOLF–RAYET WINDS: CHANDRA/HETG X-RAY SPECTRA OF WR 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Schulz, N. S. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L.; Shenar, T. [Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Nichols, J. S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS 34, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pollock, A. M. T., E-mail: dph@space.mit.edu, E-mail: ken.gayley@gmail.com, E-mail: wrh@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de, E-mail: lida@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de, E-mail: shtomer@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de, E-mail: ignace@mail.etsu.edu, E-mail: jnichols@cfa.harvard.edu [European Space Agency, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada (Spain)

    2015-12-10

    With a deep Chandra/HETGS exposure of WR 6, we have resolved emission lines whose profiles show that the X-rays originate from a uniformly expanding spherical wind of high X-ray-continuum optical depth. The presence of strong helium-like forbidden lines places the source of X-ray emission at tens to hundreds of stellar radii from the photosphere. Variability was present in X-rays and simultaneous optical photometry, but neither were correlated with the known period of the system or with each other. An enhanced abundance of sodium revealed nuclear-processed material, a quantity related to the evolutionary state of the star. The characterization of the extent and nature of the hot plasma in WR 6 will help to pave the way to a more fundamental theoretical understanding of the winds and evolution of massive stars.

  7. The Orbital and Physical Parameters, and the Distance of the Eclipsing Binary System OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, S. S.; Graczyk, D.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzyński, G.; Thompson, I. B.; Konorski, P.; Pilecki, B.; Villanova, S.; Udalski, A.; Soszyński, I.; Suchomska, K.; Karczmarek, P.; Górski, M.; Wielgórski, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of a new detached eclipsing binary, OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658, in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The system consists of two late G-type giant stars on an eccentric orbit with an orbital period of ˜200 days. The system shows total eclipses and the components have similar temperatures, making it ideal for a precise distance determination. Using multi-color photometric and high resolution spectroscopic data, we have performed an analysis of light and radial velocity curves simultaneously using the Wilson-Devinney code. We derived orbital and physical parameters of the binary with a high precision of \\lt 1%. The masses and surface metallicities of the components are virtually the same and equal to 2.23+/- 0.02 {M}⊙ and [{Fe}/{{H}}]\\=\\-0.63+/- 0.10 dex. However, their radii and rates of rotation show a distinct trace of differential stellar evolution. The distance to the system was calculated using an infrared calibration between V-band surface brightness and (V-K) color, leading to a distance modulus of (m-M)\\=\\18.452+/- 0.023 (statistical) ± 0.046 (systematic). Because OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658 is located relatively far from the LMC barycenter, we applied a geometrical correction for its position in the LMC disk using the van der Marel et al. model of the LMC. The resulting barycenter distance to the galaxy is {d}{{LMC}}\\=\\50.30+/- 0.53 (stat.) kpc, and is in perfect agreement with the earlier result of Pietrzyński et al.

  8. WR 148: identifying the companion of an extreme runaway massive binary*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Melissa; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Hill, Grant M.; Shenar, Tomer; Richardson, Noel D.; Pablo, Herbert; St-Louis, Nicole; Ramiaramanantsoa, Tahina

    2017-05-01

    WR 148 (HD 197406) is an extreme runaway system considered to be a potential candidate for a short-period (4.3173 d) rare WR + compact object binary. Provided with new high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra from the Keck observatory, we determine the orbital parameters for both the primary WR and the secondary, yielding respective projected orbital velocity amplitudes of 88.1 ± 3.8 km s-1 and 79.2 ± 3.1 km s-1 and implying a mass ratio of 1.1 ± 0.1. We then apply the shift-and-add technique to disentangle the spectra and obtain spectra compatible with a WN7ha and an O4-6 star. Considering an orbital inclination of ˜67°, derived from previous polarimetry observations, the system's total mass would be a mere 2-3M_{⊙}, an unprecedented result for a putative massive binary system. However, a system comprising a 37 M_{⊙} secondary (typical mass of an O5V star) and a 33 M_{⊙} primary (given the mass ratio) would infer an inclination of ˜18°. We therefore reconsider the previous methods of deriving the orbital inclination based on time-dependent polarimetry and photometry. While the polarimetric results are inconclusive requiring better data, the photometric results favour low inclinations. Finally, we compute WR 148's space velocity and retrace the runaway's trajectory back to the Galactic plane (GP). With an ejection velocity of 198 ± 27 km s-1 and a travel time of 4.7 ± 0.8 Myr to reach its current location, WR 148 was most likely ejected via dynamical interactions in a young cluster.

  9. Comparative study of the radioprotective effects of cysteamine, WR-2721, and WR-1065 in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    The compounds, 2-mercaptoethylamine (cysteamine), S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721), and N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065) were tested for toxicity and radioprotective effect in cultured human cells using viability (reproductive death) as an indicator. WR-2721 and WR-1065 had no harmful effect at concentrations of 4 and 10 mM for periods up to 3 hr whereas cysteamine was toxic if left in contact with the cells for more than 30 min. The response of the cells to radiation was measured after a 30-min treatment with 4 mM of each protective agent. Survival curves were constructed and the following dose reduction factors (DRFs) were calculated: WR-2721, 1.3; cysteamine, 2.3; WR-1065, 2.9. Increasing the concentration of protective agent did not increase the DRF under these conditions except in the case of cysteamine. Extending the period of treatment with drug before irradiation increased the DRF for WR-2721 and WR-1065; values up to 1.8 and 3.4 were obtained with 10 mM WR-2721 and WR-1065, respectively. With these two compounds, the rate of development of protection with time is almost independent of concentration until the maximum is attained; it is probably controlled by the rate of transport across the cell membrane, in the case of WR-1065, and by the rate of hydrolysis of WR-2721

  10. The Magellanic Analog Dwarf Companions and Stellar Halos (MADCASH) Survey: Near-Field Cosmology with Resolved Stellar Populations Around Local Volume LMC Stellar-Mass Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Sand, David J.; Willman, Beth; Brodie, Jean P.; Crnojevic, Denija; Peter, Annika; Price, Paul A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Strader, Jay

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the first results of our observational program to comprehensively map nearly the entire virial volumes of roughly LMC stellar mass galaxies at distances of ~2-4 Mpc. The MADCASH (Magellanic Analog Dwarf Companions And Stellar Halos) survey will deliver the first census of the dwarf satellite populations and stellar halo properties within LMC-like environments in the Local Volume. These will inform our understanding of the recent DES discoveries of dwarf satellites tentatively affiliated with the LMC/SMC system. We will detail our discovery of the faintest known dwarf galaxy satellite of an LMC stellar-mass host beyond the Local Group, based on deep Subaru+HyperSuprimeCam imaging reaching ~2 magnitudes below its TRGB. We will summarize the survey results and status to date, highlighting some challenges encountered and lessons learned as we process the data for this program through a prototype LSST pipeline. Our program will examine whether LMC stellar mass dwarfs have extended stellar halos, allowing us to assess the relative contributions of in-situ stars vs. merger debris to their stellar populations and halo density profiles. We outline the constraints on galaxy formation models that will be provided by our observations of low-mass galaxy halos and their satellites.

  11. The role of rotation in the evolution of massive stars losing mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasan, S.R.; Wilson, W.J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The role of differential and solid body rotation in the evolution of massive stars undergoing mass loss is discussed. The implications for Of, WR, β Cephei stars and shell stars are brought out. (Auth.)

  12. Regiones H II alrededor de estrellas WR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez Benitez, S.; Niemela, V.

    En base a observaciones espectroscópicas en el rango óptico, obtenidas en el CASLEO, se estudian las condiciones físicas de tres regiones H II alrededor de estrellas WR: N76 en el entorno de Ab7, en la Nube Menor de Magallanes, N79 alrededor de Br 2, en la Nube Mayor de Magallanes y G2.4+1.4 alrededor de WR 102, en nuestra Galaxia. Estas regiones presentan una alta ionización. Se observa la línea nebular de HeII en 4686 Å . Utilizando líneas nebulares de diagnóstico, se derivan los valores de la densidad y la temperatura electrónica, así como también las abundancias de algunos de los elementos químicos nebulares.

  13. Phase I clinical studies with WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, M.M.; Shaw, M.T.; Slavik, M.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Toxicity studies of S-2-(3 aminopropylamino)-ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) access patients in remission following radiation therapy. The dose has been escalated from 25 to 250 mg/m2 without significant symptoms. Inconsistent variation in the systolic blood pressure in some patients has been observed over an 8-10-point range without producing any symptoms. Combining WR-2721 with conventional radiotherapy is contemplated by intravenous injection the drug 20 to 30 minutes before irradiation. This will start as weekly injections, and the number of weekly injections will be increased progessively. Animal studies suggest that the level already safely reached could give significant protection to the normal tissues without protecting tumor

  14. Bursting star formation and the overabundance of Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodigfee, G.; Deloore, C.

    1985-01-01

    The ratio of the number of WR-stars to their OB progenitors appears to be significantly higher in some extragalactic systems than in our Galaxy. This overabundance of Wolf-Rayet-stars can be explained as a consequence of a recent burst of star formation. It is suggested that this burst is the manifestation of a long period nonlinear oscillation in the star formation process, produced by positive feedback effects between young stars and the interstellar medium. Star burst galaxies with large numbers of WR-stars must generate gamma fluxes but due to the distance, all of them are beyond the reach of present-day detectors, except probably 30 Dor

  15. OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893: The discovery of a long-period eclipsing binary with a circumstellar disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Subo [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Road 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Katz, Boaz [Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Prieto, Jose L. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Udalski, Andrzej; Kozlowski, Szymon [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Bramich, D. M. [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, Tornado Tower, Floor 19, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Hundertmark, M.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Jaimes, R. Figuera [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Snodgrass, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-06-10

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a disk-eclipse system OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893. The eclipse occurs with a period of 468 days, a duration of about 15 days, and a deep (up to Δm{sub I} ≈ 1.5), peculiar, and asymmetric profile. A possible origin of such an eclipse profile involves a circumstellar disk. The presence of the disk is confirmed by the H-α line profile from the follow-up spectroscopic observations, and the star is identified as Be/Ae type. Unlike the previously known disk-eclipse candidates, the eclipses of OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893 retain the same shape throughout the span of ∼17 yr (13 orbital periods), indicating no measurable orbital precession of the disk.

  16. Identification of two new HMXBs in the LMC: an ˜2013 s pulsar and a probable SFXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilopoulos, G.; Maitra, C.; Haberl, F.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Petropoulou, M.

    2018-03-01

    We report on the X-ray and optical properties of two high-mass X-ray binary systems located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Based on the obtained optical spectra, we classify the massive companion as a supergiant star in both systems. Timing analysis of the X-ray events collected by XMM-Newton revealed the presence of coherent pulsations (spin period ˜2013 s) for XMMU J053108.3-690923 and fast flaring behaviour for XMMU J053320.8-684122. The X-ray spectra of both systems can be modelled sufficiently well by an absorbed power law, yielding hard spectra and high intrinsic absorption from the environment of the systems. Due to their combined X-ray and optical properties, we classify both systems as SgXRBs: the 19th confirmed X-ray pulsar and a probable supergiant fast X-ray transient in the LMC, the second such candidate outside our Galaxy.

  17. ISO-SWS spectrophotometry of galactic Wolf-Rayet stars: preliminary results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hucht, K. A.; Morris, P. W.; Williams, P. M.; Setia Gunawan, D. Y. A.; Beintema, D. A.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; de Graauw, T.; Heras, A.; Kester, D. J. M.; Lahuis, F.; Leech, K. J.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Salama, A.; Valentijn, E. A.; Vandenbussche, B.

    1996-01-01

    ISO-SWS spectra of seven late-type galactic Wolf-Rayet stars are discussed. A high resolution spectrum (2.3-29.6μm, λ/{DELTA}λ=~820-1700) of the WC8 star WR11 (γ^2^ Vel) is shown and its Ne abundance is discussed. Medium resolution spectra (λ/{DELTA}λ=~250-600) of the WC8-9 stars WR48a, WR98a,

  18. Opposite effects of WR-2721 and WR-1065 on radiation-induced hypothermia: possible correlation with oxygen uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Kumar, K.S.; Hunt, W.A.; Weiss, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces hypothermia in guinea pigs. While systemic injection of the radioprotectant S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) did not block hyperthermia induced by exposure to 10 Gy of gamma radiation, central administration did attenuate it. The dephosphorylated metabolite of WR-2721, N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065), accentuated radiation-induced hypothermia by both routes of administration. In brain homogenates, oxygen uptake was inhibited by WR-2721 but elevated by WR-1065. These results suggest that the antagonism of radiation-induced hypothermia found only after central administration of WR-2721 is due to its direct actions and not to its dephosphorylated metabolite and that this effect may be correlated with the inhibition by WR-2721 of oxygen uptake

  19. Anomalous Low States and Long Term Variability in the Black Hole Binary LMC X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Alan P.; Boyd, Patricia T.

    2012-01-01

    Rossi X-my Timing Explorer observations of the black hole binary LMC X-3 reveal an extended very low X-ray state lasting from 2003 December 13 until 2004 March 18, unprecedented both in terms of its low luminosity (>15 times fainter than ever before seen in this source) and long duration (approx 3 times longer than a typical low/hard state excursion). During this event little to no source variability is observed on timescales of approx hours-weeks, and the X-ray spectrum implies an upper limit of 1.2 x 10(exp 35) erg/s, Five years later another extended low state occurs, lasting from 2008 December 11 until 2009 June 17. This event lasts nearly twice as long as the first, and while significant variability is observed, the source remains reliably in the low/hard spectral state for the approx 188 day duration. These episodes share some characteristics with the "anomalous low states" in the neutron star binary Her X-I. The average period and amplitude of the Variability of LMC X-3 have different values between these episodes. We characterize the long-term variability of LMC X-3 before and after the two events using conventional and nonlinear time series analysis methods, and show that, as is the case in Her X-I, the characteristic amplitude of the variability is related to its characteristic timescale. Furthermore, the relation is in the same direction in both systems. This suggests that a similar mechanism gives rise to the long-term variability, which in the case of Her X-I is reliably modeled with a tilted, warped precessing accretion disk.

  20. Two extremely luminous WN stars in the Galactic center with circumstellar emission from dust and gas

    OpenAIRE

    Barniske, A.; Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W. -R.

    2008-01-01

    We study relatively isolated massive WN-type stars in the Galactic center. The K-band spectra of WR102ka and WR102c are exploited to infer the stellar parameters and to compute synthetic stellar spectra using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code. These models are combined with dust-shell models for analyzing the Spitzer IRS spectra of these objects. Archival IR images complement the interpretation. We report that WR102ka and WR102c are among the most luminous stars in the Milky...

  1. X-ray observations of the colliding wind binary WR 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Bharti; Pandey, Jeewan Chandra

    2018-04-01

    Using the archival data obtained from Chandra and Suzaku spanning over '8 years, we present an analysis of a WN6h+O4f Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. The X-ray light curves folded over a period of '208 d in the 0.3 - 10.0 keV energy band showed phase-locked variability where the count rates were found to be maximum near the periastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were well explained by a two-temperature plasma model with temperatures of 0.64 ± 0.01 and 2.96 ± 0.05 keV and are consistent with previous results. The orbital phase dependent local hydrogen column density was found to be maximum just after the periastron passage, when the WN type star is in front of the O star. The hard (2.0 - 10.0 keV) X-ray luminosity was linearly dependent on the inverse of binary separation which confirms that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary.

  2. Wolf-Rayet stars associated to giant regions of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Odorico, S.; Rosa, M.

    1982-01-01

    Data on Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in extragalactic H II regions and emission line galaxies are presented and discussed. The sample is still limited and inhomogeneous but two important points appear to be already established: a) The WR stars are more numerous than the blue supergiants at least in same phase of the evolution of the stellar clusters which ionize the giant H II regions, b) When the WR stars are detected, two cases are apparently observed, one in which only WN, the other in which both WN and WC, are present. (Auth.)

  3. The WR-1 corrosion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.V.; Simmons, G.R.

    1978-07-01

    This report describes a new Corrosion Test Facility which has recently been installed in the WR-1 organic-cooled research reactor. The irradiation facility is a single insert, installed in a reactor site, which can deliver a fast neutron flux density of 2.65 x 10 17 neutrons/(m 2 .s) to specimens under irradiation. A self-contained controlled-chemistry cooling water circuit removes the gamma- and neutron-heat generated in the insert and specimens. Specimen temperatures typically vary from 245 deg C to 280 deg C across the insert core region. (author)

  4. Phase-resolved XMM-Newton and swift observations of WR 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, J. C.; Pandey, S. B.; Karmakar, Subhajeet, E-mail: jeewan@aries.res.in [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Nainital 263 002 (India)

    2014-06-10

    We present an analysis of long-term X-ray and optical observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. Using archival data from observations with the XMM-Newton and the Swift observatories, spanning over ∼10 yr, we show that WR 25 is a periodic variable in X-rays with a period of 208 ± 3 days. X-ray light curves in the 0.5-10.0 keV energy band show phase-locked variability, where the flux increased by a factor of ∼2 from minimum to maximum, being maximum near periastron passage. The light curve in the soft energy band (0.5-2.0 keV) shows two minima indicating the presence of two eclipses. However, the light curve in the hard energy band (2.0-10.0 keV) shows only one minimum during the apastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were explained by a two-temperature plasma model. Both the cool and the hot plasmas were constant at 0.628 ± 0.008 and 2.75 ± 0.06 keV throughout an orbital cycle, where the cooler plasma could be due to small scale shocks in a radiation-driven outflow and the high temperature plasma could be due to the collision of winds. The column density varied with the orbital phase and was found to be maximum after the periastron passage, when the WN star is in front of the O star. The abundances of WR 25 were found to be non-solar. Optical V-band data of WR 25 also show the phase-locked variability, being at maximum near periastron passage. The results based on the present analysis indicate that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary where the presence of soft X-rays is attributed to individual components; however, hard X-rays are due to the collision of winds.

  5. Wolf-Rayet stars and galactic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenholm, B.

    1975-01-01

    A 15 0 wide strip along the galactic equator between longitudes 250 0 and 360 0 has been searched for Wolf-Rayet stars. Six new WR stars and four new planetary nebulae have been found. Seven stars earlier listed as WR stars have been rejected as such. The new WR stars in the 'Luminous Stars in the Southern Milky Way' are discussed. A sample of 154 WR stars has been treated statistically. For the distribution in longitude, comparisons are made with OB stars and classical cepheids. The differences in distribution are thought to be an age effect. An effort to explain the empty interval towards the anticentre is made. The distribution in latitude is compared with young clusters and long-period cepheids. The physical plane formed by these objects is tilted about one degree to the galactic plane and the tilt is upwards in the Cygnus direction. This result is also received by a least squares solution of the objects when given in rectangular coordinates. The WR star sample is regarded as fairly complete up to a distance of 5 kpc. (orig.) [de

  6. Sizing the star cluster population of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, Andrés E.

    2018-04-01

    The number of star clusters that populate the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) at deprojected distances knowledge of the LMC cluster formation and dissolution histories, we closely revisited such a compilation of objects and found that only ˜35 per cent of the previously known catalogued clusters have been included. The remaining entries are likely related to stellar overdensities of the LMC composite star field, because there is a remarkable enhancement of objects with assigned ages older than log(t yr-1) ˜ 9.4, which contrasts with the existence of the LMC cluster age gap; the assumption of a cluster formation rate similar to that of the LMC star field does not help to conciliate so large amount of clusters either; and nearly 50 per cent of them come from cluster search procedures known to produce more than 90 per cent of false detections. The lack of further analyses to confirm the physical reality as genuine star clusters of the identified overdensities also glooms those results. We support that the actual size of the LMC main body cluster population is close to that previously known.

  7. A DARK ENERGY CAMERA SEARCH FOR MISSING SUPERGIANTS IN THE LMC AFTER THE ADVANCED LIGO GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE EVENT GW150914

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annis, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Diehl, H. T.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Herner, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Berger, E.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Drout, M. R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brout, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Chen, H.; Doctor, Z.; Farr, B.; Holz, D.; Kessler, R. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chornock, R. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, 251B Clippinger Lab, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Collaboration: DES Collaboration; and others

    2016-06-01

    The collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg{sup 2} of the localization area, including 38 deg{sup 2} on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We construct a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates: less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf–Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. We discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.

  8. A Dark Energy Camera Search for Missing Supergiants in the LMC After the Advanced LIGO Gravitational-Wave Event GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Berger, E.; Brout, D.; Chen, H.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Cenko, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    The collapse of a stellar core is expected to produce gravitational waves (GWs), neutrinos, and in most cases a luminous supernova. Sometimes, however, the optical event could be significantly less luminous than a supernova and a direct collapse to a black hole, where the star just disappears, is possible. The GW event GW150914 was detected by the LIGO Virgo Collaboration via a burst analysis that gave localization contours enclosing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Shortly thereafter, we used DECam to observe 102 deg(exp.2) of the localization area,including 38 deg(exp. 2) on the LMC for a missing supergiant search. We construct a complete catalog of LMC luminous red supergiants, the best candidates to undergo invisible core collapse, and collected catalogs of other candidates:less luminous red supergiants, yellow supergiants, blue supergiants, luminous blue variable stars, and Wolf-Rayet stars. Of the objects in the imaging region, all are recovered in the images. The timescale for stellar disappearance is set by the free-fall time, which is a function of the stellar radius. Our observations at 4 and 13 days after the event result in a search sensitive to objects of up to about 200 solar radii. We conclude that it is unlikely that GW150914 was caused by the core collapse of a relatively compact supergiant in the LMC, consistent with the LIGO Collaboration analyses of the gravitational waveform as best interpreted as a high mass binary black hole merger. We discuss how to generalize this search for future very nearby core-collapse candidates.

  9. Stellar Variability at the Main-sequence Turnoff of the Intermediate-age LMC Cluster NGC 1846

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, R.; Pajkos, M. A.; Vivas, A. K.; Strader, J.; Contreras Ramos, R.

    2018-04-01

    Intermediate-age (IA) star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) present extended main-sequence turn-offs (MSTO) that have been attributed to either multiple stellar populations or an effect of stellar rotation. Recently it has been proposed that these extended main sequences can also be produced by ill-characterized stellar variability. Here we present Gemini-S/Gemini Multi-Object Spectrometer (GMOS) time series observations of the IA cluster NGC 1846. Using differential image analysis, we identified 73 new variable stars, with 55 of those being of the Delta Scuti type, that is, pulsating variables close the MSTO for the cluster age. Considering completeness and background contamination effects, we estimate the number of δ Sct belonging to the cluster between 40 and 60 members, although this number is based on the detection of a single δ Sct within the cluster half-light radius. This amount of variable stars at the MSTO level will not produce significant broadening of the MSTO, albeit higher-resolution imaging will be needed to rule out variable stars as a major contributor to the extended MSTO phenomenon. Though modest, this amount of δ Sct makes NGC 1846 the star cluster with the highest number of these variables ever discovered. Lastly, our results present a cautionary tale about the adequacy of shallow variability surveys in the LMC (like OGLE) to derive properties of its δ Sct population. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), and Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil).

  10. Creating an enabling environment for WR&R implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathatou, P-M; Kampragou, E; Grigoropoulou, H; Assimacopoulos, D; Karavitis, C; Gironás, J

    2017-09-01

    Reclaimed water is receiving growing attention worldwide as an effective solution for alleviating the growing water scarcity in many areas. Despite the various benefits associated with reclaimed water, water recycling and reuse (WR&R) practices are not widely applied around the world. This is mostly due to complex and inadequate local legal and institutional frameworks and socio-economic structures, which pose barriers to wider WR&R implementation. An integrated approach is therefore needed while planning the implementation of WR&R schemes, considering all the potential barriers, and aiming to develop favourable conditions for enhancing reclaimed water use. This paper proposes a comprehensive methodology supporting the development of an enabling environment for WR&R implementation. The political, economic, social, technical, legal and institutional factors that may influence positively (drivers) or negatively (barriers) WR&R implementation in the regional water systems are identified, through the mapping of local stakeholder perceptions. The identified barriers are further analysed, following a Cross-Impact/System analysis, to recognize the most significant barriers inhibiting system transition, and to prioritize the enabling instruments and arrangements that are needed to boost WR&R implementation. The proposed methodology was applied in the Copiapó River Basin in Chile, which faces severe water scarcity. Through the analysis, it was observed that barriers outweigh drivers for the implementation of WR&R schemes in the Copiapó River Basin, while the key barriers which could be useful for policy formulation towards an enabling environment in the area concern the unclear legal framework regarding the ownership of treated wastewater, the lack of environmental policies focusing on pollution control, the limited integration of reclaimed water use in current land use and development policies, the limited public awareness on WR&R, and the limited availability of

  11. Further Wolf-Rayet stars in the starburst cluster Westerlund 1

    OpenAIRE

    Negueruela, I.; Clark, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    We present new low and intermediate-resolution spectroscopic observations of the Wolf Rayet (WR) star population in the massive starburst cluster Westerlund 1. Finding charts are presented for five new WRs - four WNL and one WCL - raising the current total of known WRs in the cluster to 19. We also present new spectra and correct identifications for the majority of the 14 WR stars previously known, notably confirming the presence of two WNVL stars. Finally we briefly discuss the massive star ...

  12. NEW X-RAY DETECTIONS OF WNL STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Stephen L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Zhekov, Svetozar A. [Space and Solar-Terrestrial Research Institute, Moskovska str. 6, Sofia-1000 (Bulgaria); Guedel, Manuel [Department of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Schmutz, Werner [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD), Dorfstrasse 33, CH-7260 Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Sokal, Kimberly R., E-mail: Stephen.Skinner@colorado.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that putatively single nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet stars (WN stars) without known companions are X-ray sources. However, almost all WN star X-ray detections so far have been of earlier WN2-WN6 spectral subtypes. Later WN7-WN9 subtypes (also known as WNL stars) have proved more difficult to detect, an important exception being WR 79a (WN9ha). We present here new X-ray detections of the WNL stars WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). These new results, when combined with previous detections, demonstrate that X-ray emission is present in WN stars across the full range of spectral types, including later WNL stars. The two WN8 stars observed to date (WR 16 and WR 40) show unusually low X-ray luminosities (L{sub x} ) compared to other WN stars, and it is noteworthy that they also have the lowest terminal wind speeds (v{sub {infinity}}). Existing X-ray detections of about a dozen WN stars reveal a trend of increasing L{sub x} with wind luminosity L{sub wind} = (1/2)M-dot v{sup 2}{sub {infinity}}, suggesting that wind kinetic energy may play a key role in establishing X-ray luminosity levels in WN stars.

  13. NEW X-RAY DETECTIONS OF WNL STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Güdel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner; Sokal, Kimberly R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that putatively single nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet stars (WN stars) without known companions are X-ray sources. However, almost all WN star X-ray detections so far have been of earlier WN2-WN6 spectral subtypes. Later WN7-WN9 subtypes (also known as WNL stars) have proved more difficult to detect, an important exception being WR 79a (WN9ha). We present here new X-ray detections of the WNL stars WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). These new results, when combined with previous detections, demonstrate that X-ray emission is present in WN stars across the full range of spectral types, including later WNL stars. The two WN8 stars observed to date (WR 16 and WR 40) show unusually low X-ray luminosities (L x ) compared to other WN stars, and it is noteworthy that they also have the lowest terminal wind speeds (v ∞ ). Existing X-ray detections of about a dozen WN stars reveal a trend of increasing L x with wind luminosity L wind = (1/2)M-dot v 2 ∞ , suggesting that wind kinetic energy may play a key role in establishing X-ray luminosity levels in WN stars.

  14. A deep near-infrared spectroscopic survey of the Scutum-Crux arm for Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslowe, C. K.; Crowther, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a New Technology Telescope/Son-of-Isaac spectroscopic survey of infrared selected Wolf-Rayet (WR) candidates in the Scutum-Crux spiral arm (298° ≤ l ≤ 340°, |b| ≤ 0.5°. We obtained near-IR spectra of 127 candidates, revealing 17 WR stars - a ∼13 per cent success rate - of which 16 are newly identified here. The majority of the new WR stars are classified as narrow-lined WN5-7 stars, with two broad-lined WN4-6 stars and three WC6-8 stars. The new stars, with distances estimated from previous absolute magnitude calibrations, have no obvious association with the Scutum-Crux arm. Refined near-infrared (YHJK) classification criteria based on over a hundred Galactic and Magellanic Cloud WR stars, providing diagnostics for hydrogen in WN stars, plus the identification of WO stars and intermediate WN/C stars. Finally, we find that only a quarter of WR stars in the survey region are associated with star clusters and/or H II regions, with similar statistics found for luminous blue variables (LBVs) in the Milky Way. The relative isolation of evolved massive stars is discussed, together with the significance of the co-location of LBVs and WR stars in young star clusters.

  15. The Wolf-Rayet hydrogen puzzle -- an observational point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Foellmi, C.; Marchenko, S. V.; Moffat, A. F. J.

    2005-01-01

    Significant amounts of hydrogen were found in very hot early-type single WN stars in the SMC and the LMC. Recently, we found similar evidence in the Wolf-Rayet star of a short-period LMC binary. We discuss here the relevance of hydrogen for WR star classification, models, the relation to metallicity, and the GRB progenitors.

  16. Three candidate double clusters in the LMC: truth or dare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessandro, Emanuele; Zocchi, Alice; Varri, Anna Lisa; Mucciarelli, Alessio; Bellazzini, Michele; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Lanzoni, Barbara; Lapenna, Emilio; Origlia, Livia

    2018-02-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) hosts a large number of candidate stellar cluster pairs. Binary stellar clusters provide important clues about cluster formation processes and the evolutionary history of the host galaxy. However, to properly extract and interpret this information, it is crucial to fully constrain the fraction of real binary systems and their physical properties. Here we present a detailed photometric analysis based on ESO-FORS2 images of three candidate cluster multiplets in the LMC, namely SL349-SL353, SL385-SL387-NGC 1922 and NGC 1836-BRHT4b-NGC 1839. For each cluster, we derived ages, structural parameters and morphological properties. We have also estimated the degree of filling of their Roche lobe, as an approximate tool to measure the strength of the tidal perturbations induced by the LMC. We find that the members of the possible pairs SL349-SL353 and BRHT4b-NGC 1839 have a similar age (t = 1.00 ± 0.12 Gyr and t = 140 ± 15 Myr, respectively), thus possibly hinting at a common origin of their member systems. We also find that all candidate pairs in our sample show evidence of intracluster overdensities that can be a possible indication of real binarity. Particularly interesting is the case of SL349-SL353. In fact, SL353 is relatively close to the condition of critical filling, thus suggesting that these systems might actually constitute an energetically bound pair. It is therefore key to pursue a detailed kinematic screening of such clusters, without which, at present, we do not dare making a conclusive statement about the true nature of this putative pair.

  17. What Determines Star Formation Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Neal John

    2017-06-01

    The relations between star formation and gas have received renewed attention. We combine studies on scales ranging from local (within 0.5 kpc) to distant galaxies to assess what factors contribute to star formation. These include studies of star forming regions in the Milky Way, the LMC, nearby galaxies with spatially resolved star formation, and integrated galaxy studies. We test whether total molecular gas or dense gas provides the best predictor of star formation rate. The star formation ``efficiency," defined as star formation rate divided by mass, spreads over a large range when the mass refers to molecular gas; the standard deviation of the log of the efficiency decreases by a factor of three when the mass of relatively dense molecular gas is used rather than the mass of all the molecular gas. We suggest ways to further develop the concept of "dense gas" to incorporate other factors, such as turbulence.

  18. Bright X-ray transient in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, R.; Read, A. M.; Li, D. Y.

    2018-01-01

    We report a bright X-ray transient in the LMC from an XMM-Newton slew made on 5th January 2018. The source, XMMSL2 J053629.4-675940, had a soft X-ray (0.2-2 keV) count rate in the EPIC-pn detector, medium filter of 1.82+/-0.56 c/s, equivalent to a flux Fx=2.3+/-0.7E-12 ergs/s/cm2 for a nominal spectrum of a power-law of slope 2 absorbed by a column NH=3E20 cm^-2.

  19. Wolf-Rayet stars in the Andromeda Galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, A.F.J.; Shara, M.M.; Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD)

    1987-01-01

    A survey of M31 for strong-line Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars has been completed, confirming the trends found previously, that (1) M31 is at present about an order of magnitude less active in star formation than the Galaxy, as reflected in the total number of W-R stars, assumed to have evolved from massive progenitors; (2) the number ratio of late to early WC stars, WCL/WCE, varies systematically with galactocentric radius as in the Galaxy, possibly a consequence of the metallicity gradient in the disk; and (3) most W-R stars lie in the prominent ring of active star formation at R = 7-12 kpc from the center of M31. 19 references

  20. Prolonged radioprotective activity of WR-2721 linked to dextran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moenig, H.; Konermann, G.; Oehlert, W.

    1990-01-01

    The radioprotective agent WR-2721 was linked to dextran and poly(glutamic acid) respectively, to obtain a prolonged radioprotective ability. Male mice were administered these water soluble polymer conjugates one to 72 hours prior to a whole body irradiation with X-rays. A prolongation of radioprotective efficiency was achieved with two dextran-(WR-2721)-conjugates. For a period of 24 hours between administration, and irradiation dose reduction factors of 1.14±0.04 and 1.10±0.03 respectively were found. After 72 hours, no protective effect was observed. Histopathological investigations of the liver for formation of tumors 200 to 600 days after irradiation seems to indicate that a protective effect is not produced by the dextran-(WR-2721)-conjugats. (orig.) [de

  1. Interaction of cultured mammalian cells with WR-2721 and its thiol, WR-1065: implications for mechanisms of radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, J.W.; Inhaber, E.R.; Schneider, H.; Labelle, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    An isothermal microcalorimeter was used to measure changes in heat flow when radioprotective drugs were added to cultured mammalian cells. The heat produced when WR-2721 was added continued for at least 90 min. WR-2721 was dephosphorylated by the cells to thiol (WR-1065) which oxidizes to disulphide. In the microcalorimeter, thiols give an immediate burst of heat due to this oxidation. A biological oxygen monitor revealed that WR-1065 and cysteamine rapidly consumed all the oxygen in culture medium. (10mM WR-1065 deoxygenated medium in 2 min.). Rapid consumption of oxygen by radioprotective thiols indicates that they will not co-exist with oxygen for long in cells. This has two important implications with respect to mechanisms of radioprotection: (1) oxygen in tissues will be consumed rapidly and could results in local hypoxia; and, (2) at modest doses of protective agents the thiol will be consumed in oxic cells and hence very little will be available for reactions such as hydrogen donation. The results indicate that anoxia is probably the principle mechanism of protection by aminothiols in mammals and aerated cells. (author)

  2. Proper motion separation of Be stars in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, K.; García, A.; Sabogal, B.

    2018-01-01

    We present a proper motion investigation of a sample of Be stars candidates towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which has resulted in the identification of two separate populations, in the Galactic foreground and in the Magellanic background. OGLE BVI and 2MASS JHK photometry were used with the SPM4 proper motions to discriminate the different populations located towards the LMC. Two populations with distinctive infrared colours and noticeable different kinematics were found, the bluer sample is consistent with being in the LMC and the redder one with belonging to the Milky Way (MW) disk. This settles the nature of the redder sample which had been described in previous publications as a possible unknown subclass of stars among the Be candidates in the LMC.

  3. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-01-01

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds

  4. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37663 (United States); Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52245 (United States); Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Huenemoerder, D. P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pollock, A. M. T. [European Space Agency XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Apartado 78, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); McFall, M., E-mail: ignace@etsu.edu [Department of Physics, 191 W. Woodruff Avenue, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds.

  5. Discovery of a new Wolf-Rayet star and its ring nebula in Cygnus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Fabrika, S.; Hamann, W.-R.; Sholukhova, O.; Valeev, A. F.; Goranskij, V. P.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Bomans, D. J.; Oskinova, L. M.

    2009-11-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a ring nebula around a candidate Wolf-Rayet (WR) star, HBHA4202-22, in Cygnus using the Spitzer Space Telescope archival data. Our spectroscopic follow-up observations confirmed the WR nature of this star (we named it WR138a) and showed that it belongs to the WN8-9h subtype. We thereby add a new example to the known sample of late WN stars with circumstellar nebulae. We analysed the spectrum of WR138a by using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmospheres, obtaining a stellar temperature of 40kK. The stellar wind composition is dominated by helium with 20 per cent of hydrogen. The stellar spectrum is highly reddened and absorbed (EB- V = 2.4mag, AV = 7.4mag). Adopting a stellar luminosity of logL/Lsolar = 5.3, the star has a mass-loss rate of 10-4.7Msolaryr-1, and resides in a distance of 4.2 kpc. We measured the proper motion for WR138a and found that it is a runaway star with a peculiar velocity of ~=50kms-1. Implications of the runaway nature of WR138a for constraining the mass of its progenitor star and understanding the origin of its ring nebula are discussed.

  6. O3 stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walborn, N.R.

    1982-01-01

    A brief review of the 10 known objects in this earliest spectral class is presented. Two new members are included: HD 64568 in NGC 2467 (Puppis OB2), which provides the first example of an O3 V((f*)) spectrum; and Sk -67 0 22 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which is intermediate between types O3 If* and WN6-A. In addition, the spectrum of HDE 269810 in the LMC is reclassified as the first of type O3 III (f*). The absolute visual magnitudes of these stars are rediscussed

  7. An IRAS-Based Search for New Dusty Late-Type WC Wolf-Rayet Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Martin

    1995-01-01

    I have examined all Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data relevant to the 173 Galactic Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars in an updated catalog, including the 13 stars newly discovered by Shara and coworkers. Using the W-R coordinates in these lists, I have examined the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC), the Faint Source Catalog, and the Faint Source Reject Catalog, and have generated one-dimensional spatial profiles, 'ADDSCANs', and two-dimensional full-resolution images, 'FRESCOS'. The goal was to assemble the best set of observed IRAS color indices for different W-R types, in particular for known dusty late-type WC Wolf-Rayet (WCL) objects. I have also unsuccessfully sought differences in IRAS colors and absolute magnitudes between single and binary W-R stars. The color indices for the entire ensemble of W-R stars define zones in the IRAS color-color ([12] - [25], [25] - [60])-plane. By searching the PSC for otherwise unassociated sources that satisfy these colors, I have identified potential new W-R candidates, perhaps too faint to have been recognized in previous optical searches. I have extracted these candidates' IRAS low-resolution spectrometer (LRS) data and compared the spectra with the highly characteristic LRS shape for known dusty WCL stars. The 13 surviving candidates must now be ex amined by optical spectroscopy. This work represents a much more rigorous and exhaustive version of the LRS study that identified IRAS 17380 - 3031 (WR98a) as the first new W-R (WC9) star discovered by IPAS. This search should have detected dusty WCL stars to a distance of 7.0 kpc from the Sun, for l is greater than 30 degrees, and to 2.9 kpc even in the innermost galaxy. For free-free-dominated W-R stars the corresponding distances are 2.5 and 1.0 kpc, respectively.

  8. Massive runaway stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2010-09-01

    The origin of massive field stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) has long been an enigma. The recent measurements of large offsets (˜ 100 km s-1) between the heliocentric radial velocities of some very massive (O2-type) field stars and the systemic LMC velocity provides a possible explanation of this enigma and suggests that the field stars are runaway stars ejected from their birthplaces at the very beginning of their parent cluster's dynamical evolution. A straightforward way to prove this explanation is to measure the proper motions of the field stars and to show that they are moving away from one of the nearby star clusters or OB associations. This approach is, however, complicated by the long distance to the LMC, which makes accurate proper motion measurements difficult. We used an alternative approach for solving the problem (first applied for Galactic field stars), based on the search for bow shocks produced by runaway stars. The geometry of detected bow shocks would allow us to infer the direction of stellar motion, thereby determining their possible parent clusters. In this paper we present the results of a search for bow shocks around six massive field stars that have been proposed as candidate runaway stars. Using archival Spitzer Space Telescope data, we found a bow shock associated with one of our programme stars, the O2 V((f*)) star BI 237, which is the first-ever detection of bow shocks in the LMC. Orientation of the bow shock suggests that BI 237 was ejected from the OB association LH 82 (located at ≃ 120 pc in projection from the star). A by-product of our search is the detection of bow shocks generated by four OB stars in the field of the LMC and an arc-like structure attached to the candidate luminous blue variable R81 (HD 269128). The geometry of two of these bow shocks is consistent with the possibility that their associated stars were ejected from the 30 Doradus star-forming complex. We discuss implications of our findings for the

  9. A new carbon-symbiotic star in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, A.P.; Hartwick, F.D.A.

    1989-01-01

    A new carbon-symbiotic star, designated as CH-95, was discovered during a study of the kinematics of CH stars in the LMC. The spectrum of CH-95 is presented. Some of the strong emission lines found include H, He I, He II, forbidden O III, and the broad C III/N III blend at 4640 A, often seen in compact systems such as X-ray binaries. A comparison was made with other C-star symbiotics in the LMC, SMC, and Draco. 12 refs

  10. A comparison of LMC and SDL complexity measures on binomial distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueira, José Roberto C.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of complexity has been widely discussed in the last forty years, with a lot of thinking contributions coming from all areas of the human knowledge, including Philosophy, Linguistics, History, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and many others, with mathematicians trying to give a rigorous view of it. In this sense, thermodynamics meets information theory and, by using the entropy definition, López-Ruiz, Mancini and Calbet proposed a definition for complexity that is referred as LMC measure. Shiner, Davison and Landsberg, by slightly changing the LMC definition, proposed the SDL measure and the both, LMC and SDL, are satisfactory to measure complexity for a lot of problems. Here, SDL and LMC measures are applied to the case of a binomial probability distribution, trying to clarify how the length of the data set implies complexity and how the success probability of the repeated trials determines how complex the whole set is.

  11. Terminal velocities for a large sample of O stars, B supergiants, and Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinja, R.K.; Barlow, M.J.; Howarth, I.D.

    1990-01-01

    It is argued that easily measured, reliable estimates of terminal velocities for early-type stars are provided by the central velocity asymptotically approached by narrow absorption features and by the violet limit of zero residual intensity in saturated P Cygni profiles. These estimators are used to determine terminal velocities, v(infinity), for 181 O stars, 70 early B supergiants, and 35 Wolf-Rayet stars. For OB stars, the values are typically 15-20 percent smaller than the extreme violet edge velocities, v(edge), while for WR stars v(infinity) = 0.76 v(edge) on average. New mass-loss rates for WR stars which are thermal radio emitters are given, taking into account the new terminal velocities and recent revisions to estimates of distances and to the mean nuclear mass per electron. The relationships between v(infinity), the surface escape velocities, and effective temperatures are examined. 67 refs

  12. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION SURROUNDING WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 211853

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Qin Shengli, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2012-05-20

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} and kinematic temperature {approx}20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core 'A', which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the 'collect and collapse' process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core 'A' seem to be affected by the 'radiation-driven implosion' process.

  13. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION SURROUNDING WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 211853

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Qin Shengli

    2012-01-01

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10 3 cm –3 and kinematic temperature ∼20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core 'A', which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the 'collect and collapse' process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core 'A' seem to be affected by the 'radiation-driven implosion' process.

  14. Influence of WR-2721 on metastatic tumor spread after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.; Jernigan, M.C.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The Line 1 alveolar cell carcinoma is a transplantable murine tumor which, unlike most others, kills the host by means of metastatic spread. Attempts to cure this tumor with localized radiation therapy often fail, in spite of local tumor control, because the metastases evade the treatment. These facts suggest that host-tumor interactions may play a particularly important role in determining the ultimate survival of the tumor bearing animal. In order to initially evaluate the possible importance of normal regional tissues in host-tumor interactions the influence of WR-2721, a radioprotective drug, was examined for local tumor control and subsequent survival of the tumor bearing animal after localized radiation. Results indicated that WR-2721 can decrease metastasis. (U.S.)

  15. The diffuse source at the center of LMC SNR 0509–67.5 is a background galaxy at z = 0.031

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Walker, Emma S.; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2014-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are well-known for their use in the measurement of cosmological distances, but our continuing lack of concrete knowledge about their progenitor stars is both a matter of debate and a source of systematic error. In our attempts to answer this question, we presented unambiguous evidence that LMC SNR 0509–67.5, the remnant of an SN Ia that exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud 400 ± 50 yr ago, did not have any point sources (stars) near the site of the original supernova explosion, from which we concluded that this particular supernova must have had a progenitor system consisting of two white dwarfs. There is, however, evidence of nebulosity near the center of the remnant, which could have been left over detritus from the less massive WD, or could have been a background galaxy unrelated to the supernova explosion. We obtained long-slit spectra of the central nebulous region using GMOS on Gemini South to determine which of these two possibilities is correct. The spectra show Hα emission at a redshift of z = 0.031, which implies that the nebulosity in the center of LMC SNR 0509–67.5 is a background galaxy, unrelated to the supernova.

  16. Protective effect of WR-2823 in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanovicj, A.; Tanasijevicj, D.; Cvetkovicj, M.; Cjosicj, M.; Chizmicj, Z.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical compound named WR-2823 has been synthetised. The acute toxicity after IP application has been investigated and LD 50 estimated. The protective ability of the radioprotector has been investigated in mice with gamma rays of 60 Co, or at the origin of 252 Cf. High protective potency in mice, treated with lethal doses of gamma rays and neutrons have been estimated. (author) 8 refs.; 1 tab

  17. Chemoprotection against fractionated radiation exposures with WR-2721: skin injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echols, F.S.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    These studies extend the analysis of the potential application of WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] to radiation therapy by determining the ability of the drug to protect mice against hair loss induced by multiple exposures to radiation. In the two mouse strains tested, RFM and BALB/c, the relatively low drug dose used (200 mg/kg) protected the mice against hair loss from single exposures by factors of 1.67 and 1.73. The dose necessary to produce a given level of hair loss (ED 50 ) increases with increasing number of fractions. The ED 50 increases as N/sup 0.52/ and N/sup 0.59/ in the two strains of mice when they are not drug-treated, but as N/sup 0.39/ and N/sup 0.50/ in mice that are drug-treated. Thus, the protective effectiveness of WR-2721 decreases with increasing numbers of fractions, but the drug is still able to give a dose-modifying factor of about 1.25 when the total exposure is given as a series of 9 or 10 fractions. WR-2721 appears to offer the possibility of improving the efficiency of radiotherapy under clinical conditions

  18. UNDERSTANDING THE UNUSUAL X-RAY EMISSION PROPERTIES OF THE MASSIVE, CLOSE BINARY WR 20a: A HIGH ENERGY WINDOW INTO THE STELLAR WIND INITIATION REGION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit

  19. Understanding the Unusual X-Ray Emission Properties of the Massive, Close Binary WR 20a: A High Energy Window into the Stellar Wind Initiation Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  20. UNDERSTANDING THE UNUSUAL X-RAY EMISSION PROPERTIES OF THE MASSIVE, CLOSE BINARY WR 20a: A HIGH ENERGY WINDOW INTO THE STELLAR WIND INITIATION REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  1. Construction of Database for Pulsating Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B. Q.; Yang, M.; Jiang, B. W.

    2011-07-01

    A database for the pulsating variable stars is constructed for Chinese astronomers to study the variable stars conveniently. The database includes about 230000 variable stars in the Galactic bulge, LMC and SMC observed by the MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) and OGLE (Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment) projects at present. The software used for the construction is LAMP, i.e., Linux+Apache+MySQL+PHP. A web page is provided to search the photometric data and the light curve in the database through the right ascension and declination of the object. More data will be incorporated into the database.

  2. Star cluster formation history along the minor axis of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, Andrés E.; Cole, Andrew A.; Emptage, Bryn

    2018-01-01

    We analysed Washington CMT1 photometry of star clusters located along the minor axis of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), from the LMC optical centre up to ∼39° outwards to the North-West. The data base was exploited in order to search for new star cluster candidates, to produce cluster CMDs cleaned from field star contamination and to derive age estimates for a statistically complete cluster sample. We confirmed that 146 star cluster candidates are genuine physical systems, and concluded that an overall ∼30 per cent of catalogued clusters in the surveyed regions are unlikely to be true physical systems. We did not find any new cluster candidates in the outskirts of the LMC (deprojected distance ≳ 8°). The derived ages of the studied clusters are in the range 7.2 < log(t yr-1) ≤ 9.4, with the sole exception of the globular cluster NGC 1786 (log(t yr-1) = 10.10). We also calculated the cluster frequency for each region, from which we confirmed previously proposed outside-in formation scenarios. In addition, we found that the outer LMC fields show a sudden episode of cluster formation (log(t yr-1) ∼7.8-7.9) which continued until log(t yr-1) ∼7.3 only in the outermost LMC region. We link these features to the first pericentre passage of the LMC to the Milky Way (MW), which could have triggered cluster formation due to ram pressure interaction between the LMC and MW halo.

  3. AGAPEROS Searches for microlensing in the LMC with the Pixel Method; 2, Selection of possible microlensing events

    CERN Document Server

    Melchior, A.L.; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E.; Baillon, P.; Bareyre, P.; Bauer, F.; Beaulieu, J.-Ph.; Bouquet, A.; Brehin, S.; Cavalier, F.; Char, S.; Couchot, F.; Coutures, C.; Ferlet, R.; Fernandez, J.; Gaucherel, C.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Goldman, B.; Gondolo, P.; Gros, M.; Guibert, J.; Hardin, D.; Kaplan, J.; de Kat, J.; Lachieze-Rey, M.; Laurent, B; Lesquoy, E; Magneville, Ch.; Mansoux, B.; Marquette, J.-B.; Maurice, E.; Milsztajn, A.; Moniez, M.; Moreau, O.; Moscoso, L.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perdereau. O.; Prevot, L.; Renault, C.; Queinnec, F.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Vigroux, L.; Zylberajch, S.; Magneville, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    We apply the pixel method of analysis (sometimes called ``pixel lensing'') to a small subset of the EROS-1 microlensing observations of the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The pixel method is designed to find microlensing events of unresolved source stars and had heretofore been applied only to M31 where essentially all sources are unresolved. With our analysis optimised for the detection of long-duration microlensing events due to 0.01-1 Mo Machos, we detect no microlensing events and compute the corresponding detection efficiencies. We show that the pixel method should detect 10 to 20 times more microlensing events for M>0.05 Mo Machos compared to a classical analysis of the same data which latter monitors only resolved stars. In particular, we show that for a full halo of Machos in the mass range 0.1 -- 0.5 Mo, a pixel analysis of the three-year EROS-1 data set covering 0.39 deg^2 would yield 4 events.

  4. Neon Abundances from a Spitzer/IRS Survey of Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ignace, R.; Cassinelli, J.P.; Tracy, G.; Churchwell, E.B.; Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    We report on neon abundances derived from Spitzer high resolution spectral data of eight Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars using the forbidden line of [Ne III] 15.56 μm. Our targets include four WN stars of subtypes 4-7, and four WC stars of subtypes 4-7. We derive ion fraction abundances γ of Ne2+ for the

  5. Modeling pulsations in hot stars with winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noels, Arlette; Godart, Melanie [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Liege (Belgium); Dupret, Marc-Antoine [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, LESIA (France)], E-mail: Arlette.Noels@ulg.ac.be, E-mail: ma.dupret@obspm.fr, E-mail: Melanie.Godart@ulg.ac.be

    2008-10-15

    The interaction pulsation/mass loss takes different aspects. Pulsations can trigger mass loss as in LBVs and Miras; on the other hand, mass loss can modify the driving conditions within the stars. But the most spectacular aspect is the effect on stellar models which, in turn, opens a royal way to asteroseismology to test physical conditions inside massive stars, such as the extent of convective cores or the appearance of new driving mechanisms. We start with a discussion on MS stars and their strange mode instabilities. We then move on to the excitation of the LBV phenomenon. WR stars and the newly observed MOST period in WR123 are discussed in view of the power of asteroseismology. We then turn to B supergiants, in particular HD163899, and show how asteroseismology can really probe convection, semiconvection and mass loss.

  6. Supernovae from Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, R.

    1986-01-01

    Wolf-Rayet stars are known to originate from the most massive stars. Under the assumption that these stripped stars explode at the end of their evolution through the same instability mechanism as type II supernovae, we calculate their light curve. The latter is found to be quite similar to the typical SN I light curves but is fainter by about 2 magnitudes. A detailed study of its shape leads to identify the WR supernovae with the SNIp (or SNIb) subclass. The more massive WR stars should explode via the e + e - pair production mechanism, with negligible 56 Ni formation. Their rather dim light curve is predicted to have a ∼ 2 month plateau and afterwards a very sharp decline. A delayed manifestation of such an event might be the Cas A remnant

  7. Modeling pulsations in hot stars with winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noels, Arlette; Godart, Melanie; Dupret, Marc-Antoine

    2008-01-01

    The interaction pulsation/mass loss takes different aspects. Pulsations can trigger mass loss as in LBVs and Miras; on the other hand, mass loss can modify the driving conditions within the stars. But the most spectacular aspect is the effect on stellar models which, in turn, opens a royal way to asteroseismology to test physical conditions inside massive stars, such as the extent of convective cores or the appearance of new driving mechanisms. We start with a discussion on MS stars and their strange mode instabilities. We then move on to the excitation of the LBV phenomenon. WR stars and the newly observed MOST period in WR123 are discussed in view of the power of asteroseismology. We then turn to B supergiants, in particular HD163899, and show how asteroseismology can really probe convection, semiconvection and mass loss.

  8. New Galactic Candidate Luminous Blue Variables and Wolf-Rayet Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, Guy S.; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Beletsky, Yuri; Kniazev, Alexei Y.

    2012-04-01

    We have undertaken a near-infrared spectral survey of stars associated with compact mid-IR shells recently revealed by the MIPSGAL (24 μm) and GLIMPSE (8 μm) Spitzer surveys, whose morphologies are typical of circumstellar shells produced by massive evolved stars. Through spectral similarity with known Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, a large population of candidate LBVs (cLBVs) and a smaller number of new WR stars are being discovered. This significantly increases the Galactic cLBV population and confirms that nebulae are inherent to most (if not all) objects of this class.

  9. Cisplatin neuropathy. Risk factors, prognosis, and protection by WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollman, J.E.; Glover, D.J.; Hogan, W.M.; Furman, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    A prospective study of patients receiving cis-diaminedichloroplatin II (DDP) was carried out to determine if risk factors could be identified related to the patient's living habits or past medical history that would predict in which patients DDP neuropathy might develop. Sixty-nine patients receiving six different combinations of chemotherapeutic agents, including DDP were examined. Twenty-eight of these patients received DDP in combination with the radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethylphosporothioic acid (WR 2721). No risk factors were identified relating to personal habits or past medical history of the patients. However, patients receiving DDP (40 mg/m2) on 5 consecutive days had a significantly higher incidence of neuropathy. Patients receiving DDP in combination with WR 2721 had a significantly lower incidence of neuropathy, and the mean dose at onset was significantly higher than the mean dose at onset of neuropathy for all other groups. In addition, five of six patients who were available for long-term follow-up demonstrated nearly complete reversal of the signs and symptoms of neuropathy

  10. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS IN APPARENTLY SINGLE GALACTIC WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. A GLOBAL VIEW OF THE WIND VARIABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chene, A.-N.; St-Louis, N.

    2011-01-01

    This study is the second part of a survey searching for large-scale spectroscopic variability in apparently single Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. In a previous paper (Paper I), we described and characterized the spectroscopic variability level of 25 WR stars observable from the northern hemisphere and found 3 new candidates presenting large-scale wind variability, potentially originating from large-scale structures named corotating interaction regions (CIRs). In this second paper, we discuss an additional 39 stars observable from the southern hemisphere. For each star in our sample, we obtained 4-5 high-resolution spectra with a signal-to-noise ratio of ∼100 and determined its variability level using the approach described in Paper I. In total, 10 new stars are found to show large-scale spectral variability of which 7 present CIR-type changes (WR 8, WR 44, WR55, WR 58, WR 61, WR 63, WR 100). Of the remaining stars, 20 were found to show small-amplitude changes and 9 were found to show no spectral variability as far as can be concluded from the data on hand. Also, we discuss the spectroscopic variability level of all single galactic WR stars that are brighter than v ∼ 12.5, and some WR stars with 12.5 < v ≤ 13.5, i.e., all the stars presented in our two papers and four more stars for which spectra have already been published in the literature. We find that 23/68 stars (33.8%) present large-scale variability, but only 12/54 stars (∼22.1%) are potentially of CIR type. Also, we find that 31/68 stars (45.6%) only show small-scale variability, most likely due to clumping in the wind. Finally, no spectral variability is detected based on the data on hand for 14/68 (20.6%) stars. Interestingly, the variability with the highest amplitude also has the widest mean velocity dispersion.

  11. Spectrophotometric observations of very low ionization HII regions in the LMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, M.; Ruiz, M.T.; Rubio, M.

    1987-01-01

    Optical spectrophotometric observations of 17 very low ionization HII regions of the LMC are reported. Physical conditions and chemical composition of these objects are derived from the emission line intensities. The average chemical abundances obtained are: log O/H=8.49+-0.08, log N/H=6.91+-0.07 and log S/H=6.89+-0.10. We do not find evidence of any composition gradient in the LMC. The HII regions in the vicinity of the detected molecular cloud complexes show higher nebular reddening. (Author)

  12. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Jason; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    We present the first ever global, spatially resolved reconstruction of the star formation history (SFH) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), based on the application of our StarFISH analysis software to the multiband photometry of 20 million of its stars from the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey. The general outlines of our results are consistent with previously published results: following an initial burst of star formation, there was a quiescent epoch from approximately 12 to 5 Gyr ago. Star formation then resumed and has proceeded until the current time at an average rate of roughly 0.2 M sun yr -1 , with temporal variations at the factor of 2 level. The re-ignition of star formation about 5 Gyr ago, in both the LMC and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), is suggestive of a dramatic event at that time in the Magellanic system. Among the global variations in the recent star formation rate are peaks at roughly 2 Gyr, 500 Myr, 100 Myr, and 12 Myr. The peaks at 500 Myr and 2 Gyr are nearly coincident with similar peaks in the SFH of the SMC, suggesting a joint history for these galaxies extending back at least several Gyr. The chemical enrichment history recovered from our StarFISH analysis is in broad agreement with that inferred from the LMC's star cluster population, although our constraints on the ancient chemical enrichment history are weak. We conclude from the concordance between the star formation and chemical enrichment histories of the field and cluster populations that the field and cluster star formation modes are tightly coupled.

  13. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. II. Discovery of six clusters with Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chené, A.-N.; Borissova, J.; Bonatto, C.; Majaess, D. J.; Baume, G.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Kurtev, R.; Schnurr, O.; Bouret, J.-C.; Catelan, M.; Emerson, J. P.; Feinstein, C.; Geisler, D.; de Grijs, R.; Hervé, A.; Ivanov, V. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lucas, P.; Mahy, L.; Martins, F.; Mauro, F.; Minniti, D.; Moni Bidin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea" (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. degrees of the Galactic bulge, and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: This is the second in a series of papers about young, massive open clusters observed using the VVV survey. We present the first study of six recently discovered clusters. These clusters contain at least one newly discovered Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters for a subset of clusters. Results: We find that the six studied stellar groups are real young (2-7 Myr) and massive (between 0.8 and 2.2 × 103 M⊙) clusters. They are highly obscured (AV ~ 5-24 mag) and compact (1-2 pc). In addition to WR stars, two of the six clusters also contain at least one red supergiant star, and one of these two clusters also contains a blue supergiant. We claim the discovery of 8 new WR stars, and 3 stars showing WR-like emission lines which could be classified WR or OIf. Preliminary analysis provides initial masses of ~30-50 M⊙ for the WR stars. Finally, we discuss the spiral structure of the Galaxy using the six new clusters as tracers, together with the previously studied VVV clusters. Based on observations with ISAAC, VLT, ESO (programme 087.D-0341A), New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory (programme 087.D-0490A) and with the Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory (programme CN2011A-086). Also based on data from the VVV survey (programme 172.B-2002).

  14. Line strengths in WN stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leep, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    The author has analyzed high-dispersion spectra of over 100 WN stars in the Galaxy and the Large Magellenic Cloud (LMC). Most of the spectra were obtained through 4-m telescopes (Conti, Leep, and Perry 1981). The measured strengths of the WN classification lines N III lambdalambda4634-41, N IV lambda4057, N V lambda4604 (Smith 1968) for stars on WN subtypes 2.5-8 are shown. The assignments of WN subtypes are based on visual estimates of ratios of line strengths according to the scheme of Smith (1968), except that stars appearing to be earlier than WN3 are classified as WN2 or WN2.5 as explained by van der Hucht et al. (1981) and by Conti, Leep and Perry (1981). (Auth.)

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LMC OGLE-III Shallow Survey variable stars (Ulaczyk+, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaczyk, K.; Szymanski, M. K.; Udalski, A.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Poleski, R.; Gieren, W.; Walker, A. R.; Garcia-Varela, A.

    2017-07-01

    Photometric data were collected using the 1.3-m Warsaw Telescope located at Las Campanas Observatory, operated by the Carnegie Institution for Science. We used exactly the same photometric system as in the OGLE-III main survey. Detailed information about whole instrumentation can be found in Udalski (2003AcA....53..291U). (5 data files).

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Variable stars in LMC MACHO fields 1 & 79 (Szulagyi+, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulagyi, J.; Kovacs, G.; Welch, D. L.

    2009-06-01

    Tables 1 and 2 give the brief summary of the variables found in the course of the analysis. Main properties are listed and preliminary classifications are given (this latter is ambiguous in some cases, as indicated by question marks). Time series (original, published by the MACHO project and TFA-filtered) can be accessed at: http://www.konkoly.hu/staff/kovacs/macho_tfa/ (2 data files).

  17. The HR diagram for luminous stars in nearby galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Due to the extreme faintness of stars in other galaxies it is only possible to sample the brightest stars in the nearest galaxies. The observations must then be compared with comparable data for the brightest stars, the supergiants and O-type stars, in the Milky Way. The data for the luminous stars are most complete for the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud. The luminosities for the stars in our Galaxy are based on their membership in associations and clusters, and consequently are representative of Population I within approximately 3kpc of the Sun. The data for the stars in the LMC with spectral types O to G8 come from published observations, and the M supergiants are from the author's recent observations of red stars in the LMC. This is the first time that the M supergiants have been included in an HR diagram of the Large Cloud. The presence of the red stars is important for any discussion of the evolution of the massive stars. (Auth.)

  18. The vast population of Wolf-Rayet and red supergiant stars in M101. I. Motivation and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shara, Michael M.; Bibby, Joanne L.; Zurek, David [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Crowther, Paul A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Moffat, Anthony F. J. [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, CP 6128 Succ. C-V, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Drissen, Laurent [Département de Physique, Université Laval, Pavillon Vachon, Quebec City, QC G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Assembling a catalog of at least 10,000 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars is an essential step in proving (or disproving) that these stars are the progenitors of Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae. To this end, we have used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to carry out a deep, He II optical narrowband imaging survey of the ScI spiral galaxy M101. Almost the entire galaxy was imaged with the unprecedented depth and resolution that only the HST affords. Differenced with archival broadband images, the narrowband images allow us to detect much of the W-R star population of M101. We describe the extent of the survey and our images, as well as our data reduction procedures. A detailed broadband-narrowband imaging study of a field east of the center of M101, containing the giant star-forming region NGC 5462, demonstrates our completeness limits, how we find W-R candidates, their properties and spatial distribution, and how we rule out most contaminants. We use the broadband images to locate luminous red supergiant (RSG) candidates. The spatial distributions of the W-R and RSG stars near NGC 5462 are strikingly different. W-R stars dominate the complex core, while RSGs dominate the complex halo. Future papers in this series will describe and catalog more than a thousand W-R and RSG candidates that are detectable in our images, as well as spectra of many of those candidates.

  19. THE ARAUCARIA PROJECT: A STUDY OF THE CLASSICAL CEPHEID IN THE ECLIPSING BINARY SYSTEM OGLE LMC562.05.9009 IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieren, Wolfgang; Pilecki, Bogumił; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Graczyk, Dariusz; Górski, Marek; Taormina, Mónica; Gallenne, Alexandre, E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: pilecki@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: pietrzyn@astrouw.edu.pl [Universidad de Concepción, Departamento de Astronomía, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); and others

    2015-12-10

    We present a detailed study of the classical Cepheid in the double-lined, highly eccentric eclipsing binary system OGLE-LMC562.05.9009. The Cepheid is a fundamental mode pulsator with a period of 2.988 days. The orbital period of the system is 1550 days. Using spectroscopic data from three 4–8-m telescopes and photometry spanning 22 years, we were able to derive the dynamical masses and radii of both stars with exquisite accuracy. Both stars in the system are very similar in mass, radius, and color, but the companion is a stable, non-pulsating star. The Cepheid is slightly more massive and bigger (M{sub 1} = 3.70 ± 0.03 M{sub ⊙}, R{sub 1} = 28.6 ± 0.2 R{sub ⊙}) than its companion (M{sub 2} = 3.60 ± 0.03 M{sub ⊙}, R{sub 2} = 26.6 ± 0.2 R{sub ⊙}). Within the observational uncertainties both stars have the same effective temperature of 6030 ± 150 K. Evolutionary tracks place both stars inside the classical Cepheid instability strip, but it is likely that future improved temperature estimates will move the stable giant companion just beyond the red edge of the instability strip. Within current observational and theoretical uncertainties, both stars fit on a 205 Myr isochrone arguing for their common age. From our model, we determine a value of the projection factor of p = 1.37 ± 0.07 for the Cepheid in the OGLE-LMC562.05.9009 system. This is the second Cepheid for which we could measure its p-factor with high precision directly from the analysis of an eclipsing binary system, which represents an important contribution toward a better calibration of Baade-Wesselink methods of distance determination for Cepheids.

  20. AGAPEROS Searches for microlensing in the LMC with the Pixel Method; 1, Data treatment and pixel light curves production

    CERN Document Server

    Melchior, A.-L.; Ansari, R.; Aubourg, E.; Baillon, P.; Bareyre, P.; Bauer, F.; Beaulieu, J.-Ph.; Bouquet, A.; Brehin, S.; Cavalier, F.; Char, S.; Couchot, F.; Coutures, C.; Ferlet, R.; Fernandez, J.; Gaucherel, C.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Goldman, B.; Gondolo, P.; Gros, M.; Guibert, J.; Gry, C.; Hardin, D.; Kaplan, J.; de Kat, J.; Lachieze-Rey, M.; Laurent, B.; Lesquoy, E.; Magneville, Ch.; Mansoux, B.; Marquette, J.-B.; Maurice, E.; Milsztajn, A.; Moniez, M.; Moreau, O.; Moscoso, L.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perdereau, O.; Prevot, L.; Renault, C.; Queinnec, F.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Vigroux, L.; Zylberajch, S.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Magneville, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    The presence and abundance of MAssive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs) towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) can be studied with microlensing searches. The 10 events detected by the EROS and MACHO groups suggest that objects with 0.5 Mo could fill 50% of the dark halo. This preferred mass is quite surprising, and increasing the presently small statistics is a crucial issue. Additional microlensing of stars too dim to be resolved in crowded fields should be detectable using the Pixel Method. We present here an application of this method to the EROS 91-92 data (one tenth of the whole existing data set). We emphasize the data treatment required for monitoring pixel fluxes. Geometric and photometric alignments are performed on each image. Seeing correction and error estimates are discussed. 3.6" x 3.6" super-pixel light curves, thus produced, are very stable over the 120 days time-span. Fluctuations at a level of 1.8% of the flux in blue and 1.3% in red are measured on the pixel light curves. This level of stabil...

  1. Retention of 241Am and 239Pu in the rat as influenced by Triton WR 1339

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, R.; Siedel, A.

    1976-01-01

    A lysosomotropic agent, the non-ionic detergent Triton WR 1339 (a poly-oxyethylene ether of formaldehyde polymers of octylphenol) is known to be stored in rat liver lysosomes. The results of a study made to determine whether Triton WR 1339 exerts an influence on the metabolic fate of monomeric 239 Pu and 241 Am in the rat as well as on the removal of these nuclides by DTPA, since Triton WR 1339 and transuranic elements share the same deposition site, are reported. The influence of Triton WR 1339 on the 241 Am content (per cent of 241 Am dose) of rat organs (skeleton, liver, kidneys) at different times after Triton WR 1339 injection, the influence of the time of Triton WR 1339 injection on the 241 Am content (per cent of 241 Am dose) of the same rat organs, and the influence of Triton WR 1339 Zn-DTPA and the combination of them on the retention of monomeric 239 Pu in the same rat organs (per cent of 239 Pu dose), are shown in tabular form. The mechanism whereby Triton WR 1339 appears to shorten the biological half-life of 239 Pu and 241 Am in rat liver is discussed. (U.K.)

  2. A Numerical Procedure for Analysis of W/R Contact Using Explicit Finite Element Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y.; Markine, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    Since no effective experimental approaches have been proposed to assess wheel and rail (W/R) contact performance till now, numerical computational analysis is known as an alternative to approximately simulate the W/R interaction. In this paper, one numerical procedure is proposed on the basis of

  3. Spectral Properties of the X-ray Binary Pulsar LMC X-4 during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    S. Naik & B. Paul Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, 400 005, India. Abstract. ... in the Large Magellanic Cloud. A spin period of 13.5 s ... In this paper we present the spectral variations of LMC X-4 during the 30.5 day long period ...

  4. Insight into star death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talcott, R.

    1988-01-01

    Nineteen neutrinos, formed in the center of a supernova, became a theorist's dream. They came straight from the heart of supernova 1987A and landed in two big underground tanks of water. Suddenly a new chapter in observational astronomy opened as these two neutrino telescopes gave astronomers their first look ever into the core of a supernova explosion. But the theorists' dream almost turned into a nightmare. Observations of the presupernova star showed conclusively that the star was a blue supergiant, but theorists have long believed only red supergiant stars could explode as supernovae. Do astronomers understand supernovae better now than when supernova 1987A exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) one year ago? Yes. The observations of neutrinos spectacularly confirmed a vital aspect of supernova theory. But the observed differences between 1987A and other supernovae have illuminated and advanced our perception of how supernovae form. By working together, observers and theorists are continuing to hone their ideas about how massive stars die and how the subsequent supernovae behave

  5. The galactic distribution of Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidayat, B.; Supelli, K.; Hucht, K.A. van der

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of the most recent compilation of narrow-band photometry and absolute visual magnitudes of Wolf-Rayet stars, and adopting a normal interstellar extinction law in all directions, the galactic distribution of 132 of the 159 known galactic WR stars is presented and discussed. The spiral structure is found to be more clearly pronounced than in earlier studies. Furthermore the authors find an indication of two spiral arms at r=4 and 6 kpc. There appears to be an asymmetry of the z-distribution of single stars with respect to galactic longitude. The location of the WC8.5 and WC9 stars between 4.5 and 9 kpc from the galactic center is discussed in the context of Maeder's red supergiant to WR star scenario. (Auth.)

  6. The OGLE view of microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds - I. A trickle of events in the OGLE-II LMC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Belokurov, V.; Smith, M. C.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Szewczyk, O.; Żebruń, K.

    2009-08-01

    We present the results from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment II (OGLE-II) survey (1996-2000) towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which has the aim of detecting the microlensing phenomena caused by dark matter compact objects in the Galactic halo [massive compact halo objects (MACHOs)]. We use high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images of the OGLE fields and derive the correction for the number of monitored stars in each field. This also yields blending distributions which we use in `catalogue-level' Monte Carlo simulations of the microlensing events in order to calculate the detection efficiency of the events. We detect two candidates for microlensing events in the All Stars Sample, which translates into an optical depth of 0.43 +/- 0.33 × 10-7. If both events were due to MACHO, the fraction of mass of compact dark matter objects in the Galactic halo would be 8 +/- 6 per cent. This optical depth, however, along with the characteristics of the events seems to be consistent with the self-lensing scenario, i.e. self-lensing alone is sufficient to explain the observed microlensing signal. Our results indicate the non-detection of MACHOs lensing towards the LMC with an upper limit on their abundance in the Galactic halo of 19 per cent for M = 0.4Msolar and 10 per cent for masses between 0.01 and 0.2Msolar. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3-m Warsaw Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. E-mail: wyrzykow@ast.cam.ac.uk ‡ Name pronunciation: Woocash Vizhikovsky.

  7. Stellar population of NGC 1850 in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmozzi, Roberto; Panagia, Nino

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the globular cluster NGC 1850 taken with the HST Wide Field Camera are used to constrain the stellar population of this member of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Three exposures were obtained for each band at exposure times of 10, 100, and 1100 seconds, and the longest exposure was halved to minimize the effects of cosmic noise and the saturation of bright objects. A total of about 12,000 stars with magnitudes of 14-24 and masses of 0.8-13 solar mass are measured, and the age of NGC 1850 is given at approximately 25 million years.

  8. DISCOVERY OF A WOLF-RAYET STAR THROUGH DETECTION OF ITS PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlefield, Colin [Law School, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Garnavich, Peter; McClelland, Colin; Rettig, Terrence [Physics Department, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Marion, G. H. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vinko, Jozsef [Department of Optics, University of Szeged (Hungary); Wheeler, J. Craig [Astronomy Department, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a heavily reddened Wolf-Rayet star that we name WR 142b. While photometrically monitoring a cataclysmic variable, we detected weak variability in a nearby field star. Low-resolution spectroscopy revealed a strong emission line at 7100 A, suggesting an unusual object and prompting further study. A spectrum taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope confirms strong He II emission and an N IV 7112 A line consistent with a nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet star of spectral class WN6. Analysis of the He II line strengths reveals no detectable hydrogen in WR 142b. A blue-sensitive spectrum obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope shows no evidence for a hot companion star. The continuum shape and emission line ratios imply a reddening of E(B - V) = 2.2-2.6 mag. We estimate that the distance to WR 142b is 1.4 {+-} 0.3 kpc.

  9. Properties of hot luminous stars; Proceedings of the First Boulder-Munich Workshop, Boulder, CO, Aug. 6-11, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garmany, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on the properties of hot luminous stars are presented. Individual topics addressed include: problems in photometry of early-type stars; digital optical morphology of OB spectra; massive-star content of the Magellanic Clouds; observations of massive OB stars; LSS 3074, a new double-lined early O-type binary; non-LTE line blanketing with elements 1-28; non-LTE analysis of four PG1159 stars; rescaling method for model atmospheres of hot stars; stellar wind albedo effects on hot photospheres; atomic data and models for hot star abundance determinations; ring nebulae analysis as a probe for WR atmospheres; coordinated observations of P Cygni; radiation-driven winds of hot luminous stars; winds of O stars: velocities and ionization; methods of radiative transfer in expanding atmospheres; mass loss from extragalactic O stars; H-alpha observations of O- and B-type stars; applicability of steady models for hot-star winds; mass of the O6Iaf star HD 153919; stellar winds in Beta Lyrae; models of WR stars; observational abundances of WR stars, the all-variable WC7 binary HD193793

  10. The sixth catalogue of galactic Wolf-Rayet stars, their past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hucht, K.A. van der; Conti, P.S.; Lundstroem, I.; Stenholm, B.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the Sixth Catalogue of galactic Wolf-Rayet stars (Pop I), a short history on the five earlier WR catalogues, improved spectral classification, finding charts, a discussion on related objects, and a review of the current statur of Wolf-Rayet star research. The appendix presents a bibliography on most of the Wolf-Rayet literature published since 1867. (orig.)

  11. WR-1065 and radioprotection of vascular endothelial cells. I. Cell proliferation, DNA synthesis and damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Kang, H.J.; Baumann, F.E.; Blazek, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity limits radiation therapy and could depend on the extent of damage to the vascular endothelium. Aminothiols such as WR-1065 [N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane] provide radioprotection for normal tissues, but little is known about how the aminothiols specifically affect the endothelium. Bovine aortic endothelial cells in culture were exposed to WR-1065 for 2 h before irradiation ( 137 Cs γ rays, 1 Gy/min). Alone, WR-1065 demonstrated an antiproliferative effect that was related to dose (0.5-4 mM) and was evident by lowered counts of adherent cells 48 h after exposure. WR-1065 was clearly radioprotective when assessed by colony formation and incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine. However, when the number of adherent cells was evaluated, radioprotection appeared to be slight and evident only in logarithmically growing cells. WR-1065 at 2 mM suppressed single-strand DNA breaks after 3 Gy by 22% and double-strand breaks after 9 Gy by 47%. Also in the irradiated cells, WR-1065 more than doubled the rate of progression of cells from G 1 to S phase. WR-1065 pretreatment elevated cellular glutathione (GSH) content more than twofold. Although pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine inhibited the elevation of GSH, the radioprotective impact of WR-1065 on total DNA strand breaks and colony formation was unaffected. These results suggest that WR-1065 may enable tissue recovery from irradiation by promoting the replication of endothelial cells, possibly by mechanisms independent of GSH. 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Brilliant Star in a Colourful Neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A spectacular new image from ESO's Wide Field Imager at the La Silla Observatory in Chile shows the brilliant and unusual star WR 22 and its colourful surroundings. WR 22 is a very hot and bright star that is shedding its atmosphere into space at a rate many millions of times faster than the Sun. It lies in the outer part of the dramatic Carina Nebula from which it formed. Very massive stars live fast and die young. Some of these stellar beacons have such intense radiation passing through their thick atmospheres late in their lives that they shed material into space many millions of times more quickly than relatively sedate stars such as the Sun. These rare, very hot and massive objects are known as Wolf-Rayet stars [1], after the two French astronomers who first identified them in the mid-nineteenth century, and one of the most massive ones yet measured is known as WR 22. It appears at the centre of this picture, which was created from images taken through red, green and blue filters with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. WR 22 is a member of a double star system and has been measured to have a mass at least 70 times that of the Sun. WR 22 lies in the southern constellation of Carina, the keel of Jason's ship Argo in Greek mythology. Although the star lies over 5000 light-years from the Earth it is so bright that it can just be faintly seen with the unaided eye under good conditions. WR 22 is one of many exceptionally brilliant stars associated with the beautiful Carina Nebula (also known as NGC 3372) and the outer part of this huge region of star formation in the southern Milky Way forms the colourful backdrop to this image. The subtle colours of the rich background tapestry are a result of the interactions between the intense ultraviolet radiation coming from hot massive stars, including WR 22, and the vast gas clouds, mostly hydrogen, from which they formed. The central part of this enormous complex

  13. Effects of daily treatment with a radioprotector WR-2721 on Ehrlich's ascites tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikebuchi, Makoto; Shinohara, Shigeo; Kimura, Hiroshi; Morimoto, Kunio; Shima, Akihiro

    1981-01-01

    Mice were injected daily with a radioprotector WR-2721 (S-2-[3-aminopropyl-amino]ethylphosphorothioic acid) after inoculation with Ehrlich's ascites tumor cells. Increases in weight of mice, volume of ascitic fluid and number of ascitic cells per mouse were reduced by the daily administration of 5 mg/mouse of the drug, indicating a suppressive effect of WR-2721 on growth of ascitic cells. But daily treatment with 5 mg/mouse of WR-2721 caused earlier death of tumor-bearing mice. (author)

  14. OGLE Collection of Star Clusters. New Objects in the Outskirts of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, D. M.; Udalski, A.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Skowron, J.; Karczmarek, P.; Cieślar, M.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2016-09-01

    The Magellanic System (MS), consisting of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and the Magellanic Bridge (MBR), contains diverse sample of star clusters. Their spatial distribution, ages and chemical abundances may provide important information about the history of formation of the whole System. We use deep photometric maps derived from the images collected during the fourth phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-IV) to construct the most complete catalog of star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud using the homogeneous photometric data. In this paper we present the collection of star clusters found in the area of about 225 square degrees in the outer regions of the LMC. Our sample contains 679 visually identified star cluster candidates, 226 of which were not listed in any of the previously published catalogs. The new clusters are mainly young small open clusters or clusters similar to associations.

  15. Population I Cepheids and understanding star formation history of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Yogesh Chandra; Joshi, Santosh; Mohanty, Auro Prasad

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the age and spatial distributions of Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) as a function of their ages using data from the OGLE III photometric catalogue. A period - age relation derived for Classical Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) has been used to find the ages of Cepheids. The age distribution of the SMC Classical Cepheids is found to have a peak at log(Age) = 8.40 ± 0.10 which suggests that a major star formation event might have occurred in the SMC about 250 ± 50 Myr ago. It is believed that this star forming burst had been triggered by close interactions of the SMC with the LMC and/or the Milky Way. A comparison of the observed spatial distributions of the Cepheids and open star clusters has also been carried out to study the star formation scenario in the SMC. (paper)

  16. Reduction of radiation effects by chemical protector (WR-2721)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Yun, T.K.; Koh, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    As a part studies on effect of radiation, the present report was carried out to evaluate the changes of leukocytes, lymphocytes percent of leukocytes and several organs in swiss webster (NIH-GP) mice by radiation protective agents prior to γ-ray exposure. The whole body irradiation after administration of a radiation protective agents was done in dose level of 25,50,100 and 300 rads by a single exposure of γ-ray delivered from 60 Co, source tele-irradiation unit at a dose rate of 100 rad/min. Mice of each experimental group were whole body γ-irradiated in plastic cage with special producted rotating machine. The radiation protective agent was employed WR-2721 and the amounts injected intraperitoneally were 400mg/kg of body weight. The leukocytes were counted with hemocytometer. Differential count of leukocytes was done with 200 cells every smear and lymphocyte percent of leukocyte were determined in relative proportion only. All major organ were examined grossly and weighted. After fixation with formalin solution, histo-pathological preparations were made for microscopical study. (Author)

  17. Searching for magnetic fields in 11 Wolf-Rayet stars: Analysis of circular polarization measurements from ESPaDOnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Chevrotière, A.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J. [Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Québec (CRAQ), Département de physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Collaboration: MiMeS Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    With recent detections of magnetic fields in some of their progenitor O stars, combined with known strong fields in their possible descendant neutron stars, it is natural to search for magnetic fields in Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, despite the problems associated with the presence of winds enhanced by an order of magnitude over those of O stars. We continue our search among a sample of 11 bright WR stars following our introductory study in a previous paper of WR6 = EZ CMa using the spectropolarimeter ESPaDOnS at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, most of them in all four Stokes parameters. This sample includes six WN stars and five WC stars encompassing a range of spectral subclasses. Six are medium/long-period binaries and three show corotating interaction regions. We report no definite detections of a magnetic field in the winds in which the lines form (which is about the same distance from the center of the star as it is from the surface of the progenitor O star) for any of the eleven stars. Possible reasons and their implications are discussed. Nonetheless, the data show evidence supporting marginal detections for WR134, WR137, and WR138. According to the Bayesian analysis, the most probable field intensities are B {sub wind} ∼ 200, 130, and 80 G, respectively, with a 95.4% probability that the magnetic fields present in the observable parts of their stellar wind, if stronger, does not exceed B{sub wind}{sup max}∼1900 G, ∼1500 G, and ∼1500 G, respectively. In the case of non-detections, we report an average field strength upper limit of B{sub wind}{sup max}∼500 G.

  18. The Baldwin-effect in Wolf-Rayet stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gent, Jeroen Ivar van

    2000-01-01

    This thesis investigates the Baldwin-effect in Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. The Baldwin-effect is a correlation with negative slope between the equivalent width of spectral emission lines and the monochromatic luminosity of the underlying continuum at the line wavelength. This effect has been known to

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LMC PNe multiwavelength photometry (Reid, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, W. A.

    2017-07-01

    Using the 2MASS 6x catalogue for the LMC (Cutri et al. 2003, Cat. II/246; 2012, Cat. VII/233), magnitudes were obtained for 274 PNe in J, 269 in H and 263 in Ks. To increase the number of detections available for comparison, magnitudes were also obtained from the InfraRed Survey Facility (IRSF) Magellanic Clouds Point Source Catalogue (Kato et al., 2007, Cat. II/288). The 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8um bands were obtained with the IRAC on board Spitzer. This study used the archival data from the Spitzer legacy programme SAGE (Meixner et al., 2006, Cat. J/AJ/132/2268) which mapped the central 7x7deg2 area of the LMC. The MIPS data were also obtained from both the Hora et al. (2008, Cat. J/AJ/135/726) and Gruendl & Chu (2009, Cat. J/ApJS/184/172) studies. (3 data files).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LMC NIR Synoptic Survey. II. Wesenheit relations (Bhardwaj+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Kanbur, S. M.; Macri, L. M.; Singh, H. P.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Wagner-Kaiser, R.; Sarajedini, A.

    2018-03-01

    We make use of NIR mean magnitudes for 775 fundamental-mode and 474 first-overtone Cepheids in the LMC from Macri et al. 2015, J/AJ/149/117 (Paper I). These magnitudes are based on observations from a synoptic survey (average of 16 epochs) of the central region of the LMC using the CPAPIR camera at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory 1.5-m telescope between 2006 and 2007. Most of these Cepheid variables were previously studied in the optical V and I bands by the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III) survey (Soszynski et al. 2008, J/AcA/58/163; Ulaczyk et al. 2013, J/AcA/63/159). The V and I band mean magnitudes are also compiled in Paper I. The calibration into the 2MASS photometric system, extinction corrections, and the adopted reddening law are discussed in detail in Paper I. (4 data files).

  1. Neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irvine, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: introduction (resume of stellar evolution, gross characteristics of neutron stars); pulsars (pulsar characteristics, pulsars as neutron stars); neutron star temperatures (neutron star cooling, superfluidity and superconductivity in neutron stars); the exterior of neutron stars (the magnetosphere, the neutron star 'atmosphere', pulses); neutron star structure; neutron star equations of state. (U.K.)

  2. Changes in the Long-Term Intensity Variations in Cygnus X-2 and LMC X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, B.; Kitamoto, S.; Makino, F.

    2000-01-01

    We report the detection of changes in the long-term intensity variations in two X-ray binaries, Cyg X-2 and LMC X-3. In this work, we have used the long-term light curves obtained with the All-Sky Monitors (ASMs) of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), Ginga, Ariel 5, and Vela 5B and the scanning modulation collimator of HEAO 1. It is found that in the light curves of both the sources, obtained with these instruments at various times over the last 30 years, more than one periodic or quasi-periodic component is always present. The multiple prominent peaks in the periodograms have frequencies unrelated to each other. In Cyg X-2, RXTE-ASM data show strong peaks at 40.4 and 68.8 days, and Ginga-ASM data show strong peaks at 53.7 and 61.3 days. Multiple peaks are also observed in LMC X-3. The various strong peaks in the periodograms of LMC X-3 appear at 104, 169, and 216 days (observed with RXTE-ASM) and 105, 214, and 328 days (observed with Ginga-ASM). The present results, when compared with the earlier observations of periodicities in these two systems, demonstrate the absence of any stable long period. The 78 day periodicity detected earlier in Cyg X-2 was probably due to the short time base in the RXTE data that were used, and the periodicity of 198 days in LMC X-3 was due to a relatively short duration of observation with HEAO 1.

  3. Detection of a Very Bright Source Close to the LMC Supernova SN 1987A: Erratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenson, P.; Papaliolios, C.; Karovska, M.; Noyes, R.

    1988-01-01

    In the Letter "Detection of a Very Bright Source Close to the LMC Supernova SN 1987A" by P. Nisenson, C. Papaliolios, M. Karovska, and R. Noyes (1987 Ap. J. [Letters], 320, L15), two of the figure labels for Figure 1 were inadvertently transposed in the production process. A corrected version of the figure appears as Plate L4. The Journal regrets the error.

  4. HPLC assay for 2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanethiol (WR-1065) in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGovern, E.P.; Swynnerton, N.F.; Steele, P.D.; Mangold, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    A high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) plasma assay for WR-1065 is described which is both precise and accurate throughout the concentration range from 1 to 500 μg/mL of plasma. The analyte is separated by HPLC and detected with a thiol specific electrochemical transducer cell. The detector response is linear over the ranges 1 to 10 μg/mL, 10 to 100 μg/mL, and 100 to 500 μg/mL. The absolute retention times for WR-1065 and WT-1729 are 9 and 12 minutes, respectively. The assay uses 100 μL of plasma and requires a total chromatography cycle time of 40 minutes. The method has been found suitable for the determination of WR-1065 in plasma from a beagle dog after i.v. administration of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioate (WR-2721)

  5. Circumvention of the tumor membrane barrier to WR-2721 absorption by reduction of drug hydrophilicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuhas, J.M.; Davis, M.E.; Glover, D.; Brown, D.Q.; Ritter, M.

    1982-01-01

    In attempting to account for the ability of most solid tumors to restrict the absorption of WR-2721, aminopropyl-aminoethylphosphorothioate, we examined a number of drug characteristics which might allow for this restriction, and observed that drug hypdrophilicity was a major contributing factor. When the highly hydrophilic WR-2721 was dephosphorylated, the drug became less hydrophilic and could readily cross tumor cell membranes. In addition, conventional radioprotectants, such as cysteine and mercaptoethylamine, were shown to be less hydrophilic than WR-2721 and also to cross tumor membranes readily. Therefore, drug hydrophilicity would appear to be the factor underlying the ability of WR-2721 to selectively protect normal tissues while most other protectors alter the radiation resistance of normal and tumor tissue alike. A red blood cell model for studying this problem in greater detail is described

  6. Local changes after intramuscular administration of gammaphos (WR-2721) in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resl, M.; Kuna, P.

    1985-01-01

    Local changes were investigated after i.m. injection of WR-2721, dissolved in saline or in aqua pro injectionem (ApI), and of ApI or saline alone. First muscle changes were found in the all the experimental groups after 6 h. Their development was most intensive after i.m. injection of ApI alone (granular degeneration up to complete necrosis of muscle fibers). The local changes after i.m. injection of WR-2721 in saline did not reach the intensity of changes of WR-2721 in ApI. The first reparative or regenerative changes were observed 72 hours after application. In the late phase (14th to 21st day) the normal tissue state was reached. The i.m. injection of WR-2721 in saline may be one of the possible routes of administration of this radioprotective substance. (author)

  7. CYG X-3: A GALACTIC DOUBLE BLACK HOLE OR BLACK-HOLE-NEUTRON-STAR PROGENITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland); Mandel, Ilya [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Sathyaprakash, B. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3YB (United Kingdom); Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Mikolajewska, Joanna [Centrum Astronomiczne im. M. Kopernika, Bartycka 18, PL-00-716 Warszawa (Poland)

    2013-02-10

    There are no known stellar-origin double black hole (BH-BH) or black-hole-neutron-star (BH-NS) systems. We argue that Cyg X-3 is a very likely BH-BH or BH-NS progenitor. This Galactic X-ray binary consists of a compact object, wind-fed by a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) type companion. Based on a comprehensive analysis of observational data, it was recently argued that Cyg X-3 harbors a 2-4.5 M {sub Sun} black hole (BH) and a 7.5-14.2 M {sub Sun} W-R companion. We find that the fate of such a binary leads to the prompt ({approx}< 1 Myr) formation of a close BH-BH system for the high end of the allowed W-R mass (M {sub W-R} {approx}> 13 M {sub Sun }). For the low- to mid-mass range of the W-R star (M {sub W-R} {approx} 7-10 M {sub Sun }) Cyg X-3 is most likely (probability 70%) disrupted when W-R ends up as a supernova. However, with smaller probability, it may form a wide (15%) or a close (15%) BH-NS system. The advanced LIGO/VIRGO detection rate for mergers of BH-BH systems from the Cyg X-3 formation channel is {approx}10 yr{sup -1}, while it drops down to {approx}0.1 yr{sup -1} for BH-NS systems. If Cyg X-3 in fact hosts a low-mass black hole and massive W-R star, it lends additional support for the existence of BH-BH/BH-NS systems.

  8. Further candidates of supermassive stars in other galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Kaler, Th.; Feitzinger, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    To look for other supermassive stars in other galaxies means to answer the question: what is the spectroscopic and morphological signature of such objects. The interpretation of WR sources found in other supergiant HII complexes depends basically on our picture of 30 Dor and in particular of R136a. The authors have undertaken a search of possible sites of such supermassive stars on the basis of the morphology of 30 Dor and NGC 604. (Auth.)

  9. Interspecies comparison of the tissue distribution of WR-2721, a radioprotective drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, L.C.; Rafter, J.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Pre-irradiation intravenous administration of the radioprotective drug S-2-[3-aminopropylamino]ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) has potential value in radiotherapy because it doubles the radiation resistance of normal mouse tissues while affording only minimal protection to tumors. Deficient deposition of WR- 2721 in tumor tissue has recently been demonstrated and this is thought to be a major reason for the preferential protection of normal tissues by the drug. Data originally obtained in studies using the mouse and rat indicated that the tissue distribution of WR-2721 was possibly more closely related to dose per unit surface area than to dose per unit weight. To test this hypothesis an interspecies comparison of the tissue distribution of 35 S-labeled WR-2721 was carried out in normal mice, rats, rabbits, and dogs at 15 and 30 minutes after intravenous administration. Results suggest that the surface area and body weight exert equal effects on the tissue concentration of WR-2721. The results further suggest that lower absolute doses of WR-2721 in the human, possibly as low as 20 mg/kg, may provide a radioprotective effect equivalent to that produced from 100 mg/kg in the mouse, i.e., a 50 to 80 percent increase in radiation resistance (CH)

  10. The WR/LBV system HD 5980 in the Small Magellanic Cloud: What is its evolutionary status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigsberger, Gloria; Morrell, Nidia; Hillier, D. John; Barba, Rodolfo; Gamen, Roberto

    2013-06-01

    HD 5980 is located in the Small Magellanic Cloud and consists of two binary systems which, if physically associated, are very widely separated. Their orbital periods are 19.3d and 97d and each of these systems contains very luminous massive stars. The P=19.3d binary is peculiar in that it consists of two WR stars, one of which underwent an LBV eruption in 1994. Because this binary is eclipsing and because it has been monitored since the 1950s, we now have a good grasp on the fundamental parameters of the LBV component. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that its bolometric luminosity increased during the 1994 eruption. In this poster we will summarize our current knowledge of HD 5980, including recent results derived from observations at Las Campanas Observatory which yield an improved orbital solution for the two binary systems and strong limits on the mass of the LBV. With these data, it should now be possible to constrain the evolutionary path that has been followed by the LBV and speculate on its properties as it approaches the supernova stage.

  11. Isotopic anomalies in cosmic rays and winds from Wolf-Rayet stars - a new model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, A.

    1984-01-01

    The insufficiency of the metal-rich supernovae model and of the Wolf-Rayet star model for explaining the isotopic anomalies in the galactic cosmic ray source (GCRS) is examined, and a new model for attacking the anomaly problem is proposed. The main properties of WR stars relevant to the study of GCRS are recalled, with particular emphasis on their chemical excesses and the steep galactic gradient in their distribution. The proposed model assumes that GCRs originate from two main sources of different composition and galactic distribution, probably SN's and WR stars. Their properties may change with galactocentric distance. The relevant physical physicochemical relationships are derived, and some approximations which account for the contributions of WR and SN sources in GCRS are worked out for comparison with observations. The model is found to account very well for the observed anomalies. 33 references

  12. The Most Metal-poor Stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.

    2018-06-01

    The chemical abundances of the most metal-poor stars in a galaxy can be used to investigate the earliest stages of its formation and chemical evolution. Differences between the abundances of the most metal-poor stars in the Milky Way and in its satellite dwarf galaxies have been noted and provide the strongest available constraints on the earliest stages of general galactic chemical evolution models. However, the masses of the Milky Way and its satellite dwarf galaxies differ by four orders of magnitude, leaving a gap in our knowledge of the early chemical evolution of intermediate mass galaxies like the Magellanic Clouds. To close that gap, we have initiated a survey of the metal-poor stellar populations of the Magellanic Clouds using the mid-infrared metal-poor star selection of Schlaufman & Casey (2014). We have discovered the three most metal-poor giant stars known in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and reobserved the previous record holder. The stars have metallicities in the range -2.70 < [Fe/H] < -2.00 and three show r-process enhancement: one has [Eu II/Fe] = +1.65 and two others have [Eu II/Fe] = +0.65. The probability that four randomly selected very metal-poor stars in the halo of the Milky Way are as r-process enhanced is 0.0002. For that reason, the early chemical enrichment of the heaviest elements in the LMC and Milky Way were qualitatively different. It is also suggestive of a possible chemical link between the LMC and the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies nearby with evidence of r-process enhancement (e.g., Reticulum II and Tucana III). Like Reticulum II, the most metal-poor star in our LMC sample is the only one not enhanced in r-process elements.

  13. A new Wolf-Rayet star and its circumstellar nebula in Aquila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Hamann, W.-R.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Fabrika, S.; Valeev, A. F.

    2010-04-01

    We report the discovery of a new Wolf-Rayet star in Aquila via detection of its circumstellar nebula (reminiscent of ring nebulae associated with late WN stars) using the Spitzer Space Telescope archival data. Our spectroscopic follow-up of the central point source associated with the nebula showed that it is a WN7h star (we named it WR121b). We analysed the spectrum of WR121b by using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmospheres, obtaining a stellar temperature of ~=50kK. The stellar wind composition is dominated by helium with ~20 per cent of hydrogen. The stellar spectrum is highly reddened [E(B - V) = 2.85mag]. Adopting an absolute magnitude of Mv = -5.7, the star has a luminosity of logL/Lsolar = 5.75 and a mass-loss rate of 10-4.7Msolaryr-1, and resides at a distance of 6.3kpc. We searched for a possible parent cluster of WR121b and found that this star is located at ~=1° from the young star cluster embedded in the giant HII region W43 (containing a WN7+a/OB? star - WR121a). We also discovered a bow shock around the O9.5III star ALS9956, located at from the cluster. We discuss the possibility that WR121b and ALS9956 are runaway stars ejected from the cluster in W43. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC). E-mail: vgvaram@mx.iki.rssi.ru (VVG); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK); wrh@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de (WRH); berdnik@sai.msu.ru (LNB); fabrika@sao.ru (SF); azamat@sao.ru (AFV)

  14. The extraordinary mass-loss bubble G2.4 + 1.4 and its central star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopita, M.A.; Mcgregor, P.J.; Rawlings, S.J.; Lozinskaia, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Data are presented on the WR 102 star and the surrounding nebula (G2.4 + 1.4). It is shown that WR 102 and the nebula are associated, the nebula being a mass-loss bubble powered by the central star. From a photoionization analysis of the surrounding nebula, the star was determined to have the following parameters: log T(ion) = 5.20 + or - 0.05; log (R/solar R) = about 0.05; and log (L/solar L) = 5.85 + or - 0.20. 42 refs

  15. Reduced protection of stem spermatogonia by WR-2721 at low doses of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meistrich, M.; Finch, M.; Hunter, N.; Milas, L.

    1984-01-01

    The radioprotection of normal cells with WR-2721 at low doses of radiation (about 2 Gy per fraction) was investigated using testicular stem cells. Survival of stem spermatogonia to single doses of irradiation, measured using sperm head counts at 56 days postirradiation, indicated no protection factor (PF = 1.00) at 2 GY by 400 mg/kg WR-2721, but a significant PF = 1.44 at 12 Gy. Stem cell survival was also measured after 5 fractions. When daily fractionation was used with 300 mg/kg WR-2721, given prior to each irradiation, little or no protection was observed at 2 Gy using the sperm head assay (PF = 0.98) or at 2.4 Gy using counts of repopulating tubules at 35 days postirradiation (PF = 1.12). In contrast, there was more significant protection (PF's = 1.22 and 1.27) for these two assays when 300 mg/kg WR-2721 was used with single high doses of radiation. When 4-hour fractionation was used with 300 mg/kg WR-2721, given prior to the first dose and 150 mg/kg prior to subsequent doses, minimal protection was observed at 2 Gy/fraction using the sperm head assay (PF = 0.98) and the repopulating tubule assay (PF = 1.09). Thus, protection of these cells in the clinical dose range is much lower than that observed at doses above 10 Gy. These results may be explained by a decrease in the intrinsic ability of WR-2721 to protect at lower radiation doses plus a cytotoxic effect of WR-2721

  16. The Evolution of Massive Stars: a Selection of Facts and Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbeveren, D.

    In the present paper we discuss a selection of facts and questions related to observations and evolutionary calculations of massive single stars and massive stars in interacting binaries. We focus on the surface chemical abundances, the role of stellar winds, the early Be-stars, the high mass X-ray binaries and the effects of rotation on stellar evolution. Finally, we present an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) of WR binaries in dense stellar environments.

  17. Grain processes in massive star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfire, M.G.; Cassinelli, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that stars greater than 100 M(solar) exist in the Galaxy and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), however classical star formation theory predicts stellar mass limits of only approx. 60 M(solar). A protostellar accretion flow consists of inflowing gas and dust. Grains are destroyed as they are near the central protostar creating a dust shell or cocoon. Radiation pressure acting on the grain can halt the inflow of material thereby limiting the amount of mass accumulated by the protostar. We first consider rather general constraints on the initial grain to gas ratio and mass accretion rates that permit inflow. We further constrain these results by constructing a numerical model. Radiative deceleration of grains and grain destruction processes are explicitly accounted for in an iterative solution of the radiation-hydrodynamic equations. Findings seem to suggest that star formation by spherical accretion requires rather extreme preconditioning of the grain and gas environment

  18. Depletion of glutathione by the radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioic acid (WR2721)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schor, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    S-2-(3-Aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioic acid (WR2721) is a free radical scavenger currently in limited clinical use as an adjunct in cancer radio- and chemotherapy. We have previously determined the pharmacokinetics and protein binding characteristics of WR2721 in rabbits and in humans. We have also shown that WR2721 is an effective mucolytic agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. In vivo, WR2721 is converted to its free thiol analogue, N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane (MDP), and, as such, reacts with disulfide bonds in the mucin molecule, altering its rheology. In the course of experiments designed to examine the spectrum of its activity as a free radical scavenger, we have observed that WR2721 exacerbates the toxicity of those free radical-generating agents, such as acetaminophen and 6-hydroxydopamine, which depend upon glutathione for their detoxication. For this reason, we examined the glutathione content of the livers of mice treated with WR2721. (author)

  19. Characterizing Wolf-Rayet stars in the near- and mid-infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faherty, Jacqueline K. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Shara, Michael M.; Zurek, David; Kanarek, Graham [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Moffat, Anthony F. J., E-mail: jfaherty@dtm.ciw.edu [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    We present refined color-color selection criteria for identifying Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars using available mid-infrared (MIR) photometry from WISE in combination with near-infrared (NIR) photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Using a sample of spectrally classified objects, we find that WR stars are well distinguished from the field stellar population in the (W1 – W2) versus (J – K{sub s} ) color-color diagram, and further distinguished from other emission line objects such as planetary nebulae, Be, and cataclysmic variable stars using a combination of NIR and MIR color constraints. As proof of concept we applied the color constraints to a photometric sample in the Galactic plane, located WR star candidates, and present five new spectrally confirmed and classified WC (1) and WN (4) stars. Analysis of the 0.8-5.0 μm spectral data for a subset of known, bright WC and WN stars shows that emission lines (primarily He I) extend into the 3.0-5.0 μm spectral region, although their strength is greatly diminished compared to the 0.8-2.5 μm region. The WR population stands out relative to background field stars at NIR and MIR colors due to an excess continuum contribution, likely caused by free-free scattering in dense winds. Mean photometric properties of known WRs are presented and imply that reddened late-type WN and WC sources are easier to detect than earlier-type sources at larger Galactic radii. WISE W3 and W4 images of 10 WR stars show evidence of circumstellar shells linked to mass ejections from strong stellar winds.

  20. Properties of O dwarf stars in 30 Doradus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabín-Sanjulián, Carolina; VFTS Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    We perform a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of 105 presumably single O dwarf stars in 30 Doradus, located within the Large Magellanic Cloud. We use mid-to-high resolution multi-epoch optical spectroscopic data obtained within the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. Stellar and wind parameters are derived by means of the automatic tool iacob-gbat, which is based on a large grid of fastwind models. We also benefit from the Bayesian tool bonnsai to estimate evolutionary masses. We provide a spectral calibration for the effective temperature of O dwarf stars in the LMC, deal with the mass discrepancy problem and investigate the wind properties of the sample.

  1. Effect of radioprotectant WR 2721 on cyclic nucleotides, prostaglandins, and lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocha, P.J.; Catravas, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    Within 1 hr after ip injection of the radioprotectant WR 2721 into rats, splenic cGMP levels dropped and remained suppressed for 6 hr before returning to normal. However, if rats were exposed to ionizing radiation 30-40 min after WR 2721 treatment, they had higher cGMP levels at 3 hr postirradiation than the nonirradiUted, drug-treated controls, but the cGMP content was still found to be lower than that of the irradiated nondrug-treated controls. Radiation exposure of animals pretreated with WR 2721 also resulted in higher liver and spleen levels of cAMP and additional elevations in spleen prostaglandin content, compared with irradiated controls at 3-6 hr after radiation treatment. The secondary fluctuations of lysosomal enzyme activities, prostaglandin content, and cyclic nucleotide levels were also altered in irradiated rats pretreated with WR 2721 when compared with irradiated controls. Liver and spleen lysosomal β-glucuronidase activities, spleen cAMP and cGMP levels, and spleen prostaglandin concentrations were closer to physiological levels at 3 days postirradiation in rats given WR 2721 before the radiation treatment

  2. Acute cardiovascular and autonomic effects of WR-2721: a radioprotective compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, R.W.; Heiffer, M.H.

    1975-01-01

    WR-2721 is a chemical which has shown much promise as a protective agent in animals exposed to ionizing radiation. Our experiments on anesthetized dogs and cats indicate that WR-2721 has little acute cardiovascular action in these animals when given intravenously in doses of 50 to 200 mg/kg. A total cumulative dose of 600 mg/kg within 2 hr was not lethal and, indeed, was well tolerated. Arterial blood pressure was not markedly lowered in dogs and cats given these doses. In dogs, a slight vasodilation was noted in the femoral vascular bed after intra-arterial injection. Mydriasis and watery salivation were observed in all animals. In the dog, WR-2721 (100 mg/kg) was observed to produce blockade of the bilateral carotid artery-occlusion pressor response, the pressor response to the ganglionic stimulant DMPP, and the bradycardia to vagus nerve stimulation. In the cat, WR-2721 (100 mg/kg) also blocked the contraction of the cat nictitating membrane due to stimulation of the preganglionic fibers of the superior cervical ganglion, but not the contraction seen with postganglionic fiber stimulation. Our experiments indicate that WR-2721 is a ganglionic blocking agent. It does not share this property with closely related structural congeners. (U.S.)

  3. The chemical composition of the Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    This review summarises current knowledge of the chemical composition of PopI WR stars, concentrating on work carried out in this area since the last IAU, No. 49, symposium devoted to this stellar class (Bappu and Sahade 1973). Section 2 deals with an assessment of the atmospheric H/He ratio in both WN and WC stars: a parameter of fundamental importance in addressing their evolutionary status, as well as providing a base species with which to compare other derived chemical abundances. Section 3 briefly deals with the models generally employed and gives recent results for He, C and N abundances derived from both visible and UV line analyses. Section 4 summarises recent results from stellar evolutionary theory and in Section 5 these are compared with those derived from observation, assessing the significance of these new results and their implications for the evolutionary status of the WR stars. Some areas for further advancement are identified. (Auth.)

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The distance modulus of the LMC (Kovacs, 2000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, G.

    2000-11-01

    This table provides periods, intensity averaged V magnitudes and magnitude averaged V-Rc (Johnson V & Kron-Cousins R) colors of the MACHO LMC double-mode RR Lyrae variables employed in the above paper. For the calculation of the averages, an iterative 3-sigma condition was used to omit outliers. Further references (coordinates, amplitude ratios, etc.) to these variables can be found in Alcock et al. (1997ApJ...482...89A) and in Alcock et al. (2000, Cat. ). Trasformation to the standard system has been performed in accordance with Alcock et al. (1999PASP..111.1539A). (1 data file).

  5. Improved HPLC assay for S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioate (WR-2721) in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swynnerton, N.F.; McGovern, E.P.; Nino, J.A.; Mangold, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    An HPLC assay is presented for the detection and quantitation of the radioprotective drug S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioate (WR-2721, ethiofos) present in plasma. Improved selectivity and a 40-fold increase in sensitivity have been demonstrated over the method previously reported by this laboratory. Using precolumn derivatization with fluorescamine and S-3-(4-aminobutylamino)propyl phosphorothioate (WR-80855, a homolog of WR-2721) as the internal standard, drug levels of 0.05 to 1000 μg/mL were determined with excellent precision. Detector response was linear over the entire range. The assay uses 150 μL of plasma and requires a total chromatography time of about 50 minutes. The method was found suitable for pharmacokinetic studies in a preliminary experiment with a beagle dog in which no interferences due to plasma constituents or drug metabolites were observed

  6. RED EYES ON WOLF-RAYET STARS: 60 NEW DISCOVERIES VIA INFRARED COLOR SELECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauerhan, Jon C.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Morris, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    We have spectroscopically identified 60 Galactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, including 38 nitrogen types (WN) and 22 carbon types (WC). Using photometry from the Spitzer/GLIMPSE and Two Micron All Sky Survey databases, the new WRs were selected via a method we have established that exploits their unique infrared colors, which is mainly the result of excess radiation generated by free-free scattering within their dense ionized winds. The selection criterion has been refined since the last report, resulting in a WR detection rate of ∼20% in spectroscopic follow-up of candidates that comprise a broad color space defined by the color distribution of all known WRs having B > 14 mag. However, there are smaller regions within this color space that yield WRs at a rate of >50% in spectroscopic follow-up. Candidates that are not WRs are mainly Be stars, which is possibly attributable to the physical similarities between the free-free emission parameters of Be disks and WR winds. As an additional selection experiment, the list of WR candidates was cross-correlated with archival X-ray point-source catalogs, which increases the WR detection rate of the broad color space to ∼40%; 10 new WR X-ray sources have been found in addition to a previously unrecognized X-ray counterpart to a known WR. The extinction values, distances, and Galactocentric radii of all new WRs are calculated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Although the majority of the new WRs have no obvious association with stellar clusters, two WC8 stars reside in a previously unknown massive-star cluster, in which five OB supergiants were also identified. The new system lies at an estimated distance of ∼6.1 kpc, near the intersection of the Scutum-Centaurus Arm with the Galaxy's bar. In addition, two WC and four WN stars, all but one of which are X-ray sources, were identified in association with the stellar clusters Danks 1 and 2. A WN9 star has also been associated with the cluster [DBS2003] 179. This work

  7. Topical or systemic 16,16 dm prostaglandin E2 or WR-2721 (WR-1065) protects mice from alopecia after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, L.; Malkinson, F.D.; Hanson, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies in mice demonstrated that systemic or topical 16,16 dm PGE 2 protected against single dose radiation-induced hair loss. The authors have now investigated prostaglandin, or WR-2721, protection against murine alopecia produced by varying doses and schedules of fractionated radiation. In some studies with the radioprotectors given systematically, WR-2721 afforded slightly greater radioprotection than 16,16 dm PGE 2 . The two compounds were essentially equally radioprotective in the topical application studies. Since both systemic and topical applications of the agents tested enhanced hair regrowth following radiation, the authors conclude that clinical use of these compounds may provide some protection of hair follicles, and perhaps other tissues, lying within a radiation therapy field. (author)

  8. Topical or systemic 16,16 dm prostaglandin E sub 2 or WR-2721 (WR-1065) protects mice from alopecia after fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, L.; Malkinson, F.D. (Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke' s Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)); Hanson, W.R. (Hines VA Medical Center, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Previous studies in mice demonstrated that systemic or topical 16,16 dm PGE{sub 2} protected against single dose radiation-induced hair loss. The authors have now investigated prostaglandin, or WR-2721, protection against murine alopecia produced by varying doses and schedules of fractionated radiation. In some studies with the radioprotectors given systematically, WR-2721 afforded slightly greater radioprotection than 16,16 dm PGE{sub 2}. The two compounds were essentially equally radioprotective in the topical application studies. Since both systemic and topical applications of the agents tested enhanced hair regrowth following radiation, the authors conclude that clinical use of these compounds may provide some protection of hair follicles, and perhaps other tissues, lying within a radiation therapy field. (author).

  9. Gamma-ray line emission from 26Al produced by Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prantzos, N.; Casse, M.; Gros, M.; Arnould, M.

    1985-08-01

    The recent satellite observations of the 1.8 MeV line from the decay of 26 Al has given a new impetus to the study of the nucleosynthesis of 26 Al. In this communication we discuss the production and ejection of 26 Al by massive mass-losing stars (Of and WR stars), in the light of recent stellar models. We also derive the longitude distribution of the 26 Al gamma-ray line emission produced by the galactic collection of WR stars, based on various estimates of their radial distribution. This longitude profile provides i) a specific signature of massive stars on the background of other potential 26 Al sources, as novae, supernovae, certain red giants and possibly AGB stars and ii) a possible tool to improve the data analysis of the HEAO 3 and SMM experiments

  10. PROTOTYPING NON-EQUILIBRIUM VISCOUS-TIMESCALE ACCRETION THEORY USING LMC X-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambier, Hal J.; Smith, David M. [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    Explaining variability observed in the accretion flows of black hole X-ray binary systems remains challenging, especially concerning timescales less than, or comparable to, the viscous timescale but much larger than the inner orbital period despite decades of research identifying numerous relevant physical mechanisms. We take a simplified but broad approach to study several mechanisms likely relevant to patterns of variability observed in the persistently high-soft Roche-lobe overflow system LMC X-3. Based on simple estimates and upper bounds, we find that physics beyond varying disk/corona bifurcation at the disk edge, Compton-heated winds, modulation of total supply rate via irradiation of the companion, and the likely extent of the partial hydrogen ionization instability is needed to explain the degree, and especially the pattern, of variability in LMC X-3 largely due to viscous dampening. We then show how evaporation-condensation may resolve or compound the problem given the uncertainties associated with this complex mechanism and our current implementation. We briefly mention our plans to resolve the question, refine and extend our model, and alternatives we have not yet explored.

  11. APSIDAL MOTION AND A LIGHT CURVE SOLUTION FOR 13 LMC ECCENTRIC ECLIPSING BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasche, P.; Wolf, M.; Vraštil, J.; Pilarcik, L. [Astronomical Institute, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, CZ-180 00 Praha 8, V Holešovičkách 2 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    New CCD observations for 13 eccentric eclipsing binaries from the Large Magellanic Cloud were carried out using the Danish 1.54 m telescope located at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. These systems were observed for their times of minimum and 56 new minima were obtained. These are needed for accurate determination of the apsidal motion. Besides that, in total 436 times of minimum were derived from the photometric databases OGLE and MACHO. The O – C diagrams of minimum timings for these B-type binaries were analyzed and the parameters of the apsidal motion were computed. The light curves of these systems were fitted using the program PHOEBE, giving the light curve parameters. We derived for the first time relatively short periods of the apsidal motion ranging from 21 to 107 years. The system OGLE-LMC-ECL-07902 was also analyzed using the spectra and radial velocities, resulting in masses of 6.8 and 4.4 M{sub ⊙} for the eclipsing components. For one system (OGLE-LMC-ECL-20112), the third-body hypothesis was also used to describe the residuals after subtraction of the apsidal motion, resulting in a period of about 22 years. For several systems an additional third light was also detected, which makes these systems suspect for triplicity.

  12. The Nature and Cause of Spectral Variability in LMC X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlen, L.; Smith, D. M.; Scank, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a long-term observation campaign of the extragalactic wind-accreting black-hole X-ray binary LMC X-1, using the Proportional Counter Array on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The observations show that LMC X-1's accretion disk exhibits an anomalous temperature-luminosity relation. We use deep archival RXTE observations to show that large movements across the temperature-luminosity space occupied by the system can take place on time scales as short as half an hour. These changes cannot be adequately explained by perturbations that propagate from the outer disk on a viscous timescale. We propose instead that the apparent disk variations reflect rapid fluctuations within the Compton up-scattering coronal material, which occults the inner parts of the disk. The expected relationship between the observed disk luminosity and apparent disk temperature derived from the variable occultation model is quantitatively shown to be in good agreement with the observations. Two other observations support this picture: an inverse correlation between the flux in the power-law spectral component and the fitted inner disk temperature, and a near-constant total photon flux, suggesting that the inner disk is not ejected when a lower temperature is observed.

  13. Photometric and polarimetric variability and mass-loss rate of the massive binary Wolf-Rayet star HDE 311884 (WN6 + 05: V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, A.F.J.; Drissen, L.; Robert, C.; Lamontagne, R.; Coziol, R.

    1990-01-01

    Photometric and polarimetric monitoring of the Wolf-Rayet (W-R) + O-type binary system HDE 311884 = WR 47 over many orbital cycles shows the clear effects of phase-dependent electron scattering of O-star light as the orbiting O companion shines through varying column density of W-R stellar wind material. In contrast to this wind-type eclipse, the stars themselves do not quite eclipse. Both photometry and polarimetry give a consistent estimate of the mass-loss rate of the W-R component: at about 0.00003 solar mass/yr. The orbital inclination, i = 70 deg, along with the previously published velocity orbit, yields high masses: M(WN6) = 48 solar masses and M(O5:V) = 57 solar masses. 33 refs

  14. Spitzer view of massive star formation in the tidally stripped Magellanic Bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Muller, Erik; Kawamura, Akiko; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Seale, Jonathan P.; Shiao, Bernie; Sewiło, Marta; Whitney, Barbara A.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Fukui, Yasuo; Madden, Suzanne C.; Oliveira, Joana M.; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Robitaille, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The Magellanic Bridge is the nearest low-metallicity, tidally stripped environment, offering a unique high-resolution view of physical conditions in merging and forming galaxies. In this paper, we present an analysis of candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs), i.e., in situ, current massive star formation (MSF) in the Bridge using Spitzer mid-IR and complementary optical and near-IR photometry. While we definitely find YSOs in the Bridge, the most massive are ∼10 M ☉ , <<45 M ☉ found in the LMC. The intensity of MSF in the Bridge also appears to be decreasing, as the most massive YSOs are less massive than those formed in the past. To investigate environmental effects on MSF, we have compared properties of massive YSOs in the Bridge to those in the LMC. First, YSOs in the Bridge are apparently less embedded than in the LMC: 81% of Bridge YSOs show optical counterparts, compared to only 56% of LMC sources with the same range of mass, circumstellar dust mass, and line-of-sight extinction. Circumstellar envelopes are evidently more porous or clumpy in the Bridge's low-metallicity environment. Second, we have used whole samples of YSOs in the LMC and the Bridge to estimate the probability of finding YSOs at a given H I column density, N(H I). We found that the LMC has ∼3 × higher probability than the Bridge for N(H I) >12 × 10 20 cm –2 , but the trend reverses at lower N(H I). Investigating whether this lower efficiency relative to H I is due to less efficient molecular cloud formation or to less efficient cloud collapse, or to both, will require sensitive molecular gas observations.

  15. Spitzer view of massive star formation in the tidally stripped Magellanic Bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Muller, Erik; Kawamura, Akiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Seale, Jonathan P.; Shiao, Bernie [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sewiło, Marta [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Whitney, Barbara A.; Meade, Marilyn R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusaku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Madden, Suzanne C. [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oliveira, Joana M.; Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Robitaille, Thomas P., E-mail: rchen@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-04-20

    The Magellanic Bridge is the nearest low-metallicity, tidally stripped environment, offering a unique high-resolution view of physical conditions in merging and forming galaxies. In this paper, we present an analysis of candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs), i.e., in situ, current massive star formation (MSF) in the Bridge using Spitzer mid-IR and complementary optical and near-IR photometry. While we definitely find YSOs in the Bridge, the most massive are ∼10 M {sub ☉}, <<45 M {sub ☉} found in the LMC. The intensity of MSF in the Bridge also appears to be decreasing, as the most massive YSOs are less massive than those formed in the past. To investigate environmental effects on MSF, we have compared properties of massive YSOs in the Bridge to those in the LMC. First, YSOs in the Bridge are apparently less embedded than in the LMC: 81% of Bridge YSOs show optical counterparts, compared to only 56% of LMC sources with the same range of mass, circumstellar dust mass, and line-of-sight extinction. Circumstellar envelopes are evidently more porous or clumpy in the Bridge's low-metallicity environment. Second, we have used whole samples of YSOs in the LMC and the Bridge to estimate the probability of finding YSOs at a given H I column density, N(H I). We found that the LMC has ∼3 × higher probability than the Bridge for N(H I) >12 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2}, but the trend reverses at lower N(H I). Investigating whether this lower efficiency relative to H I is due to less efficient molecular cloud formation or to less efficient cloud collapse, or to both, will require sensitive molecular gas observations.

  16. Symbiotic stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarchuk, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    There are some arguments that the symbiotic stars are binary, where one component is a red giant and the other component is a small hot star which is exciting a nebula. The symbiotic stars belong to the old disc population. Probably, symbiotic stars are just such an evolutionary stage for double stars as planetary nebulae for single stars. (Auth.)

  17. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278). WR-33278 and spermine protect against mutation induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Shigematsu, N.; Schwartz, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). Because of their reported structural and functional similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of WR-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents (at concentrations of 0.01 mM and 0.001 mM) were electroporated into cells. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction, with the sequence of irradiation followed 3 h later by electroporation being the more toxic protocol. Enhanced cell survival was observed following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278 30 min prior to irradiation; protection factors (PF) of 1.3 and 1.8, respectively. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested. These data suggest that the properties of radioprotection and chemoprevention exhibited by the phosphorothioate (WR-2721) and associated aminothiol (WR-1065) and disulfide (WR-33278) metabolites may be mediated via endogenous spermine-like polyamine processes. Such a mechanism would have important implications with respect to the design and development of new generation drugs for use in radioprotection and chemoprevention

  18. Further studies on selective radioprotection by organic zinc salts and synergism of zinc aspartate with WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floersheim, G.L.; Bieri, A.

    1990-01-01

    Protection of the haematocrit and thrombocytes by small doses of the aminothiol radioprotector WR 2721 was markedly improved by the concomitant administration of small doses of zinc aspartate. Zinc aspartate was the only one of the tested zinc salts not inhibiting the regression induced by radiotherapy of human tumours grown as xenografts in immunosuppressed mice. This also applied to zinc aspartate with WR 2721. A dose of zinc aspartate which afforded synergistic haematological protection did not enhance the toxicity of WR 2721. The synergism of zinc aspartate with WR 2721 and the differential radioprotection of the combined protocol may make it possible in clinical cancer radiotherapy to obtain selective radioprotection at a lower toxicity giving an improved therapeutic ratio compared with WR 2721 alone. (author)

  19. Draft genome sequence of the intestinal parasite Blastocystis subtype 4-isolate WR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Wawrzyniak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal protistan parasite Blastocystis is characterized by an extensive genetic variability with 17 subtypes (ST1–ST17 described to date. Only the whole genome of a human ST7 isolate was previously sequenced. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Blastocystis ST4-WR1 isolated from a laboratory rodent at Singapore.

  20. Draft genome sequence of the intestinal parasite Blastocystis subtype 4-isolate WR1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Courtine, Damien; Osman, Marwan; Hubans-Pierlot, Christine; Cian, Amandine; Nourrisson, Céline; Chabe, Magali; Poirier, Philippe; Bart, Aldert; Polonais, Valérie; Delgado-Viscogliosi, Pilar; El Alaoui, Hicham; Belkorchia, Abdel; van Gool, Tom; Tan, Kevin S. W.; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Delbac, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    (ST1-ST17) described to date. Only the whole genome of a human ST7 isolate was previously sequenced. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Blastocystis ST4-WR1 isolated from a laboratory rodent at Singapore. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc

  1. VARIABLE O VI AND N V EMISSION FROM THE X-RAY BINARY LMC X-3: HEATING OF THE BLACK HOLE COMPANION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Limin; Tripp, Todd M.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Yao Yangsen; Cui Wei; Xue Yongquan; Orosz, Jerome A.; Steeghs, Danny; Steiner, James F.; Torres, Manuel A. P.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.

    2010-01-01

    Based on high-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, we present new detections of O VI and N V emission from the black hole X-ray binary (XRB) system LMC X-3. We also update the ephemeris of the XRB using recent radial velocity measurements obtained with the echelle spectrograph on the Magellan-Clay telescope. We observe significant velocity variability of the UV emission, and we find that the O VI and N V emission velocities follow the optical velocity curve of the XRB. Moreover, the O VI and N V intensities regularly decrease between binary phase = 0.5 and 1.0, which suggests that the source of the UV emission is increasingly occulted as the B star in the XRB moves from superior to inferior conjunction. These trends suggest that illumination of the B star atmosphere by the intense X-ray emission from the accreting black hole creates a hot spot on one side of the B star, and this hot spot is the origin of the O VI and N V emission. However, the velocity semiamplitude of the ultraviolet emission, K UV ∼ 180 km s -1 , is lower than the optical semiamplitude; this difference could be due to rotation of the B star. Comparison of the FUSE observations taken in 2001 November and 2004 April shows a significant change in the O VI emission characteristics: in the 2001 data, the O VI region shows both broad and narrow emission features, while in 2004 only the narrow O VI emission is clearly present. Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data show that the XRB was in a high/soft state in the 2001 November epoch but was in a transitional state in 2004 April, so the shape of the X-ray spectrum might change the properties of the region illuminated on the B star and thus change the broad versus narrow characteristics of the UV emission. If our hypothesis about the origin of the highly ionized emission is correct, then careful analysis of the emission occultation could, in principle

  2. SPITZER SAGE-SMC INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF MASSIVE STARS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, A. Z.; Lennon, D. J.; Massa, D. L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a catalog of 5324 massive stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), with accurate spectral types compiled from the literature, and a photometric catalog for a subset of 3654 of these stars, with the goal of exploring their infrared properties. The photometric catalog consists of stars with infrared counterparts in the Spitzer SAGE-SMC survey database, for which we present uniform photometry from 0.3to24 μm in the UBVIJHK s +IRAC+MIPS24 bands. We compare the color-magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams to those of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), finding that the brightest infrared sources in the SMC are also the red supergiants, supergiant B[e] (sgB[e]) stars, luminous blue variables, and Wolf-Rayet stars, with the latter exhibiting less infrared excess, the red supergiants being less dusty and the sgB[e] stars being on average less luminous. Among the objects detected at 24 μm in the SMC are a few very luminous hypergiants, four B-type stars with peculiar, flat spectral energy distributions, and all three known luminous blue variables. We detect a distinct Be star sequence, displaced to the red, and suggest a novel method of confirming Be star candidates photometrically. We find a higher fraction of Oe and Be stars among O and early-B stars in our SMC catalog, respectively, when compared to the LMC catalog, and that the SMC Be stars occur at higher luminosities. We estimate mass-loss rates for the red supergiants, confirming the correlation with luminosity even at the metallicity of the SMC. Finally, we confirm the new class of stars displaying composite A and F type spectra, the sgB[e] nature of 2dFS1804 and find the F0 supergiant 2dFS3528 to be a candidate luminous blue variable with cold dust.

  3. Spectrophotometry of emission-line stars in the magellanic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannan, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The strong emission lines in the most luminous stars in the Magellanic Clouds indicate that these stars have such strong stellar winds that their photospheres are so masked that optical absorption lines do not provide an accurate measure of photospheric conditions. In the research funded by this grant, temperatures and gravities of emission-line stars both in the Large (LMC) and Small Magellanic Clouds (SMC) have been measured by fitting of continuum ultraviolet-optical fluxes observed with IUE with theoretical model atmospheres. Preliminary results from this work formed a major part of an invited review 'The Distribution of Types of Luminous Blue Variables'. Interpretation of the IUE observations obtained in this grant and archive data were also included in a talk at the First Boulder-Munich Hot Stars Workshop. Final results of these studies are now being completed for publication in refereed journals.

  4. Construction of the Database for Pulsating Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Qiu; Yang, Ming; Jiang, Bi-Wei

    2012-01-01

    A database for pulsating variable stars is constructed to favor the study of variable stars in China. The database includes about 230,000 variable stars in the Galactic bulge, LMC and SMC observed in an about 10 yr period by the MACHO(MAssive Compact Halo Objects) and OGLE(Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment) projects. The software used for the construction is LAMP, i.e., Linux+Apache+MySQL+PHP. A web page is provided for searching the photometric data and light curves in the database through the right ascension and declination of an object. Because of the flexibility of this database, more up-to-date data of variable stars can be incorporated into the database conveniently.

  5. Massive stars with mass loss: Evolution, nucleosynthesis, and astrophysical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prantzos, N.

    1986-06-01

    Evolution and nucleosynthesis of mass loss WR stars is studied, particularly evolution of stars with initial mass between 50 and 100 solar masses, during combustion of H and He. A semi-empirical mass loss formalism, the Roxburgh criterion for convection, and nuclear data are used. Composition of the stellar surface and ejecta (and ejecta contribution to cosmic ray composition) are derived. The contribution of these stars to s elements in our solar system is shown. Their production of 26 Al is compared to the quantity in the galaxy. Gamma ray emission at 1.8 MeV from the decay of this radionuclide is estimated in galactic longitude. The stars evolve as 0 and 0f stars during H combustion and spend 20% of their He combustion period as WN stars and 80% as WC-W0. Evolution always occurs in the blue part of the HR diagram, and satisfies observational constraints on its upper part [fr

  6. Core expansion in young star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elson, R.A.W.; Freeman, K.C.; Lauer, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    The core radii of 18 rich star clusters in the LMC with ages from 10 Myr to 1 Gyr. Data for an additional 17 clusters with ages from 1 Myr to 10 Gyr are available in the literature. The combined sample shows that the core radii increase from about 0 to about 5 pc between about 1 Myr and 1 Gyr, and then begin to decrease again. The expansion of the cores is probably driven by mass loss from evolving stars. Models of cluster evolution show that the rate of increase in core radius is sensitive to the slope of the initial mass function. The observed core radius-age relation for the LMC clusters favors an intial mass function with slope slightly flatter than the Salpeter value. 20 refs

  7. Optical spectrophotometric atlas of Supernova 1987A in the LMC. I. The first 130 days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, M.M.; Heathcote, S.R.; Hamuy, M.; Navarrete, M.

    1988-01-01

    Optical spectrophotometry of SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) covering the first 5 months since outburst is presented. More than 80 spectra were obtained at Cerro Tololo over this period, mostly with the 2D-Frutti two-dimensional photon-counting detector on the 1-m telescope. The spectrophotometric calibration of the 2D-Frutti data is considered in detail. Through a comparison with broadband photometry, it is shown that the accuracy of the 2D-Frutti spectrophotometry is + or - 5 percent in absolute terms, and that the relative calibration for any single spectrum is accurate to + or - 3 percent. CCD spectrophotometry obtained on the first night of observation (Feb. 25, 1987) is also briefly discussed. Radial velocities for several prominent absorption and emission features are measured from these combined data. 13 references

  8. OGLE Collection of Star Clusters. New Objects in the Outskirts of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Sitek, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, D. M.; Udalski, A.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Skowron, J.; Karczmarek, P.; Cieślar, M.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Poleski, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Magellanic System (MS), consisting of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and the Magellanic Bridge (MBR), contains diverse sample of star clusters. Their spatial distribution, ages and chemical abundances may provide important information about the history of formation of the whole System. We use deep photometric maps derived from the images collected during the fourth phase of The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-IV) to construct the most com...

  9. THE AGE-METALLICITY RELATIONSHIP OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD FIELD STAR POPULATION FROM WIDE-FIELD WASHINGTON PHOTOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piatti, Andrés E.; Geisler, Doug

    2013-01-01

    We analyze age and metallicity estimates for an unprecedented database of some 5.5 million stars distributed throughout the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) main body, obtained from CCD Washington CT 1 photometry, reported on in Piatti et al. We produce a comprehensive field star age-metallicity relationship (AMR) from the earliest epoch until ∼1 Gyr ago. This AMR reveals that the LMC has not evolved chemically as either a closed-box or bursting system, exclusively, but as a combination of both scenarios that have varied in relative strength over the lifetime of the galaxy, although the bursting model falls closer to the data in general. Furthermore, while old and metal-poor field stars have been preferentially formed in the outer disk, younger and more metal-rich stars have mostly been formed in the inner disk, confirming an outside-in formation. We provide evidence for the formation of stars between 5 and 12 Gyr, during the cluster age gap, although chemical enrichment during this period was minimal. We find no significant metallicity gradient in the LMC. We also find that the range in the metallicity of an LMC field has varied during the lifetime of the LMC. In particular, we find only a small range of the metal abundance in the outer disk fields, whereas an average range of Δ[Fe/H] = +0.3 ± 0.1 dex appears in the inner disk fields. Finally, the cluster and field AMRs show a satisfactory match only for the last 3 Gyr, while for the oldest ages (>11 Gyr), the cluster AMR is a remarkable lower envelope to the field AMR. Such a difference may be due to the very rapid early chemical evolution and lack of observed field stars in this regime, whereas the globular clusters are easily studied. This large difference is not easy to explain as coming from stripped ancient Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters, although the field SMC AMR is on average ∼0.4 dex more metal-poor at all ages than that of the LMC but otherwise very similar.

  10. THE AGE-METALLICITY RELATIONSHIP OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD FIELD STAR POPULATION FROM WIDE-FIELD WASHINGTON PHOTOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piatti, Andres E. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Geisler, Doug, E-mail: andres@iafe.uba.ar [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2013-01-01

    We analyze age and metallicity estimates for an unprecedented database of some 5.5 million stars distributed throughout the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) main body, obtained from CCD Washington CT{sub 1} photometry, reported on in Piatti et al. We produce a comprehensive field star age-metallicity relationship (AMR) from the earliest epoch until {approx}1 Gyr ago. This AMR reveals that the LMC has not evolved chemically as either a closed-box or bursting system, exclusively, but as a combination of both scenarios that have varied in relative strength over the lifetime of the galaxy, although the bursting model falls closer to the data in general. Furthermore, while old and metal-poor field stars have been preferentially formed in the outer disk, younger and more metal-rich stars have mostly been formed in the inner disk, confirming an outside-in formation. We provide evidence for the formation of stars between 5 and 12 Gyr, during the cluster age gap, although chemical enrichment during this period was minimal. We find no significant metallicity gradient in the LMC. We also find that the range in the metallicity of an LMC field has varied during the lifetime of the LMC. In particular, we find only a small range of the metal abundance in the outer disk fields, whereas an average range of {Delta}[Fe/H] = +0.3 {+-} 0.1 dex appears in the inner disk fields. Finally, the cluster and field AMRs show a satisfactory match only for the last 3 Gyr, while for the oldest ages (>11 Gyr), the cluster AMR is a remarkable lower envelope to the field AMR. Such a difference may be due to the very rapid early chemical evolution and lack of observed field stars in this regime, whereas the globular clusters are easily studied. This large difference is not easy to explain as coming from stripped ancient Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters, although the field SMC AMR is on average {approx}0.4 dex more metal-poor at all ages than that of the LMC but otherwise very similar.

  11. Ring nebulae associated with Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Y.-H.

    1982-01-01

    Using strict selection criteria, the author and colleagues have searched for ring nebulae associated with Wolf-Rayet stars in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. 15 WR ring nebulae are identified in the Galaxy, 9 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and none in the small Magellanic Cloud. The morphology and kinematics of these 24 nebulae have subsequently been observed to study their nature. These nebulae and their references are listed and a correlation between spectral and nebular types is presented. (Auth.)

  12. Observations of southern Wolf-Rayet stars. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemela, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    The Wolf-Rayet star HD 90657 is found to be a spectroscopic binary with a WN5+O6 spectrum and a period of 6.456 days. Preliminary orbital elements show an elliptic orbit and a mass ratio Msub(WR)/Msub(O) approximately 0.5. Evidence is presented for the Wolf-Rayet atmosphere being accelerated outwards and not being spherically symmetric. (Auth.)

  13. Discovery of a new Wolf-Rayet star and a candidate star cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Chené, A.-N.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Schnurr, O.; Shenar, T.; Sander, A.; Hainich, R.; Langer, N.; Hamann, W.-R.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.

    2014-08-01

    We report the first-ever discovery of a Wolf-Rayet (WR) star in the Large Magellanic Cloud via detection of a circular shell with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Follow-up observations with Gemini-South resolved the central star of the shell into two components separated from each other by ≈2 arcsec (or ≈0.5 pc in projection). One of these components turns out to be a WN3 star with H and He lines both in emission and absorption (we named it BAT99 3a using the numbering system based on extending the Breysacher et al. catalogue). Spectroscopy of the second component showed that it is a B0 V star. Subsequent spectroscopic observations of BAT99 3a with the du Pont 2.5-m telescope and the Southern African Large Telescope revealed that it is a close, eccentric binary system, and that the absorption lines are associated with an O companion star. We analysed the spectrum of the binary system using the non-LTE Potsdam WR (POWR) code, confirming that the WR component is a very hot (≈90 kK) WN star. For this star, we derived a luminosity of log L/ L⊙ = 5.45 and a mass-loss rate of 10- 5.8 M⊙ yr- 1, and found that the stellar wind composition is dominated by helium with 20 per cent of hydrogen. Spectroscopy of the shell revealed an He III region centred on BAT99 3a and having the same angular radius (≈15 arcsec) as the shell. We thereby add a new example to a rare class of high-excitation nebulae photoionized by WR stars. Analysis of the nebular spectrum showed that the shell is composed of unprocessed material, implying that the shell was swept-up from the local interstellar medium. We discuss the physical relationship between the newly identified massive stars and their possible membership of a previously unrecognized star cluster.

  14. Effect of the radioprotector WR 2721 on the response of metastatic Lewis lung carcinoma colonies to alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wist, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    WR 2721 protected ''artificial'' lung metastases of Lewis lung carcinoma against the cytotoxic effects of cyclophosphamide and melphalan. When mice were pretreated with WR 2721 30 min before exposure to the alkylating agents a significant increase in the number of lung metastases could be observed. This protection of micrometastases had a significant impact on survival in the case of cyclophosphamide treatment, but not in the case of melphalan treatment. The degree of protection at a standard dose of WR 2721 was dose dependent. (orig.)

  15. SURVEYING THE AGENTS OF GALAXY EVOLUTION IN THE TIDALLY STRIPPED, LOW METALLICITY SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD (SAGE-SMC). II. COOL EVOLVED STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D.; Shiao, Bernie; Srinivasan, Sundar; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; McDonald, Iain; Kemper, F.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Misselt, Karl; Babler, Brian; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Whitney, Barbara; Hora, Joe; Robitaille, Thomas; Indebetouw, Remy; Sewilo, Marta

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the infrared (IR) properties of cool, evolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), including the red giant branch (RGB) stars and the dust-producing red supergiant (RSG) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars using observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy program entitled 'Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally Stripped, Low Metallicity SMC', or SAGE-SMC. The survey includes, for the first time, full spatial coverage of the SMC bar, wing, and tail regions at IR wavelengths (3.6-160 μm). We identify evolved stars using a combination of near-IR and mid-IR photometry and point out a new feature in the mid-IR color-magnitude diagram that may be due to particularly dusty O-rich AGB stars. We find that the RSG and AGB stars each contribute ∼20% of the global SMC flux (extended + point-source) at 3.6 μm, which emphasizes the importance of both stellar types to the integrated flux of distant metal-poor galaxies. The equivalent SAGE survey of the higher-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-LMC) allows us to explore the influence of metallicity on dust production. We find that the SMC RSG stars are less likely to produce a large amount of dust (as indicated by the [3.6] - [8] color). There is a higher fraction of carbon-rich stars in the SMC, and these stars appear to reach colors as red as their LMC counterparts, indicating that C-rich dust forms efficiently in both galaxies. A preliminary estimate of the dust production in AGB and RSG stars reveals that the extreme C-rich AGB stars dominate the dust input in both galaxies, and that the O-rich stars may play a larger role in the LMC than in the SMC.

  16. A Survey for hot Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae I. Methods and First Results

    OpenAIRE

    Kanarek, Graham C.; Shara, Michael M.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of initial spectrographic followup with the Very Large Telescope (UT3, Melipal) for $K_s \\ge 14$ Galactic plane CIV emission-line candidates in the near-infrared (NIR). These 7 faint stars all display prominent HeI and CIV emission lines characteristic of a carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet star. They have NIR colours which are much too blue to be those of distant, classical WR stars. The magnitudes and colours are compatible with those expected for central stars of planetary nebu...

  17. Observational tests for the evolution of massive stars in nearby galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitherer, C.

    1990-01-01

    Population synthesis calculations applicable to the massive stellar content in nearby galaxies are presented. Stellar evolution calculations are combined with mass loss, model atmospheres with line blanketing, and a spectral type calibration to compute observable parameters of massive stars as a function of the star formation rate and the initial mass function slope. The number of O stars of given spectral types, the number of W-R stars, supernova rates, and fluxes of ionizing photons are predicted. Important constraints for the theories of stellar atmospheres and stellar evolution can be derived from observations if stellar number counts and ionizing flux data are available. 94 refs

  18. Protection against the clastogenic effect of CIS-PLATINUM by WR-2721, ATP and Vitamin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupova, I.; Yagova, A.

    1993-01-01

    The mutagenic effect of antineoplastic drug Cis-Platinum has been assessed by the frequency of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (PE) in the mouse bone marrow at time intervals of 24, 48 and 73 h. The maximal clastogenic effect of 2 mg/kg of Cis-Platinum has been found at 24 h interval after treatment (3.6%). The protection against mutagenic activity of Cis-Platinum has been studied by pretreatment of the mice with the thiophosphate compound WR-2721, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Vitamin C alone or in combinations at the time of maximal response. The radioprotector WR-2721 exerts a high anti-mutagenic activity when applied prior to Cis-Platinum (2.2%; p 0.05). (author)

  19. Radioprotection of mouse skin by WR-2721: the critical influence of oxygen tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denekamp, J.; Michael, B.D.; Rojas, A.; Stewart, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    The epidermal clone assay has been used to study the radioprotective effect of WR-2721 on mouse skin under different conditions of oxygenation and under anoxia. The skin has shown a progressive decrease in sensitivity as the inspired gas has changed from 100% oxygen towards 0% oxygen. Compared with mice breathning 100% oxygen, those breathing air are partially protected. The inspired oxygen concentration to give half the full oxygen effect is 10-12%. The radioprotecton observed with 400 mg/kg WR-2721 is markedly dependent on the ambient oxygen concentration. The protection factor is 1.1 or less in mice breathing 5%, 1% or 0% oxygen. Protection is maximal (1.95) in air and in 50% oxygen and diminishes to 1.6 at higher oxygen tensions

  20. Survival of bone marrow-engrafted mice subsequent to protection from lethal radiation by WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnamon, K.E.; Ketterling, L.L.; Ledney, G.D.; Lorenz, G.B.; Mioduszewski, R.J.; Stampfli, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    For the first time data are presented for animals treated with bone marrow cells after lethal radiation exposure while protected with WR 2721 (the single radioprotective chemical compound with the highest known dose reduction factor). The LD 50 30 (lethal dose to 50% in 30 days) for mice exposed to whole-body 60 Co radiation was elevated from 824 +- 8 rad in unprotected and untreated mice to (a) 1181 +- 33 rad in animals which received syngeneic bone marrow cells after exposure; (b) 1342 +- 27 rad in animals which received WR 2721 before radiation exposure; and (c) 1608 +- 33 rad in animals receiving both the radioprotective agent before exposure and bone marrow engraftment after exposure

  1. Mass-loss rates of cool stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrien Els Decin, Leen

    2015-08-01

    Over much of the initial mass function, stars lose a significant fraction of their mass through a stellar wind during the late stages of their evolution when being a (super)giant star. As of today, we can not yet predict the mass-loss rate during the (super)giant phase for a given star with specific stellar parameters from first principles. This uncertainty directly impacts the accuracy of current stellar evolution and population synthesis models that predict the enrichment of the interstellar medium by these stellar winds. Efforts to establish the link between the initial physical and chemical conditions at stellar birth and the mass-loss rate during the (super)giant phase have proceeded on two separate tracks: (1) more detailed studies of the chemical and morpho-kinematical structure of the stellar winds of (super)giant stars in our own Milky Way by virtue of the proximity, and (2) large scale and statistical studies of a (large) sample of stars in other galaxies (such as the LMC and SMC) and globular clusters eliminating the uncertainty on the distance estimate and providing insight into the dependence of the mass-loss rate on the metallicity. In this review, I will present recent results of both tracks, will show how recent measurements confirm (some) theoretical predictions, but also how results from the first track admonish of common misconceptions inherent in the often more simplified analysis used to analyse the large samples from track 2.

  2. Evolution of massive close binaries and formation of neutron stars and black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massevitch, A.G.; Tutukov, A.V.; Yungelson, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    Main results of computations of evolution for massive close binaries (10 M(Sun)+9.4 M(Sun), 16 M(Sun)+15 M(Sun), 32 M(Sun)+30 M(Sun), 64 M(Sun)+60 M(Sun)) up to oxygen exhaustion in the core are described. Mass exchange starting in core hydrogen, shell hydrogen and core helium burning stages was studied. Computations were performed assuming both the Ledoux and Schwarzschild stability criteria for semiconvection. The influence of UFI-neutrino emission on evolution of close binaries was investigated. The results obtained allow to outline the following evolutionary chain: two detached Main-Sequence stars - mass exchange - Wolf-Rayet star or blue supergiant plus main sequence star - explosion of the initially more massive star appearing as a supernova event - collapsed or neutron star plus Main-Sequence star, that may be observed as a 'runaway star' - mass exchange leading to X-rays emission - collapsed or neutron star plus WR-star or blue supergiant - second explosion of supernova that preferentially disrupts the system and gives birth to two single high spatial velocity pulsars. Numerical estimates concerning the number and properties of WR-stars, pulsars and X-ray sources are presented. The results are in favour of the existence of UFI-neutrino and of the Ledoux criterion for describing semiconvection. Properties of several well-known X-ray sources and the binary pulsar are discussed on base of evolutionary chain of close binaries. (Auth.)

  3. Dose and time relationships of the radioprotector WR-2721 on locomotor activity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landauer, M.R.; Davis, H.D.; Dominitz, J.A.; Weiss, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on locomotor activity were evaluated in CD2F1 male mice. Separate groups of animals (N = 10/group) received an IP injection of vehicle, 25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg of WR-2721 immediately before testing. Horizontal and vertical activity were measured using a Digiscan automated animal activity monitor. The latency to onset and duration of action of each dose of the radioprotector were recorded. For both behavioral measures, a significant reduction was observed in activity at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg. A dose of 200 mg/kg had a 12- to 14-min latency to onset and significantly reduced behavioral activity for 3 hr. Mice injected with 400 mg/kg exhibited locomotor deficits within 8-10 min and were affected for up to 9 hr. The ED50 for horizontal and vertical activities at 1 hr postinjection were determined to be 271 and 105 mg/kg, respectively. The results demonstrate that significant reductions in locomotor activity are exhibited at doses of 200 mg/kg or more and that vertical activity was more sensitive to the disruptive effects of WR-2721 than was horizontal activity

  4. Enhancement of protective action of radioprotector; Mogucnosti potenciranja zastitnog dejstva radioprotektora WR-2721

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobric, S; Milovanovic, S [Vojnotehnicki Institut, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1996-12-31

    The efficacy of radioprotector WR-2721 (300 mg/kg ip, 20 min before irradiation), alone or in combination with an extract of Ginkgo biloba (Tebonin{sup R}) (17.5 mg/kg ip, 20 min before, and then 1 hr and 24 hr after irradiation), an extract of thymus (Thymolip{sup R}) (10 mg/kg sc, 24 hr before and 15 min after irradiation), herbal mitogen agrostemin (0.1 mg/kg ip. 24 before and immediately after irradiation) and calcium antagonist verapamil (1 mg/kg ip, immediately before irradiation), was studied in adult male Wistar rats irradiated by 9 Gy and 12 Gy of X-rays. It was established that above mentioned compounds, except wr-2721, failed to protect irradiated animals. Given in combination with WR-2721 only agrostemin and verapamil enhanced the efficacy of the protector. The combination with verapamil was more effective providing protection even in supralethal irradiated rats. (author) 7 refs. 2 tabs.

  5. LEW.1WR1 RATS DEVELOP AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES SPONTANEOUSLY AND IN RESPONSE TO ENVIRONMENTAL PERTURBATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordes, John P.; Leif, Jean H.; Woda, Bruce A.; Flanagan, Joan F.; Greiner, Dale L.; Kislauskis, Edward H.; Tirabassi, Rebecca S.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new rat model of autoimmune diabetes that arose in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) congenic LEW rat. Spontaneous diabetes in LEW.1WR1 rats (RT1u/u/a) occurs with a cumulative frequency of ∼2% at a median age of 59 days. The disease is characterized by hyperglycemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and polyuria. Both sexes are affected, and islets of acutely diabetic rats are devoid of beta cells whereas alpha and delta cell populations are spared. The peripheral lymphoid phenotype is normal, including the fraction of ART2+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). We tested the hypothesis that the expression of diabetes would be increased by immunological perturbation of innate or adaptive immunity. Treatment of young rats with depleting anti-ART2.1 mAb increased the frequency of diabetes to 50%. Treatment with the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid increased the frequency of diabetes to 100%. All diabetic rats exhibited end-stage islets. The LEW.1WR1 rat is also susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis but is free of spontaneous thyroiditis. The LEW.1WR1 rat provides a new model for studying autoimmune diabetes and arthritis in an animal with a genetic predisposition to both disorders that can be amplified by environmental perturbation. PMID:16123363

  6. Extreme isolation of WN3/O3 stars and implications for their evolutionary origin as the elusive stripped binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan; Götberg, Ylva; de Mink, Selma E.

    2018-03-01

    Recent surveys of the Magellanic Clouds have revealed a subtype of Wolf-Rayet (WR) star with peculiar properties. WN3/O3 spectra exhibit both WR-like emission and O3 V-like absorption - but at lower luminosity than O3 V or WN stars. We examine the projected spatial distribution of WN3/O3 stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud as compared to O-type stars. Surprisingly, WN3/O3 stars are among the most isolated of all classes of massive stars; they have a distribution similar to red supergiants dominated by initial masses of 10-15 M⊙, and are far more dispersed than classical WR stars or luminous blue variables. Their lack of association with clusters of O-type stars suggests strongly that WN3/O3 stars are not the descendants of single massive stars (30 M⊙ or above). Instead, they are likely products of interacting binaries at lower initial mass (10-18 M⊙). Comparison with binary models suggests a probable origin with primaries in this mass range that were stripped of their H envelopes through non-conservative mass transfer by a low-mass secondary. We show that model spectra and positions on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for binary-stripped stars are consistent with WN3/O3 stars. Monitoring radial velocities with high-resolution spectra can test for low-mass companions or runaway velocities. With lower initial mass and environments that avoid very massive stars, the WN3/O3 stars fit expectations for progenitors of Type Ib and possibly Type Ibn supernovae.

  7. Microlensing of unresolved stars as a brown dwarf detection method

    CERN Document Server

    Bouquet, Alain; Melchior, Anne-Laure; Giraud-Heraud, Yannick; Baillon, Paul

    1993-01-01

    We describe a project of brown dwarf detection in the dark halo of a galaxy using the microlensing effect. We argue that monitoring pixels instead of stars could provide an enhancement in the number of detectable events. We estimate the detection efficiency with a Monte-Carlo simulation. We expect a ten-fold increase with respect to current experiments. To assess the feasibility of this method we have determined the photometric precision of a pixel by comparing several pictures of a same field in the LMC. To be published in the Proceeding of the workshop 'The dark side of the universe...', Roma, Juin 1993,

  8. Multifrequency radio observations of a SNR in the LMC: The case of SNR J0527-6549 (DEM l204

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozzetto L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed study and results of new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA observations of supernova remnant SNR J0527-6549. This Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC object follows a typical supernova remnant (SNR horseshoe morphology with a diameter of D=(66×58±1 pc which is among the largest SNRs in the LMC. Its relatively large size indicates older age while a steeper than expected radio spectral index of α=-0.92±0.11 is more typical of younger and energetic SNRs. Also, we report detections of regions with a high order of polarization at a peak value of ~54%±17% at 6 cm.

  9. ON THE LAUNCHING AND STRUCTURE OF RADIATIVELY DRIVEN WINDS IN WOLF–RAYET STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D., E-mail: ro@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2016-04-20

    Hydrostatic models of Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars typically contain low-density outer envelopes that inflate the stellar radii by a factor of several and are capped by a denser shell of gas. Inflated envelopes and density inversions are hallmarks of envelopes that become super-Eddington as they cross the iron-group opacity peak, but these features disappear when mass loss is sufficiently rapid. We re-examine the structures of steady, spherically symmetric wind solutions that cross a sonic point at high optical depth, identifying the physical mechanism through which the outflow affects the stellar structure, and provide an improved analytical estimate for the critical mass-loss rate above which extended structures are erased. Weak-flow solutions below this limit resemble hydrostatic stars even in supersonic zones; however, we infer that these fail to successfully launch optically thick winds. WR envelopes will therefore likely correspond to the strong, compact solutions. We also find that wind solutions with negligible gas pressure are stably stratified at and below the sonic point. This implies that convection is not the source of variability in WR stars, as has been suggested; however, acoustic instabilities provide an alternative explanation. Our solutions are limited to high optical depths by our neglect of Doppler enhancements to the opacity, and do not account for acoustic instabilities at high Eddington factors; yet, they do provide useful insights into WR stellar structures.

  10. Fluorine Abundances of AGB Stars in Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, A.; Lebzelter, T.; Aringer, B.; Hinkle, K. H.; Nowotny, W.

    2015-08-01

    We have measured the abundance of fluorine, [F/Fe], in a number of AGB stars in stellar clusters have correlated the results with their C/O ratios. This allows us to investigate the change in the fluorine abundance along the evolution on the giant branch. The target list includes primarily O-rich stars in three LMC globular clusters - NGC 1806, NGC 1846 and NGC 1978 - as well as Rup 106 and 47 Tuc in our Galaxy. The observational data were obtained with the PHOENIX spectrograph, and the COMA code was used for modelling the synthetic spectra. Within individual clusters, we find consistent [F/Fe] values at similar C/O for most of our target stars.

  11. Detection of variable VHE γ-ray emission from the extra-galactic γ-ray binary LMC P3

    Science.gov (United States)

    HESS Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Armand, C.; Arrieta, M.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Żywucka, N.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Recently, the high-energy (HE, 0.1-100 GeV) γ-ray emission from the object LMC P3 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) has been discovered to be modulated with a 10.3-day period, making it the first extra-galactic γ-ray binary. Aim. This work aims at the detection of very-high-energy (VHE, >100 GeV) γ-ray emission and the search for modulation of the VHE signal with the orbital period of the binary system. Methods: LMC P3 has been observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.); the acceptance-corrected exposure time is 100 h. The data set has been folded with the known orbital period of the system in order to test for variability of the emission. Results: VHE γ-ray emission is detected with a statistical significance of 6.4 σ. The data clearly show variability which is phase-locked to the orbital period of the system. Periodicity cannot be deduced from the H.E.S.S. data set alone. The orbit-averaged luminosity in the 1-10 TeV energy range is (1.4 ± 0.2) × 1035 erg s-1. A luminosity of (5 ± 1) × 1035 erg s-1 is reached during 20% of the orbit. HE and VHE γ-ray emissions are anti-correlated. LMC P3 is the most luminous γ-ray binary known so far.

  12. Stars and Star Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  13. Gamma-ray burst progenitors and the population of rotating Wolf-Rayet stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jorick S

    2013-06-13

    In our quest for gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitors, it is relevant to consider the progenitor evolution of normal supernovae (SNe). This is largely dominated by mass loss. We discuss the mass-loss rate for very massive stars up to 300M⊙. These objects are in close proximity to the Eddington Γ limit. We describe the new concept of the transitional mass-loss rate, enabling us to calibrate wind mass loss. This allows us to consider the occurrence of pair-instability SNe in the local Universe. We also discuss luminous blue variables and their link to luminous SNe. Finally, we address the polarization properties of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, measuring their wind asphericities. We argue to have found a group of rotating WR stars that fulfil the required criteria to make long-duration GRBs.

  14. Mass and p-factor of the Type II Cepheid OGLE-LMC-T2CEP-098 in a Binary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilecki, Bogumił; Gieren, Wolfgang; Smolec, Radosław; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Thompson, Ian B.; Anderson, Richard I.; Bono, Giuseppe; Soszyński, Igor; Kervella, Pierre; Nardetto, Nicolas; Taormina, Mónica; Stȩpień, Kazimierz; Wielgórski, Piotr

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of a study of the type II Cepheid (P puls = 4.974 days) in the eclipsing binary system OGLE-LMC-T2CEP-098 (P orb = 397.2 days). The Cepheid belongs to the peculiar W Vir group, for which the evolutionary status is virtually unknown. It is the first single-lined system with a pulsating component analyzed using the method developed by Pilecki et al. We show that the presence of a pulsator makes it possible to derive accurate physical parameters of the stars even if radial velocities can be measured for only one of the components. We have used four different methods to limit and estimate the physical parameters, eventually obtaining precise results by combining pulsation theory with the spectroscopic and photometric solutions. The Cepheid radius, mass, and temperature are 25.3+/- 0.2 {R}⊙ , 1.51+/- 0.09 {M}⊙ , and 5300+/- 100 {{K}}, respectively, while its companion has a similar size (26.3 {R}⊙ ), but is more massive (6.8 {M}⊙ ) and hotter (9500 K). Our best estimate for the p-factor of the Cepheid is 1.30+/- 0.03. The mass, position on the period-luminosity diagram, and pulsation amplitude indicate that the pulsating component is very similar to the Anomalous Cepheids, although it has a much longer period and is redder in color. The very unusual combination of the components suggest that the system has passed through a mass-transfer phase in its evolution. More complicated internal structure would then explain its peculiarity. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Clay Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  15. Lines profile variations and binarity in Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisiacchi, G.F.; Firmani, C.; Lara, E. de

    1982-01-01

    Recently, HD50896, a WN5 star, for a long time considered as isolated, has been demonstrated to be a binary. This star shows very small displacement of the lines due to orbital motion and no evidence of the secondary spectrum. Is HD50896 a rare system in which the profile variations are peculiarly strong and easy to be detected, or are there many of these undetected binaries for which the analysis of the profile variation may be a powerful method to determine the periodicity. With this problem in mind the authors have observed a sample of 17 WR stars during a week to analyze both profile and radial velocity variations. This sample includes all the WR stars with Msub(v) 0 0 except for five stars that are binaries with determined period. All the spectra have been taken with a dispersion of 1.1 A channel -1 using a SIT television camera and a low dispersion spectrograph attached to the 2-meter telescope of the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in San Pedro Martir, Baja California (Mexico). (Auth.)

  16. OGLE Collection of Star Clusters. New Objects in the Magellanic Bridge and the Outskirts of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Sitek, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Udalski, A.; Skowron, D. M.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Skowron, J.; Karczmarek, P.; Cieślar, M.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Poleski, R.

    2018-01-01

    The Magellanic System (MS) encompasses the nearest neighbors of the Milky Way, the Large (LMC) and Small (SMC) Magellanic Clouds, and the Magellanic Bridge (MBR). This system contains a diverse sample of star clusters. Their parameters, such as the spatial distribution, chemical composition and age distribution yield important information about the formation scenario of the whole Magellanic System. Using deep photometric maps compiled in the fourth phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing E...

  17. Structure of the Large Magellanic Cloud from near infrared magnitudes of red clump stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, S.; Subramaniam, A.

    2013-04-01

    Context. The structural parameters of the disk of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) are estimated. Aims: We used the JH photometric data of red clump (RC) stars from the Magellanic Cloud Point Source Catalog (MCPSC) obtained from the InfraRed Survey Facility (IRSF) to estimate the structural parameters of the LMC disk, such as the inclination, i, and the position angle of the line of nodes (PAlon), φ. Methods: The observed LMC region is divided into several sub-regions, and stars in each region are cross-identified with the optically identified RC stars to obtain the near infrared magnitudes. The peak values of H magnitude and (J - H) colour of the observed RC distribution are obtained by fitting a profile to the distributions and by taking the average value of magnitude and colour of the RC stars in the bin with largest number. Then the dereddened peak H0 magnitude of the RC stars in each sub-region is obtained from the peak values of H magnitude and (J - H) colour of the observed RC distribution. The right ascension (RA), declination (Dec), and relative distance from the centre of each sub-region are converted into x,y, and z Cartesian coordinates. A weighted least square plane fitting method is applied to this x,y,z data to estimate the structural parameters of the LMC disk. Results: An intrinsic (J - H)0 colour of 0.40 ± 0.03 mag in the Simultaneous three-colour InfraRed Imager for Unbiased Survey (SIRIUS) IRSF filter system is estimated for the RC stars in the LMC and a reddening map based on (J - H) colour of the RC stars is presented. When the peaks of the RC distribution were identified by averaging, an inclination of 25°.7 ± 1°.6 and a PAlon = 141°.5 ± 4°.5 were obtained. We estimate a distance modulus, μ = 18.47 ± 0.1 mag to the LMC. Extra-planar features which are both in front and behind the fitted plane are identified. They match with the optically identified extra-planar features. The bar of the LMC is found to be part of the disk within 500

  18. Inhibition of topoisomerase IIα activity in CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector and antimutagenic agent when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure to Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells at a concentration of 4 mM. Under these exposure conditions, topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and associated protein contents were measured in the K1 cell line using the DNA relaxation assay, the P4 unknotting assay, and immunoblotting, respectively. WR-1065 was ineffective in modifying topo I activity, but it did reduce topo IIa activity by an average of 50 percent. The magnitude of topo IIa protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. Cell cycle effects were monitored by the method of flow cytometry. Exposure of cells to 4 mM WR-1065 for a period of up to 6 h resulted in a buildup of cells in the G2 compartment. However, in contrast to topo II inhibitors used in chemotherapy, WR-1065 is an effective radioprotector agent capable of protecting against both radiation-induced cell lethality and mutagenesis. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds such as WR-1065 has been their ability to affect endogenous enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with such a proposed mechanism and demonstrate in particular a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on type II topoisomerase, which is involved in DNA synthesis

  19. Inhibition of topoisomerase II{alpha} activity in CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Constantinou, A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Specialized Cancer Center; Shigematsu, N.; Murley, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector and antimutagenic agent when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure to Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells at a concentration of 4 mM. Under these exposure conditions, topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and associated protein contents were measured in the K1 cell line using the DNA relaxation assay, the P4 unknotting assay, and immunoblotting, respectively. WR-1065 was ineffective in modifying topo I activity, but it did reduce topo IIa activity by an average of 50 percent. The magnitude of topo IIa protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. Cell cycle effects were monitored by the method of flow cytometry. Exposure of cells to 4 mM WR-1065 for a period of up to 6 h resulted in a buildup of cells in the G2 compartment. However, in contrast to topo II inhibitors used in chemotherapy, WR-1065 is an effective radioprotector agent capable of protecting against both radiation-induced cell lethality and mutagenesis. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds such as WR-1065 has been their ability to affect endogenous enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with such a proposed mechanism and demonstrate in particular a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on type II topoisomerase, which is involved in DNA synthesis.

  20. The variable stars of NGC 1866

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.L.; Cote, P.; Fischer, P.; Mateo, M.; Madore, B.F.

    1991-01-01

    A search has been conducted for new variables in the LMC cluster NGC 1866 using new multiepoch CCD photometry. Eight previously unknown Cepheid variables, most near the cluster core, are found. Of the new variables reported by Storm et al. (188), only six of 10 appear to be Cepheids and one of these is not a member. Periods and mean magnitudes and colors for sufficiently uncrowded variables are reported, as is one red giant variable of long period and one Cepheid which is a single-lined spectroscopic binary with a velocity semiamplitude greater than or equal to 10.5 km/s. The variation of light-curve amplitude with position in the instability strip is reported along with an apparently nonvariable star, which is a radial velocity member, in the strip. A true distance modulus of 18.57 + or - 0.01 mag is obtained for the cluster. 36 refs

  1. Toxicity studies on the radioprotective agent WR-2721 in CDF1 mice and beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, T.E.; Glaza, S.M.; Dickie, B.C.; Weltman, R.H.; Greenspun, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    WR-2721, S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid, is used extensively to protect normal cells during the irradiation of neoplastic cells. Dose levels for human radiotherapy are based on results obtained from laboratory animal lethality and toxicity studies. WR-2721 was administered intravenously to CDF1 mice and beagle dogs. Single dose lethality studies in mice showed the average 1/10 of the lethal dose, the median lethal dose and 9/10 the lethal dose to be 508 (1523 mg/m2), 589 (1766 mg/m2), and 682 mg/kg (2047 mg/m2), respectively. The lethal dose for female mice was lower than that for males. The 1/10 lethal dose in mice was slightly toxic to dogs; 1/10 of that dose was nontoxic. The lethal dose for dogs (6000 mg/m2) was higher than that for mice (2000 mg/m2). Clinical signs of toxicosis in the single-dose mouse toxicity study were evident in the 1st week following treatment and declined during the recovery period; signs of toxicosis were transient in dogs. Acute drug-induced pathologic changes included elevated BUN and SGOT levels, lymphoid necrosis, and renal tubular degeneration in mice. These changes were evident in the 1st week following treatment, but had dissipated by study termination. Generalized vascular changes (congestion, hemorrhage, and edema) and renal tubular degeneration occurred in treated dogs that had died or were killed moribund 7 days postinjection. These findings indicate sex-dependent and interspecies variation in the toxicity of WR-2721 with acute, but reversible, pathologic changes

  2. A dearth of OH/IR stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Steven R.; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Gómez, José F.; Green, James A.; Zijlstra, Albert A.; Nanni, Ambra; Imai, Hiroshi; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Oliveira, Joana M.

    2018-01-01

    We present the results of targeted observations and a survey of 1612-, 1665- and 1667-MHz circumstellar OH maser emission from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and red supergiants (RSGs) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), using the Parkes and Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) radio telescopes. No clear OH maser emission has been detected in any of our observations targeting luminous, long-period, large-amplitude variable stars, which have been confirmed spectroscopically and photometrically to be mid- to late-M spectral type. These observations have probed 3-4 times deeper than any OH maser survey in the SMC. Using a bootstrapping method with Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Galactic OH/IR star samples and our SMC observation upper limits, we have calculated the likelihood of not detecting maser emission in any of the two sources considered to be the top maser candidates to be less than 0.05 per cent, assuming a similar pumping mechanism as the LMC and Galactic OH/IR sources. We have performed a population comparison of the Magellanic Clouds and used Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry to confirm that we have observed all high luminosity SMC sources that are expected to exhibit maser emission. We suspect that, compared to the OH/IR stars in the Galaxy and LMC, the reduction in metallicity may curtail the dusty wind phase at the end of the evolution of the most massive cool stars. We also suspect that the conditions in the circumstellar envelope change beyond a simple scaling of abundances and wind speed with metallicity.

  3. From gas to stars in energetic environments: dense gas clumps in the 30 Doradus region within the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Crystal N.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jürgen; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony; Looney, Leslie; Henkel, Christian; Chen, Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Muller, Erik; Pineda, Jorge L.; Seale, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We present parsec-scale interferometric maps of HCN(1-0) and HCO + (1-0) emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO + emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H 2 O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). YSOs seem to continue along the same direction of the filament toward the massive compact star cluster R136 in the southwest. We present detailed comparisons of clump properties (masses, linewidths, and sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, and N44). Our analysis shows that the 30Dor-10 clumps have similar masses but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO + (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30 Doradus region.

  4. Investigations with beagles about toxicity and radioprotective effect of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Sedlmeier, H.; Wustrow, T.; Messerschmidt, O.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl-thiophosphate) was examined in 25 beagles. The study showed that the toxicity of the substance increases as the dose gets higher. Between the doses 200 and 250 mg/kg of body weight, the increase of toxicity was significantly greater than could be expected on the basis of the dose difference. Until a dose of 200 mg/kg, the authors found no side effects which would have disturbed vital functions, but higher doses led to marked symptoms of intoxication. (orig.) [de

  5. THE MASS-LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. IV. CONSTRUCTION AND VALIDATION OF A GRID OF MODELS FOR OXYGEN-RICH AGB STARS, RED SUPERGIANTS, AND EXTREME AGB STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Meixner, M.; Srinivasan, S.

    2011-01-01

    To measure the mass loss from dusty oxygen-rich (O-rich) evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we have constructed a grid of models of spherically symmetric dust shells around stars with constant mass-loss rates using 2Dust. These models will constitute the O-rich model part of the 'Grid of Red supergiant and Asymptotic giant branch star ModelS' (GRAMS). This model grid explores four parameters-stellar effective temperature from 2100 K to 4700 K; luminosity from 10 3 to 10 6 L sun ; dust shell inner radii of 3, 7, 11, and 15 R star ; and 10.0 μm optical depth from 10 -4 to 26. From an initial grid of ∼1200 2Dust models, we create a larger grid of ∼69,000 models by scaling to cover the luminosity range required by the data. These models are available online to the public. The matching in color-magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams to observed O-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) candidate stars from the SAGE and SAGE-Spec LMC samples and a small sample of OH/IR stars is generally very good. The extreme AGB star candidates from SAGE are more consistent with carbon-rich (C-rich) than O-rich dust composition. Our model grid suggests lower limits to the mid-infrared colors of the dustiest AGB stars for which the chemistry could be O-rich. Finally, the fitting of GRAMS models to spectral energy distributions of sources fit by other studies provides additional verification of our grid and anticipates future, more expansive efforts.

  6. Wolf-Rayet stars in the central region of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Graefener, Goetz; Oskinova, Lidia; Zinnecker, Hans

    2004-09-01

    We propose to take mid-IR spectra of two Wolf-Rayet stars in the inner part of our Galaxy, within 30pc projected distance from the central Black Hole. Massive stars dominate the central galactic region by their mass-loss and ionizing radiation. A quantitative analysis of this stellar inventory is essential for understanding the energy, momentum and mass budget, for instance with respect to the feeding of the central black hole. Our group developed a highly advanced model code for the expanding atmospheres of WR stars. Recently we extended the spectrum synthesis to IR wavelengths. These models will be applied for the analysis of the Spitzer IRS data. The proposed mid-IR observations will provide a wide spectral range with many lines which are needed to determine the stellar parameters, such as stellar luminosity, effective temperature, mass-loss rate and chemical composition. Near-IR spectra of the program stars are available and will augment the analysis. The capability of our code to reproduce the observed mid-IR spectrum of a WN star has been demonstrated. The two targets we selected are sufficiently isolated, while the Galactic center cluster is too crowded for the size of Spitzer's spectrograph slit. As estimated from the K-band spectra, one of the stars (WR102ka) is of very late subtype (WN9), while the other star (WR102c) has the early subtype WN6. Hence they represent different stages in the evolutionary sequence of massive stars, the late-WN just having entered the Wolf-Rayet phase and the early WN being further evolved. We expect that the parameters of massive stars in the inner galaxy differ from the usual Galactic population. One reason is that higher metallicity should lead to stronger mass-loss, which affects the stellar evolution. The Spitzer IRS, with its high sensitivity, provides a unique opportunity to study representative members of the stellar population in the vicinity of the Galactic center.

  7. Intensive photometry of southern Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balona, L.A.; Egan, J.; Marang, F.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented of an intensive photometric campaign on 17 of the brightest southern Wolf-Rayet stars. We report the detection of multi-periodicity in two stars: HD 50896 and HD 96548. It is likely that these periodicities are not coherent but are manifestations of the quasi-periodic variations seen in a few WR stars. A good example of these variations is given by HD 86161. A new eclipsing binary, HD 92740 has been discovered; other stars show periodic variations which can be explained by phase-dependent scattering of the secondary light as it traverses the Wolf-Rayet wind. An important conclusion of this study is that not a single example was found of short-period variations which can be attributed to pulsation. (author)

  8. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  9. Spectral Confirmation of New Galactic LBV and WN Stars Associated With Mid-IR Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, Guy; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.

    2014-08-01

    Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars represent an extremely rare class and short-lived phase in the lives of very luminous massive stars with high mass loss rates. Extragalactic LBVs are responsible for producing false supernovae (SN), the SN Impostors, and have been directly linked with the progenitors of actual SN, indicating the LBV phase can be a final endpoint for massive star evolution. Yet only a few confirmed LBVs have been identified in the Galaxy. Their stellar evolution is poorly constrained by observations, and the physical reason for their unstable nature, both in terms of moderate spectral and photometric variability of a few magnitudes and the giant eruptions a la η Car that rival SN explosions, remains a mystery. Newly discovered mid-IR shells act as signposts, pointing to the central massive stars (LBV and Wolf-Rayet [WR] stars) that produced them. We have undertaken a spectroscopic survey of possible progenitor stars within these shells and are discovering that many are LBVs and WN-type WR transitional stars. We propose to extend this IR spectral survey to the south to search for new progenitor stars associated with dozens of newly identified shells. This survey should result in a substantial increase of new WRs and candidate LBVs for continued future study. Spectral analysis will yield new insights into the winds and physical properties of these rare and important objects, and lead to a better understanding of the physics driving giant eruptions.

  10. Effects of WR1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced motor imbalance: Possible involvement of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza M; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Khalifeh, Solmaz; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-08-03

    Over production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is postulated to be the main contributor in degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. In this study we investigated the effects of WR1065, a free radical scavenger, on motor imbalance, oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory cytokines in CSF and brain of hemi-parkinsonian rats. Lesion of dopaminergic neurons was done by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine into the central region of the substentia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to induce hemi-parkinsonism and motor imbalance in rats. WR1065 (20, 40 and 80μg/2μl/rat) was administered three days before 6-OHDA administration. After three weeks behavioral study was performed and then brain and CSF samples were collected to assess tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), interlukin (IL-1β), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA). WR1065 pre-treatment in rats before receiving 6-OHDA, improved significantly motor impairment and caused reduction of MDA and inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β levels, while GSH level significantly increased when compared with lesioned rats. Our study indicated that WR1065 could improve 6-OHDA-induced motor imbalance. Furthermore, it decreased lipid peroxidation and inflammatory cytokines and restored the level of GSH up to normal range. We suggest that WR1065 can be proposed as a potential neuroprotective agent in motor impairments of PD. However to prove this hypothesis more clinical trial studies should be done. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypolipidemic action of chrysin on Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in female C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheli Stéfani Zarzecki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone is a flavonoid, natural component of traditional medicinal herbs, present in honey, propolis and many plant extracts. The objective of this study was to investigate the hypolipidemic properties of chrysin on Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in female C57BL/6 mice. Triton WR-1339 was administered intraperitoneally (400 mg/kg to overnight-fasted mice to develop acute hyperlipidemia. Chrysin was administered orally (10 mg/kg 30 min before Triton WR-1339. At 24 h after Triton WR-1339 injection, blood samples were collected to measure plasma lipid levels. The hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, carbonyl content, non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH and ascorbic acid (AA levels, as well as catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD activity were recorded. Chrysin administration significantly decreased total cholesterol levels. In addition, it partially decreased non-high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglycerides levels in plasma of hyperlipidaemic mice. In addition chrysin administration prevented the increase on TBARS levels and prevented the decrease in SOD activity induced by Triton WR-1339. These findings indicated that chrysin was able to decrease plasma lipids concentration and that its antioxidant properties was, at least in part, involved in the hypolipidaemic action of chrysin.

  12. THE DUSTIEST POST-MAIN SEQUENCE STARS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Olivia C.; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sargent, Benjamin A. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Boyer, Martha L. [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sewiło, Marta [The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hony, Sacha [Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie, Universitt Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-10-01

    Using observations from the Herschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) survey of the Magellanic Clouds (MC), we have found 35 evolved stars and stellar end products that are bright in the far-infrared. These 28 (LMC) and 7 (SMC) sources were selected from the 529 evolved star candidates in the HERITAGE far-infrared point source catalogs. Our source identification method is based on spectral confirmation, spectral energy distribution characteristics, careful examination of the multiwavelength images and includes constraints on the luminosity, resulting in a thoroughly vetted list of evolved stars. These sources span a wide range in luminosity and hence initial mass. We found 13 low- to intermediate-mass evolved stars, including asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae, and a symbiotic star. We also identify 10 high mass stars, including 4 of the 15 known B[e] stars in the MC, 3 extreme red supergiants that are highly enshrouded by dust, a Luminous Blue Variable, a Wolf–Rayet star, and two supernova remnants. Further, we report the detection of 9 probable evolved objects which were previously undescribed in the literature. These sources are likely to be among the dustiest evolved objects in the MC. The Herschel emission may either be due to dust produced by the evolved star or it may arise from swept-up interstellar medium material.

  13. Applications of machine-learning algorithms for infrared colour selection of Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Morris, P. W.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Marston, A. P.; Mauerhan, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated and applied machine-learning algorithms for infrared colour selection of Galactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) candidates. Objects taken from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) catalogue of the infrared objects in the Galactic plane can be classified into different stellar populations based on the colours inferred from their broad-band photometric magnitudes [J, H and Ks from 2 Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and the four Spitzer/IRAC bands]. The algorithms tested in this pilot study are variants of the k-nearest neighbours approach, which is ideal for exploratory studies of classification problems where interrelations between variables and classes are complicated. The aims of this study are (1) to provide an automated tool to select reliable WR candidates and potentially other classes of objects, (2) to measure the efficiency of infrared colour selection at performing these tasks and (3) to lay the groundwork for statistically inferring the total number of WR stars in our Galaxy. We report the performance results obtained over a set of known objects and selected candidates for which we have carried out follow-up spectroscopic observations, and confirm the discovery of four new WR stars.

  14. Survival of irradiated mice treated with WR-151327, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate, or ofloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledney, G. D.; Elliott, T. B.; Landauer, M. R.; Vigneulle, R. M.; Henderson, P. L.; Harding, R. A.; Tom, S. P.

    1994-10-01

    Spaceflight personnel need treatment options that would enhance survival from radiation and would not disrupt task performance. Doses of prophylactic or therapeutic agents known to induce significant short-term (30-day) survival with minimal behavioral (locomotor) changes were used for 180-day survival studies. In protection studies, groups of mice were treated with the phosphorothioate WR-151327 (200 mg/kg, 25% of the LD10) or the immunomodulator, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM; 8 mg/kg), before lethal irradiation with reactor-generated fission neutrons and γ-rays (n/γ = 1) or 60Co γ-rays. In therapy studies, groups of mice received either S-TDCM, the antimicrobial ofloxacin, or S-TDCM plus ofloxacin after irradiation. For WR-151327 treated-mice, survival at 180 days for n/γ = 1 and γ-irradiated mice was 90% and 92%, respectively; for S-TDCM (protection), 57% and 78%, respectively; for S-TDCM (therapy), 20% and 25%, respectively; for ofloxacin, 38% and 5%, respectively; for S-TDCM combined with ofloxacin, 30% and 30%, respectively; and for saline, 8% and 5%, respectively. Ofloxacin or combined ofloxacin and S-TDCM increased survival from the gram-negative bacterial sepsis that predominated in n/γ = 1) irradiated mice. The efficacies of the treatments depended on radiation quality, treatment agent and its mode of use, and microflora of the host.

  15. Clinical experiences with a chemical radioprotector in tumor radiotherapy: WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Since cysteine was found to protect lethally irradiated rats, sulfhydryl compounds that provide protection of laboratory animals against lethal doses of ionizing radiations have also been given much attention. The SH compounds have been the most extensively investigated, and β-aminoethylisothiouronium (AET) and cysteamine have been selected as being representative of those drugs that are highly protective. However, clinical application is limited, as the toxicity of these compounds is high. In a series of experiments to reevaluate radioprotective agents with low toxicity, the authors found that 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) and adrenochrome monoguangylhydrazone methanesulfonate (AMM) have a potent radioprotector effect in a dose far below their toxic doses in both mice and humans. Recently, the development of effective thiophosphate derivatives of cysteamine, namely WR-2721 [S-2-(3-amino-propylaminoethyl)phosphorothioate] by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Commands, led to a reevaluation of these compounds and their potential in radiotherapy. Initial investigations indicated that WR-2721 provided a considerable degree of radioprotection to normal tissues. This compound provided excellent protection for normal tissues (DMF = 2-2.5) but little protection for the transplanted tumor. Thus this drug may have a differential protection in vivo and may be useful for improving the therapeutic ratio in cancer radiotherapy. The results of animal and chemical experiments in Japan are summarized herein

  16. Analysis of S-35 labeled WR-2721 and its metabolites in biological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, K.W.; Krohn, K.A.; Grunbaum, Z.; Phillips, R.B.; Mahler, P.A.; Menard, T.W.; Spence, A.M.; Rasey, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Studies with WR-2721 and related compounds have been hindered by the lack of a suitable assay for the drug and its major metabolites. A chromatographic method which requires no derivation for the separation and detection of WR-2721, the free thiol, its symmetrical disulfide and other mixed disulfides has been developed. The procedure involves ion-pairing for separation of ionizable compounds by causing polar molecules to become more lipophilic and hence separable using reverse phase HPLC. Detection is based upon liquid scintillation counting of S-35 incorporated during the synthesis of the parent compound. This method requires no pre-column preparation of samples and, by detecting the S-35 label, eliminates the chance that a coeluting species could interfere with detection, as might occur with post-column derivatization. This analytical technique employing radiotracers can be used to study radioprotective mechanisms by time dependent measurements of the tissue distribution and chemical form of labeled drug. Such chemical information can then be correlated with biological measures of radiation protection

  17. A RAPIDLY EVOLVING REGION IN THE GALACTIC CENTER: WHY S-STARS THERMALIZE AND MORE MASSIVE STARS ARE MISSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xian; Amaro-Seoane, Pau, E-mail: Xian.Chen@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: Pau.Amaro-Seoane@aei.mpg.de [Max Planck Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-05-10

    The existence of ''S-stars'' within a distance of 1'' from Sgr A* contradicts our understanding of star formation, due to Sgr A* 's forbiddingly violent environment. A suggested possibility is that they form far away and were brought in by some fast dynamical process, since they are young. Nonetheless, all conjectured mechanisms either fail to reproduce their eccentricities—without violating their young age—or cannot explain the problem of {sup i}nverse mass segregation{sup :} the fact that lighter stars (the S-stars) are closer to Sgr A* and more massive ones, Wolf-Rayet (WR) and O-stars, are farther out. In this Letter we propose that the mechanism responsible for both the distribution of the eccentricities and the paucity of massive stars is the Kozai-Lidov-like resonance induced by a sub-parsec disk recently discovered in the Galactic center. Considering that the disk probably extended to a smaller radius in the past, we show that in as short as (a few) 10{sup 6} yr, the stars populating the innermost 1'' region would redistribute in angular-momentum space and recover the observed ''super-thermal'' distribution. Meanwhile, WR and O-stars in the same region intermittently attain ample eccentricities that will lead to their tidal disruptions by the central massive black hole. Our results provide new evidences that Sgr A* was powered several millions years ago by an accretion disk as well as by tidal stellar disruptions.

  18. Hitomi observations of the LMC SNR N 132 D: Highly redshifted X-ray emission from iron ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sato, Toshiki; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Łukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen

    2018-03-01

    We present Hitomi observations of N 132 D, a young, X-ray bright, O-rich core-collapse supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Despite a very short observation of only 3.7 ks, the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) easily detects the line complexes of highly ionized S K and Fe K with 16-17 counts in each. The Fe feature is measured for the first time at high spectral resolution. Based on the plausible assumption that the Fe K emission is dominated by He-like ions, we find that the material responsible for this Fe emission is highly redshifted at ˜ 800 km s-1 compared to the local LMC interstellar medium (ISM), with a 90% credible interval of 50-1500 km s-1 if a weakly informative prior is placed on possible line broadening. This indicates (1) that the Fe emission arises from the supernova ejecta, and (2) that these ejecta are highly asymmetric, since no blueshifted component is found. The S K velocity is consistent with the local LMC ISM, and is likely from swept-up ISM material. These results are consistent with spatial mapping that shows the He-like Fe concentrated in the interior of the remnant and the S tracing the outer shell. The results also show that even with a very small number of counts, direct velocity measurements from Doppler-shifted lines detected in extended objects like supernova remnants are now possible. Thanks to the very low SXS background of ˜ 1 event per spectral resolution element per 100 ks, such results are obtainable during short pointed or slew observations with similar instruments. This highlights the power of high-spectral-resolution imaging observations, and demonstrates the new window that has been opened with Hitomi and will be greatly widened with future missions such as the X-ray Astronomy Recovery Mission (XARM) and Athena.

  19. Study of the Correlations and the MAXI Hardness Ratio between the Anomalous and Normal Low States of LMC X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpin, Trevor; Boyd, Patricia T.; Smale, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    The bright, unusual black-hole X-ray binary LMC X-3 has been monitored virtually continuously by the Japanese MAXI X-ray All-Sky Monitor aboard the International Space Station (Matsuoka, et al., PASJ, 2009) from August 2009 to the present. Comparison with RXTE PCA and ASM light curves during the ~2.33-year period of overlap demonstrate that despite slight differences in energy-band boundaries both the ASM and MAXI faithfully reproduce characteristics of the high-amplitude, nonperiodic long-term variability, on the order of 100-300 days, clearly seen in the more sensitive PCA monitoring. The mechanism for this variability at a timescale many times longer than the 1.7-day orbital period is still unknown. Models to explain the long-term variability invoke mechanisms such as changes in mass transfer rate, and/or a precessing warped accretion disk. Observations of LMC X-3 have not definitely determined whether wind accretion or Roche-love overflow is the driver of the long-term variability. Recent MAXI monitoring of LMC X-3 includes excellent coverage of a rare anomalous low state (ALS) where the X-ray source cannot be distinguished from the background, as well as several normal low states, in which the source count rate passes smoothly through a low, yet detectable value. Pointed Swift XRT and UVOT observations also sample this ALS and one normal low state well. We combine these data sets to study the correlations between the wavelength regimes observed during the ALS versus the normal low. We also examine the behavior of the X-ray hardness ratios using XRT and MAXI monitoring data during the ALS versus the normal low state.

  20. AN APPARENT PRECESSING HELICAL OUTFLOW FROM A MASSIVE EVOLVED STAR: EVIDENCE FOR BINARY INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, R. M.; Hankins, M. J.; Herter, T. L. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Morris, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mills, E. A. C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O 1009, Lopezville Drive, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Ressler, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Massive, evolved stars play a crucial role in the metal enrichment, dust budget, and energetics of the interstellar medium; however, the details of their evolution are uncertain because of their rarity and short lifetimes before exploding as supernovae. Discrepancies between theoretical predictions from single-star evolutionary models and observations of massive stars have evoked a shifting paradigm that implicates the importance of binary interaction. We present mid- to far-infrared observations from the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy of a conical “helix” of warm dust (∼180 K) that appears to extend from the Wolf–Rayet star WR102c. Our interpretation of the helix is a precessing, collimated outflow that emerged from WR102c during a previous evolutionary phase as a rapidly rotating luminous blue variable. We attribute the precession of WR102c to gravitational interactions with an unseen compact binary companion whose orbital period can be constrained to 800 days < P < 1400 days from the inferred precession period, τ{sub p} ∼ 1.4 × 10{sup 4} yr, and limits imposed on the stellar and orbital parameters of the system. Our results concur with the range of orbital periods (P ≲ 1500 days) where spin-up via mass exchange is expected to occur for massive binary systems.

  1. Astronomy in Denver: Spectropolarimetric Observations of 5 Wolf-Rayet Binary Stars with SALT/RSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullard, Andrew; Ansary, Zyed; Azancot Luchtan, Daniel; Gallegos, Hunter; Luepker, Martin; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Nordsieck, Kenneth H.; SALT observation team

    2018-06-01

    Mass loss from massive stars is an important yet poorly understood factor in shaping their evolution. Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are of particular interest due to their stellar winds, which create large regions of circumstellar material (CSM). They are also supernova and possible gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitors. Like other massive stars, WR stars often occur in binaries, where interaction can affect their mass loss rates and provide the rapid rotation thought to be required for GRB production. The diagnostic tool of spectropolarimetry, along with the potentially eclipsing nature of a binary system, helps us to better characterize the CSM created by the stars’ colliding winds. Thus, we can determine mass loss rates and infer rapid rotation. We present spectropolarimetric results for five WR+O eclipsing binary systems, obtained with the Robert Stobie Spectrograph at the South African Large Telescope, between April 2017 and April 2018. The data allow us to map both continuum and emission line polarization variations with phase, which constrains where different CSM components scatter light in the systems. We discuss our initial findings and interpretations of the polarimetric variability in each binary system, and compare the systems.

  2. DISCOVERY OF A WOLF-RAYET STAR THROUGH DETECTION OF ITS PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlefield, Colin; Garnavich, Peter; McClelland, Colin; Rettig, Terrence; Marion, G. H.; Vinkó, József; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2012-01-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a heavily reddened Wolf-Rayet star that we name WR 142b. While photometrically monitoring a cataclysmic variable, we detected weak variability in a nearby field star. Low-resolution spectroscopy revealed a strong emission line at 7100 Å, suggesting an unusual object and prompting further study. A spectrum taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope confirms strong He II emission and an N IV 7112 Å line consistent with a nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet star of spectral class WN6. Analysis of the He II line strengths reveals no detectable hydrogen in WR 142b. A blue-sensitive spectrum obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope shows no evidence for a hot companion star. The continuum shape and emission line ratios imply a reddening of E(B – V) = 2.2-2.6 mag. We estimate that the distance to WR 142b is 1.4 ± 0.3 kpc.

  3. DD 13 - A very young and heavily reddened early O star in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Peter S.; Fitzpatrick, Edward L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates the Large Magellanic Cloud star DD 13, which is likely the major ionizing source of the nebula N159A. New optical spectroscopy and new estimates of the broadband photometric properties of DD 13 are obtained. A spectral type of O3-O6 V, E(B-V) = 0.64, and M(V) = -6.93 is found. The spectral type cannot be more precisely defined due to contamination of the spectral data by nebular emission, obliterating the important He I classification lines. These results, plus a published estimate of the Lyman continuum photon injection rate into N159A, suggest that DD 13 actually consists of about 2-4 young, early O stars still enshrouded by their natal dust cloud. The star DD 13 may be a younger example of the type of tight cluster represented by the LMC 'star' Sk-66 deg 41, recently revealed to be composed of six or more components.

  4. [Sensitivity of BALB/c and WR strain mice to the immunodepressive action of cyclophosphamide and thiophosphamide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ir, K N; Telegin, L Iu; Pevnitskiĭ, L A; Malashenko, A M

    1984-05-01

    Experiments were made on BALB/cJ YSto and WR/Y mice to study the immunosuppressant action of cyclophosphamide (CP) and thiophosphamide (thiotepa) in vivo. WR mice were found to be significantly more sensitive to the immunosuppressant action of thiotepa than BALB/c mice and to have similar sensitivity to the action of CP. BALB/c mice appeared highly resistant to the action of both the drugs. Based on the data obtained and those reported in the literature a possible parallelism is suggested between the mutagenic and immunosuppressant action of CP and thiotepa.

  5. Radio stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjellming, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    Any discussion of the radio emission from stars should begin by emphasizing certain unique problems. First of all, one must clarify a semantic confusion introduced into radio astronomy in the late 1950's when most new radio sources were described as radio stars. All of these early 'radio stars' were eventually identified with other galactic and extra-galactic objects. The study of true radio stars, where the radio emission is produced in the atmosphere of a star, began only in the 1960's. Most of the work on the subject has, in fact, been carried out in only the last few years. Because the real information about radio stars is quite new, it is not surprising that major aspects of the subject are not at all understood. For this reason this paper is organized mainly around three questions: what is the available observational information; what physical processes seem to be involved; and what working hypotheses look potentially fruitful. (Auth.)

  6. Shooting stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurette, M.; Hammer, C.

    1985-01-01

    A shooting star passage -even a star shower- can be sometimes easily seen during moonless black night. They represent the partial volatilization in earth atmosphere of meteorites or micrometeorites reduced in cosmic dusts. Everywhere on earth, these star dusts are searched to be gathered. This research made one year ago on the Greenland ice-cap is this article object; orbit gathering projects are also presented [fr

  7. 76 FR 10899 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the W.R. Grace and Company...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Employees From the W.R. Grace and Company in Curtis, MD, To Be Included in the Special Exposure Cohort... evaluate a petition to designate a class of employees from the W.R. Grace and Company in Curtis, Maryland... Compensation Program Act of 2000. The initial proposed definition for the class being evaluated, subject to...

  8. Observations of Bright Massive Stars Using Small Size Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beradze, Sopia; Kochiashvili, Nino

    2017-11-01

    The size of a telescope determines goals and objects of observations. During the latest decades it becomes more and more difficult to get photometric data of bright stars because most of telescopes of small sizes do not operate already. But there are rather interesting questions connected to the properties and evolution ties between different types of massive stars. Multi-wavelength photometric data are needed for solution of some of them. We are presenting our observational plans of bright Massive X-ray binaries, WR and LBV stars using a small size telescope. All these stars, which are presented in the poster are observational targets of Sopia Beradze's future PhD thesis. We already have got very interesting results on the reddening and possible future eruption of the massive hypergiant star P Cygni. Therefore, we decided to choose some additional interesting massive stars of different type for future observations. All Massive stars play an important role in the chemical evolution of galaxies because of they have very high mass loss - up to 10-4M⊙/a year. Our targets are on different evolutionary stages and three of them are the members of massive binaries. We plan to do UBVRI photometric observations of these stars using the 48 cm Cassegrain telescope of the Abastumani Astrophisical Observatory.

  9. Very massive runaway stars from three-body encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Gualandris, Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Very massive stars preferentially reside in the cores of their parent clusters and form binary or multiple systems. We study the role of tight very massive binaries in the origin of the field population of very massive stars. We performed numerical simulations of dynamical encounters between single (massive) stars and a very massive binary with parameters similar to those of the most massive known Galactic binaries, WR 20a and NGC 3603-A1. We found that these three-body encounters could be responsible for the origin of high peculiar velocities (≥70 km s-1) observed for some very massive (≥60-70 M⊙) runaway stars in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud (e.g. λ Cep, BD+43°3654, Sk -67°22, BI 237, 30 Dor 016), which can hardly be explained within the framework of the binary-supernova scenario. The production of high-velocity massive stars via three-body encounters is accompanied by the recoil of the binary in the opposite direction to the ejected star. We show that the relative position of the very massive binary R145 and the runaway early B-type star Sk-69°206 on the sky is consistent with the possibility that both objects were ejected from the central cluster, R136, of the star-forming region 30 Doradus via the same dynamical event - a three-body encounter.

  10. Massive runaway stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.; Kroupa, P.

    2011-01-01

    Using archival Spitzer Space Telescope data, we identified for the first time a dozen runaway OB stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) through the detection of their bow shocks. The geometry of detected bow shocks allows us to infer the direction of motion of the associated stars and to determine their possible parent clusters and associations. One of the identified runaway stars, AzV 471, was already known as a high-velocity star on the basis of its high peculiar radial velocity, which is offset by ≃ 40 km s-1 from the local systemic velocity. We discuss implications of our findings for the problem of the origin of field OB stars. Several of the bow shock-producing stars are found in the confines of associations, suggesting that these may be “alien” stars contributing to the age spread observed for some young stellar systems. We also report the discovery of a kidney-shaped nebula attached to the early WN-type star SMC-WR3 (AzV 60a). We interpreted this nebula as an interstellar structure created owing to the interaction between the stellar wind and the ambient interstellar medium.

  11. Effects of area postrema lesions on taste aversions produced by treatment with WR-2721 in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1986-01-01

    The conditioned taste aversion procedure was used to further assess some behavioral effects of treatment with the putative radioprotectant WR-2721 and the role of the area postrema in mediating the behavioral effects of treatment. Treatment with 40, 150 or 300 mg/kg WR-2721 produced dose-dependent changes in sucrose intake in both control rats and rats with area postrema lesions. The effectiveness of the lesion in disrupting the acquisition of an aversion varied as a function of the dose administered, with the lesions producing the greatest disruption of aversion learning at the lowest dose and little disruption at the highest dose tested. At all dose levels, sucrose intake was greater for the rats with area postrema lesions than for the sham-operated control rats. Treatment with WR-2721 also produced significant decreases in total fluid intake, particularly at the higher dose levels. The results are discussed as indicating that treatment with WR-2721 produces highly toxic effects on behavior and that the use of the compound as a radioprotectant for radiotherapy requires additional assessment of its effects on brain function and behavior

  12. Protein binding of N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane via mixed disulfide formation after oral administration of WR 2721

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabachnik, N.F.; Blackburn, P.; Peterson, C.M.; Cerami, A.

    1982-02-01

    Earlier studies have shown that WR 2721 (H2N-(CH2)3-NH(CH2)2SPO3H2) is converted to its free thiol form, N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane (MDP), at the acidic pH of the stomach. MDP is a radioprotective compound and a mucolytic agent capable of decreasing sputum viscosity in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Conversion of WR 2721 and MDP to the corresponding sulfonic acid (MDP-SO3H) permits quantitative determination of these compounds in physiological fluids by use of an automatic amino acid analyzer. After oral administration of WR 2721 to human patients and rabbits it is converted to MDP and the free thiol form of the drug associates with plasma proteins by mixed disulfide linkage. The plasma proteins serve as a depot and reservoir of MDP for potential exchange at the tissues. When incubated with whole sputum or with purified mucin solutions in vitro, MDP decreased the viscosity of these solutions by reduction of the accessible disulfide bonds of the mucin molecule and was subsequently found in mixed disulfide association with the mucin molecule. The association of MDP with proteins via mixed disulfide linkage has important implications for the development of optimal dose regimens for administration of WR 2721 to patients.

  13. Protein binding of N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane via mixed disulfide formation after oral administration of WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabachnik, N.F.; Blackburn, P.; Peterson, C.M.; Cerami, A.

    1982-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that WR 2721 [H2N-(CH2)3-NH(CH2)2SPO3H2] is converted to its free thiol form, N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane (MDP), at the acidic pH of the stomach. MDP is a radioprotective compound and a mucolytic agent capable of decreasing sputum viscosity in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Conversion of WR 2721 and MDP to the corresponding sulfonic acid (MDP-SO3H) permits quantitative determination of these compounds in physiological fluids by use of an automatic amino acid analyzer. After oral administration of WR 2721 to human patients and rabbits it is converted to MDP and the free thiol form of the drug associates with plasma proteins by mixed disulfide linkage. The plasma proteins serve as a depot and reservoir of MDP for potential exchange at the tissues. When incubated with whole sputum or with purified mucin solutions in vitro, MDP decreased the viscosity of these solutions by reduction of the accessible disulfide bonds of the mucin molecule and was subsequently found in mixed disulfide association with the mucin molecule. The association of MDP with proteins via mixed disulfide linkage has important implications for the development of optimal dose regimens for administration of WR 2721 to patients

  14. [Clinical case of the month. Mild hemolytic disease of the newborn due to an anti-Wr(a) antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutgens, A; Monfort, M; Wagemans, D; Van Cauwenberge, J-R; Gérard, C

    2012-01-01

    A Caucasian woman, with a A+ CCD.ee K neg erythrocyte phenotype and no history of blood transfusion, delivered a first child who developed mild anemia. The direct antiglobulin test performed on the newborn red blood cells belonging to the A+ CCD.ee K neg group, was strongly positive for IgG. During the pregnancy and after the delivery, the woman had a negative irregular antibody screening test, using standard red blood cells. However, at birth, using a collection of thawed red blood cells with rare phenotypes (private antigens), the lab showed an antibody anti-Wr(a) in the maternal serum. The activity of the maternal antibody, with a titer of 16, was completely inhibited by dithiothreitol, indicating the nature IgM of the circulating antibody. The presence of the antigen Wr(a) on the surface of the newborn and its biological father red blood cells was confirmed. The concentration of IgG anti-Wr(a) on baby erythrocytes was demonstrated by the presence of the antibody anti-Wr(a) in the eluate. This case illustrates the difficulties to detect antibodies against private antigens on baby erythrocytes, responsible of hemolytic diseases of newborn. Indeed, standard red blood cell panels used for irregular antibodies screening test do not express generally those private antigens.

  15. Faint planetary nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds - central star properties and nebular abundances for the Jacoby sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.B.C.; Liebert, J.; Boroson, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-four of the LMC and SMC planetary nebulae contained in Jacoby's (1980) sample are studied. Spectrophotometric observations were used to infer the Stoy temperatures, luminosities, and radii of the central stars. For objects in which forbidden O III electron temperatures could be determined, the nebular abundances of He, N, O, and Ne were calculated and compared with values for giant H II regions for the relevant host galaxy. When the present abundance results were compared with previously published results for planetary nebulae in the LMC, SMC, and the Galaxy, a strong correlation was found for O/H versus Ne/H and strong anticorrelations were found for O/H versus forbidden O III temperature, and N/O versus O/H. 69 refs

  16. Star Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  17. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  18. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  19. A Massive Star Census of the Starburst Cluster R136

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Paul

    2012-10-01

    We propose to carry out a comprehensive census of the most massive stars in the central parsec {4"} of the starburst cluster, R136, which powers the Tarantula Nebula in the LMC. R136 is both sufficiently massive that the upper mass function is richly populated and young enough that its most massive stars have yet to explode as supernovae. The identification of very massive stars in R136, up to 300 solar masses, raises general questions of star formation, binarity and feedback in young massive clusters. The proposed STIS spectral survey of 36 stars more massive than 50 solar masses within R136 is ground-breaking, of legacy value, and is specifically tailored to a} yield physical properties; b} detect the majority of binaries by splitting observations between Cycles 19 and 20; c} measure rotational velocities, relevant for predictions of rotational mixing; d} quantify mass-loss properties for very massive stars; e} determine surface compositions; f} measure radial velocities, relevant for runaway stars and cluster dynamics; g} quantify radiative and mechanical feedback. This census will enable the mass function of very massive stars to be measured for the first time, as a result of incomplete and inadequate spectroscopy to date. It will also perfectly complement our Tarantula Survey, a ground-based VLT Large Programme, by including the most massive stars that are inaccessible to ground-based visual spectroscopy due to severe crowding. These surveys, together with existing integrated UV and optical studies will enable 30 Doradus to serve as a bona-fide template for unresolved extragalactic starburst regions.

  20. Radio stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjellming, R.M.; Gibson, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of stellar radio emission became an important field of research in the 1970's and have now expanded to become a major area of radio astronomy with the advent of new instruments such as the Very Large Array in New Mexico and transcontinental telescope arrays. This volume contains papers from the workshop on stellar continuum radio astronomy held in Boulder, Colorado, and is the first book on the rapidly expanding field of radio emission from stars and stellar systems. Subjects covered include the observational and theoretical aspects of stellar winds from both hot and cool stars, radio flares from active double star systems and red dwarf stars, bipolar flows from star-forming regions, and the radio emission from X-ray binaries. (orig.)

  1. Are superluminous supernovae and long GRBs the products of dynamical processes in young dense star clusters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Heuvel, E. P. J. [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Portegies Zwart, S. F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-12-20

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) occur almost exclusively in small galaxies (Small/Large Magellanic Cloud (SMC/LMC)-like or smaller), and the few SLSNe observed in larger star-forming galaxies always occur close to the nuclei of their hosts. Another type of peculiar and highly energetic supernovae are the broad-line Type Ic SNe (SN Ic-BL) that are associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). Also these have a strong preference for occurring in small (SMC/LMC-like or smaller) star-forming galaxies, and in these galaxies LGRBs always occur in the brightest spots. Studies of nearby star-forming galaxies that are similar to the hosts of LGRBs show that these brightest spots are giant H II regions produced by massive dense young star clusters with many hundreds of O- and Wolf-Rayet-type stars. Such dense young clusters are also found in abundance within a few hundred parsecs from the nucleus of larger galaxies like our own. We argue that the SLSNe and the SNe Ic-BL/LGRBs are exclusive products of two types of dynamical interactions in dense young star clusters. In our model the high angular momentum of the collapsing stellar cores required for the engines of an SN Ic-BL results from the post-main-sequence mergers of dynamically produced cluster binaries with almost equal-mass components. The merger produces a critically rotating single helium star with sufficient angular momentum to produce an LGRB; the observed 'metal aversion' of LGRBs is a natural consequence of the model. We argue that, on the other hand, SLSNe could be the products of runaway multiple collisions in dense clusters, and we present (and quantize) plausible scenarios of how the different types of SLSNe can be produced.

  2. SPITZER SAGE INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF MASSIVE STARS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, A. Z.; Massa, D. L.; Sewilo, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a catalog of 1750 massive stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), with accurate spectral types compiled from the literature, and a photometric catalog for a subset of 1268 of these stars, with the goal of exploring their infrared properties. The photometric catalog consists of stars with infrared counterparts in the Spitzer SAGE survey database, for which we present uniform photometry from 0.3 to 24 μm in the UBVIJHK s +IRAC+MIPS24 bands. The resulting infrared color-magnitude diagrams illustrate that the supergiant B[e], red supergiant, and luminous blue variable (LBV) stars are among the brightest infrared point sources in the LMC, due to their intrinsic brightness, and at longer wavelengths, due to dust. We detect infrared excesses due to free-free emission among ∼900 OB stars, which correlate with luminosity class. We confirm the presence of dust around 10 supergiant B[e] stars, finding the shape of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to be very similar, in contrast to the variety of SED shapes among the spectrally variable LBVs. The similar luminosities of B[e] supergiants (log L/L sun ≥ 4) and the rare, dusty progenitors of the new class of optical transients (e.g., SN 2008S and NGC 300 OT), plus the fact that dust is present in both types of objects, suggests a common origin for them. We find the infrared colors for Wolf-Rayet stars to be independent of spectral type and their SEDs to be flatter than what models predict. The results of this study provide the first comprehensive roadmap for interpreting luminous, massive, resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies at infrared wavelengths.

  3. IUE observations of interstellar Si IV and C IV lines observed in the spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.J.; Willis, A.J.; Wilson, R.

    1980-01-01

    Recent IUE observations of Wolf-Rayet stars show narrow absorption lines in the highly ionized species of Si IV and C IV. The strengths of these 'interstellar' Si IV and C IV lines observed in the spectra of 10 WR stars and two other early-type stars are compared. Of the WR sample, six stars exhibit very strong Si IV and C IV lines (Wsub(lambda) approximately 0.3 to 0.5 A) whilst the other four stars show much weaker lines (Wsub(lambda) approximately 0.1 A). There is no correlation between the strengths of these lines with either stellar distance or colour excess. The weaker absorptions may arise in the individual stellar H II regions, the observed strengths being consistent with those expected for stars with Tsub(eff) = 30 000 K. Five of the other stars which exhibit very strong absorptions lie in the line of sight to active interstellar regions (Cygnus and Carina nebulae) and it is considered probable that, in addition to their H II region components, the bulk of the strong Si IV and C IV absorptions originate in hot gas associated with these active regions. In the case of the WN5 star HD 50896 violet-displaced components are observed in the interstellar lines of low ionization species. These are thought to be produced in the ring nebula S308 surrounding HD 50896. (author)

  4. Production of a conjugated fatty acid by Bifidobacterium breve LMC520 from α-linolenic acid: conjugated linolenic acid (CLnA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hui Gyu; Cho, Hyung Taek; Song, Myoung-Chong; Kim, Sang Bum; Kwon, Eung Gi; Choi, Nag Jin; Kim, Young Jun

    2012-03-28

    This study was performed to characterize natural CLnA isomer production by Bifidobacterium breve LMC520 of human origin in comparison to conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) production. B. breve LMC520 was found to be highly active in terms of CLnA production, of which the major portion was identified as cis-9,trans-11,cis-15 CLnA isomer by GC-MS and NMR analysis. B. breve LMC520 was incubated for 48 h using MRS medium (containing 0.05% L-cysteine · HCl) under different environmental conditions such as atmosphere, pH, and substrate concentration. The high conversion rate of α-linolenic acid (α-LNA) to CLnA (99%) was retained up to 2 mM α-LNA, and the production was proportionally increased nearly 7-fold with 8 mM by the 6 h of incubation under anaerobic conditions at a wide range of pH values (between 5 and 9). When α-LNA was compared with linoleic acid (LA) as a substrate for isomerization by B. breve LMC520, the conversion of α-LNA was higher than that of LA. These results demonstrated that specific CLnA isomer could be produced through active bacterial conversion at an optimized condition. Because many conjugated octadecatrienoic acids in nature are shown to play many positive roles, the noble isomer found in this study has potential as a functional source.

  5. A spatially resolved study of photoelectric heating and [C II] cooling in the LMC Comparison with dust emission as seen by SAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubin, D.; Hony, S.; Madden, S. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Meixner, M.; Indebetouw, R.; Reach, W.; Ginsburg, A.; Kim, S.; Mochizuki, K.; Babler, B.; Block, M.; Bracker, S. B.; Engelbracht, C. W.; For, B. -Q.; Gordon, K.; Hora, J. L.; Leitherer, C.; Meade, M.; Misselt, K.; Sewilo, M.; Vijh, U.; Whitney, B.

    Context. Photoelectric heating is a dominant heating mechanism for many phases of the interstellar medium. We study this mechanism throughout the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Aims. We aim to quantify the importance of the [C II] cooling line and the photoelectric heating process of various

  6. Contribution of stellar winds to the composition of cosmic rays - exotic Ne and Fe from Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, J.B.; Dearborn, D.S.P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of previous calculations of the production of Al-26 and the enhancement of heavy isotopes of Fe by Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are discussed. Mass fractions of Al-26 in WR ejects and in WR H-rich envelopes are given as a function of stellar mass. It is concluded that the predicted mass of Al-26 in the ISM and its galactic distribution are such that WR stars are expected to be a significant if not the major source of the Al-26. The results suggest that He-22 enhancement must be accompanied by 4-8X enhancement of Fe-57, 20-45X enhancement of Fe-58, and 5-10X enhancement of Co-59. The isotopes of Fe are found to be affected before an appreciable enhancement of Ne-22 occurs. The size of the Ne-22 enhancement depends on the details of the mass-loss history whereas the Fe enhancement does not. 11 references

  7. The first detection on Wolf-Rayet stars in M31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shara, M.M.; Moffat, A.F.J.

    1982-01-01

    A search to continuum magnitude B approximately equal to 21.5 (Msub(B) approximately equal to -3) using a narrow band filter at lambda4670A and a wide B-band filter has revealed 21 Wolf-Rayet star candidates in about half the giant Sb galaxy M31. Some weak-line WR stars, particularly WN subtypes, may have escaped detection. These numbers are compatible with the total number of luminous (i.e. massive) stars in M31. Eighteen of twenty confirmed candidate stars in M31 lie in the direction of OB associations in the ring of prominent star formation 5-16 kpc from the center. (Auth.)

  8. Symbiotic stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Among the several hundred million binary systems estimated to lie within 3000 light years of the solar system, a tiny fraction, no more than a few hundred, belong to a curious subclass whose radiation has a wavelength distribution so peculiar that it long defied explanation. Such systems radiate strongly in the visible region of the spectrum, but some of them do so even more strongly at both shorter and longer wavelengths: in the ultraviolet region and in the infrared and radio regions. This odd distribution of radiation is best explained by the pairing of a cool red giant star and an intensely hot small star that is virtually in contact with its larger companion. Such objects have become known as symbiotic stars. On photographic plate only the giant star can be discerned, but evidence for the existence of the hot companion has been supplied by satellite-born instruments capable of detecting ultraviolet radiation. The spectra of symbiotic stars indicate that the cool red giant is surrounded by a very hot ionized gas. Symbiotic stars also flared up in outbursts indicating the ejection of material in the form of a shell or a ring. Symbiotic stars may therefore represent a transitory phase in the evolution of certain types of binary systems in which there is substantial transfer of matter from the larger partner to the smaller

  9. Unusual Black Hole Binary LMC X-3: A Transient High-Mass X-Ray Binary That Is Almost Always On?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpin, Trevor J.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Smale, Alan P.; Valencic, Lynne A.

    2017-01-01

    We have analyzed a rich, multimission, multiwavelength data set from the black hole X-ray binary (BHXB) LMC X-3, covering a new anomalous low state (ALS), during which the source flux falls to an unprecedentedly low and barely detectable level, and a more normal low state. Simultaneous X-ray and UV/optical monitoring data from Swift are combined with pointed observations from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and X-ray Multi- Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) and light curves from the Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image (MAXI) instrument to compare the source characteristics during the ALS with those seen during the normal low state. An XMM-Newton spectrum obtained during the ALS can be modeled using an absorbed power law with Gamma = 1.41‚+/- 0.65 and a luminosity of 7.97 x 10(exp 33) erg/s (0.6-5 keV). The Swift X-ray and UV light curves indicate an X-ray lag of approx. 8 days as LMC X-3 abruptly exits the ALS, suggesting that changes in the mass accretion rate from the donor drive the X-ray lag. The normal low state displays an asymmetric profile in which the exit occurs more quickly than the entry, with minimum X-ray flux a factor of approx. 4300 brighter than during the ALS. The UV brightness of LMC X-3 in the ALS is also fainter and less variable than during normal low states. The existence of repeated ALSs in LMC X-3, as well as a comparison with other BHXBs, implies that it is very close to the transient/persistent X-ray source dividing line. We conclude that LMC X-3 is a transient source that is almost always "on."

  10. Exciting Message from a Dying Monster Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    same conditions as in lasers. However, the emission that is amplified in this case is not visible light as in lasers, but rather microwave radiation [3]. They are therefore known under the name masers or Microwave Amplified Stimulated Emission Radiators. This radiation is not visible to the human eye or optical astronomical detectors, but must be captured with astronomical radio telescopes. Later, silicon-monoxide (SiO) masers were discovered in which the molecules that amplify the microwave emission are made up of equal proportions of silicon (Si) and oxygen (O). The discovery of the first extra-galactic SiO maser In May 1995, new state-of-the-art receivers were installed on the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) , a radio dish measuring 15 metres across at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile. The great technical improvement of the receivers and the excellent quality of this observing site and of the telescope itself make it one of the world's most powerful instruments for this type of research. And indeed, immediately after the installation of the new receivers, the first observations bore fruit. The astronomers decided to look with the telescope at the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy to the Milky Way galaxy in which we live. On a dark night in the Southern Hemisphere, one can easily spot the LMC with the naked eye as a little `cloud', seen in the direction of the southern constellation of Doradus (The Goldfish). Although much smaller than the Milky Way, it still contains many millions of stars. The astronomers chose to observe the largest known star in the LMC and they registered its microwave radiation for no less than 26 hours. Most of the observing was done during daytime, which is possible with this type of instrument: at microwave wavelengths, the sky appears dark even during the day. The astronomers were delighted to see the star shining at microwave wavelengths, cf. ESO Press Photo 16/96. The measured wavelength leaves no doubt that

  11. A new method to determine the interstellar reddening towards WN stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Peter S.; Morris, Patrick W.

    1990-01-01

    An empirical approach to determine the redding in WN stars is presented, in which the measured strengths of the emission lines of He II at 1640 and 4686 A are used to estimate the extinction. The He II emission lines at these wavelengths are compared for a number of WN stars in the Galaxy and the LMC. It is shown that the equivalent width ratios are single valued and are independent of the spectral subtypes. The reddening for stars in the Galaxy is derived using a Galactic extinction law and observed line flux ratios, showing good agreement with previous determinations of reddening. The possible application of the method to study the absorption properties of the interstellar medium in more distant galaxies is discussed.

  12. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  13. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  14. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  15. The stellar content of NGC 346 - A plethora of O stars in the SMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, P.; Parker, J.W.; Garmany, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    The stellar content of NGC 346, the largest and brightest H II region in the SMC, was investigated using the results of CCD UBV photometry and spectroscopy. Spectra of 42 blue stars were classified, showing that 33 are of the O type, of which 11 are of type O6.5 or earlier, which is as many early-type O stars known in the rest of the SMC. The results identify 25-30 NGC 346 stars more massive than 25 solar masses, and six stars more massive than 40 solar masses, indicating that the upper-mass cutoff to the IMF is not lower in the SMC than in the Galaxy or the LMC. The presence of evolved 15 solar-mass stars in the NGC 346 indicates that some massive stars formed 15 million yr ago. The results of spatial distribution suggest that star formation began at the southwest side of the association and has spread to where the central cluster lies now, providing an example of sequential star formation in the SMC. 69 refs

  16. STARS no star on Kauai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.

    1993-01-01

    The island of Kuai, home to the Pacific Missile Range Facility, is preparing for the first of a series of Star Wars rocket launches expected to begin early this year. The Strategic Defense Initiative plans 40 launches of the Stategic Target System (STARS) over a 10-year period. The focus of the tests appears to be weapons and sensors designed to combat multiple-warhead ICBMs, which will be banned under the START II Treaty that was signed in January. The focus of this article is to express the dubious value of testing the STARS at a time when their application will not be an anticipated problem

  17. Flare stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicastro, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    The least massive, but possibly most numerous, stars in a galaxy are the dwarf M stars. It has been observed that some of these dwarfs are characterized by a short increase in brightness. These stars are called flare stars. These flare stars release a lot of energy in a short amount of time. The process producing the eruption must be energetic. The increase in light intensity can be explained by a small area rising to a much higher temperature. Solar flares are looked at to help understand the phenomenon of stellar flares. Dwarfs that flare are observed to have strong magnetic fields. Those dwarf without the strong magnetic field do not seem to flare. It is believed that these regions of strong magnetic fields are associated with star spots. Theories on the energy that power the flares are given. Astrophysicists theorize that the driving force of a stellar flare is the detachment and collapse of a loop of magnetic flux. The mass loss due to stellar flares is discussed. It is believed that stellar flares are a significant contributor to the mass of interstellar medium in the Milky Way

  18. Hypolipidemic activity of Phellinus rimosus against triton WR-1339 and high cholesterol diet induced hyperlipidemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rony, K A; Ajith, T A; Nima, N; Janardhanan, K K

    2014-03-01

    Patients with the risk for atherosclerotic disease will be targeted to reduce the existing hyperlipidemia. The hypolipidemic activity of Phellinus rimosus was studied using triton WR-1339 and high cholesterol diet (HCD) induced models. The triton induced elevated lipid profile was attenuated by P. rimosus or standard drug atorvastatin. Similarly, administration of P. rimosus along with HCD significantly decline serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, with elevating the high-density lipoprotein. Thiobarbituric acid reacting substances in heart and liver significantly decreased; where as activity of enzymatic antioxidants and level of reduced glutathione were significantly increased. In both models, P. rimosus extract showed a significant ameliorative effect on the elevated atherogenic index as well as LDL/HDL-C ratio. The hypolipidemic activity of P. rimosus can be ascribed to its inhibitory effect on the liver HMG CoA reductase activity. The results suggest the possible therapeutic potential of this fungus as hypolipidemic agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Wolf-Rayet Content of the Andromeda Galaxy: What Do Massive Stars Really Do When the Metallicity is Above Solar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip

    2000-08-01

    We are proposing to survey M 31 for Wolf-Rayet stars (WRs) and red supergiants (RSGs), providing much needed information about how massive stars evolve at greater-than-solar metallicities. Our understanding of massive star evolution is hampered by the effects of mass-loss on these stars; at higher metallicities mass-loss effects become ever more pronounced. Our previous work on other Local Group galaxies (Massey & Johnson 1998) has shown that the number of RSGs to WRs correlates well with metallicity, changing by a factor of 6 from NGC 6822 (log O/H+12=8.3) to the inner parts of M 33 (8.7). Our study of five small regions in M 31 suggests that above this value the ratio of RSGs to WRs doesn't change: does this mean that no massive star that becomes a WR spends any time as a RSG at above solar metallicities? We fear instead that our sample (selected, afterall, for containing WR stars) was not sufficiently well-mixed in age to provide useful global values; the study we propose here will survey all of M 31. Detection of WRs will provide fundamental data not only on massive star evolution, but also act as tracers of the most massive stars, and improve our knowledge of recent star-formation in the Andromeda Galaxy.

  20. Influence of a radioprotector WR-638 on the lymphoid compartment of the irradiated rat thymus: a flow cytometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragojevic-Simic, V.; Colic, M.; Gasic, S.

    1994-01-01

    The T cell composition of the thymus of X-ray irradiated (3.5 Gy) Wistar rat protected with WR-638 was analyzed by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies directed to the Thy 1.1, CD43, CD2, CD5, CD4, CD8 and class I and II MHC antigens. It was shown that this dose of X-rays caused cyclic changes in thymic cellularity manifested as: primary involution (until day 2), primary regeneration (from days 2 to 14), secondary involution (from days 14 to 21) and secondary regeneration (from days 21 to 30). WR-638 reduced the magnitude of thymocyte depletion in the primary involutive phase of the irradiated thymi. (author)

  1. Validation of KENO V.a for criticality safety calculations involving WR-1 fast-neutron fuel arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I. C.

    1991-07-15

    The KENO V.a criticality safety code, used with the SCALE 27-energy-group ENDF/B-IV-based cross-section library, has been validated for low-enriched uranium carbide (UC) WR-1 fast-neutron (FN) fuel arrangements. Because of a lack of relevant experimental data for UC fuel in the published literature, the validation is based primarily on calculational comparisons with critical experiments for fuel types with a range of enrichments and densities that cover those of the FN UC fuel. The ability of KENO V.a to handle the unique annular pin arrangement of the WR-1 FN fuel bundle was established using a comparison with the MCNP3B code used with a continuous-energy ENDF/B-V-based cross-section library. This report is part of the AECL--10146 report series documenting the validation of the KENO V.a criticality safety code.

  2. Radioprotective action of WR-1065 on radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.; VanAnkeren, S.C.; Milas, L.; Meyn, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the radioprotective effect of WR-1065 on cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. The effects of the drug on the induction and rejoining of gamma-ray-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) were measured using alkaline (pH 12.1) and neutral (pH 7.0) elution, respectively. Molecular protection factors (PFs) calculated from these data allowed us to determine whether the degree of modification of strand breakage accurately predicted the PFs measured using the biological end point of cell survival. The drug did protect against the induction of both SSBs and DSBs, although to an extent that did not appear to fully account for the degree of radioprotection in terms of cell killing measured under identical conditions. It is therefore unlikely that radioprotection by WR-1065 occurs simply as a consequence of a general lowering of all types of gamma-ray-induced DNA lesions, and it is possible that the drug could differentially protect against the induction of subsets of these DNA lesions. The rate of SSB rejoining was retarded following preirradiation treatment of cells with WR-1065, but there was no effect on DSB rejoining. Postirradiation treatment with WR-1065 also appeared to retard SSB rejoining but without an accompanying effect on either DSB rejoining or cell survival; however, this effect was largely reversed by the addition of catalase and was, therefore, probably a result of H 2 O 2 generated by autoxidation of the drug. Based on these observations, it would appear that the molecular actions of aminothiol radioprotective compounds that lead to reduced cell killing are much more complex than previously thought

  3. Aminoquinolone WR6026 as a feasible substitute for gentian violet in Chagas' disease prophylaxis in preserved blood for transfusional purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moraes-Souza Helio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for a colorless, nontoxic and efficient drug to prevent transfusion-associated Chagas' disease (TACD has been underway unsuccessfully since 1953 when gentian violet was preconized and to date is still being used as the only in vitro trypanocidal agent. The recent findings of aminoquinolone "WR6026" as a trypanocidal agent, led the authors to study the metabolism of red cells stored with this compound, the main objective of which was to define its applicability in TACD control. Ten units of human whole blood collected in CPDA-1 were divided into two equal satellite bags. One had "WR6026" (final concentration 62.5µg/mL added and the other was used as a control, both were stored at 4ºC. At baseline, day 7, 14, 21 and 28, samples were taken for the following measurements: adenosine triphosphate (ATP, hemoglobin, electrolytes (sodium and potassium, gases (pO2 and pCO2 and osmotic fragility. The results of tests and control were analyzed through parametric t-student test. The results were similar in both groups throughout the experiment except for the level of ATP on day 14, which presented significantly higher values in the tests when compared with the controls (p = 0.012. It was concluded that WR6026 does not interfere in the preservation and probably the viability of the erythrocytes also until day 28 of storage. Consequently the authors suggest that WR6026 could emerge as a colorless substitute for gentian violet in the control of TACD in endemic areas.

  4. Tidal interaction, star formation and chemical evolution in blue compact dwarf galaxy Mrk 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, A.; Omar, A.; Jaiswal, S.

    2018-02-01

    The optical spectroscopic and radio interferometric H I 21 cm-line observations of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Mrk 22 are presented. The Wolf-Rayet (WR) emission-line features corresponding to high ionization lines of He II λ4686 and C IV λ5808 from young massive stars are detected. The ages of two prominent star-forming regions in the galaxy are estimated as ∼10 and ∼ 4 Myr. The galaxy has non-thermal radio deficiency, which also indicates a young starburst and lack of supernovae events from the current star formation activities, consistent with the detection of WR emission-line features. A significant N/O enrichment is seen in the fainter star-forming region. The gas-phase metallicities [12 + log(O/H)] for the bright and faint regions are estimated as 7.98±0.07 and 7.46±0.09, respectively. The galaxy has a large diffuse H I envelop. The H I images reveal disturbed gas kinematics and H I clouds outside the optical extent of the galaxy, indicating recent tidal interaction or merger in the system. The results strongly indicate that Mrk 22 is undergoing a chemical and morphological evolution due to ongoing star formation, most likely triggered by a merger.

  5. The effective temperatures of early Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmutz, W.

    1982-01-01

    Nussbaumer et al. (1981) (NSSW) have calculated temperatures of 15 Wolf-Rayet stars, which cover most subtypes in the WN and WC sequences. Some Wolf-Rayet stars are found to have a blackbody-like energy distribution and therefore their effective temperature can be well determined, others show deviation from the blackbody shape. This deviation is probably due to an extended continuum emitting region. In view of these later cases NSSW adopted a temperature which they derived from a Zanstra analysis of the He II recombination lines. According to their analysis there should be a continuum jump at 2050 A. New IUE observations of the WN 5 star HD 50896 however did not show any trace of such an absorption edge. This implies that the effective temperature of this WN 5 star and probably of all WR stars with a non blackbody energy distribution is not yet known accurately. Therefore the author started a detailed analysis with a spherically symmetric atmosphere model. Though the model has not yet reached its final shape he has obtained as a first result that the location of HD 50896 in the HR-diagram is to the left of the ZAMS and that the Zanstra analysis is indeed not valid for this star. (Auth.)

  6. Symbiotic stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of symbiotic star systems are discussed, based on a review of recent observational data. A model of a symbiotic star system is presented which illustrates how a cool red-giant star is embedded in a nebula whose atoms are ionized by the energetic radiation from its hot compact companion. UV outbursts from symbiotic systems are explained by two principal models: an accretion-disk-outburst model which describes how material expelled from the tenuous envelope of the red giant forms an inwardly-spiralling disk around the hot companion, and a thermonuclear-outburst model in which the companion is specifically a white dwarf which superheats the material expelled from the red giant to the point where thermonuclear reactions occur and radiation is emitted. It is suspected that the evolutionary course of binary systems is predetermined by the initial mass and angular momentum of the gas cloud within which binary stars are born. Since red giants and Mira variables are thought to be stars with a mass of one or two solar mass, it is believed that the original cloud from which a symbiotic system is formed can consist of no more than a few solar masses of gas.

  7. Dark stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maselli, Andrea; Pnigouras, Pantelis; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2017-01-01

    to the formation of compact objects predominantly made of dark matter. Considering both fermionic and bosonic (scalar φ4) equations of state, we construct the equilibrium structure of rotating dark stars, focusing on their bulk properties and comparing them with baryonic neutron stars. We also show that these dark......Theoretical models of self-interacting dark matter represent a promising answer to a series of open problems within the so-called collisionless cold dark matter paradigm. In case of asymmetric dark matter, self-interactions might facilitate gravitational collapse and potentially lead...... objects admit the I-Love-Q universal relations, which link their moments of inertia, tidal deformabilities, and quadrupole moments. Finally, we prove that stars built with a dark matter equation of state are not compact enough to mimic black holes in general relativity, thus making them distinguishable...

  8. Neutrino jets from high-mass WR gauge bosons in TeV-scale left-right symmetric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Manimala; Ruiz, Richard; Scott, Darren J.; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We reexamine the discovery potential at hadron colliders of high-mass right-handed (RH) gauge bosons WR—an inherent ingredient of left-right symmetric models (LRSM). We focus on the regime where the WR is very heavy compared to the heavy Majorana neutrino N , and we investigate an alternative signature for WR→N decays. The produced neutrinos are highly boosted in this mass regime. Subsequently, their decays via off-shell WR bosons to jets, i.e., N →ℓ±jj, are highly collimated, forming a single neutrino jet (jN). The final-state collider signature is then ℓ±jN, instead of the widely studied ℓ±ℓ±j j . Present search strategies are not sensitive to this hierarchical mass regime due to the breakdown of the collider signature definition. We take into account QCD corrections beyond next-to-leading order (NLO) that are important for high-mass Drell-Yan processes at the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For the first time, we evaluate WR production at NLO with threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithm (NNLL) matched to the threshold-improved parton distributions. With these improvements, we find that a WR of mass MWR=3 (4 )[5 ] TeV and mass ratio of (mN/MWR)discovered with a 5 - 6 σ statistical significance at 13 TeV after 10 (100 )[2000 ] fb-1 of data. Extending the analysis to the hypothetical 100 TeV Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC), 5 σ can be obtained for WR masses up to MW R=15 (30 ) with approximately 100 fb-1 (10 ab-1 ). Conversely, with 0.9 (10 )[150 ] fb-1 of 13 TeV data, MWR<3 (4 )[5 ] TeV and (mN/MWR)<0.1 can be excluded at 95% C.L.; with 100 fb-1 (2.5 ab-1 ) of 100 TeV data, MW R<22 (33 ) TeV can be excluded.

  9. The MACHO Project 9 Million Star Color-Magnitude Diagram of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Basu, A.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Drake, A. J.; Freeman, K. C.

    2000-01-01

    We present a 9 million star color-magnitude diagram (9M CMD) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) bar. The 9M CMD reveals a complex superposition of different-age and -metallicity stellar populations, with important stellar evolutionary phases occurring over 3 orders of magnitude in number density. First, we count the nonvariable red and blue supergiants and the associated Cepheid variables and measure the stellar effective temperatures defining the Cepheid instability strip. Lifetime predictions of stellar evolution theory are tested, with implications for the origin of low-luminosity Cepheids. The highly evolved asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the 9M CMD have a bimodal distribution in brightness, which we interpret as discrete old populations ((greater-or-similar sign)1 Gyr). The faint AGB sequence may be metal-poor and very old. Comparing the mean properties of giant branch and horizontal-branch (HB) stars in the 9M CMD with those of clusters, we identify NGC 411 and M3 as templates for the admixture of old stellar populations in the bar. However, there are several indications that the old and metal-poor field population has a red HB morphology: the RR Lyrae variables lie preferentially on the red edge of the instability strip, the AGB bump is very red, and the ratio of AGB bump stars to RR Lyrae variables is quite large. If the HB second parameter is age, the old and metal-poor field population in the bar likely formed after the oldest LMC clusters. Lifetime predictions of stellar evolution theory lead us to associate a significant fraction of the ∼1 million red HB clump giants in the 9M CMD with the same old and metal-poor population producing the RR Lyrae stars and the AGB bump. In this case, compared with the age-dependent luminosity predictions of stellar evolution theory, the red HB clump is too bright relative to the RR Lyrae stars and AGB bump. Last, we show that the surface density profile of RR Lyrae variables is fitted by an exponential

  10. The MACHO Project 9 Million Star Color-Magnitude Diagram of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Basu, A.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Drake, A. J.; Freeman, K. C. (and others)

    2000-05-01

    We present a 9 million star color-magnitude diagram (9M CMD) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) bar. The 9M CMD reveals a complex superposition of different-age and -metallicity stellar populations, with important stellar evolutionary phases occurring over 3 orders of magnitude in number density. First, we count the nonvariable red and blue supergiants and the associated Cepheid variables and measure the stellar effective temperatures defining the Cepheid instability strip. Lifetime predictions of stellar evolution theory are tested, with implications for the origin of low-luminosity Cepheids. The highly evolved asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the 9M CMD have a bimodal distribution in brightness, which we interpret as discrete old populations ((greater-or-similar sign)1 Gyr). The faint AGB sequence may be metal-poor and very old. Comparing the mean properties of giant branch and horizontal-branch (HB) stars in the 9M CMD with those of clusters, we identify NGC 411 and M3 as templates for the admixture of old stellar populations in the bar. However, there are several indications that the old and metal-poor field population has a red HB morphology: the RR Lyrae variables lie preferentially on the red edge of the instability strip, the AGB bump is very red, and the ratio of AGB bump stars to RR Lyrae variables is quite large. If the HB second parameter is age, the old and metal-poor field population in the bar likely formed after the oldest LMC clusters. Lifetime predictions of stellar evolution theory lead us to associate a significant fraction of the {approx}1 million red HB clump giants in the 9M CMD with the same old and metal-poor population producing the RR Lyrae stars and the AGB bump. In this case, compared with the age-dependent luminosity predictions of stellar evolution theory, the red HB clump is too bright relative to the RR Lyrae stars and AGB bump. Last, we show that the surface density profile of RR Lyrae variables is fitted by an exponential

  11. THE MASS LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: EMPIRICAL RELATIONS FOR EXCESS EMISSION AT 8 AND 24 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Sundar; Meixner, Margaret; Leitherer, Claus; Vijh, Uma; Gordon, Karl D.; Sewilo, Marta; Volk, Kevin; Blum, Robert D.; Harris, Jason; Babler, Brian L.; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles W.; For, Bi-Qing; Misselt, Karl A.; Cohen, Martin; Hora, Joseph L.; Indebetouw, Remy; Markwick-Kemper, Francisca

    2009-01-01

    We present empirical relations describing excess emission from evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) survey which includes the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm and Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) 24, 70, and 160 μm bands. We combine the SAGE data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS; J, H, and K s ) and the optical Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS; U, B, V, and I) point source catalogs in order to create complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star candidates in the LMC. AGB star outflows are among the main producers of dust in a galaxy, and this mass loss results in an excess in the fluxes observed in the 8 and 24 μm bands. The aim of this work is to investigate the mass loss return by AGB stars to the interstellar medium of the LMC by studying the dependence of the infrared excess flux on the total luminosity. We identify oxygen-rich, carbon-rich, and extreme AGB star populations in our sample based on their 2MASS and IRAC colors. The SEDs of oxygen- and carbon-rich AGB stars are compared with appropriate stellar photosphere models to obtain the excess flux in all the IRAC bands and the MIPS 24 μm band. Extreme AGB stars are dominated by circumstellar emission at 8 and 24 μm; thus we approximate their excesses with the flux observed in these bands. We find about 16,000 O-rich, 6300 C-rich, and 1000 extreme sources with reliable 8 μm excesses, and about 4500 O-rich, 5300 C-rich, and 960 extreme sources with reliable 24 μm excesses. The excesses are in the range 0.1 mJy to 5 Jy. The 8 and 24 μm excesses for all three types of AGB candidates show a general increasing trend with luminosity. The color temperature of the circumstellar dust derived from the ratio of the 8 and 24 μm excesses decreases with an increase in excess, while the 24 μm optical depth increases with

  12. Linear relations between leaf mass per area (LMA) and seasonal climate discovered through Linear Manifold Clustering (LMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Haralick, R. M.; Diky, A.; Kattge, J.; Su, X.

    2016-12-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) is a critical variable in plant carbon allocation, correlates with leaf activity traits (photosynthetic activity, respiration), and is a controller of litterfall mass and hence carbon substrate for soil biogeochemistry. Recent advances in understanding the leaf economics spectrum (LES) show that LMA has a strong correlation with leaf life span, a trait that reflects ecological strategy, whereas physiological traits that control leaf activity scale with each other when mass-normalized (Osnas et al., 2013). These functional relations help reduce the number of independent variables in quantifying leaf traits. However, LMA is an independent variable that remains a challenge to specify in dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs), when vegetation types are classified into a limited number of plant functional types (PFTs) without clear mechanistic drivers for LMA. LMA can range orders of magnitude across plant species, as well as vary within a single plant, both vertically and seasonally. As climate relations in combination with alternative ecological strategies have yet to be well identified for LMA, we have assembled 22,000 records of LMA spanning 0.004 - 33 mg/m2 from the numerous contributors to the TRY database (Kattge et al., 2011), with observations distributed over several climate zones and plant functional categories (growth form, leaf type, phenology). We present linear relations between LMA and climate variables, including seasonal temperature, precipitation, and radiation, as derived through Linear Manifold Clustering (LMC). LMC is a stochastic search technique for identifying linear dependencies between variables in high dimensional space. We identify a set of parsimonious classes of LMA-climate groups based on a metric of minimum description to identify structure in the data set, akin to data compression. The relations in each group are compared to Köppen-Geiger climate classes, with some groups revealing continuous linear relations

  13. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY REVEALS THE SPECIAL NATURE OF WOLF-RAYET STAR WINDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W.-R. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52245 (United States); Huenemoerder, D. P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37663 (United States); Pollock, A. M. T., E-mail: lida@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de [European Space Agency XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Apartado 78, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-03-10

    We present the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a putatively single Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. 400 ks observations of WR 6 by the XMM-Newton telescope resulted in a superb quality high-resolution X-ray spectrum. Spectral analysis reveals that the X-rays originate far out in the stellar wind, more than 30 stellar radii from the photosphere, and thus outside the wind acceleration zone where the line-driving instability (LDI) could create shocks. The X-ray emitting plasma reaches temperatures up to 50 MK and is embedded within the unshocked, 'cool' stellar wind as revealed by characteristic spectral signatures. We detect a fluorescent Fe line at Almost-Equal-To 6.4 keV. The presence of fluorescence is consistent with a two-component medium, where the cool wind is permeated with the hot X-ray emitting plasma. The wind must have a very porous structure to allow the observed amount of X-rays to escape. We find that neither the LDI nor any alternative binary scenario can explain the data. We suggest a scenario where X-rays are produced when the fast wind rams into slow 'sticky clumps' that resist acceleration. Our new data show that the X-rays in single WR star are generated by some special mechanism different from the one operating in the O-star winds.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF STELLAR STRATIFICATION IN THREE YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Rochau, Boyke; Mackey, Dougal; Xin Yu

    2010-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of stellar stratification in young star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We apply our recently developed effective radius method for the assessment of stellar stratification on imaging data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys of three young LMC clusters to characterize the phenomenon and develop a comparative scheme for its assessment in such clusters. The clusters of our sample, NGC 1983, NGC 2002, and NGC 2010, are selected on the basis of their youthfulness, and their variety in appearance, structure, stellar content, and surrounding stellar ambient. Our photometry is complete for magnitudes down to m 814 ≅ 23 mag, allowing the calculation of the structural parameters of the clusters, the estimation of their ages, and the determination of their stellar content. Our study shows that each cluster in our sample demonstrates stellar stratification in a quite different manner and at different degree from the others. Specifically, NGC 1983 shows partial segregation, with the effective radius increasing with fainter magnitudes only for the faintest stars of the cluster. Our method on NGC 2002 provides evidence of strong stellar stratification for both bright and faint stars; the cluster demonstrates the phenomenon with the highest degree in the sample. Finally, NGC 2010 is not segregated, as its bright stellar content is not centrally concentrated, the relation of effective radius to magnitude for stars of intermediate brightness is rather flat, and we find no evidence of stratification for its faintest stars. For the parameterization of the phenomenon of stellar stratification and its quantitative comparison among these clusters, we propose the slope derived from the change in the effective radius over the corresponding magnitude range as indicative parameter of the degree of stratification in the clusters. A positive value of this slope indicates mass segregation in the cluster, while a negative or zero value

  15. "Antes e depois da LMC": experiências e dimensões da leucemia mieloide crônica como uma ruptura biográfica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeimi Alexandra Alzate López

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa as experiências de enfermidade de pacientes com leucemia mieloide crônica (LMC, centrando nas dimensões que apontam a chegada da doença como uma ruptura biográfica. Este estudo qualitativo baseou-se na análise das narrativas de seis pacientes, com idades entre 23 e 62 anos, usuários do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS e pacientes de um hospital – centro de referência em atenção hematológica na cidade de Salvador, Bahia, Brasil. Nos resultados apresenta-se a experiência de ruptura com base em três categorias (1 os significados da doença e a LMC como ameaça; (2 rupturas físicas, sociais e as experiências estigmatizantes; (3 a percepção de um “antes” e um “depois” da LMC, apontando para as mudanças no self, nas relações sociais e na vida cotidiana. Concluiu-se que os impactos biográficos, sociais e dos sistemas de saúde (considerando o custo das medicações atualizam e ampliam questões como o acesso a tratamentos, assim como o enfrentamento do certo e do incerto, em que o “conhecido” da LMC encontra-se pouco acessível ao estoque de conhecimento da vida cotidiana.

  16. Hybrid stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hybrid stars. AsHOK GOYAL. Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India. Abstract. Recently there have been important developments in the determination of neutron ... number and the electric charge. ... available to the system to rearrange concentration of charges for a given fraction of.

  17. Pulsating stars

    CERN Document Server

    Catelan, M?rcio

    2014-01-01

    The most recent and comprehensive book on pulsating stars which ties the observations to our present understanding of stellar pulsation and evolution theory.  Written by experienced researchers and authors in the field, this book includes the latest observational results and is valuable reading for astronomers, graduate students, nuclear physicists and high energy physicists.

  18. Variable stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feast, M.W.; Wenzel, W.; Fernie, J.D.; Percy, J.R.; Smak, J.; Gascoigne, S.C.B.; Grindley, J.E.; Lovell, B.; Sawyer Hogg, H.B.; Baker, N.; Fitch, W.S.; Rosino, L.; Gursky, H.

    1976-01-01

    A critical review of variable stars is presented. A fairly complete summary of major developments and discoveries during the period 1973-1975 is given. The broad developments and new trends are outlined. Essential problems for future research are identified. (B.R.H. )

  19. THE MASS-LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. VI. LUMINOSITIES AND MASS-LOSS RATES ON POPULATION SCALES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riebel, D.; Meixner, M.; Srinivasan, S.; Sargent, B.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from the first application of the Grid of Red Supergiant and Asymptotic Giant Branch ModelS (GRAMS) model grid to the entire evolved stellar population of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). GRAMS is a pre-computed grid of 80,843 radiative transfer models of evolved stars and circumstellar dust shells composed of either silicate or carbonaceous dust. We fit GRAMS models to ∼30,000 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars in the LMC, using 12 bands of photometry from the optical to the mid-infrared. Our published data set consists of thousands of evolved stars with individually determined evolutionary parameters such as luminosity and mass-loss rate. The GRAMS grid has a greater than 80% accuracy rate discriminating between oxygen- and carbon-rich chemistry. The global dust injection rate to the interstellar medium (ISM) of the LMC from RSGs and AGB stars is on the order of 2.1 × 10 –5 M ☉ yr –1 , equivalent to a total mass injection rate (including the gas) into the ISM of ∼6 × 10 –3 M ☉ yr –1 . Carbon stars inject two and a half times as much dust into the ISM as do O-rich AGB stars, but the same amount of mass. We determine a bolometric correction factor for C-rich AGB stars in the K s band as a function of J – K s color, BC K s = -0.40(J-K s ) 2 + 1.83(J-K s ) + 1.29. We determine several IR color proxies for the dust mass-loss rate (M-dot d ) from C-rich AGB stars, such as log M-dot d = (-18.90/((K s -[8.0])+3.37) - 5.93. We find that a larger fraction of AGB stars exhibiting the 'long-secondary period' phenomenon are more O-rich than stars dominated by radial pulsations, and AGB stars without detectable mass loss do not appear on either the first-overtone or fundamental-mode pulsation sequences.

  20. Star Products and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Iida, Mari; Yoshioka, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Star products parametrized by complex matrices are defined. Especially commutative associative star products are treated, and star exponentials with respect to these star products are considered. Jacobi's theta functions are given as infinite sums of star exponentials. As application, several concrete identities are obtained by properties of the star exponentials.

  1. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR-FORMING REGION N206

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romita, Krista Alexandra; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Carlson, Lynn Redding; Whitney, B.; Babler, B.; Meade, M.; Indebetouw, R.; Hora, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    We present analysis of the energetic star-forming region Henize 206 (N206) located near the southern edge of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) based on photometric data from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE-LMC; IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 μm and MIPS 24 μm), Infrared Survey Facility near-infrared survey (J, H, K s ), and the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS UBVI) covering a wavelength range of 0.36-24 μm. Young stellar object (YSO) candidates are identified based upon their location in infrared color-magnitude space and classified by the shapes of their spectral energy distributions in comparison with a pre-computed grid of YSO models. We identify 116 YSO candidates: 102 are well characterized by the YSO models, predominately Stage I, and 14 may be multiple sources or young sources with transition disks. Careful examination of the individual sources and their surrounding environment allows us to identify a factor of ∼14.5 more YSO candidates than have already been identified. The total mass of these well-fit YSO candidates is ∼520 M sun . We calculate a current star formation rate of 0.27 x 10 -1 M sun yr -1 kpc -2 . The distribution of YSO candidates appears to follow shells of neutral material in the interstellar medium.

  2. Structural changes in the hot Algol OGLE-LMC-DPV-097 and its disc related to its long cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés L, J.; Mennickent, R. E.; Djurašević, G.; Poleski, R.; Soszyński, I.

    2018-06-01

    Double Periodic Variables (DPVs) are hot Algols showing a long photometric cycle of uncertain origin. We report the discovery of changes in the orbital light curve of OGLE-LMC-DPV-097 which depend on the phase of its long photometric cycle. During the ascending branch of the long cycle the brightness at the first quadrature is larger than during the second quadrature, during the maximum of the long cycle the brightness is basically the same at both quadratures, during the descending branch the brightness at the second quadrature is larger than during the first quadrature, and during the minimum of the long cycle the secondary minimum disappears. We model the light curve at different phases of the long cycle and find that the data are consistent with changes in the properties of the accretion disc and two disc spots. The disc's size and temperature change with the long-cycle period. We find a smaller and hotter disc at minimum, and larger and cooler disc at maximum. The spot temperatures, locations, and angular sizes also show variability during the long cycle.

  3. Are Wolf-Rayet Stars Able to Pollute the Interstellar Medium of Galaxies? Results from Integral Field Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Pérez-Montero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial distribution of chemical abundances in a sample of low metallicity Wolf-Rayet (WR galaxies selected from the SDSS. We used the integral field spectroscopy technique in the optical spectral range (3700 Å–6850 Å with PMAS attached to the CAHA 3.5 m telescope. Our statistical analysis of the spatial distributions of O/H and N/O, as derived using the direct method or strong-line parameters consistent with it, indicates that metallicity is homogeneous in five out of the six analysed objects in scales of the order of several kpc. Only in the object WR404 is a gradient of metallicity found in the direction of the low surface brightness tail. In contrast, we found an overabundance of N/O in spatial scales of the order of hundreds of pc associated with or close to the positions of the WR stars in 4 out of the 6 galaxies. We exclude possible hydrodynamical causes, such as the metal-poor gas inflow, for this local pollution by means of the analysis of the mass-metallicity relation (MZR and mass-nitrogen-to-oxygen relation (MNOR for the WR galaxies catalogued in the SDSS.

  4. SPITZER ANALYSIS OF H II REGION COMPLEXES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS: DETERMINING A SUITABLE MONOCHROMATIC OBSCURED STAR FORMATION INDICATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, B.; Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Babler, B.; Bracker, S.; Meade, M.; Block, M.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Misselt, K.; Bolatto, A. D.; Carlson, L. R.; Hora, J. L.; Robitaille, T.; Indebetouw, R.; Madden, S. C.; Oey, M. S.; Oliveira, J. M.; Vijh, U. P.

    2010-01-01

    H II regions are the birth places of stars, and as such they provide the best measure of current star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies. The close proximity of the Magellanic Clouds allows us to probe the nature of these star forming regions at small spatial scales. To study the H II regions, we compute the bolometric infrared flux, or total infrared (TIR), by integrating the flux from 8 to 500 μm. The TIR provides a measure of the obscured star formation because the UV photons from hot young stars are absorbed by dust and re-emitted across the mid-to-far-infrared (IR) spectrum. We aim to determine the monochromatic IR band that most accurately traces the TIR and produces an accurate obscured SFR over large spatial scales. We present the spatial analysis, via aperture/annulus photometry, of 16 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 16 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) H II region complexes using the Spitzer Space Telescope's IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 8 μm) and MIPS (24, 70, 160 μm) bands. Ultraviolet rocket data (1500 and 1900 A) and SHASSA Hα data are also included. All data are convolved to the MIPS 160 μm resolution (40 arcsec full width at half-maximum), and apertures have a minimum radius of 35''. The IRAC, MIPS, UV, and Hα spatial analysis are compared with the spatial analysis of the TIR. We find that nearly all of the LMC and SMC H II region spectral energy distributions (SEDs) peak around 70 μm at all radii, from ∼10 to ∼400 pc from the central ionizing sources. As a result, we find the following: the sizes of H II regions as probed by 70 μm are approximately equal to the sizes as probed by TIR (∼70 pc in radius); the radial profile of the 70 μm flux, normalized by TIR, is constant at all radii (70 μm ∼ 0.45TIR); the 1σ standard deviation of the 70 μm fluxes, normalized by TIR, is a lower fraction of the mean (0.05-0.12 out to ∼220 pc) than the normalized 8, 24, and 160 μm normalized fluxes (0.12-0.52); and these results are the same for the LMC and the

  5. SEARCH FOR A MAGNETIC FIELD VIA CIRCULAR POLARIZATION IN THE WOLF-RAYET STAR EZ CMa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Chevrotiere, A.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal and Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Quebec (CRAQ), C. P. 6128, succ. centre-ville, Montreal (Quebec) H3C 3J7 (Canada); Collaboration: MiMeS Collaboration

    2013-02-20

    We report on the first deep, direct search for a magnetic field via the circular polarization of Zeeman splitting in a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star. Using the highly efficient ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we observed at three different epochs one of the best W-R candidates in the sky expected to harbor a magnetic field, the bright, highly variable WN4 star EZ CMa = WR6 = HD 50896. We looked for the characteristic circular polarization (Stokes V) pattern in strong emission lines that would arise as a consequence of a global, rotating magnetic field with a split monopole configuration. We also obtained nearly simultaneous linear polarization spectra (Stokes Q and U), which are dominated by electron scattering, most likely from a flattened wind with large-scale corotating structures. As the star rotates with a period of 3.766 days, our view of the wind changes, which in turn affects the value of the linear polarization in lines versus continuum at the {approx}0.2% level. Depending on the epoch of observation, our Stokes V data were affected by significant crosstalk from Stokes Q and U to V. We removed this spurious signal from the circular polarization data and experimented with various levels of spectral binning to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of our data. In the end, no magnetic field is unambiguously detected in EZ CMa. Assuming that the star is intrinsically magnetic and harbors a split monopole configuration, we find an upper limit of B {approx} 100 G for the intensity of its field in the line-forming regions of the stellar wind.

  6. SEARCH FOR A MAGNETIC FIELD VIA CIRCULAR POLARIZATION IN THE WOLF-RAYET STAR EZ CMa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Chevrotière, A.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first deep, direct search for a magnetic field via the circular polarization of Zeeman splitting in a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star. Using the highly efficient ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we observed at three different epochs one of the best W-R candidates in the sky expected to harbor a magnetic field, the bright, highly variable WN4 star EZ CMa = WR6 = HD 50896. We looked for the characteristic circular polarization (Stokes V) pattern in strong emission lines that would arise as a consequence of a global, rotating magnetic field with a split monopole configuration. We also obtained nearly simultaneous linear polarization spectra (Stokes Q and U), which are dominated by electron scattering, most likely from a flattened wind with large-scale corotating structures. As the star rotates with a period of 3.766 days, our view of the wind changes, which in turn affects the value of the linear polarization in lines versus continuum at the ∼0.2% level. Depending on the epoch of observation, our Stokes V data were affected by significant crosstalk from Stokes Q and U to V. We removed this spurious signal from the circular polarization data and experimented with various levels of spectral binning to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of our data. In the end, no magnetic field is unambiguously detected in EZ CMa. Assuming that the star is intrinsically magnetic and harbors a split monopole configuration, we find an upper limit of B ∼ 100 G for the intensity of its field in the line-forming regions of the stellar wind.

  7. The hypolipidemic activity of Ayurvedic medicine, Arogyavardhini vati in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemic rats: A comparison with fenofibrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gajendra; Srivastava, Amita; Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor of coronary heart disease. Currently available hypolipidemic drugs have been associated with number of side effects. Arogyavardhini vati, an Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation has been used for liver disorders. Therefore, present study was designed to evaluate the effect of Arogyavardhini vati in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Anti-hyperlipidemic activity evaluation of Arogyavardhini vati against Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Overnight fasted male Wistar rats (150-200 g) were randomly divided into normal control group [4% Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO), i.p.], positive control group (Triton WR-1339 in 4% DMSO, 400 mg/kg, i.p.), standard drug treated (fenofibrate 65 mg/kg, p.o. for 7 days after inducing hyperlipidemia) and Arogyavardhini vati treated (50, 100, 200 mg/kg, p.o. for 7 days after inducing hyperlipidemia). Rat doses were calculated by extrapolating the equivalent human dose (therapeutic dose, sub-maximum, and maximum dose). Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein HDL, liver malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) levels were estimated at end of experiments. Arogyavardhini vati significantly decreased serum cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and significantly increased serum HDL in a dose-dependent manner. Decreased MDA and increased GSH levels in liver were observed at all doses of Arogyavardhini vati (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) and fenofibrate-treated groups when compared with Triton-treated group. Atherogenic Index (AI) level was significantly decreased in fenofibrate and Arogyavardhini vati (200 mg/kg) treated rats when compared with normal control. Arogyavardhini vati, a traditionally used Ayurvedic medicine may be a useful therapy for hypercholesterolemia through reducing oxidative stress (decreasing MDA and increasing GSH) and lipid levels.

  8. Radioprotection by WR-151327 against the late normal tissue damage in mouse hind legs from gamma ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Satoru; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the protective effect of WR-151327 on late radiation-induced damaged to normal tissues in mice, the right hind legs of mice with or without WR-151327 administration (400 mg/kg) were irradiated with 137 Cs gamma rays. Leg contracture and skin shrinkage assays were performed at 380 days after irradiation. The mice were killed on day 400 postirradiation and histological sections of the legs were made. The thickness of the dermis, epidermis, and skin (dermis plus epidermis) was measured. The muscular area of the legs and the posterior knee angle between the femur and tibia were also measured. The left hind legs were similarly assessed as nonirradiated controls. Group means and standard deviations were calculated and dose-response curves were drawn for every endpoint. Then, the dose modifying factor (DMF) for each endpoint and the correlations among endpoints were determined. Latae damage assayed by leg contracture and skin shrinkage progressed with increasing radiation dose. However, it was reduced by drug treatment. The significant effect was indicated for skin shrinkage by a DMF of 1.8 at 35%. The DMF for leg contracture was 1.3 at 6 mm. In the irradiated legs, epidermal hyperplasia and dermal fibrosis in the skin, muscular atrophy, and extension disturbance of the knee joint were observed. These changes progressed with increasing radiation dose. Skin damage assayed by the present endpoints was also reduced by drug treatment by DMFs of 1.4 to 1.7. However, DMFs for damage to the muscle and knee were not determined because no isoeffect was observed. There were good correlations between leg contracture or skin shrinkage and the other endpoints in both untreated and drug-treated mice. WR-151327 has the potential to protect against radiation-induced late normal tissue damage. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004.......Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004....

  10. Molecular Hydrogen Images of Star Forming Regions in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Ronald G.; Barba, R.; Bolatto, A.; Chu, Y.; Points, S.; Rubio, M.; Smith, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds exhibit a variety of star formation physics with multiple phase components in low metallicity, gas rich environments. The 10 K, 100 K, and 104 K regimes are well explored. We are imaging LMC and SMC star forming regions in 2.12 micron H2 emission which arises in the 1000 K transition zone of molecular clouds. This is an NOAO Survey program using the widefield IR camera NEWFIRM on the CTIO 4-m Blanco telescope during its limited southern deployment. The data set will have immediate morphological applications and will provide target selection for followup infrared spectroscopy. We will provide a public archive of fully calibrated images with no proprietary period. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  11. Near-Infrared Keck Interferometer and IOTA Closure Phase Observations of Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, J.; Wallace, D.; Barry, R.; Richardson, L. J.; Traub, W.; Danchi, W. C.

    We present first results from observations of a small sample of IR-bright Wolf-Rayet stars with the Keck Interferometer in the near-infrared, and with the IONIC beam three-telescope beam combiner at the Infrared and Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) observatory. The former results were obtained as part of shared-risk observations in commissioning the Keck Interferometer and form a subset of a high-resolution study of dust around Wolf-Rayet stars using multiple interferometers in progress in our group. The latter results are the first closure phase observations of these stars in the near-infrared in a separated telescope interferometer. Earlier aperture-masking observations with the Keck-I telescope provide strong evidence that dust-formation in late-type WC stars are a result of wind-wind collision in short-period binaries.Our program with the Keck interferometer seeks to further examine this paradigm at much higher resolution. We have spatially resolved the binary in the prototypical dusty WC type star WR 140. WR 137, another episodic dust-producing star, has been partially resolved for the first time, providing the first direct clue to its possible binary nature.We also include WN stars in our sample to investigate circumstellar dust in this other main sub-type of WRs. We have been unable to resolve any of these, indicating a lack of extended dust.Complementary observations using the MIDI instrument on the VLTI in the mid-infrared are presented in another contribution to this workshop.

  12. X-rays from Wolf-Rayet stars observed by the Einstein observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, W.T.; Cassinelli, J.P.; Hucht, K.A. van der

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results of three X-ray surveys are presented. Out of a sample of 20 stars, X-rays were detected from four Wolf-Rayet stars and two O8f + stars. The detected stars have about the same mean value as O stars for the X-ray to total luminosity ratio, Lsub(x)/L = 10 -7 , but exhibit a much larger variation about the mean. The spectral energy distributions are also found to be like that of O stars in that they do not exhibit large attenuation of X-rays softer than 1 keV. This indicates that for both the O stars and WR stars much of the X-ray emission is coming from hot wisps or shocks in the outer regions of the winds and not from a thin source at the base of the wind. The general spectral shape and flux level place severe restrictions on models that attribute the lack of hydrogen emission lines to extremely high temperatures of the gas in the wind. (Auth.)

  13. Disk Disruptions and X-ray Intensity Excursions in Cyg X-2, LMC X-3 and Cyg X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, P. T.; Smale, A. P.

    2001-05-01

    The RXTE All Sky Monitor soft X-ray light curves of many X-ray binaries show long-term intensity variations (a.k.a "superorbital periodicities") that have been ascribed to precession of a warped, tilted accretion disk around the X-ray source. We have found that the excursion times between X-ray minima in Cyg X-2 can be characterized as a series of integer multiples of the 9.8 binary orbital period, (as opposed to the previously reported stable 77.7 day single periodicity, or a single modulation whose period changes slowly with time). While the data set is too short for a proper statistical analysis, it is clear that the length of any given intensity excursion cannot be used to predict the next (integer) excursion length in the series. In the black hole candidate system LMC X-3, the excursion times are shown to be related to each other by rational fractions. We find that the long term light curve of the unusual galactic X-ray jet source Cyg X-3 can also be described as a series of intensity excursions related to each other by integer multiples of a fundamental underlying clock. In the latter cases, the clock is apparently not related to the known binary periods. A unified physical model, involving both an inclined accretion disk and a fixed-probability disk disruption mechanism is presented, and compared with three-body scattering results. Each time the disk passes through the orbital plane it experiences a fixed probability P that it will disrupt. This model has testable predictions---the distribution of integers should resemble that of an atomic process with a characteristic half life. Further analysis can support or refute the model, and shed light on what system parameters effectively set the value of P.

  14. CD8 Knockout Mice Are Protected from Challenge by Vaccination with WR201, a Live Attenuated Mutant of Brucella melitensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L. Yingst

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells have been reported to play an important role in defense against B. abortus infection in mouse models. In the present report, we use CD8 knockout mice to further elucidate the role of these cells in protection from B. melitensis infection. Mice were immunized orally by administration of B. melitensis WR201, a purine auxotrophic attenuated vaccine strain, then challenged intranasally with B. melitensis 16M. In some experiments, persistence of WR201 in the spleens of CD8 knockout mice was slightly longer than that in the spleens of normal mice. However, development of anti-LPS serum antibody, antigen-induced production of γ-interferon (IFN-γ by immune splenic lymphocytes, protection against intranasal challenge, and recovery of nonimmunized animals from intranasal challenge were similar between normal and knockout animals. Further, primary Brucella infection was not exacerbated in perforin knockout and Fas-deficient mice and these animals’ anti-Brucella immune responses were indistinguishable from those of normal mice. These results indicate that CD8+ T cells do not play an essential role as either cytotoxic cells or IFN-γ producers, yet they do participate in a specific immune response to immunization and challenge in this murine model of B. melitensis infection.

  15. Interacting star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Overmerging problem solved by cluster group formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Stéphane; Bergond, Gilles; Vallenari, Antonella

    1999-04-01

    We present the tidal tail distributions of a sample of candidate binary clusters located in the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). One isolated cluster, SL 268, is presented in order to study the effect of the LMC tidal field. All the candidate binary clusters show tidal tails, confirming that the pairs are formed by physically linked objects. The stellar mass in the tails covers a large range, from 1.8x 10(3) to 3x 10(4) \\msun. We derive a total mass estimate for SL 268 and SL 356. At large radii, the projected density profiles of SL 268 and SL 356 fall off as r(-gamma ) , with gamma = 2.27 and gamma =3.44, respectively. Out of 4 pairs or multiple systems, 2 are older than the theoretical survival time of binary clusters (going from a few 10(6) years to 10(8) years). A pair shows too large age difference between the components to be consistent with classical theoretical models of binary cluster formation (Fujimoto & Kumai \\cite{fujimoto97}). We refer to this as the ``overmerging'' problem. A different scenario is proposed: the formation proceeds in large molecular complexes giving birth to groups of clusters over a few 10(7) years. In these groups the expected cluster encounter rate is larger, and tidal capture has higher probability. Cluster pairs are not born together through the splitting of the parent cloud, but formed later by tidal capture. For 3 pairs, we tentatively identify the star cluster group (SCG) memberships. The SCG formation, through the recent cluster starburst triggered by the LMC-SMC encounter, in contrast with the quiescent open cluster formation in the Milky Way can be an explanation to the paucity of binary clusters observed in our Galaxy. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile}

  16. REFINED NEUTRON STAR MASS DETERMINATIONS FOR SIX ECLIPSING X-RAY PULSAR BINARIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, Meredith L.; Orosz, Jerome A.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Torres, Manuel A. P.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Buxton, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an improved method for determining the mass of neutron stars in eclipsing X-ray pulsar binaries and apply the method to six systems, namely, Vela X-1, 4U 1538-52, SMC X-1, LMC X-4, Cen X-3, and Her X-1. In previous studies to determine neutron star mass, the X-ray eclipse duration has been approximated analytically by assuming that the companion star is spherical with an effective Roche lobe radius. We use a numerical code based on Roche geometry with various optimizers to analyze the published data for these systems, which we supplement with new spectroscopic and photometric data for 4U 1538-52. This allows us to model the eclipse duration more accurately and thus calculate an improved value for the neutron star mass. The derived neutron star mass also depends on the assumed Roche lobe filling factor β of the companion star, where β = 1 indicates a completely filled Roche lobe. In previous work a range of β between 0.9 and 1.0 was usually adopted. We use optical ellipsoidal light-curve data to constrain β. We find neutron star masses of 1.77 ± 0.08 M sun for Vela X-1, 0.87 ± 0.07 M sun for 4U 1538-52 (eccentric orbit), 1.00 ± 0.10 M sun for 4U 1538-52 (circular orbit), 1.04 ± 0.09 M sun for SMC X-1, 1.29 ± 0.05 M sun for LMC X-4, 1.49 ± 0.08 M sun for Cen X-3, and 1.07 ± 0.36 M sun for Her X-1. We discuss the limits of the approximations that were used to derive the earlier mass determinations, and we comment on the implications our new masses have for observationally refining the upper and lower bounds of the neutron star mass distribution.

  17. The Tarantula Nebula as a template for extragalactic star forming regions from VLT/MUSE and HST/STIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Paul A.; Caballero-Nieves, Saida M.; Castro, Norberto; Evans, Christopher J.

    2017-11-01

    We present VLT/MUSE observations of NGC 2070, the dominant ionizing nebula of 30 Doradus in the LMC, plus HST/STIS spectroscopy of its central star cluster R136. Integral Field Spectroscopy (MUSE) and pseudo IFS (STIS) together provides a complete census of all massive stars within the central 30×30 parsec2 of the Tarantula. We discuss the integrated far-UV spectrum of R136, of particular interest for UV studies of young extragalactic star clusters. Strong He iiλ1640 emission at very early ages (1-2 Myr) from very massive stars cannot be reproduced by current population synthesis models, even those incorporating binary evolution and very massive stars. A nebular analysis of the integrated MUSE dataset implies an age of ~4.5 Myr for NGC 2070. Wolf-Rayet features provide alternative age diagnostics, with the primary contribution to the integrated Wolf-Rayet bumps arising from R140 rather than the more numerous H-rich WN stars in R136. Caution should be used when interpreting spatially extended observations of extragalactic star-forming regions.

  18. Hydrogen-deficient Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todt, H.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Hamann, W.-R.; Pena, M.; Graefener, G.; Buckley, D.; Crause, L.; Crawford, S. M.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Hettlage, C.; Hooper, E.; Husser, T.-O.; Kotze, P.; Loaring, N.; Nordsieck, K. H.; O'Donoghue, D.; Pickering, T.; Potter, S.; Romero-Colmenero, E.; Vaisanen, P.; Williams, T.; Wolf, M.

    2015-06-01

    A significant number of the central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) are hydrogen-deficient and are considered as the progenitors of H-deficient white dwarfs. Almost all of these H-deficient CSPNe show a chemical composition of helium, carbon, and oxygen. Most of them exhibit Wolf-Rayet-like emission line spectra and are therefore classified as of spectral type [WC]. In the last years, CSPNe of other Wolf-Rayet spectral subtypes have been identified, namely PB 8 (spectral type [WN/WC]), IC 4663 and Abell 48 (spectral type [WN]). We performed spectral analyses for a number of Wolf-Rayet type central stars of different evolutionary stages with the help of our Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model code for expanding atmospheres to determine relevant stellar parameters. The results of our recent analyses will be presented in the context of stellar evolution and white dwarf formation. Especially the problems of a uniform evolutionary channel for [WC] stars as well as constraints to the formation of [WN] or [WN/WC] subtype stars will be addressed.

  19. Life of a star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henbest, Nigel.

    1988-01-01

    The paper concerns the theory of stellar evolution. A description is given of:- how a star is born, main sequence stars, red giants, white dwarfs, supernovae, neutron stars and black holes. A brief explanation is given of how the death of a star as a supernova can trigger off the birth of a new generation of stars. Classification of stars and the fate of our sun, are also described. (U.K.)

  20. Corrections for hydrostatic atmospheric models: radii and effective temperatures of Wolf Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loore, C. de; Hellings, P.; Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.

    1982-01-01

    With the assumption of plane-parallel hydrostatic atmospheres, used generally for the computation of evolutionary models, the radii of WR stars are seriously underestimated. The true atmospheres may be very extended, due to the effect of the stellar wind. Instead of these hydrostatic atmospheres the authors consider dynamical atmospheres adopting a velocity law. The equation of the optical depth is integrated outwards using the equation of continuity. The ''hydrostatic'' radii are to be multiplied with a factor 2 to 8, and the effective temperatures with a factor 0.8 to 0.35 when Wolf Rayet characteristics for the wind are considered, and WR mass loss rates are used. With these corrections the effective temperatures of the theoretical models, which are helium burning Roche lobe overflow remnants, range between 30,000 K and 50,000 K. Effective temperatures calculated in the hydrostatic hypothesis can be as high as 150,000 K for helium burning RLOF-remnants with WR mass loss rates. (Auth.)

  1. ISOLATED WOLF-RAYET STARS AND O SUPERGIANTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION IDENTIFIED VIA PASCHEN-α EXCESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Stolovy, S. R.; Cotera, A.; Dong, H.; Wang, Q. D.; Morris, M. R.; Lang, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of 19 hot, evolved, massive stars near the Galactic center region (GCR). These objects were selected for spectroscopy owing to their detection as strong sources of Paschen-α (Pα) emission-line excess, following a narrowband imaging survey of the central 0. 0 65 x 0. 0 25 (l, b) around Sgr A* with the Hubble Space Telescope. Discoveries include six carbon-type (WC) and five nitrogen-type (WN) Wolf-Rayet stars, six O supergiants, and two B supergiants. Two of the O supergiants have X-ray counterparts having properties consistent with solitary O stars and colliding-wind binaries. The infrared photometry of 17 stars is consistent with the Galactic center distance, but 2 of them are located in the foreground. Several WC stars exhibit a relatively large infrared excess, which is possibly thermal emission from hot dust. Most of the stars appear scattered throughout the GCR, with no relation to the three known massive young clusters; several others lie near the Arches and Quintuplet clusters and may have originated within one of these systems. The results of this work bring the total sample of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the GCR to 88. All sources of strong Pα excess have been identified in the area surveyed with HST, which implies that the sample of WN stars in this region is near completion, and is dominated by late (WNL) types. The current WC sample, although probably not complete, is almost exclusively dominated by late (WCL) types. The observed WR subtype distribution in the GCR is a reflection of the intrinsic rarity of early subtypes (WNE and WCE) in the inner Galaxy, an effect that is driven by metallicity.

  2. Abell 48 - a rare WN-type central star of a planetary nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todt, H.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Hamann, W.-R.; Buckley, D.; Crause, L.; Crawford, S. M.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Hettlage, C.; Hooper, E.; Husser, T.-O.; Kotze, P.; Loaring, N.; Nordsieck, K. H.; O'Donoghue, D.; Pickering, T.; Potter, S.; Romero-Colmenero, E.; Vaisanen, P.; Williams, T.; Wolf, M.

    2013-04-01

    A considerable fraction of the central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) are hydrogen-deficient. Almost all of these H-deficient central stars (CSs) display spectra with strong carbon and helium lines. Most of them exhibit emission-line spectra resembling those of massive WC stars. Therefore these stars are classed as CSPNe of spectral type [WC]. Recently, quantitative spectral analysis of two emission-line CSs, PB 8 and IC 4663, revealed that these stars do not belong to the [WC] class. Instead PB 8 has been classified as [WN/WC] type and IC 4663 as [WN] type. In this work we report the spectroscopic identification of another rare [WN] star, the CS of Abell 48. We performed a spectral analysis of Abell 48 with the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) models for expanding atmospheres. We find that the expanding atmosphere of Abell 48 is mainly composed of helium (85 per cent by mass), hydrogen (10 per cent) and nitrogen (5 per cent). The residual hydrogen and the enhanced nitrogen abundance make this object different from the other [WN] star IC 4663. We discuss the possible origin of this atmospheric composition.

  3. Dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31. I. Variable stars and stellar populations in Andromeda XIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusano, Felice; Clementini, Gisella; Garofalo, Alessia; Federici, Luciana, E-mail: felice.cusano@oabo.inaf.it, E-mail: gisella.clementini@oabo.inaf.it, E-mail: luciana.federici@oabo.inaf.it, E-mail: alessia.garofalo@studio.unibo.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); and others

    2013-12-10

    We present B, V time-series photometry of Andromeda XIX (And XIX), the most extended (half-light radius of 6.'2) of Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal companions, which we observed with the Large Binocular Cameras at the Large Binocular Telescope. We surveyed a 23' × 23' area centered on And XIX and present the deepest color-magnitude diagram (CMD) ever obtained for this galaxy, reaching, at V ∼ 26.3 mag, about one magnitude below the horizontal branch (HB). The CMD shows a prominent and slightly widened red giant branch, along with a predominantly red HB, which extends to the blue to significantly populate the classical instability strip. We have identified 39 pulsating variable stars, of which 31 are of RR Lyrae type and 8 are Anomalous Cepheids (ACs). Twelve of the RR Lyrae variables and three of the ACs are located within And XIX's half light radius. The average period of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars ((P {sub ab}) = 0.62 days, σ = 0.03 days) and the period-amplitude diagram qualify And XIX as an Oosterhoff-Intermediate system. From the average luminosity of the RR Lyrae stars ((V(RR)) = 25.34 mag, σ = 0.10 mag), we determine a distance modulus of (m – M){sub 0} = 24.52 ± 0.23 mag in a scale where the distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is 18.5 ± 0.1 mag. The ACs follow a well-defined Period-Wesenheit (PW) relation that appears to be in very good agreement with the PW relationship defined by the ACs in the LMC.

  4. Influence of starvation, triton WR-1339 and [131I]-human serum albumin on rat liver lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harikumar, P.; Ninjoor, V.

    1986-01-01

    The response of rat liver lysosomes to starvation and administration of lysosomotropic agents viz. Triton WR-1339 and [ 131 I]-human serum albumin, was assessed in terms of their distribution pattern after isopycnic sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Starvation induced changes in lysosomes appeared to be similar to that produced by the detergent uptake. Both the treatments caused a distinct decline in the equilibration densities of the organelles. On the other hand, injected labelled protein failed to comigrate with the lysosomal markers in starved as well as Triton treated rats and conspicuously remained in a region of high specific gravity in the gradient. These findings indicate retarded fusion between secondary lysosomes and [ 131 I]-human serum albumin containing phagosomes in the livers of rats subjected to starvation or detergent treatment. (author)

  5. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, P.S.; Underhill, A.B.; Jordan, S.; Thomas, R.

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented

  6. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  7. Results of the indoor radiological survey at the W.R. Grace Co., Curtis Bay site, Baltimore, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1989-07-01

    The W.R. Grace Company, Davison Chemical Division, conducted developmental research and extraction of thorium from monazite ore at its Curtis Bay facility in Baltimore, Maryland, during the 1950s under contract to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Only one of the numerous buildings on the site was used for these operations. A 1979 aerial survey of the site for the Department of Energy (DOE) indicated that a comprehensive ground survey was required to determine whether or not any contamination remained from the AEC activities in that building. A radiological scoping survey performed later that year for DOE by a team from the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), disclosed surface contamination (alpha) levels in excess of DOE criteria on all five levels of the building. As a result of this finding, two additional surveys were performed in 1986 by ORNL at the request of DOE to evaluate any present or potential health risk. They are detailed in this report. The results of the 1986 surveys revealed several areas having elevated levels of radiation as a result of significant quantities of thorium on some building surfaces such as floors and ceiling beams. Most areas were small spots and in locations of low occupancy; thus, the possibility for significant exposure to workers was judged to be low. To confirm this evaluation, annual radiation exposure estimates for workers frequenting the few, larger contaminated areas on the site were derived using ORNL survey data and occupancy factors provided by the W.R. Grace Company. Estimates ranged from 27 to 41 mrem/yr or a maximum of 41% of the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr for members of the general public. 2 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  8. A BUTTERFLY-SHAPED 'PAPILLON' NEBULA YIELDS SECRETS OF MASSIVE STAR BIRTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA Hubble Space Telescope view of a turbulent cauldron of starbirth, called N159, taking place 170,000 light-years away in our satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Torrential stellar winds from hot newborn massive stars within the nebula sculpt ridges, arcs, and filaments in the vast cloud, which is over 150 light-years across. A rare type of compact ionized 'blob' is resolved for the first time to be a butterfly-shaped or 'Papillon' (French for 'butterfly') nebula, buried in the center of the maelstrom of glowing gases and dark dust. The unprecedented details of the structure of the Papillon, itself less than 2 light-years in size (about 2 arcseconds in the sky), are seen in the inset. A possible explanation of this bipolar shape is the outflow of gas from massive stars (over 10 times the mass of our sun) hidden in the central absorption zone. Such stars are so hot that their radiation pressure halts the infall of gas and directs it away from the stars in two opposite directions. Presumably, a dense equatorial disk formed by matter still trying to fall in onto the stars focuses the outstreaming matter into the bipolar directions. This observation is part of a search for young massive stars in the LMC. Rare are the cases where we can see massive stars so early after their birth. The red in this true-color image is from the emission of hydrogen and the yellow from high excitation ionized oxygen. The picture was taken on September 5, 1998 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The Hubble observations of the Papillon nebula were conducted by the European astronomers Mohammad Heydari-Malayeri (Paris Observatory, France) and co-investigators Michael Rosa (Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility, European Southern Observatory, Germany), Vassilis Charmandaris (Paris Observatory), Lise Deharveng (Marseille Observatory, France), and Hans Zinnecker (Astrophysical Institute, Potsdam, Germany). Their work is submitted for publication in the European

  9. La Silla quest RR Lyrae star survey: Region I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn, R.; Miller, L.; Horowitz, B.; Baltay, C.; Ellman, N.; Hadjiyska, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Vivas, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    A search for RR Lyrae stars (RRLSs) in ∼840 deg 2 of the sky in right ascension 150°-210° and declination –10° to + 10° yielded 1013 type ab and 359 type c RRLS. This sample is used to study the density profile of the Galactic halo, halo substructures, and the Oosterhoff type of the halo over distances (d ☉ ) from ∼5 to ∼80 kpc. The halo is flattened toward the Galactic plane, and its density profile steepens in slope at galactocentric distances greater than ∼25 kpc. The RRLS in the stellar stream from the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy match well the model of Law and Majewski for the stars that were stripped 1.3-3.2 Gyr ago, but not for the ones stripped 3.2-5.0 Gyr ago. Over densities are found at the locations of the Virgo Overdensity and the Virgo Stellar Stream. Within 1° of 1220-1, which Jerjen et al. identify as a halo substructure at d ☉ ∼ 24 kpc, there are four RRLS that are possibly members. Away from substructures, the RRLS are a mixture of Oosterhoff types I and II, but mostly OoI (∼73%). The accretion of galaxies resembling in RRLS content the most massive Milky Way satellites (LMC, SMC, For, Sgr) may explain this preponderance of OoI. Six new RRLS and three new anomalous Cepheids were found in the Sextans dSph galaxy.

  10. Revealing the nebular properties and Wolf-Rayet population of IC10 with Gemini/GMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Katie; Crowther, Paul A.; Archer, I.

    2017-12-01

    We present a deep imaging and spectroscopic survey of the Local Group irregular galaxy IC10 using Gemini North and GMOS to unveil its global Wolf-Rayet (WR) population. We obtain a star formation rate (SFR) of 0.045 ± 0.023 M⊙ yr-1, for IC10 from the nebular H α luminosity, which is comparable to the Small Magellanic Cloud. We also present a revised nebular oxygen abundance of log(O/H) + 12 = 8.40 ± 0.04, comparable to the LMC. It has previously been suggested that for IC10 to follow the WR subtype-metallicity dependance seen in other Local Group galaxies, a large WN population awaits discovery. Our search revealed three new WN stars, and six candidates awaiting confirmation, providing little evidence to support this claim. The new global WR star total of 29 stars is consistent with the Large Magellanic Cloud population when scaled to the reduced SFR of IC10. For spectroscopically confirmed WR stars, the WC/WN ratio is lowered to 1.0; however, including all potential candidates, and assuming those unconfirmed to be WN stars, would reduce the ratio to ∼0.7. We attribute the high WC/WN ratio to the high star formation surface density of IC10 relative to the Magellanic Clouds, which enhances the frequency of high-mass stars capable of producing WC stars.

  11. 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR1065) is anti-neoplastic and anti-mutagenic when given during 60Coγ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.K.; Nagy, B.; Peraino, C.; Grdina, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 2[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR1065) has been studied on the induction of neoplastic transformation using 10T1/2 cells and on mutation of the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus using Chinese hamster V79 cells. The first observations that treatment of 10T1/2 cells with 1 mM WR1065 for a total of 35 min during irradiation with 60 C γ-rays significantly reduces the incidence of neoplastic transformation while having no effect on cell viability are reported. In a similar experiment with V79 cells in which 4mM WR1065 was used, a significant reduction in mutation frequency at the HGPRT locus and significant protection against cell killing was found. These results suggest that WR1965 acts to modulate both acute damage and sub-lethal processes that lead to mutation and neoplastic transformation. Beyond the purely mechanistic approach of these studies, the potential application of these agents to minimizing the long-term neoplastic effects of radiation or chemotherapeutic agents currently in use for treating potentially curable cancer patients should be further investigated. (author)

  12. The effect of 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR 1065) on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair and cell progression in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Nagy, B.

    1986-01-01

    The radioprotector 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR 1065) was investigated with respect to its ability to affect radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in V79 cells. At a concentration of 4mM, WR 1065 protected against the formation of single strand breaks (SSB), when present during irradiation. The protector appeared, however, to inhibit the subsequent postirradiation repair or rejoining of SSB. While repair was complete within 24h, the protector reduced the rate of repair by a factor of 3. This inhibitory effect on the rate of repair did not correlate with either measured differences in cell survival or mutagenesis. WR 1065 present in the growth medium inhibited the progression of cells through S-phase, and cell-doubling time following a 3h exposure to the protector was increased from 11 to 18h. These data are consistent with the property of thiols to inhibit DNA polymerase activity. It was concluded that, while the presence of WR 1065 during irradiation reduced SSB-DNA damage, its effect on the subsequent rejoining of these breaks could not be correlated with its observed effect on protecting against radiation-induced mutagenesis. (author)

  13. Protective effect of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on irradiation-induced inhibition of intestinal transport function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.S.; Ando, M.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on whole-body irradiation-induced inhibition of intestinal transport function. The jejunal transport of fluid and sugars was studied in male Swiss-Webster mice before and 3 days after whole-body irradiation (1000 rads). The rates of glucose and water transport were decreased by 86 and 70%, respectively, in irradiated animals. However, the rate of transport of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3MG) was not affected. In mice receiving WR-2721 (500 mg/kg, ip) 15 to 30 min prior to whole-body irradiation, net water flux was unaffected and the rate of D-glucose transport was decreased only 8%. WR-2721 administered alone (500 mg/kg, ip) had no effect on either D-glucose transport or net water flux across the jejunal mucosa. The results suggest that WR-2721 protects against irradiation-induced inhibition of some intestinal transport functions

  14. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  15. MAGNETIC FIELDS OF STARS

    OpenAIRE

    Bychkov, V. D.; Bychkova, L. V.; Madej, J.

    2008-01-01

    Now it is known about 1212 stars of the main sequence and giants (from them 610 stars - it is chemically peculiarity (CP) stars) for which direct measurements of magnetic fields were spent (Bychkov et al.,2008). Let's consider, what representations were generated about magnetic fields (MT) of stars on the basis of available observations data.

  16. Compact stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez-Delgado, Gabino; Estevez-Delgado, Joaquin

    2018-05-01

    An analysis and construction is presented for a stellar model characterized by two parameters (w, n) associated with the compactness ratio and anisotropy, respectively. The reliability range for the parameter w ≤ 1.97981225149 corresponds with a compactness ratio u ≤ 0.2644959374, the density and pressures are positive, regular and monotonic decrescent functions, the radial and tangential speed of sound are lower than the light speed, moreover, than the plausible stability. The behavior of the speeds of sound are determinate for the anisotropy parameter n, admitting a subinterval where the speeds are monotonic crescent functions and other where we have monotonic decrescent functions for the same speeds, both cases describing a compact object that is also potentially stable. In the bigger value for the observational mass M = 2.05 M⊙ and radii R = 12.957 Km for the star PSR J0348+0432, the model indicates that the maximum central density ρc = 1.283820319 × 1018 Kg/m3 corresponds to the maximum value of the anisotropy parameter and the radial and tangential speed of the sound are monotonic decrescent functions.

  17. Effect of an aminothiol (WR-1065) on radiation-induced mutagenesis and cytotoxicity in two repair-deficient mammalian cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Nagy, B.; Meechan, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    WR-2721 and its free thiol WR-1065 have been found to effectively protect against radiation- and/or chemotherapy-induced mutagenesis, transformation and carcinogenesis. With respect to the antimutagenic effect, WR-1065 significantly reduced the frequency of HGPRT mutants even when it was administered up to three hours following exposure of cells to radiation. The mechanisms of action most often attributed to these agents include their ability to scavenge free radicals, enter into chemical repair processes through the donation of hydrogen atoms, and induce intracellular hypoxia by means of auto-oxidative processes. Although evidence exists for each of these processes, none is sufficiently satisfactory to account for the post-irradiation protection of WR-1065 against mutation induction in mammalian cells. The most elegant work describing the role of aminothiols on cellular enzymatic repair processes has focused on well-characterized repair-proficient and -deficient bacterial and yeast cell systems. Protection against radiation-induced cytotoxicity by the aminothiol cysteamine was absent in E. coli cell lines that were characterized as having genetically defective repair systems. Until recently, such studies could not be effectively performed with mammalian cells. However, with the isolation and characterization of rodent cell lines deficient in their ability to repair DNA damage, it is now possible to investigate the role of cell-mediated repair systems on aminothiol radioprotection. Specifically, the authors have investigated the effects of WR-1065 on radiation-induced mutagenesis and cytotoxicity in cell lines EM9 and xrs-5, which are defective in DNA single-strand break (SSB) and double-strand break (DSB) rejoining, respectively. Corresponding parental repair-proficient cell lines, AA8 and K1, were also studied for comparative purposes. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Inhibition of topoisomerase II activity in repair-proficient CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.

    1992-09-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector under in vitro conditions when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure at a concentration of 4 mM to repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.4). In contrast, the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary xrs-5 cell line is not protected under these conditions (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.0). Topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and protein contents were measured in both Kl and xrs-5 cell lines and were found to be similar in magnitude. Neither exposure to radiation, to WR-1065, or to both affected these variables in xrs-5 cells. WR 1065 was effective, however, in reducing topo 11 activity by a factor of 2 in the repair-proficient Kl cell line. Topo II protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds has been their ability to affect enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results demonstrate a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on a specific nuclear enzyme (i.e., type H topoisomerase), which is involved in DNA synthesis. These results also suggest that differences do exist between the topo 11 enzymes isolated from the parent repair-proficient Kl and the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient xrs-5 mutant cell lines

  19. Inhibition of topoisomerase II activity in repair-proficient CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, D.J.; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.

    1992-09-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector under in vitro conditions when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure at a concentration of 4 mM to repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.4). In contrast, the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary xrs-5 cell line is not protected under these conditions (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.0). Topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and protein contents were measured in both Kl and xrs-5 cell lines and were found to be similar in magnitude. Neither exposure to radiation, to WR-1065, or to both affected these variables in xrs-5 cells. WR 1065 was effective, however, in reducing topo 11 activity by a factor of 2 in the repair-proficient Kl cell line. Topo II protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds has been their ability to affect enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results demonstrate a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on a specific nuclear enzyme (i.e., type H topoisomerase), which is involved in DNA synthesis. These results also suggest that differences do exist between the topo 11 enzymes isolated from the parent repair-proficient Kl and the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient xrs-5 mutant cell lines.

  20. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MIPS 24um nebulae (Gvaramadze+, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Fabrika, S.

    2011-03-01

    Massive evolved stars lose a large fraction of their mass via copious stellar wind or instant outbursts. During certain evolutionary phases, they can be identified by the presence of their circumstellar nebulae. In this paper, we present the results of a search for compact nebulae (reminiscent of circumstellar nebulae around evolved massive stars) using archival 24um data obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. We have discovered 115 nebulae, most of which bear a striking resemblance to the circumstellar nebulae associated with luminous blue variables (LBVs) and late WN-type (WNL) Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). (1 data file).

  2. Giant CP stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loden, L.O.; Sundman, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study is part of an investigation of the possibility of using chemically peculiar (CP) stars to map local galactic structure. Correct luminosities of these stars are therefore crucial. CP stars are generally regarded as main-sequence or near-main-sequence objects. However, some CP stars have been classified as giants. A selection of stars, classified in literature as CP giants, are compared to normal stars in the same effective temperature interval and to ordinary 'non giant' CP stars. There is no clear confirmation of a higher luminosity for 'CP giants', than for CP stars in general. In addition, CP characteristics seem to be individual properties not repeated in a component star or other cluster members. (author). 50 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  3. A COMPREHENSIVE, WIDE-FIELD STUDY OF PULSATING STARS IN THE CARINA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivas, A. Katherina [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía (CIDA), Apartado Postal 264, Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Mateo, Mario, E-mail: akvivas@cida.ve, E-mail: mmateo@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We report the detection of 388 pulsating variable stars (and some additional miscellaneous variables) in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy over an area covering the full visible extent of the galaxy and extending a few times beyond its photometric (King) tidal radius along the direction of its major axis. Included in this total are 340 newly discovered dwarf Cepheids (DCs), which are mostly located ∼2.5 mag below the horizontal branch and have very short periods (<0.1 days), typical of their class and consistent with their location on the upper part of the extended main sequence of the younger populations of the galaxy. Several extra-tidal DCs were found in our survey up to a distance of ∼1° from the center of Carina. Our sample also includes RR Lyrae stars and anomalous Cepheids, some of which were found outside the galaxy's tidal radius as well. This supports past works that suggest that Carina is undergoing tidal disruption. We use the period-luminosity relationship for DCs to estimate a distance modulus of μ{sub 0} = 20.17 ± 0.10 mag, in very good agreement with the estimate from RR Lyrae stars. We find some important differences in the properties of the DCs of Carina and those in Fornax and the LMC, the only extragalactic samples of DCs currently known. These differences may reflect a metallicity spread, depth along the line of sight, and/or different evolutionary paths of the DC stars.

  4. A NEW CENSUS OF THE VARIABLE STAR POPULATION IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 2419

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Criscienzo, M.; Greco, C.; Ripepi, V.; Dall' Ora, M.; Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Clementini, G.; Federici, L.; Di Fabrizio, L.

    2011-01-01

    We present B, V, and I CCD light curves for 101 variable stars belonging to the globular cluster NGC 2419, 60 of which are new discoveries, based on data sets obtained at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, the Subaru telescope, and the Hubble Space Telescope. The sample includes 75 RR Lyrae stars (38 RRab, 36 RRc, and one RRd), one Population II Cepheid, 12 SX Phoenicis variables, two δ Scuti stars, three binary systems, five long-period variables, and three variables of uncertain classification. The pulsation properties of the RR Lyrae variables are close to those of Oosterhoff type II clusters, consistent with the low metal abundance and the cluster horizontal branch morphology, disfavoring (but not totally ruling out) an extragalactic hypothesis for the origin of NGC 2419. The observed properties of RR Lyrae and SX Phoenicis stars are used to estimate the cluster reddening and distance, using a number of different methods. Our final value is μ 0 (NGC 2419) = 19.71 ± 0.08 mag (D = 87.5 ± 3.3 kpc), with E(B - V) = 0.08 ± 0.01 mag, [Fe/H] = -2.1 dex on the Zinn and West metallicity scale, and a value of M V that sets μ 0 (LMC) = 18.52 mag. This value is in good agreement with the most recent literature estimates of the distance to NGC 2419.

  5. An extensive spectroscopic time series of three Wolf-Rayet stars - I. The lifetime of large-scale structures in the wind of WR 134

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aldoretta, E.J.; St-Louis, N.; Richardson, N.; Moffat, A.F.J.; Eversberg, T.; Hill, G.M.; Shenar, T.; Artigau, E.; Gauza, B.; Knapen, J.H.; Kubát, Jiří; Kubátová, Brankica; Maltais-Tariant, R.; Munoz, M.; Pablo, H.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Richard-Laferriere, A.; Sablowski, D.P.; Simon-Diaz, S.; St-Jean, L.; Bolduan, F.; Dias, F.M.; Dubreuil, P.; Fuchs, D.; Garrel, T.; Grutzeck, G.; Hunger, T.; Kuesters, D.; Langenbrink, M.; Leadbeater, R.; Li, D.; Lopez, A.; Mauclaire, B.; Moldenhawer, T.; Potter, M.; dos Santos, E.M.; Schanne, L.; Schmidt, J.; Sieske, H.; Strachan, J.; Stinner, E.; Stinner, P.; Stober, B.; Strandbaek, K.; Syder, T.; Verilhac, D.; Waldschlaeger, U.; Weiss, D.; Wendt, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 460, č. 3 (2016), s. 3407-3417 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10589S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : instabilities * data analysis * spectroscopic techniques Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  6. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Schwartz, J.L.; Shigematsu, N.

    1993-06-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide NN double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent (WR-2721). Because of their structural similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of VM-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents were electroporated into cells. Electroporation alone reduced cell survival to 75% but had no effect on hprt mutation frequency. The electroporation of either spermine or WR-33278 at concentrations greater than 0.01 mM was extremely toxic. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction. Cell survival values at a radiation dose of 750 cGy were enhanced by factors of 1.3 and 1.8 following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278, respectively, 30 min prior to irradiation. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested

  7. Rates of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    It is illustrated that a theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies depends on an understanding of star formation, and especially of the factors influencing the rate of star formation. Some of the theoretical problems of star formation in galaxies, some approaches that have been considered in models of galaxy evolution, and some possible observational tests that may help to clarify which processes or models are most relevant are reviewed. The material is presented under the following headings: power-law models for star formation, star formation processes (conditions required, ways of achieving these conditions), observational indications and tests, and measures of star formation rates in galaxies. 49 references

  8. Energy production in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethe, Hans.

    1977-01-01

    Energy in stars is released partly by gravitation, partly by nuclear reactions. For ordinary stars like our sun, nuclear reactions predominate. However, at the end of the life of a star very large amounts of energy are released by gravitational collapse; this can amount to as much as 10 times the total energy released nuclear reactions. The rotational energy of pulsars is a small remnant of the energy of gravitation. The end stage of small stars is generally a white dwarf, of heavy stars a neutron star of possibly a black hole

  9. Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae in the SMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2004-01-01

    In FUSE cycle 3's program C056 we studied four Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae (CSPN) in the Small Magellanic Could. All FUSE observations have been successfully completed and have been reduced and analyzed. The observation of one object (SMP SMC 5) appeared to be off-target and no useful stellar flux was gathered. For another observation (SMP SMC 1) the voltage problems resulted in the loss of data from one of the SiC detectors, but we were still able to analyze the remaining data. The analysis and the results are summarized below. The FUSE data were reduced using the latest available version of the FUSE calibration pipeline (CALFUSE v2.4). The flux of these SMC post-AGB objects is at the threshold of FUSE S sensitivity, and the targets required many orbit-long exposures, each of which typically had low (target) count-rates. The background subtraction required special care during the reduction, and was done in a similar manner to our FUSE cycle 2 BOO1 objects. The resulting calibrated data from the different channels were compared in the overlapping regions for consistency. The final combined, extracted spectra of each target was then modeled to determine the stellar and nebular parameters. The FUSE spectra, combined with archival HST spectra, have been analyzed using stellar atmospheres codes such as TLUSTY and CMFGEN to derive photospheric and wind parameters of the central stars, and with ISM models to determine the amount and temperature of the surrounding atomic and molecular hydrogen. We have combined these results with those of our cycle 4 (D034) program (CSPN of the LMC) in Herald & Bianchi 2004a (paper in preparation, will be submitted to ApJ in June 2004). Two of the three SMC objects analyzed were found to have significantly lower stellar temperatures than had been predicted using nebular photoionization models, indicating either a hotter ionizing companion or the existence of strong shocks in the nebular environment. The analysis also revealed that

  10. Regular Generalized Star Star closed sets in Bitopological Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    K. Kannan; D. Narasimhan; K. Chandrasekhara Rao; R. Ravikumar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the concepts of τ1τ2-regular generalized star star closed sets , τ1τ2-regular generalized star star open sets and study their basic properties in bitopological spaces.

  11. Quark core stars, quark stars and strange stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, F.

    1988-01-01

    A recent one flavor quark matter equation of state is generalized to several flavors. It is shown that quarks undergo a first order phase transition. In addition, this equation of state depends on just one parameter in the two flavor case, two parameters in the three flavor case, and these parameters are constrained by phenomenology. This equation of state is then applied to the hadron-quark transition in neutron stars and the determination of quark star stability, the investigation of strange matter stability and possible strange star existence. 43 refs., 6 figs

  12. MEAN AGE GRADIENT AND ASYMMETRY IN THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cignoni, M.; Cole, A. A.; Tosi, M.; Gallagher, J. S.; Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Nota, A.; Grebel, E. K.

    2013-01-01

    We derive the star formation history (SFH) in four regions of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using the deepest VI color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) ever obtained for this galaxy. The images were obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and are located at projected distances of 0.°5-2° from the SMC center, probing the main body and the wing of the galaxy. We derived the SFHs of the four fields using two independent procedures to fit synthetic CMDs to the data. We compare the SFHs derived here with our earlier results for the SMC bar to create a deep pencil-beam survey of the global history of the central SMC. We find in all the six fields observed with HST a slow star formation (SF) pace from 13 to 5-7 Gyr ago, followed by a ≈2-3 times higher activity. This is remarkable because dynamical models do not predict a strong influence of either the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) or the Milky Way at that time. The level of the intermediate-age SF rate enhancement systematically increases toward the center, resulting in a gradient in the mean age of the population, with the bar fields being systematically younger than the outer ones. SF over the most recent 500 Myr is strongly concentrated in the bar, the only exception being the area of the SMC wing. The strong current activity of the latter is likely driven by interaction with the LMC. At a given age, there is no significant difference in metallicity between the inner and outer fields, implying that metals are well mixed throughout the SMC. The age-metallicity relations we infer from our best-fitting models are monotonically increasing with time, with no evidence of dips. This may argue against the major merger scenario proposed by Tsujimoto and Bekki in 2009, although a minor merger cannot be ruled out

  13. Absolute spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars: Are the colors the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, P.

    1982-01-01

    For the past year the author has collecting data on all the northern hemisphere WR stars brighter than v approximately 15 with the Intensified Reticon Scanner (IRS) on the Kitt Peak No. 1 - 36'' (0.9-m) telescope. The instrument consists of the regular cassegrain spectrograph followed by a three stage image tube coupled to a 920x2 Reticon via a microchannel plate. Measurements were made with simultaneous sky subtraction, with coverage obtained from lambdalambda 3300 - 7100 A. The resolution is 3 A in the blue and 6 A in the red. Counts were converted to absolute flux by observations of standard stars tied into the Hayes and Latham (1975) calibration of Vega. (Auth.)

  14. Molecular Cloud Structures and Massive Star Formation in N159

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, O.; Meixner, M.; Fukui, Y.; Tachihara, K.; Onishi, T.; Saigo, K.; Tokuda, K.; Harada, R.

    2018-02-01

    The N159 star-forming region is one of the most massive giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We show the 12CO, 13CO, CS molecular gas lines observed with ALMA in N159 west (N159W) and N159 east (N159E). We relate the structure of the gas clumps to the properties of 24 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) that include 10 newly identified YSOs based on our search. We use dendrogram analysis to identify properties of the molecular clumps, such as flux, mass, linewidth, size, and virial parameter. We relate the YSO properties to the molecular gas properties. We find that the CS gas clumps have a steeper size–linewidth relation than the 12CO or 13CO gas clumps. This larger slope could potentially occur if the CS gas is tracing shocks. The virial parameters of the 13CO gas clumps in N159W and N159E are low (<1). The threshold for massive star formation in N159W is 501 M ⊙ pc‑2, and the threshold for massive star formation in N159E is 794 M ⊙ pc‑2. We find that 13CO is more photodissociated in N159E than N159W. The most massive YSO in N159E has cleared out a molecular gas hole in its vicinity. All the massive YSO candidates in N159E have a more evolved spectral energy distribution type in comparison to the YSO candidates in N159W. These differences lead us to conclude that the giant molecular cloud complex in N159E is more evolved than the giant molecular cloud complex in N159W.

  15. ENERGY STAR Certified Displays

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 7.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Displays that are effective as of July 1, 2016....

  16. ENERGY STAR Certified Boilers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Boilers that are effective as of October 1,...

  17. ENERGY STAR Certified Televisions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 7.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Televisions that are effective as of October 30,...

  18. ENERGY STAR Certified Dehumidifiers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 4.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Dehumidifiers that are effective as of October...

  19. Observations of central stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Difficulties occurring in the observation of central stars of planetary nebulae are reviewed with emphasis on spectral classifications and population types, and temperature determination. Binary and peculiar central stars are discussed. (U.M.G.)

  20. ENERGY STAR Certified Telephones

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Telephony (cordless telephones and VoIP...

  1. Star formation: Cosmic feast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaringi, Simone

    2017-03-01

    Low-mass stars form through a process known as disk accretion, eating up material that orbits in a disk around them. It turns out that the same mechanism also describes the formation of more massive stars.

  2. Performance of highly rated UO2 fuel in the WR-1 organic-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schankula, M. H.; Hastings, I. J.

    1977-07-15

    Information on oxide fuel behaviour in organic coolant was required as part of the organic-cooled power reactor (OCR) study. Of major interest were data on the release of fission gases from fuel operating at high fuel surface temperatures and low external restraint; features which are peculiar to the OCR. To provide these and other data, UO2 fuel with cold-worked Zr-2.5wt%Nb sheathing was irradiated in the WR-1 organic-cooled reactor to burnups of 135-154 MWh/kgU at a time-averaged linear power of 60-63 kW/m. Elements with 0.38 and 0.69 mm thick sheathing showed maximum diametral increases averaging 3.7 and 1.7% respectively at pellet mid-planes. Reduced fuel/sheath heat transfer resulting from a difference between internal gas pressure and coolant pressure produced high operating temperatures, and there was evidence of central melting in some elements. Fission gas releases were 30-60%. In the heat affected zone adjacent to brazed appendages, the diametral increases were lower, averaging 0.9 and 0.5% for 0.38 and 0.69 mm thick sheathing respectively. Heat treatment during the brazing process produced a local improvement in sheath creep strength. Highly rated oxide fuel irradiated in organic coolant will require sheathing with improved high temperature creep properties; heat-treated Zr-2.5 wt% Nb may provide this improvement.

  3. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  4. The low-metallicity starburst NGC346: massive-star population and feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskinova, Lida

    2017-08-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is ideal to study young, massive stars at low metallicity. The compact cluster NGC346 contains about half of all O-type stars in the entire SMC. The massive-star population of this cluster powers N66, the brightest and largest HII region in the SMC. We propose to use HST-STIS to slice NGC346 with 20 long-slit exposures, in order to obtain the UV spectra of most of the massive early-type stars of this cluster. Archival data of 13 exposures that cover already a minor part of this cluster will be included in our analyses. Our aim is to quantitatively analyze virtually the whole massive-star population of NGC346. We have already secured the optical spectra of all massive stars in the field with the integral-field spectrograph MUSE at the ESO-VLT. However, for the determination of the stellar-wind parameters, i.e. the mass-loss rates and the wind velocities, ultraviolet spectra are indispensable. Our advanced Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) code will be used for modeling the stellar and wind spectra in the course of the analysis. Finally, we will obtain:(a) the fundamental stellar and wind parameters of all stars brighter than spectral type B2V in the field, which, e,g,, will constrain the initial mass function in this young low-metallicity starburst;(b) mass-loss rates of many more OB-type stars at SMC metallicity than hitherto known, allowing to better constrain their metallicity dependence;(c) the integrated feedback by ionizing radiation and stellar winds of the whole massive-star population of NGC346, which will be used as input to model the ecology of the giant HII region N66.These HST UV data will be of high legacy value.

  5. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jian-Ying; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting ...

  6. America's Star Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  7. Using Star Clusters as Tracers of Star Formation and Chemical Evolution: The Chemical Enrichment History of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, Igor V.; Asa’d, Randa

    2018-05-01

    The star formation (SFH) and chemical enrichment (CEH) histories of Local Group galaxies are traditionally studied by analyzing their resolved stellar populations in a form of color–magnitude diagrams obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Star clusters can be studied in integrated light using ground-based telescopes to much larger distances. They represent snapshots of the chemical evolution of their host galaxy at different ages. Here we present a simple theoretical framework for the chemical evolution based on the instantaneous recycling approximation (IRA) model. We infer a CEH from an SFH and vice versa using observational data. We also present a more advanced model for the evolution of individual chemical elements that takes into account the contribution of supernovae type Ia. We demonstrate that ages, iron, and α-element abundances of 15 star clusters derived from the fitting of their integrated optical spectra reliably trace the CEH of the Large Magellanic Cloud obtained from resolved stellar populations in the age range 40 Myr age–metallicity relation. Moreover, the present-day total gas mass of the LMC estimated by the IRA model (6.2× {10}8 {M}ȯ ) matches within uncertainties the observed H I mass corrected for the presence of molecular gas (5.8+/- 0.5× {10}8 {M}ȯ ). We briefly discuss how our approach can be used to study SFHs of galaxies as distant as 10 Mpc at the level of detail that is currently available only in a handful of nearby Milky Way satellites. .

  8. Recovering star formation histories: Integrated-light analyses vs. stellar colour-magnitude diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lara, T.; Pérez, I.; Gallart, C.; Alloin, D.; Monelli, M.; Koleva, M.; Pompei, E.; Beasley, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Florido, E.; Aparicio, A.; Fleurence, E.; Hardy, E.; Hidalgo, S.; Raimann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Accurate star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies are fundamental for understanding the build-up of their stellar content. However, the most accurate SFHs - those obtained from colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of resolved stars reaching the oldest main-sequence turnoffs (oMSTO) - are presently limited to a few systems in the Local Group. It is therefore crucial to determine the reliability and range of applicability of SFHs derived from integrated light spectroscopy, as this affects our understanding of unresolved galaxies from low to high redshift. Aims: We evaluate the reliability of current full spectral fitting techniques in deriving SFHs from integrated light spectroscopy by comparing SFHs from integrated spectra to those obtained from deep CMDs of resolved stars. Methods: We have obtained a high signal-to-noise (S/N ~ 36.3 per Å) integrated spectrum of a field in the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using EFOSC2 at the 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla Observatory. For this same field, resolved stellar data reaching the oMSTO are available. We have compared the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time and the age-metallicity relation (AMR) obtained from the integrated spectrum using STECKMAP, and the CMD using the IAC-star/MinnIAC/IAC-pop set of routines. For the sake of completeness we also use and discuss other synthesis codes (STARLIGHT and ULySS) to derive the SFR and AMR from the integrated LMC spectrum. Results: We find very good agreement (average differences ~4.1%) between the SFR (t) and the AMR obtained using STECKMAP on the integrated light spectrum, and the CMD analysis. STECKMAP minimizes the impact of the age-metallicity degeneracy and has the advantage of preferring smooth solutions to recover complex SFHs by means of a penalized χ2. We find that the use of single stellar populations (SSPs) to recover the stellar content, using for instance STARLIGHT or ULySS codes, hampers the reconstruction of the SFR (t) and AMR

  9. The radioprotector WR-2721 reduces neutron-induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in mouse splenocytes when administered prior to or following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Basic, I.

    1992-01-01

    An in vitro T-lymphocyte cloning technique has been applied to study the effects of JANUS fission-spectrum neutron irradiation and the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on the subsequent development of somatic mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in hybrid B6CF1 male mice. In control studies performed to establish an in vitro cloning technique, the mutant frequencies of splenic T-lymphocytes, as a result of exposure to a 100 cGy dose of neutrons, increased with time from a control level of 9 x 10 -7 to a maximum value of 1.7 x 10 -5 at 56 days following irradiation. Between 56 and 150 days after irradiation, mutant frequencies were observed to plateau and remain stable. All subsequent determinations were performed at 56 days following the experimental treatment of animals. WR-2721 at a dose of 400 mg/kg was effective in protecting against the induction of hprt mutants (i.e. a mutant frequency reduction factor, MFRF) following the largest dose of neutrons used (i.e. 150 cGy). The antimutagenic effectiveness of WR-2721 administered 30 min prior to irradiation was unaffected, even when the dose was reduced to 200 mg/kg. These findings confirm our earlier report using the radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,2-diaminopropane (WR-1065) under in vitro conditions, and demonstrate that these agents can be used as effective antimutagens even when they are administered up to 3 h following radiation exposure. (Author)

  10. White Dwarf Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Kepler, S. O.; Romero, Alejandra Daniela; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Ourique, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    White dwarf stars are the final stage of most stars, born single or in multiple systems. We discuss the identification, magnetic fields, and mass distribution for white dwarfs detected from spectra obtained by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey up to Data Release 13 in 2016, which lead to the increase in the number of spectroscopically identified white dwarf stars from 5000 to 39000. This number includes only white dwarf stars with log g >= 6.5 stars, i.e., excluding the Extremely Low Mass white dw...

  11. Rotating Stars in Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stergioulas Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on the equilibrium properties and on the nonaxisymmetric instabilities in f-modes and r-modes have been updated and several new sections have been added on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity.

  12. Nuclear physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Most elements are synthesized, or ""cooked"", by thermonuclear reactions in stars. The newly formed elements are released into the interstellar medium during a star's lifetime, and are subsequently incorporated into a new generation of stars, into the planets that form around the stars, and into the life forms that originate on the planets. Moreover, the energy we depend on for life originates from nuclear reactions that occur at the center of the Sun. Synthesis of the elements and nuclear energy production in stars are the topics of nuclear astrophysics, which is the subject of this book

  13. Chemical Compositions of Young Stars in the Leading Arm of the Magellanic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Moni Bidin, C.; Casetti-Dinescu, D. I.; Mendez, R. A.; Girard, T. M.; Korchagin, V. I.; Vieira, K.; van Altena, W. F.; Zhao, G.

    2017-07-01

    Seven element abundances (He, C, N, O, Mg, Si, and S) and kinematics were determined for eight O-/B- type stars, based on high resolution spectra taken with the MIKE instrument on the Magellan 6.5m Clay telescope (program ID: CN2014A-057). The sample is selected from 42 candidates Casetti-Dinescu et al.(2014, ApJL, 784, L37) of membership in the Leading Arm (LA) of the Magellanic System. After investigating the relationship between abundances and kinematics parameters, we found that five stars have kinematics compatible with LA membership, i.e. RV>100kms-1. For the five possible LA member stars, Mg abundance is significantly lower than that of the remaining two that are kinematical members of the Galactic disk, and is more close to the LMC values. Distances to the LA members indicate that they are at the edge of the Galactic disk, while ages are of the order of ˜ 50-70 Myr, lower than the dynamical age of the LA, suggesting a single star-forming episode in the LA. VLSR of the LA members decreases with decreasing Magellanic longitude, confirming the results of previous LA gas studies (McClure-Griffiths et al.2008, ApJ, 673, L143). Our abundance and kinematic results for the LA member stars demonstrate that parts of the LA are hydrodynamically interacting with the gaseous Galactic disk, forming young stars that are chemically distinct from those in the Galactic disk. These results can provide constraints to future models for the Magellanic leading material.

  14. Chemical Composition of Young Stars in the Leading Arm of the Magellanic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lan; Zhao, Gang [Key Lab. of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, CAS, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, 100012 Beijing (China); Moni Bidin, Christian [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Católica del Norte, Av. Angomos 0610, Antofagasta (Chile); Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); Méndez, Réne A. [Departamento de Astronomia Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio #1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Girard, Terrence M. [14 Dunn Rd, Hamden, Connecticut, CT 06518 (United States); Korchagin, Vladimir I. [Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Stachki st/194, 344090, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Vieira, Katherine; Van Altena, William F. [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomiá, Apartado Postal 264, Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    Chemical abundances of eight O- and B-type stars are determined from high-resolution spectra obtained with the MIKE instrument on the Magellan 6.5 m Clay telescope. The sample is selected from 42 candidates for membership in the Leading Arm (LA) of the Magellanic System. Stellar parameters are measured by two independent grids of model atmospheres and analysis procedures, confirming the consistency of the stellar parameter results. Abundances of seven elements (He, C, N, O, Mg, Si, and S) are determined for the stars, as are their radial velocities and estimates of distances and ages. Among the seven B-type stars analyzed, the five that have radial velocities compatible with membership of the LA have an average [Mg/H] of −0.42 ± 0.16, significantly lower than the average of the remaining two, [Mg/H] = −0.07±0.06, which are kinematical members of the Galactic disk. Among the five LA members, four have individual [Mg/H] abundance compatible with that in the LMC. Within errors, we cannot exclude the possibility that one of these stars has an [Mg/H] consistent with the more metal-poor, SMC-like material. The remaining fifth star has an [Mg/H] close to Milky Way values. Distances to the LA members indicate that they are at the edge of the Galactic disk, while ages are of the order of ∼50–70 Myr, lower than the dynamical age of the LA, suggesting a single star-forming episode in the LA. V {sub LSR} of the LA members decreases with decreasing Magellanic longitude, confirming the results of previous LA gas studies.

  15. Evolution of variable stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, S.A.

    1986-08-01

    Throughout the domain of the H R diagram lie groupings of stars whose luminosity varies with time. These variable stars can be classified based on their observed properties into distinct types such as β Cephei stars, δ Cephei stars, and Miras, as well as many other categories. The underlying mechanism for the variability is generally felt to be due to four different causes: geometric effects, rotation, eruptive processes, and pulsation. In this review the focus will be on pulsation variables and how the theory of stellar evolution can be used to explain how the various regions of variability on the H R diagram are populated. To this end a generalized discussion of the evolutionary behavior of a massive star, an intermediate mass star, and a low mass star will be presented. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Star-Branched Polymers (Star Polymers)

    KAUST Repository

    Hirao, Akira; Hayashi, Mayumi; Ito, Shotaro; Goseki, Raita; Higashihara, Tomoya; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of well-defined regular and asymmetric mixed arm (hereinafter miktoarm) star-branched polymers by the living anionic polymerization is reviewed in this chapter. In particular, much attention is being devoted to the synthetic

  17. SMC west halo: a slice of the galaxy that is being tidally stripped?. Star clusters trace age and metallicity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, B.; Kerber, L.; Barbuy, B.; Bica, E.; Ortolani, S.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The evolution and structure of the Magellanic Clouds is currently under debate. The classical scenario in which both the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC) are orbiting the Milky Way has been challenged by an alternative in which the LMC and SMC are in their first close passage to our Galaxy. The clouds are close enough to us to allow spatially resolved observation of their stars, and detailed studies of stellar populations in the galaxies are expected to be able to constrain the proposed scenarios. In particular, the west halo (WH) of the SMC was recently characterized with radial trends in age and metallicity that indicate tidal disruption. Aims: We intend to increase the sample of star clusters in the west halo of the SMC with homogeneous age, metallicity, and distance derivations to allow a better determination of age and metallicity gradients in this region. Positions are compared with the orbital plane of the SMC from models. Methods: Comparisons of observed and synthetic V(B-V) colour-magnitude diagrams were used to derive age, metallicity, distance, and reddening for star clusters in the SMC west halo. Observations were carried out using the 4.1 m SOAR telescope. Photometric completeness was determined through artificial star tests, and the members were selected by statistical comparison with a control field. Results: We derived an age of 1.23 ± 0.07 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.87 ± 0.07 for the reference cluster NGC 152, compatible with literature parameters. Age and metallicity gradients are confirmed in the WH: 2.6 ± 0.6 Gyr/° and -0.19 ± 0.09 dex/°, respectively. The age-metallicity relation for the WH has a low dispersion in metallicity and is compatible with a burst model of chemical enrichment. All WH clusters seem to follow the same stellar distribution predicted by dynamical models, with the exception of AM-3, which should belong to the counter-bridge. Brück 6 is the youngest cluster in our sample. It is only 130 ± 40 Myr old and

  18. THE MASS-LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. DUST PROPERTIES FOR OXYGEN-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Meixner, M.; Gordon, Karl D.; Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Speck, A. K.; Matsuura, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Hony, S.; Indebetouw, R.; Marengo, M.; Sloan, G. C.

    2010-01-01

    We model multi-wavelength broadband UBVIJHK s and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry and Infrared Spectrograph spectra from the SAGE and SAGE-Spectroscopy observing programs of two oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (O-rich AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using radiative transfer (RT) models of dust shells around stars. We chose a star from each of the bright and faint O-rich AGB populations found by earlier studies of the SAGE sample in order to derive a baseline set of dust properties to be used in the construction of an extensive grid of RT models of the O-rich AGB stars found in the SAGE surveys. From the bright O-rich AGB population, we chose HV 5715, and from the faint O-rich AGB population we chose SSTISAGE1C J052206.92-715017.6 (SSTSAGE052206). We found the complex indices of refraction of oxygen-deficient silicates from Ossenkopf et al. and a power law with exponential decay grain size distribution like what Kim et al. used but with γ of -3.5, a min of 0.01 μm, and a 0 of 0.1 μm to be reasonable dust properties for these models. There is a slight indication that the dust around the faint O-rich AGB may be more silica-rich than that around the bright O-rich AGB. Simple models of gas emission suggest a relatively extended gas envelope for the faint O-rich AGB star modeled, consistent with the relatively large dust shell inner radius for the same model. Our models of the data require the luminosity of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 to be ∼5100 L sun and ∼36,000 L sun , respectively. This, combined with the stellar effective temperatures of 3700 K and 3500 K, respectively, that we find best fit the optical and near-infrared data, suggests stellar masses of ∼3 M sun and ∼7 M sun . This, in turn, suggests that HV 5715 is undergoing hot-bottom burning and that SSTSAGE052206 is not. Our models of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 require dust shells of inner radius ∼17 and ∼52 times the stellar radius, respectively, with dust temperatures there of

  19. Star-Branched Polymers (Star Polymers)

    KAUST Repository

    Hirao, Akira

    2015-09-01

    The synthesis of well-defined regular and asymmetric mixed arm (hereinafter miktoarm) star-branched polymers by the living anionic polymerization is reviewed in this chapter. In particular, much attention is being devoted to the synthetic development of miktoarm star polymers since 2000. At the present time, the almost all types of multiarmed and multicomponent miktoarm star polymers have become feasible by using recently developed iterative strategy. For example, the following well-defined stars have been successfully synthesized: 3-arm ABC, 4-arm ABCD, 5-arm ABCDE, 6-arm ABCDEF, 7-arm ABCDEFG, 6-arm ABC, 9-arm ABC, 12-arm ABC, 13-arm ABCD, 9-arm AB, 17-arm AB, 33-arm AB, 7-arm ABC, 15-arm ABCD, and 31-arm ABCDE miktoarm star polymers, most of which are quite new and difficult to synthesize by the end of the 1990s. Several new specialty functional star polymers composed of vinyl polymer segments and rigid rodlike poly(acetylene) arms, helical polypeptide, or helical poly(hexyl isocyanate) arms are introduced.

  20. A rare encounter with very massive stars in NGC 3125-A1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wofford, Aida [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Leitherer, Claus [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chandar, Rupali [University of Toledo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Bouret, Jean-Claude, E-mail: wofford@iap.edu [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France)

    2014-02-01

    Super star cluster A1 in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 3125 is characterized by broad He II λ1640 emission (FWHM ∼ 1200 km s{sup –1}) of unprecedented strength (equivalent width, EW = 7.1 ± 0.4 Å). Previous attempts to characterize the massive star content in NGC 3125-A1 were hampered by the low resolution of the UV spectrum and the lack of co-spatial panchromatic data. We obtained far-UV to near-IR spectroscopy of the two principal emitting regions in the galaxy with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We use these data to study three clusters in the galaxy, A1, B1, and B2. We derive cluster ages of 3-4 Myr, intrinsic reddenings of E(B – V) = 0.13, 0.15, and 0.13, and cluster masses of 1.7 × 10{sup 5}, 1.4 × 10{sup 5}, and 1.1 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}, respectively. A1 and B2 show O V λ1371 absorption from massive stars, which is rarely seen in star-forming galaxies, and have Wolf-Rayet (WR) to O star ratios of N(WN5-6)/N(O) = 0.23 and 0.10, respectively. The high N(WN5-6)/N(O) ratio of A1 cannot be reproduced by models that use a normal initial mass function (IMF) and generic WR star line luminosities. We rule out that the extraordinary He II λ1640 emission and O V λ1371 absorption of A1 are due to an extremely flat upper IMF exponent, and suggest that they originate in the winds of very massive (>120 M {sub ☉}) stars. In order to reproduce the properties of peculiar clusters such as A1, the present grid of stellar evolution tracks implemented in Starburst99 needs to be extended to masses >120 M {sub ☉}.

  1. Massive stars in galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the morphologic type of a galaxy and the evolution of its massive stars is explored, reviewing observational results for nearby galaxies. The data are presented in diagrams, and it is found that the massive-star populations of most Sc spiral galaxies and irregular galaxies are similar, while those of Sb spirals such as M 31 and M 81 may be affected by morphology (via differences in the initial mass function or star-formation rate). Consideration is also given to the stability-related upper luminosity limit in the H-R diagram of hypergiant stars (attributed to radiation pressure in hot stars and turbulence in cool stars) and the goals of future observation campaigns. 88 references

  2. Evolution of massive stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loore, C. de

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of stars with masses larger than 15 sun masses is reviewed. These stars have large convective cores and lose a substantial fraction of their matter by stellar wind. The treatment of convection and the parameterisation of the stellar wind mass loss are analysed within the context of existing disagreements between theory and observation. The evolution of massive close binaries and the origin of Wolf-Rayet Stars and X-ray binaries is also sketched. (author)

  3. OGLE Collection of Star Clusters. New Objects in the Magellanic Bridge and the Outskirts of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Udalski, A.; Skowron, D. M.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Skowron, J.; Karczmarek, P.; Cieślar, M.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2017-12-01

    The Magellanic System (MS) encompasses the nearest neighbors of the Milky Way, the Large (LMC) and Small (SMC) Magellanic Clouds, and the Magellanic Bridge (MBR). This system contains a diverse sample of star clusters. Their parameters, such as the spatial distribution, chemical composition and age distribution yield important information about the formation scenario of the whole Magellanic System. Using deep photometric maps compiled in the fourth phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-IV) we present the most complete catalog of star clusters in the Magellanic System ever constructed from homogeneous, long time-scale photometric data. In this second paper of the series, we show the collection of star clusters found in the area of about 360 square degrees in the MBR and in the outer regions of the SMC. Our sample contains 198 visually identified star cluster candidates, 75 of which were not listed in any of the previously published catalogs. The new discoveries are mainly young small open clusters or clusters similar to associations.

  4. Fast pulsars, strange stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1990-02-01

    The initial motivation for this work was the reported discovery in January 1989 of a 1/2 millisecond pulsar in the remnant of the spectacular supernova, 1987A. The status of this discovery has come into grave doubt as of data taken by the same group in February, 1990. At this time we must consider that the millisecond signal does not belong to the pulsar. The existence of a neutron star in remnant of the supernova is suspected because of recent observations on the light curve of the remnant, and of course by the neutrino burst that announced the supernova. However its frequency is unknown. I can make a strong case that a pulsar rotation period of about 1 ms divides those that can be understood quite comfortably as neutron stars, and those that cannot. What we will soon learn is whether there is an invisible boundary below which pulsar periods do not fall, in which case, all are presumable neutron stars, or whether there exist sub- millisecond pulsars, which almost certainly cannot be neutron stars. Their most plausible structure is that of a self-bound star, a strange-quark-matter star. The existence of such stars would imply that the ground state of the strong interaction is not, as we usually assume, hadronic matter, but rather strange quark matter. Let us look respectively at stars that are bound only by gravity, and hypothetical stars that are self-bound, for which gravity is so to speak, icing on the cake

  5. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jiong; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  6. Introduction to neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lattimer, James M. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States)

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  7. Strangeon and Strangeon Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyu, Lai; Renxin, Xu

    2017-06-01

    The nature of pulsar-like compact stars is essentially a central question of the fundamental strong interaction (explained in quantum chromo-dynamics) at low energy scale, the solution of which still remains a challenge though tremendous efforts have been tried. This kind of compact objects could actually be strange quark stars if strange quark matter in bulk may constitute the true ground state of the strong-interaction matter rather than 56Fe (the so-called Witten’s conjecture). From astrophysical points of view, however, it is proposed that strange cluster matter could be absolutely stable and thus those compact stars could be strange cluster stars in fact. This proposal could be regarded as a general Witten’s conjecture: strange matter in bulk could be absolutely stable, in which quarks are either free (for strange quark matter) or localized (for strange cluster matter). Strange cluster with three-light-flavor symmetry is renamed strangeon, being coined by combining “strange nucleon” for the sake of simplicity. A strangeon star can then be thought as a 3-flavored gigantic nucleus, and strangeons are its constituent as an analogy of nucleons which are the constituent of a normal (micro) nucleus. The observational consequences of strangeon stars show that different manifestations of pulsarlike compact stars could be understood in the regime of strangeon stars, and we are expecting more evidence for strangeon star by advanced facilities (e.g., FAST, SKA, and eXTP).

  8. Interacting binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahade, Jorge; Ter Haar, D

    1978-01-01

    Interacting Binary Stars deals with the development, ideas, and problems in the study of interacting binary stars. The book consolidates the information that is scattered over many publications and papers and gives an account of important discoveries with relevant historical background. Chapters are devoted to the presentation and discussion of the different facets of the field, such as historical account of the development in the field of study of binary stars; the Roche equipotential surfaces; methods and techniques in space astronomy; and enumeration of binary star systems that are studied

  9. Polarization of Be stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, M.W.

    1975-01-01

    Linear polarization of starlight may be produced by electron scattering in the extended atmospheres of early type stars. Techniques are investigated for the measurement and interpretation of this polarization. Polarimetric observations were made of twelve visual double star systems in which at least one member was a B type star as a means of separating the intrinsic stellar polarization from the polarization produced in the interstellar medium. Four of the double stars contained a Be star. Evidence for intrinsic polarization was found in five systems including two of the Be systems, one double star with a short period eclipsing binary, and two systems containing only normal early type stars for which emission lines have not been previously reported. The interpretation of these observations in terms of individual stellar polarizations and their wavelength dependence is discussed. The theoretical basis for the intrinsic polarization of early type stars is explored with a model for the disk-like extended atmospheres of Be stars. Details of a polarimeter for the measurement of the linear polarization of astronomical point sources are also presented with narrow band (Δ lambda = 100A) measurements of the polarization of γ Cas from lambda 4000 to lambda 5800

  10. ENERGY STAR Unit Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These quarterly Federal Fiscal Year performance reports track the ENERGY STAR qualified HOME units that Participating Jurisdictions record in HUD's Integrated...

  11. La Silla quest RR Lyrae star survey: Region I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn, R.; Miller, L. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Horowitz, B.; Baltay, C.; Ellman, N.; Hadjiyska, E.; Rabinowitz, D. [Department of Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06511-8499 (United States); Vivas, A. K. [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía, Apartado Postal 264, Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2014-01-20

    A search for RR Lyrae stars (RRLSs) in ∼840 deg{sup 2} of the sky in right ascension 150°-210° and declination –10° to + 10° yielded 1013 type ab and 359 type c RRLS. This sample is used to study the density profile of the Galactic halo, halo substructures, and the Oosterhoff type of the halo over distances (d {sub ☉}) from ∼5 to ∼80 kpc. The halo is flattened toward the Galactic plane, and its density profile steepens in slope at galactocentric distances greater than ∼25 kpc. The RRLS in the stellar stream from the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy match well the model of Law and Majewski for the stars that were stripped 1.3-3.2 Gyr ago, but not for the ones stripped 3.2-5.0 Gyr ago. Over densities are found at the locations of the Virgo Overdensity and the Virgo Stellar Stream. Within 1° of 1220-1, which Jerjen et al. identify as a halo substructure at d {sub ☉} ∼ 24 kpc, there are four RRLS that are possibly members. Away from substructures, the RRLS are a mixture of Oosterhoff types I and II, but mostly OoI (∼73%). The accretion of galaxies resembling in RRLS content the most massive Milky Way satellites (LMC, SMC, For, Sgr) may explain this preponderance of OoI. Six new RRLS and three new anomalous Cepheids were found in the Sextans dSph galaxy.

  12. DETAILED CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES OF FOUR STARS IN THE UNUSUAL GLOBULAR CLUSTER PALOMAR 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakari, Charli M.; Venn, Kim A.; Irwin, Mike; Aoki, Wako; Arimoto, Nobuo; Dotter, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Detailed chemical abundances for 21 elements are presented for four red giants in the anomalous outer halo globular cluster Palomar 1 (R GC = 17.2 kpc, Z = 3.6 kpc) using high-resolution (R = 36, 000) spectra from the High Dispersion Spectrograph on the Subaru Telescope. Pal 1 has long been considered unusual because of its low surface brightness, sparse red giant branch, young age, and its possible association with two extragalactic streams of stars. This paper shows that its chemistry further confirms its unusual nature. The mean metallicity of the four stars, [Fe/H] = -0.60 ± 0.01, is high for a globular cluster so far from the Galactic center, but is low for a typical open cluster. The [α/Fe] ratios, though in agreement with the Galactic stars within the 1σ errors, agree best with the lower values in dwarf galaxies. No signs of the Na/O anticorrelation are detected in Pal 1, though Na appears to be marginally high in all four stars. Pal 1's neutron-capture elements are also unusual: its high [Ba/Y] ratio agrees best with dwarf galaxies, implying an excess of second-peak over first-peak s-process elements, while its [Eu/α] and [Ba/Eu] ratios show that Pal 1's contributions from the r-process must have differed in some way from normal Galactic stars. Therefore, Pal 1 is unusual chemically, as well in its other properties. Pal 1 shares some of its unusual abundance characteristics with the young clusters associated with the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy remnant and the intermediate-age LMC clusters, and could be chemically associated with the Canis Majoris overdensity; however, it does not seem to be similar to the Monoceros/Galactic Anticenter Stellar Stream.

  13. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  14. Radioprotective effects of Sipunculus nudus L. polysaccharide combined with WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on radiation-injured mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shuqi; Shen Xianrong; Liu Yuming; He Ying; Jiang Dingwen; Chen Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the radioprotective effect of Sipunculus nudus L. polysaccharide (SNP) in combination with WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on irradiated mice. A total of 70 Imprinting Control Region (ICR) mice were divided into seven groups: the control group, the model group and five administration groups. All groups, except the control group, were exposed to a 5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray beam. Blood parameters [including white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC) and platelet counts and hemoglobin level] were assessed three days before irradiation, and the on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after irradiation. Spleen, thymus and testicular indices, DNA contents of bone marrow cells, bone marrow nucleated cells, sperm counts, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), testosterone and estradiol levels in the serum were assessed on the 14th day after irradiation. The combined administration of SNP, WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF exerted synergistic recovery effects on peripheral blood WBC, RBC and platelet counts and hemoglobin levels in irradiated mice, and synergistic promotion effects on spleen, thymus, testicle, bone marrow nucleated cells and sperm counts in irradiated mice. The synergistic administration increased the serum SOD activities and serum testosterone content of irradiated mice, but synergy decreased the content of serum MDA and estradiol in irradiated mice. These results suggest that the combined administration of SNP, WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF should increase the efficacy of these drugs for acute radiation sickness, protect immunity, hematopoiesis and the reproductive organs of irradiated-damaged mice, and improve oxidation resistance in the body. (author)

  15. Phase I trials of WR2721 in combination with radiation therapy and with the alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and cis-platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kligerman, M.M.; Blumberg, A.L.; Glick, J.H.; Nelson, D.F.; Glover, D.; Yuhas, J.M.; Amols, H.I.; Goodman, R.L.

    Three phase I trials of the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) have accessed 60 patients. Study 1 is devised to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a single dose of the protector 15 to 30 minutes before a single radiation treatment of a size used routinely in palliative management. Study 2 plans to determine the MTD for up to 15 daily doses of the drug over 3 weeks during palliative radiotherapy. Also, the multipe-dose study will establish the MTD before palliative irradiation for fewer than five fractions a week. Study 3 uses the existing single-dose MTD determined in Study 1 as pretreatment 15 to 30 minutes before cyclophosphamide or cis-platinum. Toxic symptoms include emesis, hypotension, hypertension, somnolence, and sneezing. Only one serious episode of hypotension, considered idiosyncratic, and one instance of moderate to severe vomiting have occurred. Forty-one patients have been entered in Study 1 and a dose of 600 mg/m2 has been reached. The next step is to proceed to the planned highest level of 740 mg/m2. Of five patients in the multiple-dose study, one has been given, without toxicity, WR2721 at the level of 100 mg/m2 for 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Fourteen patients are accessed to the alkylating agent study. Using protector doses of 450 mg/m2, a cyclophosphamide level of 1500 mg/m2 has been accomplished. However, two of three patients who received 450 mg/m2 of WR2721 before 120 mg/m2 of cis-platinum have shown moderate elevation of the serum creatinine, both of which returned to normal.

  16. Phase I trials of WR2721 in combination with radiation therapy and with the alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and cis-platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, M.M.; Blumberg, A.L.; Glick, J.H.; Nelson, D.F.; Glover, D.; Yuhas, J.M.; Amols, H.I.; Goodman, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Three phase I trials of the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) have accessed 60 patients. Study 1 is devised to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a single dose of the protector 15 to 30 minutes before a single radiation treatment of a size used routinely in palliative management. Study 2 plans to determine the MTD for up to 15 daily doses of the drug over 3 weeks during palliative radiotherapy. Also, the multipe-dose study will establish the MTD before palliative irradiation for fewer than five fractions a week. Study 3 uses the existing single-dose MTD determined in Study 1 as pretreatment 15 to 30 minutes before cyclophosphamide or cis-platinum. Toxic symptoms include emesis, hypotension, hypertension, somnolence, and sneezing. Only one serious episode of hypotension, considered idiosyncratic, and one instance of moderate to severe vomiting have occurred. Forty-one patients have been entered in Study 1 and a dose of 600 mg/m2 has been reached. The next step is to proceed to the planned highest level of 740 mg/m2. Of five patients in the multiple-dose study, one has been given, without toxicity, WR2721 at the level of 100 mg/m2 for 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Fourteen patients are accessed to the alkylating agent study. Using protector doses of 450 mg/m2, a cyclophosphamide level of 1500 mg/m2 has been accomplished. However, two of three patients who received 450 mg/m2 of WR2721 before 120 mg/m2 of cis-platinum have shown moderate elevation of the serum creatinine, both of which returned to normal

  17. Science Through ARts (STAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolecki, Joseph; Petersen, Ruth; Williams, Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is an educational initiative designed to teach students through a multidisciplinary approach to learning. This presentation describes the STAR pilot project, which will use Mars exploration as the topic to be integrated. Schools from the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and possibly eastern Europe are expected to participate in the pilot project.

  18. European Stars and Stripes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hendricks, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    The European Stars and Stripes (ES&S) organization publishes a daily newspaper, The Stars and Stripes, for DoD personnel stationed in Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and other DoD activities in the U.S. European Command...

  19. Nebraska STARS: Achieving Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschewski, Pat; Isernhagen, Jody; Dappen, Leon

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the state of Nebraska passed legislation requiring the assessment of student performance on content standards, but its requirements were very different from those of any other state. Nebraska created what has come to be known as STARS (School-based Teacher-led Assessment and Reporting System). Under STARS, each of Nebraska's nearly 500…

  20. Convective overshooting in stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrássy, R.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous observations provide evidence that the standard picture, in which convective mixing is limited to the unstable layers of a star, is incomplete. The mixing layers in real stars are significantly more extended than what the standard models predict. Some of the observations require changing

  1. By Draconis Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Bernard W.

    An optical spectroscopic survey of dK-M stars has resulted in the discovery of several new H-alpha emission objects. Available optical data suggest these stars have a level of chromospheric activity midway between active BY Dra stars and quiet dM's. These "marginal" BY Dra stars are single objects that have rotation velocities slightly higher than that of quiet field stars but below that of active flare/BY Dra objects. The marginal BY Dra stars provide us with a class of objects rotating very near a "trigger velocity" (believed to be 5 km/s) which appears to divide active flare/BY Dra stars from quiet dM's. UV data on Mg II emission fluxes and strength of transition region features such as C IV will serve to fix activity levels in the marginal objects and determine chromosphere and transition-region heating rates. Simultaneous optical magnetic field measures will be used to explore the connection between fieldstrength/filling-factor and atmospheric heating. Comparison of these data with published information on active and quiet dM stars will yield information on the character of the stellar dynamo as it makes a transition from "low" to "high" activity.

  2. Observing Double Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  3. Neutron Stars and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact astronomical objects in the universe which are accessible by direct observation. Studying neutron stars means studying physics in regimes unattainable in any terrestrial laboratory. Understanding their observed complex phenomena requires a wide range of scientific disciplines, including the nuclear and condensed matter physics of very dense matter in neutron star interiors, plasma physics and quantum electrodynamics of magnetospheres, and the relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics of electron-positron pulsar winds interacting with some ambient medium. Not to mention the test bed neutron stars provide for general relativity theories, and their importance as potential sources of gravitational waves. It is this variety of disciplines which, among others, makes neutron star research so fascinating, not only for those who have been working in the field for many years but also for students and young scientists. The aim of this book is to serve as a reference work which not only review...

  4. Spectrophotometry of carbon stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oganesyan, R.K.; Karapetyan, M.S.; Nersisyan, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The results are given of the spectrophotometric investigation of 56 carbon stars in the spectral range from 4000 to 6800 A with resolution 3 A. The observed energy distributions of these stars are determined relative to the flux at the wavelength /sub 0/ = 5556; they are presented in the form of graphs. The energy distributions have been obtained for the first time for 35 stars. Variation in the line Ba II 4554 A has been found in the spectra of St Cam, UU Aur, and RV Mon. Large changes have taken place in the spectra of RT UMa and SS Vir. It is noted that the spectra of carbon stars have a depression, this being situated in different spectral regions for individual groups of stars.

  5. Rotating stars in relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  6. On the evolution of stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippenhahn, R.

    1989-01-01

    A popular survey is given of the present knowledge on evolution and ageing of stars. Main sequence stars, white dwarf stars, and red giant stars are classified in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR)-diagram by measurable quantities: surface temperature and luminosity. From the HR-diagram it can be concluded to star mass and age. Star-forming processes in interstellar clouds as well as stellar burning processes are illustrated. The changes occurring in a star due to the depletion of the nuclear energy reserve are described. In this frame the phenomena of planetary nebulae, supernovae, pulsars, neutron stars as well as of black holes are explained

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of star/linear and star/star blends with chemically identical monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, P E [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Avgeropoulos, A [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Freire, J J [Departamento de Ciencias y Tecnicas FisicoquImicas, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Facultad de Ciencias, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kosmas, M [Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Vlahos, C [Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2007-11-21

    The effects of chain size and architectural asymmetry on the miscibility of blends with chemically identical monomers, differing only in their molecular weight and architecture, are studied via Monte Carlo simulation by using the bond fluctuation model. Namely, we consider blends composed of linear/linear, star/linear and star/star chains. We found that linear/linear blends are more miscible than the corresponding star/star mixtures. In star/linear blends, the increase in the volume fraction of the star chains increases the miscibility. For both star/linear and star/star blends, the miscibility decreases with the increase in star functionality. When we increase the molecular weight of linear chains of star/linear mixtures the miscibility decreases. Our findings are compared with recent analytical and experimental results.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of star/linear and star/star blends with chemically identical monomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakis, P. E.; Avgeropoulos, A.; Freire, J. J.; Kosmas, M.; Vlahos, C.

    2007-11-01

    The effects of chain size and architectural asymmetry on the miscibility of blends with chemically identical monomers, differing only in their molecular weight and architecture, are studied via Monte Carlo simulation by using the bond fluctuation model. Namely, we consider blends composed of linear/linear, star/linear and star/star chains. We found that linear/linear blends are more miscible than the corresponding star/star mixtures. In star/linear blends, the increase in the volume fraction of the star chains increases the miscibility. For both star/linear and star/star blends, the miscibility decreases with the increase in star functionality. When we increase the molecular weight of linear chains of star/linear mixtures the miscibility decreases. Our findings are compared with recent analytical and experimental results.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of star/linear and star/star blends with chemically identical monomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorakis, P E; Avgeropoulos, A; Freire, J J; Kosmas, M; Vlahos, C

    2007-01-01

    The effects of chain size and architectural asymmetry on the miscibility of blends with chemically identical monomers, differing only in their molecular weight and architecture, are studied via Monte Carlo simulation by using the bond fluctuation model. Namely, we consider blends composed of linear/linear, star/linear and star/star chains. We found that linear/linear blends are more miscible than the corresponding star/star mixtures. In star/linear blends, the increase in the volume fraction of the star chains increases the miscibility. For both star/linear and star/star blends, the miscibility decreases with the increase in star functionality. When we increase the molecular weight of linear chains of star/linear mixtures the miscibility decreases. Our findings are compared with recent analytical and experimental results

  10. Star Cluster Structure from Hierarchical Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudic, Michael; Hopkins, Philip; Murray, Norman; Lamberts, Astrid; Guszejnov, David; Schmitz, Denise; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Young massive star clusters (YMCs) spanning 104-108 M⊙ in mass generally have similar radial surface density profiles, with an outer power-law index typically between -2 and -3. This similarity suggests that they are shaped by scale-free physics at formation. Recent multi-physics MHD simulations of YMC formation have also produced populations of YMCs with this type of surface density profile, allowing us to narrow down the physics necessary to form a YMC with properties as observed. We show that the shallow density profiles of YMCs are a natural result of phase-space mixing that occurs as they assemble from the clumpy, hierarchically-clustered configuration imprinted by the star formation process. We develop physical intuition for this process via analytic arguments and collisionless N-body experiments, elucidating the connection between star formation physics and star cluster structure. This has implications for the early-time structure and evolution of proto-globular clusters, and prospects for simulating their formation in the FIRE cosmological zoom-in simulations.

  11. Making star teams out of star players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankins, Michael; Bird, Alan; Root, James

    2013-01-01

    Top talent is an invaluable asset: In highly specialized or creative work, for instance, "A" players are likely to be six times as productive as "B" players. So when your company has a crucial strategic project, why not multiply all that firepower and have a team of your best performers tackle it? Yet many companies hesitate to do this, believing that all-star teams don't work: Big egos will get in the way. The stars won't be able to work with one another. They'll drive the team Leader crazy. Mankins, Bird, and Root of Bain & Company believe it's time to set aside that thinking. They have seen all-star teams do extraordinary work. But there is a right way and a wrong way to organize them. Before you can even begin to assemble such a team, you need to have the right talent management practices, so you hire and develop the best people and know what they're capable of. You have to give the team appropriate incentives and leaders and support staffers who are stars in their own right. And projects that are ill-defined or small scale are not for all-star teams. Use them only for critical missions, and make sure their objectives are clear. Even with the right setup, things can still go wrong. The wise executive will take steps to manage egos, prune non-team-players, and prevent average coworkers from feeling completely undervalued. She will also invest a lot of time in choosing the right team Leader and will ask members for lots of feedback to monitor how that leader is doing.

  12. Stability of boson stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleiser, M.

    1988-01-01

    Boson stars are gravitationally bound, spherically symmetric equilibrium configurations of cold, free, or interacting complex scalar fields phi. As these equilibrium configurations naturally present local anisotropy, it is sensible to expect departures from the well-known stability criteria for fluid stars. With this in mind, I investigate the dynamical instability of boson stars against charge-conserving, small radial perturbations. Following the method developed by Chandrasekhar, a variational base for determining the eigenfrequencies of the perturbations is found. This approach allows one to find numerically an upper bound for the central density where dynamical instability occurs. As applications of the formalism, I study the stability of equilibrium configurations obtained both for the free and for the self-interacting [with V(phi) = (λ/4)chemical bondphichemical bond 4 ] massive scalar field phi. Instabilities are found to occur not for the critical central density as in fluid stars but for central densities considerably higher. The departure from the results for fluid stars is sensitive to the coupling λ; the higher the value of λ, the more the stability properties of boson stars approach those of a fluid star. These results are linked to the fractional anisotropy at the radius of the configuration

  13. From clouds to stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmegreen, B.G.

    1982-01-01

    At the present time, the theory of star formation must be limited to what we know about the lowest density gas, or about the pre-main sequence stars themselves. We would like to understand two basic processes: 1) how star-forming clouds are created from the ambient interstellar gas in the first place, and 2) how small parts of these clouds condense to form individual stars. We are interested also in knowing what pre-main sequence stars are like, and how they can interact with their environment. These topics are reviewed in what follows. In this series of lectures, what we know about the formation of stars is tentatively described. The lectures begin with a description of the interstellar medium, and then they proceed along the same direction that a young star would follow during its creation, namely from clouds through the collapse phase and onto the proto-stellar phase. The evolution of viscous disks and two models for the formation of the solar system are described in the last lectures. The longest lectures, and the topics that are covered in most detail, are not necessarily the ones for which we have the most information. Physically intuitive explanations for the various processes are emphasized, rather then mathematical explanations. In some cases, the mathematical aspects are developed as well, but only when the equations can be used to give important numerical values for comparison with the observations

  14. Nuclear physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Thermonuclear reactions in stars is a major topic in the field of nuclear astrophysics, and deals with the topics of how precisely stars generate their energy through nuclear reactions, and how these nuclear reactions create the elements the stars, planets and - ultimately - we humans consist of. The present book treats these topics in detail. It also presents the nuclear reaction and structure theory, thermonuclear reaction rate formalism and stellar nucleosynthesis. The topics are discussed in a coherent way, enabling the reader to grasp their interconnections intuitively. The book serves bo

  15. Entropy Production of Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid M. Martyushev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The entropy production (inside the volume bounded by a photosphere of main-sequence stars, subgiants, giants, and supergiants is calculated based on B–V photometry data. A non-linear inverse relationship of thermodynamic fluxes and forces as well as an almost constant specific (per volume entropy production of main-sequence stars (for 95% of stars, this quantity lies within 0.5 to 2.2 of the corresponding solar magnitude is found. The obtained results are discussed from the perspective of known extreme principles related to entropy production.

  16. ULTRA-LOW AMPLITUDE VARIABLES IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD-CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS, POP. II CEPHEIDS, RV TAU STARS, AND BINARY VARIABLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert Buchler, J.; Wood, Peter R.; Soszynski, Igor

    2009-01-01

    A search for variable stars with ultra-low amplitudes (ULAs), in the millimagnitude range, has been made in the combined MACHO and OGLE databases in the broad vicinity of the Cepheid instability strip in the HR diagram. A total of 25 singly periodic and 4 multiply periodic ULA objects have been uncovered. Our analysis does not allow us to distinguish between pulsational and ellipsoidal (binary) variabilities, nor between Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and foreground objects. However, the objects are strongly clustered and appear to be associated with the pulsational instability strips of LMC Pop. I and II variables. When combined with the ULA variables of Buchler et al., a total of 20 objects fall close to the classical Cepheid instability strip. However, they appear to fall on parallel period-magnitude (PM) relations that are shifted to slightly higher magnitude which would confer them a different evolutionary status. Low-amplitude RV Tauri and Pop. II Cepheids have been uncovered that do not appear in the MACHO or OGLE catalogs. Interestingly, a set of binaries seem to lie on a PM relation that is essentially parallel to that of the RV Tauri/Pop. II Cepheids.

  17. Multiple stellar generations in the Large Magellanic Cloud Star Cluster NGC 1846

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Antonino

    2010-09-01

    The recent discovery of multiple stellar populations in massive Galactic globular clusters poses a serious challenge for models of star cluster formation and evolution. The finding of multiple main sequences in the massive clusters NGC 2808 and omega Centauri, and multiple sub-giant-branch in NGC 1851 and many other globulars have demonstrated that star clusters are not as simple as we have imagined for decades. Surprisingly the only way to explain the main sequence splitting appears to be Helium enrichment, up to an astonishingly high Y 0.40.An unique angle on this problem can be provided by intermediate-age clusters in the Magellanic Clouds with peculiar main-sequence turn-off morphologies. Recent discoveries, based on ACS data of unparalleled photometric accuracy, have demonstrated that the CMDs of a large fraction of these clusters { 70 %} are not consistent with the simple, single stellar population hypothesis. Explanations for what conditions could give rise to multiple populations in Galactic Globular Clusters remain controversial; this is even more the case for LMC clustersTo properly constraint the multipopulation phenomenon in Magellanic Cloud star clusters, we propose deep UV/IR imaging of NGC 1846, a star cluster where multiple populations have already been identified. The proposed observation will allow us to accurately measure the age difference between the stellar populations providing fundamental clues on the formation mechanism. Our simulations of WFC3 performance suggest that we will be able to detect even the main sequence splitting caused by small He differences {Delta Y 0.02}.

  18. Carbon Stars T. Lloyd Evans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that the features used in estimating luminosities of ordinary giant stars are just those whose abundance ... This difference between the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of CH stars and the. J stars, which belong to .... that the first group was binaries, as for the CH stars of the solar vicinity, while those of the second group ...

  19. The donor star of the X-ray pulsar X1908+075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Núñez, S.; Sander, A.; Gímenez-García, A.; Gónzalez-Galán, A.; Torrejón, J. M.; Gónzalez-Fernández, C.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2015-06-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries consist of a massive donor star and a compact object. While several of those systems have been well studied in X-rays, little is known for most of the donor stars as they are often heavily obscured in the optical and ultraviolet regime. There is an opportunity to observe them at infrared wavelengths, however. The goal of this study is to obtain the stellar and wind parameters of the donor star in the X1908+075 high-mass X-ray binary system with a stellar atmosphere model to check whether previous studies from X-ray observations and spectral morphology lead to a sufficient description of the donor star. We obtained H- and K-band spectra of X1908+075 and analysed them with the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code. For the first time, we calculated a stellar atmosphere model for the donor star, whose main parameters are: Mspec = 15 ± 6 M⊙, T∗ = 23-3+6 kK, log geff = 3.0 ± 0.2 and log L/L⊙ = 4.81 ± 0.25. The obtained parameters point towards an early B-type (B0-B3) star, probably in a supergiant phase. Moreover we determined a more accurate distance to the system of 4.85 ± 0.50 kpc than the previously reported value. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. AgSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    AgSTAR promotes biogas recovery projects, which generate renewable energy and other beneficial products from the anaerobic digestion of livestock manure and organic wastes while decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture sector.

  1. Orbiting radiation stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, Dean P; Langford, John; Perez-Giz, Gabe

    2016-01-01

    We study a spherically symmetric solution to the Einstein equations in which the source, which we call an orbiting radiation star (OR-star), is a compact object consisting of freely falling null particles. The solution avoids quantum scale regimes and hence neither relies upon nor ignores the interaction of quantum mechanics and gravitation. The OR-star spacetime exhibits a deep gravitational well yet remains singularity free. In fact, it is geometrically flat in the vicinity of the origin, with the flat region being of any desirable scale. The solution is observationally distinct from a black hole because a photon from infinity aimed at an OR-star escapes to infinity with a time delay. (paper)

  2. Cataclysmic Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Coel

    2001-01-01

    Cataclysmic variable stars are the most variable stars in the night sky, fluctuating in brightness continually on timescales from seconds to hours to weeks to years. The changes can be recorded using amateur telescopes, yet are also the subject of intensive study by professional astronomers. That study has led to an understanding of cataclysmic variables as binary stars, orbiting so closely that material transfers from one star to the other. The resulting process of accretion is one of the most important in astrophysics. This book presents the first account of cataclysmic variables at an introductory level. Assuming no previous knowledge of the field, it explains the basic principles underlying the variability, while providing an extensive compilation of cataclysmic variable light curves. Aimed at amateur astronomers, undergraduates, and researchers, the main text is accessible to those with no mathematical background, while supplementary boxes present technical details and equations.

  3. SX Phoenicis stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, J.; Mateo, M.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the basic observational information concerning SX Phe stars, including recent findings such as the discovery of about 40 low-luminosity variable stars in the Carina dwarf galaxy and identification of at least one SX Phe star in the metal-rich globular cluster M71. Direct evidence supporting the hypothesis that at least some BSs are binary systems comes from the discovery of two contact binaries and a semidetached binary among the 50 BSs in the globular cluster NGC 5466. Since these systems will coalesce on a time scale 500 Myr, it stands to reason that many (if not most) BSs are coalesced binaries. The merger hypothesis also explains the relatively-large masses (1.0-1.2 solar masses) that have been derived for SX Phe stars and halo BSs, and may also account for the nonvariable BSs in the 'SX Phe instability strip'. 132 refs

  4. Sounds of a Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Acoustic Oscillations in Solar-Twin "Alpha Cen A" Observed from La Silla by Swiss Team Summary Sound waves running through a star can help astronomers reveal its inner properties. This particular branch of modern astrophysics is known as "asteroseismology" . In the case of our Sun, the brightest star in the sky, such waves have been observed since some time, and have greatly improved our knowledge about what is going on inside. However, because they are much fainter, it has turned out to be very difficult to detect similar waves in other stars. Nevertheless, tiny oscillations in a solar-twin star have now been unambiguously detected by Swiss astronomers François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory, using the CORALIE spectrometer on the Swiss 1.2-m Leonard Euler telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. This telescope is mostly used for discovering exoplanets (see ESO PR 07/01 ). The star Alpha Centauri A is the nearest star visible to the naked eye, at a distance of a little more than 4 light-years. The new measurements show that it pulsates with a 7-minute cycle, very similar to what is observed in the Sun . Asteroseismology for Sun-like stars is likely to become an important probe of stellar theory in the near future. The state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph , to be mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, will be able to search for oscillations in stars that are 100 times fainter than those for which such demanding observations are possible with CORALIE. PR Photo 23a/01 : Oscillations in a solar-like star (schematic picture). PR Photo 23b/01 : Acoustic spectrum of Alpha Centauri A , as observed with CORALIE. Asteroseismology: listening to the stars ESO PR Photo 23a/01 ESO PR Photo 23a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 357 x 400 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 713 x 800 pix - 256k] [HiRes - JPEG: 2673 x 3000 pix - 2.1Mb Caption : PR Photo 23a/01 is a graphical representation of resonating acoustic waves in the interior of a solar-like star. Red and blue

  5. Spectrophotometry of carbon stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gow, C.E.

    1975-01-01

    Observations of over one hundred carbon stars have been made with the Indiana rapid spectral scanner in the red and, when possible, in the visual and blue regions of the spectrum. Five distinct subtypes of carbon stars (Barium, CH, R, N, and hydrogen deficient) are represented in the list of observed stars, although the emphasis was placed on the N stars when the observations were made. The rapid scanner was operated in the continuous sweep mode with the exit slit set at twenty angstroms, however, seeing fluctuations and guiding errors smear the spectrum to an effective resolution of approximately thirty angstroms. Nightly observations of Hayes standard stars yielded corrections for atmospheric extinction and instrumental response. The reduction scheme rests on two assumptions, that thin clouds are gray absorbers and the wavelength dependence of the sky transparency does not change during the course of the night. Several stars have been observed in the blue region of the spectrum with the Indiana SIT vidicon spectrometer at two angstroms resolution. It is possible to derive a color temperature for the yellow--red spectral region by fitting a black-body curve through two chosen continuum points. Photometric indices were calculated relative to the blackbody curve to measure the C 2 Swan band strength, the shape of the CN red (6,1) band to provide a measure of the 12 C/ 13 C isotope ratio, and in the hot carbon stars (Barium, CH, and R stars) the strength of an unidentified feature centered at 400 angstroms. An extensive abundance grid of model atmospheres was calculated using a modified version of the computer code ATLAS

  6. Young Stars with SALT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, Adric R. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Alam, Munazza K.; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L. [Department of Astrophysics, The American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Henry, Todd J., E-mail: arr@caltech.edu [RECONS Institute, Chambersburg, PA (United States)

    2017-05-10

    We present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of 79 nearby M dwarfs in 77 systems. All of these dwarfs are low-proper-motion southern hemisphere objects and were identified in a nearby star survey with a demonstrated sensitivity to young stars. Using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Red Side Spectrograph on the South African Large Telescope, we have determined radial velocities, H-alpha, lithium 6708 Å, and potassium 7699 Å equivalent widths linked to age and activity, and spectral types for all of our targets. Combined with astrometric information from literature sources, we identify 44 young stars. Eighteen are previously known members of moving groups within 100 pc of the Sun. Twelve are new members, including one member of the TW Hydra moving group, one member of the 32 Orionis moving group, 9 members of Tucana-Horologium, one member of Argus, and two new members of AB Doradus. We also find 14 young star systems that are not members of any known groups. The remaining 33 star systems do not appear to be young. This appears to be evidence of a new population of nearby young stars not related to the known nearby young moving groups.

  7. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  8. Asteroseismology of white dwarf stars

    OpenAIRE

    Córsico, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Most of low- and intermediate-mass stars that populate the Universe will end their lives as white dwarf stars. These ancient stellar remnants have encrypted inside a precious record of the evolutionary history of the progenitor stars, providing a wealth of information about the evolution of stars, star formation, and the age of a variety of stellar populations, such as our Galaxy and open and globular clusters. While some information like surface chemical composition, temperature and gravity ...

  9. A robust star identification algorithm with star shortlisting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Deval Samirbhai; Chen, Shoushun; Low, Kay Soon

    2018-05-01

    A star tracker provides the most accurate attitude solution in terms of arc seconds compared to the other existing attitude sensors. When no prior attitude information is available, it operates in "Lost-In-Space (LIS)" mode. Star pattern recognition, also known as star identification algorithm, forms the most crucial part of a star tracker in the LIS mode. Recognition reliability and speed are the two most important parameters of a star pattern recognition technique. In this paper, a novel star identification algorithm with star ID shortlisting is proposed. Firstly, the star IDs are shortlisted based on worst-case patch mismatch, and later stars are identified in the image by an initial match confirmed with a running sequential angular match technique. The proposed idea is tested on 16,200 simulated star images having magnitude uncertainty, noise stars, positional deviation, and varying size of the field of view. The proposed idea is also benchmarked with the state-of-the-art star pattern recognition techniques. Finally, the real-time performance of the proposed technique is tested on the 3104 real star images captured by a star tracker SST-20S currently mounted on a satellite. The proposed technique can achieve an identification accuracy of 98% and takes only 8.2 ms for identification on real images. Simulation and real-time results depict that the proposed technique is highly robust and achieves a high speed of identification suitable for actual space applications.

  10. GeV gamma-rays and TeV neutrinos from very massive compact binary systems: The case of WR 20a

    OpenAIRE

    Bednarek, W.

    2005-01-01

    Massive Wolf-Rayet stars in a compact binary systems are characterised by very strong winds which collide creating a shock wave. If the wind nuclei accelerated at the shock can reach large enough energies, they suffer disintegration in collisions with soft thermal radiation from the massive stars injecting relativistic protons and neutrons. Protons collide with the matter of the wind and a fraction of neutrons colide with the massive stars producing gamma-rays and neutrinos. We calculate the ...

  11. Wolf-Rayet Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Sander, Andreas; Todt, Helge

    Nearly 150 years ago, the French astronomers Charles Wolf and Georges Rayet described stars with very conspicuous spectra that are dominated by bright and broad emission lines. Meanwhile termed Wolf-Rayet Stars after their discoverers, those objects turned out to represent important stages in the life of massive stars. As the first conference in a long time that was specifically dedicated to Wolf-Rayet stars, an international workshop was held in Potsdam, Germany, from 1.-5. June 2015. About 100 participants, comprising most of the leading experts in the field as well as as many young scientists, gathered for one week of extensive scientific exchange and discussions. Considerable progress has been reported throughout, e.g. on finding such stars, modeling and analyzing their spectra, understanding their evolutionary context, and studying their circumstellar nebulae. While some major questions regarding Wolf-Rayet stars still remain open 150 years after their discovery, it is clear today that these objects are not just interesting stars as such, but also keystones in the evolution of galaxies. These proceedings summarize the talks and posters presented at the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet workshop. Moreover, they also include the questions, comments, and discussions emerging after each talk, thereby giving a rare overview not only about the research, but also about the current debates and unknowns in the field. The Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC) included Alceste Bonanos (Athens), Paul Crowther (Sheffield), John Eldridge (Auckland), Wolf-Rainer Hamann (Potsdam, Chair), John Hillier (Pittsburgh), Claus Leitherer (Baltimore), Philip Massey (Flagstaff), George Meynet (Geneva), Tony Moffat (Montreal), Nicole St-Louis (Montreal), and Dany Vanbeveren (Brussels).

  12. Models of symbiotic stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedjung, Michael

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important features of symbiotic stars is the coexistence of a cool spectral component that is apparently very similar to the spectrum of a cool giant, with at least one hot continuum, and emission lines from very different stages of ionization. The cool component dominates the infrared spectrum of S-type symbiotics; it tends to be veiled in this wavelength range by what appears to be excess emission in D-type symbiotics, this excess usually being attributed to circumstellar dust. The hot continuum (or continua) dominates the ultraviolet. X-rays have sometimes also been observed. Another important feature of symbiotic stars that needs to be explained is the variability. Different forms occur, some variability being periodic. This type of variability can, in a few cases, strongly suggest the presence of eclipses of a binary system. One of the most characteristic forms of variability is that characterizing the active phases. This basic form of variation is traditionally associated in the optical with the veiling of the cool spectrum and the disappearance of high-ionization emission lines, the latter progressively appearing (in classical cases, reappearing) later. Such spectral changes recall those of novae, but spectroscopic signatures of the high-ejection velocities observed for novae are not usually detected in symbiotic stars. However, the light curves of the 'symbiotic nova' subclass recall those of novae. We may also mention in this connection that radio observations (or, in a few cases, optical observations) of nebulae indicate ejection from symbiotic stars, with deviations from spherical symmetry. We shall give a historical overview of the proposed models for symbiotic stars and make a critical analysis in the light of the observations of symbiotic stars. We describe the empirical approach to models and use the observational data to diagnose the physical conditions in the symbiotics stars. Finally, we compare the results of this empirical

  13. Lots of Small Stars Born in Starburst Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    will quickly affect their environment, but how much? At this moment, nobody knows for sure what determines the actual masses of individual stars that are formed in a very massive and turbulent gas cloud, although some ideas can now be tested with these new observations. The NGC 3603 region The new VLT observations are the key part of a larger research programme that also includes observations of the stellar cluster in the famous Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), as well as adaptive optics observations with ground-based telescopes of more quiescent, star-forming regions in the Galaxy. However, the team considered the starburst region NGC 3603 as the best target for this kind of investigation. It is situated in the far southern constellation Carina (The Keel) and can only be observed from the South. Moreover, such a study has to focus on the densest part of the cluster that can only be resolved with a very sensitive infrared (IR) instrument under the best seeing conditions. The VLT ANTU telescope and the multi-mode ISAAC facility are ideally suited for this purpose. NGC 3603 is located in the Carina spiral arm in the Milky Way galaxy at a distance of about 20,000 light-years (6 - 7 kpc). It is the only massive, galactic "HII-region" (so denoted by astronomers because part of its hydrogen is ionized) in which a central cluster of strongly UV-radiating stars of types "O" and "B" that ionize the nebula can be studied at visual and near-infrared wavelengths. This is because the line-of-sight is reasonably free of dust in this direction; the dimming in near-infrared radiation due to intervening matter between the nebula and us is only about a factor of 2 (contrary to 80 in visible light). The total mass of the hot O- and B-stars in NGC 3603 is over 2000 solar masses. Together, the more than fifty heavy and bright O-stars in NGC 3603 have about 100 times the ionizing power of the well

  14. A combined HST and XMM-Newton campaign for the magnetic O9.7 V star HD 54879. Constraining the weak-wind problem of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenar, T.; Oskinova, L. M.; Järvinen, S. P.; Luckas, P.; Hainich, R.; Todt, H.; Hubrig, S.; Sander, A. A. C.; Ilyin, I.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2017-10-01

    Context. HD 54879 (O9.7 V) is one of a dozen O-stars for which an organized atmospheric magnetic field has been detected. Despite their importance, little is known about the winds and evolution of magnetized massive stars. Aims: To gain insights into the interplay between atmospheres, winds, and magnetic fields of massive stars, we acquired UV and X-ray data of HD 54879 using the Hubble Space Telescope and the XMM-Newton satellite. In addition, 35 optical amateur spectra were secured to study the variability of HD 54879. Methods: A multiwavelength (X-ray to optical) spectral analysis is performed using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code and the xspec software. Results: The photospheric parameters (T∗ = 30.5 kK, log g = 4.0 [cm s-2], log L = 4.45 [L⊙]) are typical for an O9.7 V star. The microturbulent, macroturbulent, and projected rotational velocities are lower than previously suggested (ξph,vmac,vsini ≤ 4 km s-1). An initial mass of 16 M⊙ and an age of 5 Myr are inferred from evolutionary tracks. We derive a mean X-ray emitting temperature of log TX = 6.7 [K] and an X-ray luminosity of LX = 1 × 1032 erg s-1. Short- and long-scale variability is seen in the Hα line, but only a very long period of P ≈ 5 yr could be estimated. Assessing the circumstellar density of HD 54879 using UV spectra, we can roughly estimate the mass-loss rate HD 54879 would have in the absence of a magnetic field as log ṀB = 0 ≈ -9.0 [M⊙ yr-1]. The magnetic field traps the stellar wind up to the Alfvén radius rA ≳ 12 R∗, implying that its true mass-loss rate is log Ṁ ≲ -10.2 [M⊙ yr-1]. Hence, density enhancements around magnetic stars can be exploited to estimate mass-loss rates of non-magnetic stars of similar spectral types, essential for resolving the weak wind problem. Conclusions: Our study confirms that strongly magnetized stars lose little or no mass, and supplies important constraints on the weak-wind problem of massive main sequence

  15. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND METAL CONTENT OF THE GREEN PEAS. NEW DETAILED GTC-OSIRIS SPECTROPHOTOMETRY OF THREE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorin, R.; Perez-Montero, E.; Vilchez, J. M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia S/N, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Papaderos, P., E-mail: amorin@iaa.es [Centro de Astrofisica and Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

    2012-04-20

    We present deep broadband imaging and long-slit spectroscopy of three compact, low-mass starburst galaxies at redshift z {approx} 0.2-0.3, also referred to as Green Peas (GP). We measure physical properties of the ionized gas and derive abundances for several species with high precision. We find that the three GPs display relatively low extinction, low oxygen abundances, and remarkably high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratios. We also report on the detection of clear signatures of Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars in these galaxies. We carry out a pilot spectral synthesis study using a combination of both population and evolutionary synthesis models. Their outputs are in qualitative agreement, strongly suggesting a formation history dominated by starbursts. In agreement with the presence of W-R stars, these models show that these GPs currently undergo a major starburst producing between {approx}4% and {approx}20% of their stellar mass. However, as models imply, they are old galaxies that formed most of their stellar mass several Gyr ago. The presence of old stars has been spectroscopically verified in one of the galaxies by the detection of Mg I {lambda}{lambda}5167, 5173 absorption lines. Additionally, we perform a surface photometry study based on Hubble Space Telescope data, which indicates that the three galaxies possess an exponential low surface brightness envelope. If due to stellar emission, the latter is structurally compatible with the evolved hosts of luminous blue compact dwarf (BCD)/H II galaxies, suggesting that GPs are identifiable with major episodes in the assembly history of local BCDs. These conclusions highlight the importance of these objects as laboratories for studying galaxy evolution at late cosmic epochs.

  16. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND METAL CONTENT OF THE GREEN PEAS. NEW DETAILED GTC-OSIRIS SPECTROPHOTOMETRY OF THREE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorín, R.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M.; Papaderos, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present deep broadband imaging and long-slit spectroscopy of three compact, low-mass starburst galaxies at redshift z ∼ 0.2-0.3, also referred to as Green Peas (GP). We measure physical properties of the ionized gas and derive abundances for several species with high precision. We find that the three GPs display relatively low extinction, low oxygen abundances, and remarkably high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratios. We also report on the detection of clear signatures of Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars in these galaxies. We carry out a pilot spectral synthesis study using a combination of both population and evolutionary synthesis models. Their outputs are in qualitative agreement, strongly suggesting a formation history dominated by starbursts. In agreement with the presence of W-R stars, these models show that these GPs currently undergo a major starburst producing between ∼4% and ∼20% of their stellar mass. However, as models imply, they are old galaxies that formed most of their stellar mass several Gyr ago. The presence of old stars has been spectroscopically verified in one of the galaxies by the detection of Mg I λλ5167, 5173 absorption lines. Additionally, we perform a surface photometry study based on Hubble Space Telescope data, which indicates that the three galaxies possess an exponential low surface brightness envelope. If due to stellar emission, the latter is structurally compatible with the evolved hosts of luminous blue compact dwarf (BCD)/H II galaxies, suggesting that GPs are identifiable with major episodes in the assembly history of local BCDs. These conclusions highlight the importance of these objects as laboratories for studying galaxy evolution at late cosmic epochs.

  17. Circulation of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since the dawn of man, contemplation of the stars has been a primary impulse in human beings, who proliferated their knowledge of the stars all over the world. Aristotle sees this as the product of primeval and perennial “wonder” which gives rise to what we call science, philosophy, and poetry. Astronomy, astrology, and star art (painting, architecture, literature, and music) go hand in hand through millennia in all cultures of the planet (and all use catasterisms to explain certain phenomena). Some of these developments are independent of each other, i.e., they take place in one culture independently of others. Some, on the other hand, are the product of the “circulation of stars.” There are two ways of looking at this. One seeks out forms, the other concentrates on the passing of specific lore from one area to another through time. The former relies on archetypes (for instance, with catasterism), the latter constitutes a historical process. In this paper I present some of the surprising ways in which the circulation of stars has occurred—from East to West, from East to the Far East, and from West to East, at times simultaneously.

  18. Insights into Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Study Sites GC955 and WR313 from New Multicomponent and High-Resolution 2D Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition expedition in the Gulf of Mexico, acquiring multicomponent data and high-resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) data at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313). Based on previously collected logging-while-drilling (LWD) borehole data, these gas hydrate study sites are known to include high concentrations of gas hydrate within sand layers. At GC955 our new 2D data reveal at least three features that appear to be fluid-flow pathways (chimneys) responsible for gas migration and thus account for some aspects of the gas hydrate distribution observed in the LWD data. Our new data also show that the main gas hydrate target, a Pleistocene channel/levee complex, has an areal extent of approximately 5.5 square kilometers and that a volume of approximately 3 x 107 cubic meters of this body lies within the gas hydrate stability zone. Based on LWD-inferred values and reasonable assumptions for net sand, sand porosity, and gas hydrate saturation, we estimate a total equivalent gas-in-place volume of approximately 8 x 108 cubic meters for the inferred gas hydrate within the channel/levee deposits. At WR313 we are able to map the thin hydrate-bearing sand layers in considerably greater detail than that provided by previous data. We also can map the evolving and migrating channel feature that persists in this area. Together these data and the emerging results provide valuable new insights into the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  19. Four new Delta Scuti stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Four new Delta Scuti stars are reported. Power, modified into amplitude, spectra, and light curves are used to determine periodicities. A complete frequency analysis is not performed due to the lack of a sufficient time base in the data. These new variables help verify the many predictions that Delta Scuti stars probably exist in prolific numbers as small amplitude variables. Two of these stars, HR 4344 and HD 107513, are possibly Am stars. If so, they are among the minority of variable stars which are also Am stars.

  20. Neutron star/red giant encounters in globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailyn, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    The author presents a simple expression for the amount by which xsub(crit) is diminished as a star evolves xsub(crit) Rsub(crit)/R*, where Rsub(crit) is the maximum distance of closest approach between two stars for which the tidal energy is sufficient to bind the system, and R* is the radius of the star on which tides are being raised. Also it is concluded that tidal capture of giants by neutron stars resulting in binary systems is unlikely in globular clusters. However, collisions between neutron stars and red giants, or an alternative process involving tidal capture of a main-sequence star into an initially detached binary system, may result either in rapidly rotating neutron stars or in white dwarf/neutron star binaries. (author)

  1. Heavy Metal Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    La Silla Telescope Detects Lots of Lead in Three Distant Binaries Summary Very high abundances of the heavy element Lead have been discovered in three distant stars in the Milky Way Galaxy . This finding strongly supports the long-held view that roughly half of the stable elements heavier than Iron are produced in common stars during a phase towards the end of their life when they burn their Helium - the other half results from supernova explosions. All the Lead contained in each of the three stars weighs about as much as our Moon. The observations show that these "Lead stars" - all members of binary stellar systems - have been more enriched with Lead than with any other chemical element heavier than Iron. This new result is in excellent agreement with predictions by current stellar models about the build-up of heavy elements in stellar interiors. The new observations are reported by a team of Belgian and French astronomers [1] who used the Coude Echelle Spectrometer on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory (Chile). PR Photo 26a/01 : A photo of HD 196944 , one of the "Lead stars". PR Photo 26b/01 : A CES spectrum of HD 196944 . The build-up of heavy elements Astronomers and physicists denote the build-up of heavier elements from lighter ones as " nucleosynthesis ". Only the very lightest elements (Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium [2]) were created at the time of the Big Bang and therefore present in the early universe. All the other heavier elements we now see around us were produced at a later time by nucleosynthesis inside stars. In those "element factories", nuclei of the lighter elements are smashed together whereby they become the nuclei of heavier ones - this process is known as nuclear fusion . In our Sun and similar stars, Hydrogen is being fused into Helium. At some stage, Helium is fused into Carbon, then Oxygen, etc. The fusion process requires positively charged nuclei to move very close to each other before they can unite. But with increasing

  2. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  3. Dynamical Boson Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Liebling

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea of stable, localized bundles of energy has strong appeal as a model for particles. In the 1950s, John Wheeler envisioned such bundles as smooth configurations of electromagnetic energy that he called geons, but none were found. Instead, particle-like solutions were found in the late 1960s with the addition of a scalar field, and these were given the name boson stars. Since then, boson stars find use in a wide variety of models as sources of dark matter, as black hole mimickers, in simple models of binary systems, and as a tool in finding black holes in higher dimensions with only a single Killing vector. We discuss important varieties of boson stars, their dynamic properties, and some of their uses, concentrating on recent efforts.

  4. GRACE star camera noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Nate

    2016-08-01

    Extending results from previous work by Bandikova et al. (2012) and Inacio et al. (2015), this paper analyzes Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) star camera attitude measurement noise by processing inter-camera quaternions from 2003 to 2015. We describe a correction to star camera data, which will eliminate a several-arcsec twice-per-rev error with daily modulation, currently visible in the auto-covariance function of the inter-camera quaternion, from future GRACE Level-1B product releases. We also present evidence supporting the argument that thermal conditions/settings affect long-term inter-camera attitude biases by at least tens-of-arcsecs, and that several-to-tens-of-arcsecs per-rev star camera errors depend largely on field-of-view.

  5. Molecules in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, research related to molecules in stars has rapidly expanded because of progress in related fields. For this reason, it is almost impossible to cover all the topics related to molecules in stars. Thus, here the authors focus their attention on molecules in the atmospheres of cool stars and do not cover in any detail topics related to circumstellar molecules originating from expanding envelopes located far from the stellar surface. However, the authors do discuss molecules in quasi-static circumstellar envelopes (a recently discovered new component of circumstellar envelopes) located near the stellar surface, since molecular lines originating from such envelopes show little velocity shift relative to photospheric lines, and hence they directly affect the interpretation and analysis of stellar spectra

  6. CARBON NEUTRON STAR ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleimanov, V. F.; Klochkov, D.; Werner, K.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars is limited in particular by uncertainties in the chemical composition of their atmospheres. For example, the atmospheres of thermally emitting neutron stars in supernova remnants might have exotic chemical compositions, and for one of them, the neutron star in Cas A, a pure carbon atmosphere has recently been suggested by Ho and Heinke. To test this composition for other similar sources, a publicly available detailed grid of the carbon model atmosphere spectra is needed. We have computed this grid using the standard local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation and assuming that the magnetic field does not exceed 10 8  G. The opacities and pressure ionization effects are calculated using the Opacity Project approach. We describe the properties of our models and investigate the impact of the adopted assumptions and approximations on the emergent spectra

  7. Instability and star evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzoyan, L.V.

    1981-01-01

    The observational data are discussed which testify that the phenomena of dynamical instability of stars and stellar systems are definite manifestations of their evolution. The study of these phenomena has shown that the instability is a regular phase of stellar evolution. It has resulted in the recognition of the most important regularities of the process of star formation concerning its nature. This became possible due to the discovery in 1947 of stellar associations in our Galaxy. The results of the study of the dynamical instability of stellar associations contradict the predictions of classical hypothesis of stellar condensation. These data supplied a basis for a new hypothesis on the formation of stars and nebulae by the decay of superdense protostars [ru

  8. The twinkling of stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakeman, E.; Parry, G.; Pike, E.R.; Pusey, P.N.

    1978-01-01

    This article collects together some of the main ideas and experimental results on the twinkling of stars. Statistical methods are used to characterise the features of the scintillation and to investigate the ways in which these depend on the zenith angle of the star, the bandwidth of the light and various other parameters. Some new results are included which demonstrate the advantages of using photon counting methods in experiments on stellar scintillation. Since the twinkling of stars is a consequence of the turbulence in the Earth's magnetic atmosphere then measurements can be used to deduce some features of the structure of the turbulence. Some of the experiments designed to do this are discussed and the results reported. (author)

  9. Weighing the Smallest Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    VLT Finds Young, Very Low Mass Objects Are Twice As Heavy As Predicted Summary Thanks to the powerful new high-contrast camera installed at the Very Large Telescope, photos have been obtained of a low-mass companion very close to a star. This has allowed astronomers to measure directly the mass of a young, very low mass object for the first time. The object, more than 100 times fainter than its host star, is still 93 times as massive as Jupiter. And it appears to be almost twice as heavy as theory predicts it to be. This discovery therefore suggests that, due to errors in the models, astronomers may have overestimated the number of young "brown dwarfs" and "free floating" extrasolar planets. PR Photo 03/05: Near-infrared image of AB Doradus A and its companion (NACO SDI/VLT) A winning combination A star can be characterised by many parameters. But one is of uttermost importance: its mass. It is the mass of a star that will decide its fate. It is thus no surprise that astronomers are keen to obtain a precise measure of this parameter. This is however not an easy task, especially for the least massive ones, those at the border between stars and brown dwarf objects. Brown dwarfs, or "failed stars", are objects which are up to 75 times more massive than Jupiter, too small for major nuclear fusion processes to have ignited in its interior. To determine the mass of a star, astronomers generally look at the motion of stars in a binary system. And then apply the same method that allows determining the mass of the Earth, knowing the distance of the Moon and the time it takes for its satellite to complete one full orbit (the so-called "Kepler's Third Law"). In the same way, they have also measured the mass of the Sun by knowing the Earth-Sun distance and the time - one year - it takes our planet to make a tour around the Sun. The problem with low-mass objects is that they are very faint and will often be hidden in the glare of the brighter star they orbit, also when viewed

  10. General Relativity and Compact Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-01-01

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10 14 times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed

  11. Atmospheres of central stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummer, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    The author presents a brief summary of atmospheric models that are of possible relevance to the central stars of planetary nebulae, and then discusses the extent to which these models accord with the observations of both nebulae and central stars. Particular attention is given to the significance of the very high Zanstra temperature implied by the nebulae He II lambda 4686 A line, and to the discrepancy between the Zanstra He II temperature and the considerably lower temperatures suggested by the appearance of the visual spectrum for some of these objects. (Auth.)

  12. The Drifting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  13. The star of Bethlehem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that the cause and form of the star are still uncertain. The astrologically significant triple conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter in the constellation of Pisces appears to be the most likely explanation, although the two comets of March 5 BC and April 4 BC cannot be dismissed, nor can the possibility that the 'star' was simply legendary. The conjunction occurred in 7 BC and there are indications that Jesus Christ was probably born in the Autumn of that year, around October 7 BC. (U.K.)

  14. The formation of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stahler, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of star formation, one of the most active fields of modern astronomy. The reader is guided through the subject in a logically compelling manner. Starting from a general description of stars and interstellar clouds, the authors delineate the earliest phases of stellar evolution. They discuss formation activity not only in the Milky Way, but also in other galaxies, both now and in the remote past. Theory and observation are thoroughly integrated, with the aid of numerous figures and images. In summary, this volume is an invaluable resource, both as a text f

  15. Chaplygin dark star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolami, O.; Paramos, J.

    2005-01-01

    We study the general properties of a spherically symmetric body described through the generalized Chaplygin equation of state. We conclude that such an object, dubbed generalized Chaplygin dark star, should exist within the context of the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) model of unification of dark energy and dark matter, and derive expressions for its size and expansion velocity. A criteria for the survival of the perturbations in the GCG background that give origin to the dark star are developed, and its main features are analyzed

  16. ON THE NEED FOR DEEP-MIXING IN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS OF LOW MASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busso, M.; Palmerini, S.; Maiorca, E.; Cristallo, S.; Abia, C.; Straniero, O.; Gallino, R.; Cognata, M. La

    2010-01-01

    The photospheres of low-mass red giants show CNO isotopic abundances that are not satisfactorily accounted for by canonical stellar models. The same is true for the measurements of these isotopes and of the 26 Al/ 27 Al ratio in presolar grains of circumstellar origin. Non-convective mixing, occurring during both red giant branch (RGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stages, is the explanation commonly invoked to account for the above evidence. Recently, the need for such mixing phenomena on the AGB was questioned, and chemical anomalies usually attributed to them were suggested to be formed in earlier phases. We have therefore re-calculated extra-mixing effects in low-mass stars for both the RGB and AGB stages, in order to verify the above claims. Our results contradict them; we actually confirm that slow transport below the convective envelope occurs also on the AGB. This is required primarily by the oxygen isotopic mix and the 26 Al content of presolar oxide grains. Other pieces of evidence exist, in particular from the isotopic ratios of carbon stars of type N, or C(N), in the Galaxy and in the LMC, as well as of SiC grains of AGB origin. We further show that, when extra-mixing occurs in the RGB phases of Population I stars above about 1.2 M sun , this consumes 3 He in the envelope, probably preventing the occurrence of thermohaline diffusion on the AGB. Therefore, we argue that other extra-mixing mechanisms should be active in those final evolutionary phases.

  17. ENERGY STAR Certified Commercial Dishwashers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Commercial Dishwashers that are effective as of...

  18. ENERGY STAR Certified Commercial Ovens

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.2 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Commercial Ovens that are effective as of...

  19. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  20. ENERGY STAR Certified Commercial Boilers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Commercial Boilers that are effective as of...