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Sample records for liver xenobiotic metabolizing

  1. Rb and p53 Liver Functions Are Essential for Xenobiotic Metabolism and Tumor Suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Toussaint, Mathilda J. M.; Youssef, Sameh A.; Tooten, Peter C. J.; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressors Retinoblastoma (Rb) and p53 are frequently inactivated in liver diseases, such as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) or infections with Hepatitis B or C viruses. Here, we discovered a novel role for Rb and p53 in xenobiotic metabolism, which represent a key function of the liver

  2. Rb and p53 Liver Functions Are Essential for Xenobiotic Metabolism and Tumor Suppression.

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    Sathidpak Nantasanti

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressors Retinoblastoma (Rb and p53 are frequently inactivated in liver diseases, such as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC or infections with Hepatitis B or C viruses. Here, we discovered a novel role for Rb and p53 in xenobiotic metabolism, which represent a key function of the liver for metabolizing therapeutic drugs or toxins. We demonstrate that Rb and p53 cooperate to metabolize the xenobiotic 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC. DDC is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (Cyp3a enzymes resulting in inhibition of heme synthesis and accumulation of protoporphyrin, an intermediate of heme pathway. Protoporphyrin accumulation causes bile injury and ductular reaction. We show that loss of Rb and p53 resulted in reduced Cyp3a expression decreased accumulation of protoporphyrin and consequently less ductular reaction in livers of mice fed with DDC for 3 weeks. These findings provide strong evidence that synergistic functions of Rb and p53 are essential for metabolism of DDC. Because Rb and p53 functions are frequently disabled in liver diseases, our results suggest that liver patients might have altered ability to remove toxins or properly metabolize therapeutic drugs. Strikingly the reduced biliary injury towards the oxidative stress inducer DCC was accompanied by enhanced hepatocellular injury and formation of HCCs in Rb and p53 deficient livers. The increase in hepatocellular injury might be related to reduce protoporphyrin accumulation, because protoporphrin is well known for its anti-oxidative activity. Furthermore our results indicate that Rb and p53 not only function as tumor suppressors in response to carcinogenic injury, but also in response to non-carcinogenic injury such as DDC.

  3. [Effects of berberine on the recovery of rat liver xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes after partial hepatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverinsky, I V; Zverinskaya, H G; Sutsko, I P; Telegin, P G; Shlyahtun, A G

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the effect of berberine on the recovery processes of liver xenobiotic-metabolizing function during its compensatory growth after 70% partial hepatectomy. It was found the hepatic ability to metabolize foreign substances are not restored up to day 8. Administration of berberine (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 6 days led to normalization of both cytochrome P450-dependent and flavin-containing monooxygenases. It is suggested that in the biotransformation of berberine involved not only cytochrome P450, but also flavin-containing monooxygenases.

  4. Xenobiotic-contaminated diets affect hepatic lipid metabolism: Implications for liver steatosis in Sparus aurata juveniles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maradonna, F.; Nozzi, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e dell’Ambiente, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Santangeli, S. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e dell’Ambiente, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); INBB Consorzio Interuniversitario di Biosistemi e Biostrutture, 00136 Roma (Italy); Traversi, I. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell’Ambiente e della Vita, Università di Genova, 16132 Genova (Italy); Gallo, P. [INBB Consorzio Interuniversitario di Biosistemi e Biostrutture, 00136 Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Mezzogiorno, 80055 Portici, Napoli (Italy); Fattore, E. [Dipartimento Ambiente e Salute, IRCCS–Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”, 20156 Milano (Italy); Mita, D.G. [INBB Consorzio Interuniversitario di Biosistemi e Biostrutture, 00136 Roma (Italy); Mandich, A. [INBB Consorzio Interuniversitario di Biosistemi e Biostrutture, 00136 Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell’Ambiente e della Vita, Università di Genova, 16132 Genova (Italy); Carnevali, O., E-mail: o.carnevali@univpm.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e dell’Ambiente, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); INBB Consorzio Interuniversitario di Biosistemi e Biostrutture, 00136 Roma (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Diets contaminated with NP, BPA, or t-OP affect lipid metabolism. • Xenobiotic-contaminated diets induce metabolic disorders. • Hepatic metabolic disorders may be related to environmental pollution. - Abstract: The metabolic effects induced by feed contaminated with a lower or a higher concentration of -nonylpnenol (NP), 4-tert-octylphenol (t-OP) or bisphenol A (BPA), three environmental endocrine disruptors, were assessed in juvenile sea bream liver. Histological analysis demonstrated that all these three xenobiotics induced hepatic lipid accumulation and steatosis. These findings prompted analysis of the expression of the major molecules involved in lipid metabolism: peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (which is encoded by ppars), fatty acid synthase (encoded by fas), lipoprotein lipase (encoded by lpl) and hormone-sensitive lipase (encoded by hsl). The enzymes encoded by ppars and fas are in fact responsible for lipid accumulation, whereas lpl- and hsl- encoded proteins play a pivotal role in fat mobilization. The three xenobiotics modulated ppar mRNA expression: pparα mRNA expression was induced by the higher dose of each contaminant; pparβ mRNA expression was upregulated by the lower doses and in BPA2 fish ppary mRNA overexpression was induced by all pollutants. These data agreed with the lipid accumulation profiles documented by histology. Fas mRNA levels were modulated by the two NP doses and the higher BPA concentration. Lpl mRNA was significantly upregulated in all experimental groups except for BPA1 fish while hsl mRNA was significantly downregulated in all groups except for t-OP2 and BPA1 fish. The plasma concentrations of cortisol, the primary stress biomarker, were correlated with the levels of pepck mRNA level. This gene encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase which is one of the key enzymes of gluconeogenesis. Pepck mRNA was significantly overexpressed in fish exposed to NP2 and both t-OP doses. Finally, the genes

  5. Xenobiotic-contaminated diets affect hepatic lipid metabolism: Implications for liver steatosis in Sparus aurata juveniles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maradonna, F.; Nozzi, V.; Santangeli, S.; Traversi, I.; Gallo, P.; Fattore, E.; Mita, D.G.; Mandich, A.; Carnevali, O.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Diets contaminated with NP, BPA, or t-OP affect lipid metabolism. • Xenobiotic-contaminated diets induce metabolic disorders. • Hepatic metabolic disorders may be related to environmental pollution. - Abstract: The metabolic effects induced by feed contaminated with a lower or a higher concentration of -nonylpnenol (NP), 4-tert-octylphenol (t-OP) or bisphenol A (BPA), three environmental endocrine disruptors, were assessed in juvenile sea bream liver. Histological analysis demonstrated that all these three xenobiotics induced hepatic lipid accumulation and steatosis. These findings prompted analysis of the expression of the major molecules involved in lipid metabolism: peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (which is encoded by ppars), fatty acid synthase (encoded by fas), lipoprotein lipase (encoded by lpl) and hormone-sensitive lipase (encoded by hsl). The enzymes encoded by ppars and fas are in fact responsible for lipid accumulation, whereas lpl- and hsl- encoded proteins play a pivotal role in fat mobilization. The three xenobiotics modulated ppar mRNA expression: pparα mRNA expression was induced by the higher dose of each contaminant; pparβ mRNA expression was upregulated by the lower doses and in BPA2 fish ppary mRNA overexpression was induced by all pollutants. These data agreed with the lipid accumulation profiles documented by histology. Fas mRNA levels were modulated by the two NP doses and the higher BPA concentration. Lpl mRNA was significantly upregulated in all experimental groups except for BPA1 fish while hsl mRNA was significantly downregulated in all groups except for t-OP2 and BPA1 fish. The plasma concentrations of cortisol, the primary stress biomarker, were correlated with the levels of pepck mRNA level. This gene encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase which is one of the key enzymes of gluconeogenesis. Pepck mRNA was significantly overexpressed in fish exposed to NP2 and both t-OP doses. Finally, the genes

  6. Altered carbohydrate, lipid, and xenobiotic metabolism by liver from rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, A. H. Jr; Hoel, M.; Wang, E.; Mullins, R. E.; Hargrove, J. L.; Jones, D. P.; Popova, I. A.; Merrill AH, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    To determine the possible biochemical effects of prolonged weightlessness on liver function, samples of liver from rats that had flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were analyzed for protein, glycogen, and lipids as well as the activities of a number of key enzymes involved in metabolism of these compounds and xenobiotics. Among the parameters measured, the major differences were elevations in the glycogen content and hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase activities for the rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and decreases in the amount of microsomal cytochrome P-450 and the activities of aniline hydroxylase and ethylmorphine N-demethylase, cytochrome P-450-dependent enzymes. These results support the earlier finding of differences in these parameters and suggest that altered hepatic function could be important during spaceflight and/or the postflight recovery period.

  7. Activities of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in rat placenta and liver in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabian, Eric; Wang, Xinyi; Engel, Franziska; Li, Hequn; Landsiedel, Robert; Ravenzwaay, van Bennard

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess whether the placental metabolism of xenobiotic compounds should be taken into consideration for physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PBTK) modelling, the activities of seven phase I and phase II enzymes have been quantified in the 18-day placenta of untreated Wistar rats. To

  8. The effects of multiply ionizing gamma irradiations on the xenobiotic metabolizing system in the liver of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavodnik, L.B.; Buko, V.U.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work was the studying the effect of multiply low doses of gamma-irradiation in a total doze 1 and 2 Gy on processes lipid peroxidation and xenobiotics metabolizing in rat liver. It was shown the multiply irradiation causes the expressed activation of lipid peroxidation, by increase of TBARS level and dien conjugates. The system of microsomal oxidations was broken at the same time. (authors)

  9. Xenobiotic Metabolism and Gut Microbiomes.

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    Anubhav Das

    Full Text Available Humans are exposed to numerous xenobiotics, a majority of which are in the form of pharmaceuticals. Apart from human enzymes, recent studies have indicated the role of the gut bacterial community (microbiome in metabolizing xenobiotics. However, little is known about the contribution of the plethora of gut microbiome in xenobiotic metabolism. The present study reports the results of analyses on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in various human gut microbiomes. A total of 397 available gut metagenomes from individuals of varying age groups from 8 nationalities were analyzed. Based on the diversities and abundances of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, various bacterial taxa were classified into three groups, namely, least versatile, intermediately versatile and highly versatile xenobiotic metabolizers. Most interestingly, specific relationships were observed between the overall drug consumption profile and the abundance and diversity of the xenobiotic metabolizing repertoire in various geographies. The obtained differential abundance patterns of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and bacterial genera harboring them, suggest their links to pharmacokinetic variations among individuals. Additional analyses of a few well studied classes of drug modifying enzymes (DMEs also indicate geographic as well as age specific trends.

  10. Systemic responses to inhaled ozone in mice: cachexia and down-regulation of liver xenobiotic metabolizing genes

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    Last, Jerold A [Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, School of Medicine, Toxic Substances Program, 1131 Surge I, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8723 (United States); Gohil, Kishorchandra [Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, School of Medicine, Toxic Substances Program, 1131 Surge I, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8723 (United States); Mathrani, Vivek C [Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, School of Medicine, Toxic Substances Program, 1131 Surge I, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8723 (United States); Kenyon, Nicholas J [Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, School of Medicine, Toxic Substances Program, 1131 Surge I, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8723 (United States)

    2005-10-15

    Rats or mice acutely exposed to high concentrations of ozone show an immediate and significant weight loss, even when allowed free access to food and water. The mechanisms underlying this systemic response to ozone have not been previously elucidated. We have applied the technique of global gene expression analysis to the livers of C57BL mice acutely exposed to ozone. Mice lost up to 14% of their original body weight, with a 42% decrease in total food consumption. We previously had found significant up-regulation of genes encoding proliferative enzymes, proteins related to acute phase reactions and cytoskeletal functions, and other biomarkers of a cachexia-like inflammatory state in lungs of mice exposed to ozone. These results are consistent with a general up-regulation of different gene families responsive to NF-{kappa}B in the lungs of the exposed mice. In the present study, we observed significant down-regulation of different families of mRNAs in the livers of the exposed mice, including genes related to lipid and fatty acid metabolism, and to carbohydrate metabolism in this tissue, consistent with a systemic cachexic response. Several interferon-dependent genes were down-regulated in the liver, suggesting a possible role for interferon as a signaling molecule between lung and liver. In addition, transcription of several mRNAs encoding enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism in the livers of mice exposed to ozone was decreased, suggesting cytokine-mediated suppression of cytochrome P450 expression. This finding may explain a previously controversial report from other investigators more than 20 years ago of prolongation of pentobarbital sleeping time in mice exposed to ozone.

  11. Systemic responses to inhaled ozone in mice: cachexia and down-regulation of liver xenobiotic metabolizing genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, Jerold A.; Gohil, Kishorchandra; Mathrani, Vivek C.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2005-01-01

    Rats or mice acutely exposed to high concentrations of ozone show an immediate and significant weight loss, even when allowed free access to food and water. The mechanisms underlying this systemic response to ozone have not been previously elucidated. We have applied the technique of global gene expression analysis to the livers of C57BL mice acutely exposed to ozone. Mice lost up to 14% of their original body weight, with a 42% decrease in total food consumption. We previously had found significant up-regulation of genes encoding proliferative enzymes, proteins related to acute phase reactions and cytoskeletal functions, and other biomarkers of a cachexia-like inflammatory state in lungs of mice exposed to ozone. These results are consistent with a general up-regulation of different gene families responsive to NF-κB in the lungs of the exposed mice. In the present study, we observed significant down-regulation of different families of mRNAs in the livers of the exposed mice, including genes related to lipid and fatty acid metabolism, and to carbohydrate metabolism in this tissue, consistent with a systemic cachexic response. Several interferon-dependent genes were down-regulated in the liver, suggesting a possible role for interferon as a signaling molecule between lung and liver. In addition, transcription of several mRNAs encoding enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism in the livers of mice exposed to ozone was decreased, suggesting cytokine-mediated suppression of cytochrome P450 expression. This finding may explain a previously controversial report from other investigators more than 20 years ago of prolongation of pentobarbital sleeping time in mice exposed to ozone

  12. Geraniol Pharmacokinetics, Bioavailability and Its Multiple Effects on the Liver Antioxidant and Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes

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    Barbara Pavan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Geraniol is a natural monoterpene showing anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, neuroprotective and anticancer effects. No pharmacokinetic and bioavailability data on geraniol are currently available. We therefore performed a systematic study to identify the permeation properties of geraniol across intestinal cells, and its pharmacokinetics and bioavailability after intravenous and oral administration to rats. In addition, we systematically investigated the potential hepatotoxic effects of high doses of geraniol on hepatic phase I, phase II and antioxidant enzymatic activities and undertook a hematochemical analysis on mice. Permeation studies performed via HPLC evidenced geraniol permeability coefficients across an in vitro model of the human intestinal wall for apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical transport of 13.10 ± 2.3 × 10-3 and 2.1 ± 0.1⋅× 10-3 cm/min, respectively. After intravenous administration of geraniol to rats (50 mg/kg, its concentration in whole blood (detected via HPLC decreased following an apparent pseudo-first order kinetics with a half-life of 12.5 ± 1.5 min. The absolute bioavailability values of oral formulations (50 mg/kg of emulsified geraniol or fiber-adsorbed geraniol were 92 and 16%, respectively. Following emulsified oral administration, geraniol amounts in the cerebrospinal fluid of rats ranged between 0.72 ± 0.08 μg/mL and 2.6 ± 0.2 μg/mL within 60 min. Mice treated with 120 mg/kg of geraniol for 4 weeks showed increased anti-oxidative defenses with no signs of liver toxicity. CYP450 enzyme activities appeared only slightly affected by the high dosage of geraniol.

  13. Xenobiotic metabolism in the fourth dimension: PARtners in time.

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    Green, Carla B; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2006-07-01

    A significant portion of the transcriptome in mammals, including the PAR bZIP transcription factors DBP, HLF, and TEF, is under circadian clock control. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Gachon and colleagues (Gachon et al., 2006) show that disruption of these three genes in mice alters gene expression patterns of many proteins involved in drug metabolism and in liver and kidney responses to xenobiotic agents. Triple mutant mice have severe physiological deficits, including increased hypersensitivity to xenobiotic agents and premature aging, highlighting the profound effect the circadian clock has on this important response system.

  14. Comparative liver accumulation of dioxin-like compounds in sheep and cattle: Possible role of AhR-mediated xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, F; Spalenza, V; Benedetto, A; Manzini, L; Badino, P; Abete, M C; Nebbia, C

    2016-11-15

    PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs are persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that accumulate in animal products and may pose serious health problems. Those able to bind the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), eliciting a plethora of toxic responses, are defined dioxin-like (DL) compounds, while the remainders are called non-DL (NDL). An EFSA opinion has highlighted the tendency of ovine liver to specifically accumulate DL-compounds to a greater extent than any other farmed ruminant species. To examine the possible role in such an accumulation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XME) involved in DL-compound biotransformation, liver samples were collected from ewes and cows reared in an area known for low dioxin contamination. A related paper reported that sheep livers had about 5-fold higher DL-compound concentrations than cattle livers, while the content of the six marker NDL-PCBs did not differ between species. Specimens from the same animals were subjected to gene expression analysis for AhR, AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and AhR-dependent oxidative and conjugative pathways; XME protein expression and activities were also investigated. Both AhR and ARNT mRNA levels were about 2-fold lower in ovine samples and the same occurred for CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, being approximately 3- and 9-fold less expressed in sheep compared to cattle, while CYP1B1 could be detectable in cattle only. The results of the immunoblotting and catalytic activity (most notably EROD) measurements of the CYP1A family enzymes were in line with the gene expression data. By contrast, phase II enzyme expression and activities in sheep were higher (UGT1A) or similar (GSTA1, NQO1) to those recorded in cattle. The overall low expression of CYP1 family enzymes in the sheep is in line with the observed liver accumulation of DL-compounds and is expected to affect the kinetics and the dynamics of other POPs such as many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as of toxins (e.g. aflatoxins) or drugs (e.g. benzimidazole

  15. PROXIMAL: a method for Prediction of Xenobiotic Metabolism.

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    Yousofshahi, Mona; Manteiga, Sara; Wu, Charmian; Lee, Kyongbum; Hassoun, Soha

    2015-12-22

    Contamination of the environment with bioactive chemicals has emerged as a potential public health risk. These substances that may cause distress or disease in humans can be found in air, water and food supplies. An open question is whether these chemicals transform into potentially more active or toxic derivatives via xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes expressed in the body. We present a new prediction tool, which we call PROXIMAL (Prediction of Xenobiotic Metabolism) for identifying possible transformation products of xenobiotic chemicals in the liver. Using reaction data from DrugBank and KEGG, PROXIMAL builds look-up tables that catalog the sites and types of structural modifications performed by Phase I and Phase II enzymes. Given a compound of interest, PROXIMAL searches for substructures that match the sites cataloged in the look-up tables, applies the corresponding modifications to generate a panel of possible transformation products, and ranks the products based on the activity and abundance of the enzymes involved. PROXIMAL generates transformations that are specific for the chemical of interest by analyzing the chemical's substructures. We evaluate the accuracy of PROXIMAL's predictions through case studies on two environmental chemicals with suspected endocrine disrupting activity, bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-chlorobiphenyl (PCB3). Comparisons with published reports confirm 5 out of 7 and 17 out of 26 of the predicted derivatives for BPA and PCB3, respectively. We also compare biotransformation predictions generated by PROXIMAL with those generated by METEOR and Metaprint2D-react, two other prediction tools. PROXIMAL can predict transformations of chemicals that contain substructures recognizable by human liver enzymes. It also has the ability to rank the predicted metabolites based on the activity and abundance of enzymes involved in xenobiotic transformation.

  16. Applications of NMR spectroscopy to xenobiotic metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Recent years have seen high field NMR spectrometers become commonplace in research laboratories. At the same time, major advances in methodology for structural analysis have occurred, particularly notable among these being the development of two-dimensional spectroscopic techniques. Many applications have been made of NMR spectroscopy in the study of xenobiotic metabolic processes. This deals with two specific applications which have been made in the author's laboratory and involve mechanistic studies of the reactions of the carcinogens ethylene dibromide and aflatoxin with DNA

  17. A Liver-Centric Multiscale Modeling Framework for Xenobiotics.

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    James P Sluka

    Full Text Available We describe a multi-scale, liver-centric in silico modeling framework for acetaminophen pharmacology and metabolism. We focus on a computational model to characterize whole body uptake and clearance, liver transport and phase I and phase II metabolism. We do this by incorporating sub-models that span three scales; Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling of acetaminophen uptake and distribution at the whole body level, cell and blood flow modeling at the tissue/organ level and metabolism at the sub-cellular level. We have used standard modeling modalities at each of the three scales. In particular, we have used the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML to create both the whole-body and sub-cellular scales. Our modeling approach allows us to run the individual sub-models separately and allows us to easily exchange models at a particular scale without the need to extensively rework the sub-models at other scales. In addition, the use of SBML greatly facilitates the inclusion of biological annotations directly in the model code. The model was calibrated using human in vivo data for acetaminophen and its sulfate and glucuronate metabolites. We then carried out extensive parameter sensitivity studies including the pairwise interaction of parameters. We also simulated population variation of exposure and sensitivity to acetaminophen. Our modeling framework can be extended to the prediction of liver toxicity following acetaminophen overdose, or used as a general purpose pharmacokinetic model for xenobiotics.

  18. Xenobiotic metabolism in human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibbs, S.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Merk, H.F.; Lockley, D.J.; Pendlington, R.U.; Pease, C.K.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we discuss and compare studies of xenobiotic metabolism in both human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs. In comparison to the liver, the skin is a less studied organ in terms of characterising metabolic capability. While the skin forms the major protective barrier to environmental

  19. In silico prediction of xenobiotic metabolism in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Fangping [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Xenobiotic metabolism in humans is catalyzed by a few enzymes with broad substrate specificities, which provide the overall broad chemical specificity for nearly all xenobiotics that humans encounter. Xenobiotic metabolism are classified into functional group biotransformations. Based on bona fide reactions and negative examples for each reaction class, support vector machine (SVM) classifiers are built. The input to SVM is a set of atomic and molecular features to define the electrostatic, steric, energetic, geometrical and topological environment of the atoms in the reaction center under the molecule. Results show that the overall sensitivity and specificity of classifiers is around 87%.

  20. Elucidation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways in human skin and human skin models by proteomic profiling.

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    Sven van Eijl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics, but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4-10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these

  1. Hepatocyte-based flow analytical bioreactor for xenobiotics metabolism bioprediction

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    M Helvenstein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The research for new in vitro screening tools for predictive metabolic profiling of drug candidates is of major interest in the pharmaceutical field. The main motivation is to avoid late rejection in drug development and to deliver safer drugs to the market. Thanks to the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles, a flow bioreactor has been developed which is able to perform xenobiotic metabolism studies. The selected cell line (HepaRG maintained its metabolic competencies once iron oxide nanoparticles were internalized. Based on magnetically trapped cells in a homemade immobilization chamber, through which a flow of circulating phase was injected to transport nutrients and/or the studied xenobiotic, off-line and online (when coupled to a high-performance liquid chromatography chain metabolic assays were developed using diclofenac as a reference compound. The diclofenac demonstrated a similar metabolization profile chromatogram, both with the newly developed setup and with the control situation. Highly versatile, this pioneering and innovative instrumental design paves the way for a new approach in predictive metabolism studies.

  2. Glucoraphanin, the bioprecursor of the widely extolled chemopreventive agent sulforaphane found in broccoli, induces Phase-I xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and increases free radical generation in rat liver

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    Perocco, Paolo [Department of Experimental Pathology, Cancerology Section, viale Filopanti 22, I-40126, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Bronzetti, Giorgio [Institute of Biology and Agricultural Biotechnology - CNR Research Area, via Moruzzi, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Canistro, Donatella; Sapone, Andrea; Affatato, Alessandra; Pozzetti, Laura; Broccoli, Massimiliano [Department of Pharmacology, Molecular Toxicology Unit, via Irnerio 48, I-40126, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Valgimigli, Luca [Department of Organic Chemistry ' A. Mangini' , Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40127, Alma-Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Pedulli, Gian Franco [Department of Organic Chemistry ' A. Mangini' , Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40127, Alma-Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Iori, Renato [C.R.A - Research Institute for Industrial Crops, via di Corticella 133, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Barillari, Jessica [Institute of Biology and Agricultural Biotechnology - CNR Research Area, via Moruzzi, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)]|[C.R.A - Research Institute for Industrial Crops, via di Corticella 133, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Sblendorio, Valeriana [Department of Pharmacology, Molecular Toxicology Unit, via Irnerio 48, I-40126, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Legator, Marvin S. [Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Division of Environmental Toxicology, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, 700 Harborside Drive, Galveston, TX 77555-1110 (United States); Paolini, Moreno [Department of Pharmacology, Molecular Toxicology Unit, via Irnerio 48, I-40126, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z. [Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Division of Environmental Toxicology, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, 700 Harborside Drive, Galveston, TX 77555-1110 (United States)]. E-mail: sabdelra@utmb.edu

    2006-03-20

    Epidemiological and animal studies linking high fruit and vegetable consumption to lower cancer risk have strengthened the belief that long-term administration of isolated naturally occurring dietary constituents could reduce the risk of cancer. In recent years, metabolites derived from phytoalexins, such as glucoraphanin found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables (Brassicaceae), have gained much attention as potential cancer chemopreventive agents. The protective effect of these micronutrients is assumed to be due to the inhibition of Phase-I carcinogen-bioactivating enzymes and/or induction of Phase-II detoxifying enzymes, an assumption that still remains uncertain. The protective effect of glucoraphanin is thought to be due to sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate metabolite produced from glucoraphanin by myrosinase. Here we show, in rat liver, that while glucoraphanin slightly induces Phase-II enzymes, it powerfully boosts Phase-I enzymes, including activators of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrosamines and olefins. Induction of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms CYP1A1/2, CYP3A1/2 and CYP2E1 was confirmed by Western immunoblotting. CYP induction was paralleled by an increase in the corresponding mRNA levels. Concomitant with this Phase-I induction, we also found that glucoraphanin generated large amount of various reactive radical species, as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry coupled to a radical-probe technique. This suggests that long-term uncontrolled administration of glucoraphanin could actually pose a potential health hazard.

  3. Glucoraphanin, the bioprecursor of the widely extolled chemopreventive agent sulforaphane found in broccoli, induces Phase-I xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and increases free radical generation in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perocco, Paolo; Bronzetti, Giorgio; Canistro, Donatella; Valgimigli, Luca; Sapone, Andrea; Affatato, Alessandra; Pedulli, Gian Franco; Pozzetti, Laura; Broccoli, Massimiliano; Iori, Renato; Barillari, Jessica; Sblendorio, Valeriana; Legator, Marvin S.; Paolini, Moreno; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal studies linking high fruit and vegetable consumption to lower cancer risk have strengthened the belief that long-term administration of isolated naturally occurring dietary constituents could reduce the risk of cancer. In recent years, metabolites derived from phytoalexins, such as glucoraphanin found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables (Brassicaceae), have gained much attention as potential cancer chemopreventive agents. The protective effect of these micronutrients is assumed to be due to the inhibition of Phase-I carcinogen-bioactivating enzymes and/or induction of Phase-II detoxifying enzymes, an assumption that still remains uncertain. The protective effect of glucoraphanin is thought to be due to sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate metabolite produced from glucoraphanin by myrosinase. Here we show, in rat liver, that while glucoraphanin slightly induces Phase-II enzymes, it powerfully boosts Phase-I enzymes, including activators of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrosamines and olefins. Induction of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms CYP1A1/2, CYP3A1/2 and CYP2E1 was confirmed by Western immunoblotting. CYP induction was paralleled by an increase in the corresponding mRNA levels. Concomitant with this Phase-I induction, we also found that glucoraphanin generated large amount of various reactive radical species, as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry coupled to a radical-probe technique. This suggests that long-term uncontrolled administration of glucoraphanin could actually pose a potential health hazard

  4. Uses and limits of radiotracers in the study of drugs and xenobiotics metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Y.

    1980-01-01

    This review deals with scientific papers issued in 1977-1978, on labelling of drugs and xenobiotics and their metabolism. It is divided in five parts: site of label; in vivo metabolism in animals and human beings; in vitro metabolism on tissue slices, cells culture, microsomes, membrane receptors; metabolism of xenobiotics: nutrients, food additives, detergents, plastics and fabrics; discussion. Metabolic studies, nowadays, associate radiotracers, stable isotopes with high performing procedures for analytical separation [fr

  5. Extent of cutaneous metabolism during percutaneous absorption of xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronaugh, R L; Stewart, R F; Storm, J E

    1989-07-01

    In vitro percutaneous absorption studies generally do not determine whether biotransformation occurs during passage of a substance through the skin. Since it has recently been demonstrated that several chemicals are metabolized during skin permeation, we investigated the metabolism of five additional compounds (14C-labeled) after application to fuzzy rat skin: caffeine, p,p'-DDT, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), salicylic acid, and acetyl ethyl tetramethyltetralin (AETT). The viability of skin was maintained with a tissue culture medium. Radioactivity of each substrate and any metabolites in skin and receptor fluid was measured so that the absorption and metabolism of water-insoluble compounds would be accurately determined. Percutaneous absorption ranged from a low of 13% of the applied dose for BHT to a high of 49% for DDT. BHT was metabolized in skin to 4-hydroxy-BHT and an unknown metabolite. Of the absorbed radioisotope, 6.6% was isolated in biotransformed products found mainly in the receptor fluid. AETT was also metabolized during absorption, with 1.9% of the absorbed radioisotope found in two unknown peaks. Caffeine, DDT, and salicylic acid were not metabolized during skin permeation. Skin and liver microsomal metabolism was measured for all compounds except DDT. Metabolism in skin was observed only for the compounds also biotransformed in the diffusion cell; BHT and AETT were metabolized at 113 and 2.5 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. In this study, as in others, skin metabolism was substantially less than the corresponding metabolism in liver. Therefore, a low rate of liver metabolism such as that found for caffeine, salicylic acid, and DDT might often be predictive of the absence of measurable metabolism during skin permeation. It seems likely that for many compounds, the biotransformations in skin will be small in terms of the percentage of absorbed material that is metabolized. Nevertheless, with potent compounds, even small quantities of a metabolite

  6. Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPARα in mouse liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, Pamela K.; Woods, Courtney G.; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPARα will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR α. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPARα in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens

  7. Metabolic and redox barriers in the skin exposed to drugs and xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkina, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    Growing exposure of human skin to environmental and occupational hazards, to numerous skin care/beauty products, and to topical drugs led to a biomedical concern regarding sustainability of cutaneous chemical defence that is essential for protection against intoxication. Since skin is the largest extra-hepatic drug/xenobiotic metabolising organ where redox-dependent metabolic pathways prevail, in this review, publications on metabolic processes leading to redox imbalance (oxidative stress) and its autocrine/endocrine impact to cutaneous drug/xenobiotic metabolism were scrutinised. Chemical and photo-chemical skin barriers contain metabolic and redox compartments: their protective and homeostatic functions. The review will examine the striking similarity of adaptive responses to exogenous chemical/photo-chemical stressors and endogenous toxins in cutaneous metabolic and redox system; the role(s) of xenobiotics/drugs and phase II enzymes in the endogenous antioxidant defence and maintenance of redox balance; redox regulation of interactions between metabolic and inflammatory responses in skin cells; skin diseases sharing metabolic and redox problems (contact dermatitis, lupus erythematosus, and vitiligo) Due to exceptional the redox dependence of cutaneous metabolic pathways and interaction of redox active metabolites/exogenous antioxidants with drug/xenobiotic metabolism, metabolic tests of topical xenobiotics/drugs should be combined with appropriate redox analyses and performed on 3D human skin models.

  8. A Liver-centric Multiscale Modeling Framework for Xenobiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe a multi-scale framework for modeling acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity. Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic. Overdose of acetaminophen can result in liver injury via its biotransformation into toxic product, which further induce massive necrosis. Our study foc...

  9. Effect of Nine Diets on Xenobiotic Transporters in Livers of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Cui, Julia Yue; Lu, Hong; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2017-01-01

    1. Lifestyle diseases are often caused by inappropriate nutrition habits and attempted to be treated by polypharmacotherapy. Therefore, it is important to determine whether differences in diet affect the disposition of drugs. Xenobiotic transporters in the liver are essential in drug disposition. 2. In the current study, mice were fed one of 9 diets for 3 weeks. The mRNAs of 23 known xenobiotic transporters in livers of mice were quantified by microarray analysis, and validated by branched DNA assay. The mRNAs of 15 transporters were altered by at least one diet. Diet-restriction (10) and the atherogenic diet (10) altered the expression of the most number of transporters, followed by western diet (8), high-fat diet (4), lab chow (2), high-fructose diet (2) and EFA-deficient diet (2), whereas the low n-3 FA diet had no effect on these transporters. Seven of the 11 xenobiotic transporters in the Slc family, three of 4 in the Abcb family, two of 4 in the Abcc family and all 3 in the Abcg family were changed significantly. 3. This first comprehensive study indicates that xenobiotic transporters are altered by diet, and suggests there are likely diet-drug interactions due to changes in the expression of drug transporters. PMID:25566878

  10. Acetaminophen induces xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in rat: Impact of a uranium chronic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouas, Caroline; Souidi, Maâmar; Grandcolas, Line; Grison, Stephane; Baudelin, Cedric; Gourmelon, Patrick; Pallardy, Marc; Gueguen, Yann

    2009-11-01

    The extensive use of uranium in civilian and military applications increases the risk of human chronic exposure. Uranium is a slightly radioactive heavy metal with a predominantly chemical toxicity, especially in kidney but also in liver. Few studies have previously shown some effects of uranium on xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XME) that might disturb drug pharmacokinetic. The aim of this study was to determine whether a chronic (9 months) non-nephrotoxic low dose exposure to depleted uranium (DU, 1mg/rat/day) could modify the liver XME, using a single non-hepatotoxic acetaminophen (APAP) treatment (50mg/kg). Most of XME analysed were induced by APAP treatment at the gene expression level but at the protein level only CYP3A2 was significantly increased 3h after APAP treatment in DU-exposed rats whereas it remained at a basal level in unexposed rats. In conclusion, these results showed that a chronic non-nephrotoxic DU exposure specially modify CYP3A2 after a single therapeutic APAP treatment. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Functioning of Microsomal Cytochrome P450s: Murburn Concept Explains the Metabolism of Xenobiotics in Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj, Kelath Murali; Parashar, Abhinav; Gade, Sudeep K; Venkatachalam, Avanthika

    2016-01-01

    murburn as the operative concept. The mechanism of uncoupling (peroxide/water formation) was found to be dependent on multiple one and two electron equilibriums amongst the reaction components. The investigation explains the evolutionary implications of xenobiotic metabolism, confirms the obligatory role of diffusible reactive species in routine redox metabolism within liver microsomes and establishes that a redox enzyme like CYP enhances reaction rates (achieves catalysis) via a novel (hitherto unknown) modality.

  12. Effects of tin-protoporphyrin administration on hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in the juvenile rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, D.L.; Becker, F.F.

    1988-01-01

    The heme analogue tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnP) is a potent inhibitor of microsomal heme oxygenase. Administration of SnP to neonatal rats can prevent hyperbilirubinemia by blocking the postnatal increase of heme oxygenase activity. Apparently innocuous at therapeutic doses, it is of potential clinical value for chemoprevention of neonatal jaundice. We found that when 50-g male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated daily with 50 mumol of SnP/kg sc for 6 days, hepatic microsomal cytochromes b5 and P-450 were significantly diminished. Cytochrome P-450 reductase, two P-450-dependent monooxygenases, aminopyrine demethylase and benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase, and catalase, a peroxisomal hemoprotein, were also significantly diminished. These results suggested that SnP might significantly affect the metabolism of other xenobiotics. This possibility was confirmed by the finding that hexobarbital-induced sleep lasted 4 times longer in SnP-treated rats than in controls. Inhibition of protein synthesis by SnP was ruled out as the cause of hemoprotein loss when administration of [ 3 H]leucine to SnP-treated and control rats demonstrated that proteins of the microsomal, cytosolic, and plasma membrane fractions of the livers from both groups incorporated similar levels of leucine. When 55 FeCl 3 and [2- 14 C]glycine were administered to measure heme synthesis, heme extract from the livers of SnP-treated rats contained 4 times more label from iron and glycine than did heme from control livers. Despite the apparent increased rate of heme synthesis in SnP-treated rats, each of the three cell fractions demonstrated a significant loss of heme but contained sizable amounts of SnP. These findings suggest that SnP causes a decrease of functional hemoprotein and partial loss of enzymic activity by displacing intracellular heme

  13. Retrofit Strategies for Incorporating Xenobiotic Metabolism into High Throughput Screening Assays (EMGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA’s ToxCast program is designed to assess chemical perturbations of molecular and cellular endpoints using a variety of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. However, existing HTS assays have limited or no xenobiotic metabolism which could lead to a mischaracterization...

  14. Molecular, cellular, and tissue impact of depleted uranium on xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Yann; Rouas, Caroline; Monin, Audrey; Manens, Line; Stefani, Johanna; Delissen, Olivia; Grison, Stéphane; Dublineau, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Enzymes that metabolize xenobiotics (XME) are well recognized in experimental models as representative indicators of organ detoxification functions and of exposure to toxicants. As several in vivo studies have shown, uranium can alter XME in the rat liver or kidneys after either acute or chronic exposure. To determine how length or level of exposure affects these changes in XME, we continued our investigation of chronic rat exposure to depleted uranium (DU, uranyl nitrate). The first study examined the effect of duration (1-18 months) of chronic exposure to DU, the second evaluated dose dependence, from a level close to that found in the environment near mining sites (0.2 mg/L) to a supra-environmental dose (120 mg/L, 10 times the highest level naturally found in the environment), and the third was an in vitro assessment of whether DU exposure directly affects XME and, in particular, CYP3A. The experimental in vivo models used here demonstrated that CYP3A is the enzyme modified to the greatest extent: high gene expression changed after 6 and 9 months. The most substantial effects were observed in the liver of rats after 9 months of exposure to 120 mg/L of DU: CYP3A gene and protein expression and enzyme activity all decreased by more than 40 %. Nonetheless, no direct effect of DU by itself was observed after in vitro exposure of rat microsomal preparations, HepG2 cells, or human primary hepatocytes. Overall, these results probably indicate the occurrence of regulatory or adaptive mechanisms that could explain the indirect effect observed in vivo after chronic exposure.

  15. Short-term hepatic effects of depleted uranium on xenobiotic and bile acid metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueguen, Y.; Souidi, M.; Baudelin, C.; Dudoignon, N.; Grison, S.; Dublineau, I.; Marquette, C.; Voisin, P.; Gourmelon, P.; Aigueperse, J.

    2006-01-01

    The toxicity of uranium has been demonstrated in different organs, including the kidneys, skeleton, central nervous system, and liver. However, few works have investigated the biological effects of uranium contamination on important metabolic function in the liver. In vivo studies were conducted to evaluate its effects on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes involved in the metabolism of cholesterol and xenobiotics in the rat liver. The effects of depleted uranium (DU) contamination on Sprague-Dawley were measured at 1 and 3 days after exposure. Biochemical indicators characterizing liver and kidney functions were measured in the plasma. The DU affected bile acid CYP activity: 7α-hydroxycholesterol plasma level decreased by 52% at day 3 whereas microsomal CYP7A1 activity in the liver did not change significantly and mitochondrial CYP27A1 activity quintupled at day 1. Gene expression of the nuclear receptors related to lipid metabolism (FXR and LXR) also changed, while PPARα mRNA levels did not. The increased mRNA levels of the xenobiotic-metabolizing CYP3A enzyme at day 3 may be caused by feedback up-regulation due to the decreased CYP3A activity at day 1. CAR mRNA levels, which tripled on day 1, may be involved in this up-regulation, while mRNA levels of PXR did not change. These results indicate that high levels of depleted uranium, acting through modulation of the CYP enzymes and some of their nuclear receptors, affect the hepatic metabolism of bile acids and xenobiotics. (orig.)

  16. Triclocarban mediates induction of xenobiotic metabolism through activation of the constitutive androstane receptor and the estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Fei Yueh

    Full Text Available Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide, TCC is used as a broad-based antimicrobial agent that is commonly added to personal hygiene products. Because of its extensive use in the health care industry and resistance to degradation in sewage treatment processes, TCC has become a significant waste product that is found in numerous environmental compartments where humans and wildlife can be exposed. While TCC has been linked to a range of health and environmental effects, few studies have been conducted linking exposure to TCC and induction of xenobiotic metabolism through regulation by environmental sensors such as the nuclear xenobiotic receptors (XenoRs. To identify the ability of TCC to activate xenobiotic sensors, we monitored XenoR activities in response to TCC treatment using luciferase-based reporter assays. Among the XenoRs in the reporter screening assay, TCC promotes both constitutive androstane receptor (CAR and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα activities. TCC treatment to hUGT1 mice resulted in induction of the UGT1A genes in liver. This induction was dependent upon the constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR because no induction occurred in hUGT1Car(-/- mice. Induction of the UGT1A genes by TCC corresponded with induction of Cyp2b10, another CAR target gene. TCC was demonstrated to be a phenobarbital-like activator of CAR in receptor-based assays. While it has been suggested that TCC be classified as an endocrine disruptor, it activates ERα leading to induction of Cyp1b1 in female ovaries as well as in promoter activity. Activation of ERα by TCC in receptor-based assays also promotes induction of human CYP2B6. These observations demonstrate that TCC activates nuclear xenobiotic receptors CAR and ERα both in vivo and in vitro and might have the potential to alter normal physiological homeostasis. Activation of these xenobiotic-sensing receptors amplifies gene expression profiles that might represent a mechanistic base for

  17. Phase 0 and phase III transport in various organs: combined concept of phases in xenobiotic transport and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Barbara; Petzinger, Ernst

    2014-08-01

    The historical phasing concept of drug metabolism and elimination was introduced to comprise the two phases of metabolism: phase I metabolism for oxidations, reductions and hydrolyses, and phase II metabolism for synthesis. With this concept, biological membrane barriers obstructing the accessibility of metabolism sites in the cells for drugs were not considered. The concept of two phases was extended to a concept of four phases when drug transporters were detected that guided drugs and drug metabolites in and out of the cells. In particular, water soluble or charged drugs are virtually not able to overcome the phospholipid membrane barrier. Drug transporters belong to two main clusters of transporter families: the solute carrier (SLC) families and the ATP binding cassette (ABC) carriers. The ABC transporters comprise seven families with about 20 carriers involved in drug transport. All of them operate as pumps at the expense of ATP splitting. Embedded in the former phase concept, the term "phase III" was introduced by Ishikawa in 1992 for drug export by ABC efflux pumps. SLC comprise 52 families, from which many carriers are drug uptake transporters. Later on, this uptake process was referred to as the "phase 0 transport" of drugs. Transporters for xenobiotics in man and animal are most expressed in liver, but they are also present in extra-hepatic tissues such as in the kidney, the adrenal gland and lung. This review deals with the function of drug carriers in various organs and their impact on drug metabolism and elimination.

  18. Clonal xenobiotic resistance during pollution-induced toxic injury and hepatocellular carcinogenesis in liver of female flounder (Platichthys flesus (L.))

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, Angela; Alpermann, Tilmann; Lauritzen, Bjarne; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile and adult female flounder (Platichthys flesus (L.)) were caught either in the estuary of the most polluted European river, the Elbe, or as controls in a reference site to study pollution-induced xenobiotic resistance in their livers in relation to pathological alterations. In juvenile fish,

  19. Hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression through the life stages of the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice S Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs. No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been carried out through life stages in any species. RESULTS: Using full-genome arrays, the mRNA expression of all XMETs and their regulatory proteins was examined during fetal (gestation day (GD 19, neonatal (postnatal day (PND 7, prepubescent (PND32, middle age (12 months, and old age (18 and 24 months in the C57BL/6J (C57 mouse liver and compared to adults. Fetal and neonatal life stages exhibited dramatic differences in XMET mRNA expression compared to the relatively minor effects of old age. The total number of XMET probe sets that differed from adults was 636, 500, 84, 5, 43, and 102 for GD19, PND7, PND32, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months, respectively. At all life stages except PND32, under-expressed genes outnumbered over-expressed genes. The altered XMETs included those in all of the major metabolic and transport phases including introduction of reactive or polar groups (Phase I, conjugation (Phase II and excretion (Phase III. In the fetus and neonate, parallel increases in expression were noted in the dioxin receptor, Nrf2 components and their regulated genes while nuclear receptors and regulated genes were generally down-regulated. Suppression of male-specific XMETs was observed at early (GD19, PND7 and to a lesser extent, later life stages (18 and 24 months. A number of female-specific XMETs exhibited a spike in expression centered at PND7. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis revealed dramatic differences in the expression of the XMETs, especially in the fetus and neonate that are partially dependent on gender-dependent factors. XMET expression can be used to predict life stage-specific responses to environmental chemicals and drugs.

  20. Energy Metabolism in the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic activity is tightly controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is metabolized into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is completely oxidized to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, phospholipids, and cholesterol esters in hepatocytes, and these complex lipids are stored in lipid droplets and membrane structures, or secreted into the circulation as VLDL particles. In the fasted state, the liver secretes glucose through both breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis) and de novo glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis). During pronged fasting, hepatic gluconeogenesis is the primary source of endogenous glucose production. Fasting also promotes lipolysis in adipose tissue to release nonesterified fatty acids which are converted into ketone bodies in the liver though mitochondrial β oxidation and ketogenesis. Ketone bodies provide a metabolic fuel for extrahepatic tissues. Liver metabolic processes are tightly regulated by neuronal and hormonal systems. The sympathetic system stimulates, whereas the parasympathetic system suppresses, hepatic gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates glycolysis and lipogenesis, but suppresses gluconeogenesis; glucagon counteracts insulin action. Numerous transcription factors and coactivators, including CREB, FOXO1, ChREBP, SREBP, PGC-1α, and CRTC2, control the expression of the enzymes which catalyze the rate-limiting steps of liver metabolic processes, thus controlling liver energy metabolism. Aberrant energy metabolism in the liver promotes insulin resistance, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD). PMID:24692138

  1. Energy Metabolism in the Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic activity is tightly controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is metabolized into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is completely oxidized to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, p...

  2. Transcriptional expression analysis of ABC efflux transporters and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in the Chinese rare minnow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lilai; Lv, Biping; Zha, Jinmiao; Wang, Zijian

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the cDNA fragments of five ABC transporter genes (ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC2, and ABCG2) in the rare minnow were cloned, and their tissue-specific expression patterns were evaluated across eight rare minnow tissues (liver, gill, intestine, kidney, spleen, brain, skin, and muscle). Furthermore, the transcriptional effects on these ABC transporter genes and five xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme genes (CYP1A, GSTm, GSTp1, GCLC, and UGT1a) were determined in the rare minnow liver after 12 days of pyrene exposure. Basal expression analysis showed that the tissues with high expression of the ABC transporters included the liver, kidney, and intestine. Moreover, the most highly expressed of the ABC genes were ABCB1 and ABCC2 in all eight of the tissues tested. The ABCB11 gene was almost exclusively expressed in the liver of the rare minnow, whereas ABCC1 and ABCG2 showed weak expression in all eight tissues compared to ABCB1 and ABCC2. Our results provide the first thorough examination of the expression patterns of toxicologically relevant ABC transporters in the rare minnow and serve as a necessary basis for further studies of these ABC transporters in fish. Furthermore, synergistic up-regulation of CYP1A, GSTp1, GCLC, UGT1a, and ABCC2 was observed in the rare minnow liver following pyrene exposure, while GSTm, ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, and ABCG2 were not significantly affected (p ABC transporters by pyrene suggests a possible involvement and cooperation of these genes in the detoxification process in rare minnows. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of frequently used industrial solvents and monomers of plastics on xenobiotic metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gut, I. (Institut Hygieny a Epidemiologie, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-11-01

    In male Wistar rats, inhalation of benzene, toluene, or styrene induced a dose-dependent increase of the in vitro hepatic microsomal metabolism of benzene, but toluene metabolism and microsomal cytochrome P-450 level were little affected. In phenobarbital pretreated rats the solvents induced increased biotransformation of benzene metabolism toluene, but relatively less than in controls, and benzene and toluene inhalation actually caused an apparent destruction of cytochrome P-450. In vivo rates of metabolism of toluene and styrene were in good agreement with the in vitro hepatic microsomal biotransformation of benzene or toluene, but benzene metabolism not due to inhibition of benzene metabolism in vivo caused by benzene metabolites. In simultaneously administered two solvents, toluene, styrene or xylene markedly inhibited metabolism of benzene-/sup 14/C, but toluene-/sup 14/C metabolsim was little affected by coadministered benzene, styrene or xylene. Various industrial solvents inhibited metabolism of acrylonitrile along the oxidative pathway leading to thiocyanate, but actually increased the rate of the conjugative pathway beginning with cyanoethylation of glutathion and the final products. Various derivatives of benzene had low inhibiting effect on antipyrine metabolism and clinical significance of such effect is of little significance. Inhibition of benzene metabolism by toluene followed in significantly decreased myelotoxicity of benzene, but the modification of acrylonitrile metabolism and pharmacokinetics by organic solvents given at low doses markedly increased lethal effects of acrylonitrile. The prediction of in vivo rates of metabolism based on the in vitro rates of hepatic microsomal metabolism is therefore possible, provided the inhibiting potency of the xenobiotic and/or its metabolites, self-induction of their metabolism, as well as differences in their pharmacokinetics are considered.

  4. Energy metabolism in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic function is controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is converted into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is subsequently oxidized in the mitochondria to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, phospholipids, and/or cholesterol esters in hepatocytes. These complex lipids are stored in lipid droplets and membrane structures, or secreted into the circulation as very low-density lipoprotein particles. In the fasted state, the liver secretes glucose through both glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. During pronged fasting, hepatic gluconeogenesis is the primary source for endogenous glucose production. Fasting also promotes lipolysis in adipose tissue, resulting in release of nonesterified fatty acids which are converted into ketone bodies in hepatic mitochondria though β-oxidation and ketogenesis. Ketone bodies provide a metabolic fuel for extrahepatic tissues. Liver energy metabolism is tightly regulated by neuronal and hormonal signals. The sympathetic system stimulates, whereas the parasympathetic system suppresses, hepatic gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates glycolysis and lipogenesis but suppresses gluconeogenesis, and glucagon counteracts insulin action. Numerous transcription factors and coactivators, including CREB, FOXO1, ChREBP, SREBP, PGC-1α, and CRTC2, control the expression of the enzymes which catalyze key steps of metabolic pathways, thus controlling liver energy metabolism. Aberrant energy metabolism in the liver promotes insulin resistance, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases. © 2014 American Physiological Society.

  5. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Gene Variants and Renal Cell Cancer: A Multicenter Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heck, Julia E. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Moore, Lee E. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Yuan-Chin A. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McKay, James D. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Hung, Rayjean J. [Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Karami, Sara [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gaborieau, Valérie [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila [Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Zaridze, David G. [Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Carcinogenesis, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mukeriya, Anush [Cancer Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mates, Dana [Institute of Public Health, Bucharest (Romania); Foretova, Lenka [Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno (Czech Republic); Janout, Vladimir; Kollárová, Helena [Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Bencko, Vladimir [First Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Rothman, Nathaniel [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Brennan, Paul [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Chow, Wong-Ho [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Boffetta, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.boffetta@mssm.edu [International Prevention Research Institute, Lyon (France); Tisch Cancer Institute, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-02-20

    Background: The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have among the highest worldwide rates of renal cell cancer (RCC). Few studies have examined whether genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolic pathway genes may modify risk for this cancer. Methods: The Central and Eastern Europe Renal Cell Cancer study was a hospital-based case–control study conducted between 1998 and 2003 across seven centers in Central and Eastern Europe. Detailed data were collected from 874 cases and 2053 controls on demographics, work history, and occupational exposure to chemical agents. Genes [cytochrome P-450 family, N-acetyltransferases, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase I (NQO1), microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] were selected for the present analysis based on their putative role in xenobiotic metabolism. Haplotypes were calculated using fastPhase. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for country of residence, age, sex, smoking, alcohol intake, obesity, and hypertension. Results: We observed an increased risk of RCC with one SNP. After adjustment for multiple comparisons it did not remain significant. Neither NAT1 nor NAT2 slow acetylation was associated with disease. Conclusion: We observed no association between this pathway and renal cell cancer.

  6. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Gene Variants and Renal Cell Cancer: A Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, Julia E.; Moore, Lee E.; Lee, Yuan-Chin A.; McKay, James D.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Karami, Sara; Gaborieau, Valérie; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Zaridze, David G.; Mukeriya, Anush; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kollárová, Helena; Bencko, Vladimir; Rothman, Nathaniel; Brennan, Paul; Chow, Wong-Ho; Boffetta, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Background: The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have among the highest worldwide rates of renal cell cancer (RCC). Few studies have examined whether genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolic pathway genes may modify risk for this cancer. Methods: The Central and Eastern Europe Renal Cell Cancer study was a hospital-based case–control study conducted between 1998 and 2003 across seven centers in Central and Eastern Europe. Detailed data were collected from 874 cases and 2053 controls on demographics, work history, and occupational exposure to chemical agents. Genes [cytochrome P-450 family, N-acetyltransferases, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase I (NQO1), microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] were selected for the present analysis based on their putative role in xenobiotic metabolism. Haplotypes were calculated using fastPhase. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for country of residence, age, sex, smoking, alcohol intake, obesity, and hypertension. Results: We observed an increased risk of RCC with one SNP. After adjustment for multiple comparisons it did not remain significant. Neither NAT1 nor NAT2 slow acetylation was associated with disease. Conclusion: We observed no association between this pathway and renal cell cancer.

  7. High hydrostatic pressure influences the in vitro response to xenobiotics in Dicentrarchus labrax liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, Benjamin; Mignolet, Eric; Debier, Cathy [Institut des Sciences de la Vie, Université Catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Calderon, Pedro Buc [Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73, B-1200 Woluwé-Saint-Lambert (Belgium); Thomé, Jean Pierre [Laboratoire d’Ecologie Animale et Ecotoxicologie, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 août 15, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Rees, Jean François, E-mail: jf.rees@uclouvain.be [Institut des Sciences de la Vie, Université Catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The methodology of precision-cut liver slices was applied to the European seabass. • Liver slices remained viable and functional in short-term co-exposure studies. • CYP1A induction was blocked in slices exposed to an AhR agonist at high pressure. • HSP70 induction was lower in slices exposed to an AhR agonist at high pressure. • Oxidative stress responses to tBHP were less pronounced at high pressure. - Abstract: Hydrostatic pressure (HP) increases by about 1 atmosphere (0.1 MPa) for each ten-meter depth increase in the water column. This thermodynamical parameter could well influence the response to and effects of xenobiotics in the deep-sea biota, but this possibility remains largely overlooked. To grasp the extent of HP adaptation in deep-sea fish, comparative studies with living cells of surface species exposed to chemicals at high HP are required. We initially conducted experiments with precision-cut liver slices of a deep-sea fish (Coryphaenoides rupestris), co-exposed for 15 h to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist 3-methylcholanthrene at HP levels representative of the surface (0.1 MPa) and deep-sea (5–15 MPa; i.e., 500–1500 m depth) environments. The transcript levels of a suite of stress-responsive genes, such as the AhR battery CYP1A, were subsequently measured (Lemaire et al., 2012; Environ. Sci. Technol. 46, 10310–10316). Strikingly, the AhR agonist-mediated increase of CYP1A mRNA content was pressure-dependently reduced in C. rupestris. Here, the same co-exposure scenario was applied for 6 or 15 h to liver slices of a surface fish, Dicentrarchus labrax, a coastal species presumably not adapted to high HP. Precision-cut liver slices of D. labrax were also used in 1 h co-exposure studies with the pro-oxidant tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) as to investigate the pressure-dependence of the oxidative stress response (i.e., reactive oxygen production, glutathione and lipid peroxidation status). Liver cells remained

  8. High hydrostatic pressure influences the in vitro response to xenobiotics in Dicentrarchus labrax liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, Benjamin; Mignolet, Eric; Debier, Cathy; Calderon, Pedro Buc; Thomé, Jean Pierre; Rees, Jean François

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The methodology of precision-cut liver slices was applied to the European seabass. • Liver slices remained viable and functional in short-term co-exposure studies. • CYP1A induction was blocked in slices exposed to an AhR agonist at high pressure. • HSP70 induction was lower in slices exposed to an AhR agonist at high pressure. • Oxidative stress responses to tBHP were less pronounced at high pressure. - Abstract: Hydrostatic pressure (HP) increases by about 1 atmosphere (0.1 MPa) for each ten-meter depth increase in the water column. This thermodynamical parameter could well influence the response to and effects of xenobiotics in the deep-sea biota, but this possibility remains largely overlooked. To grasp the extent of HP adaptation in deep-sea fish, comparative studies with living cells of surface species exposed to chemicals at high HP are required. We initially conducted experiments with precision-cut liver slices of a deep-sea fish (Coryphaenoides rupestris), co-exposed for 15 h to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist 3-methylcholanthrene at HP levels representative of the surface (0.1 MPa) and deep-sea (5–15 MPa; i.e., 500–1500 m depth) environments. The transcript levels of a suite of stress-responsive genes, such as the AhR battery CYP1A, were subsequently measured (Lemaire et al., 2012; Environ. Sci. Technol. 46, 10310–10316). Strikingly, the AhR agonist-mediated increase of CYP1A mRNA content was pressure-dependently reduced in C. rupestris. Here, the same co-exposure scenario was applied for 6 or 15 h to liver slices of a surface fish, Dicentrarchus labrax, a coastal species presumably not adapted to high HP. Precision-cut liver slices of D. labrax were also used in 1 h co-exposure studies with the pro-oxidant tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) as to investigate the pressure-dependence of the oxidative stress response (i.e., reactive oxygen production, glutathione and lipid peroxidation status). Liver cells remained

  9. Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Xenobiotic Nuclear Receptor Interactions Regulate Energy Metabolism, Behavior, and Inflammation in Non-alcoholic-Steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlang, Banrida; Prough, Russell A; Falkner, K Cameron; Hardesty, Josiah E; Song, Ming; Clair, Heather B; Clark, Barbara J; States, J Christopher; Arteel, Gavin E; Cave, Matthew C

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental pollutants associated with non-alcoholic-steatohepatitis (NASH), diabetes, and obesity. We previously demonstrated that the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1260, induced steatohepatitis and activated nuclear receptors in a diet-induced obesity mouse model. This study aims to evaluate PCB interactions with the pregnane-xenobiotic receptor (Pxr: Nr1i2) and constitutive androstane receptor (Car: Nr1i3) in NASH. Wild type C57Bl/6 (WT), Pxr(-/-) and Car(-/-) mice were fed the high fat diet (42% milk fat) and exposed to a single dose of Aroclor 1260 (20 mg/kg) in this 12-week study. Metabolic phenotyping and analysis of serum, liver, and adipose was performed. Steatohepatitis was pathologically similar in all Aroclor-exposed groups, while Pxr(-/-) mice displayed higher basal pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Pxr repressed Car expression as evident by increased basal Car/Cyp2b10 expression in Pxr(-/-) mice. Both Pxr(-/-) and Car(-/-) mice showed decreased basal respiratory exchange rate (RER) consistent with preferential lipid metabolism. Aroclor increased RER and carbohydrate metabolism, associated with increased light cycle activity in both knockouts, and decreased food consumption in the Car(-/-) mice. Aroclor exposure improved insulin sensitivity in WT mice but not glucose tolerance. The Aroclor-exposed, Pxr(-/-) mice displayed increased gluconeogenic gene expression. Lipid-oxidative gene expression was higher in WT and Pxr(-/-) mice although RER was not changed, suggesting PCB-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, Pxr and Car regulated inflammation, behavior, and energy metabolism in PCB-mediated NASH. Future studies should address the 'off-target' effects of PCBs in steatohepatitis. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. In vitro approach to studying cutaneous metabolism and disposition of topically applied xenobiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, J.; Hall, J.; Shugart, L.R.; Holland, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The extent to which cutaneous metabolism may be involved in the penetration and fate of topically applied xenobiotics was examined by metabolically viable and structurally intact mouse skin in organ culture. Evidence that skin penetration of certain chemicals is coupled to cutaneous metabolism was based upon observations utilizing [ 14 C]benzo[a]pyrene (BP). As judged by the recovery of radioactivity in the culture medium 24 hr after in vitro topical application of [ 14 C]BP to the skin from both control and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced C3H mice, skin penetration of BP was higher in the induced tissue. All classes of metabolites of BP were found in the culture medium; water-soluble metabolites predominated and negligible amounts of unmetabolized BP were found. As shown by enzymatic hydrolysis of the medium, TCDD induction resulted in shifting the cutaneous metabolism of BP toward the synthesis of more water-soluble conjugates. Differences in the degree of covalent binding of BP, via diol epoxide intermediates to epidermal DNA, from control and induced tissues were observed. These differences may reflect a change in the pathways of metabolism as a consequence of TCDD induction. These results indicated that topically applied BP is metabolized by the skin during its passage through the skin; and the degree of percutaneous penetration and disposition of BP was dependent upon the metabolic status of the tissue. This suggests that cutaneous metabolism may play an important role in the translocation and subsequent physiological disposition of topically applied BP. 33 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  11. High hydrostatic pressure influences the in vitro response to xenobiotics in Dicentrarchus labrax liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Benjamin; Mignolet, Eric; Debier, Cathy; Calderon, Pedro Buc; Thomé, Jean Pierre; Rees, Jean François

    2016-04-01

    Hydrostatic pressure (HP) increases by about 1 atmosphere (0.1MPa) for each ten-meter depth increase in the water column. This thermodynamical parameter could well influence the response to and effects of xenobiotics in the deep-sea biota, but this possibility remains largely overlooked. To grasp the extent of HP adaptation in deep-sea fish, comparative studies with living cells of surface species exposed to chemicals at high HP are required. We initially conducted experiments with precision-cut liver slices of a deep-sea fish (Coryphaenoides rupestris), co-exposed for 15h to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist 3-methylcholanthrene at HP levels representative of the surface (0.1MPa) and deep-sea (5-15MPa; i.e., 500-1500m depth) environments. The transcript levels of a suite of stress-responsive genes, such as the AhR battery CYP1A, were subsequently measured (Lemaire et al., 2012; Environ. Sci. Technol. 46, 10310-10316). Strikingly, the AhR agonist-mediated increase of CYP1A mRNA content was pressure-dependently reduced in C. rupestris. Here, the same co-exposure scenario was applied for 6 or 15h to liver slices of a surface fish, Dicentrarchus labrax, a coastal species presumably not adapted to high HP. Precision-cut liver slices of D. labrax were also used in 1h co-exposure studies with the pro-oxidant tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) as to investigate the pressure-dependence of the oxidative stress response (i.e., reactive oxygen production, glutathione and lipid peroxidation status). Liver cells remained viable in all experiments (adenosine triphosphate content). High HP precluded the AhR agonist-mediated increase of CYP1A mRNA expression in D. labrax, as well as that of glutathione peroxidase, and significantly reduced that of heat shock protein 70. High HP (1h) also tended per se to increase the level of oxidative stress in liver cells of the surface fish. Trends to an increased resistance to tBHP were also noted. Whether the latter observation truly

  12. CHANGING METABOLIC FUNCTIONS IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS AFTER INTRODUCTION OF THE XENOBIOTIC, IMMUNOTROPIC DRUG AND PROBIOTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvyagintseva O.V.

    2015-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The peripheral blood leukocytes were cultured according to the method of Hereford in medium 199 with the addition of fetal calf serum in the absence and in the presence of T-cell mitogen – phytohemagglutinin. Results and discussion. In all studied groups (introduction of the xenobiotic, "Fungidol", probiotic experimental animals revealed a significant increase in the concentrations of ceruloplasmin and haptoglobin on the average in 1,5 times in comparison with the control, indicating the development of the inflammatory process after the toxic action of copper sulphate. During administration of sulphate of copper, the experimental animals showed a reduction in the index of completion of phagocytosis, indicating a failure of the process of endocytosis of bacterial antigens and reduced stimulation index due to the low activity of NADPoxidase system of phagocytes. The introduction of xenobiotic animals was increased 1,2 times compared with the control (23,33±1,38 % the number of transformed cells in the background of mitogenic inducer of cell proliferation. The proliferative activity of hemolytic after the joint action of the xenobiotic and immunotropic drug in cell culture with the mitogen was the highest and exceeded 1,5 times control (23,33±1,38%. After the introduction of copper sulfate and probiotic proliferative activity of hemolytic was also significantly higher spontaneous. Introduction biologic response modifier substance to a greater extent than probiotics stimulate a protective immune processes aimed at combating the negative effect of the xenobiotic. Conclusion. Thus, the introduction of copper sulfate launches in animals a cascade of reactions aimed at the disruption of homeostasis. It is a violation of various physiological processes of digestion, respiration, cell differentiation, water-salt metabolism, metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, detoxification of exogenous substrates and metabolites, production of biologically active

  13. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  14. Liver and water metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallot, P.

    1959-01-01

    The causes for the disturbance of hydro-electrolytic equilibrium observed in cirrhosis patients are far from clear. Studies on the static distribution of liquid in the organism and also on anomalies in the distribution of deuterium oxide and tritiated water provide no direct explanation of the nature of the water retaining mechanism. At the period when the illness is established, endocrine factors and electrolytic perturbations contribute to maintaining or increasing oliguresis, but they cannot be held solely responsible in the initial stages of evolution. An explanation of the ascites should therefore be looked for in a non-functioning of the polygonal or Kupffer cells. The hypothesis of an insufficient rejection of water outside the lymph spaces of the liver during cirrhosis is put forward, but the experimental demonstration of such a phenomenon proves very difficult. (author) [fr

  15. Systematic Analysis Reveals that Cancer Mutations Converge on Deregulated Metabolism of Arachidonate and Xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gatto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations are the basis of the clonal evolution of most cancers. Nevertheless, a systematic analysis of whether mutations are selected in cancer because they lead to the deregulation of specific biological processes independent of the type of cancer is still lacking. In this study, we correlated the genome and transcriptome of 1,082 tumors. We found that nine commonly mutated genes correlated with substantial changes in gene expression, which primarily converged on metabolism. Further network analyses circumscribed the convergence to a network of reactions, termed AraX, that involves the glutathione- and oxygen-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid and xenobiotics. In an independent cohort of 4,462 samples, all nine mutated genes were consistently correlated with the deregulation of AraX. Among all of the metabolic pathways, AraX deregulation represented the strongest predictor of patient survival. These findings suggest that oncogenic mutations drive a selection process that converges on the deregulation of the AraX network.

  16. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire [EA4483, Université de Lille 2, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, Pôle Recherche, 59045 Lille (France); Buob, David [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR837, Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert, Equipe 5, 59045 Lille (France); Flamand, Vincent [Service d' Urologie, Hôpital Huriez, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Hennino, Marie-Flore [EA4483, Université de Lille 2, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, Pôle Recherche, 59045 Lille (France); Service de Néphrologie, Hôpital Huriez, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Perrais, Michaël [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR837, Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert, Equipe 5, 59045 Lille (France); and others

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue.

  17. Intrinsic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Activities in Early Life Stages of Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Jens C; Schultz, Bernadette; Fruth, Daniela; Fabian, Eric; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Hidding, Björn; Salinas, Edward R

    2017-09-01

    Early life stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio, zf) are gaining attention as an alternative invivo test system for drug discovery, early developmental toxicity screenings and chemical testing in ecotoxicological and toxicological testing strategies. Previous studies have demonstrated transcriptional evidence for xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XME) during early zf development. However, elaborate experiments on XME activities during development are incomplete. In this work, the intrinsic activities of representative phase I and II XME were monitored by transformation of putative zf model substrates analyzed using photometry and high pressure liquid chromatography techniques. Six different defined stages of zf development (between 2.5 h postfertilization (hpf) to 120 hpf) were investigated by preparing a subcellular fraction from whole organism homogenates. We demonstrated that zf embryos as early as 2.5 hpf possess intrinsic metabolic activities for esterase, Aldh, Gst, and Cyp1a above the methodological detection limit. The activities of the enzymes Cyp3a and Nat were measurable during later stages in development. Activities represent dynamic patterns during development. The role of XME activities revealed in this work is relevant for the assessing toxicity in this test system and therefore contributes to a valuable characterization of zf embryos as an alternative testing organism in toxicology. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Design and Performance of a Xenobiotic Metabolism Database Manager for Building Metabolic Pathway Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major challenge for scientists and regulators is accounting for the metabolic activation of chemicals that may lead to increased toxicity. Reliable forecasting of chemical metabolism is a critical factor in estimating a chemical’s toxic potential. Research is underway to develo...

  19. Maintenance of drug metabolism and transport functions in human precision-cut liver slices during prolonged incubation for 5 days

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Vatakuti, Suresh; Schievink, Bauke; Merema, Marjolijn T.; Asplund, Annika; Synnergren, Jane; Aspegren, Anders; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    Human precision-cut liver slices (hPCLS) are a valuable ex vivo model that can be used in acute toxicity studies. However, a rapid decline in metabolic enzyme activity limits their use in studies that require a prolonged xenobiotic exposure. The aim of the study was to extend the viability and

  20. Organ slices as an in vitro test system for drug metabolism in human liver, lung and kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olinga, Peter; de Jager, M.H; Meijer, D.K F; Groothuis, Geny; Merema, M.T.

    1999-01-01

    Metabolism of xenobiotics occurs mainly in the liver, but in addition, the lungs and kidneys may contribute considerably. The choice of the animal species during drug development as a predictive model for the human condition is often inadequate due to large interspecies differences. Therefore, a

  1. Phosphorylation of Isoflavones by Bacillus subtilis BCRC 80517 May Represent Xenobiotic Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chen; Wu, Bo-Yuan; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Fon; Chiou, Tai-Ying; Su, Nan-Wei

    2018-01-10

    The soy isoflavones daidzein (DAI) and genistein (GEN) have beneficial effects on human health. However, their oral bioavailability is hampered by their low aqueous solubility. Our previous study revealed two water-soluble phosphorylated conjugates of isoflavones, daidzein 7-O-phosphate and genistein 7-O-phosphate, generated via biotransformation by Bacillus subtilis BCRC80517 cultivated with isoflavones. In this study, two novel derivatives of isoflavones, daidzein 4'-O-phosphate and genistein 4'-O-phosphate, were identified by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and 1 H, 13 C, and 31 P NMR, and their biotransformation roadmaps were proposed. Primarily, isoflavone glucosides were deglycosylated and then phosphorylated predominantly into 7-O-phosphate conjugates with traces of 4'-O-phosphate conjugates. Inevitably, trace quantities of glucosides were converted into 6″-O-succinyl glucosides. GEN was more efficiently phosphorylated than DAI. Nevertheless, the presence of GEN prolonged the time until the exponential phase of cell growth, whereas the other isoflavones showed little effect on cell growth. Our findings provide new insights into the novel microbial phosphorylation of isoflavones involved in xenobiotic metabolism.

  2. Impact of environmental exposures on ovarian function and role of xenobiotic metabolism during ovotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Poulomi; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2012-06-15

    The mammalian ovary is a heterogeneous organ and contains oocyte-containing follicles at varying stages of development. The most immature follicular stage, the primordial follicle, comprises the ovarian reserve and is a finite number, defined at the time of birth. Depletion of all follicles within the ovary leads to reproductive senescence, known as menopause. A number of chemical classes can destroy follicles, thus hastening entry into the menopausal state. The ovarian response to chemical exposure can determine the extent of ovotoxicity that occurs. Enzymes capable of bioactivating as well as detoxifying xenobiotics are expressed in the ovary and their impact on ovotoxicity has been partially characterized for trichloroethylene, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, and 4-vinylcyclohexene. This review will discuss those studies, as well as illustrate where knowledge gaps remain for chemicals that have also been established as ovotoxicants. -- Highlights: ► Summary of ovotoxicant action during ovotoxicity. ► Discussion of impact of biotransformation on chemical toxicity. ► Identification of knowledge gaps in chemical metabolism.

  3. Impact of environmental exposures on ovarian function and role of xenobiotic metabolism during ovotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Poulomi; Keating, Aileen F.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian ovary is a heterogeneous organ and contains oocyte-containing follicles at varying stages of development. The most immature follicular stage, the primordial follicle, comprises the ovarian reserve and is a finite number, defined at the time of birth. Depletion of all follicles within the ovary leads to reproductive senescence, known as menopause. A number of chemical classes can destroy follicles, thus hastening entry into the menopausal state. The ovarian response to chemical exposure can determine the extent of ovotoxicity that occurs. Enzymes capable of bioactivating as well as detoxifying xenobiotics are expressed in the ovary and their impact on ovotoxicity has been partially characterized for trichloroethylene, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, and 4-vinylcyclohexene. This review will discuss those studies, as well as illustrate where knowledge gaps remain for chemicals that have also been established as ovotoxicants. -- Highlights: ► Summary of ovotoxicant action during ovotoxicity. ► Discussion of impact of biotransformation on chemical toxicity. ► Identification of knowledge gaps in chemical metabolism.

  4. Carcinogen-induced mdr overexpression is associated with xenobiotic resistance in rat preneoplastic liver nodules and hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, C R; Ivy, S P; Rushmore, T; Lee, G; Koo, P; Goldsmith, M E; Myers, C E; Farber, E; Cowan, K H

    1987-11-01

    We have previously reported the isolation of a human breast cancer cell line resistant to doxorubicin (adriamycin; AdrR MCF-7 cells) that has also developed the phenotype of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR in this cell line is associated with increased expression of mdr (P glycoprotein) gene sequences. The development of MDR in AdrR MCF-7 cells is also associated with changes in the expression of several phase I and phase II drug-detoxifying enzymes. These changes are remarkably similar to those associated with development of xenobiotic resistance in rat hyperplastic liver nodules, a well-studied model system of chemical carcinogenesis. Using an mdr-encoded cDNA sequence isolated from AdrR MCF-7 cells, we have examined the expression of mdr sequences in rat livers under a variety of experimental conditions. The expression of mdr increased 3-fold in regenerating liver. It was also elevated (3- to 12-fold) in several different samples of rat hyperplastic nodules and in four of five hepatomas that developed in this system. This suggests that overexpression of mdr, a gene previously associated with resistance to antineoplastic agents, may also be involved in the development of resistance to xenobiotics in rat hyperplastic nodules. In addition, although the acute administration of 2-acetylaminofluorene induced an 8-fold increase in hepatic mdr-encoded RNA, performance of a partial hepatectomy either before or after administration of 2-acetylaminofluorene resulted in a greater than 80-fold increase in mdr gene expression over that in normal untreated livers. This represents an important in vivo model system in which to study the acute regulation of this drug resistance gene.

  5. Purification and characterization of akr1b10 from human liver: role in carbonyl reduction of xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hans-Jörg; Breyer-Pfaff, Ursula; Wsol, Vladimir; Venz, Simone; Block, Simone; Maser, Edmund

    2006-03-01

    Members of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily have a broad substrate specificity in catalyzing the reduction of carbonyl group-containing xenobiotics. In the present investigation, a member of the aldose reductase subfamily, AKR1B10, was purified from human liver cytosol. This is the first time AKR1B10 has been purified in its native form. AKR1B10 showed a molecular mass of 35 kDa upon gel filtration and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Kinetic parameters for the NADPH-dependent reduction of the antiemetic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist dolasetron, the antitumor drugs daunorubicin and oracin, and the carcinogen 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) to the corresponding alcohols have been determined by HPLC. Km values ranged between 0.06 mM for dolasetron and 1.1 mM for daunorubicin. Enzymatic efficiencies calculated as kcat/Km were more than 100 mM-1 min-1 for dolasetron and 1.3, 0.43, and 0.47 mM-1 min-1 for daunorubicin, oracin, and NNK, respectively. Thus, AKR1B10 is one of the most significant reductases in the activation of dolasetron. In addition to its reducing activity, AKR1B10 catalyzed the NADP+-dependent oxidation of the secondary alcohol (S)-1-indanol to 1-indanone with high enzymatic efficiency (kcat/Km=112 mM-1 min-1). The gene encoding AKR1B10 was cloned from a human liver cDNA library and the recombinant enzyme was purified. Kinetic studies revealed lower activity of the recombinant compared with the native form. Immunoblot studies indicated large interindividual variations in the expression of AKR1B10 in human liver. Since carbonyl reduction of xenobiotics often leads to their inactivation, AKR1B10 may play a role in the occurrence of chemoresistance of tumors toward carbonyl group-bearing cytostatic drugs.

  6. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and their role in uptake and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártíková, Hana; Skálová, Lenka; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Vokřál, Ivan; Vaněk, Tomáš; Podlipná, Radka

    2015-08-01

    Many various xenobiotics permanently enter plants and represent potential danger for their organism. For that reason, plants have evolved extremely sophisticated detoxification systems including a battery of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. Some of them are similar to those in humans and animals, but there are several plant-specific ones. This review briefly introduces xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and summarizes present information about their action toward veterinary drugs. Veterinary drugs are used worldwide to treat diseases and protect animal health. However, veterinary drugs are also unwantedly introduced into environment mostly via animal excrements, they persist in the environment for a long time and may impact on the non-target organisms. Plants are able to uptake, transform the veterinary drugs to non- or less-toxic compounds and store them in the vacuoles and cell walls. This ability may protect not only plant themselves but also other organisms, predominantly invertebrates and wild herbivores. The aim of this review is to emphasize the importance of plants in detoxification of veterinary drugs in the environment. The results of studies, which dealt with transport and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in plants, are summarized and evaluated. In conclusion, the risks and consequences of veterinary drugs in the environment and the possibilities of phytoremediation technologies are considered and future perspectives are outlined.

  7. Relationship between intratumoral expression of genes coding for xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and benefit from adjuvant tamoxifen in estrogen receptor alpha-positive postmenopausal breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bièche, Ivan; Girault, Igor; Urbain, Estelle; Tozlu, Sengül; Lidereau, Rosette

    2004-01-01

    Little is known of the function and clinical significance of intratumoral dysregulation of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme expression in breast cancer. One molecular mechanism proposed to explain tamoxifen resistance is altered tamoxifen metabolism and bioavailability. To test this hypothesis, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to quantify the mRNA expression of a large panel of genes coding for the major xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (12 phase I enzymes, 12 phase II enzymes and three members of the ABC transporter family) in a small series of normal breast (and liver) tissues, and in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-negative and ERα-positive breast tumors. Relevant genes were further investigated in a well-defined cohort of 97 ERα-positive postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with primary surgery followed by adjuvant tamoxifen alone. Seven of the 27 genes showed very weak or undetectable expression in both normal and tumoral breast tissues. Among the 20 remaining genes, seven genes (CYP2A6, CYP2B6, FMO5, NAT1, SULT2B1, GSTM3 and ABCC11) showed significantly higher mRNA levels in ERα-positive breast tumors than in normal breast tissue, or showed higher mRNA levels in ERα-positive breast tumors than in ERα-negative breast tumors. In the 97 ERα-positive breast tumor series, most alterations of these seven genes corresponded to upregulations as compared with normal breast tissue, with an incidence ranging from 25% (CYP2A6) to 79% (NAT1). Downregulation was rare. CYP2A6, CYP2B6, FMO5 and NAT1 emerged as new putative ERα-responsive genes in human breast cancer. Relapse-free survival was longer among patients with FMO5-overexpressing tumors or NAT1-overexpressing tumors (P = 0.0066 and P = 0.000052, respectively), but only NAT1 status retained prognostic significance in Cox multivariate regression analysis (P = 0.0013). Taken together, these data point to a role of genes coding for xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in breast tumorigenesis, NAT1 being an

  8. Polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and diet influence colorectal adenoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwood, Emma L; Elliott, Faye; Forman, David; Barrett, Jennifer H; Wilkie, Murray J V; Carey, Francis A; Steele, Robert J C; Wolf, Roland; Bishop, Timothy; Smith, Gillian

    2010-05-01

    We have earlier shown that diet and xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme genotypes influence colorectal cancer risk, and now investigate whether similar associations are seen in patients with premalignant colorectal adenomas (CRA), recruited during the pilot phase of the Scottish Bowel Screening Programme. Nineteen polymorphisms in 13 genes [cytochrome P450 (P450), glutathione S-transferase (GST), N-acetyl transferase, quinone reductase (NQ01) and microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1) genes] were genotyped using multiplex PCR or Taqman-based allelic discrimination assays and analyzed in conjunction with diet, assessed by food frequency questionnaire, in a case-control study [317 CRA cases (308 cases genotyped), 296 controls]. Findings significant at a nominal 5% level are reported. CRA risk was inversely associated with fruit (P=0.02, test for trend) and vegetable (P=0.001, test for trend) consumption. P450 CYP2C9*3 heterozygotes had reduced CRA risk compared with homozygotes for the reference allele [odds ratio (OR): 0.60; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.36-0.99], whereas CYP2D6*4 homozygotes (OR: 2.72; 95% CI: 1.18-6.27) and GSTM1 'null' individuals (OR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.04-1.98) were at increased risk. The protective effect of fruit consumption was confined to GSTP1 (Ala114Val) reference allele homozygotes (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.34-0.71, P=0.03 for interaction). CRA risk was not associated with meat consumption, although a significant interaction between red meat consumption and EPHX1 (His139Arg) genotype was noted (P=0.02 for interaction). We report the novel associations between P450 genotype and CRA risk, and highlight the risk association with GSTM1 genotype, common to our CRA and cancer case-control series. In addition, we report a novel modifying influence of GSTP1 genotype on dietary chemoprevention. These novel findings require independent confirmation.

  9. Polymorphisms of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in bladder cancer patients of the Semmelweis University Budapest, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbinghaus, Dörte; Bánfi, Gergely; Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Bürger, Hannah; Hengstler, Jan G; Nyirády, Péter; Golka, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes such as N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) or glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) are known to modulate bladder cancer risk. As no apparent data were available from Hungary, a former member of the eastern European economic organization, a study was performed in Budapest. In total, 182 bladder cancer cases and 78 cancer-free controls were investigated by questionnaire. Genotypes of NAT2, GSTM1, GSTT1, rs1058396 and rs17674580 were determined by standard methods. Current smokers' crude odds ratio (OR) (3.43) and former smokers crude OR (2.36) displayed a significantly increased bladder cancer risk. The risk rose by a factor of 1.56 per 10 pack years. Exposure to fumes was associated with an elevated bladder cancer risk (23% cases, 13% controls). Sixty-four % of the cases and 59% of controls were slow NAT2 acetylators. It was not possible to establish a particular impact of NAT2*6A and *7B genotypes (15 cases, 8%, 5 controls, 7%). GSTT1 exerted no marked influence on bladder cancer (negative 21% cases vs. 22% controls). The portion of GSTM1 negative bladder cancer patients was increased (63% cases vs. 54% controls). The SLC14A1 SNPs rs1058396[AG/GG] and the nearby rs17674580[CT/TT] occurred more frequently in cases (79% and 68%) than controls (77% and 55%). The portion of GSTM1 negative bladder cancer patients is comparable with portions reported from other industrialized areas like Lutherstadt Wittenberg/Germany (58%), Dortmund/Germany (70%), Brescia/Italy (66%) or an occupational case-control series in Germany (56%). Data indicate that GSTM1 is a susceptibility factor for environmentally triggered bladder cancer rather than for smoking-mediated bladder cancer.

  10. Effect of CAR activation on selected metabolic pathways in normal and hyperlipidemic mouse livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezen, Tadeja; Tamasi, Viola; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Björkhem, Ingemar; Meyer, Urs A; Rozman, Damjana

    2009-08-19

    Detoxification in the liver involves activation of nuclear receptors, such as the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), which regulate downstream genes of xenobiotic metabolism. Frequently, the metabolism of endobiotics is also modulated, resulting in potentially harmful effects. We therefore used 1,4-Bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) to study the effect of CAR activation on mouse hepatic transcriptome and lipid metabolome under conditions of diet-induced hyperlipidemia. Using gene expression profiling with a dedicated microarray, we show that xenobiotic metabolism, PPARalpha and adipocytokine signaling, and steroid synthesis are the pathways most affected by TCPOBOP in normal and hyperlipidemic mice. TCPOBOP-induced CAR activation prevented the increased hepatic and serum cholesterol caused by feeding mice a diet containing 1% cholesterol. We show that this is due to increased bile acid metabolism and up-regulated removal of LDL, even though TCPOBOP increased cholesterol synthesis under conditions of hyperlipidemia. Up-regulation of cholesterol synthesis was not accompanied by an increase in mature SREBP2 protein. As determined by studies in CAR -/- mice, up-regulation of cholesterol synthesis is however CAR-dependent; and no obvious CAR binding sites were detected in promoters of cholesterogenic genes. TCPOBOP also affected serum glucose and triglyceride levels and other metabolic processes in the liver, irrespective of the diet. Our data show that CAR activation modulates hepatic metabolism by lowering cholesterol and glucose levels, through effects on PPARalpha and adiponectin signaling pathways, and by compromising liver adaptations to hyperlipidemia.

  11. Monocrotophos induces the expression and activity of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in pre-sensitized cultured human brain cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay K Tripathi

    Full Text Available The expression and metabolic profile of cytochrome P450s (CYPs is largely missing in human brain due to non-availability of brain tissue. We attempted to address the issue by using human brain neuronal (SH-SY5Y and glial (U373-MG cells. The expression and activity of CYP1A1, 2B6 and 2E1 were carried out in the cells exposed to CYP inducers viz., 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC, cyclophosphamide (CPA, ethanol and known neurotoxicant- monocrotophos (MCP, a widely used organophosphorous pesticide. Both the cells show significant induction in the expression and CYP-specific activity against classical inducers and MCP. The induction level of CYPs was comparatively lower in MCP exposed cells than cells exposed to classical inducers. Pre-exposure (12 h of cells to classical inducers significantly added the MCP induced CYPs expression and activity. The findings were concurrent with protein ligand docking studies, which show a significant modulatory capacity of MCP by strong interaction with CYP regulators-CAR, PXR and AHR. Similarly, the known CYP inducers- 3-MC, CPA and ethanol have also shown significantly high docking scores with all the three studied CYP regulators. The expression of CYPs in neuronal and glial cells has suggested their possible association with the endogenous physiology of the brain. The findings also suggest the xenobiotic metabolizing capabilities of these cells against MCP, if received a pre-sensitization to trigger the xenobiotic metabolizing machinery. MCP induced CYP-specific activity in neuronal cells could help in explaining its effect on neurotransmission, as these CYPs are known to involve in the synthesis/transport of the neurotransmitters. The induction of CYPs in glial cells is also of significance as these cells are thought to be involved in protecting the neurons from environmental insults and safeguard them from toxicity. The data provide better understanding of the metabolizing capability of the human brain cells against

  12. Bile Acid Metabolism in Liver Pathobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, John Y. L.; Ferrell, Jessica M.

    2018-01-01

    Bile acids facilitate intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary cholesterol secretion to maintain bile acid homeostasis, which is essential for protecting liver and other tissues and cells from cholesterol and bile acid toxicity. Bile acid metabolism is tightly regulated by bile acid synthesis in the liver and bile acid biotransformation in the intestine. Bile acids are endogenous ligands that activate a complex network of nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor and membrane G protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 to regulate hepatic lipid and glucose metabolic homeostasis and energy metabolism. The gut-to-liver axis plays a critical role in the regulation of enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, bile acid pool size, and bile acid composition. Bile acids control gut bacteria overgrowth, and gut bacteria metabolize bile acids to regulate host metabolism. Alteration of bile acid metabolism by high-fat diets, sleep disruption, alcohol, and drugs reshapes gut microbiome and causes dysbiosis, obesity, and metabolic disorders. Gender differences in bile acid metabolism, FXR signaling, and gut microbiota have been linked to higher prevalence of fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in males. Alteration of bile acid homeostasis contributes to cholestatic liver diseases, inflammatory diseases in the digestive system, obesity, and diabetes. Bile acid-activated receptors are potential therapeutic targets for developing drugs to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:29325602

  13. High-throughput metagenomic analysis of petroleum-contaminated soil microbiome reveals the versatility in xenobiotic aromatics metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yun-Juan; Xu, Zixiang; Li, Yang; Yao, Zhi; Sun, Jibin; Song, Hui

    2017-06-01

    The soil with petroleum contamination is one of the most studied soil ecosystems due to its rich microorganisms for hydrocarbon degradation and broad applications in bioremediation. However, our understanding of the genomic properties and functional traits of the soil microbiome is limited. In this study, we used high-throughput metagenomic sequencing to comprehensively study the microbial community from petroleum-contaminated soils near Tianjin Dagang oilfield in eastern China. The analysis reveals that the soil metagenome is characterized by high level of community diversity and metabolic versatility. The metageome community is predominated by γ-Proteobacteria and α-Proteobacteria, which are key players for petroleum hydrocarbon degradation. The functional study demonstrates over-represented enzyme groups and pathways involved in degradation of a broad set of xenobiotic aromatic compounds, including toluene, xylene, chlorobenzoate, aminobenzoate, DDT, methylnaphthalene, and bisphenol. A composite metabolic network is proposed for the identified pathways, thus consolidating our identification of the pathways. The overall data demonstrated the great potential of the studied soil microbiome in the xenobiotic aromatics degradation. The results not only establish a rich reservoir for novel enzyme discovery but also provide putative applications in bioremediation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by Toxcast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the ...

  15. Effects of brussels sprouts, indole 3-carbinol and phenobarbital on xenobiotic metabolism and in vivo DNA binding of aflatoxin B1 in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbe, A.D.; Bjeldanes, L.F.

    1986-01-01

    Cruciferous vegetables have been shown to be potent inducers of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in the rat and this may offer protection against chemical carcinogenesis. Adult, male, SD rats were fed on purified diets supplemented with 25% freeze-dried Brussels sprouts or 250 ppm idole 3-carbinol (I3C) for 2 weeks, or given phenobarbital (PB, 1 mg/ml) in the drinking water for 7 days prior to killing. Brussels sprouts caused a 50% decrease (p 3 H] aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1 ) to liver DNA, and increased intestinal and hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. Hepatic monooxygenase activity was not altered in this group but greater than 2-fold increases in intestinal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) and ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECD) activities were found. I3C did not decrease AFB 1 binding, nor did it increase hepatic or intestinal GST activity. I3C did increase both intestinal AHH and ECD activities. PB treatment significantly decreased AFB 1 binding by 60%, and significantly elevated hepatic but not intestinal GST activity. Hepatic AHH and ECD activities were also elevated in this group, while intestinal AHH and ECD activities were decreased. These results emphasize the importance of GST activity in the detoxification of AFB 1 and suggest a less important role for intestinal monooxygenase activity in the metabolism of this hepatocarcinogen

  16. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage

  17. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Richardson, Jason R. [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Science, School of Health Sciences and Practice, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.

  18. Microbial transformation of xenobiotics for environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial transformation of xenobiotics for environmental bioremediation. ... anaerobic and reductive biotransformation by co-metabolic processes and an overview of ... of xenobiotic compounds in context to the modern day biotechnology.

  19. Chimeric mice with humanized liver: Application in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics studies for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naritomi, Yoichi; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2018-02-01

    Predicting human drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (PK) is key to drug discovery. In particular, it is important to predict human PK, metabolite profiles and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Various methods have been used for such predictions, including in vitro metabolic studies using human biological samples, such as hepatic microsomes and hepatocytes, and in vivo studies using experimental animals. However, prediction studies using these methods are often inconclusive due to discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo results, and interspecies differences in drug metabolism. Further, the prediction methods have changed from qualitative to quantitative to solve these issues. Chimeric mice with humanized liver have been developed, in which mouse liver cells are mostly replaced with human hepatocytes. Since human drug metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the liver of these mice, they are regarded as suitable models for mimicking the drug metabolism and PK observed in humans; therefore, these mice are useful for predicting human drug metabolism and PK. In this review, we discuss the current state, issues, and future directions of predicting human drug metabolism and PK using chimeric mice with humanized liver in drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Lactate metabolism in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the healthy liver there is a splanchnic net-uptake of lactate caused by gluconeogenesis. It has previously been shown that patients with acute liver failure in contrast have a splanchnic release of lactate caused by a combination of accelerated glycolysis in the splanchnic region...... and a reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Aims. The aims of the present study were to investigate lactate metabolism and kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease compared with a control group with normal liver function. Methods. A total of 142 patients with chronic liver disease and 14 healthy controls...... underwent a liver vein catheterization. Blood samples from the femoral artery and the hepatic and renal veins were simultaneously collected before and after stimulation with galactose. Results. The fasting lactate levels, both in the hepatic vein and in the femoral artery, were higher in the patients than...

  1. Phase I to II cross-induction of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: A feedforward control mechanism for potential hormetic responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiang; Pi Jingbo; Woods, Courtney G.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2009-01-01

    Hormetic responses to xenobiotic exposure likely occur as a result of overcompensation by the homeostatic control systems operating in biological organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying overcompensation that leads to hormesis are still unclear. A well-known homeostatic circuit in the cell is the gene induction network comprising phase I, II and III metabolizing enzymes, which are responsible for xenobiotic detoxification, and in many cases, bioactivation. By formulating a differential equation-based computational model, we investigated in this study whether hormesis can arise from the operation of this gene/enzyme network. The model consists of two feedback and one feedforward controls. With the phase I negative feedback control, xenobiotic X activates nuclear receptors to induce cytochrome P450 enzyme, which bioactivates X into a reactive metabolite X'. With the phase II negative feedback control, X' activates transcription factor Nrf2 to induce phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase, etc., which participate in a set of reactions that lead to the metabolism of X' into a less toxic conjugate X''. The feedforward control involves phase I to II cross-induction, in which the parent chemical X can also induce phase II enzymes directly through the nuclear receptor and indirectly through transcriptionally upregulating Nrf2. As a result of the active feedforward control, a steady-state hormetic relationship readily arises between the concentrations of the reactive metabolite X' and the extracellular parent chemical X to which the cell is exposed. The shape of dose-response evolves over time from initially monotonically increasing to J-shaped at the final steady state-a temporal sequence consistent with adaptation-mediated hormesis. The magnitude of the hormetic response is enhanced by increases in the feedforward gain, but attenuated by increases in the bioactivation or phase II feedback loop gains. Our study suggests a

  2. Phase I to II cross-induction of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: a feedforward control mechanism for potential hormetic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Pi, Jingbo; Woods, Courtney G; Andersen, Melvin E

    2009-06-15

    Hormetic responses to xenobiotic exposure likely occur as a result of overcompensation by the homeostatic control systems operating in biological organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying overcompensation that leads to hormesis are still unclear. A well-known homeostatic circuit in the cell is the gene induction network comprising phase I, II and III metabolizing enzymes, which are responsible for xenobiotic detoxification, and in many cases, bioactivation. By formulating a differential equation-based computational model, we investigated in this study whether hormesis can arise from the operation of this gene/enzyme network. The model consists of two feedback and one feedforward controls. With the phase I negative feedback control, xenobiotic X activates nuclear receptors to induce cytochrome P450 enzyme, which bioactivates X into a reactive metabolite X'. With the phase II negative feedback control, X' activates transcription factor Nrf2 to induce phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase, etc., which participate in a set of reactions that lead to the metabolism of X' into a less toxic conjugate X''. The feedforward control involves phase I to II cross-induction, in which the parent chemical X can also induce phase II enzymes directly through the nuclear receptor and indirectly through transcriptionally upregulating Nrf2. As a result of the active feedforward control, a steady-state hormetic relationship readily arises between the concentrations of the reactive metabolite X' and the extracellular parent chemical X to which the cell is exposed. The shape of dose-response evolves over time from initially monotonically increasing to J-shaped at the final steady state-a temporal sequence consistent with adaptation-mediated hormesis. The magnitude of the hormetic response is enhanced by increases in the feedforward gain, but attenuated by increases in the bioactivation or phase II feedback loop gains. Our study suggests a

  3. Coactivator PGC-1α regulates the fasting inducible xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme CYP2A5 in mouse primary hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arpiainen, Satu; Jaervenpaeae, Sanna-Mari; Manninen, Aki; Viitala, Pirkko; Lang, Matti A.; Pelkonen, Olavi; Hakkola, Jukka

    2008-01-01

    The nutritional state of organisms and energy balance related diseases such as diabetes regulate the metabolism of xenobiotics such as drugs, toxins and carcinogens. However, the mechanisms behind this regulation are mostly unknown. The xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A5 enzyme has been shown to be induced by fasting and by glucagon and cyclic AMP (cAMP), which mediate numerous fasting responses. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC)-1α triggers many of the important hepatic fasting effects in response to elevated cAMP levels. In the present study, we were able to show that cAMP causes a coordinated induction of PGC-1α and CYP2A5 mRNAs in murine primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the elevation of the PGC-1α expression level by adenovirus mediated gene transfer increased CYP2A5 transcription. Co-transfection of Cyp2a5 5' promoter constructs with the PGC-1α expression vector demonstrated that PGC-1α is able to activate Cyp2a5 transcription through the hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4α response element in the proximal promoter of the Cyp2a5 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that PGC-1α binds, together with HNF-4α, to the same region at the Cyp2a5 proximal promoter. In conclusion, PGC-1α mediates the expression of CYP2A5 induced by cAMP in mouse hepatocytes through coactivation of transcription factor HNF-4α. This strongly suggests that PGC-1α is the major factor mediating the fasting response of CYP2A5

  4. Transposable elements are enriched within or in close proximity to xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xianchun

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposons, i.e. transposable elements (TEs, are the major internal spontaneous mutation agents for the variability of eukaryotic genomes. To address the general issue of whether transposons mediate genomic changes in environment-adaptation genes, we scanned two alleles per each of the six xenobiotic-metabolizing Helicoverpa zea cytochrome P450 loci, including CYP6B8, CYP6B27, CYP321A1, CYP321A2, CYP9A12v3 and CYP9A14, for the presence of transposon insertions by genome walking and sequence analysis. We also scanned thirteen Drosophila melanogaster P450s genes for TE insertions by in silico mapping and literature search. Results Twelve novel transposons, including LINEs (long interspersed nuclear elements, SINEs (short interspersed nuclear elements, MITEs (miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements, one full-length transib-like transposon, and one full-length Tcl-like DNA transpson, are identified from the alleles of the six H. zea P450 genes. The twelve transposons are inserted into the 5'flanking region, 3'flanking region, exon, or intron of the six environment-adaptation P450 genes. In D. melanogaster, seven out of the eight Drosophila P450s (CYP4E2, CYP6A2, CYP6A8, CYP6A9, CYP6G1, CYP6W1, CYP12A4, CYP12D1 implicated in insecticide resistance are associated with a variety of transposons. By contrast, all the five Drosophila P450s (CYP302A1, CYP306A1, CYP307A1, CYP314A1 and CYP315A1 involved in ecdysone biosynthesis and developmental regulation are free of TE insertions. Conclusion These results indicate that TEs are selectively retained within or in close proximity to xenobiotic-metabolizing P450 genes.

  5. The role of IL6 in liver cancer linked to metabolic liver disease ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The role of IL6 in liver cancer linked to metabolic liver disease. Liver cancer is highly fatal, it has very few treatment options, and it is one of the few cancers whose incidence is rising worldwide. One poorly understood risk factor for liver cancer is obesity/metabolic disease (such as diabetes and fatty liver disease).

  6. Estimation of liver glucose metabolism after refeeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognstad, R.

    1987-01-01

    Refeeding or infusing glucose to rats fasted for 24 hr or more causes rapid liver glycogen synthesis, the carbon source now considered to be largely from gluconeogenesis. While substrate cycling between plasma glucose and liver glucose-6P is known to occur, this cycling has apparently been ignored when calculations are made of % contribution of direct and indirect pathways to liver glycogen synthesis, or when hepatic glucose output is calculated from glucose turnover minus the glucose infusion rate. They show that, isotopically, an estimate of the fluxes of liver glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase is required to quantitate sources of carbon for liver glycogen synthesis, and to measure hepatic glucose output (or uptake). They propose a method to estimate these fluxes, involving a short infusion of a 14 C labelled gluconeogenic precursor plus (6T)glucose, with determination of isotopic yields in liver glycogen and total glucose. Given also the rate of liver glycogen synthesis, this procedure permits the estimation of net gluconeogenesis and hepatic glucose output or uptake. Also, in vitro evidence against the notion of a drastic zonation of liver carbohydrate metabolism is presented, e.g. raising the glucose concentration from 10 to 25 mM increases the 14 C yield from H 14 CO 3 - in lactate, with the increased pyruvate kinase flux and decreased gluconeogenesis occurring in the same cell type, not opposing pathways in different hepatocyte types (as has been postulated by some to occur in vivo after refeeding

  7. Phase I and phase II reductive metabolism simulation of nitro aromatic xenobiotics with electrochemistry coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy, Ugo; Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Li, Ke; Li, Weiming

    2014-11-01

    Electrochemistry combined with (liquid chromatography) high resolution mass spectrometry was used to simulate the general reductive metabolism of three biologically important nitro aromatic molecules: 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), niclosamide, and nilutamide. TFM is a pesticide used in the Laurential Great Lakes while niclosamide and nilutamide are used in cancer therapy. At first, a flow-through electrochemical cell was directly connected to a high resolution mass spectrometer to evaluate the ability of electrochemistry to produce the main reduction metabolites of nitro aromatic, nitroso, hydroxylamine, and amine functional groups. Electrochemical experiments were then carried out at a constant potential of -2.5 V before analysis of the reduction products by LC-HRMS, which confirmed the presence of the nitroso, hydroxylamine, and amine species as well as dimers. Dimer identification illustrates the reactivity of the nitroso species with amine and hydroxylamine species. To investigate xenobiotic metabolism, the reactivity of nitroso species to biomolecules was also examined. Binding of the nitroso metabolite to glutathione was demonstrated by the observation of adducts by LC-ESI(+)-HRMS and the characteristics of their MSMS fragmentation. In conclusion, electrochemistry produces the main reductive metabolites of nitro aromatics and supports the observation of nitroso reactivity through dimer or glutathione adduct formation.

  8. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in the skin of rat, mouse, pig, guinea pig, man, and in human skin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesch, F; Fabian, E; Guth, K; Landsiedel, R

    2014-12-01

    The exposure of the skin to medical drugs, skin care products, cosmetics, and other chemicals renders information on xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XME) in the skin highly interesting. Since the use of freshly excised human skin for experimental investigations meets with ethical and practical limitations, information on XME in models comes in the focus including non-human mammalian species and in vitro skin models. This review attempts to summarize the information available in the open scientific literature on XME in the skin of human, rat, mouse, guinea pig, and pig as well as human primary skin cells, human cell lines, and reconstructed human skin models. The most salient outcome is that much more research on cutaneous XME is needed for solid metabolism-dependent efficacy and safety predictions, and the cutaneous metabolism comparisons have to be viewed with caution. Keeping this fully in mind at least with respect to some cutaneous XME, some models may tentatively be considered to approximate reasonable closeness to human skin. For dermal absorption and for skin irritation among many contributing XME, esterase activity is of special importance, which in pig skin, some human cell lines, and reconstructed skin models appears reasonably close to human skin. With respect to genotoxicity and sensitization, activating XME are not yet judgeable, but reactive metabolite-reducing XME in primary human keratinocytes and several reconstructed human skin models appear reasonably close to human skin. For a more detailed delineation and discussion of the severe limitations see the "Overview and Conclusions" section in the end of this review.

  9. DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF A XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM DATABASE MANAGER FOR METABOLIC SIMULATOR ENHANCEMENT AND CHEMICAL RISK ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major uncertainty that has long been recognized in evaluating chemical toxicity is accounting for metabolic activation of chemicals resulting in increased toxicity. In silico approaches to predict chemical metabolism and to subsequently screen and prioritize chemicals for risk ...

  10. Investigation of the role of the enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism in the resistance of insects to insecticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonova, I.N.; Nedel'kina, S.V.; Naumova, N.B.; Salganik, R.I.

    1986-01-01

    The activity of three enzyme systems of xenobiotic metabolism: cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases, nonspecific esterases, and glutathione S-transferases, was investigated on a sensitive strain (S) of the housefly M. domestica L. and strains resistant to tetrametrin (R/sub tetr/), permetrin (R/sub perm/), mecarbenyl (R/sub mec/), and chlorophos (R/sub chlor/). In the strains R/sub tetr/ and R/sub mec/, in comparison with strain S, an increase of 2.7 and 2.3-fold, respectively, in the activity of microsomal monooxygenases was observed. The position of the maxima of the CO-differential spectra of cytochrome P-450 in all the investigated resistant strains, with the exception of R/sub chlor/, is shifted by 1-2 nm in the shortwave direction. The activity of glutathione S-transferases in the strain R/sub tetr/ proved elevated in comparison with the strain S. The data of an investigation of the total esterase activity and the data of starch gel electrophoresis are evidence of quantitative and qualitative differences between the strains. For all the resistant strains except for R/sub mec/, supplementary zones of esterase activity appear. The data obtained are discussed in connection with the resistance of the insects to insecticides

  11. Host genes related to paneth cells and xenobiotic metabolism are associated with shifts in human ileum-associated microbial composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to integrate human clinical, genotype, mRNA microarray and 16 S rRNA sequence data collected on 84 subjects with ileal Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis or control patients without inflammatory bowel diseases in order to interrogate how host-microbial interactions are perturbed in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Ex-vivo ileal mucosal biopsies were collected from the disease unaffected proximal margin of the ileum resected from patients who were undergoing initial intestinal surgery. Both RNA and DNA were extracted from the mucosal biopsy samples. Patients were genotyped for the three major NOD2 variants (Leufs1007, R702W, and G908R and the ATG16L1T300A variant. Whole human genome mRNA expression profiles were generated using Agilent microarrays. Microbial composition profiles were determined by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3-V5 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16 S rRNA gene. The results of permutation based multivariate analysis of variance and covariance (MANCOVA support the hypothesis that host mucosal Paneth cell and xenobiotic metabolism genes play an important role in host microbial interactions.

  12. Lowbush wild blueberries have the potential to modify gut microbiota and xenobiotic metabolism in the rat colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Lacombe

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is populated by an array of microbial species that play an important role in metabolic and immune functions. The composition of microorganisms is influenced by the components of the host's diet and can impact health. In the present study, dietary enrichment of lowbush wild blueberries (LWB was examined to determine their effect on colon microbial composition and their potential in promoting gut health. The microbial composition and functional potential of the colon microbiota from Sprague Dawley rats fed control diets (AIN93 and LWB-enriched diets (AIN93+8% LWB powder substituting for dextrose for 6 weeks were assessed using Illumina shotgun sequencing and bioinformatics tools. Our analysis revealed an alteration in the relative abundance of 3 phyla and 22 genera as representing approximately 14 and 8% of all phyla and genera identified, respectively. The LWB-enriched diet resulted in a significant reduction in the relative abundance of the genera Lactobacillus and Enterococcus. In addition, hierarchal analysis revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria, the order Actinomycetales, and several novel genera under the family Bifidobacteriaceae and Coriobacteriaceae, in the LWB group. Functional annotation of the shotgun sequences suggested that approximately 9% of the 4709 Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Gene and Genome (KEGG hits identified were impacted by the LWB-diet. Open Reading Frames (ORFs assigned to KEGG category xenobiotics biodegradation and metabolism were significantly greater in the LWB-enriched diet compared to the control and included the pathway for benzoate degradation [PATH:ko00362] and glycosaminoglycan degradation [PATH:ko00531]. Moreover, the number of ORFs assigned to the bacterial invasion of epithelial cells [PATH:ko05100] pathway was approximately 8 fold lower in the LWB group compared to controls. This study demonstrated that LWBs have the potential to promote

  13. A catalogue of polymorphisms related to xenobiotic metabolism and cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemignani, Federica; Landi, Stefano; Vivant, Franck; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Brennan, Paul; Canzian, Federico

    2002-08-01

    High-throughput genotyping technology of multiple genes based on large samples of cases and controls are likely to be important in identifying common genes which have a moderate effect on the development of specific diseases. We present here a comprehensive list of 313 known experimentally confirmed polymorphisms in 54 genes which are particularly relevant for metabolism of drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and other potential carcinogens. We have compiled a catalog with a standardized format that summarizes the genetic and biochemical properties of the selected polymorphisms. We have also confirmed or redesigned experimental conditions for simplex or multiplex PCR amplification of a subset of 168 SNPs of particular interest, which will provide the basis for the design of assays compatible with high-throughput genotyping.

  14. Transferrin metabolism in alcoholic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, B.J.; Chapman, R.W.; Nunes, R.M.; Sorrentino, D.; Sherlock, S.

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of transferrin was studied using purified 125 I-labeled transferrin in 11 alcoholic patients; six with fatty liver and five with cirrhosis. Six healthy subjects whose alcohol intake was les than 40 gm daily were studied as a control group. There were no significant differences in the mean fractional catabolic rate and plasma volume in the alcoholic groups when compared with control subjects. A significantly decreased mean serum transferrin concentration was found in the alcoholic cirrhotic patients (1.8 +/- 0.3 gm per liter vs. 2.9 +/- 0.2; p less than 0.01), resulting from diminished total body synthesis (0.9 +/- 0.2 mg per kg per hr vs. 1.8 +/- 0.2; p less than 0.01). In contrast, in the patients with alcoholic fatty liver, the mean total body transferrin synthesis (2.4 +/- 0.3 mg per kg per hr) was significantly increased when compared with controls (p less than 0.05). For all the alcoholic patients, the serum transferrin correlated with transferrin synthesis (r = +0.70; p less than 0.01) but the serum iron did not. These results suggest that, in alcoholic cirrhosis, transferrin synthesis is decreased, probably reflecting diminished synthetic capacity by the liver. In contrast, in patients with alcoholic fatty liver, transferrin turnover is accelerated

  15. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoefner, Line Buch; Rostved, Andreas Arendtsen; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2018-01-01

    syndrome after liver transplantation. METHODS: The databases Medline and Scopus were searched for observational studies evaluating prevalence and risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. Meta-analyses were performed based on odds ratios (ORs) from multivariable analyses...

  16. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliver, Linda S M

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. - Highlights: • Biological impact of xenobiotics acting through Glucocorticoid Receptor. • Promiscuity of Glucocorticoid

  17. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliver, Linda S M, E-mail: linda.gulliver@otago.ac.nz

    2017-03-15

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. - Highlights: • Biological impact of xenobiotics acting through Glucocorticoid Receptor. • Promiscuity of Glucocorticoid

  18. Structural changes in the liver in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Vasendin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientifically proven close relationship of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with development of metabolic syndrome and its individual components involves the conclusion that the target organ in metabolic symptom, even regardless of the severity of obesity, the liver occupies a dominant position, as the body undergoes the first characteristic of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease changes, involving violation of metabolism in the body. Dislipoproteinemia plays an important role in the formation of metabolic syndrome in obesity and other obesity-associated diseases. Altered liver function are the root cause of violations of processes of lipid metabolism and, consequently, abnormal functioning of the liver may be a separate, additional and independent risk factor for development of dyslipidemia and obesity as the main component of the metabolic syndrome.

  19. Application of chimeric mice with humanized liver for study of human-specific drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Thomas J; Reddy, Vijay G B; Kakuni, Masakazu; Morikawa, Yoshio; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Human-specific or disproportionately abundant human metabolites of drug candidates that are not adequately formed and qualified in preclinical safety assessment species pose an important drug development challenge. Furthermore, the overall metabolic profile of drug candidates in humans is an important determinant of their drug-drug interaction susceptibility. These risks can be effectively assessed and/or mitigated if human metabolic profile of the drug candidate could reliably be determined in early development. However, currently available in vitro human models (e.g., liver microsomes, hepatocytes) are often inadequate in this regard. Furthermore, the conduct of definitive radiolabeled human ADME studies is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor that is more suited for later in development when the risk of failure has been reduced. We evaluated a recently developed chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on uPA/SCID background for its ability to predict human disposition of four model drugs (lamotrigine, diclofenac, MRK-A, and propafenone) that are known to exhibit human-specific metabolism. The results from these studies demonstrate that chimeric mice were able to reproduce the human-specific metabolite profile for lamotrigine, diclofenac, and MRK-A. In the case of propafenone, however, the human-specific metabolism was not detected as a predominant pathway, and the metabolite profiles in native and humanized mice were similar; this was attributed to the presence of residual highly active propafenone-metabolizing mouse enzymes in chimeric mice. Overall, the data indicate that the chimeric mice with humanized liver have the potential to be a useful tool for the prediction of human-specific metabolism of xenobiotics and warrant further investigation.

  20. Xenobiotic/medium chain fatty acid: CoA ligase - a critical review on its role in fatty acid metabolism and the detoxification of benzoic acid and aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluis, Rencia; Erasmus, Elardus

    2016-10-01

    Activation of fatty acids by the acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) is the vital first step in fatty acid metabolism. The enzymatic and physiological characterization of the human xenobiotic/medium chain fatty acid: CoA ligases (ACSMs) has been severely neglected even though xenobiotics, such as benzoate and salicylate, are detoxified through this pathway. This review will focus on the nomenclature and substrate specificity of the human ACSM ligases; the biochemical and enzymatic characterization of ACSM1 and ACSM2B; the high sequence homology of the ACSM2 genes (ACSM2A and ACSM2B) as well as what is currently known regarding disease association studies. Several discrepancies exist in the current literature that should be taken note of. For example, the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) reported to be associated with aspirin metabolism and multiple risk factors of metabolic syndrome are incorrect. Kinetic data on the substrate specificity of the human ACSM ligases are non-existent and currently no data exist on the influence of SNPs on the enzyme activity of these ligases. One of the biggest obstacles currently in the field is that glycine conjugation is continuously studied as a one-step process, which means that key regulatory factors of the two individual steps remain unknown.

  1. Influence of nutrition on liver oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera, F; Culebras, J M; González-Gallego, J

    1996-06-01

    The liver plays a major role in the disposition of the majority of drugs. This is due to the presence of several drug-metabolizing enzyme systems, including a group of membrane-bound mixed-function oxidative enzymes, mainly the cytochrome P450 system. Hepatic oxidative capacity can be assessed by changes in antipyrine metabolism. Different drugs and other factors may induce or inhibit the cytochrome P450-dependent system. This effect is important in terms of the efficacy or toxicity of drugs that are substrates for the system. Microsomal oxidation in animals fed with protein-deficient diets is depressed. The mixed-function oxidase activity recovers after a hyperproteic diet or the addition of lipids. Similar findings have been reported in patients with protein-calorie malnutrition, although results in the elderly are conflicting. Different studies have revealed that microsomal oxidation is impaired by total parenteral nutrition and that this effect is absent when changing the caloric source from carbohydrates to a conventional amino acid solution or after lipid addition, especially when administered as medium-chain/long-chain triglyceride mixtures. Peripheral parenteral nutrition appears to increase antipyrine clearance.

  2. Influence of dietary macronutrients on liver fat accumulation and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, Siôn A; Hodson, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    The liver is a principal metabolic organ within the human body and has a major role in regulating carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. With increasing rates of obesity, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is growing. It remains unclear why NAFLD, which is now defined as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, develops but lifestyle factors such as diet (ie, total calorie and specific nutrient intakes), appear to play a key role. Here we review the av...

  3. Investigation on liver fast metabolism with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, K.H.; Schmitt, W.G.H.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the density of normal and diffusely diseased liver parenchyma show a significant difference only in fatty liver. A linear relationship between the fat content and physical density has been demonstrated. Computed tomographic densitometry of liver tissue correlates well with physical in vitro measurements of fat content and is sufficiently accurate for clinical use. Other types of liver diseases cannot be differentiated by densitometry, Lipolisis in fatty liver in chronic alcoholism alcohol withdrawal has been investigated. It has been found that a rate of decrease of the fatty degeneration of the liver equals to 1 percent/day. Fatty degeneration of the liver in acute pancreatitis and other diseases have been also investigated. CT densitometry of the liver should be considered as a useful routine clinical method to determine the fat content of liver. (author)

  4. Investigation on liver fast metabolism with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebener, K.H.; Schmitt, W.G.H. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pathologisches Inst.)

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the density of normal and diffusely diseased liver parenchyma show a significant difference only in fatty liver. A linear relationship between the fat content and physical density has been demonstrated. Computed tomographic densitometry of liver tissue correlates well with physical in vitro measurements of fat content and is sufficiently accurate for clinical use. Other types of liver diseases cannot be differentiated by densitometry, Lipolisis in fatty liver in chronic alcoholism alcohol withdrawal has been investigated. It has been found that a rate of decrease of the fatty degeneration of the liver equals to 1 percent/day. Fatty degeneration of the liver in acute pancreatitis and other diseases have been also investigated. CT densitometry of the liver should be considered as a useful routine clinical method to determine the fat content of liver.

  5. Detection of xenobiotic-induced DNA damage by the comet assay applied to human and rat precision-cut liver slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plazar, Janja; Hrejac, Irena; Pirih, Primoz; Filipic, Metka; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    The comet assay is a simple and sensitive method for measuring DNA damage at the level of individual cells and is extensively used in genotoxicity studies. It is commonly applied to cultured cells. The aim of this study was to apply the comet assay for use in fresh liver tissue, where metabolic

  6. Recovery of nutritional metabolism after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Kohei; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Teramoto, Arisa; Urano, Eri; Katayama, Takafumi; Morine, Yuji; Imura, Satoru; Utsunomiya, Tohru; Shimada, Mitsuo; Takeda, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative nutritional assessment is critically important to reflect nutritional management because liver transplantation (LTx) often is undertaken in patients with poor nutritional status. The aim of this study was to evaluate nutritional status, including the non-protein respiratory quotient (npRQ), resting energy expenditure (REE), nitrogen balance, and blood biochemical parameters in patients before and after LTx. Fourteen patients undergoing LTx and 10 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The npRQ and REE were measured using indirect calorimetry before LTx and at 2, 3, and 4 wk after the procedure. Blood biochemistry and nitrogen balance calculated by 24-h urine collection were performed concurrently with indirect calorimetric measurement; the results were compared between the two groups. Before LTx, npRQ was significantly lower and serum non-esterified fatty acid levels were significantly higher in the patients than in the controls. Furthermore, a negative nitrogen balance was observed in the patients. These, however, improved significantly at 4 wk after LTx. REE did not significantly increase compared with the preoperative values in recipients. Blood biochemistry showed gradually increasing levels of serum cholinesterase and albumin. These failed to reach to normal levels by 4 wk post-transplant. The findings revealed that improvement of nutritional metabolism after LTx may require 4 wk. Additional nutritional strategies, therefore, may be needed to minimize catabolic state during the early post-transplant period. Adequate, individualized nutritional guidance before and after LTx should be performed in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bisphenol A sulfonation is impaired in metabolic and liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalcin, Emine B.; Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Slitt, Angela L.; King, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial chemical and suspected endocrine disruptor to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. The liver metabolizes and facilitates BPA excretion through glucuronidation and sulfonation. The sulfotransferase enzymes contributing to BPA sulfonation (detected in human and rodents) is poorly understood. Objectives: To determine the impact of metabolic and liver disease on BPA sulfonation in human and mouse livers. Methods: The capacity for BPA sulfonation was determined in human liver samples that were categorized into different stages of metabolic and liver disease (including obesity, diabetes, steatosis, and cirrhosis) and in livers from ob/ob mice. Results: In human liver tissues, BPA sulfonation was substantially lower in livers from subjects with steatosis (23%), diabetes cirrhosis (16%), and cirrhosis (18%), relative to healthy individuals with non-fatty livers (100%). In livers of obese mice (ob/ob), BPA sulfonation was lower (23%) than in livers from lean wild-type controls (100%). In addition to BPA sulfonation activity, Sult1a1 protein expression decreased by 97% in obese mouse livers. Conclusion: Taken together these findings establish a profoundly reduced capacity of BPA elimination via sulfonation in obese or diabetic individuals and in those with fatty or cirrhotic livers versus individuals with healthy livers. - Highlights: • Present study demonstrates that hepatic SULT 1A1/1A3 are primarily sulfonate BPA in mouse and human. • Hepatic BPA sulfonation is profoundly reduced steatosis, diabetes and cirrhosis. • With BPA-S detectable in urine under low or common exposures, these findings are novel and important.

  8. Bisphenol A sulfonation is impaired in metabolic and liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalcin, Emine B.; Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Slitt, Angela L., E-mail: angela_slitt@uri.edu; King, Roberta, E-mail: rking@uri.edu

    2016-02-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial chemical and suspected endocrine disruptor to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. The liver metabolizes and facilitates BPA excretion through glucuronidation and sulfonation. The sulfotransferase enzymes contributing to BPA sulfonation (detected in human and rodents) is poorly understood. Objectives: To determine the impact of metabolic and liver disease on BPA sulfonation in human and mouse livers. Methods: The capacity for BPA sulfonation was determined in human liver samples that were categorized into different stages of metabolic and liver disease (including obesity, diabetes, steatosis, and cirrhosis) and in livers from ob/ob mice. Results: In human liver tissues, BPA sulfonation was substantially lower in livers from subjects with steatosis (23%), diabetes cirrhosis (16%), and cirrhosis (18%), relative to healthy individuals with non-fatty livers (100%). In livers of obese mice (ob/ob), BPA sulfonation was lower (23%) than in livers from lean wild-type controls (100%). In addition to BPA sulfonation activity, Sult1a1 protein expression decreased by 97% in obese mouse livers. Conclusion: Taken together these findings establish a profoundly reduced capacity of BPA elimination via sulfonation in obese or diabetic individuals and in those with fatty or cirrhotic livers versus individuals with healthy livers. - Highlights: • Present study demonstrates that hepatic SULT 1A1/1A3 are primarily sulfonate BPA in mouse and human. • Hepatic BPA sulfonation is profoundly reduced steatosis, diabetes and cirrhosis. • With BPA-S detectable in urine under low or common exposures, these findings are novel and important.

  9. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  10. [Study of enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism in the evaluation of quality of protein-containing wheat germ flakes and wallpaper flour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinchuk, A N; E En Gyn; Safronova, A M; Peskova, E V

    1991-01-01

    Intake of wheat upholstery meal by growing rats was attended by a sharp decrease in the content and activity of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes in the hepatic microsomes, that was caused by the low biological value of the meal proteins. Hepatic microsomes of the rats that were fed with wheat germ flakes showed increased specific content of cytochromes P-450 and b5, but the total blood protein content per 100 g of body mass was lower than during casein consumption. No significant changes were detected in hydroxylation rate of benz(a)pyrene, aniline and ethylmorphine. During consumption of wheat germ flakes induction of UDP-glucuronide-transferase was detected in hepatic microsomes. Wheat germ flakes induced a 5-fold increase of Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity. Wheat germ flakes produced no significant effect on glutathione-S-aryltransferase and glutathione reductase activity.

  11. Recellularization of rat liver: An in vitro model for assessing human drug metabolism and liver biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Robertson

    Full Text Available Liver-like organoids that recapitulate the complex functions of the whole liver by combining cells, scaffolds, and mechanical or chemical cues are becoming important models for studying liver biology and drug metabolism. The advantages of growing cells in three-dimensional constructs include enhanced cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions and preserved cellular phenotype including, prevention of de-differentiation. In the current study, biomimetic liver constructs were made via perfusion decellularization of rat liver, with the goal of maintaining the native composition and structure of the extracellular matrix. We optimized our decellularization process to produce liver scaffolds in which immunogenic residual DNA was removed but glycosaminoglycans were maintained. When the constructs were recellularized with rat or human liver cells, the cells remained viable, capable of proliferation, and functional for 28 days. Specifically, the cells continued to express cytochrome P450 genes and maintained their ability to metabolize a model drug, midazolam. Microarray analysis showed an upregulation of genes involved in liver regeneration and fibrosis. In conclusion, these liver constructs have the potential to be used as test beds for studying liver biology and drug metabolism.

  12. Hepatic injury induces contrasting response in liver and kidney to chemicals that are metabolically activated: Role of male sex hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young C.; Yim, Hye K.; Jung, Young S.; Park, Jae H.; Kim, Sung Y.

    2007-01-01

    Injury to liver, resulting in loss of its normal physiological/biochemical functions, may adversely affect a secondary organ. We examined the response of the liver and kidney to chemical substances that require metabolic activation for their toxicities in mice with a preceding liver injury. Carbon tetrachloride treatment 24 h prior to a challenging dose of carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen decreased the resulting hepatotoxicity both in male and female mice as determined by histopathological examination and increases in serum enzyme activities. In contrast, the renal toxicity of the challenging toxicants was elevated markedly in male, but not in female mice. Partial hepatectomy also induced similar changes in the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of a challenging toxicant, suggesting that the contrasting response of male liver and kidney was associated with the reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity. Carbon tetrachloride pretreatment or partial hepatectomy decreased the hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in both sexes but elevated the renal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole O-demethylase and aminopyrine N-demethylase activities significantly only in male mice. Increases in Cyp2e1 and Cyp2b expression were also evident in male kidney. Castration of males or testosterone administration to females diminished the sex-related differences in the renal response to an acute liver injury. The results indicate that reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity induced by liver injury may render secondary target organs susceptible to chemical substances activated in these organs. This effect may be sex-specific. It is also suggested that an integrated approach should be taken for proper assessment of chemical hazards

  13. Circadian Reprogramming in the Liver Identifies Metabolic Pathways of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shogo; Solanas, Guiomar; Peixoto, Francisca Oliveira; Bee, Leonardo; Symeonidi, Aikaterini; Schmidt, Mark S; Brenner, Charles; Masri, Selma; Benitah, Salvador Aznar; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2017-08-10

    The process of aging and circadian rhythms are intimately intertwined, but how peripheral clocks involved in metabolic homeostasis contribute to aging remains unknown. Importantly, caloric restriction (CR) extends lifespan in several organisms and rewires circadian metabolism. Using young versus old mice, fed ad libitum or under CR, we reveal reprogramming of the circadian transcriptome in the liver. These age-dependent changes occur in a highly tissue-specific manner, as demonstrated by comparing circadian gene expression in the liver versus epidermal and skeletal muscle stem cells. Moreover, de novo oscillating genes under CR show an enrichment in SIRT1 targets in the liver. This is accompanied by distinct circadian hepatic signatures in NAD + -related metabolites and cyclic global protein acetylation. Strikingly, this oscillation in acetylation is absent in old mice while CR robustly rescues global protein acetylation. Our findings indicate that the clock operates at the crossroad between protein acetylation, liver metabolism, and aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Alanine metabolism in pyridoxine-depleted rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Mitsuko; Abe, Midori

    1976-01-01

    Alanine metabolism in normal and pyridoxine-deficient rats was studied in vivo and in vitro. Incorporation of 14 C-alanine into various liver components was determined and no difference was shown between normal and deficient animals in the incorporation into liver homogenates, lipid, protein and plasma glucose. Using the liver slice system, gluconeogenic activity from alanine or pyruvate was 40% lower in deficient rats compared with the activity of normal rats. However, inhibition was completely removed by the addition of 2-oxoglutarate to alanine. Penicillamine did not affect glucose formation from alanine in the liver slice. (auth.)

  15. Gender Differences in Adipocyte Metabolism and Liver Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Ka-Wing Cheung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the third most common cancer type and the second leading cause of deaths in men. Large population studies have demonstrated remarkable gender disparities in the incidence and the cumulative risk of liver cancer. A number of emerging risk factors regarding metabolic alterations associated with obesity, diabetes and dyslipidemia have been ascribed to the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD and ultimately liver cancer. The deregulation of fat metabolism derived from excessive insulin, glucose and lipid promotes cancer-causing inflammatory signaling and oxidative stress, which eventually triggers the uncontrolled hepatocellular proliferation. This review presents the current standing on the gender differences in body fat compositions and their mechanistic linkage with the development of NAFLD-related liver cancer, with an emphasis on genetic, epigenetic and microRNA control. The potential roles of sex hormones in instructing adipocyte metabolic programs may help unravel the mechanisms underlying gender dimorphism in liver cancer and identify the metabolic targets for disease management.

  16. Metabolism, genomics, and DNA repair in the mouse aging liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebel, Michel; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2011-01-01

    hepatic metabolic and detoxification activities, with implications for systemic aging and age-related disease. It has become clear, using rodent models as biological tools, that genetic instability in the form of gross DNA rearrangements or point mutations accumulate in the liver with age. DNA lesions......The liver plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, hormones, and metabolic waste products, thereby maintaining body homeostasis. The liver undergoes substantial changes in structure and function within old age. Such changes are associated with significant impairment of many......, such as oxidized bases or persistent breaks, increase with age and correlate well with the presence of senescent hepatocytes. The level of DNA damage and/or mutation can be affected by changes in carcinogen activation, decreased ability to repair DNA, or a combination of these factors. This paper covers some...

  17. Toxicokinetics of the food-toxin IQ in human placental perfusion is not affected by ABCG2 or xenobiotic metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immonen, E; Kummu, M; Petsalo, A

    2010-01-01

    Metabolizing enzymes and transporters affect toxicokinetics of foreign compounds (e.g. drugs and carcinogens) in human placenta. The heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) is a food-borne carcinogen being metabolically activated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, especial...

  18. Inherited metabolic liver diseases in infants and children: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Barić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of metabolism, which affect the liver are a large, continuously increasing group of diseases. Their clinical onset can occur at any age, from intrauterine period presenting as liver failure already at birth to late adulthood. Inherited metabolic disorders must be considered in differential diagnosis of every unexplained liver disease. Specific diagnostic work-up for either their confirmation or exclusion should start immediately since any postponing can result in delayed diagnosis and death or irreversible disability. This can be particularly painful while many inherited metabolic liver diseases are relatively easily treatable if diagnosed on time, for instance galactosemia or hereditary fructose intolerance by simple dietary means. Any unexplained liver disease, even one looking initially benign, should be considered as a potential liver failure and therefore should deserve proper attention. Diagnosis in neonates is additionally complicated because of the factors which can mask liver disease, such as physiological neonatal jaundice, normally relatively enlarged liver and increased transaminases at that age. In everyday practice, in order to reveal the etiology, it is useful to classify and distinguish some clinical patterns which, together with a few routine, widely available laboratory tests (aminotransferases, prothrombine time, albumin, gammaGT, total and conjugated bilirubin, ammonia, alkaline phosphatase and glucose make the search for the cause much easier. These patterns are isolated hyperbilirubinemia, syndrome of cholestasis in early infancy, hepatocellular jaundice, Reye syndrome, portal cirrhosis and isolated hepatomegaly. Despite the fact that some diseases can present with more than one pattern (for instance, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency as infantile cholestasis, but also as hepatocellular jaundice, and that in some disesases one pattern can evolve into another (for instance, Wilson disease from hepatocellular

  19. Liver and muscle protein metabolism in cachexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Up to 50% of cancer patients suffer from progressive weight loss (cachexia). Cachexia is induced by proinflammatory mediators (cytokines), induced by the tumor’s presence. These cytokines induce so-called acute phase protein synthesis by the liver, followed by skeletal muscle protein breakdown.

  20. Evolving insights on metabolism, autophagy and epigenetics in liver myofibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeribe Chike Nwosu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Liver myofibroblasts (MFB are crucial mediators of extracellular matrix (ECM deposition in liver fibrosis. They arise mainly from hepatic stellate cells (HSCs upon a process termed activation. To a lesser extent, and depending on the cause of liver damage, portal fibroblasts, mesothelial cells and fibrocytes may also contribute to the MFB population. Targeting MFB to reduce liver fibrosis is currently an area of intense research. Unfortunately, a clog in the wheel of antifibrotic therapies is the fact that although MFB are known to mediate scar formation, and participate in liver inflammatory response, many of their molecular portraits are currently unknown. In this review, we discuss recent understanding of MFB in health and diseases, focusing specifically on three evolving research fields: metabolism, autophagy and epigenetics. We have emphasized on therapeutic prospects where applicable and mentioned techniques for use in MFB studies. Subsequently, we highlighted uncharted territories in MFB research to help direct future efforts aimed at bridging gaps in current knowledge.

  1. Differences in the expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes between islets derived from the ventral and dorsal anlage of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standop, Jens; Ulrich, Alexis B; Schneider, Matthias B; Büchler, Markus W; Pour, Parviz M

    2002-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer have been linked to the exposure of environmental chemicals (xenobiotics), which generally require metabolic activation to highly reactive toxic or carcinogenic intermediates. The primary enzyme system involved is made up of numerous cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenases (CYP). Glutathione S-transferases (GST) belong to the enzyme systems that catalyze the conjugation of the reactive intermediates produced by CYPs to less toxic or readily excretable metabolites. Because the majority of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancers develop in the organ's head, we compared the expression of selected CYP and GST enzymes between the tissues deriving from the ventral anlage (head) and dorsal anlage (corpus, tail). A total of 20 normal pancreatic tissue specimen from organ donors and early autopsy cases were processed immunohistochemically by using antibodies to CYP 1A1, 1A2, 2B6, 2C8/9/19, 2D6, 2E1, 3A1, 3A2 and 3A4, GST-alpha, GST-mu and GST-pi, and the NADPH cytochrome P450 oxido-reductase (NA-OR), the specificity of which has been verified in our previous study by Western blot and RT-PCR analyses. In all pancreatic regions, most of the enzymes were expressed in islet cells. However, more islets in the head region expressed CYP 2B6, 2C8/9/19, 2E1 and the NA-OR, than those in the body and tail. Moreover, the expression of CYP 2B6 and 2E1 was restricted to the pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells, and the concentration of CYP 3A1 and 3A4 was stronger in PP cells than in other islet cells. On the other hand, GST-mu and GST-pi were expressed primarily in islet cells of the body and tail. The greater content of xenobiotic-metabolizing and carcinogen-activating CYP enzymes and a lower expression of detoxifying GST enzymes in the head of the pancreas could be one reason for the greater susceptibility of this region for inflammatory and malignant diseases. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP

  2. Coenzyme metabolism in rat liver transketolase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbach, Z.V.; Kubyshin, V.L.; Maglysh, S.S.; Zabrodskaya, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of the results of kinetic investigations, two binding sites for hydroxythiamine diphosphate were determined in apotransketolase, with sharply differing values of K/sub i/: (7-22) x 10 -9 and (13.0-19.7) x 10 -8 M. A study was made of the turnover rate of thiamine diphosphate in holotransketolase in rat liver tissue by a radioisotope method, using [ 14 C] thiamine as the labeled precursor. The half-substitution time and rate constant of degradation of the coenzyme in transketolase are close in absolute values to the analogous indices for the protein portion of the enzyme and constitute 153 h and 0.108 day -1 , respectively. Rat liver transketolase exists in vivo in the form of a substituted α-carbanion. Replacement of thiamine diphosphate by hydroxythiamine diphosphate in the holoenzyme has no effect on the formation of the intermediate α-carbanion form of the enzyme

  3. Influence of dietary macronutrients on liver fat accumulation and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Siôn A; Hodson, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    The liver is a principal metabolic organ within the human body and has a major role in regulating carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. With increasing rates of obesity, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is growing. It remains unclear why NAFLD, which is now defined as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, develops but lifestyle factors such as diet (ie, total calorie and specific nutrient intakes), appear to play a key role. Here we review the available observational and intervention studies that have investigated the influence of dietary macronutrients on liver fat content. Findings from observational studies are conflicting with some reporting that relative to healthy controls, patients with NAFLD consume diets higher in total fat/saturated fatty acids, whilst others find they consume diets higher in carbohydrates/sugars. From the limited number of intervention studies that have been undertaken, a consistent finding is a hypercaloric diet, regardless of whether the excess calories have been provided either as fat, sugar, or both, increases liver fat content. In contrast, a hypocaloric diet decreases liver fat content. Findings from both hyper- and hypo-caloric feeding studies provide some suggestion that macronutrient composition may also play a role in regulating liver fat content and this is supported by data from isocaloric feeding studies; fatty acid composition and/or carbohydrate content/type appear to influence whether there is accrual of liver fat or not. The mechanisms by which specific macronutrients, when consumed as part of an isocaloric diet, cause a change in liver fat remain to be fully elucidated. PMID:28947639

  4. Influence of dietary macronutrients on liver fat accumulation and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Siôn A; Hodson, Leanne

    2017-12-01

    The liver is a principal metabolic organ within the human body and has a major role in regulating carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. With increasing rates of obesity, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is growing. It remains unclear why NAFLD, which is now defined as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, develops but lifestyle factors such as diet (ie, total calorie and specific nutrient intakes), appear to play a key role. Here we review the available observational and intervention studies that have investigated the influence of dietary macronutrients on liver fat content. Findings from observational studies are conflicting with some reporting that relative to healthy controls, patients with NAFLD consume diets higher in total fat/saturated fatty acids, whilst others find they consume diets higher in carbohydrates/sugars. From the limited number of intervention studies that have been undertaken, a consistent finding is a hypercaloric diet, regardless of whether the excess calories have been provided either as fat, sugar, or both, increases liver fat content. In contrast, a hypocaloric diet decreases liver fat content. Findings from both hyper- and hypo-caloric feeding studies provide some suggestion that macronutrient composition may also play a role in regulating liver fat content and this is supported by data from isocaloric feeding studies; fatty acid composition and/or carbohydrate content/type appear to influence whether there is accrual of liver fat or not. The mechanisms by which specific macronutrients, when consumed as part of an isocaloric diet, cause a change in liver fat remain to be fully elucidated. © American Federation for Medical Research (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. The metabolism of aflatoxin B1 by hepatocytes isolated from rats following the in vivo administration of some xenobiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, S.A.; Neal, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    Isolated rat hepatocytes, an intact cellular system capable of performing phase I and phase II metabolism, have been used to investigate metabolism of aflatoxin B1. These cells were found to metabolise [ 14 C]aflatoxin B1 to aflatoxins M1 and Q1, and to radiolabelled polar material, presumably conjugates, as analysed by h.p.l.c., t.l.c. and radioactive determination. In vivo administration of the mixed function oxidase inducers, phenobarbitone and 3-methylcholanthrene, resulted in enhanced hepatocyte phase I (microsomal) metabolism of aflatoxin B1. In contrast to metabolism of AFB1 by in vitro subcellular systems increased production of polar material (conjugated metabolites) derived from [ 14 C]aflatoxin B1 was also detected in hepatocytes isolated from these pretreated animals. Formation of aflatoxin Q1 by isolated hepatocytes appeared to be mediated by cytochrome P450-linked enzymes whereas cytochrome P448-linked enzymes were apparently involved in aflatoxin M1 production. Chronic feeding of aflatoxin B1 to rats enhanced hepatocyte production of conjugated material only and did not elevate cellular cytochrome P450 levels, thus suggesting that aflatoxin B1 is not an inducer of its own primary metabolism

  6. Insulin resistance and postreceptor changes of liver metabolism in fat-fed mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedeskov, Carl Jørgen; Capito, Kirsten; Hansen, Svend Erik

    1992-01-01

    Medicinsk biokemi, animal diabetes, insulin resistance, postreceptor defects, liver metabolism, high-fat diet......Medicinsk biokemi, animal diabetes, insulin resistance, postreceptor defects, liver metabolism, high-fat diet...

  7. Radiorespirometric study of carbohydrate metabolism in childhood liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DaCosta, H.; Shreeve, W.W.; Merchant, S.

    1976-01-01

    The need for a suitable parameter to evaluate patients with chronic liver disease has been felt for some time, especially in order to judge the response to surgical shunts and the influence of certain drugs and diets on the liver. Since the liver is a major organ for carbohydrate metabolism, it was decided to analyze the in vivo oxidation of such substrates as glucose and galactose labeled with 14 C. Moderately advanced ''Indian childhood cirrhosis'' and idiopathic fatty hepatic infiltration were selected to represent diffuse chronic liver disease. Oral administration of 14 C-U-glucose or 14 C-1-galactose was followed by analyses of 14 CO 2 in breath by liquid scintillation counting. Conversion of 14 C-glucose to 14 CO 2 was accelerated by both diseases. On the other hand, oxidation of 14 C-galactose was slowed in fatty infiltration and was markedly subnormal in Indian childhood cirrhosis

  8. Functional proteomic analysis of corticosteroid pharmacodynamics in rat liver: Relationship to hepatic stress, signaling, energy regulation, and drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyar, Vivaswath S; Almon, Richard R; DuBois, Debra C; Sukumaran, Siddharth; Qu, Jun; Jusko, William J

    2017-05-08

    Corticosteroids (CS) are anti-inflammatory agents that cause extensive pharmacogenomic and proteomic changes in multiple tissues. An understanding of the proteome-wide effects of CS in liver and its relationships to altered hepatic and systemic physiology remains incomplete. Here, we report the application of a functional pharmacoproteomic approach to gain integrated insight into the complex nature of CS responses in liver in vivo. An in-depth functional analysis was performed using rich pharmacodynamic (temporal-based) proteomic data measured over 66h in rat liver following a single dose of methylprednisolone (MPL). Data mining identified 451 differentially regulated proteins. These proteins were analyzed on the basis of temporal regulation, cellular localization, and literature-mined functional information. Of the 451 proteins, 378 were clustered into six functional groups based on major clinically-relevant effects of CS in liver. MPL-responsive proteins were highly localized in the mitochondria (20%) and cytosol (24%). Interestingly, several proteins were related to hepatic stress and signaling processes, which appear to be involved in secondary signaling cascades and in protecting the liver from CS-induced oxidative damage. Consistent with known adverse metabolic effects of CS, several rate-controlling enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and fatty-acid metabolism were altered by MPL. In addition, proteins involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds, xenobiotics, and therapeutic drugs including cytochrome P450 and Phase-II enzymes were differentially regulated. Proteins related to the inflammatory acute-phase response were up-regulated in response to MPL. Functionally-similar proteins showed large diversity in their temporal profiles, indicating complex mechanisms of regulation by CS. Clinical use of corticosteroid (CS) therapy is frequent and chronic. However, current knowledge on the proteome-level effects of CS in liver and

  9. Improved xenobiotic metabolism and reduced susceptibility to cancer in gluten-sensitive macaques upon introduction of a gluten-free diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Sestak

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A non-human primate (NHP model of gluten sensitivity was employed to study the gene perturbations associated with dietary gluten changes in small intestinal tissues from gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta.Stages of remission and relapse were accomplished in gluten-sensitive animals by administration of gluten-free (GFD and gluten-containing (GD diets, as described previously. Pin-head-sized biopsies, obtained non-invasively by pediatric endoscope from duodenum while on GFD or GD, were used for preparation of total RNA and gene profiling, using the commercial Rhesus Macaque Microarray (Agilent Technologies,targeting expression of over 20,000 genes.When compared with normal healthy control, gluten-sensitive macaques showed differential gene expressions induced by GD. While observed gene perturbations were classified into one of 12 overlapping categories--cancer, metabolism, digestive tract function, immune response, cell growth, signal transduction, autoimmunity, detoxification of xenobiotics, apoptosis, actin-collagen deposition, neuronal and unknown function--this study focused on cancer-related gene networks such as cytochrome P450 family (detoxification function and actin-collagen-matrix metalloproteinases (MMP genes.A loss of detoxification function paralleled with necessity to metabolize carcinogens was revealed in gluten-sensitive animals while on GD. An increase in cancer-promoting factors and a simultaneous decrease in cancer-preventing factors associated with altered expression of actin-collagen-MMP gene network were noted. In addition, gluten-sensitive macaques showed reduced number of differentially expressed genes including the cancer-associated ones upon withdrawal of dietary gluten. Taken together, these findings indicate potentially expanded utility of gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques in cancer research.

  10. Improved Xenobiotic Metabolism and Reduced Susceptibility to Cancer in Gluten-Sensitive Macaques upon Introduction of a Gluten-Free Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, Karol; Conroy, Lauren; Aye, Pyone P.; Mehra, Smriti; Doxiadis, Gaby G.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Background A non-human primate (NHP) model of gluten sensitivity was employed to study the gene perturbations associated with dietary gluten changes in small intestinal tissues from gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Methodology Stages of remission and relapse were accomplished in gluten-sensitive animals by administration of gluten-free (GFD) and gluten-containing (GD) diets, as described previously. Pin-head-sized biopsies, obtained non-invasively by pediatric endoscope from duodenum while on GFD or GD, were used for preparation of total RNA and gene profiling, using the commercial Rhesus Macaque Microarray (Agilent Technologies),targeting expression of over 20,000 genes. Principal Findings When compared with normal healthy control, gluten-sensitive macaques showed differential gene expressions induced by GD. While observed gene perturbations were classified into one of 12 overlapping categories - cancer, metabolism, digestive tract function, immune response, cell growth, signal transduction, autoimmunity, detoxification of xenobiotics, apoptosis, actin-collagen deposition, neuronal and unknown function - this study focused on cancer-related gene networks such as cytochrome P450 family (detoxification function) and actin-collagen-matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) genes. Conclusions/Significance A loss of detoxification function paralleled with necessity to metabolize carcinogens was revealed in gluten-sensitive animals while on GD. An increase in cancer-promoting factors and a simultaneous decrease in cancer-preventing factors associated with altered expression of actin-collagen-MMP gene network were noted. In addition, gluten-sensitive macaques showed reduced number of differentially expressed genes including the cancer-associated ones upon withdrawal of dietary gluten. Taken together, these findings indicate potentially expanded utility of gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques in cancer research. PMID:21533263

  11. In vitro metabolism of [14C]-toluene by human and rat liver microsomes and liver slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, D.E.; Moore, T.J.; Michener, S.R.; Powis, G.

    1990-01-01

    Toluene metabolites produced by liver microsomes from six human donors included benzylalcohol (Balc), benzaldehyde (Bald) and benzoic acid (Bacid). Microsomes from only one human donor metabolized toluene to p-cresol and o-cresol. Human liver microsomes also metabolized Balc to Bald. Balc metabolism required NADPH, was inhibited by carbon monoxide, and was decreased at a buffer pH of 10. Balc metabolism was not inhibited by ADP-ribose or sodium azide. These results suggest that cytochrome P450 is responsible for the in vitro metabolism of Balc by human liver microsomes. Toluene metabolites formed by human liver slices and released into the incubation media included hippuric acid, and Bacid. Cresols or cresol-conjugates were not detected in liver slice incubation media from any human donor. Toluene metabolism by human liver was compared to metabolism by comparable liver preparations from male Fischer F344 rats. Rates of toluene metabolism by human liver microsomes and liver slices were 9-fold and 1.3-fold greater than for rat liver, respectively. Covalent binding of toluene to human liver microsomes and liver slices was 21-fold and 4-fold greater than for comparable rat liver preparations. Covalent binding of toluene to human microsomes required NADPH, was significantly decreased by coincubation with 4 mM cysteine or 4 mM glutathione, and radioactivity associated with microsomes was decreased by subsequent digestion of microsomes with protease. These results suggest that toluene metabolism and covalent binding of toluene are underestimated if the male Fischer 344 rat is used as a model for human toluene metabolism

  12. Sox17 regulates liver lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Rommelaere

    Full Text Available Liver is a major regulator of lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting, a process involving PPARalpha activation. We recently showed that the Vnn1 gene is a PPARalpha target gene in liver and that release of the Vanin-1 pantetheinase in serum is a biomarker of PPARalpha activation. Here we set up a screen to identify new regulators of adaptation to fasting using the serum Vanin-1 as a marker of PPARalpha activation. Mutagenized mice were screened for low serum Vanin-1 expression. Functional interactions with PPARalpha were investigated by combining transcriptomic, biochemical and metabolic approaches. We characterized a new mutant mouse in which hepatic and serum expression of Vanin-1 is depressed. This mouse carries a mutation in the HMG domain of the Sox17 transcription factor. Mutant mice display a metabolic phenotype featuring lipid abnormalities and inefficient adaptation to fasting. Upon fasting, a fraction of the PPARα-driven transcriptional program is no longer induced and associated with impaired fatty acid oxidation. The transcriptional phenotype is partially observed in heterozygous Sox17+/- mice. In mutant mice, the fasting phenotype but not all transcriptomic signature is rescued by the administration of the PPARalpha agonist fenofibrate. These results identify a novel role for Sox17 in adult liver as a modulator of the metabolic adaptation to fasting.

  13. Yeast and mammalian metabolism continuous monitoring by using pressure recording as an assessment technique for xenobiotic agent effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Marziale; Ballerini, Monica; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Marelli, E.; Mazza, Francesca; Zabeo, Matteo

    2002-06-01

    Our work is devoted to the study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human lymphocytes cellular metabolism in order to develop a reference model to assess biological systems responses to chemical or physical agents exposure. CO2 variations inside test-tubes are measured by differential pressure sensors; pressure values are subsequently converted in voltage. The system allows to test up to 16 samples at the same time. Sampling manages up to 100 acquisitions per second. Values are recorded by a data acquisition card connected to a computer. This procedure leads to a standard curve (pressure variation versus time), typical of the cellular line, that describe cellular metabolism. The longest time lapse used is of 170 h. Different phases appear in this curve: an initial growth up to a maximum, followed by a decrement that leads to a typical depression (pressure value inside the test-tubes is lower than the initial one) after about 35 h from the beginning of yeast cells. The curve is reproducible within an experimental error of 4%. The analysis of many samples and the low cost of the devices allow a good statistical significance of the data. In particular as a test we will compare two sterilizing agents effects: UV radiation and amuchina.

  14. Effects of chlorinated drinking water on the xenobiotic metabolism in Cyprinus carpio treated with samples from two Italian municipal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Silvia; Canistro, Donatella; Vivarelli, Fabio; Paolini, Moreno

    2016-09-01

    Drinking water (DW) disinfection represents a milestone of the past century, thanks to its efficacy in the reduction of risks of epidemic forms by water micro-organisms. Nevertheless, such process generates disinfection by-products (DBPs), some of which are genotoxic both in animals and in humans and carcinogenic in animals. At present, chlorination is one of the most employed strategies but the toxicological effects of several classes of DBPs are unknown. In this investigation, a multidisciplinary approach foreseeing the chemical analysis of chlorinated DW samples and the study of its effects on mixed function oxidases (MFOs) belonging to the superfamily of cytochrome P450-linked monooxygenases of Cyprinus carpio hepatopancreas, was employed. The experimental samples derived from aquifers of two Italian towns (plant 1, river water and plant 2, spring water) were obtained immediately after the disinfection (A) and along the network (R1). Animals treated with plant 1 DW-processed fractions showed a general CYP-associated MFO induction. By contrast, in plant 2, a complex modulation pattern was achieved, with a general up-regulation for the point A and a marked MFO inactivation in the R1 group, particularly for the testosterone metabolism. Together, the toxicity and co-carcinogenicity (i.e. unremitting over-generation of free radicals and increased bioactivation capability) of DW linked to the recorded metabolic manipulation, suggests that a prolonged exposure to chlorine-derived disinfectants may produce adverse health effects.

  15. The metabolic effects of diuron in the rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Simões, Mellina; Bracht, Lívia; Parizotto, Angela Valderrama; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2017-09-01

    A systematic study on the effects of diuron on the hepatic metabolism was conducted with emphasis on parameters linked to energy metabolism. The experimental system was the isolated perfused rat liver. The results demonstrate that diuron inhibited biosynthesis (gluconeogenesis) and ammonia detoxification, which are dependent of ATP generated within the mitochondria. Conversely, it stimulated glycolysis and fructolysis, which are compensatory phenomena for an inhibited mitochondrial ATP generation. Furthermore, diuron diminished the cellular ATP content under conditions where the mitochondrial respiratory chain was the only source of this compound. Besides the lack of circulating glucose due to gluconeogenesis inhibition, one can expect metabolic acidosis due to excess lactate production, impairment of ammonia detoxification and cell damage due to a deficient maintenance of its homeostasis. Some of the general signs of toxicity that were observed in diuron-treated rats can be attributed, partly at least, to the effects of the herbicide on energy metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in human prostate and in prostate epithelial cells (PECs) derived from primary cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Buheissi, S Z; Cole, K J; Hewer, A; Kumar, V; Bryan, R L; Hudson, D L; Patel, H R; Nathan, S; Miller, R A; Phillips, D H

    2006-06-01

    Dietary heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are carcinogenic in rodent prostate requiring activation by enzymes such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) and N-acetyltransferase (NAT). We investigated by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry the expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and NAT1 in human prostate and in prostate epithelial cells (PECs) derived from primary cultures and tested their ability to activate the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and its N-hydroxy metabolite (N-OH-IQ) to DNA-damaging moieties. Western blotting identified CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and NAT1. Immunohistochemistry localized NAT1 to the cytoplasm of PECs. Inter-individual variation was observed in the expression levels of CYP1A1, 1A2, and NAT1 (11, 75, and 35-fold, respectively). PECs expressed CYP1A1 and NAT1 but not CYP1A2. When incubated with IQ or N-OH-IQ, PECs formed DNA adducts indicating their ability to metabolically activate these compounds. Prostate cells possess the capacity to activate dietary carcinogens. PECs may provide a useful model system to study their role in prostate carcinogenesis.

  17. Implication of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme gene (CYP2E1, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, mEH and NAT2 Polymorphisms in Breast Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabbouj Sallouha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzymes (XMEs contribute to the detoxification of numerous cancer therapy-induced products. This study investigated the susceptibility and prognostic implications of the CYP2E1, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, mEH and NAT2 gene polymorphisms in breast carcinoma patients. Methods The authors used polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme digestion to characterize the variation of the CYP2E1, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, mEH and NAT2 gene in a total of 560 unrelated subjects (246 controls and 314 patients. Results The mEH (C/C mutant and the NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes were significantly associated with breast carcinoma risk (p = 0.02; p = 0.01, respectively. For NAT2 the association was more pronounced among postmenopausal patients (p = 0.006. A significant association was found between CYP2D6 (G/G wild type and breast carcinoma risk only in postmenopausal patients (p = 0.04. Association studies of genetic markers with the rates of breast carcinoma specific overall survival (OVS and the disease-free survival (DFS revealed among all breast carcinoma patients no association to DFS but significant differences in OVS only with the mEH gene polymorphisms (p = 0.02. In addition, the mEH wild genotype showed a significant association with decreased OVS in patients with axillary lymph node-negative patients (p = 0.03 and with decreasesd DFS in patients with axillary lymph node-positive patients (p = 0.001. However, the NAT2 intermediate acetylator genotype was associated with decreased DFS in axillary lymph node-negative patients. Conclusion The present study may prove that polymorphisms of some XME genes may predict the onset of breast carcinoma as well as survival after treatment.

  18. Effect of thiabendazole on some rat hepatic xenobiotic metabolising enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, R.J.; Scott, M.P.; Walters, D.G.; Stierum, R.H.; Groten, J.P.; Meredith, C.; Lake, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of thiabendazole (TB) on some rat hepatic xenobiotic metabolising enzymes has been investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed control diet or diets containing 102-5188 ppm TB for 28 days. As a positive control for induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolism, rats were also fed diets

  19. Adrenergic Metabolic and Hemodynamic Effects of Octopamine in the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelar Bracht

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The fruit extracts of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange are traditionally used as weight-loss products and as appetite suppressants. A component of these extracts is octopamine, which is an adrenergic agent. Weight-loss and adrenergic actions are always related to metabolic changes and this work was designed to investigate a possible action of octopamine on liver metabolism. The isolated perfused rat liver was used to measure catabolic and anabolic pathways and hemodynamics. Octopamine increased glycogenolysis, glycolysis, oxygen uptake, gluconeogenesis and the portal perfusion pressure. Octopamine also accelerated the oxidation of exogenous fatty acids (octanoate and oleate, as revealed by the increase in 14CO2 production derived from 14C labeled precursors. The changes in glycogenolysis, oxygen uptake and perfusion pressure were almost completely abolished by α1-adrenergic antagonists. The same changes were partly sensitive to the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol. It can be concluded that octopamine accelerates both catabolic and anabolic processes in the liver via adrenergic stimulation. Acceleration of oxygen uptake under substrate-free perfusion conditions also means acceleration of the oxidation of endogenous fatty acids, which are derived from lipolysis. All these effects are compatible with an overall stimulating effect of octopamine on metabolism, which is compatible with its reported weight-loss effects in experimental animals.

  20. The significance of liver in metabolism of plutonium 239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netchev, Christo.

    1977-01-01

    Plutonium 239 has an important toxicological significance and is widely used in the nuclear industry which makes the study of its metabolism in the organism appear of substantial interest. The role of the liver in the distribution of radionuclide and its barrier capabilities, determining to a certain extent the back transport of the isotope from the blood plasma into the gut is studied. The storage of Plutonium 239 in the organ and its reexcretion by way of the gull is quantitatively demonstrated. This question is related to the exact determination of the coefficient of absorption of the radioisotope in the digestive tract. The radionuclide is inserted into organism as PuCl 3 directly into vein jugularis and vein portae. The peculiarities of its distribution in the liver by the two ways of introduction as well as the essential differences in the radioactivity of the products of excretion by portal application are described. The mechanism of the storage of the radioisotope in the organ is explained to a great extent with its physical and chemical condition in the liver tissue. Plutonium 239 is found in the liver completely as a complex compound with the tissue proteins, the combining with globulines predominating. The dynamics of exchange of the radionuclide in the organ is determined mainly by its complex combination with the globulins. The part of nuclide connected with the other protein fractions of liver is not significant and hence they do not much influence kinetics in the organ

  1. LC-MS-BASED METABOLOMICS OF XENOBIOTIC-INDUCED TOXICITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenobiotic exposure, especially high-dose or repeated exposure of xenobiotics, can elicit detrimental effects on biological systems through diverse mechanisms. Changes in metabolic systems, including formation of reactive metabolites and disruption of endogenous metabolism, are not only the common consequences of toxic xenobiotic exposure, but in many cases are the major causes behind development of xenobiotic-induced toxicities (XIT. Therefore, examining the metabolic events associated with XIT generates mechanistic insights into the initiation and progression of XIT, and provides guidance for prevention and treatment. Traditional bioanalytical platforms that target only a few suspected metabolites are capable of validating the expected outcomes of xenobiotic exposure. However, these approaches lack the capacity to define global changes and to identify unexpected events in the metabolic system. Recent developments in high-throughput metabolomics have dramatically expanded the scope and potential of metabolite analysis. Among all analytical techniques adopted for metabolomics, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS has been most widely used for metabolomic investigations of XIT due to its versatility and sensitivity in metabolite analysis. In this review, technical platform of LC-MS-based metabolomics, including experimental model, sample preparation, instrumentation, and data analysis, are discussed. Applications of LC-MS-based metabolomics in exploratory and hypothesis-driven investigations of XIT are illustrated by case studies of xenobiotic metabolism and endogenous metabolism associated with xenobiotic exposure.

  2. Metabolic Disturbances in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liver disease results in complex pathophysiologic disturbances affecting nutrient digestion, absorption, distribution, storage, and use. This article aimed to present a classification of metabolic disturbances in chronic liver disease in children?   Materials and Methods: In this review study databases including proquest, pubmedcentral, scincedirect, ovid, medlineplus were been searched with keyword words such as” chronic liver disease"  ” metabolic disorder””children” between 1999 to 2014. Finally, 8 related articles have been found.   Results: Metabolic disorder in this population could be categorized in four set: 1carbohydrates, 2proteins,3 fats and 4vitamins. 1 Carbohydrates: Children with CLD are at increased risk for fasting hypoglycemia, because the capacity for glycogen storage and gluconeogenesis is reduced as a result of abnormal hepatocyte function and loss of hepatocyte mass. 2 Proteins: The liver’s capacity for plasma protein synthesis is impaired by reduced substrate availability, impaired hepatocyte function, and increased catabolism. This results in hypoalbuminemia, leading to peripheral edema and contributing to ascites. Reduced synthesis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and its binding protein IGF-BP3 by the chronically diseased liver results in growth hormone resistance and may contribute to the poor growth observed in these children. 3 Fats: There is increased fat oxidation in children with end-stage liver disease in the fed and fasting states compared with controls, which is probably related to reduced carbohydrate availability. The increased lipolysis results in a decrease in fat stores, which may not be easily replenished in the setting of the fat malabsorption that accompanies cholestasis. Reduced bile delivery to the gut results in impaired fat emulsification, and hence digestion. The products of fat digestion are also poorly absorbed, because bile is also required for micelle formation

  3. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Prevalence, Influence on Age and Sex, and Relationship with Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Yun Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Fatty liver can be considered as the hepatic consequence of metabolic syndrome, specifically IR. There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and fatty liver among the elderly population. Metabolic disorders are closely related to fatty liver; moreover, fatty liver appears to be a good predictor for the clustering of risk factors for metabolic syndrome.

  4. A proteomic-based characterization of liver metabolism in dairy cows and young pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersen, Henrik

    This thesis deals with studies on liver metabolism in cows and pigs. Proteome analysis was used to quantify a large number of proteins involved in metabolic pathways. In cows, the objective was to characterize differences in the liver proteome between early lactation dairy cows with low or high...... liver fat content and suggest potential blood-based biomarkers for early detection of fatty liver to substantiate prevention strategies. Our results show that several proteins in liver metabolic pathways are affected by liver fat content and that blood aspartate aminotransferase, ß...

  5. Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor gene expression in liver cells is modulated by Ets-1 in synchrony with transcription factors Pax5, LEF-1 and c-jun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Sangeeta; Saradhi, Mallampati; Rana, Manjul; Chatterjee, Swagata [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Aumercier, Marc [IRI, CNRS USR 3078, Université de Lille-Nord de France, Parc CNRS de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley, BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Tyagi, Rakesh K., E-mail: rktyagi@yahoo.com [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear receptor PXR is predominantly expressed in liver and intestine. Expression of PXR is observed to be dysregulated in various metabolic disorders indicating its involvement in disease development. However, information available on mechanisms of PXR self-regulation is fragmentary. The present investigation identifies some of the regulatory elements responsible for its tight regulation and low cellular expression. Here, we report that the PXR-promoter is a target for some key transcription factors like PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun. Interestingly, we observed that PXR-promoter responsiveness to Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, is considerably enhanced by Ets transcription factors (PU.1 and Ets-1). Co-transfection of cells with Ets-1, LEF-1 and c-Jun increased PXR-promoter activity by 5-fold and also induced expression of endogenous human PXR. Site-directed mutagenesis and transfection studies revealed that two Ets binding sites and two of the three LEF binding sites in the PXR-promoter are functional and have a positive effect on PXR transcription. Results suggest that expression of Ets family members, in conjunction with Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, lead to coordinated up-regulation of PXR gene transcription. Insights obtained on the regulation of PXR gene have relevance in offering important cues towards normal functioning as well as development of several metabolic disorders via PXR signaling. - Highlights: • The study identified cis-regulatory elements in the nuclear receptor PXR promoter. • Several trans-acting factors modulating the PXR-promoter have been identified. • PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1, c-Jun, LyF-VI and NF-1 act as modulators of the PXR-promoter. • Ets-1 in conjunction with LEF-1 and c-Jun exhibit 5-fold activation of the PXR-promoter. • Insights into PXR-regulation have relevance in normal and pathological conditions.

  6. Actions of juglone on energy metabolism in the rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saling, Simoni Cristina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Mito, Márcio Shigueaki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2011-01-01

    Juglone is a phenolic compound used in popular medicine as a phytotherapic to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, it also acts as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated liver mitochondria and, thus, may interfere with the hepatic energy metabolism. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of juglone on several metabolic parameters in the isolated perfused rat liver. Juglone, in the concentration range of 5 to 50 μM, stimulated glycogenolysis, glycolysis and oxygen uptake. Gluconeogenesis from both lactate and alanine was inhibited with half-maximal effects at the concentrations of 14.9 and 15.7 μM, respectively. The overall alanine transformation was increased by juglone, as indicated by the stimulated release of ammonia, urea, L-glutamate, lactate and pyruvate. A great increase (9-fold) in the tissue content of α-ketoglutarate was found, without a similar change in the L-glutamate content. The tissue contents of ATP were decreased, but those of ADP and AMP were increased. Experiments with isolated mitochondria fully confirmed previous notions about the uncoupling action of juglone. It can be concluded that juglone is active on metabolism at relatively low concentrations. In this particular it resembles more closely the classical uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. Ingestion of high doses of juglone, thus, presents the same risks as the ingestion of 2,4-dinitrophenol which comprise excessive compromising of ATP production, hyperthermia and even death. Low doses, i.e., moderate consumption of natural products containing juglone, however, could be beneficial to health if one considers recent reports about the consequences of chronic mild uncoupling. -- Highlights: ► We investigated how juglone acts on liver metabolism. ► The actions on hepatic gluconeogenesis, glycolysis and ureogenesis. ► Juglone stimulates glycolysis and ureagenesis and inhibits gluconeogenesis. ► The cellular ATP content is diminished. ► Juglone can

  7. Diet and liver apoptosis in rats: a particular metabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Maria Emilia Lopes; Xavier, Analucia Rampazzo; Azeredo, Vilma Blondet

    2017-03-30

    Various studies have indicated an association between modifi cation in dietary macronutrient composition and liver apoptosis. To explain how changes in metabolic pathways associated with a high-protein, high-fat, and low-carbohydrate diet causes liver apoptosis. Two groups of rats were compared. An experimental diet group (n = 8) using a high-protein (59.46%), high-fat (31.77%), and low-carbohydrate (8.77%) diet versus a control one (n = 9) with American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-93-M diet. Animals were sacrificed after eight weeks, the adipose tissue weighed, the liver removed for flow cytometry analysis, and blood collected to measure glucose, insulin, glucagon, IL-6, TNF, triglycerides, malondialdehyde, and β-hydroxybutyrate. Statistical analysis was carried out using the unpaired and parametric Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coeffi ents. Significance was set at p triglycerides lower levels compared with the control group. The results show a positive and significant correlation between the percentage of nonviable hepatocytes and malondialdehyde levels (p = 0.0217) and a statistically significant negative correlation with triglycerides levels (p = 0.006). Results suggest that plasmatic malondialdehyde and triglyceride levels are probably good predictors of liver damage associated with an experimental low-carbohydrate diet in rats.

  8. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Genetic networks of liver metabolism revealed by integration of metabolic and transcriptional profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine T Ferrara

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Although numerous quantitative trait loci (QTL influencing disease-related phenotypes have been detected through gene mapping and positional cloning, identification of the individual gene(s and molecular pathways leading to those phenotypes is often elusive. One way to improve understanding of genetic architecture is to classify phenotypes in greater depth by including transcriptional and metabolic profiling. In the current study, we have generated and analyzed mRNA expression and metabolic profiles in liver samples obtained in an F2 intercross between the diabetes-resistant C57BL/6 leptin(ob/ob and the diabetes-susceptible BTBR leptin(ob/ob mouse strains. This cross, which segregates for genotype and physiological traits, was previously used to identify several diabetes-related QTL. Our current investigation includes microarray analysis of over 40,000 probe sets, plus quantitative mass spectrometry-based measurements of sixty-seven intermediary metabolites in three different classes (amino acids, organic acids, and acyl-carnitines. We show that liver metabolites map to distinct genetic regions, thereby indicating that tissue metabolites are heritable. We also demonstrate that genomic analysis can be integrated with liver mRNA expression and metabolite profiling data to construct causal networks for control of specific metabolic processes in liver. As a proof of principle of the practical significance of this integrative approach, we illustrate the construction of a specific causal network that links gene expression and metabolic changes in the context of glutamate metabolism, and demonstrate its validity by showing that genes in the network respond to changes in glutamine and glutamate availability. Thus, the methods described here have the potential to reveal regulatory networks that contribute to chronic, complex, and highly prevalent diseases and conditions such as obesity and diabetes.

  10. Fatty Liver Index and Lipid Accumulation Product Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects without Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Lung Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fatty liver index (FLI and lipid accumulation product (LAP are indexes originally designed to assess the risk of fatty liver and cardiovascular disease, respectively. Both indexes have been proven to be reliable markers of subsequent metabolic syndrome; however, their ability to predict metabolic syndrome in subjects without fatty liver disease has not been clarified. Methods. We enrolled consecutive subjects who received health check-up services at Taipei Veterans General Hospital from 2002 to 2009. Fatty liver disease was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography. The ability of the FLI and LAP to predict metabolic syndrome was assessed by analyzing the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC curve. Results. Male sex was strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, and the LAP and FLI were better than other variables to predict metabolic syndrome among the 29,797 subjects. Both indexes were also better than other variables to detect metabolic syndrome in subjects without fatty liver disease (AUROC: 0.871 and 0.879, resp., and the predictive power was greater among women. Conclusion. Metabolic syndrome increases the cardiovascular disease risk. The FLI and LAP could be used to recognize the syndrome in both subjects with and without fatty liver disease who require lifestyle modifications and counseling.

  11. Methods of measuring metabolism during surgery in humans: focus on the liver-brain relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battezzati, Alberto; Bertoli, Simona

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to review recent advances in setting methods and models for measuring metabolism during surgery in humans. Surgery, especially solid organ transplantation, may offer unique experimental models in which it is ethically acceptable to gain information on difficult problems of amino acid and protein metabolism. Two areas are reviewed: the metabolic study of the anhepatic phase during liver transplantation and brain microdialysis during cerebral surgery. The first model offers an innovative approach to understand the relative role of liver and extrahepatic organs in gluconeogenesis, and to evaluate whether other organs can perform functions believed to be exclusively or almost exclusively performed by the liver. The second model offers an insight to intracerebral metabolism that is closely bound to that of the liver. The recent advances in metabolic research during surgery provide knowledge immediately useful for perioperative patient management and for a better control of surgical stress. The studies during the anhepatic phase of liver transplantation have showed that gluconeogenesis and glutamine metabolism are very active processes outside the liver. One of the critical organs for extrahepatic glutamine metabolism is the brain. Microdialysis studies helped to prove that in humans there is an intense trafficking of glutamine, glutamate and alanine among neurons and astrocytes. This delicate network is influenced by systemic amino acid metabolism. The metabolic dialogue between the liver and the brain is beginning to be understood in this light in order to explain the metabolic events of brain damage during liver failure.

  12. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids: Metabolic Activation Pathways Leading to Liver Tumor Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peter P

    2017-01-17

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) and PA N-oxides are a class of phytochemical carcinogens contained in over 6000 plant species spread around the world. It has been estimated that approximately half of the 660 PAs and PA N-oxides that have been characterized are cytotoxic, genotoxic, and tumorigenic. It was recently determined that a genotoxic mechanism of liver tumor initiation mediated by PA-derived DNA adducts is a common metabolic activation pathway of a number of PAs. We proposed this set of PA-derived DNA adducts could be a common biological biomarker of PA exposure and a potential biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor formation. We have also found that several reactive secondary pyrrolic metabolites can dissociate and interconvert to other secondary pyrrolic metabolites, resulting in the formation of the same exogenous DNA adducts. This present perspective reports the current progress on these new findings and proposes future research needed for obtaining a greater understanding of the role of this activation pathway and validating the use of this set of PA-derived DNA adducts as a biological biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor initiation.

  13. Metabolism of the polycyclic musk galaxolide and its interference with endogenous and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Denise; Dimastrogiovanni, Giorgio; Blázquez, Mercedes; Porte, Cinta

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the metabolism and mode of action of galaxolide (HHCB) in the European sea bass -Dicentrarchus labrax- following a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg HHCB/kg body weight. In addition, a group of fish was injected with 50 mg/kg of ketoconazole (KCZ), a fungicide that is known to interfere with different Cyp isoenzymes. HHCB was actively metabolised by sea bass and acted as a weak inhibitor of the synthesis of oxyandrogens in gonads of male fish. Both, HHCB and a hydroxylated metabolite were detected in bile. The fungicide ketoconazole was a strong inhibitor of Cyp11β and Cyp3a-catalyzed activities. The work contributes to the better understanding of the impact of synthetic musks on fish and proposes the determination of HHCB and/or its hydroxylated metabolite in bile as a tool to assess environmental exposure in wild fish. -- Highlights: ► The metabolism and mode of action of galaxolide has been investigated in sea bass. ► A hydroxylated metabolite was for the first time identified in fish bile. ► EROD and BCOD activities were not altered by galaxolide exposure. ► Galaxolide decreased moderately the synthesis of oxyandrogens in testes. -- HHCB is actively metabolised by sea bass and acts as a weak inhibitor of the synthesis of oxyandrogens in gonads of male fish

  14. Actions of juglone on energy metabolism in the rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saling, Simoni Cristina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Mito, Marcio Shigueaki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar, E-mail: adebracht@uol.com.br

    2011-12-15

    Juglone is a phenolic compound used in popular medicine as a phytotherapic to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, it also acts as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated liver mitochondria and, thus, may interfere with the hepatic energy metabolism. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of juglone on several metabolic parameters in the isolated perfused rat liver. Juglone, in the concentration range of 5 to 50 {mu}M, stimulated glycogenolysis, glycolysis and oxygen uptake. Gluconeogenesis from both lactate and alanine was inhibited with half-maximal effects at the concentrations of 14.9 and 15.7 {mu}M, respectively. The overall alanine transformation was increased by juglone, as indicated by the stimulated release of ammonia, urea, L-glutamate, lactate and pyruvate. A great increase (9-fold) in the tissue content of {alpha}-ketoglutarate was found, without a similar change in the L-glutamate content. The tissue contents of ATP were decreased, but those of ADP and AMP were increased. Experiments with isolated mitochondria fully confirmed previous notions about the uncoupling action of juglone. It can be concluded that juglone is active on metabolism at relatively low concentrations. In this particular it resembles more closely the classical uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. Ingestion of high doses of juglone, thus, presents the same risks as the ingestion of 2,4-dinitrophenol which comprise excessive compromising of ATP production, hyperthermia and even death. Low doses, i.e., moderate consumption of natural products containing juglone, however, could be beneficial to health if one considers recent reports about the consequences of chronic mild uncoupling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated how juglone acts on liver metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The actions on hepatic gluconeogenesis, glycolysis and ureogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Juglone stimulates glycolysis and ureagenesis and

  15. Experimental studies on the in vivo disposition and metabolism of toxic oil syndrome xenobiotics using dual-labelled fatty acid anilides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiguez Farre, E.; Vera, N. de; Cristofol, R.M.; Planas, A.; Camon, L.

    1986-01-01

    The outbreak of mass poisoning affecting more than 20000 people in Spain in 1981, has been related to the consumption of adulterated rapesseed oil containing fatty acid anilides (FAA). The aim of this study was to define the biological kinetics and metabolism of (ring-U- 3 H)- or (ring-U 3 H, carboxyl- 14 C)-oleic and linoleic acid anilides (OA and LA), given intragastrically to mice. Nearly 60% of OA and 54% of LA were absorbed mainly via the portal vein. The remaining fraction was detected in 24 h faeces mainly as the parent compound. A fraction of radiotracer was absorbed via the lymphatic system. Computer-fitted time activity curves showed different tissue radiotracer uptake followed by slow monoexponential elimination phase for both FAA. The highest retention was exhibited by spleen, lung and thymus. Anilide ring tritium was excreted mainly in the urine, where only small amounts of the carboxyl- 14 C -label were detected. TLC autoradiography of urine showed the same metabolic pattern for both OA and LA. About 50% of hydrolyzed was identified by mass spectrometry as true paracetamol. These results indicate that FAA were hydrolized by a first-pass effect mainly in the liver or in the intestinal wall. The major metabolites of FAA observed in our studies were the same as those reported to be present in urine and tissues of TOS patients. (Author)

  16. Osteopontin regulates the cross-talk between phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol metabolism in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez-Garcia, Maitane; Gomez-Santos, Beatriz; Buqué, Xabier; García-Rodriguez, Juan L; Romero, Marta R; Marin, Jose J G; Arteta, Beatriz; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Castaño, Luis; Syn, Wing-Kin; Fresnedo, Olatz; Aspichueta, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is involved in different liver pathologies in which metabolic dysregulation is a hallmark. Here, we investigated whether OPN could alter liver, and more specifically hepatocyte, lipid metabolism and the mechanism involved. In mice, lack of OPN enhanced cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) levels and promoted loss of phosphatidylcholine (PC) content in liver; in vivo treatment with recombinant (r)OPN caused opposite effects. rOPN directly decreased CYP7A1 levels through activation of focal adhesion kinase-AKT signaling in hepatocytes. PC content was also decreased in OPN-deficient (OPN-KO) hepatocytes in which de novo FA and PC synthesis was lower, whereas cholesterol (CHOL) synthesis was higher, than in WT hepatocytes. In vivo inhibition of cholesterogenesis normalized liver PC content in OPN-KO mice, demonstrating that OPN regulates the cross-talk between liver CHOL and PC metabolism. Matched liver and serum samples showed a positive correlation between serum OPN levels and liver PC and CHOL concentration in nonobese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver. In conclusion, OPN regulates CYP7A1 levels and the metabolic fate of liver acetyl-CoA as a result of CHOL and PC metabolism interplay. The results suggest that CYP7A1 is a main axis and that serum OPN could disrupt liver PC and CHOL metabolism, contributing to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression in nonobese patients.

  17. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Revealed by Liver Lipidomics

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    Zhao Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to characterize the disorder of lipid metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. HCC is a worldwide disease. The research into the disorder of lipid metabolism in HCC is very limited. Study of lipid metabolism in liver cancer tissue may have the potential to provide new insight into HCC mechanisms. Methods: A lipidomics study of HCC based on Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-electronic spray ionization-QTOF mass spectrometer (UPLC-ESI-QTOF MS and Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (MALDI-FTICR MS was performed. Results: Triacylglycerols (TAGs with the number of double bond (DB > 2 (except 56:5 and 56:4 TAG were significantly down-regulated; conversely, others (except 52:2 TAG were greatly up-regulated in HCC tissues. Moreover, the more serious the disease was, the higher the saturated TAG concentration and the lower the polyunsaturated TAG concentration were in HCC tissues. The phosphatidylcholine (PC, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and phosphatidylinositol (PI were altered in a certain way. Sphingomyelin (SM was up-regulated and ceramide (Cer were down-regulated in HCC tissues. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first such report showing a unique trend of TAG, PC, PE and PI. The use of polyunsaturated fatty acids, like eicosapentanoic and docosahexanoic acid, as supplementation, proposed for the treatment of Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, may also be effective for the treatment of HCC.

  18. Dysfunctional Muscle and Liver Glycogen Metabolism in mdx Dystrophic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, David I.; Lau, Xianzhong; Flores, Marcelo; Trieu, Jennifer; Gehrig, Stefan M.; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Lynch, Gordon S.; Koopman, René

    2014-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, genetic muscle wasting disorder characterised by progressive muscle weakness. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (dmd) gene resulting in very low levels or a complete absence of the dystrophin protein, a key structural element of muscle fibres which is responsible for the proper transmission of force. In the absence of dystrophin, muscle fibres become damaged easily during contraction resulting in their degeneration. DMD patients and mdx mice (an animal model of DMD) exhibit altered metabolic disturbances that cannot be attributed to the loss of dystrophin directly. We tested the hypothesis that glycogen metabolism is defective in mdx dystrophic mice. Results Dystrophic mdx mice had increased skeletal muscle glycogen (79%, (Pglycogen synthesis is initiated by glycogenin, the expression of which was increased by 50% in mdx mice (PGlycogen synthase activity was 12% higher (Pglycogen branching enzyme activity was 70% lower (Pglycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 62% lower activity (Pglycogen debranching enzyme expression was 50% higher (Pglycogen (Pglycogen metabolism in mdx mice identified reduced glycogenin protein expression (46% less; Pglycogen but reduced amounts of liver glycogen. PMID:24626262

  19. Liver fat content in type 2 diabetes: relationship with hepatic perfusion and substrate metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijzewijk, Luuk J.; van der Meer, Rutger W.; Lubberink, Mark; Lamb, Hildo J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; de Roos, Albert; Twisk, Jos W.; Heine, Robert J.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Diamant, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is common in type 2 diabetes. It is causally linked to the features of the metabolic syndrome, liver cirrhosis, and cardiovascular disease. Experimental data have indicated that increased liver fat may impair hepatic perfusion and metabolism. The aim of the current study was to

  20. Metabolic adaptations in models of fatty liver disease : Of mice and math

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    The increasing incidence of overweight is accompanied by a plethora of medical symptoms together called the metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, characterized by persistent storage of lipids in the liver, is regarded as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome. An imbalance

  1. Assessment of metabolic stability using the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9 fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard protocols are given for assessing metabolic stability in rainbow trout using the liver S9 fraction. These protocols describe the isolation of S9 fractions from trout livers, evaluation of metabolic stability using a substrate depletion approach, and expression of the res...

  2. [Effect of acute biliary pancreatitis on liver metabolism of phenazone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartleb, M; Nowak, A; Nowakowska-Duława, E; Mańczyk, I; Becker, A; Kacperek, T

    1990-03-01

    In 22 patients with acute pancreatitis caused by biliary calculi and 9 healthy controls the rate of hepatic elimination of phenazone was measured. The aim of the study was evaluation of the oxidative-detoxicating action of the liver in this disease in relation to its severity. In pancreatitis patients the half-time (T2) of phenazone was significantly (p less than 0.01 longer than in healthy subjects (23.6 +/- 10.5 vs 13.2 +/- 7.2 hrs). The T2 of phenazone was not correlated with the concentrations of transaminases, bilirubin and prothrombin, but was correlated positively with the concentration of hepatic lactic dehydrogenase (p less than 0.001). In the initial stage of pancreatitis the T2 of phenazone was without prognostic significance and showed no agreement with Ranson's clinical-laboratory classification of the severity of the disease. The degree of impairment of the hepatic metabolism of phenazone measured with the percent difference between T2 of phenazone in both tests was significantly (p less than 0.05) greater in the group of patients with complications than in those without pancreatitis complications (70.7 +/- 64.4% vs 21.4 +/- 16.2%). Biliary pancreatitis impairs the oxidative-reductive function of the liver proportionally to the degree of hepatic lactic dehydrogenase in the serum. Evaluation of the rate of hepatic elimination of phenazone in the initial stage of this pancreatitis was without prognostic importance for the severity of the disease.

  3. Liver, but not muscle, has an entrainable metabolic memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Song Chen

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia in the hospitalized setting is common, especially in patients that receive nutritional support either continuously or intermittently. As the liver and muscle are the major sites of glucose disposal, we hypothesized their metabolic adaptations are sensitive to the pattern of nutrient delivery. Chronically catheterized, well-controlled depancreatized dogs were placed on one of three isocaloric diets: regular chow diet once daily (Chow or a simple nutrient diet (ND that was given either once daily (ND-4 or infused continuously (ND-C. Intraportal insulin was infused to maintain euglycemia. After 5 days net hepatic (NHGU and muscle (MGU glucose uptake and oxidation were assessed at euglycemia (120 mg/dl and hyperglycemia (200 mg/dl in the presence of basal insulin. While hyperglycemia increased both NHGU and MGU in Chow, NHGU was amplified in both groups receiving ND. The increase was associated with enhanced activation of glycogen synthase, glucose oxidation and suppression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK-4. Accelerated glucose-dependent muscle glucose uptake was only evident with ND-C. This was associated with a decrease in PDK-4 expression and an increase in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation. Interestingly, ND-C markedly increased hepatic FGF-21 expression. Thus, augmentation of carbohydrate disposal in the liver, as opposed to the muscle, is not dependent on the pattern of nutrient delivery.

  4. Application of a novel regulatable Cre recombinase system to define the role of liver and gut metabolism in drug oral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Colin J; McLaughlin, Lesley A; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Taylor, Malcolm; Gilbert, Ian; McLaren, Aileen W; Wolf, C Roland

    2015-02-01

    The relative contribution of hepatic compared with intestinal oxidative metabolism is a crucial factor in drug oral bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy. Oxidative metabolism is mediated by the cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase system to which cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) is the essential electron donor. In order to study the relative importance of these pathways in drug disposition, we have generated a novel mouse line where Cre recombinase is driven off the endogenous Cyp1a1 gene promoter; this line was then crossed on to a floxed POR mouse. A 40 mg/kg dose of the Cyp1a1 inducer 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) eliminated POR expression in both liver and small intestine, whereas treatment at 4 mg/kg led to a more targeted deletion in the liver. Using this approach, we have studied the pharmacokinetics of three probe drugs--paroxetine, midazolam, nelfinavir--and show that intestinal metabolism is a determinant of oral bioavailability for the two latter compounds. The Endogenous Reductase Locus (ERL) mouse represents a significant advance on previous POR deletion models as it allows direct comparison of hepatic and intestinal effects on drug and xenobiotic clearance using lower doses of a single Cre inducing agent, and in addition minimizes any cytotoxic effects, which may compromise interpretation of the experimental data.

  5. Approaching Resonant Absorption of Environmental Xenobiotics Harmonic Oscillation by Linear Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia A. Bulucea

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several decades, it has become increasingly accepted that the term xenobiotic relates to environmental impact, since environmental xenobiotics are understood to be substances foreign to a biological system, which did not exist in nature before their synthesis by humans. In this context, xenobiotics are persistent pollutants such as dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls, as well as plastics and pesticides. Dangerous and unstable situations can result from the presence of environmental xenobiotics since their harmful effects on humans and ecosystems are often unpredictable. For instance, the immune system is extremely vulnerable and sensitive to modulation by environmental xenobitics. Various experimental assays could be performed to ascertain the immunotoxic potential of environmental xenobiotics, taking into account genetic factors, the route of xenobiotic penetration, and the amount and duration of exposure, as well as the wave shape of the xenobiotic. In this paper, we propose an approach for the analysis of xenobiotic metabolism using mathematical models and corresponding methods. This study focuses on a pattern depicting mathematically modeled processes of resonant absorption of a xenobiotic harmonic oscillation by an organism modulated as an absorbing oscillator structure. We represent the xenobiotic concentration degree through a spatial concentration vector, and we model and simulate the oscillating regime of environmental xenobiotic absorption. It is anticipated that the results could be used to facilitate the assessment of the processes of environmental xenobiotic absorption, distribution, biotransformation and removal within the framework of compartmental analysis, by establishing appropriate mathematical models and simulations.

  6. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein alters liver and plasma triglyceride metabolism through two liver networks in female mice[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Brian T.; Le, Thao D.; Zhu, Lin; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Stafford, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma TGs increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women. Estrogen treatment raises plasma TGs in women, but molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we explore the role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in the regulation of TG metabolism in female mice, which naturally lack CETP. In transgenic CETP females, acute estrogen treatment raised plasma TGs 50%, increased TG production, and increased expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis, but not in nontransgenic littermate females. In CETP females, estrogen enhanced expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), a nuclear receptor regulating VLDL production. Deletion of liver SHP prevented increases in TG production and expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis in CETP mice with estrogen treatment. We also examined whether CETP expression had effects on TG metabolism independent of estrogen treatment. CETP increased liver β-oxidation and reduced liver TG content by 60%. Liver estrogen receptor α (ERα) was required for CETP expression to enhance β-oxidation and reduce liver TG content. Thus, CETP alters at least two networks governing TG metabolism, one involving SHP to increase VLDL-TG production in response to estrogen, and another involving ERα to enhance β-oxidation and lower liver TG content. These findings demonstrate a novel role for CETP in estrogen-mediated increases in TG production and a broader role for CETP in TG metabolism. PMID:27354419

  7. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein alters liver and plasma triglyceride metabolism through two liver networks in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Brian T; Le, Thao D; Zhu, Lin; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Stafford, John M

    2016-08-01

    Elevated plasma TGs increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women. Estrogen treatment raises plasma TGs in women, but molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we explore the role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in the regulation of TG metabolism in female mice, which naturally lack CETP. In transgenic CETP females, acute estrogen treatment raised plasma TGs 50%, increased TG production, and increased expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis, but not in nontransgenic littermate females. In CETP females, estrogen enhanced expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), a nuclear receptor regulating VLDL production. Deletion of liver SHP prevented increases in TG production and expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis in CETP mice with estrogen treatment. We also examined whether CETP expression had effects on TG metabolism independent of estrogen treatment. CETP increased liver β-oxidation and reduced liver TG content by 60%. Liver estrogen receptor α (ERα) was required for CETP expression to enhance β-oxidation and reduce liver TG content. Thus, CETP alters at least two networks governing TG metabolism, one involving SHP to increase VLDL-TG production in response to estrogen, and another involving ERα to enhance β-oxidation and lower liver TG content. These findings demonstrate a novel role for CETP in estrogen-mediated increases in TG production and a broader role for CETP in TG metabolism. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Fatty liver as a risk factor for progression from metabolically healthy to metabolically abnormal in non-overweight individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Fukuda, Takuya; Ohbora, Akihiro; Kojima, Takao; Fukui, Michiaki

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies identified that metabolically abnormal non-obese phenotype is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about risk factor for progression from metabolically healthy non-overweight to metabolically abnormal phenotype. We hypothesized that fatty liver had a clinical impact on progression from metabolically healthy non-overweight to metabolically abnormal phenotype. In this retrospective cohort study, 14,093 Japanese (7557 men and 6736 women), who received the health-checkup program from 2004 to 2012, were enrolled. Overweight and obesity were defined as body mass index 23.0-25.0 and ≥25.0 kg/m 2 . Four metabolic factors (impaired fasting glucose, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and low high density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration) were used for definition of metabolically healthy (less than two factors) or metabolically abnormal (two or more). We divided the participants into three groups: metabolically healthy non-overweight (9755 individuals, men/women = 4290/5465), metabolically healthy overweight (2547 individuals, 1800/747) and metabolically healthy obesity (1791 individuals, 1267/524). Fatty liver was diagnosed by ultrasonography. Over the median follow-up period of 5.3 years, 873 metabolically healthy non-overweight, 512 metabolically healthy overweight and 536 metabolically healthy obesity individuals progressed to metabolically abnormal. The adjusted hazard risks of fatty liver on progression were 1.49 (95% confidence interval 1.20-1.83, p = 0.005) in metabolically healthy non-overweight, 1.37 (1.12-1.66, p = 0.002) in metabolically healthy overweight and 1.38 (1.15-1.66, p overweight individuals.

  9. Relationship between hepatocellular carcinoma, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: which clinical arguments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmorduc, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    Obesity and the metabolic syndrome are growing epidemics associated with an increased risk for many types of cancer. In the liver, inflammatory and angiogenic changes due to insulin resistance and fatty liver disease are associated with an increased incidence of liver cancer. Regardless of underlying liver disease, cirrhosis remains the most important risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) although are cases of HCC arising without cirrhosis raise the possibility of a direct carcinogenesis secondary to Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). Moreover, metabolic syndrome and its different features may also increase the risk of HCC in the setting of chronic liver diseases of other causes such as viral hepatitis or alcohol abuse. Taking into account all these data, it is necessary to better determine the risk of developing HCC in patients with metabolic syndrome to improve the screening guidelines and develop prophylactic treatments in this setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Studies of liver-specific metabolic reactions with 15N. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschberg, K.; Jung, K.; Faust, H.; Matkowitz, R.

    1987-01-01

    The 15 N tracer technique was used to investigate liver-specific reactions (urea and hippurate synthesis) for studying the metabolism in the healthy and damaged pig liver. After [ 15 N]ammonium chloride administration the tracer distribution on non-protein compounds of serum and urine was followed. Blood samplings before and after liver passage rendered possible a direct analysis of the [ 15 N]ammonium metabolism. The thioacetamide-induced liver damage was used as model for an acute liver intoxication. The capacity for urea synthesis was not influenced by means of this noxious substance, but the metabolism of amino acids and hippuric acid. The considerably depressed excretion of [ 15 N]hippurate seems to be a suitable indicator of liver disfunction. (author)

  11. Associations between Zinc Deficiency and Metabolic Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

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    Takashi Himoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is an essential trace element which has favorable antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and apoptotic effects. The liver mainly plays a crucial role in maintaining systemic Zn homeostasis. Therefore, the occurrence of chronic liver diseases, such as chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or fatty liver, results in the impairment of Zn metabolism, and subsequently Zn deficiency. Zn deficiency causes plenty of metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and hepatic encephalopathy. Inversely, metabolic abnormalities like hypoalbuminemia in patients with liver cirrhosis often result in Zn deficiency. Recent studies have revealed the putative mechanisms by which Zn deficiency evokes a variety of metabolic abnormalities in chronic liver disease. Zn supplementation has shown beneficial effects on such metabolic abnormalities in experimental models and actual patients with chronic liver disease. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of metabolic abnormalities deriving from Zn deficiency and the favorable effects of Zn administration in patients with chronic liver disease. In addition, we also highlight the interactions between Zn and other trace elements, vitamins, amino acids, or hormones in such patients.

  12. Inhibition of the human liver microsomal and human cytochrome P450 1A2 and 3A4 metabolism of estradiol by deployment-related and other chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Khawja A; Cho, Taehyeon M; Rose, Randy L; Hodgson, Ernest

    2006-09-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) are major catalysts in the metabolism of xenobiotics and endogenous substrates such as estradiol (E2). It has previously been shown that E2 is predominantly metabolized in humans by CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 with 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) the major metabolite. This study examines effects of deployment-related and other chemicals on E2 metabolism by human liver microsomes (HLM) and individual P450 isoforms. Kinetic studies using HLM, CYP3A4, and CYP1A2 showed similar affinities (Km) for E2 with respect to 2-OHE2 production. Vmax and CLint values for HLM are 0.32 nmol/min/mg protein and 7.5 microl/min/mg protein; those for CYP3A4 are 6.9 nmol/min/nmol P450 and 291 microl/min/nmol P450; and those for CYP1A2 are 17.4 nmol/min/nmol P450 and 633 microl/min/nmol P450. Phenotyped HLM use showed that individuals with high levels of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 have the greatest potential to metabolize E2. Preincubation of HLM with a variety of chemicals, including those used in military deployments, resulted in varying levels of inhibition of E2 metabolism. The greatest inhibition was observed with organophosphorus compounds, including chlorpyrifos and fonofos, with up to 80% inhibition for 2-OHE2 production. Carbaryl, a carbamate pesticide, and naphthalene, a jet fuel component, inhibited ca. 40% of E2 metabolism. Preincubation of CYP1A2 with chlorpyrifos, fonofos, carbaryl, or naphthalene resulted in 96, 59, 84, and 87% inhibition of E2 metabolism, respectively. Preincubation of CYP3A4 with chlorpyrifos, fonofos, deltamethrin, or permethrin resulted in 94, 87, 58, and 37% inhibition of E2 metabolism. Chlorpyrifos inhibition of E2 metabolism is shown to be irreversible.

  13. Effects of Castration on Expression of Lipid Metabolism Genes in the Liver of Korean Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Baik, Myunggi; Nguyen, Trang Hoa; Jeong, Jin Young; Piao, Min Yu; Kang, Hyeok Joong

    2015-01-01

    Castration induces the accumulation of body fat and deposition of intramuscular fat in Korean cattle, resulting in improved beef quality. However, little is known about the metabolic adaptations in the liver following castration. To understand changes in lipid metabolism following castration, hepatic expression levels of lipid metabolism genes were compared between Korean bulls and steers. Steers had higher (p

  14. Coordinated and interactive expression of genes of lipid metabolism and inflammation in adipose tissue and liver during metabolic overload.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic metabolic overload results in lipid accumulation and subsequent inflammation in white adipose tissue (WAT, often accompanied by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. In response to metabolic overload, the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammatory processes is adapted. However, it still remains unknown how these adaptations in gene expression in expanding WAT and liver are orchestrated and whether they are interrelated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ApoE*3Leiden mice were fed HFD or chow for different periods up to 12 weeks. Gene expression in WAT and liver over time was evaluated by micro-array analysis. WAT hypertrophy and inflammation were analyzed histologically. Bayesian hierarchical cluster analysis of dynamic WAT gene expression identified groups of genes ('clusters' with comparable expression patterns over time. HFD evoked an immediate response of five clusters of 'lipid metabolism' genes in WAT, which did not further change thereafter. At a later time point (>6 weeks, inflammatory clusters were induced. Promoter analysis of clustered genes resulted in specific key regulators which may orchestrate the metabolic and inflammatory responses in WAT. Some master regulators played a dual role in control of metabolism and inflammation. When WAT inflammation developed (>6 weeks, genes of lipid metabolism and inflammation were also affected in corresponding livers. These hepatic gene expression changes and the underlying transcriptional responses in particular, were remarkably similar to those detected in WAT. CONCLUSION: In WAT, metabolic overload induced an immediate, stable response on clusters of lipid metabolism genes and induced inflammatory genes later in time. Both processes may be controlled and interlinked by specific transcriptional regulators. When WAT inflammation began, the hepatic response to HFD resembled that in WAT. In all, WAT and liver respond to metabolic overload by

  15. Short-term calorie restriction feminizes the mRNA profiles of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective anti-aging interventions in mammals. A modern theory suggests that aging results from a decline in detoxification capabilities and thus accumulation of damaged macromolecules. The present study aimed to determine how short-term CR alters mRNA profiles of genes that encode metabolism and detoxification machinery in the liver. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed CR (0, 15, 30, or 40%) diets for one month, followed by mRNA quantification of 98 xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in the liver, including 7 uptake transporters, 39 phase-I enzymes, 37 phase-II enzymes, 10 efflux transporters, and 5 transcription factors. In general, 15% CR did not alter mRNAs of most XPGs, whereas 30 and 40% CR altered over half of the XPGs (32 increased and 29 decreased). CR up-regulated some phase-I enzymes (fold increase), such as Cyp4a14 (12), Por (2.3), Nqo1 (1.4), Fmo2 (5.4), and Fmo3 (346), and numerous number of phase-II enzymes, such as Sult1a1 (1.2), Sult1d1 (2.0), Sult1e1 (33), Sult3a1 (2.2), Gsta4 (1.3), Gstm2 (1.3), Gstm3 (1.7), and Mgst3 (2.2). CR feminized the mRNA profiles of 32 XPGs in livers of male mice. For instance, CR decreased the male-predominantly expressed Oatp1a1 (97%) and increased the female-predominantly expressed Oatp1a4 (11). In conclusion, short-term CR alters the mRNA levels of over half of the 98 XPGs quantified in livers of male mice, and over half of these alterations appear to be due to feminization of the liver. - Highlights: • Utilized a graded CR model in male mice • The mRNA profiles of xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in liver were investigated. • CR up-regulates many phase-II enzymes. • CR tends to feminize the mRNA profiles of XPGs

  16. Short-term calorie restriction feminizes the mRNA profiles of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Zidong Donna [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: cklaasse@kumc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective anti-aging interventions in mammals. A modern theory suggests that aging results from a decline in detoxification capabilities and thus accumulation of damaged macromolecules. The present study aimed to determine how short-term CR alters mRNA profiles of genes that encode metabolism and detoxification machinery in the liver. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed CR (0, 15, 30, or 40%) diets for one month, followed by mRNA quantification of 98 xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in the liver, including 7 uptake transporters, 39 phase-I enzymes, 37 phase-II enzymes, 10 efflux transporters, and 5 transcription factors. In general, 15% CR did not alter mRNAs of most XPGs, whereas 30 and 40% CR altered over half of the XPGs (32 increased and 29 decreased). CR up-regulated some phase-I enzymes (fold increase), such as Cyp4a14 (12), Por (2.3), Nqo1 (1.4), Fmo2 (5.4), and Fmo3 (346), and numerous number of phase-II enzymes, such as Sult1a1 (1.2), Sult1d1 (2.0), Sult1e1 (33), Sult3a1 (2.2), Gsta4 (1.3), Gstm2 (1.3), Gstm3 (1.7), and Mgst3 (2.2). CR feminized the mRNA profiles of 32 XPGs in livers of male mice. For instance, CR decreased the male-predominantly expressed Oatp1a1 (97%) and increased the female-predominantly expressed Oatp1a4 (11). In conclusion, short-term CR alters the mRNA levels of over half of the 98 XPGs quantified in livers of male mice, and over half of these alterations appear to be due to feminization of the liver. - Highlights: • Utilized a graded CR model in male mice • The mRNA profiles of xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in liver were investigated. • CR up-regulates many phase-II enzymes. • CR tends to feminize the mRNA profiles of XPGs.

  17. The liver in regulation of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Gautam; Subramaniam, V Nathan

    2017-09-01

    The liver is one of the largest and most functionally diverse organs in the human body. In addition to roles in detoxification of xenobiotics, digestion, synthesis of important plasma proteins, gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, and storage, the liver also plays a significant role in iron homeostasis. Apart from being the storage site for excess body iron, it also plays a vital role in regulating the amount of iron released into the blood by enterocytes and macrophages. Since iron is essential for many important physiological and molecular processes, it increases the importance of liver in the proper functioning of the body's metabolism. This hepatic iron-regulatory function can be attributed to the expression of many liver-specific or liver-enriched proteins, all of which play an important role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. This review focuses on these proteins and their known roles in the regulation of body iron metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Interplay between FGF21 and insulin action in the liver regulates metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Vienberg, Sara G; Smyth, Graham

    2014-01-01

    gluconeogenesis in these animals. Improvements in blood sugar were due in part to increased glucose uptake in brown fat, browning of white fat, and overall increased energy expenditure. These effects were preserved even after removal of the main interscapular brown fat pad. In contrast to its retained effects...... of insulin action in the liver by increasing energy metabolism via activation of brown fat and browning of white fat, but intact liver insulin action is required for FGF21 to control hepatic lipid metabolism....

  19. Prevalence of non alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iftikhar, R.; Kamran, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine frequency of Non Alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of medicine, CMH Okara, Jan 2013 to July 2013. Patients and Methods: We included 491 adult males, diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MetS), presenting in outpatient department for routine review. MetS was diagnosed as per the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) proposed criteria of 2004. Detailed history and examination of each individual was done and data entered in pre designed performa. Brightness and posterior attenuation on ultrasound abdomen were considered indices for fatty liver disease in presence of elevated ALT, negative hepatitis serology and absence of alcohol intake. All the data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of 491 participants with MetS, 222 (45.2%) had fatty liver disease. Mean BMI in patients with metabolic syndrome was 26.1 (± .89) and mean BMI in fatty liver patients was 27.3 (± 0.67). Out of total 5 components of Mets, patients with fatty liver disease had 3.24 (± 0.25) components, as compared to 2.1 (± 0.34) in whole of study group. Conclusion: A large number of patients with metabolic syndrome have fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease is more frequent in patients who are overweight and those having multiple risk factors of metabolic syndrome. (author)

  20. Immunosuppressive and postoperative effects of orthotopic liver transplantation on bone metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, MMJ; Malinchoc, M; Sibonga, J; Clarke, BL; Hay, JE

    Bone loss occurs early after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in all liver transplant recipients and leads to postoperative fractures, especially in cholestatic patients with the lowest bone mass. Little is known about the underlying changes in bone metabolism after OLT or about the etiology

  1. Fasting-induced liver GADD45β restrains hepatic fatty acid uptake and improves metabolic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmeister, Jessica; Zota, Annika; Sijmonsma, Tjeerd P; Seibert, Oksana; Cıngır, Şahika; Schmidt, Kathrin; Vallon, Nicola; de Guia, Roldan M; Niopek, Katharina; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Maida, Adriano; Blüher, Matthias; Okun, Jürgen G; Herzig, Stephan; Rose, Adam J

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that repeated short-term nutrient withdrawal (i.e. fasting) has pleiotropic actions to promote organismal health and longevity. Despite this, the molecular physiological mechanisms by which fasting is protective against metabolic disease are largely unknown. Here, we show that, metabolic control, particularly systemic and liver lipid metabolism, is aberrantly regulated in the fasted state in mouse models of metabolic dysfunction. Liver transcript assays between lean/healthy and obese/diabetic mice in fasted and fed states uncovered "growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible" GADD45β as a dysregulated gene transcript during fasting in several models of metabolic dysfunction including ageing, obesity/pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes, in both mice and humans. Using whole-body knockout mice as well as liver/hepatocyte-specific gain- and loss-of-function strategies, we revealed a role for liver GADD45β in the coordination of liver fatty acid uptake, through cytoplasmic retention of FABP1, ultimately impacting obesity-driven hyperglycaemia. In summary, fasting stress-induced GADD45β represents a liver-specific molecular event promoting adaptive metabolic function. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  2. Skeletal Muscle Derived IL-6 in Liver and Adipose Tissue Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jakob Grunnet

    Summary Physical activity can lead to metabolic disease and treatment of several metabolic diseases include exercise training. Skeletal muscle has, due to its central role in glucose and fat metabolism at rest and during exercise been studied in detail with regard to exercise training. The role...... of both liver and adipose tissue regulation in whole body metabolism has come in to focus and it has been shown that both tissues are subject to exercise training-induced adaptations. However, the contribution of endocrine factors to the regulation of exercise training-induced adaptations in liver...... and adipose tissue metabolism is unknown. It has been suggested that myokines, such as IL-6, released from skeletal muscle affects liver and adipose tissue and are involved in the regulation of exercise training adaptations. Thus, the aim of this thesis was to investigate the role of skeletal muscle derived...

  3. Artificial neural network-based exploration of gene-nutrient interactions in folate and xenobiotic metabolic pathways that modulate susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Pavithrakumari, Manickam; Jayapriya, Jaganathan; Hussain, Tajamul; Alrokayan, Salman A; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-04-15

    In the current study, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based breast cancer prediction model was developed from the data of folate and xenobiotic pathway genetic polymorphisms along with the nutritional and demographic variables to investigate how micronutrients modulate susceptibility to breast cancer. The developed ANN model explained 94.2% variability in breast cancer prediction. Fixed effect models of folate (400 μg/day) and B12 (6 μg/day) showed 33.3% and 11.3% risk reduction, respectively. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed the following interactions in responders to folate: RFC1 G80A × MTHFR C677T (primary), COMT H108L × CYP1A1 m2 (secondary), MTR A2756G (tertiary). The interactions among responders to B12 were RFC1G80A × cSHMT C1420T and CYP1A1 m2 × CYP1A1 m4. ANN simulations revealed that increased folate might restore ER and PR expression and reduce the promoter CpG island methylation of extra cellular superoxide dismutase and BRCA1. Dietary intake of folate appears to confer protection against breast cancer through its modulating effects on ER and PR expression and methylation of EC-SOD and BRCA1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Short-term calorie restriction feminizes the mRNA profiles of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective anti-aging interventions in mammals. A modern theory suggests that aging results from a decline in detoxification capabilities and thus accumulation of damaged macromolecules. The present study aimed to determine how short-term CR alters mRNA profiles of genes that encode metabolism and detoxification machinery in the liver. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed CR (0, 15, 30, or 40%) diets for one month, followed by mRNA quantification of 98 xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in the liver, including 7 uptake transporters, 39 phase-I enzymes, 37 phase-II enzymes, 10 efflux transporters, and 5 transcription factors. In general, 15% CR did not alter mRNAs of most XPGs, whereas 30 and 40% CR altered over half of the XPGs (32 increased and 29 decreased). CR up-regulated some phase-I enzymes (fold increase), such as Cyp4a14 (12), Por (2.3), Nqo1 (1.4), Fmo2 (5.4), and Fmo3 (346), and numerous number of phase-II enzymes, such as Sult1a1 (1.2), Sult1d1 (2.0), Sult1e1 (33), Sult3a1 (2.2), Gsta4 (1.3), Gstm2 (1.3), Gstm3 (1.7), and Mgst3 (2.2). CR feminized the mRNA profiles of 32 XPGs in livers of male mice. For instance, CR decreased the male-predominantly expressed Oatp1a1 (97%) and increased the female-predominantly expressed Oatp1a4 (11). In conclusion, short-term CR alters the mRNA levels of over half of the 98 XPGs quantified in livers of male mice, and over half of these alterations appear to be due to feminization of the liver. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficient pigs are a novel large animal model of metabolic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond D. Hickey

    2014-07-01

    FAH-deficiency produced a lethal defect in utero that was corrected by administration of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl-1,3 cyclohexanedione (NTBC throughout pregnancy. Animals on NTBC were phenotypically normal at birth; however, the animals were euthanized approximately four weeks after withdrawal of NTBC due to clinical decline and physical examination findings of severe liver injury and encephalopathy consistent with acute liver failure. Biochemical and histological analyses, characterized by diffuse and severe hepatocellular damage, confirmed the diagnosis of severe liver injury. FAH−/− pigs provide the first genetically engineered large animal model of a metabolic liver disorder. Future applications of FAH−/− pigs include discovery research as a large animal model of HT1 and spontaneous acute liver failure, and preclinical testing of the efficacy of liver cell therapies, including transplantation of hepatocytes, liver stem cells, and pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes.

  6. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  7. Diagnosis and management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and related metabolic disorders: Consensus statement from the Study Group of Liver and Metabolism, Chinese Society of Endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Fan, Jian-Gao

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in Western countries, affecting 20%–33% of the general population. Large population-based surveys in China indicate a prevalence of approximately 15%–30%. Worldwide, including in China, the prevalence of NAFLD has increased rapidly in parallel with regional trends of obesity, type2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In addition, NAFLD has contributed significantly to increased overall, as well as cardiovascular and liver-related, mortality in the general population. In view of rapid advances in research into NAFLD in recent years, this consensus statement provides a brief update on the progress in the field and suggests preferred approaches for the comprehensive management of NAFLD and its related metabolic diseases. PMID:23560695

  8. The effectiveness of metformin in patients with metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Butrova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of action of metformin is realized through activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, leading to a decrease hepatic glucose production as well as to decrease the synthesis of triglycerides and an increase in fat oxidation. Several studies have demonstrated the positive effect of the drug in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, manifested in reducing the activity of enzymes, reducing the size of the liver and insulin resistance. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of metformin in patients with metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The study found that the use Siofor 850 mg 2 times a day in conjunction with a reduced-calorie nutrition in patients with metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease leads to a significant reduction in insulin resistance associated with decreased activity of transaminases, improvement of metabolic parameters. The therapy Siofor majority of patients (60% with metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease achieved a clinically significant weight loss and improved body composition. Application Siofor improves lifestyle changes in obese patients with non-alcoholic liver disease dirovoy and metabolic disorders.

  9. Risk assessment of silica nanoparticles on liver injury in metabolic syndrome mice induced by fructose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianmei; He, Xiwei; Yang, Yang; Li, Mei; Xu, Chenke; Yu, Rong

    2018-07-01

    This study aims to assess the effects and the mechanisms of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) on hepatotoxicity in both normal and metabolic syndrome mouse models induced by fructose. Here, we found that SiNPs exposure lead to improved insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome mice, but markedly worsened hepatic ballooning, inflammation infiltration, and fibrosis. Moreover, SiNPs exposure aggravated liver injury in metabolic syndrome mice by causing serious DNA damage. Following SiNPs exposure, liver superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in metabolic syndrome mice were stimulated, which is accompanied by significantly increased malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels as compared to normal mice. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that SiNPs were more readily deposited in the liver mitochondria of metabolic syndrome mice, resulting in more severe mitochondrial injury as compared to normal mice. We speculated that SiNPs-induced mitochondrial injury might be the cause of hepatic oxidative stress, which further lead to a series of liver lesions as observed in mice following SiNPs exposure. Based on these results, it is likely that SiNPs will increase the risk and severity of liver disease in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Therefore, SiNPs should be used cautiously in food additives and clinical settings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Xenobiotics and the Human Gut Microbiome: Metatranscriptomics Reveal the Active Players

    OpenAIRE

    Ursell, Luke K.; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    The human gut microbiome plays an important role in the metabolism of xenobiotics. In a recent issue of Cell, Maurice et al. identify the active members of the gut microbiome and show how gene expression profiles change within the gut microbial community in response to antibiotics and host-targeted xenobiotics.

  11. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Matthew C.; Clair, Heather B.; Hardesty, Josiah E.; Falkner, K. Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J.; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A.; McClain, Craig J.; Prough, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  12. Cranberry juice suppressed the diclofenac metabolism by human liver microsomes, but not in healthy human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Kentarou; Tsuruoka, Shu-ichi; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Hasegawa, Gohki; Obi, Yuri; Kaneda, Tae; Takahashi, Masaki; Maekawa, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Fujimura, Akio

    2009-01-01

    AIM To investigate a potential interaction between cranberry juice and diclofenac, a substrate of CYP2C9. METHODS The inhibitory effect of cranberry juice on diclofenac metabolism was determined using human liver microsome assay. Subsequently, we performed a clinical trial in healthy human subjects to determine whether the repeated consumption of cranberry juice changed the diclofenac pharmacokinetics. RESULTS Cranberry juice significantly suppressed diclofenac metabolism by human liver microsomes. On the other hand, repeated consumption of cranberry juice did not influence the diclofenac pharmacokinetics in human subjects. CONCLUSIONS Cranberry juice inhibited diclofenac metabolism by human liver microsomes, but not in human subjects. Based on the present and previous findings, we think that although cranberry juice inhibits CYP2C9 activity in vitro, it does not change the pharmacokinetics of medications metabolized by CYP2C9 in clinical situations. PMID:19694738

  13. Chlamydia pneumoniae acute liver infection affects hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangoni, Antonella; Fiorino, Erika; Gilardi, Federica; Aldini, Rita; Scotti, Elena; Nardini, Paola; Foschi, Claudio; Donati, Manuela; Montagnani, Marco; Cevenini, Monica; Franco, Placido; Roda, Aldo; Crestani, Maurizio; Cevenini, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae has been linked to atherosclerosis, strictly associated with hyperlipidemia. The liver plays a central role in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Since in animal models C. pneumoniae can be found at hepatic level, this study aims to elucidate whether C. pneumoniae infection accelerates atherosclerosis by affecting lipid metabolism. Thirty Balb/c mice were challenged intra-peritoneally with C. pneumoniae elementary bodies and thirty with Chlamydia trachomatis, serovar D. Thirty mice were injected with sucrose-phosphate-glutamate buffer, as negative controls. Seven days after infection, liver samples were examined both for presence of chlamydia and expression of genes involved in inflammation and lipid metabolism. C. pneumoniae was isolated from 26 liver homogenates, whereas C. trachomatis was never re-cultivated (P triglycerides levels compared both with negative controls (P metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Citrate Defines a Regulatory Link Between Energy Metabolism and the Liver Hormone Hepcidin

    OpenAIRE

    Ladeira Courelas da Silva, Ana Rita

    2017-01-01

    Iron plays a critical role as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin as well as a constituent of iron-sulfur clusters. Increasing evidence suggests that mechanisms maintaining iron homeostasis cross-talk to intermediary metabolism. The liver hormone hepcidin is the key regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Hepcidin transcriptional control is linked to the nutrient-sensing mTOR pathway, proliferative signals, gluconeogenic responses during starvation and hormones that modulate energy metabolism. The...

  15. Comparative Metabolism Study of Five Protoberberine Alkaloids in Liver Microsomes from Rat, Rhesus Monkey, and Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhou, Yanyan; Si, Nan; Han, Lingyu; Ren, Wei; Xin, Shaokun; Wang, Hongjie; Zuo, Ran; Wei, Xiaolu; Yang, Jian; Zhao, Haiyu; Bian, Baolin

    2017-11-01

    Protoberberine alkaloids including berberine, palmatine, jatrorrhizine, coptisine, and epiberberine are major components in many medicinal plants. They have been widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammation, diabetes, depression, hypertension, and various infectious areas. However, the metabolism of five protoberberine alkaloids among different species has not been clarified previously. In order to elaborate on the in vitro metabolism of them, a comparative analysis of their metabolic profile in rat, rhesus monkey, and human liver microsomes was carried out using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution linear trap quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (UHPLC-electrospray ionization-Orbitrap MS) for the first time. Each metabolite was identified and semiquantified by its accurate mass data and peak area. Fifteen metabolites were characterized based on accurate MS/MS spectra and the proposed MS/MS fragmentation pathways including demethylation, hydroxylation, and methyl reduction. Among them, the content of berberine metabolites in human liver microsomes was similar with those in rhesus monkey liver microsomes, whereas berberine in rat liver microsomes showed no demethylation metabolites and the content of metabolites showed significant differences with that in human liver microsomes. On the contrary, the metabolism of palmatine in rat liver microsomes resembled that in human liver microsomes. The content of jatrorrhizine metabolites presented obvious differences in all species. The HR-ESI-MS/MS fragmentation behavior of protoberberine alkaloids and their metabolic profile in rat, rhesus monkey, and human liver microsomes were investigated for the first time. The results demonstrated that the biotransformation characteristics of protoberberine alkaloids among different species had similarities as well differences that would be beneficial for us to better understand the pharmacological activities of protoberberine alkaloids

  16. Prioritizing Popular Proteins in Liver Cancer: Remodelling One-Carbon Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, María Isabel; Molina, Manuela; Odriozola, Leticia; Elortza, Félix; Mato, José María; Sitek, Barbara; Zhang, Pumin; He, Fuchu; Latasa, María Uxue; Ávila, Matías Antonio; Corrales, Fernando José

    2017-12-01

    Primary liver cancer (HCC) is recognized as the fifth most common neoplasm and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Most risk factors are known, and the molecular pathogenesis has been widely studied in the past decade; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be unveiled, as they will facilitate the definition of novel biomarkers and clinical targets for more effective patient management. We utilize the B/D-HPP popular protein strategy. We report a list of popular proteins that have been highly cocited with the expression "liver cancer". Several enzymes highlight the known metabolic remodeling of liver cancer cells, four of which participate in one-carbon metabolism. This pathway is central to the maintenance of differentiated hepatocytes, as it is considered the connection between intermediate metabolism and epigenetic regulation. We designed a targeted selective reaction monitoring (SRM) method to follow up one-carbon metabolism adaptation in mouse HCC and in regenerating liver following exposure to CCl 4 . This method allows systematic monitoring of one-carbon metabolism and could prove useful in the follow-up of HCC and of chronically liver-diseased patients (cirrhosis) at risk of HCC. The SRM data are available via ProteomeXchange in PASSEL (PASS01060).

  17. Intracerebroventricular ghrelin treatment affects lipid metabolism in liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Cristina; Librán-Pérez, Marta; Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Míguez, Jesús M; Soengas, José L

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to elucidate in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) the effects of central ghrelin (GHRL) treatment on the regulation of liver lipid metabolism, and the possible modulatory effect of central GHRL treatment on the simultaneous effects of raised levels of oleate. Thus, we injected intracerebroventricularly (ICV) rainbow trout GHRL in the presence or absence of oleate and evaluated in liver variables related to lipid metabolism. Oleate treatment elicited in liver of rainbow trout decreased lipogenesis and increased oxidative capacity in agreement with previous studies. Moreover, as demonstrated for the first time in fish in the present study, GHRL also acts centrally modulating lipid metabolism in liver, resulting in increased potential for lipogenesis and decreased potential for fatty acid oxidation, i.e. the converse effects to those elicited by central oleate treatment. The simultaneous treatment of GHRL and oleate confirmed these counteractive effects. Thus, the nutrient sensing mechanisms present in hypothalamus, particularly those involved in sensing of fatty acid, are involved in the control of liver energy metabolism in fish, and this control is modulated by the central action of GHRL. These results give support to the notion of hypothalamus as an integrative place for the regulation of peripheral energy metabolism in fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bile Acid Signaling in Liver Metabolism and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiangang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndromes are increasingly recognized as health concerns worldwide. Overnutrition and insulin resistance are the major causes of diabetic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in humans. Studies in the past decade provide evidence that bile acids are not just biological detergents facilitating gut nutrient absorption, but also important metabolic regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Pharmacological alteration of bile acid metabolism or bile acid signaling pathways such as using bile acid receptor agonists or bile acid binding resins may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. On the other hand, bile acid signaling is complex, and the molecular mechanisms mediating the bile acid effects are still not completely understood. This paper will summarize recent advances in our understanding of bile acid signaling in regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, and the potentials of developing novel therapeutic strategies that target bile acid metabolism for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  19. Phylogenetic and functional characterization of ten P450 genes from the CYP6AE subfamily of Helicoverpa armigera involved in xenobiotic metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Yu; Wang, Huidong; Liu, Zhi

    2018-01-01

    450s in this subfamily can metabolise imidacloprid, but with lower efficiency than Bemisia tabaci CYP6CM1vQ. CYP6AE20 had virtually no metabolic competence to these four compounds but could metabolise several model fluorogenic substrates. These results showed the broad substrate spectrum of H...

  20. Creatine and the Liver: Metabolism and Possible Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, R P; Stefanello, S T; Mauriz, J L; Gonzalez-Gallego, J; Soares, F A A

    2016-01-01

    The process of creatine synthesis occurs in two steps, catalyzed by L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) and guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT), which take place mainly in kidney and liver, respectively. This molecule plays an important energy/pH buffer function in tissues, and to guarantee the maintenance of its total body pool, the lost creatine must be replaced from diet or de novo synthesis. Creatine administration is known to decrease the consumption of Sadenosyl methionine and also reduce the homocysteine production in liver, diminishing fat accumulation and resulting in beneficial effects in fatty liver and non-alcoholic liver disease. Different studies have shown that creatine supplementation could supply brain energy, presenting neuroprotective effects against the encephalopathy induced by hyperammonemia in acute liver failure. Creatine is also taken by many athletes for its ergogenic properties. However, little is known about the adverse effects of creatine supplementation, which are barely described in the literature, with reports of mainly hypothetical effects arising from a small number of scientific publications. Antioxidant effects have been found in several studies, although one of the theories regarding the potential for toxicity from creatine supplementation is that it can increase oxidative stress and potentially form carcinogenic compounds.

  1. HEPATOKIN1 is a biochemistry-based model of liver metabolism for applications in medicine and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Bulik, Sascha; Wallach, Iwona; Wünsch, Tilo; König, Matthias; Stockmann, Martin; Meierhofer, David; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2018-06-19

    The epidemic increase of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) requires a deeper understanding of the regulatory circuits controlling the response of liver metabolism to nutritional challenges, medical drugs, and genetic enzyme variants. As in vivo studies of human liver metabolism are encumbered with serious ethical and technical issues, we developed a comprehensive biochemistry-based kinetic model of the central liver metabolism including the regulation of enzyme activities by their reactants, allosteric effectors, and hormone-dependent phosphorylation. The utility of the model for basic research and applications in medicine and pharmacology is illustrated by simulating diurnal variations of the metabolic state of the liver at various perturbations caused by nutritional challenges (alcohol), drugs (valproate), and inherited enzyme disorders (galactosemia). Using proteomics data to scale maximal enzyme activities, the model is used to highlight differences in the metabolic functions of normal hepatocytes and malignant liver cells (adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma).

  2. Scaffold-free 3D bio-printed human liver tissue stably maintains metabolic functions useful for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizawa, Hideki; Nagao, Eri; Shimamura, Mitsuru; Zhang, Guangyuan; Torii, Hitoshi

    2017-07-01

    The liver plays a central role in metabolism. Although many studies have described in vitro liver models for drug discovery, to date, no model has been described that can stably maintain liver function. Here, we used a unique, scaffold-free 3D bio-printing technology to construct a small portion of liver tissue that could stably maintain drug, glucose, and lipid metabolism, in addition to bile acid secretion. This bio-printed normal human liver tissue maintained expression of several kinds of hepatic drug transporters and metabolic enzymes that functioned for several weeks. The bio-printed liver tissue displayed glucose production via cAMP/protein kinase A signaling, which could be suppressed with insulin. Bile acid secretion was also observed from the printed liver tissue, and it accumulated in the culture medium over time. We observed both bile duct and sinusoid-like structures in the bio-printed liver tissue, which suggested that bile acid secretion occurred via a sinusoid-hepatocyte-bile duct route. These results demonstrated that our bio-printed liver tissue was unique, because it exerted diverse liver metabolic functions for several weeks. In future, we expect our bio-printed liver tissue to be applied to developing new models that can be used to improve preclinical predictions of long-term toxicity in humans, generate novel targets for metabolic liver disease, and evaluate biliary excretion in drug development.

  3. Metabolically based liver damage pathophysiology in patients with urea cycle disorders - A new hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovski, Ivan; Ješić, Miloš; Ivanovski, Ana; Garavelli, Livia; Ivanovski, Petar

    2017-11-28

    The underlying pathophysiology of liver dysfunction in urea cycle disorders (UCDs) is still largely elusive. There is some evidence that the accumulation of urea cycle (UC) intermediates are toxic for hepatocyte mitochondria. It is possible that liver injury is directly caused by the toxicity of ammonia. The rarity of UCDs, the lack of checking of iron level in these patients, superficial knowledge of UC and an underestimation of the metabolic role of fumaric acid, are the main reasons that are responsible for the incomprehension of the mechanism of liver injury in patients suffering from UCDs. Owing to our routine clinical practice to screen for iron overload in severely ill neonates, with the focus on the newborns suffering from acute liver failure, we report a case of citrullinemia with neonatal liver failure and high blood parameters of iron overload. We hypothesize that the key is in the decreased-deficient fumaric acid production in the course of UC in UCDs that causes several sequentially intertwined metabolic disturbances with final result of liver iron overload. The presented hypothesis could be easily tested by examining the patients suffering from UCDs, for liver iron overload. This could be easily performed in countries with a high population and comprehensive national register for inborn errors of metabolism. Providing the hypothesis is correct, neonatal liver damage in patients having UCD can be prevented by the supplementation of pregnant women with fumaric or succinic acid, prepared in the form of iron supplementation pills. After birth, liver damage in patients having UCDs can be prevented by supplementation of these patients with zinc fumarate or zinc succinylate, as well.

  4. Genetic variation in genes for the xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes CYP1A1, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 and susceptibility to colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Mala; Amos, Christopher I.; Osterwisch, Daniel R.; Chen, Jinyun; Lynch, Patrick M.; Broaddus, Russell; Frazier, Marsha L.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with Lynch syndrome are predisposed to cancer due to an inherited DNA mismatch repair gene mutation. However, there is significant variability observed in disease expression, likely due to the influence of other environmental, lifestyle, or genetic factors. Polymorphisms in genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes may modify cancer risk by influencing the metabolism and clearance of potential carcinogens from the body. In this retrospective analysis, we examined key candidate gene polymorphisms in CYP1A1, EPHX1, GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 as modifiers of age at onset of colorectal cancer among 257 individuals with Lynch syndrome. We found that subjects heterozygous for CYP1A1 I462V (c.1384A>G) developed colorectal cancer 4 years earlier than those with the homozygous wild-type genotype (median ages 39 and 43 years, respectively; log-rank test P = 0.018). Furthermore, being heterozygous for the CYP1A1 polymorphisms, I462V and Msp1 (g.6235T>C), was associated with an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer [adjusted hazard ratio for AG relative to AA = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.16–2.74, P = 0.008; and hazard ratio for TC relative to TT = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.06–2.22, P = 0.02]. Since homozygous variants for both CYP1A1 polymorphisms were rare, risk estimates were imprecise. None of the other gene polymorphisms examined were associated with an earlier onset age for colorectal cancer. Our results suggest that the I462V and Msp1 polymorphisms in CYP1A1 may be an additional susceptibility factor for disease expression in Lynch syndrome since they modify the age of colorectal cancer onset by up to 4 years. PMID:18768509

  5. Disturbed Vitamin A Metabolism in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saeed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is required for important physiological processes, including embryogenesis, vision, cell proliferation and differentiation, immune regulation, and glucose and lipid metabolism. Many of vitamin A’s functions are executed through retinoic acids that activate transcriptional networks controlled by retinoic acid receptors (RARs and retinoid X receptors (RXRs.The liver plays a central role in vitamin A metabolism: (1 it produces bile supporting efficient intestinal absorption of fat-soluble nutrients like vitamin A; (2 it produces retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4 that distributes vitamin A, as retinol, to peripheral tissues; and (3 it harbors the largest body supply of vitamin A, mostly as retinyl esters, in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs. In times of inadequate dietary intake, the liver maintains stable circulating retinol levels of approximately 2 μmol/L, sufficient to provide the body with this vitamin for months. Liver diseases, in particular those leading to fibrosis and cirrhosis, are associated with impaired vitamin A homeostasis and may lead to vitamin A deficiency. Liver injury triggers HSCs to transdifferentiate to myofibroblasts that produce excessive amounts of extracellular matrix, leading to fibrosis. HSCs lose the retinyl ester stores in this process, ultimately leading to vitamin A deficiency. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is a spectrum of conditions ranging from benign hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH; it may progress to cirrhosis and liver cancer. NASH is projected to be the main cause of liver failure in the near future. Retinoic acids are key regulators of glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver and adipose tissue, but it is unknown whether impaired vitamin A homeostasis contributes to or suppresses the development of NAFLD. A genetic variant of patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3-I148M is the most prominent

  6. Genomics and the prediction of xenobiotic toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Urs-A.; Gut, Josef

    2002-01-01

    The systematic identification and functional analysis of human genes is revolutionizing the study of disease processes and the development and rational use of drugs. It increasingly enables medicine to make reliable assessments of the individual risk to acquire a particular disease, raises the number and specificity of drug targets and explains interindividual variation of the effectiveness and toxicity of drugs. Mutant alleles at a single gene locus for more than 20 drug metabolizing enzymes are some of the best studied individual risk factors for adverse drug reactions and xenobiotic toxicity. Increasingly, genetic polymorphisms of transporter and receptor systems are also recognized as causing interindividual variation in drug response and drug toxicity. However, pharmacogenetic and toxicogenetic factors rarely act alone; they produce a phenotype in concert with other variant genes and with environmental factors. Environmental factors may affect gene expression in many ways. For instance, numerous drugs induce their own and the metabolism of other xenobiotics by interacting with nuclear receptors such as AhR, PPAR, PXR and CAR. Genomics is providing the information and technology to analyze these complex situations to obtain individual genotypic and gene expression information to assess the risk of toxicity

  7. The Role of Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism in Non‐Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Massimo Perla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the epidemic of obesity across the world, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has become one of the most prevalent chronic liver disorders in children and adolescents. NAFLD comprises a spectrum of fat-associated liver conditions that can result in end-stage liver disease and the need for liver transplantation. Simple steatosis, or fatty liver, occurs early in NAFLD and may progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis with increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanism of the liver injury in NAFLD is currently thought to be a “multiple-hit process” where the first “hit” is an increase in liver fat, followed by multiple additional factors that trigger the inflammatory activity. At the onset of disease, NAFLD is characterized by hepatic triglyceride accumulation and insulin resistance. Liver fat accumulation is associated with increased lipotoxicity from high levels of free fatty acids, free cholesterol and other lipid metabolites. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction with oxidative stress and production of reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated mechanisms, are activated. The present review focuses on the relationship between intra-cellular lipid accumulation and insulin resistance, as well as on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in NAFLD.

  8. Maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythms of clock and metabolic genes in the offspring heart and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danfeng; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Mei; Liu, Chang

    2015-06-01

    Early life nutritional adversity is tightly associated with the development of long-term metabolic disorders. Particularly, maternal obesity and high-fat diets cause high risk of obesity in the offspring. Those offspring are also prone to develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, the precise underlying mechanisms leading to these metabolic dysregulation in the offspring remain unclear. On the other hand, disruptions of diurnal circadian rhythms are known to impair metabolic homeostasis in various tissues including the heart and liver. Therefore, we investigated that whether maternal obesity perturbs the circadian expression rhythms of clock, metabolic and inflammatory genes in offspring heart and liver by using RT-qPCR and Western blotting analysis. Offspring from lean and obese dams were examined on postnatal day 17 and 35, when pups were nursed by their mothers or took food independently. On P17, genes examined in the heart either showed anti-phase oscillations (Cpt1b, Pparα, Per2) or had greater oscillation amplitudes (Bmal1, Tnf-α, Il-6). Such phase abnormalities of these genes were improved on P35, while defects in amplitudes still existed. In the liver of 17-day-old pups exposed to maternal obesity, the oscillation amplitudes of most rhythmic genes examined (except Bmal1) were strongly suppressed. On P35, the oscillations of circadian and inflammatory genes became more robust in the liver, while metabolic genes were still kept non-rhythmic. Maternal obesity also had a profound influence in the protein expression levels of examined genes in offspring heart and liver. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock undergoes nutritional programing, which may contribute to the alternations in energy metabolism associated with the development of metabolic disorders in early life and adulthood.

  9. Liver enzymes and markers of inflammation in Nigerian adults with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udenze Ifeoma Christiana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the plasma levels of the liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in people with metabolic syndrome and to determine the association between the liver enzymes and obesity, insulin resistance, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP in adult Nigerians with metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: This was a case control study of 50 adult men and women with metabolic syndrome, and 50 age- and sex-matched males and females without metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP-Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII criteria. Written informed consent was obtained from the participants. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Venous blood was collected after an overnight fast. The ethics committee of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria, approved the study protocol. Comparison of continuous variables was done using the student′s t-test. Regression and correlation analysis were used to determine the associations between variables. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in the liver enzymes ALP (P = 0.031, ALT (P = 0.019, and GGT (P = 0.037, as well as in the inflammatory markers CRP (P = 0.019 and the cytokine IL-6 (P = 0.040 between the two study groups. ALP and ALT showed significant correlation with waist circumference, BMI, fasting insulin, and waist/hip ratio (P < 0.05. Multivariate regression also identified ALT, AST, and ALP to be associated with IL-6 and CRP (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Liver enzyme levels were increased in metabolic syndrome and associated with obesity, fasting insulin, and CRP. Elevated liver enzymes may indicate dysmetabolism and increased

  10. Lack of the Lysosomal Membrane Protein, GLMP, in Mice Results in Metabolic Dysregulation in Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yi Kong

    Full Text Available Ablation of glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein (GLMP, formerly known as NCU-G1 has been shown to cause chronic liver injury which progresses into liver fibrosis in mice. Both lysosomal dysfunction and chronic liver injury can cause metabolic dysregulation. Glmp gt/gt mice (formerly known as Ncu-g1gt/gt mice were studied between 3 weeks and 9 months of age. Body weight gain and feed efficiency of Glmp gt/gt mice were comparable to wild type siblings, only at the age of 9 months the Glmp gt/gt siblings had significantly reduced body weight. Reduced size of epididymal fat pads was accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly in Glmp gt/gt mice. Blood analysis revealed reduced levels of blood glucose, circulating triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acids in Glmp gt/gt mice. Increased flux of glucose, increased de novo lipogenesis and lipid accumulation were detected in Glmp gt/gt primary hepatocytes, as well as elevated triacylglycerol levels in Glmp gt/gt liver homogenates, compared to hepatocytes and liver from wild type mice. Gene expression analysis showed an increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis in Glmp gt/gt liver compared to wild type. Our findings are in agreement with the metabolic alterations observed in other mouse models lacking lysosomal proteins, and with alterations characteristic for advanced chronic liver injury.

  11. PORPHYRIN METABOLISM AND LIVER FUNCTION IN THE BANTU

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    method for the detection of urinary coproporphyrin, Mentz5 calculated that ... defect in porphyrin metabolism which is commonly found in the Bantu could be ..... wood,61 traces of uroporphyrin may be excreted in normal urine. As much as 5 ...

  12. Heart over mind: metabolic control of white adipose tissue and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Michinari; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the heart controls the metabolism of peripheral organs. Olson and colleagues previously demonstrated that miR‐208a controls systemic energy homeostasis through the regulation of MED13 in cardiomyocytes (Grueter et al, 2012). In their follow‐up study in this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver are identified as the physiological targets of cardiac MED13 signaling, most likely through cardiac‐derived circulating factors, which boost energy consumption by upregulating metabolic gene expression and increasing mitochondrial numbers (Baskin et al, 2014). In turn, increased energy expenditure in WAT and the liver confers leanness. These findings strengthen the evidence of metabolic crosstalk between the heart and peripheral tissues through cardiokines and also set the stage for the development of novel treatments for metabolic syndrome.

  13. Apoptosis (programmed cell death) as an indicator of xenobiotic toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Xenobiotics alter the frequency and pattern of apoptosis (programmed cell death). Preliminary studies identified the mouse liver, with normally low levels of apoptosis, as a preferable test system to the chicken embryo limb, with normally high levels of apoptosis. The major purposes of these investigations, using the apoptogen and necrogen 1,1-dichloroethylene (DCE), were to determine if increases in apoptosis, (1) could be quantified as a direct result of treatment, (2) were dose- and time-dependent, (3) were independent of necrosis, (4) were associated with mitosis in the control of cell numbers and (5) were limited to specific areas of the liver. To these ends, food-deprived female, CF-1 mice were administered DCE ip under varying experimental conditions. Increased apoptosis occurred in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with 12.5, 40, and 125 mg/kg for 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 hr. Peak effects were observed at 4 hr. Apoptosis occurred only in the midzonal/pericentral areas of the liver. At 12.5 mg/kg, there were no effects on biochemical (alanine transaminase) and morphological indices of necrosis, establishing apoptosis as a separate phenomenon from necrosis. Increased 3 H-thymidine incorporation (DNA synthesis), mitosis and the percentage of octaploid hepatocytes occurred from 24-48 hr after treatment with the apoptotic but non-necrotic dose of 40 mg/kg. Apoptosis only occurred in the midzonal/pericentral areas of the liver after multiple doses with DCE, indicating the zonal selectivity of the response. In conclusion, apoptosis, a normally occurring homeostatic process associated with mitosis in the control of cell numbers, is affected by selected xenobiotics in a dose-dependent manner. Xenobiotic-induced apoptosis in the liver occurs at low doses of xenobiotics which cause no other effects on tissue structure or function

  14. Nrf2 the rescue: Effects of the antioxidative/electrophilic response on the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaassen, Curtis D.; Reisman, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that positively regulates the basal and inducible expression of a large battery of cytoprotective genes. These gene products include proteins that catalyze reduction reactions (NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, Nqo1), conjugation reactions (glutathione-S-transferases, Gsts and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, Ugts), as well as the efflux of potentially toxic xenobiotics and xenobiotic conjugates (multidrug resistance-associated proteins, Mrps). The significance of Nrf2 in the liver has been established, as livers of Nrf2-null mice are more susceptible to various oxidative/electrophilic stress-induced pathologies than wild-type mice. In contrast, both pharmacological and genetic models of hepatic Nrf2 activation are protective against oxidative/electrophilic stress. Furthermore, because certain Nrf2-target genes in the liver could affect the distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics, the effects of Nrf2 on the kinetics of drugs and other xenobiotics should also be considered, with a special emphasis on metabolism and excretion. Therefore, this review highlights the research that has contributed to the understanding of the importance of Nrf2 in toxicodynamics and toxicokinetics, especially that which pertains to the liver.

  15. Analysis of small biomolecules and xenobiotic metabolism using converted graphene-like monolayer plates and laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunook; Yun, Hoyeol; Lee, Sang Wook; Yeo, Woon-Seok

    2017-06-01

    We report a method of small molecule analysis using a converted graphene-like monolayer (CGM) plate and laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF MS) without organic matrices. The CGM plate was prepared from self-assembled monolayers of biphenyl-4-thiol on gold using electron beam irradiation followed by an annealing step. The above plate was utilized for the LDI-TOF MS analyses of various small molecules and their mixtures, e.g., amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, oligoethylene glycols, and flavonoids. The CGM plate afforded high signal-to-noise ratios, good limits of detection (1pmol to 10fmol), and reusability for up to 30 cycles. As a practical application, the enzymatic activity of the cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) enzyme in human liver microsomes was assessed in the 7-hydroxylation of coumarin using the CGM plate without other purification steps. We believe that the prepared CGM plate can be practically used with the advantages of simplicity, sensitivity, and reusability for the matrix-free analysis of small biomolecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels and nonalcoholic fatty liver in individuals with features of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Larrañaga, Gabriela; Wingeyer, Silvia Perés; Graffigna, Mabel; Belli, Susana; Bendezú, Karla; Alvarez, Silvia; Levalle, Oscar; Fainboim, Hugo

    2008-07-01

    Fatty liver represents the liver component of metabolic syndrome and may be involved in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) synthesis. We studied plasma PAI-1 levels and relationships with risk factors for metabolic syndrome, including fatty liver, in 170 patients. Liver ultrasound scan was performed on all patients, and a liver biopsy was performed on those patients with chronically elevated transaminase levels. Plasma PAI-1 levels correlated significantly (P < .05) with body mass index, degree of steatosis, insulin resistance, insulin level, waist circumference, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) -cholesterol. However, only body mass index (beta = .455) and HDL-cholesterol (beta = .293) remained predictors of PAI-1 levels. Liver biopsy revealed a significant correlation (P < .05) between insulin resistance (r = 0.381) or insulin level (r = 0.519) and liver fibrosis. In patients presenting features of metabolic syndrome, plasma PAI-1 levels were mainly conditioned by the whole-body fat content.

  17. Tocotrienols Reverse Cardiovascular, Metabolic and Liver Changes in High Carbohydrate, High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng-Yew Wong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tocotrienols have been reported to improve lipid profiles, reduce atherosclerotic lesions, decrease blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin concentrations, normalise blood pressure in vivo and inhibit adipogenesis in vitro, yet their role in the metabolic syndrome has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effects of palm tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF on high carbohydrate, high fat diet-induced metabolic, cardiovascular and liver dysfunction in rats. Rats fed a high carbohydrate, high fat diet for 16 weeks developed abdominal obesity, hypertension, impaired glucose and insulin tolerance with increased ventricular stiffness, lower systolic function and reduced liver function. TRF treatment improved ventricular function, attenuated cardiac stiffness and hypertension, and improved glucose and insulin tolerance, with reduced left ventricular collagen deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration. TRF improved liver structure and function with reduced plasma liver enzymes, inflammatory cell infiltration, fat vacuoles and balloon hepatocytes. TRF reduced plasma free fatty acid and triglyceride concentrations but only omental fat deposition was decreased in the abdomen. These results suggest that tocotrienols protect the heart and liver, and improve plasma glucose and lipid profiles with minimal changes in abdominal obesity in this model of human metabolic syndrome.

  18. Effects of naphthenic acid exposure on development and liver metabolic processes in anuran tadpoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melvin, Steven D.; Lanctôt, Chantal M.; Craig, Paul M.; Moon, Thomas W.; Peru, Kerry M.; Headley, John V.; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2013-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NA) are used in a variety of commercial and industrial applications, and are primary toxic components of oil sands wastewater. We investigated developmental and metabolic responses of tadpoles exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of a commercial NA blend throughout development. We exposed Lithobates pipiens tadpoles to 1 and 2 mg/L NA for 75 days and monitored growth and development, condition factor, gonad and liver sizes, and levels of liver glucose, glycogen, lipids and cholesterol following exposure. NA decreased growth and development, significantly reduced glycogen stores and increased triglycerides, indicating disruption to processes associated with energy metabolism and hepatic glycolysis. Effects on liver function may explain reduced growth and delayed development observed in this and previous studies. Our data highlight the need for greater understanding of the mechanisms leading to hepatotoxicity in NA-exposed organisms, and indicate that strict guidelines may be needed for the release of NA into aquatic environments. -- Highlights: ► We exposed Lithobates pipiens tadpoles to 1–2 mg/L NA in the laboratory. ► We monitored survival, growth and development for 75 days. ► We measured liver glycogen, glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol levels. ► NA significantly reduced growth and development compared to controls. ► NA significantly reduced glycogen levels and increased triglycerides. -- Leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) tadpoles chronically exposed to sub-lethal NA concentrations (1–2 mg/L) suffered decreased growth and development and disruption to liver metabolic processes

  19. Avian cytochrome P450 (CYP 1-3 family genes: isoforms, evolutionary relationships, and mRNA expression in chicken liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke P Watanabe

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 (CYP of chicken and other avian species have been studied primarily with microsomes or characterized by cloning and protein expression. However, the overall existing isoforms in avian CYP1-3 families or dominant isoforms in avian xenobiotic metabolism have not yet been elucidated. In this study, we aimed to clarify and classify all of the existing isoforms of CYP1-3 in avian species using available genome assemblies for chicken, zebra finch, and turkey. Furthermore, we performed qRT-PCR assay to identify dominant CYP genes in chicken liver. Our results suggested that avian xenobiotic-metabolizing CYP genes have undergone unique evolution such as CYP2C and CYP3A genes, which have undergone avian-specific gene duplications. qRT-PCR experiments showed that CYP2C45 was the most highly expressed isoform in chicken liver, while CYP2C23b was the most highly induced gene by phenobarbital. Considering together with the result of further enzymatic characterization, CYP2C45 may have a dominant role in chicken xenobiotic metabolism due to the constitutive high expression levels, while CYP2C23a and CYP2C23b can be greatly induced by chicken xenobiotic receptor (CXR activators. These findings will provide not only novel insights into avian xenobiotic metabolism, but also a basis for the further characterization of each CYP gene.

  20. Effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on free radical metabolism of liver in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract on Free Radical Metabolism of Liver in mice during endurance exercise. Forty-eight mice were divided into the quiet group and the exercised group. And the two groups were both grouped again, including the control group and the drug-treated group.

  1. Potential role of liver enzymes levels as predictor markers of glucose metabolism disorders in Tunisian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhajja, Houda; Abdelhedi, Rania; Amouri, Ali; Hadj Kacem, Faten; Marrakchi, Rim; Safi, Wajdi; Mrabet, Houcem; Chtourou, Lassaad; Charfi, Nadia; Fourati, Mouna; Bensassi, Salwa; Jamoussi, Kamel; Abid, Mohamed; Ayadi, Hammadi; Feki, Mouna Mnif; Elleuch, Noura Bougacha

    2018-03-10

    The relationship between liver enzymes and type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk is inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate the association between liver markers and risk of carbohydrate metabolism disorders and their discriminatory power for T2D prediction. This cross-sectional study enrolled 216 participants classified as normoglycemic, prediabetes, newly-diagnosed diabetes and diagnosed diabetes. All participants underwent anthropometric and biochemical measurements. The relationship between hepatic enzymes and glucose metabolism markers was evaluated by ANCOVA analyses. The associations between liver enzymes and incident carbohydrate metabolism disorders were analyzed through logistic regression and their discriminatory capacity for T2D by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. High alkaline phosphatase (AP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), γ-glutamyltransferase (γGT) and aspartate aminotrasferase (AST) levels were independently related to decreased insulin sensitivity. Interestingly, higher AP level was significantly associated with increased risk of prediabetes (p=0.017), newly-diagnosed diabetes (p=0.004) and T2D (p=0.007). Elevated γGT level was an independent risk factor for T2D (p=0.032) and undiagnosed-T2D (p=0.010) in prediabetic and normoglycemic subjects, respectively. In ROC analysis, AP was a powerful predictor of incident diabetes and significantly improved T2D prediction. Liver enzymes within normal range, specifically AP levels, are associated with increased risk of carbohydrate metabolism disorders and significantly improved T2D prediction.

  2. Changes in energy metabolism of the juvenile Fasciola hepatica during its development in the liver parenchyma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, A.G.M.; Heuvel, J.M. van den; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1982-01-01

    Juvenile Fasciola hepatica at different stages of development were isolated from the liver parenchyma of experimentally infected rats. Their energy metabolism was studied by incubation with D-[16-14C]glucose and compared with that of juveniles isolated immediately after in vitro emergence from the

  3. Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver D.B. Johnson, 1 W.O. Ward, 2 V.L. Bass, 2 M.C.J. Schladweiler, 2A.D. Ledbetter, 2 D. Andrews, and U.P. Kodavanti 2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, Cha...

  4. Dendrobium nobile Lindl. alkaloids regulate metabolism gene expression in livers of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun-Yan; Xu, Ya-Sha; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Qin; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Liu, Jie; Shi, Jing-Shan

    2017-10-01

    In our previous studies, Dendrobium nobile Lindl. alkaloids (DNLA) has been shown to have glucose-lowering and antihyperlipidaemia effects in diabetic rats, in rats fed with high-fat diets, and in mice challenged with adrenaline. This study aimed to examine the effects of DNLA on the expression of glucose and lipid metabolism genes in livers of mice. Mice were given DNLA at doses of 10-80 mg/kg, po for 8 days, and livers were removed for total RNA and protein isolation to perform real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Dendrobium nobile Lindl. alkaloids increased PGC1α at mRNA and protein levels and increased glucose metabolism gene Glut2 and FoxO1 expression. DNLA also increased the expression of fatty acid β-oxidation genes Acox1 and Cpt1a. The lipid synthesis regulator Srebp1 (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1) was decreased, while the lipolysis gene ATGL was increased. Interestingly, DNLA increased the expression of antioxidant gene metallothionein-1 and NADPH quinone oxidoreductase-1 (Nqo1) in livers of mice. Western blot on selected proteins confirmed these changes including the increased expression of GLUT4 and PPARα. DNLA has beneficial effects on liver glucose and lipid metabolism gene expressions, and enhances the Nrf2-antioxidant pathway gene expressions, which could play integrated roles in regulating metabolic disorders. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. The role of the autonomic nervous liver innervation in the control of energy metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Chun-Xia; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2010-01-01

    Despite a longstanding research interest ever since the early work by Claude Bernard, the functional significance of autonomic liver innervation, either sympathetic or parasympathetic, is still ill defined. This scarcity of information not only holds for the brain control of hepatic metabolism, but

  6. Cadmium, cobalt and lead cause stress response, cell cycle deregulation and increased steroid as well as xenobiotic metabolism in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells which is coordinated by at least nine transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glahn, Felix; Wiese, Jan; Foth, Heidi [Martin-Luther-University, Halle-Wittenberg, Institute of Environmental Toxicology, Halle/Saale (Germany); Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Guthke, Reinhard [Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology, Hans Knoell Institute, Jena (Germany); Zellmer, Sebastian; Gebhardt, Rolf [University of Leipzig, Institute of Biochemistry, Medical Faculty, Leipzig (Germany); Golka, Klaus; Degen, Gisela H.; Hermes, Matthias; Schormann, Wiebke; Brulport, Marc; Bauer, Alexander; Bedawy, Essam [IfADo, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Dortmund (Germany); Hergenroeder, Roland [ISAS, Institute for Analytical Sciences, Dortmund (Germany); Lehmann, Thomas [Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Hengstler, Jan G. [IfADo, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Dortmund (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    Workers occupationally exposed to cadmium, cobalt and lead have been reported to have increased levels of DNA damage. To analyze whether in vivo relevant concentrations of heavy metals cause systematic alterations in RNA expression patterns, we performed a gene array study using primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Cells were incubated with 15{mu}g/l Cd(II), 25{mu}g/l Co(II) and 550{mu}g/l Pb(II) either with individual substances or in combination. Differentially expressed genes were filtered out and used to identify enriched GO categories as well as KEGG pathways and to identify transcription factors whose binding sites are enriched in a given set of promoters. Interestingly, combined exposure to Cd(II), Co(II) and Pb(II) caused a coordinated response of at least seven stress response-related transcription factors, namely Oct-1, HIC1, TGIF, CREB, ATF4, SRF and YY1. A stress response was further corroborated by up regulation of genes involved in glutathione metabolism. A second major response to heavy metal exposure was deregulation of the cell cycle as evidenced by down regulation of the transcription factors ELK-1 and the Ets transcription factor GABP, as well as deregulation of genes involved in purine and pyrimidine metabolism. A third and surprising response was up regulation of genes involved in steroid metabolism, whereby promoter analysis identified up regulation of SRY that is known to play a role in sex determination. A forth response was up regulation of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes, particularly of dihydrodiol dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (AKR1C1, AKR1C2). Incubations with individual heavy metals showed that the response of AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 was predominantly caused by lead. In conclusion, we have shown that in vivo relevant concentrations of Cd(II), Co(II) and Pb(II) cause a complex and coordinated response in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. This study gives an overview of the most responsive genes. (orig.)

  7. Studies of liver-specific metabolic reactions with /sup 15/N. 1. Metabolism of /sup 15/N-ammonium chloride in pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschberg, K; Jung, K; Faust, H; Matkowitz, R

    1987-07-01

    The /sup 15/N tracer technique was used to investigate liver-specific reactions (urea and hippurate synthesis) for studying the metabolism in the healthy and damaged pig liver. After (/sup 15/N)ammonium chloride administration the tracer distribution on non-protein compounds of serum and urine was followed. Blood samplings before and after liver passage rendered possible a direct analysis of the (/sup 15/N)ammonium metabolism. The thioacetamide-induced liver damage was used as model for an acute liver intoxication. The capacity for urea synthesis was not influenced by means of this noxious substance, but the metabolism of amino acids and hippuric acid. The considerably depressed excretion of (/sup 15/N)hippurate seems to be a suitable indicator of liver disfunction.

  8. A liver stress-endocrine nexus promotes metabolic integrity during dietary protein dilution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maida, Adriano; Zota, Annika; Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    2016-01-01

    of impaired glucose homeostasis independently of obesity and food intake. DPD-mediated metabolic inefficiency and improvement of glucose homeostasis were independent of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), but required expression of liver-derived fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in both lean and obese mice. FGF21...... expression and secretion as well as the associated metabolic remodeling induced by DPD also required induction of liver-integrated stress response-driven nuclear protein 1 (NUPR1). Insufficiency of select nonessential amino acids (NEAAs) was necessary and adequate for NUPR1 and subsequent FGF21 induction...... and secretion in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that DPD promotes improved glucose homeostasis through an NEAA insufficiency-induced liver NUPR1/FGF21 axis....

  9. Metabolism of 5-fluorouracil in human liver: an in vivo 19F NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohankrishnan, P.; Sprigg, J.; Cardwell, D.; Komoroski, R.A.; Hutchins, L.; Nauke, S.; Williamson, M.R.; Jagannathan, N.R.

    1999-01-01

    In vivo fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 19 F NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human liver. Nine patients received 5-FU, and additional chemotherapeutic agents (methotrexate, leucovorin, or levamisole) either prophylactically after breast cancer surgery or for colorectal cancer. The time constant for the disappearance of 5-FU from the liver in vivo varied from 5 to 17 min, while the time constant for the appearance of α-fluoro-β-alanine (the major catabolite of 5 FU) varied from 7 to 86 min. The modulators of 5-FU metabolism did not appear to affect the time constant for the disappearance of 5-FU from the liver or for the appearance of α-fluoro-β-alanine. Results obtained indicate that the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU and α-fluoro-β-alanine may vary substantially at different times in a given individual. (author)

  10. Metabolism of 1-[14C]nitropyrene in isolated perfused rat livers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J.A.; Medinsky, M.A.; Dutcher, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    1-Nitropyrene (1-NP), a constituent of diesel exhaust, is carcinogenic to rats and is a bacterial and mammalian mutagen. Biliary and fecal excretion of 1-NP metabolites are the major routes of excretion in rats, suggesting that hepatic metabolism plays a dominant role in determining the biological fate of 1-NP. The purpose of this investigation was to quantitate 1-[14C]NP metabolites formed in isolated perfused rat livers and excreted in bile from rats. Perfused rat livers displayed a capacity for oxidation, reduction, acetylation, and conjugation of 1-NP (or its metabolites). Reduction of 1-NP followed by N-acetylation was the major metabolic pathway observed in the perfused livers. Acetylaminopyrene (AAP) was the major metabolite detected, with total quantities (150 nmol) accounting for about 60% of the total 1-[14C]NP dose (258 nmol) added to the perfusate. Considerably smaller quantities of aminopyrene and hydroxynitropyrenes were also detected. Livers perfused with 1-[14C]NP excreted about 36 nmol equivalents of 1-[14C]NP (12% of the total 1-NP dose) in bile after 60 min. Some of the biliary metabolites were tentatively identified as metabolites of the mercapturic acid pathway. The spectrum of biliary metabolites was qualitatively identical to that seen in bile from intact rats. Quantities of 14C covalently bound to hepatic macromolecules from perfused livers were 0.4 nmol 1-NP eq/g liver. The data from this study indicate that the liver may be an important site for metabolism of 1-NP

  11. Determination of aluminium induced metabolic changes in mice liver: a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, S; Sivasubramanian, J; Khatiwada, Chandra Prasad; Manivannan, J; Raja, B

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we made a new approach to evaluate aluminium induced metabolic changes in liver tissue of mice using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis taking one step further in correlation with strong biochemical evidence. This finding reveals the alterations on the major biochemical constituents, such as lipids, proteins, nucleic acids and glycogen of the liver tissues of mice. The peak area value of amide A significantly decrease from 288.278±3.121 to 189.872±2.012 between control and aluminium treated liver tissue respectively. Amide I and amide II peak area value also decrease from 40.749±2.052 to 21.170±1.311 and 13.167±1.441 to 8.953±0.548 in aluminium treated liver tissue respectively. This result suggests an alteration in the protein profile. The absence of olefinicCH stretching band and CO stretching of triglycerides in aluminium treated liver suggests an altered lipid levels due to aluminium exposure. Significant shift in the peak position of glycogen may be the interruption of aluminium in the calcium metabolism and the reduced level of calcium. The overall findings exhibit that the liver metabolic program is altered through increasing the structural modification in proteins, triglycerides and quantitative alteration in proteins, lipids, and glycogen. All the above mentioned modifications were protected in desferrioxamine treated mice. Histopathological results also revealed impairment of aluminium induced alterations in liver tissue. The results of the FTIR study were found to be in agreement with biochemical studies and which demonstrate FTIR can be used successfully to indicate the molecular level changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are important physiological agents for intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary secretion of lipids, toxic metabolites, and xenobiotics. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and metabolic regulators that activate nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to regulate hepatic lipid, glucose, and energy homeostasis and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is critical for maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing accumulation of cholesterol, triglycerides, and toxic metabolites, and injury in the liver and other organs. Enterohepatic circulation of bile acids from the liver to intestine and back to the liver plays a central role in nutrient absorption and distribution, and metabolic regulation and homeostasis. This physiological process is regulated by a complex membrane transport system in the liver and intestine regulated by nuclear receptors. Toxic bile acids may cause inflammation, apoptosis, and cell death. On the other hand, bile acid-activated nuclear and GPCR signaling protects against inflammation in liver, intestine, and macrophages. Disorders in bile acid metabolism cause cholestatic liver diseases, dyslipidemia, fatty liver diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and bile acid sequestrants are therapeutic agents for treating chronic liver diseases, obesity, and diabetes in humans. PMID:23897684

  13. [Comparative metabolism of three amide alkaloids from Piper longum in five different species of liver microsomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huan; Guo, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Zhao, Hai-Yu; Wu, Xia

    2016-08-01

    Piperine, piperlonguminine and pellitorine are three major amide alkaloids from Piper longum, showing a variety of pharmacological activities. In order to investigate the different metabolism pathways of these compounds in five species of liver microsomes in vitro, the data of full mass spectrum, and MS2, MS3 spectra of these three alkaloids were collected and analyzed by using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a LTQ-orbitrap mass spectrometer (UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap MS); gragment ion information was collected and combined with fragmentation regularities of mass spectra and accurate mass spectrometry data of metabolites, to compare the metabolism difference of three amide alkaloids in liver microsomes of human, rhesus monkey, Beagle dogs, rats and mice. 3 metabolites of piperine, 2 metabolites of piperlonguminine and 1 metabolite of pellitorine were identified quickly. The results showed that the major metabolic pathways of these amide alkaloids in liver microsomes were methylenedioxy group demethylation and oxidation reaction, and metabolic rates were different between species. This study provides basis for further research on in vivo metabolism of piperine analogues from Piper longum. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  14. A20 modulates lipid metabolism and energy production to promote liver regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Damrauer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver regeneration is clinically of major importance in the setting of liver injury, resection or transplantation. We have demonstrated that the NF-κB inhibitory protein A20 significantly improves recovery of liver function and mass following extended liver resection (LR in mice. In this study, we explored the Systems Biology modulated by A20 following extended LR in mice.We performed transcriptional profiling using Affymetrix-Mouse 430.2 arrays on liver mRNA retrieved from recombinant adenovirus A20 (rAd.A20 and rAd.βgalactosidase treated livers, before and 24 hours after 78% LR. A20 overexpression impacted 1595 genes that were enriched for biological processes related to inflammatory and immune responses, cellular proliferation, energy production, oxidoreductase activity, and lipid and fatty acid metabolism. These pathways were modulated by A20 in a manner that favored decreased inflammation, heightened proliferation, and optimized metabolic control and energy production. Promoter analysis identified several transcriptional factors that implemented the effects of A20, including NF-κB, CEBPA, OCT-1, OCT-4 and EGR1. Interactive scale-free network analysis captured the key genes that delivered the specific functions of A20. Most of these genes were affected at basal level and after resection. We validated a number of A20's target genes by real-time PCR, including p21, the mitochondrial solute carriers SLC25a10 and SLC25a13, and the fatty acid metabolism regulator, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha. This resulted in greater energy production in A20-expressing livers following LR, as demonstrated by increased enzymatic activity of cytochrome c oxidase, or mitochondrial complex IV.This Systems Biology-based analysis unravels novel mechanisms supporting the pro-regenerative function of A20 in the liver, by optimizing energy production through improved lipid/fatty acid metabolism, and down-regulated inflammation. These findings

  15. Metabolic syndrome and risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Rodrigues de Araújo Souza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, has been considered the most common liver disease nowadays, which is also the most frequent cause of elevated transaminases and cryptogenic cirrhosis. The greatest input of fatty acids into the liver and consequent increased beta-oxidation contribute to the formation of free radicals, release of inflammatory cytokines and varying degrees of hepatocytic aggression, whose histological expression may vary from steatosis (HS to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The differentiation of these forms is required by the potential risk of progression to cirrhosis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. OBJECTIVE: To review the literature about the major risk factors for NAFLD in the context of metabolic syndrome, focusing on underlying mechanisms and prevention. METHOD: PubMed, MEDLINE and SciELO data basis analysis was performed to identify studies describing the link between risk factors for metabolic syndrome and NAFLD. A combination of descriptors was used, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, metabolic syndrome and risk factors. At the end, 96 clinical and experimental studies, cohorts, meta-analysis and systematic reviews of great impact and scientific relevance to the topic, were selected. RESULTS: The final analysis of all these data, pointed out the central obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension as the best risk factors related to NAFLD. However, other factors were highlighted, such as gender differences, ethnicity, genetic factors and the role of innate immunity system. How these additional factors may be involved in the installation, progression and disease prognosis is discussed. CONCLUSION: Risk factors for NAFLD in the context of metabolic syndrome expands the prospects to 1 recognize patients with metabolic syndrome at high risk for NAFLD, 2 elucidate pathways common to other co-morbidities, 3

  16. The fatty liver dystrophy (fld) mutation: Developmentally related alterations in hepatic triglyceride metabolism and protein expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reue, K.; Rehnmark, S.; Cohen, R.D.; Leete, T.H.; Doolittle, M.H. [West Los Angeles VA Medical Center, CA (United States). Lipid Research Lab.]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Giometti, C.S.; Mishler, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Slavin, B.G. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Fatty liver dystrophy (fld) is an autosomal recessive mutation in mice characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and development of a fatty liver in the early neonatal period. Also associated with the fld phenotype is a tissue-specific deficiency in the expression of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase, as well as elevations in hepatic apolipoprotein A-IV and apolipoprotein C-II mRNA levels. Although these lipid abnormalities resolve at the age of weaning, adult mutant mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy associated with abnormal myelin formation. The fatty liver in fld/fld neonates is characterized by the accumulation of large triglyceride droplets within the parenchymal cells, and these droplets persist within isolated hepatocytes maintained in culture for several days. To identify the metabolic defect that leads to lipid accumulation, the authors investigated several aspects of cellular triglyceride metabolism. The mutant mice exhibited normal activity of acid triacylglycerol lipase, an enzyme thought to be responsible for hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the liver. Metabolic labeling studies performed with oleic acid revealed that free fatty acids accumulate in the liver of 3 day old fld/fld mice, but not in adults. This accumulation in liver was mirrored by elevated free fatty acid levels in plasma of fld/fld neonates, with levels highest in very young mice and returning to normal by the age of one month. Quantitation of fatty acid oxidation in cells isolated from fld/fld neonates revealed that oxidation rate is reduced 60% in hepatocytes and 40% in fibroblasts; hepatocytes from adult fld/fld mice exhibited an oxidation rate similar to those from wild-type mice.

  17. Liver carbohydrates metabolism: A new islet-neogenesis associated protein peptide (INGAP-PP) target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagarcía, Hernán Gonzalo; Román, Carolina Lisi; Castro, María Cecilia; González, Luisa Arbeláez; Ronco, María Teresa; Francés, Daniel Eleazar; Massa, María Laura; Maiztegui, Bárbara; Flores, Luis Emilio; Gagliardino, Juan José; Francini, Flavio

    2018-03-01

    Islet-Neogenesis Associated Protein-Pentadecapeptide (INGAP-PP) increases β-cell mass and enhances glucose and amino acids-induced insulin secretion. Our aim was to demonstrate its effect on liver metabolism. For that purpose, adult male Wistar rats were injected twice-daily (10 days) with saline solution or INGAP-PP (250 μg). Thereafter, serum glucose, triglyceride and insulin levels were measured and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) and hepatic insulin sensitivity (HIS) were determined. Liver glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) expression and activity, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) expression, phosphofructokinase-2 (PFK-2) protein content, P-Akt/Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (P-GSK3/GSK3) protein ratios and glycogen deposit were also determined. Additionally, glucokinase activity and G-6-Pase and PEPCK gene expression were also determined in isolated hepatocytes from normal rats incubated with INGAP-PP (5 μg/ml). INGAP-PP administration did not modify any of the serum parameters tested but significantly increased activity of liver glucokinase and the protein level of its cytosolic activator, PFK-2. Conversely, INGAP-PP treated rats decreased gene expression and enzyme activity of gluconeogenic enzymes, G-6-Pase and PEPCK. They also showed a higher glycogen deposit and P-GSK3/GSK3 and P-Akt/Akt ratio. In isolated hepatocytes, INGAP-PP increased GK activity and decreased G-6-Pase and PEPCK expression. These results demonstrate a direct effect of INGAP-PP on the liver acting through P-Akt signaling pathway. INGAP-PP enhances liver glucose metabolism and deposit and reduces its production/output, thereby contributing to maintain normal glucose homeostasis. These results reinforce the concept that INGAP-PP might become a useful tool to treat people with impaired islet/liver glucose metabolism as it occurs in T2D. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intestinal first pass metabolism of midazolam in liver cirrhosis --effect of grapefruit juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Pedersen, Natalie; Larsen, Niels-Erik

    2002-01-01

    Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4 in the intestinal wall leading to a reduced intestinal first pass metabolism and thereby an increased oral bioavailability of certain drugs. For example, it has been shown that the oral bioavailability of midazolam, a CYP3A4 substrate, increased by 52% in healthy...... subjects after ingestion of grapefruit juice. However, this interaction has not been studied in patients with impaired liver function. Accordingly, the effect of grapefruit juice on the AUC of midazolam and the metabolite alpha-hydroxymidazolam was studied in patients with cirrhosis of the liver....

  19. Diet-induced metabolic hamster model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhathena J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jasmine Bhathena, Arun Kulamarva, Christopher Martoni, Aleksandra Malgorzata Urbanska, Meenakshi Malhotra, Arghya Paul, Satya PrakashBiomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, CanadaBackground: Obesity, hypercholesterolemia, elevated triglycerides, and type 2 diabetes are major risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Hamsters, unlike rats or mice, respond well to diet-induced obesity, increase body mass and adiposity on group housing, and increase food intake due to social confrontation-induced stress. They have a cardiovascular and hepatic system similar to that of humans, and can thus be a useful model for human pathophysiology.Methods: Experiments were planned to develop a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model of dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hamsters were fed a normal control diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol/methionine-deficient/choline-devoid diet, and a high-fat/high-cholesterol/choline-deficient diet. Serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, atherogenic index, and body weight were quantified biweekly. Fat deposition in the liver was observed and assessed following lipid staining with hematoxylin and eosin and with oil red O.Results: In this study, we established a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model for studying dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hyperlipidemia and elevated serum glucose concentrations were induced using this diet. Atherogenic index was elevated, increasing the risk for a cardiovascular event. Histological analysis of liver specimens at the end of four weeks showed increased fat deposition in the liver of animals fed

  20. MicroRNA-mediated regulation of glutathione and methionine metabolism and its relevance for liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shelly C; Mato, José M; Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Lamas, Santiago

    2016-11-01

    The discovery of the microRNA (miRNA) family of small RNAs as fundamental regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression has fostered research on their importance in every area of biology and clinical medicine. In the particular area of liver metabolism and disease, miRNAs are gaining increasing importance. By focusing on two fundamental hepatic biosynthetic pathways, glutathione and methionine, we review recent advances on the comprehension of the role of miRNAs in liver pathophysiology and more specifically of models of hepatic cholestasis/fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue in MCD diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sou Hyun; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jeong-Dong; Oh, Ji Youn; Jung, Young-Suk

    2016-07-26

    Higher susceptibility to metabolic disease in male exemplifies the importance of sexual dimorphism in pathogenesis. We hypothesized that the higher incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in males involves sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue. In the present study, we used a methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced fatty liver mouse model to investigate sex differences in the metabolic response of the liver and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks on an MCD-diet, fatty liver was induced in a sex-specific manner, affecting male mice more severely than females. The MCD-diet increased lipolytic enzymes in the gonadal white adipose tissue (gWAT) of male mice, whereas it increased expression of uncoupling protein 1 and other brown adipocyte markers in the gWAT of female mice. Moreover, gWAT from female mice demonstrated higher levels of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial content compared to gWAT from male mice. FGF21 expression was increased in liver tissue by the MCD diet, and the degree of upregulation was significantly higher in the livers of female mice. The endocrine effect of FGF21 was responsible, in part, for the sex-specific browning of gonadal white adipose tissue. Collectively, these data demonstrated that distinctively female-specific browning of white adipose tissue aids in protecting female mice against MCD diet-induced fatty liver disease.

  2. Celastrol ameliorates liver metabolic damage caused by a high-fat diet through Sirt1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinliang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    . Conclusions: Celastrol ameliorates NAFLD by decreasing lipid synthesis and improving the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory status. And Sirt1 has an important role in Celastrol-ameliorating liver metabolic damage caused by HFD. Keywords: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, Celastrol, Sirt1, Lipid metabolism, Chronic inflammation, Oxidative stress

  3. A tryptophan derivative, ITE, enhances liver cell metabolic functions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Lu, Juan; He, Bin; Tang, Lingling; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Danhua; Cao, Hongcui; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Cell encapsulation provides a three-dimensional support by incorporating isolated cells into microcapsules with the goal of simultaneously maintaining cell survival and function, as well as providing active transport for a bioreactor in vitro similarly to that observed in vivo. However, the biotra-nsformation and metabolic functions of the encapsulated cells are not satisfactory for clinical applications. For this purpose, in this study, hepatoma-derived Huh7 cells/C3A cells were treated with 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), an endogenous non-toxic ligand for aryl hydrocarbon receptor, in monolayer cultures and on microspheres. The mRNA and protein levels, as well as the metabolic activities of drug metabolizing enzymes, albumin secretion and urea synthesis were determined. When the Huh7 and C3A cells cultured in a monolayer on two‑dimensional surfaces, ITE enhanced the protein levels and the metabolic activities of the major cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP1B1, and slightly increased albumin secretion and urea synthesis. Moreover, when cultured on microspheres, ITE also substantially increased the protein levels and metabolic activities of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP1B1 in both liver cell lines. On the whole, our findings indicate that ITE enhances the enzymatic activities of major CYP450 enzymes and the metabolic functions of liver cells cultured in monolayer or on microspheres, indicating that it may be utilized to improve the functions of hepatocytes. Thus, it may be used in the future for the treatment of liver diseases.

  4. A tryptophan derivative, ITE, enhances liver cell metabolic functions in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Lu, Juan; He, Bin; Tang, Lingling; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Danhua; Cao, Hongcui; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Cell encapsulation provides a three-dimensional support by incorporating isolated cells into microcapsules with the goal of simultaneously maintaining cell survival and function, as well as providing active transport for a bioreactor in vitro similarly to that observed in vivo. However, the biotransformation and metabolic functions of the encapsulated cells are not satisfactory for clinical applications. For this purpose, in this study, hepatoma-derived Huh7 cells/C3A cells were treated with 2-(1′H-indole-3′-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), an endogenous non-toxic ligand for aryl hydrocarbon receptor, in monolayer cultures and on microspheres. The mRNA and protein levels, as well as the metabolic activities of drug metabolizing enzymes, albumin secretion and urea synthesis were determined. When the Huh7 and C3A cells cultured in a monolayer on two-dimensional surfaces, ITE enhanced the protein levels and the metabolic activities of the major cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP1B1, and slightly increased albumin secretion and urea synthesis. Moreover, when cultured on microspheres, ITE also substantially increased the protein levels and metabolic activities of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP1B1 in both liver cell lines. On the whole, our findings indicate that ITE enhances the enzymatic activities of major CYP450 enzymes and the metabolic functions of liver cells cultured in monolayer or on microspheres, indicating that it may be utilized to improve the functions of hepatocytes. Thus, it may be used in the future for the treatment of liver diseases. PMID:27959388

  5. Effects of castration on expression of lipid metabolism genes in the liver of korean cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Myunggi; Nguyen, Trang Hoa; Jeong, Jin Young; Piao, Min Yu; Kang, Hyeok Joong

    2015-01-01

    Castration induces the accumulation of body fat and deposition of intramuscular fat in Korean cattle, resulting in improved beef quality. However, little is known about the metabolic adaptations in the liver following castration. To understand changes in lipid metabolism following castration, hepatic expression levels of lipid metabolism genes were compared between Korean bulls and steers. Steers had higher (pcastration of bulls. However, we found no differences in the hepatic expression levels of genes related to triglyceride synthesis (mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 and 2) and fatty acid (FA) oxidation (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A, C-4 to C-12 straight chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) between bulls and steers. No differences in gene expression for very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion, including apolipoprotein B mRNA and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) protein, were observed in the liver although MTTP mRNA levels were higher in steers compared to bulls. In conclusion, FA synthesis may contribute to increased hepatic lipid deposition in steers following castration. However, hepatic lipid metabolism, including triglyceride synthesis, FA oxidation, and VLDL secretion, was not significantly altered by castration. Our results suggest that hepatic lipid metabolism does not significantly contribute to increased body fat deposition in steers following castration.

  6. Metabolic changes in the pig liver during warm ischemia and reperfusion measured by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannerup, Anne-Sofie; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Grønbaek, Henning

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Portal triad clamping can cause ischemia-reperfusion injury. The aim of the study was to monitor metabolic changes by microdialysis before, during, and after warm ischemia in the pigliver. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight pigs underwent laparotomy followed by ischemia by Pringle's maneuver. One...... in transaminase levels was observed. CONCLUSIONS: During and after warm ischemia, there were profound metabolic changes in the pigliver observed with an increase in lactate, glucose, glycerol, and the lactate-pyruvate ratio. There were no differences between the four liver lobes, indicating the piglivers...

  7. Transgenic plants for enhanced biodegradation and phytoremediation of organic xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, P C; Jamil, Sarah; Singh, Nandita

    2009-01-01

    Phytoremediation--the use of plants to clean up polluted soil and water resources--has received much attention in the last few years. Although plants have the inherent ability to detoxify xenobiotics, they generally lack the catabolic pathway for the complete degradation of these compounds compared to microorganisms. There are also concerns over the potential for the introduction of contaminants into the food chain. The question of how to dispose of plants that accumulate xenobiotics is also a serious concern. Hence the feasibility of phytoremediation as an approach to remediate environmental contamination is still somewhat in question. For these reasons, researchers have endeavored to engineer plants with genes that can bestow superior degradation abilities. A direct method for enhancing the efficacy of phytoremediation is to overexpress in plants the genes involved in metabolism, uptake, or transport of specific pollutants. Furthermore, the expression of suitable genes in root system enhances the rhizodegradation of highly recalcitrant compounds like PAHs, PCBs etc. Hence, the idea to amplify plant biodegradation of xenobiotics by genetic manipulation was developed, following a strategy similar to that used to develop transgenic crops. Genes from human, microbes, plants, and animals are being used successfully for this venture. The introduction of these genes can be readily achieved for many plant species using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated plant transformation or direct DNA methods of gene transfer. One of the promising developments in transgenic technology is the insertion of multiple genes (for phase 1 metabolism (cytochrome P450s) and phase 2 metabolism (GSH, GT etc.) for the complete degradation of the xenobiotics within the plant system. In addition to the use of transgenic plants overexpressed with P450 and GST genes, various transgenic plants expressing bacterial genes can be used for the enhanced degradation and remediation of herbicides, explosives

  8. Alteration of liver parameters in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with metabolic síndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Sahuquillo Martínez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The interest of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is growing due to several reasons: high prevalence of the disease in the Western World, its capability to progress towards more aggressive histological forms and its association with diseases that increase cardiovascular risk. Objective: To analyze the alteration of liver parameters in NAFLD in patients with metabolic syndrome. Methods: A transverse, descriptive study of 100 patients with two or more cardiovascular risk factors was conducted. All patients signed informed consent. Patients selected were among those attending our Medical Office of Primary Attention and who had very little or no alcoholic consumption. A complete battery of analysis was performed including total abdominal ultrasound. Steatosis was evaluated and, if determined positive, patients were stratified in three degrees. The following determinations were collected: sex, personal and familial history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, age, weight, BMI, present pharmacological treatment, analytical parameters, blood pressure and abdominal perimeter. Results: 100 patients were included in the study, 56 (56% women and 44 (44% men, with an average age of 61,84 + 9,5 years 23% of all patients did not have NAFLD; 29% had mild NAFLD, 29% had moderate NAFLD and 19% had severe NAFLD. 82% of men presented NAFLD. 29% of women did not nave NAFLD. 22% were overweight and 38% were obese. Blood pressure was altered in 22% of men and 18% of women. 60% had altered fasting blood glucose. 36% had hypertriglyceridemia, 41% hypercholesterolemia with 65% high LDL cholesterol and 16% of low HDL cholesterol. 83% of patients had two or more criteria of metabolic syndrome. Average transaminases were: ALT 24.98 u/i; AST 32.19 u/i; GGT 55,65 u/i; ALT/AST ratio: 0.77. Lactate dehydrogenase 255.30 u/L. Alkaline phosphatase 82.80 u/L and bilirubin 0.78 mg/dL Conclusions: We did not find correlation between liver steatosis and alteration

  9. Fasting augments PCB impact on liver metabolism in anadromous Arctic Char

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, M.M.; Aluru, N.; Maule, A.G.; Jorgensen, E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Anadromous arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) undertake short feeding migrations to seawater every summer and accumulate lipids, while the rest of the year is spent in fresh water where the accumulated lipid reserves are mobilized. We tested the hypothesis that winter fasting and the associated polychlorinated biphenyls' (PCBs) redistribution from lipid depots to critical tissues impair the liver metabolic capacity in these animals. Char were administered Aroclor 1254 (0, 1, 10, and 100 mg/ kg body mass) orally and maintained for 4 months without feeding to mimic seasonal winter fasting, while fed groups (0 and 100 mg Aroclor 1254/kg) were maintained for comparison. A clear dose-related increase in PCB accumulation and cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) protein content was observed in the livers of fasted fish. This PCB concentration and CYP1A response with the high dose of Aroclor were 1.5-fold and 3-fold greater in the fasted than in the fed fish, respectively. In fed fish, PCB exposure lowered liver glycogen content, whereas none of the other metabolic indicators were significantly affected. In fasted fish, PCB exposure depressed liver glycogen content and activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and elevated 3-hydroxyacylcoA dehydrogenase activity and glucocorticoid receptor protein expression. There were no significant impacts of PCB on heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) and hsp90 contents in either fed or fasted fish. Collectively, our study demonstrates that winter emaciation associated with the anadromous lifestyle predisposes arctic char to PCB impact on hepatic metabolism including disruption of the adaptive metabolic responses to extended fasting. ?? 2006 Oxford University Press.

  10. Dynamics of some conjugated enzymes of aminonitrogen metabolism in the liver of the irradiated body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskij, V.I.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the activity of five conjugated enzymes of the aminonitrogen metabolism in subcellular fractions of liver tissue have been studied on irradiated (450 R) rabbits during thirty days after exposure. These changes are peculiar for their manifestation in time, their depth and trend. It is suggested that in the early period of radiation damage, gluconeogenesis is enhanced, and in the later period, biosynthesis of pyrimidine bases is intensified

  11. The effect of experimental diabetes on phenylalanine metabolism in isolated liver cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Santana, M A; Fisher, M J; Bate, A J; Pogson, C I

    1985-01-01

    Chronic (10-day) diabetes was associated with increased metabolic flux through phenylalanine hydroxylase in isolated liver cells. This flux was stimulated by 0.1 microM-glucagon, but not by 10 microM-noradrenaline; 0.1 microM-insulin affected neither basal nor glucagon-stimulated flux. The increased rate of phenylalanine hydroxylation in diabetes was accompanied by parallel increases in enzyme activity (as measured with artificial cofactor) and immunoreactive-enzyme-protein content. In contra...

  12. Phenylalanine metabolism in isolated rat liver cells. Effects of glucagon and diabetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, F P; Pogson, C I

    1981-01-01

    1. Methods are described for monitoring the metabolic flux through phenylalanine hydroxylase, the tyrosine catabolic pathway and phenylalanine: pyruvate transaminase in isolated liver cell incubations. 2. The relationship between hydroxylase flux and phenylalanine concentration is sigmoidal. 3. Glucagon increases hydroxylase activity at low, near-physiological, substrate concentrations only. The hormone does not affect the rate of formation of phenylpyruvate. 4. Experimental diabetes (for 10 ...

  13. Metabolism of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and tetrabromobisphenol A by fish liver subcellular fractions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mengnan; Cheng, Jie; Wu, Ruohan; Zhang, Shenghu; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2012-06-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) are two major flame retardants that accumulate in fish tissues and are potentially toxic. Their debrominated and oxidated derivatives were also reported in fish tissues although the sources of theses derivatives were unidentified. Our study was to determine whether PBDEs and TBBPA could be metabolized by fish liver subcellular fractions in vitro and to identify what types of metabolites were formed. Liver microsomes and S9 fractions of crucian carp (Carassius auratus) were exposed to 4,4'-dibromodiphenyl ether (BDE 15), 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 47) or TBBPA solutions for 4h. Exposure of liver subcellular fractions to BDE 15 resulted in the formation of bromophenol and two monohydroxylated dibromodiphenyl ether metabolites. Neither in microsomes nor in S9 studies has revealed the presence of hydroxylated metabolites with BDE 47 exposure which indicated that the oxidation reactions in vitro were hindered by the increased number of bromine substituents on the PBDEs. TBBPA underwent an oxidative cleavage near the central carbon of the molecule, which led to the production of 2,6-dibromo-4-isopropyl-phenol and three unidentified metabolites. Another metabolite of TBBPA characterized as a hexa-brominated compound with three aromatic rings was also found in the liver subcellular fractions. These results suggest that the biotransformation of BDE 15 and TBBPA in fish liver is mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, as revealed by the formation of hydroxylated metabolites and oxidative bond cleavage products. Moreover, further studies on the identification of specific CYP450 isozymes involved in the biotransformation revealed that CYP1A was the major enzyme responsible for the biotransformation of BDE 15 and TBBPA in fish liver subcellular fractions and CYP3A4 also played a major role in metabolism of TBBPA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bone metabolism dynamics in the early post-transplant period following kidney and liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Peter W; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A; Boggian, Katia; Bonani, Marco; van Delden, Christian; Enriquez, Natalia; Fehr, Thomas; Garzoni, Christian; Hirsch, Hans H; Hirzel, Cédric; Manuel, Oriol; Meylan, Pascal; Saleh, Lanja; Weisser, Maja; Mueller, Nicolas J

    2018-01-01

    Bone disease contributes to relevant morbidity after solid organ transplantation. Vitamin D has a crucial role for bone metabolism. Activation of vitamin D depends on the endocrine function of both, liver and kidney. Our study assessed key markers of bone metabolism at time of transplantation and 6 months after transplantation among 70 kidney and 70 liver recipients. In 70 kidney recipients 25-OH vitamin D levels did not differ significantly between peri-transplant (median 32.5nmol/l) and 6 months post-transplant (median 41.9nmol/l; P = 0.272). Six months post-transplant median 1, 25-(OH)2 vitamin D levels increased by >300% (from 9.1 to 36.5ng/l; Ptransplantation and of intact parathyroid hormone 6 months post-transplant. Among 70 liver recipients, 25-OH vitamin D, 1, 25-(OH)2 vitamin D and intact parathyroid hormone levels were not significantly altered between peri-transplant and 6 months post-transplant. Contrary to kidney recipients, median CTx increased by 60.0% (from 0.45 to 0.72 ng/ml; P = 0.002) and P1NP by 49.3% (from 84.0 to 125.4ng/ml; P = 0.001) in the longitudinal course. Assessed biomarkers didn't differ between liver recipients with and without fractures. To conclude, the assessed panel of biomarkers proved highly dynamic after liver as well as kidney transplantation in the early post-transplant period. After kidney transplantation a significant gain in 1, 25-(OH)2 vitamin D combined with a decline in iPTH, CTx and P1NP, whereas after liver transplantation an increase in CTx and P1NP were characteristic.

  15. Nor-Ursodeoxycholic Acid as a Novel Therapeutic Approach for Cholestatic and Metabolic Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halilbasic, Emina; Steinacher, Daniel; Trauner, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) is a side-chain-shortened derivative of ursodeoxycholic acid with relative resistance to amidation, which enables its cholehepatic shunting. Based on its specific pharmacologic properties, norUDCA is a promising drug for a range of cholestatic liver and bile duct disorders. Recently, norUDCA has been successfully tested clinically in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as first application in patients. Moreover, hepatic enrichment of norUDCA facilitates direct therapeutic effects on both parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells, thereby counteracting cholestasis, steatosis, hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, inhibiting hepatocellular proliferation, and promoting autophagy. This may open its therapeutic use to other non-cholestatic and metabolic liver diseases. This review article is a summary of a lecture given at the XXIV International Bile Acid Meeting (Falk Symposium 203) on "Bile Acids in Health and Disease" held in Düsseldorf, on June 17-18, 2016 and summarizes the recent progress of norUDCA as novel therapeutic approach in cholestatic and metabolic liver disorders with a specific focus on PSC. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Nucleic acid metabolism in human chronic liver disease by in vitro autoradiography. I. Altered RNA metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1976-06-01

    Biopsy liver specimens from healthy control subjects (N=5) and patients with various liver diseases (N=43) were investigated by the vitro autoradiography. The Leevy technique of adding /sup 3/H-5-uridine (/sup 3/H-U) to the incubation medium was used. In healthy subjects labeling with /sup 3/H-U was observed mostly in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells and the frequency of /sup 3/H-U labeled cells was extremely high. Higher frequencies of labeled fibrocytes and endothelial cells of the blood vessel were found in acute hepatitis than in control subjects. In the active form of chronic hepatitis, significantly higher counts of labeled fibrocytes, ductular cells and lymphocytes were found. In patients with acute hepatitis or the inactive form of chronic hepatitis, only a few labeled lymphocytes were observed. Larger numbers of labeled fibrocytes were found in patients with chronic hepatitis with sublobular hepatic necrosis, than in patients with the active form of chronic hepatitis. In cirrhotic livers, marked increases of labeled ductular cells, fibrocytes and bile duct cells were found. No significant labeling differences were observed in the hepatocytes of various liver diseases. In chronic hepatitis with sublobular hepatic necrosis, a more significant decrease of labeled Kupffer cells was present than in the inactive form of chronic hepatitis. Labeled ductular cells and fibrocytes increased as the disease progressed from acute hepatitis to liver cirrhosis. The labeling index of rosettes cells was intermediate between the hepatocytes and ductular cells. The ratio of labeled parenchymal to non-parenchymal cells decreased proportionally from chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis.

  17. Uric Acid Stimulates Fructokinase and Accelerates Fructose Metabolism in the Development of Fatty Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura G.; Cicerchi, Christina; Li, Nanxing; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Le, Myphuong; Garcia, Gabriela E.; Thomas, Jeffrey B.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Andres-Hernando, Ana; Hunter, Brandi; Schreiner, George; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Excessive dietary fructose intake may have an important role in the current epidemics of fatty liver, obesity and diabetes as its intake parallels the development of these syndromes and because it can induce features of metabolic syndrome. The effects of fructose to induce fatty liver, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, however, vary dramatically among individuals. The first step in fructose metabolism is mediated by fructokinase (KHK), which phosphorylates fructose to fructose-1-phosphate; intracellular uric acid is also generated as a consequence of the transient ATP depletion that occurs during this reaction. Here we show in human hepatocytes that uric acid up-regulates KHK expression thus leading to the amplification of the lipogenic effects of fructose. Inhibition of uric acid production markedly blocked fructose-induced triglyceride accumulation in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism whereby uric acid stimulates KHK expression involves the activation of the transcription factor ChREBP, which, in turn, results in the transcriptional activation of KHK by binding to a specific sequence within its promoter. Since subjects sensitive to fructose often develop phenotypes associated with hyperuricemia, uric acid may be an underlying factor in sensitizing hepatocytes to fructose metabolism during the development of fatty liver. PMID:23112875

  18. The Severity of Fatty Liver Disease Relating to Metabolic Abnormalities Independently Predicts Coronary Calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ying-Hsiang; Wu, Yih-Jer; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Yeh, Hung-I.; Tsai, Cheng-Ho; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Hung, Chung-Lieh

    2011-01-01

    Background. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the metabolic disorders presented in liver. The relationship between severity of NAFLD and coronary atherosclerotic burden remains largely unknown. Methods and Materials. We analyzed subjects undergoing coronary calcium score evaluation by computed tomography (MDCT) and fatty liver assessment using abdominal ultrasonography. Framingham risk score (FRS) and metabolic risk score (MRS) were obtained in all subjects. A graded, semiquantitative score was established to quantify the severity of NAFLD. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to depict the association between NAFLD and calcium score. Results. Of all, 342 participants (female: 22.5%, mean age: 48.7 ± 7.0 years) met the sufficient information rendering detailed analysis. The severity of NAFLD was positively associated with MRS (X 2 = 6.12, trend P < 0.001) and FRS (X 2 = 5.88, trend P < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment for clinical variables and life styles, the existence of moderate to severe NAFLD was independently associated with abnormal calcium score (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The severity of NAFLD correlated well with metabolic abnormality and was independently predict coronary calcification beyond clinical factors. Our data suggests that NAFLD based on ultrasonogram could positively reflect the burden of coronary calcification

  19. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Altered Systemic Amino Acid Metabolism Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Sulin; Wiklund, Petri; Autio, Reija; Borra, Ronald; Ojanen, Xiaowei; Xu, Leiting; Törmäkangas, Timo; Alen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatty liver is a major cause of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify early metabolic alterations associated with liver fat accumulation in 50- to 55-year-old men (n = 49) and women (n = 52) with and without NAFLD. METHODS: Hepatic fat content was

  20. Liver Inflammation and Metabolic Signaling in ApcMin/+ Mice: The Role of Cachexia Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsale, Aditi A.; Enos, Reilly T.; Puppa, Melissa J.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Murphy, E. Angela; Fayad, Raja; Pena, Majorette O’; Durstine, J. Larry; Carson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The ApcMin/+ mouse exhibits an intestinal tumor associated loss of muscle and fat that is accompanied by chronic inflammation, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia. Since the liver governs systemic energy demands through regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, it is likely that the liver is a pathological target of cachexia progression in the ApcMin/+ mouse. The purpose of this study was to determine if cancer and the progression of cachexia affected liver endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress, inflammation, metabolism, and protein synthesis signaling. The effect of cancer (without cachexia) was examined in wild-type and weight-stable ApcMin/+ mice. Cachexia progression was examined in weight-stable, pre-cachectic, and severely-cachectic ApcMin/+ mice. Livers were analyzed for morphology, glycogen content, ER-stress, inflammation, and metabolic changes. Cancer induced hepatic expression of ER-stress markers BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein), IRE-1α (endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus signaling 1), and inflammatory intermediate STAT-3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). While gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA expression was suppressed by cancer, glycogen content or protein synthesis signaling remained unaffected. Cachexia progression depleted liver glycogen content and increased mRNA expression of glycolytic enzyme PFK (phosphofrucktokinase) and gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK. Cachexia progression further increased pSTAT-3 but suppressed p-65 and JNK (c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase) activation. Interestingly, progression of cachexia suppressed upstream ER-stress markers BiP and IRE-1α, while inducing its downstream target CHOP (DNA-damage inducible transcript 3). Cachectic mice exhibited a dysregulation of protein synthesis signaling, with an induction of p-mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), despite a suppression of Akt (thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1) and S6 (ribosomal protein S6) phosphorylation. Thus, cancer

  1. Liver inflammation and metabolic signaling in ApcMin/+ mice: the role of cachexia progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi A Narsale

    Full Text Available The ApcMin/+ mouse exhibits an intestinal tumor associated loss of muscle and fat that is accompanied by chronic inflammation, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia. Since the liver governs systemic energy demands through regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, it is likely that the liver is a pathological target of cachexia progression in the ApcMin/+ mouse. The purpose of this study was to determine if cancer and the progression of cachexia affected liver endoplasmic reticulum (ER-stress, inflammation, metabolism, and protein synthesis signaling. The effect of cancer (without cachexia was examined in wild-type and weight-stable ApcMin/+ mice. Cachexia progression was examined in weight-stable, pre-cachectic, and severely-cachectic ApcMin/+ mice. Livers were analyzed for morphology, glycogen content, ER-stress, inflammation, and metabolic changes. Cancer induced hepatic expression of ER-stress markers BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein, IRE-1α (endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus signaling 1, and inflammatory intermediate STAT-3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. While gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK mRNA expression was suppressed by cancer, glycogen content or protein synthesis signaling remained unaffected. Cachexia progression depleted liver glycogen content and increased mRNA expression of glycolytic enzyme PFK (phosphofrucktokinase and gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK. Cachexia progression further increased pSTAT-3 but suppressed p-65 and JNK (c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation. Interestingly, progression of cachexia suppressed upstream ER-stress markers BiP and IRE-1α, while inducing its downstream target CHOP (DNA-damage inducible transcript 3. Cachectic mice exhibited a dysregulation of protein synthesis signaling, with an induction of p-mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin, despite a suppression of Akt (thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 and S6 (ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Thus

  2. Studies on the mechanism of quinone action on hormonal regulation of metabolism in the rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism of quinone actions in liver cell metabolism had been investigated using menadione as a model compound. Previous reports suggested that quinones and free radicals could produce perturbations in cellular calcium homeostasis. Since calcium plays an important role in the regulation of cellular metabolic processes, then regulation of cytosolic calcium concentrations, and thus of cellular metabolism, by calcium-mobilizing hormones such as phenylephrine and vasopressin could possibly be modified by quinones such as menadione. Methods used to approach this hypothesis included the assay for activation of glycogen phosphorylase, an indirect index of calcium mobilization; the determination of calcium mobilization with 45 Ca efflux exchange and with fluorescent calcium indicator fura-2; and the measurement of phosphatidylinositides, an important link in the membrane-associated receptor-mediated signal transduction mechanism

  3. Energy metabolism and biotransformation as endpoints to pre-screen hepatotoxicity using a liver spheroid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jinsheng; Purcell, Wendy M.

    2006-01-01

    The current study investigated liver spheroid culture as an in vitro model to evaluate the endpoints relevant to the status of energy metabolism and biotransformation after exposure to test toxicants. Mature rat liver spheroids were exposed to diclofenac, galactosamine, isoniazid, paracetamol, m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB) and 3-nitroaniline (3-NA) for 24 h. Pyruvate uptake, galactose biotransformation, lactate release and glucose secretion were evaluated after exposure. The results showed that pyruvate uptake and lactate release by mature liver spheroids in culture were maintained at a relatively stable level. These endpoints, together with glucose secretion and galactose biotransformation, were related to and could reflect the status of energy metabolism and biotransformation in hepatocytes. After exposure, all of the test agents significantly reduced glucose secretion, which was shown to be the most sensitive endpoint of those evaluated. Diclofenac, isoniazid, paracetamol and galactosamine reduced lactate release (P < 0.01), but m-DNB increased lactate release (P < 0.01). Diclofenac, isoniazid and paracetamol also reduced pyruvate uptake (P < 0.01), while galactosamine had little discernible effect. Diclofenac, galactosamine, paracetamol and m-DNB also reduced galactose biotransformation (P < 0.01), by contrast, isoniazid did not. The metabolite of m-DNB, 3-NA, which served as a negative control, did not cause significant changes in lactate release, pyruvate uptake or galactose biotransformation. It is concluded that pyruvate uptake, galactose biotransformation, lactate release and glucose secretion can be used as endpoints for evaluating the status of energy metabolism and biotransformation after exposure to test agents using the liver spheroid model to pre-screen hepatotoxicity

  4. [Adiponectin in patients with metabolic syndrome and diseases of the liver, bile ducts and pancreas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vašura, Adam; Blaho, Martin; Dítě, Petr; Kupka, Tomáš; Svoboda, Pavel; Martínek, Arnošt

    Epidemiological data show that the metabolic syndrome can be diagnosed in up to 30 % of the population. Regarding 5 components of the metabolic syndrome, three of them, in case of positivity (visceral obesity, arterial hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, changes of HDL-cholesterol levels and type 2 diabetes mellitus), are pathogenic factors which are the most frequently related to cardiovascular diseases, but currently they are also the focus of interest for gastroenterologists. The relationship between non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis, including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, has been described. Less is known so far about the relation to the pancreas disease, particularly with respect to the status referred to as non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease. The hormone selectively produced by adipose tissue is adiponectin. This protein is studied as a possible biomarker in people with metabolic syndrome, including obesity. Besides that, there is a question studied whether adiponectin can also play a significant role in the pathogenesis of diseases associated with fat building up in parenchymatous organs. Finding a reliable biomarker for patients with metabolic syndrome or diseases of the liver, biliary system and pancreas in relation to metabolic syndrome, presents a big challenge. And adiponectin is one of the promising biomarkers.Key words: adiponectin - biliary disease - metabolic syndrome - pancreatic steatosis - steatohepatitis.

  5. Stereoselective in vitro metabolism of rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline epimers of Uncaria rhynchophylla in rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Qiao, Zhou; Liu, Jia; Zheng, Mei; Liu, Wenyuan; Wu, Chunyong

    2017-11-10

    1. The objective was to investigate the underlying mechanism of the stereoselectivity in the metabolism of rhynchophylline (RIN) and isorhynchophylline (IRN) epimers in rat liver microsomes (RLM). 2. After incubation, eight metabolites of RIN (M1-5) and IRN (M6-8) reacted at A- and C-ring were identified using LC-Q-TOF/MS. Metabolic pathways included oxidation, hydroxylation, N-oxidation and dehydrogenation. In addition, hydroxylation at A-ring was the major metabolic pathway for RIN whereas the oxidation at C-ring was the major one for IRN. 3. Enzyme kinetics showed that the intrinsic clearance (CL int ) for IRN elimination was 1.9-fold higher than RIN and the degradation half-life (T 1/2 ) of RIN was 4.7-fold higher than that of IRN, indicating IRN was more favorable to be metabolized than RIN in RLM. 4. Data from chemical inhibition study demonstrated CYP3A was the predominant isoform involved in the metabolic elimination of both epimers, as well as the formation of M1-8. 5. In conclusion, data revealed that due to the spatial configurations at C-7 position, RIN and IRN epimers possessed different hepatic metabolic pathways and elimination rates which were mainly mediated by CYP3A.

  6. Sorafenib metabolism is significantly altered in the liver tumor tissue of hepatocellular carcinoma patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Ye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sorafenib, the drug used as first line treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, is metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4-mediated oxidation and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT 1A9-mediated glucuronidation. Liver diseases are associated with reduced CYP and UGT activities, which can considerably affect drug metabolism, leading to drug toxicity. Thus, understanding the metabolism of therapeutic compounds in patients with liver diseases is necessary. However, the metabolism characteristic of sorafenib has not been systematically determined in HCC patients. METHODS: Sorafenib metabolism was tested in the pooled and individual tumor hepatic microsomes (THLMs and adjacent normal hepatic microsomes (NHLMs of HCC patients (n = 18. Commercial hepatic microsomes (CHLMs were used as a control. In addition, CYP3A4 and UGT1A9 protein expression in different tissues were measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: The mean rates of oxidation and glucuronidation of sorafenib were significantly decreased in the pooled THLMs compared with those in NHLMs and CHLMs. The maximal velocity (Vmax of sorafenib oxidation and glucuronidation were approximately 25-fold and 2-fold decreased in the pooled THLMs, respectively, with unchanged Km values. The oxidation of sorafenib in individual THLMs sample was significantly decreased (ranging from 7 to 67-fold than that in corresponding NHLMs sample. The reduction of glucuronidation in THLMs was observed in 15 out of 18 patients' samples. Additionally, the level of CYP3A4 and UGT1A9 expression were both notably decreased in the pooled THLMs. CONCLUSIONS: Sorafenib metabolism was remarkably decreased in THLMs. This result was associated with the down regulation of the protein expression of CYP3A4 and UGT1A9.

  7. Effect of chronic renal failure with metabolic acidosis on alanine metabolism in isolated liver cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cano, N.; Sturm, J. M.; Meijer, A. J.; El-Mir, M. Y.; Novaretti, R.; Reynier, J. P.; Leverve, X. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background Et aims: Decreased ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis from atanine have been reported during chronic renal failure in rat. This study addressed the respective roles of plasma-membrane transport and intracellular metabolism in these abnormalities of alanine pathways. Methods: In hepatocytes

  8. A switch in hepatic cortisol metabolism across the spectrum of non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adeeba; Rabbitt, Elizabeth; Brady, Theresa; Brown, Claire; Guest, Peter; Bujalska, Iwona J; Doig, Craig; Newsome, Philip N; Hubscher, Stefan; Elias, Elwyn; Adams, David H; Tomlinson, Jeremy W; Stewart, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver disease ranging from reversible hepatic steatosis, to non alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. The potential role of glucocorticoids (GC) in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is highlighted in patients with GC excess, Cushing's syndrome, who develop central adiposity, insulin resistance and in 20% of cases, NAFLD. Although in most cases of NAFLD, circulating cortisol levels are normal, hepatic cortisol availability is controlled by enzymes that regenerate cortisol (F) from inactive cortisone (E) (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, 11β-HSD1), or inactivate cortisol through A-ring metabolism (5α- and 5β-reductase, 5αR and 5βR). In vitro studies defined 11β-HSD1 expression in normal and NASH liver samples. We then characterised hepatic cortisol metabolism in 16 patients with histologically proven NAFLD compared to 32 obese controls using gas chromatographic analysis of 24 hour urine collection and plasma cortisol generation profile following oral cortisone. In patients with steatosis 5αR activity was increased, with a decrease in hepatic 11β-HSD1 activity. Total cortisol metabolites were increased in this group consistent with increased GC production rate. In contrast, in patients with NASH, 11β-HSD1 activity was increased both in comparison to patients with steatosis, and controls. Endorsing these findings, 11β-HSD1 mRNA and immunostaining was markedly increased in NASH patients in peri septal hepatocytes and within CD68 positive macrophages within inflamed cirrhotic septa. Patients with hepatic steatosis have increased clearance and decreased hepatic regeneration of cortisol and we propose that this may represent a protective mechanism to decrease local GC availability to preserve hepatic metabolic phenotype. With progression to NASH, increased 11β-HSD1 activity and consequent cortisol regeneration may serve to

  9. A switch in hepatic cortisol metabolism across the spectrum of non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeeba Ahmed

    Full Text Available Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver disease ranging from reversible hepatic steatosis, to non alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH and cirrhosis. The potential role of glucocorticoids (GC in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is highlighted in patients with GC excess, Cushing's syndrome, who develop central adiposity, insulin resistance and in 20% of cases, NAFLD. Although in most cases of NAFLD, circulating cortisol levels are normal, hepatic cortisol availability is controlled by enzymes that regenerate cortisol (F from inactive cortisone (E (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, 11β-HSD1, or inactivate cortisol through A-ring metabolism (5α- and 5β-reductase, 5αR and 5βR.In vitro studies defined 11β-HSD1 expression in normal and NASH liver samples. We then characterised hepatic cortisol metabolism in 16 patients with histologically proven NAFLD compared to 32 obese controls using gas chromatographic analysis of 24 hour urine collection and plasma cortisol generation profile following oral cortisone.In patients with steatosis 5αR activity was increased, with a decrease in hepatic 11β-HSD1 activity. Total cortisol metabolites were increased in this group consistent with increased GC production rate. In contrast, in patients with NASH, 11β-HSD1 activity was increased both in comparison to patients with steatosis, and controls. Endorsing these findings, 11β-HSD1 mRNA and immunostaining was markedly increased in NASH patients in peri septal hepatocytes and within CD68 positive macrophages within inflamed cirrhotic septa.Patients with hepatic steatosis have increased clearance and decreased hepatic regeneration of cortisol and we propose that this may represent a protective mechanism to decrease local GC availability to preserve hepatic metabolic phenotype. With progression to NASH, increased 11β-HSD1 activity and consequent cortisol regeneration may

  10. Metabolism of ginger component [6]-shogaol in liver microsomes from mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huadong; Soroka, Dominique; Zhu, Yingdong; Sang, Shengmin

    2013-05-01

    There are limited data on the metabolism of [6]-shogaol (6S), a major bioactive component of ginger. This study demonstrates metabolism of 6S in liver microsomes from mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human. The in vitro metabolism of 6S was compared among five species using liver microsomes from mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human. Following incubations with 6S, three major reductive metabolites 1-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-4-decen-3-ol (M6), 1-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-ol (M9), and 1-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-one (M11), as well as two new oxidative metabolites (1E,4E)-1-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-deca-1,4-dien-3-one (M14) and (E)-1-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-dec-1-en-3-one (M15) were found in all species. The kinetic parameters of M6 in liver microsomes from each respective species were quantified using Michaelis-Menten theory. A broad CYP-450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole, precluded the formation of oxidative metabolites, M14 and M15, and 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, an aldo-keto reductase inhibitor, eradicated the formation of the reductive metabolites M6, M9, and M11 in all species. Metabolites M14 and M15 were tested for cancer cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis and both showed substantial activity, with M14 displaying greater potency than 6S. We conclude that 6S is metabolized extensively in mammalian species mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human, and that there are significant interspecies differences to consider when planning preclinical trials toward 6S chemoprevention. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The time point of β-catenin knockout in hepatocytes determines their response to xenobiotic activation of the constitutive androstane receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzenberg, Katrin; Singh, Yasmin; Braeuning, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) controls the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and regulates hepatocyte proliferation. Studies with transgenic mice with an early postnatal conditional hepatocyte-specific knockout of the β-catenin gene Ctnnb1 revealed that β-catenin deficiency decreases the magnitude of induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes by CAR activators, abrogates zonal differences in the hepatocytes’ susceptibility to these compounds, and impacts on hepatocyte proliferation. These data, however, do not allow distinguishing between effects caused by β-catenin deficiency during postnatal liver development and acute effects of β-catenin deficiency in the adult animal at the time point of CAR activation. Therefore, CAR activation was now studied in a different mouse model allowing for the hepatocyte-specific knockout of β-catenin in adult mice. Treatment of these mice with 3 mg/kg body weight of the model CAR activator 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) confirmed previous findings related to the coordinate regulation of drug metabolism by β-catenin and CAR. More importantly, the present study clarified that the impact of β-catenin signaling on CAR-mediated enzyme induction in the liver is not merely due to developmental defects caused by a postnatal lack of β-catenin, but depends on the presence of β-catenin at the time point of xenobiotic treatment. The study also revealed interesting differences between the two mouse models: hepatic zonation of TCPOBOP-dependent induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes was restored in mice with late knockout of β-catenin, and the strong proliferative response of female mice was exclusively abolished when using animals with a late β-catenin knockout. This suggests a β-catenin-dependent postnatal priming of hepatocytes during postnatal liver development, later affecting the proliferative response of adult animals to CAR-activating xenobiotics

  12. BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF BONE RESORPTION AND HORMONAL REGULATION OF BONE METABOLISM FOLLOWING LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Buzulina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Comparative evaluation of two biochemical markers of bone resorption and hormonal regulation of bone metabolism in liver recipients. Methods and results. Bоne densitometry of L2–L4 and neck of femur, serum level of some hormones (PTH, vitamin D3, estradiol, testosterone regulating osteoclastogenesis as well as com- parative analyses of two bone resorption markers β-crosslaps and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase type 5b (TRAP-5b were fulfilled in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. In 1 month after OLT bone density reduction of L2–L4 and neck of femur; decrease of vitamin D3, estradiol in women, testosterone in men and increase levels of bone resorption markers were observed. In 1 and 2 years after OLT the rise of bone density, increased levels of PTH, estradiol, testosterone and decreased β-crosslaps levels were revealed, while vitamin D3 and TRAP-5b levels remained stable. Conclusion. TRAP-5b was found to be a more speciffic marker of bone resorption, independent from collagen metabolism in liver. Osteoporosis defined in long-term period after OLT was associated with higher TRAP-5b and revialed in women with low estradiol level. 

  13. The effects of space flight on some rat liver enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of space flight conditions on the activities of certain enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rat liver are investigated in an attempt to account for the losses in body weight observed during space flight despite preflight caloric consumption. Liver samples were analyzed for the activities of 32 cytosolic and microsomal enzymes as well as hepatic glycogen and individual fatty acid levels for ground control rats and rats flown on board the Cosmos 936 biosatellite under normal space flight conditions and in centrifuges which were sacrificed upon recovery or 25 days after recovery. Significant decreases in the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, alpha-glycerol phosphate acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, aconitase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and an increase in palmitoyl CoA desaturase are found in the flight stationary relative to the flight contrifuged rats upon recovery, with all enzymes showing alterations returning to normal values 25 days postflight. The flight stationary group is also observed to be characterized by more than twice the amount of liver glycogen of the flight centrifuged group as well as a significant increase in the ratio of palmitic to palmitoleic acid. Results thus indicate metabolic changes which may be involved in the mechanism of weight loss during weightlessness, and demonstrate the equivalence of centrifugation during space flight to terrestrial gravity.

  14. Inhibition of mirtazapine metabolism by Ecstasy (MDMA) in isolated perfused rat liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidfar, Sanaz; Ardakani, Yalda H; Lavasani, Hoda; Rouini, Mohammadreza

    2017-06-28

    Nowadays MDMA (3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine), known as ecstasy, is widely abused among the youth because of euphoria induction in acute exposure. However, abusers are predisposed to depression in chronic consumption of this illicit compound. Mirtazapine (MRZ), an antidepressant agent, may be prescribed in MDMA-induced depression. MRZ is extensively metabolized in liver by CYP450 isoenzymes. 8-hydroxymirtazapine (8-OH) is mainly produced by CYP2D6. N-desmethylmirtazapine (NDES) is generated by CYP3A4. MDMA is also metabolized by the mentioned isoenzymes and demonstrates mechanism-based inhibition (MBI) in association with CYP2D6. Several studies revealed that MDMA showed inhibitory effects on CYP3A4. In the present study, our aim was to evaluate the impact of MDMA on the metabolism of MRZ in liver. Therefore, isolated perfused rat liver model was applied as our model of choice in this assessment. The subjects of the study were categorized into two experimental groups. Rats in the control group received MRZ-containing Krebs-Henselit buffer (1 μg/ml). Rats in the treatment group received aqueous solution of 1 mg/ml MDMA (3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally 1 hour before receiving MRZ. Perfusate samples were analyzed by HPLC. Analyses of perfusate samples showed 80% increase in the parent drug concentrations and 50% decrease in the concentrations of both metabolites in our treatment group compared to the control group. In the treatment group compared to the control group, AUC (0-120) of the parent drug demonstrated 50% increase and AUC (0-120) of 8-OH and NDES showed 70% and 60% decrease, respectively. Observed decrease in metabolic ratios were 83% and 79% for 8-OH and NDES in treatment group compared to control group, respectively. Hepatic clearance (CL h ) and intrinsic clearance (Cl int ) showed 20% and 60% decrease in treatment group compared to control group. All findings prove the inhibitory effects of ecstasy on both CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 hepatic isoenzymes. In

  15. Control of alanine metabolism in rat liver by transport processes or cellular metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Fafournoux, P; Rémésy, C; Demigné, C

    1983-01-01

    1. Factors governing hepatic utilization of alanine were studied in vivo and in vitro in rats adapted to increasing dietary protein. 2. Hepatic alanine utilization was enhanced 5-fold with a 90%-casein diet, compared with a 13%-casein diet. The increased uptake resulted from enhanced fractional extraction in the presence of high concentrations of alanine in the portal vein. 3. The increase in alanine metabolism on high-protein diets was associated with an increase in alanine aminotransferase ...

  16. Developmental Programming of Obesity and Liver Metabolism by Maternal Perinatal Nutrition Involves the Melanocortin System

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    Paul Cordero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity predisposes offspring to metabolic dysfunction and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD. Melanocortin-4 receptor (Mc4r-deficient mouse models exhibit obesity during adulthood. Here, we aim to determine the influence of the Mc4r gene on the liver of mice subjected to perinatal diet-induced obesity. Female mice heterozygous for Mc4r fed an obesogenic or a control diet for 5 weeks were mated with heterozygous males, with the same diet continued throughout pregnancy and lactation, generating four offspring groups: control wild type (C_wt, control knockout (C_KO, obese wild type (Ob_wt, and obese knockout (Ob_KO. At 21 days, offspring were genotyped, weaned onto a control diet, and sacrificed at 6 months old. Offspring phenotypic characteristics, plasma biochemical profile, liver histology, and hepatic gene expression were analyzed. Mc4r_ko offspring showed higher body, liver and adipose tissue weights respect to the wild type animals. Histological examination showed mild hepatic steatosis in offspring group C_KO. The expression of hepatic genes involved in regulating inflammation, fibrosis, and immune cell infiltration were upregulated by the absence of the Mc4r gene. These results demonstrate that maternal obesogenic feeding during the perinatal period programs offspring obesity development with involvement of the Mc4r system.

  17. Tributyltin chloride leads to adiposity and impairs metabolic functions in the rat liver and pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuloso, Bruno D; Podratz, Priscila L; Merlo, Eduardo; de Araújo, Julia F P; Lima, Leandro C F; de Miguel, Emilio C; de Souza, Leticia N; Gava, Agata L; de Oliveira, Miriane; Miranda-Alves, Leandro; Carneiro, Maria T W D; Nogueira, Celia R; Graceli, Jones B

    2015-05-19

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT) is an environmental contaminant used in antifouling paints of boats. Endocrine disruptor effects of TBT are well established in animal models. However, the adverse effects on metabolism are less well understood. The toxicity of TBT in the white adipose tissue (WAT), liver and pancreas of female rats were assessed. Animals were divided into control and TBT (0.1 μg/kg/day) groups. TBT induced an increase in the body weight of the rats by the 15th day of oral exposure. The weight gain was associated with high parametrial (PR) and retroperitoneal (RP) WAT weights. TBT-treatment increased the adiposity, inflammation and expression of ERα and PPARγ proteins in both RP and PR WAT. In 3T3-L1 cells, estrogen treatment reduced lipid droplets accumulation, however increased the ERα protein expression. In contrast, TBT-treatment increased the lipid accumulation and reduced the ERα expression. WAT metabolic changes led to hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation, increase of PPARγ and reduction of ERα protein expression. Accordingly, there were increases in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests with increases in the number of pancreatic islets and insulin levels. These findings suggest that TBT leads to adiposity in WAT specifically, impairing the metabolic functions of the liver and pancreas. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. DEPTOR in POMC neurons affects liver metabolism but is dispensable for the regulation of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Alexandre; Labbé, Sébastien M; Mouchiroud, Mathilde; Huard, Renaud; Lanfray, Damien; Richard, Denis; Laplante, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    We have recently demonstrated that specific overexpression of DEP-domain containing mTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR) in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) protects mice against high-fat diet-induced obesity, revealing DEPTOR as a significant contributor to energy balance regulation. On the basis of evidence that DEPTOR is expressed in the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of the MBH, the present study aimed to investigate whether these neurons mediate the metabolic effects of DEPTOR. Here, we report that specific DEPTOR overexpression in POMC neurons does not recapitulate any of the phenotypes observed when the protein was overexpressed in the MBH. Unlike the previous model, mice overexpressing DEPTOR only in POMC neurons 1) did not show differences in feeding behavior, 2) did not exhibit changes in locomotion activity and oxygen consumption, 3) did not show an improvement in systemic glucose metabolism, and 4) were not resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity. These results support the idea that other neuronal populations are responsible for these phenotypes. Nonetheless, we observed a mild elevation in fasting blood glucose, insulin resistance, and alterations in liver glucose and lipid homeostasis in mice overexpressing DEPTOR in POMC neurons. Taken together, these results show that DEPTOR overexpression in POMC neurons does not affect energy balance regulation but could modulate metabolism through a brain-liver connection. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Effects of Castration on Expression of Lipid Metabolism Genes in the Liver of Korean Cattle

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    Myunggi Baik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Castration induces the accumulation of body fat and deposition of intramuscular fat in Korean cattle, resulting in improved beef quality. However, little is known about the metabolic adaptations in the liver following castration. To understand changes in lipid metabolism following castration, hepatic expression levels of lipid metabolism genes were compared between Korean bulls and steers. Steers had higher (p<0.001 hepatic lipids contents and higher (p<0.01 mRNA levels of lipogenic acetyl-CoA carboxylase. This differential gene expression may, in part, contribute to increased hepatic lipid content following the castration of bulls. However, we found no differences in the hepatic expression levels of genes related to triglyceride synthesis (mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 and 2 and fatty acid (FA oxidation (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A, C-4 to C-12 straight chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase between bulls and steers. No differences in gene expression for very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL secretion, including apolipoprotein B mRNA and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP protein, were observed in the liver although MTTP mRNA levels were higher in steers compared to bulls. In conclusion, FA synthesis may contribute to increased hepatic lipid deposition in steers following castration. However, hepatic lipid metabolism, including triglyceride synthesis, FA oxidation, and VLDL secretion, was not significantly altered by castration. Our results suggest that hepatic lipid metabolism does not significantly contribute to increased body fat deposition in steers following castration.

  20. Glycogen metabolism in the liver of Indian desert gerbils (Meriones hurrianae, Jerdon) exposed to internal beta irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.

    1996-01-01

    Glycogen content and the activities of phosphorylase, glycogen synthetase, phosphohexose isomerase, glucose-6-phosphatase, succinate dehydrogenase, alanine and aspartate aminotransferases have been biochemically determined in the liver of Indian desert gerbils following radiocalcium internal irradiation. Decline in glycogen, phosphohexose isomerase, with a concomitant increase in phosphorylase, succinate dehydrogenase reveals a switch over from glycolytic to oxidative metabolism in liver. Activities of aminotransferases indicate the utilization of transamination products of alanine and aspartate in oxidative pathway during early periods. Transiently increased glucose-6-phosphatase seems to restrict glycogenolytic and glycolytic metabolism and thereby pave way for the acceleration of oxidative metabolism. (author). 52 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Effects of acupuncture on the citrate and glucose metabolism in the liver under various types of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Y.Y.; Seto, K.; Saito, H.; Kawakami, M.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of acupuncture on citrate and glucose metabolism in the liver in terms of incorporation of 14 C-1, 5-citric acid and 14 C-u-glucose in some metabolites. The effect of acupuncture on citrate metabolism in the liver under control conditions was such as to increase production of G and reduce that of KB, FC and FFA. No effect of acupuncture on glucose metabolism in the liver under such conditions was observed. Both citrate and glucose metabolism were affected to a marked extent by immobilization stress or exposure to heat or cold. The deleterious effect of these types of stress was less prominent in animals receiving acupuncture at the Tsu-San-Li locus than in those treated otherwise or receiving no treatment

  2. Effects of acupuncture on the citrate and glucose metabolism in the liver under various types of stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y.Y.; Seto, K.; Saito, H.; Kawakami, M.

    A study was made of the effect of acupuncture on citrate and glucose metabolism in the liver in terms of incorporation of /sup 14/C-1, 5-citric acid and /sup 14/C-u-glucose in some metabolites. The effect of acupuncture on citrate metabolism in the liver under control conditions was such as to increase production of G and reduce that of KB, FC and FFA. No effect of acupuncture on glucose metabolism in the liver under such conditions was observed. Both citrate and glucose metabolism were affected to a marked extent by immobilization stress or exposure to heat or cold. The deleterious effect of these types of stress was less prominent in animals receiving acupuncture at the Tsu-San-Li locus than in those treated otherwise or receiving no treatment.

  3. A High Phosphorus Diet Affects Lipid Metabolism in Rat Liver: A DNA Microarray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Sunwoo; Bamba, Takeshi; Suyama, Tatsuya; Ishijima, Tomoko; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Abe, Keiko; Nakai, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A high phosphorus (HP) diet causes disorders of renal function, bone metabolism, and vascular function. We previously demonstrated that DNA microarray analysis is an appropriate method to comprehensively evaluate the effects of a HP diet on kidney dysfunction such as calcification, fibrillization, and inflammation. We reported that type IIb sodium-dependent phosphate transporter is significantly up-regulated in this context. In the present study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to investigate the effects of a HP diet on the liver, which plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was performed with total RNA isolated from the livers of rats fed a control diet (containing 0.3% phosphorus) or a HP diet (containing 1.2% phosphorus). Gene Ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that the HP diet induced down-regulation of genes involved in hepatic amino acid catabolism and lipogenesis, while genes related to fatty acid β-oxidation process were up-regulated. Although genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated in HP diet-fed rats, genes important for the elongation and desaturation reactions of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids were up-regulated. Concentrations of hepatic arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid were increased in HP diet-fed rats. These essential fatty acids activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), a transcription factor for fatty acid β-oxidation. Evaluation of the upstream regulators of DEGs using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that PPARα was activated in the livers of HP diet-fed rats. Furthermore, the serum concentration of fibroblast growth factor 21, a hormone secreted from the liver that promotes fatty acid utilization in adipose tissue as a PPARα target gene, was higher (p = 0.054) in HP diet-fed rats than in control diet-fed rats. These data suggest that a HP diet enhances energy expenditure through the utilization of free fatty acids

  4. Subchronic effects of valproic acid on gene expression profiles for lipid metabolism in mouse liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Mingoo; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Ju-Han; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-Il; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu; Lee, Mi-Ock

    2008-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used clinically to treat epilepsy, however it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis. Acute hepatotoxicity of VPA has been well documented by biochemical studies and microarray analysis, but little is known about the chronic effects of VPA in the liver. In the present investigation, we profiled gene expression patterns in the mouse liver after subchronic treatment with VPA. VPA was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day or 500 mg/kg/day to ICR mice, and the livers were obtained after 1, 2, or 4 weeks. The activities of serum liver enzymes did not change, whereas triglyceride concentration increased significantly. Microarray analysis revealed that 1325 genes of a set of 32,996 individual genes were VPA responsive when examined by two-way ANOVA (P 1.5). Consistent with our previous results obtained using an acute VPA exposure model (Lee et al., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 220:45-59, 2007), the most significantly over-represented biological terms for these genes included lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism. Biological pathway analysis suggests that the genes responsible for increased biosynthesis of cholesterol and triglyceride, and for decreased fatty acid β-oxidation contribute to the abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by subchronic VPA treatment. A comparison of the VPA-responsive genes in the acute and subchronic models extracted 15 commonly altered genes, such as Cyp4a14 and Adpn, which may have predictive power to distinguish the mode of action of hepatotoxicants. Our data provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and useful information to predict steatogenic hepatotoxicity

  5. Partition and metabolic fate of dietary glycerol in muscles and liver of juvenile tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Diego Vicente; Dias, Jorge; Colen, Rita; Rosa, Priscila Vieira; Engrola, Sofia

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of dietary glycerol on the metabolism of juvenile tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and to determine its metabolic fate. The experimental diets contained 0% (Group CON), 5% (Group G5) and 15% glycerol (Group G15) and were fed for 40 d to apparent satiation, three times a day. For the metabolism trials, six fish from each treatment were randomly chosen and tube-fed with five pellets labelled with 14 C-glycerol [ 14 C(U)] in order to evaluate the absorption, catabolism, retention and partition of glycerol in muscle and liver. Group G5 presented the highest 14 C-glycerol retention and the lowest catabolism, with no significant differences between Groups CON and G15. In Group CON, the highest percentage of 14 C was incorporated in muscle lipids; with no significant differences between Groups G5 and G15. Furthermore, no treatment effects were found for hepatic 14 C-lipid and for 14 C in hepatic and muscle non-lipid extract. In the non-lipid and non-protein fraction, the highest radioactivity was measured in livers of Group G5, however no significant differences were found for this fraction between Groups CON and G15 in liver and for all treatments in muscle. The results of the present study can have practical implications in diet formulations for tilapia and for other aquaculture species with similar feeding pattern since juvenile tilapia are able to metabolise dietary glycerol into lipids, protein and/or carbohydrates and to use it as energy source.

  6. [The effect of halothane on the fructose metabolism in the liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, E; Scholz, R

    1975-10-01

    Glucose production from frutose (2 mmol) and fructolysis was studied in perfused rat liver. In the presence of halothane (0.5, 1.5, and 4.0 vol%) glucose production was inhibited, whereas lactate production was stimulated. Total fructose metabolism was unchanged. Since halogenated hydrocarbon compounds are known to inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain, it is concluded that glucose synthesis is inhibited due to decreased supply of energy-rich phosphates from oxidative phosphorylation. On the other hand, this depletion of energy may be partially compensated for by an increased extramitochondrial energy production due to fructolysis.

  7. Transcriptional ontogeny of the developing liver

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    Lee Janice S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During embryogenesis the liver is derived from endodermal cells lining the digestive tract. These endodermal progenitor cells contribute to forming the parenchyma of a number of organs including the liver and pancreas. Early in organogenesis the fetal liver is populated by hematopoietic stem cells, the source for a number of blood cells including nucleated erythrocytes. A comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional changes that occur during the early stages of development to adulthood in the liver was carried out. Results We characterized gene expression changes in the developing mouse liver at gestational days (GD 11.5, 12.5, 13.5, 14.5, 16.5, and 19 and in the neonate (postnatal day (PND 7 and 32 compared to that in the adult liver (PND67 using full-genome microarrays. The fetal liver, and to a lesser extent the neonatal liver, exhibited dramatic differences in gene expression compared to adults. Canonical pathway analysis of the fetal liver signature demonstrated increases in functions important in cell replication and DNA fidelity whereas most metabolic pathways of intermediary metabolism were under expressed. Comparison of the dataset to a number of previously published microarray datasets revealed 1 a striking similarity between the fetal liver and that of the pancreas in both mice and humans, 2 a nucleated erythrocyte signature in the fetus and 3 under expression of most xenobiotic metabolism genes throughout development, with the exception of a number of transporters associated with either hematopoietic cells or cell proliferation in hepatocytes. Conclusions Overall, these findings reveal the complexity of gene expression changes during liver development and maturation, and provide a foundation to predict responses to chemical and drug exposure as a function of early life-stages.

  8. Serum aminotransferases in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are a signature of liver metabolic perturbations at the amino acid and Krebs cycle level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookoian, Silvia; Castaño, Gustavo O; Scian, Romina; Fernández Gianotti, Tomas; Dopazo, Hernán; Rohr, Cristian; Gaj, Graciela; San Martino, Julio; Sevic, Ina; Flichman, Diego; Pirola, Carlos J

    2016-02-01

    Extensive epidemiologic studies have shown that cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) are associated with serum concentrations of liver enzymes; however, fundamental characteristics of this relation are currently unknown. We aimed to explore the role of liver aminotransferases in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and MetS. Liver gene- and protein-expression changes of aminotransferases, including their corresponding isoforms, were evaluated in a case-control study of patients with NAFLD (n = 42), which was proven through a biopsy (control subjects: n = 10). We also carried out a serum targeted metabolite profiling to the glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and Krebs cycle (n = 48) and an exploration by the next-generation sequencing of aminotransferase genes (n = 96). An in vitro study to provide a biological explanation of changes in the transcriptional level and enzymatic activity of aminotransferases was included. Fatty liver was associated with a deregulated liver expression of aminotransferases, which was unrelated to the disease severity. Metabolite profiling showed that serum aminotransferase concentrations are a signature of liver metabolic perturbations, particularly at the amino acid metabolism and Krebs cycle level. A significant and positive association between systolic hypertension and liver expression levels of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase 2 (GOT2) messenger RNA (Spearman R = 0.42, P = 0.03) was observed. The rs6993 located in the 3' untranslated region of the GOT2 locus was significantly associated with features of the MetS, including arterial hypertension [P = 0.028; OR: 2.285 (95% CI: 1.024, 5.09); adjusted by NAFLD severity] and plasma lipid concentrations. In the context of an abnormal hepatic triglyceride accumulation, circulating aminotransferases rise as a consequence of the need for increased reactions of transamination to cope with the liver metabolic derangement that is associated with greater gluconeogenesis and

  9. Highly proliferative primitive fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells are fueled by oxidative metabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed K. Manesia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in the fetal liver (FL unlike adult bone marrow (BM proliferate extensively, posing different metabolic demands. However, metabolic pathways responsible for the production of energy and cellular building blocks in FL HSCs have not been described. Here, we report that FL HSCs use oxygen dependent energy generating pathways significantly more than their BM counterparts. RNA-Seq analysis of E14.5 FL versus BM derived HSCs identified increased expression levels of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos and the citric acid cycle (TCA. We demonstrated that FL HSCs contain more mitochondria than BM HSCs, which resulted in increased levels of oxygen consumption and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Higher levels of DNA repair and antioxidant pathway gene expression may prevent ROS-mediated (genotoxicity in FL HSCs. Thus, we here for the first time highlight the underestimated importance of oxygen dependent pathways for generating energy and building blocks in FL HSCs.

  10. Comparison of hepatotoxicity and metabolism of butyltin compounds in the liver of mice, rats and guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Shunji; Kashimoto, Takashige; Susa, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Masamitsu; Chiba, Toshikazu [Laboratory of Veterinary Public Health, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Kitasato University, Higashi 23-35-1, 034-8628, Towada-shi, Aomori (Japan); Mutoh, Ken-ichiro [Laboratory of Veterinary Anatomy, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Kitasato University, Higashi 23-35-1, 034-8628, Towada-shi, Aomori (Japan); School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Kitasato University, Higashi 23-35-1, 034-8628, Towada-shi, Aomori (Japan); Hoshi, Fumio [Laboratory of Veterinary Anatomy, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Kitasato University, Higashi 23-35-1, 034-8628, Towada-shi, Aomori (Japan); Suzuki, Takashi [Laboratory of Environmental Health and Toxicology, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, 606-5822, Kyoto (Japan); Sugiyama, Masayasu [Sugiyama Pharmacy, 1335-1 Shimotama, Tamagawa-cho, 759-3112, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    The hepatotoxicity of tributyltin chloride (TBTC) and dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) was compared among mice, rats and guinea pigs in vivo. Further, the metabolism of these butyltin compounds in the liver was also investigated in these species. The oral administration of TBTC and DBTC to mice induced obvious liver injury, as demonstrated by both serodiagnosis and histopathological diagnosis. The concentrations of TBTC and DBTC that induced hepatotoxicity in mice at 24 h after oral administration were 180 and 60 {mu}mol/kg, respectively. In the case of rats, the liver injury induced by TBTC and DBTC was detected at 24 h by the serodiagnosis, but not by histopathological diagnosis. On the other hand, in guinea pigs, TBTC and DBTC administration did not produce any clear liver injury at 24 h, as evaluated by these two diagnostic methods. Thus, the following ranking was obtained with regard to increasing order of sensitivity to liver injury caused by TBTC and DBTC: mice, rats and guinea pigs. The total butyltin contents in the liver of mice were equivalent at 3 h and 24 h after the administration of TBTC or DBTC; however, the contents in the liver of rats and guinea pigs were relatively lower at 3 h and higher at 24 h than those of mice, although there were no differences between rats and guinea pigs in the total liver butyltin content. Concerning the liver metabolism of these butyltin compounds, the main form of butyltin compounds in these animals treated with TBTC was DBTC within 3 h after oral administration, while the main metabolites at 24 h were different in each species, indicating that the liver metabolism of TBTC might vary by animal type. When the animals were treated with DBTC orally, DBTC was hardly metabolized in the livers of these animals even at 24 h, and the liver levels of DBTC were two times greater in mice and guinea pigs than in rats at 3 h and were lower in mice at 24 h than in rats and guinea pigs. The analysis of cellular distributions of DBTC in

  11. Putrescine treatment reverses α-tocopherol-induced desynchronization of polyamine and retinoid metabolism during rat liver regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Sánchez-Sevilla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pre-treatment with α-tocopherol inhibits progression of rat liver proliferation induced by partial hepatectomy (PH, by decreasing and/or desynchronizing cyclin D1 expression and activation into the nucleus, activation and nuclear translocation of STAT-1 and -3 proteins and altering retinoid metabolism. Interactions between retinoic acid and polyamines have been reported in the PH-induced rat liver regeneration. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of low dosage of α-tocopherol on PH-induced changes in polyamine metabolism. Methods This study evaluated the participation of polyamine synthesis and metabolism during α-tocopherol-induced inhibition of rat liver regeneration. In PH-rats (Wistar treated with α-tocopherol and putrescine, parameters indicative of cell proliferation, lipid peroxidation, ornithine decarboxylase expression (ODC, and polyamine levels, were determined. Results Pre-treatment with α-tocopherol to PH-animals exerted an antioxidant effect, shifting earlier the increased ODC activity and expression, temporally affecting polyamine synthesis and ornithine metabolism. Whereas administration of putrescine induced minor changes in PH-rats, the concomitant treatment actually counteracted most of adverse actions exerted by α-tocopherol on the remnant liver, restituting its proliferative potential, without changing its antioxidant effect. Putrescine administration to these rats was also associated with lower ODC expression and activity in the proliferating liver, but the temporally shifting in the amount of liver polyamines induced by α-tocopherol, was also “synchronized” by the putrescine administration. The latter is supported by the fact that a close relationship was observed between fluctuations of polyamines and retinoids. Conclusions Putrescine counteracted most adverse actions exerted by α-tocopherol on rat liver regeneration, restoring liver proliferative potential and restituting the decreased

  12. The Metabolism of Separase Inhibitor Sepin-1 in Human, Mouse, and Rat Liver Microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Separase, a known oncogene, is widely overexpressed in numerous human tumors of breast, bone, brain, blood, and prostate. Separase is an emerging target for cancer therapy, and separase enzymatic inhibitors such as sepin-1 are currently being developed to treat separase-overexpressed tumors. Drug metabolism plays a critical role in the efficacy and safety of drug development, as well as possible drug–drug interactions. In this study, we investigated the in vitro metabolism of sepin-1 in human, mouse, and rat liver microsomes (RLM using metabolomic approaches. In human liver microsomes (HLM, we identified seven metabolites including one cysteine–sepin-1 adduct and one glutathione–sepin-1 adduct. All the sepin-1 metabolites in HLM were also found in both mouse and RLM. Using recombinant CYP450 isoenzymes, we demonstrated that multiple enzymes contributed to the metabolism of sepin-1, including CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 as the major metabolizing enzymes. Inhibitory effects of sepin-1 on seven major CYP450s were also evaluated using the corresponding substrates recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration. Our studies indicated that sepin-1 moderately inhibits CYP1A2, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 with IC50 < 10 μM but weakly inhibits CYP2B6, CYP2C8/9, and CYP2D6 with IC50 > 10 μM. This information can be used to optimize the structures of sepin-1 for more suitable pharmacological properties and to predict the possible sepin-1 interactions with other chemotherapeutic drugs.

  13. Kaempferol ameliorates symptoms of metabolic syndrome by regulating activities of liver X receptor-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Minh-Hien; Jia, Yaoyao; Mok, Boram; Jun, Hee-jin; Hwang, Kwang-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2015-08-01

    Kaempferol is a dietary flavonol previously shown to regulate cellular lipid and glucose metabolism. However, its molecular mechanisms of action and target proteins have remained elusive, probably due to the involvement of multiple proteins. This study investigated the molecular targets of kaempferol. Ligand binding of kaempferol to liver X receptors (LXRs) was quantified by time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer and surface plasmon resonance analyses. Kaempferol directly binds to and induces the transactivation of LXRs, with stronger specificity for the β-subtype (EC50 = 0.33 μM). The oral administration of kaempferol in apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice (150 mg/day/kg body weight) significantly reduced plasma glucose and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and insulin sensitivity compared with the vehicle-fed control. Kaempferol also reduced plasma triglyceride concentrations and did not cause liver steatosis, a common side effect of potent LXR activation. In immunoblotting analysis, kaempferol reduced the nuclear accumulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). Our results show that the suppression of SREBP-1 activity and the selectivity for LXR-β over LXR-α by kaempferol contribute to the reductions of plasma and hepatic triglyceride concentrations in mice fed kaempferol. They also suggest that kaempferol activates LXR-β and suppresses SREBP-1 to enhance symptoms in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Biotransformation of vinclozolin in rat precision-cut liver slices: comparison with in vivo metabolic pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursztyka, Julian; Debrauwer, Laurent; Perdu, Elisabeth; Jouanin, Isabelle; Jaeg, Jean-Philippe; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre

    2008-06-25

    Vinclozolin is a dicarboxymide fungicide that presents antiandrogenic properties through its two hydrolysis products M1 and M2, which bind to the androgen receptor. Because of the lack of data on the biotransformation of vinclozolin, its metabolism was investigated in vitro in precision-cut rat liver slices and in vivo in male rat using [ (14)C]-vinclozolin. Incubations were performed using different concentrations of substrate, and the kinetics of formation of the major metabolites were studied. Three male Wistar rats were fed by gavage with [ (14)C]-VZ. Urine was collected for 24 h and analyzed by radio-HPLC for metabolic profiling. Metabolite identification was carried out on a LCQ ion trap mass spectrometer. In rat liver slices and in vivo, the major primary metabolite has been identified as 3',5'-dichloro-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutyranilide (M5) and was mainly present as glucuronoconjugates. M5 is produced by dihydroxylation of the vinyl group of M2. Other metabolites have been identified as 3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-5-(1,2-dihydroxyethyl)-1,3-oxazolidine-2,4-dione (M4), a dihydroxylated metabolite of vinclozolin, which undergoes further conjugation to glucuronic acid, and 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3,4-dihydroxy-butanoic acid (M6), a dihydroxylated metabolite of M1.

  15. Metabolic profiles are principally different between cancers of the liver, pancreas and breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhu, Anuradha; Terunuma, Atsushi; Zhang, Geng; Hussain, S Perwez; Ambs, Stefan; Wang, Xin Wei

    2014-01-01

    Molecular profiling of primary tumors may facilitate the classification of patients with cancer into more homogenous biological groups to aid clinical management. Metabolomic profiling has been shown to be a powerful tool in characterizing the biological mechanisms underlying a disease but has not been evaluated for its ability to classify cancers by their tissue of origin. Thus, we assessed metabolomic profiling as a novel tool for multiclass cancer characterization. Global metabolic profiling was employed to identify metabolites in paired tumor and non-tumor liver (n=60), breast (n=130) and pancreatic (n=76) tissue specimens. Unsupervised principal component analysis showed that metabolites are principally unique to each tissue and cancer type. Such a difference can also be observed even among early stage cancers, suggesting a significant and unique alteration of global metabolic pathways associated with each cancer type. Our global high-throughput metabolomic profiling study shows that specific biochemical alterations distinguish liver, pancreatic and breast cancer and could be applied as cancer classification tools to differentiate tumors based on tissue of origin.

  16. The Role of Circulating Amino Acids in the Hypothalamic Regulation of Liver Glucose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2016-07-01

    A pandemic of diabetes and obesity has been developing worldwide in close association with excessive nutrient intake and a sedentary lifestyle. Variations in the protein content of the diet have a direct impact on glucose homeostasis because amino acids (AAs) are powerful modulators of insulin action. In this work we review our recent findings on how elevations in the concentration of the circulating AAs leucine and proline activate a metabolic mechanism located in the mediobasal hypothalamus of the brain that sends a signal to the liver via the vagus nerve, which curtails glucose output. This neurogenic signal is strictly dependent on the metabolism of leucine and proline to acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and the subsequent production of malonyl-CoA; the signal also requires functional neuronal ATP-sensitive potassium channels. The liver then responds by lowering the rate of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, ultimately leading to a net decrease in glucose production and in concentrations of circulating glucose. Furthermore, we review here how our work with proline suggests a new role of astrocytes in the central regulation of glycemia. Last, we outline how factors such as the consumption of fat-rich diets can interfere with glucoregulatory mechanisms and, in the long term, may contribute to the development of hyperglycemia, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. The Role of Circulating Amino Acids in the Hypothalamic Regulation of Liver Glucose Metabolism123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2016-01-01

    A pandemic of diabetes and obesity has been developing worldwide in close association with excessive nutrient intake and a sedentary lifestyle. Variations in the protein content of the diet have a direct impact on glucose homeostasis because amino acids (AAs) are powerful modulators of insulin action. In this work we review our recent findings on how elevations in the concentration of the circulating AAs leucine and proline activate a metabolic mechanism located in the mediobasal hypothalamus of the brain that sends a signal to the liver via the vagus nerve, which curtails glucose output. This neurogenic signal is strictly dependent on the metabolism of leucine and proline to acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and the subsequent production of malonyl-CoA; the signal also requires functional neuronal ATP-sensitive potassium channels. The liver then responds by lowering the rate of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, ultimately leading to a net decrease in glucose production and in concentrations of circulating glucose. Furthermore, we review here how our work with proline suggests a new role of astrocytes in the central regulation of glycemia. Last, we outline how factors such as the consumption of fat-rich diets can interfere with glucoregulatory mechanisms and, in the long term, may contribute to the development of hyperglycemia, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27422516

  18. Palmitoleic Acid Improves Metabolic Functions in Fatty Liver by PPARα-Dependent AMPK Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Camila O; Teixeira, Alexandre A S; Biondo, Luana A; Lima Junior, Edson A; Batatinha, Helena A P; Rosa Neto, Jose C

    2017-08-01

    Palmitoleic acid, since described as lipokine, increases glucose uptake by modulation of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), as well as increasing lipolysis by activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), in adipose tissue. However, in liver, the effects of palmitoleic acid on glucose metabolism and the role of PPARα remain unknown. To investigate whether palmitoleic acid improved the hepatic insulin sensitivity of obese mice. C57BL6 and PPARα knockout (KO) mice were fed for 12 weeks with a standard diet (SD) or high-fat diet (HF), and in the last 2 weeks were treated with oleic or palmitoleic acid. Palmitoleic acid promoted a faster uptake of glucose in the body, associated with higher insulin concentration; however, even when stimulated with insulin, palmitoleic acid did not modulate the insulin pathway (AKT, IRS). Palmitoleic acid increased the phosphorylation of AMPK, upregulated glucokinase and downregulated SREBP-1. Regarding AMPK downstream, palmitoleic acid increased the production of FGF-21 and stimulated the expression of PPARα. Palmitoleic acid treatment did not increase AMPK phosphorylation, modulate glucokinase or increase FGF-21 in liver of PPARα KO mice. In mice fed with a high-fat diet, palmitoleic acid supplementation stimulated the uptake of glucose in liver through activation of AMPK and FGF-21, dependent on PPARα. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2168-2177, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Uptake and metabolism of polymerized albumin by rat liver. Role of the scavenger receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, T.L.; Roll, F.J.; Jones, A.L.; Weisiger, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus binds avidly to albumin polymers, which in turn may mediate viral attachment to liver cells. This hypothesis is critically dependent on prior results obtained using glutaraldehyde-polymerized human serum albumin as a model for naturally occurring albumin species. We used the perfused rat liver to characterize the uptake, cellular distribution, and metabolism of glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin. 125 I-glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin was efficiently removed from the perfusate by the liver (29% extraction). However, few autoradiographic grains were located over hepatic parenchymal cells (6%). Instead, most glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin appeared to be removed by endothelial (59%) or Kupffer (31%) cells. Hepatic uptake was strongly inhibited by formaldehyde-treated monomeric albumin, a known ligand of the endothelial scavenger receptor for chemically modified proteins. After uptake, most glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin was rapidly degraded and released into the perfusate (74% within 60 min). This process was blocked by chloroquine and leupeptin, suggesting that it involves lysosomal acid hydrolases. We conclude that glutaraldehyde-polymerized albumin is efficiently cleared and degraded by the endothelial scavenger pathway. Glutaraldehyde-polymerized albumin therefore appears to be a poor model for predicting the hepatic handling of naturally occurring albumin species bound to hepatitis B virions. Even if viral particles were to follow this pathway, few would enter parenchymal hepatocytes

  20. Beneficial mechanisms of aerobic exercise on hepatic lipid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Liong, Emily C; So, Kwok Fai; Fung, Man-Lung; Tipoe, George L

    2015-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) refers to any fatty liver disease that is not due to excessive use of alcohol. NAFLD probably results from abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin resistance. Aerobic exercise is shown to improve NAFLD. This review aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on NAFLD. We searched articles in English on the role of aerobic exercise in NAFLD therapy in PubMed. The mechanisms of chronic aerobic exercise in regulating the outcome of NAFLD include: (i) reducing intrahepatic fat content by down-regulating sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and up-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression levels; (ii) decreasing hepatic oxidative stress through modulating the reactive oxygen species, and enhancing antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and glutathione peroxidase; (iii) ameliorating hepatic inflammation via the inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta; (iv) attenuating mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by reducing cytochrome C released from the mitochondria to the cytosol; and (v) inducing hepato-protective autophagy. Aerobic exercise, via different mechanisms, significantly decreases the fat content of the liver and improves the outcomes of patients with NAFLD.

  1. Characterization of liver changes in ZSF1 rats, an animal model of metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Borges-Canha

    Full Text Available Background: The non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic counterpart of the metabolic syndrome. ZSF1 rats are a metabolic syndrome animal model in which liver changes have not been described yet. Aim: The characterization of liver histological and innate immunity changes in ZSF1 rats. Methods: Five groups of rats were included (n = 7 each group: healthy Wistar-Kyoto control rats (Ctrl, hypertensive ZSF1 lean (Ln, ZSF1 obese rats with a normal diet (Ob, ZSF1 obese rates with a high-fat diet (Ob-HFD, and ZSF1 obese rats with low-intensity exercise training (Ob-Ex. The animals were sacrificed at 20 weeks of age, their livers were collected for: a measurements of the area of steatosis, fibrosis and inflammation (histomorphological analysis; and b innate immunity (toll-like receptor [TLR] 2, TLR4, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ [PPARγ], toll interacting protein [TOLLIP] and inflammatory marker (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNFvs], interleukin 1 [IL-1] expression analysis by real-time PCR. Results: Ob, Ob-HFD and Ob-Ex were significantly heavier than Ln and Ctrl animals. Ob, Ob-HFD and Ob-Ex animals had impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. ZSF1 Ob, Ob-HFD and Ob-Ex presented a higher degree of steatosis (3,5x; p < 0.05 than Ctrl or ZSF1 Ln rats. Steatohepatitis and fibrosis were not observed in any of the groups. No differences in expression were observed between Ctrl, Ln and Ob animals (except for the significantly higher expression of TOLLIP observed in the Ob vs Ln comparison. Ob-HFD and Ob-Ex rats showed increased expression of PPARγ and TOLLIP as compared to other groups. However, both groups also showed increased expression of TLR2 and TLR4. Nevertheless, this did not translate into a differential expression of TNFα or IL-1 in any of the groups. Conclusion: The ZSF1 model is associated with liver steatosis but not with steatohepatitis or a significantly increased expression of innate immunity or

  2. In vivo 19F-MRS observation of 5-FU metabolism in fatty liver induced by choline-deficient diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Hideki; Harada, Masafumi; Nishitani, Hiromu; Koga, Keiko.

    1996-01-01

    Using 19 F-MRS, 5-FU metabolism was investigated in rat fatty liver. Fatty liver was induced by choline-deficient diet (CD diet). This study showed differences in 5-FU metabolism between normal and fatty liver. After laparotomy, a surface coil was placed directly on the liver surface. Spectra were continuously obtained after injection of 5-FU 100 mg/kg body weight via a catheter inserted into femoral vein. We made MRI and 1 H-MRS study to examine the lipid accumulation. Histological study was also performed using HE (hematoxylin-eosin) and oil red stain. The livers of rats fed a CD diet showed very high intensity on T 1 -WI. 1 H-MRS was very useful in deteminating the fat content because the fat ratio demonstrated by 1 H-MRS is well correlated to histological findings. In 19 F-MRS, we recognized the following four peaks: 5-FU, FBAL, Fnct (fluoronucleotide) and FUPA. The decrease of 5-FU was not very apparent, but compared to the normal liver, the formation of Fnct increased and the formation of FBAL was suppressed in fatty liver. The rats fed a CD diet for four weeks showed a higher Fnct peak and lower FBAL peak compared with the results of rats fed a CD diet for two weeks. In a CD diet group, liver cell degeneration and necrotic changes were observed histologically. It is reported that cell degeneration is followed by cell proliferation in fatty liver induced by a choline deficient diet, and the high Fnct peak found in our study may reflect this phenomenon. The high Fnct peak on 19 F-MRS may correspond to recovering reaction from liver injury like fatty liver. (author)

  3. The effects of space flight on some rat liver enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    We have examined, in the livers of rats carried aboard the Cosmos 936 biosatellite, the activities of about 30 enzymes concerned with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In addition to the enzyme studies, the levels of glycogen and of the individual fatty acids in hepatic lipids were determined. Livers from flight and ground control rats at recovery (R0) and 25 days after recovery (R25) were used for these analyses. For all parameters measured, the most meaningful comparisons are those made between flight stationary (FS) and flight centrifuged (FC) animals at R0. When these two groups of flight rats were compared at R0, statistically significant decreases in the activity levels of glycogen phosphorylase, α-glycerol phosphate acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, aconitase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and an increase in the palmitoyl CoA desaturase were noted in the weightless group (FS). The significance of these findings was strengthened by the fact that all enzyme activities showing alterations at R0 returned to normal 25 days postflight. When liver glycogen and total fatty acids of the two sets of flight animals were determined, significant differences that could be attributed to reduced gravity were observed. The weightless group (FS) at R0 contained, on the average, more than twice the amount of glycogen than did the centrifuged controls (FC) and a remarkable shift in the ratio of palmitate to palmitoleate was noted. These metabolic alterations, both in enzyme levels and in hepatic constituents, appear to be characteristic of the weightless condition. Our data seem to justify the conclusion that centrifugation during flight is equivalent to terrestrial gravity.

  4. Current knowledge of detoxification mechanisms of xenobiotic in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Youhui; Diao, Qingyun

    2017-01-01

    The western honey bee Apis mellifera is the most important managed pollinator species in the world. Multiple factors have been implicated as potential causes or factors contributing to colony collapse disorder, including honey bee pathogens and nutritional deficiencies as well as exposure to pesticides. Honey bees' genome is characterized by a paucity of genes associated with detoxification, which makes them vulnerable to specific pesticides, especially to combinations of pesticides in real field environments. Many studies have investigated the mechanisms involved in detoxification of xenobiotics/pesticides in honey bees, from primal enzyme assays or toxicity bioassays to characterization of transcript gene expression and protein expression in response to xenobiotics/insecticides by using a global transcriptomic or proteomic approach, and even to functional characterizations. The global transcriptomic and proteomic approach allowed us to learn that detoxification mechanisms in honey bees involve multiple genes and pathways along with changes in energy metabolism and cellular stress response. P450 genes, is highly implicated in the direct detoxification of xenobiotics/insecticides in honey bees and their expression can be regulated by honey/pollen constitutes, resulting in the tolerance of honey bees to other xenobiotics or insecticides. P450s is also a key detoxification enzyme that mediate synergism interaction between acaricides/insecticides and fungicides through inhibition P450 activity by fungicides or competition for detoxification enzymes between acaricides. With the wide use of insecticides in agriculture, understanding the detoxification mechanism of insecticides in honey bees and how honeybees fight with the xenobiotis or insecticides to survive in the changing environment will finally benefit honeybees' management.

  5. Isocaloric high-fat feeding directs hepatic metabolism to handling of nutrient imbalance promoting liver fat deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Diaz Rua, Ruben; Van Schothorst, E. M.; Keijer, J.; Palou, A.; Oliver, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Consumption of fat-rich foods is associated with obesity and related alterations. However, there is a group of individuals, the metabolically obese normal-weight (MONW) subjects, who present normal body weight but have metabolic features characteristic of the obese status, including fat deposition in critical tissues such as liver, recognized as a major cause for the promotion of metabolic diseases. Our aim was to better understand metabolic alterations present in liver of MONW rats applying whole genome transcriptome analysis. Methods: Wistar rats were chronically fed a high-fat diet isocaloric relative to Control animals to avoid the hyperphagia and overweight and to mimic MONW features. Liver transcriptome analysis of both groups was performed. Results: Sustained intake of an isocaloric high-fat diet had a deep impact on the liver transcriptome, mainly affecting lipid metabolism. Although serum cholesterol levels were not affected, circulating triacylglycerols were lower, and metabolic adaptations at gene expression level indicated adaptation toward handling the increased fat content of the diet, an increased triacylglycerol and cholesterol deposition in liver of MONW rats was observed. Moreover, gene expression pointed to increased risk of liver injury. One of the top upregulated genes in this tissue was Krt23, a marker of hepatic disease in humans that was also increased at the protein level.Conclusion:Long-term intake of a high-fat diet, even in the absence of overweight/obesity or increase in classical blood risk biomarkers, promotes a molecular environment leading to hepatic lipid accumulation and increasing the risk of suffering from hepatic diseases.

  6. Isocaloric high-fat feeding directs hepatic metabolism to handling of nutrient imbalance promoting liver fat deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Diaz Rua, Ruben

    2016-03-22

    Background/Objectives: Consumption of fat-rich foods is associated with obesity and related alterations. However, there is a group of individuals, the metabolically obese normal-weight (MONW) subjects, who present normal body weight but have metabolic features characteristic of the obese status, including fat deposition in critical tissues such as liver, recognized as a major cause for the promotion of metabolic diseases. Our aim was to better understand metabolic alterations present in liver of MONW rats applying whole genome transcriptome analysis. Methods: Wistar rats were chronically fed a high-fat diet isocaloric relative to Control animals to avoid the hyperphagia and overweight and to mimic MONW features. Liver transcriptome analysis of both groups was performed. Results: Sustained intake of an isocaloric high-fat diet had a deep impact on the liver transcriptome, mainly affecting lipid metabolism. Although serum cholesterol levels were not affected, circulating triacylglycerols were lower, and metabolic adaptations at gene expression level indicated adaptation toward handling the increased fat content of the diet, an increased triacylglycerol and cholesterol deposition in liver of MONW rats was observed. Moreover, gene expression pointed to increased risk of liver injury. One of the top upregulated genes in this tissue was Krt23, a marker of hepatic disease in humans that was also increased at the protein level.Conclusion:Long-term intake of a high-fat diet, even in the absence of overweight/obesity or increase in classical blood risk biomarkers, promotes a molecular environment leading to hepatic lipid accumulation and increasing the risk of suffering from hepatic diseases.

  7. The association between donor genetic variations in one-carbon metabolism pathway genes and hepatitis B recurrence after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Di; Zhuo, Jianyong; Yang, Modan; Wang, Chao; Linhui, Pan; Xie, Haiyang; Xu, Xiao; Zheng, Shusen

    2018-04-05

    Hepatitis B recurrence adversely affects patients' survival after liver transplantation. This study aims to find association between donor gene variations of one carbon metabolism and post-transplant hepatitis B recurrence. This study enrolled 196 patients undergoing liver transplantation for HBV related end-stage liver diseases. We detected 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of 7 one-carbon metabolism pathway genes (including MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, ALDH1L1, GART, SHMT1 and CBS) in donor livers and analyzed their association with HBV reinfection after liver transplantation. Hepatitis B recurrence was observed in 19 of the 196 patients (9.7%) undergoing liver transplantation. Hepatitis B recurrence significantly affected post-transplant survival in the 196 patients (p = 0.018), and correlate with tumor recurrence in the subgroup of HCC patients (n = 99, p = 0.006). Among the 11 SNPs, donor liver mutation in rs1979277 (G > A) was adversely associated with post-transplant hepatitis B recurrence (p = 0.042). In the subgroup of HCC patients, survival analysis showed donor liver mutations in rs1801133 (G > A) and rs1979277 (G > A) were risk factors for hepatitis B recurrence (p B recurrence in non-HCC patients (n = 97, p > 0.05). Hepatitis B recurrence impaired post-transplant survival. Donor liver genetic variations in one-carbon metabolism pathway genes were significantly associated with post-transplant hepatitis B recurrence. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Mice with chimeric livers are an improved model for human lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ewa C S; Naugler, Willscott Edward; Nauglers, Scott; Parini, Paolo; Mörk, Lisa-Mari; Jorns, Carl; Zemack, Helen; Sandblom, Anita Lövgren; Björkhem, Ingemar; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Strom, Stephen C; Grompe, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Rodents are poor model for human hyperlipidemias because total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels are very low on a normal diet. Lipoprotein metabolism is primarily regulated by hepatocytes and we therefore assessed whether chimeric mice extensively repopulated with human cells can model human lipid and bile acid metabolism. FRG [ F ah(-/-) R ag2(-/-)Il2r g (-/-)]) mice were repopulated with primary human hepatocytes. Serum lipoprotein lipid composition and distribution (VLDL, LDL, and HDL) was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography. Bile was analyzed by LC-MS or by GC-MS. RNA expression levels were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Chimeric mice displayed increased LDL and VLDL fractions and a lower HDL fraction compared to wild type, thus significantly shifting the ratio of LDL/HDL towards a human profile. Bile acid analysis revealed a human-like pattern with high amounts of cholic acid and deoxycholic acid (DCA). Control mice had only taurine-conjugated bile acids as expcted, but highly repopulated mice had glycine-conjugated cholic acid as found in human bile. RNA levels of human genes involved in bile acid synthesis including CYP7A1, and CYP27A1 were significantly upregulated as compared to human control liver. However, administration of recombinant hFGF19 restored human CYP7A1 levels to normal. Humanized-liver mice showed a typical human lipoprotein profile with LDL as the predominant lipoprotein fraction even on a normal diet. The bile acid profile confirmed presence of an intact enterohepatic circulation. Although bile acid synthesis was deregulated in this model, this could be fully normalized by FGF19 administration. Taken together these data indicate that chimeric FRG-mice are a useful new model for human lipoprotein and bile-acid metabolism.

  9. Gene expression of drug metabolizing enzymes in adult and aged mouse liver: A modulation by immobilization stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailova, O.N.; Gulyaeva, L.F.; Filipenko, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    The role of stress in the regulation of enzymatic systems involved in the biotransformation of xenobiotics, as well as endogenous substrates in the liver was investigated using single immobilization stress as a model. Adult (3 months of age) and aged (26 months) C3H/a male mice were used. Cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1A2 (CYP1A1 and CYP1A2), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) mRNA levels in the mouse liver were measured by a semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Excluding CYP1A1, experiments revealed significant differences in the expression of these genes between adult- and aged-control animals. The influence of stress on the expression of genes studied was shown to be higher in adult mice than in aged ones. Our results clearly demonstrate the lack of response or even the attenuation of gene expression in aged animals that may play an important role in age-related pathologies and diseases

  10. Effect of thiamine deficiency, pyrithiamine and oxythiamine on pyruvate metabolism in rat liver and brain in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meghal, S.K.; O'Neal, R.M.; Koeppe, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Rats were fed either a thiamine-deficient diet or diets containing pyrithiamine or oxythiamine. When symptoms of thiamine deficiency appeared, the animals were injected intraperitoneally with [2- 14 C] pyruvate six to twelve minutes prior to sacrifice. Free glutamic and aspartic acids were isolated from liver and brain and degraded. The results indicate that, in thiamine-deficient or oxythiamine-treated rats, pyruvate metabolism in liver and brain is similar to that in normal animals. In contrast, pyrithinamine drastically decreases the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by rat liver. (auth.)

  11. The fetal/neonatal mouse liver exhibits transcriptional features of the adult pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver’s ability to detoxify and eliminate xenobiotics through the expression of xenobiotic metabolism enxymes (XME). The fetus and neonate have been hypothesized to exhibit increased sensitivity to xenobiotic toxicity. T...

  12. A High Phosphorus Diet Affects Lipid Metabolism in Rat Liver: A DNA Microarray Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunwoo Chun

    Full Text Available A high phosphorus (HP diet causes disorders of renal function, bone metabolism, and vascular function. We previously demonstrated that DNA microarray analysis is an appropriate method to comprehensively evaluate the effects of a HP diet on kidney dysfunction such as calcification, fibrillization, and inflammation. We reported that type IIb sodium-dependent phosphate transporter is significantly up-regulated in this context. In the present study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to investigate the effects of a HP diet on the liver, which plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was performed with total RNA isolated from the livers of rats fed a control diet (containing 0.3% phosphorus or a HP diet (containing 1.2% phosphorus. Gene Ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs revealed that the HP diet induced down-regulation of genes involved in hepatic amino acid catabolism and lipogenesis, while genes related to fatty acid β-oxidation process were up-regulated. Although genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated in HP diet-fed rats, genes important for the elongation and desaturation reactions of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids were up-regulated. Concentrations of hepatic arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid were increased in HP diet-fed rats. These essential fatty acids activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα, a transcription factor for fatty acid β-oxidation. Evaluation of the upstream regulators of DEGs using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that PPARα was activated in the livers of HP diet-fed rats. Furthermore, the serum concentration of fibroblast growth factor 21, a hormone secreted from the liver that promotes fatty acid utilization in adipose tissue as a PPARα target gene, was higher (p = 0.054 in HP diet-fed rats than in control diet-fed rats. These data suggest that a HP diet enhances energy expenditure through the utilization of free fatty

  13. Cytotoxic effects and aromatase inhibition by xenobiotic endocrine disrupters alone and in combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benachour, Nora; Moslemi, Safa; Sipahutar, Herbert; Seralini, Gilles-Eric

    2007-01-01

    Xenobiotics may cause long-term adverse effects in humans, especially at the embryonic level, raising questions about their levels of exposure, combined effects, and crucial endpoints. We are interested in the possible interactions between xenobiotic endocrine disrupters, cellular viability and androgen metabolism. Accordingly, we tested aroclor 1254 (A1254), atrazine (AZ), o,p'-DDT, vinclozolin (VZ), p,p'-DDE, bisphenol A (BPA), chlordecone (CD), nonylphenol (NP), tributylin oxide (TBTO), and diethylstilbestrol (DES) for cellular toxicity against human embryonic 293 cells, and activity against cellular aromatase, but also on placental microsomes and on the purified equine enzyme. Cellular viability was affected in 24 h by all the xenobiotics with a threshold at 50 μM (except for TBTO and DES, 10 μM threshold), and aromatase was inhibited at non-toxic doses. In combination synergism was observed reducing the threshold values of toxicity to 4-10 μM, and aromatase activity by 50% in some cases. In placental microsomes the most active xenobiotics rapidly inhibited microsomal aromatase in a manner independent of NADPH metabolism. Prolonged exposures to low doses in cells generally amplified by 50 times aromatase inhibition. These xenobiotics may act by inhibition of the active site or by allosteric effects on the enzyme. Bioaccumulation is a feature of some xenobiotics, especially chlordecone, DDT and DDE, and low level chronic exposures can also affect cell signaling mechanisms. This new information about the mechanism of action of these xenobiotics will assist in improved molecular design with a view to providing safer compounds for use in the (human) environment

  14. Concentrations, patterns and metabolites of organochlorine pesticides in relation to xenobiotic phase I and II enzyme activities in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Svalbard and the Baltic Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routti, Heli; Bavel, Bert van; Letcher, Robert J.; Arukwe, Augustine; Chu Shaogang; Gabrielsen, Geir W.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the concentrations and patterns of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and their metabolites in liver and plasma of two ringed seal populations (Phoca hispida): lower contaminated Svalbard population and more contaminated Baltic Sea population. Among OCPs, p,p'-DDE and sum-chlordanes were the highest in concentration. With increasing hepatic contaminant concentrations and activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, the concentrations of 3-methylsulfonyl-p,p'-DDE and the concentration ratios of pentachlorophenol/hexachlorobenzene increased, and the toxaphene pattern shifted more towards persistent Parlar-26 and -50 and less towards more biodegradable Parlar-44. Relative concentrations of the chlordane metabolites, oxychlordane and -heptachlorepoxide, to sum-chlordanes were higher in the seals from Svalbard compared to the seals from the Baltic, while the trend was opposite for cis- and trans-nonachlor. The observed differences in the OCP patterns in the seals from the two populations are probably related to the catalytic activity of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, and also to differences in dietary exposure. - Contrasting patterns of organochlorine pesticides in two ringed seal populations.

  15. Concentrations, patterns and metabolites of organochlorine pesticides in relation to xenobiotic phase I and II enzyme activities in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Svalbard and the Baltic Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routti, Heli, E-mail: heli.routti@npolar.n [Norwegian Polar Institute, Polar Environmental Centre, 9296 Tromso (Norway); Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Genetics and Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, 20014 Turku (Finland); Bavel, Bert van [MTM Research Centre, Orebro University, 70182 Orebro (Sweden); Letcher, Robert J. [Wildlife Toxicology and Disease Program, Wildlife and Landscape Science Directorate, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3 (Canada); Arukwe, Augustine [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Chu Shaogang [Wildlife Toxicology and Disease Program, Wildlife and Landscape Science Directorate, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3 (Canada); Gabrielsen, Geir W. [Norwegian Polar Institute, Polar Environmental Centre, 9296 Tromso (Norway)

    2009-08-15

    The present study investigates the concentrations and patterns of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and their metabolites in liver and plasma of two ringed seal populations (Phoca hispida): lower contaminated Svalbard population and more contaminated Baltic Sea population. Among OCPs, p,p'-DDE and sum-chlordanes were the highest in concentration. With increasing hepatic contaminant concentrations and activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, the concentrations of 3-methylsulfonyl-p,p'-DDE and the concentration ratios of pentachlorophenol/hexachlorobenzene increased, and the toxaphene pattern shifted more towards persistent Parlar-26 and -50 and less towards more biodegradable Parlar-44. Relative concentrations of the chlordane metabolites, oxychlordane and -heptachlorepoxide, to sum-chlordanes were higher in the seals from Svalbard compared to the seals from the Baltic, while the trend was opposite for cis- and trans-nonachlor. The observed differences in the OCP patterns in the seals from the two populations are probably related to the catalytic activity of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, and also to differences in dietary exposure. - Contrasting patterns of organochlorine pesticides in two ringed seal populations.

  16. Prediction of bacterial growth on xenobiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Andreas Libonati; Kästner, Matthias; Trapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    to attain predictions closer to the experimentally observed yields [3]. However, this knowledge is seldom known for xenobiotics in the environment but is needed to assess the turnover leading to biomass production, i.e. for sludge production or biogenic residues. The objectives of the present study were...... method, we evaluated it with both simple substrates (e.g. acetate, methanol, and glyoxylate) and xenobiotics (e.g 2,4-D, linuron, carbofuran, carbon tetrachloride, and toluene). Experimental data for the simple substrates were taken from [4], for xenobiotics from [6] and own experimental data. For simple...... substrates, our approach predicts yields close to experimental values and also for xenobiotics the yield predictions for most of the compounds are close to the experimentally obtained values.Overall, with our method we were able to obtain yield predictions close to experimental values with a minimum of input...

  17. Effect of specific amino acids on hepatic lipid metabolism in fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheesan, Prasanthi; Beutheu, Stéphanie; Ventura, Gabrielle; Sarfati, Gilles; Nubret, Esther; Kapel, Nathalie; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne-Judith; Bergheim, Ina; Cynober, Luc; De-Bandt, Jean-Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Fructose diets have been shown to induce insulin resistance and to alter liver metabolism and gut barrier function, ultimately leading to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Citrulline, Glutamine and Arginine may improve insulin sensitivity and have beneficial effects on gut trophicity. Our aim was to evaluate their effects on liver and gut functions in a rat model of fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 58) received a 4-week fructose (60%) diet or standard chow with or without Citrulline (0.15 g/d) or an isomolar amount of Arginine or Glutamine. All diets were made isonitrogenous by addition of non-essential amino acids. At week 4, nutritional and metabolic status (plasma glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and amino acids, net intestinal absorption) was determined; steatosis (hepatic triglycerides content, histological examination) and hepatic function (plasma aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin) were assessed; and gut barrier integrity (myeloperoxidase activity, portal endotoxemia, tight junction protein expression and localization) and intestinal and hepatic inflammation were evaluated. We also assessed diets effects on caecal microbiota. In these experimental isonitrogenous fructose diet conditions, fructose led to steatosis with dyslipidemia but without altering glucose homeostasis, liver function or gut permeability. Fructose significantly decreased Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus and tended to increase endotoxemia. Arginine and Glutamine supplements were ineffective but Citrulline supplementation prevented hypertriglyceridemia and attenuated liver fat accumulation. While nitrogen supply alone can attenuate fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, Citrulline appears to act directly on hepatic lipid metabolism by partially preventing hypertriglyceridemia and steatosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition

  18. Chemical carcinogenesis in feral fish: uptake, activation, and detoxication of organic xenobiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varanasi, U.; Stein, J.E.; Nishimoto, M.; Reichert, W.L.; Collier, T.K.

    1987-01-01

    The high prevalance of liver neoplasms in English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and substantially lower prevalence of neoplasms in a closely related species, starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) captured from industrialized waterways, provide a unique opportunity to compare biochemical processes involved in chemical carcinogenesis in feral fish species. Because levels of aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs) in urban sediments are correlated with prevalences of liver neoplasms in English sole, the authors have initiated detailed studies to evaluate the effects of endogenous and exogenous factors on uptake, activation and detoxication of carcinogenic AHs, such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), using spectroscopic, chromatographic, and radiometric techniques. The results obtained thus far show that sole readily takes up AHs associated with sediment from urban areas and that the presence of other xenobiotics, such as PCBs, in sediment increases tissue concentrations of BaP metabolites. Extensive metabolism of BaP occurred whether sole was exposed to this AH via sediment, per os, or intraperitoneally. Substantial modification of hepatic DNA occurred and persisted for a period of 2-4 weeks after a single exposure to BaP. The level of covalent binding of BaP intermediates to hepatic DNA was 10-fold higher in juvenile than adult sole and 90-fold higher in juvenile sole than in Sprague-Dawley rat, a species which is resistant to BaP-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. These results, along with the authors findings that hepatic GST activity in flounder was two times higher than in sole, demonstrate that microsomal metabolism of BaP does not accurately reflect the differences in the ability of these fish to form BaP-DNA adducts in vivo and also suggest that detoxication of reactive intermediates is an important factor in determining the levels of DNA modification by AHs and resulting toxic effects in feral fish

  19. Potential for anaerobic conversion of xenobiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Dolfing, J.; Haagensen, Frank

    2003-01-01

    This review covers the latest research on the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic xenobiotic compounds, with emphasis on surfactants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalate esters, polychlorinated biphenyls, halogenated phenols, and pesticides. The versatility of anaerobic reactor systems...... regarding the treatment of xenobiotics is shown with the focus on the UASB reactor, but the applicability of other reactor designs for treatment of hazardous waste is also included. Bioaugmentation has proved to be a viable technique to enhance a specific activity in anaerobic reactors and recent research...

  20. Metabolic Syndrome and Serum Liver Enzymes Level at Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Miralem; Dervisevic, Amela; Pepic, Esad; Lepara, Orhan; Fajkic, Almir; Ascic-Buturovic, Belma; Tuna, Enes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate liver function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with and without metabolic syndrome (MS) by determining serum levels of gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). We also investigated correlation between levels of liver enzymes and some components of MS in both groups of patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 96 patients (age 47–83 years) with T2DM. All patients were divided according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) in two groups: 50 patients with T2 DM and MS (T2DM-MS) and 46 patients with T2DM without MS (T2DM-Non MS). The analysis included blood pressure monitoring and laboratory tests: fasting blood glucose (FBG), total lipoprotein cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride (TG), fibrinogen and liver enzymes: GGT, ALT and AST. T2DM-MS group included patients which had FBG ≥ 6,1 mmol/L, TG ≥ 1,7 mmol/L and blood pressure ≥ 130/85 mm Hg. Results: T2DM-MS patients had significant higher values of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and medium arterial pressure compared to T2DM-Non MS patients. Serum levels of TC, TG, LDL-C, VLDL-C and FBG were significantly higher in the T2DM-MS group compared to the T2DM-Non MS group. Serum fibrinogen level and GGT level were significantly higher in patients with T2DM-MS compared to the serum fibrinogen level and GGT level in T2DM-Non MS patients. Mean serum AST and ALT level were higher, but not significantly, in patients with T2DM and MS compared to the patients with T2DM without MS. Significant negative correlations were observed between TC and AST (r= -0,28, p<0,05), as well as between TC and ALT level (r= -0,29, p<0,05) in T2DM-MS group of patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that patients with T2DM and MS have markedly elevated liver enzymes. T2DM and MS probably play a role in

  1. In vitro metabolism studies of 18F-labeled 1-phenylpiperazine using mouse liver S9 fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Eun Kyoung; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ko, Bong-Ho; Choi, Yong; Lee, Kyung-Han; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of 1-(4-[ 18 F]fluoromethylbenzyl)-4-phenylpiperazine ([ 18 F]1) and 1-(4-[ 18 F]fluorobenzyl)-4-phenylpiperazine ([ 18 F]2) was investigated using mouse liver S9 fraction. Results were compared to those of in vivo metabolism using mouse blood and bone and to in vitro metabolism using mouse liver microsomes. Defluorination was the main metabolic pathway for [ 18 F]1 in vitro and in vivo. Based on TLC, HPLC and LC-MS data, [ 18 F]fluoride ion and less polar radioactive metabolites derived from aromatic ring oxidation were detected in vitro, and the latter metabolites were rapidly converted into the former with time, whereas only the [ 18 F]fluoride ion was detected in vivo. Similarly, the in vitro metabolism of [ 18 F]2 using either S9 fraction or microsomes showed the same pattern as the in vivo method using blood; however, the radioactive metabolites derived from aromatic ring oxidation were not detected in vivo. These results demonstrate that liver S9 fraction can be widely used to investigate the intermediate radioactive metabolites and to predict the in vivo metabolism of radiotracers

  2. Involvement of hepatic xenobiotic related genes in bromadiolone resistance in wild Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Alsbo, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    To examine the role of xenobiotic relevant genes in bromadiolone resistance in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) we compared the constitutive liver gene expression and expression upon bromadiolone administration in bromadiolone resistant and anticoagulant susceptible female rats using a LNA...... expressed in resistant than susceptible rats upon bromadiolone exposure. To establish how bromadiolone affected xenobiotic gene expression in the two strains we compared bromadiolone expression profiles to saline profiles of both strains. Bromadiolone mediated significant up-regulation of Cyp2e1 and Cyp3a3...... expression in the resistant rats whereas the rodenticide conferred down-regulation of Cyp2e1, Cyp3a3 and Gpox1 and induction of Cyp2c12 expression in susceptible rats. Cyp2c13 and Cyp3a2 expression were markedly suppressed in both strains upon treatment. This suggests that xenobiotic relevant enzymes play...

  3. Differential effects of fasting vs food restriction on liver thyroid hormone metabolism in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, E M; van Beeren, H C; Ackermans, M T; Kalsbeek, A; Fliers, E; Boelen, A

    2015-01-01

    A variety of illnesses that leads to profound changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) are axis collectively known as the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). NTIS is characterized by decreased tri-iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) and inappropriately low TSH serum concentrations, as well as altered hepatic thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism. Spontaneous caloric restriction often occurs during illness and may contribute to NTIS, but it is currently unknown to what extent. The role of diminished food intake is often studied using experimental fasting models, but partial food restriction might be a more physiologically relevant model. In this comparative study, we characterized hepatic TH metabolism in two models for caloric restriction: 36 h of complete fasting and 21 days of 50% food restriction. Both fasting and food restriction decreased serum T4 concentration, while after 36-h fasting serum T3 also decreased. Fasting decreased hepatic T3 but not T4 concentrations, while food restriction decreased both hepatic T3 and T4 concentrations. Fasting and food restriction both induced an upregulation of liver D3 expression and activity, D1 was not affected. A differential effect was seen in Mct10 mRNA expression, which was upregulated in the fasted rats but not in food-restricted rats. Other metabolic pathways of TH, such as sulfation and UDP-glucuronidation, were also differentially affected. The changes in hepatic TH concentrations were reflected by the expression of T3-responsive genes Fas and Spot14 only in the 36-h fasted rats. In conclusion, limited food intake induced marked changes in hepatic TH metabolism, which are likely to contribute to the changes observed during NTIS. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. Metabolic Syndrome Components After Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Prevalence and the Impact of Obesity and Immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perito, E R; Lustig, R H; Rosenthal, P

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with long-term morbidity and mortality after adult liver transplantation (LT). Whether pediatric LT recipients have a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome remains controversial. In a cross-sectional study, we evaluated pediatric LT recipients aged 8-30 years using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) protocols. LT recipients were matched by gender, race/ethnicity, and age with controls from NHANES. Pediatric LT recipients (n = 83), after adjusting for overweight/obesity and glucocorticoid use, had increased prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; 2-h glucose after oral glucose tolerance test ≥140 mg/dL), and low high-density lipoprotein compared to matched NHANES controls (n = 235) despite a lower prevalence of overweight/obesity. Among LT recipients, the adjusted odds of IGT doubled for every 7.5 years taking calcineurin inhibitors (odds ratio = 2.10, 95% confidence interval 1.06-4.17 per 7.5 years taking calcineurin inhibitors, p = 0.03). Among all subjects with IGT, LT recipients had a lower prevalence of overweight/obesity and less insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance) than did controls with IGT. Among normal weight subjects, LT recipients were significantly more likely than controls to have prehypertension/hypertension, IGT, low high-density lipoprotein, and metabolic syndrome. Pediatric LT recipients have unique metabolic syndrome profiles and risk factors and will require tailored screening and management protocols. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Associations of Drug Lipophilicity and Extent of Metabolism with Drug-Induced Liver Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEuen, Kristin; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida; Chen, Minjun

    2017-06-22

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI), although rare, is a frequent cause of adverse drug reactions resulting in warnings and withdrawals of numerous medications. Despite the research community's best efforts, current testing strategies aimed at identifying hepatotoxic drugs prior to human trials are not sufficiently powered to predict the complex mechanisms leading to DILI. In our previous studies, we demonstrated lipophilicity and dose to be associated with increased DILI risk and, and in our latest work, we factored reactive metabolites into the algorithm to predict DILI. Given the inconsistency in determining the potential for drugs to cause DILI, the present study comprehensively assesses the relationship between DILI risk and lipophilicity and the extent of metabolism using a large published dataset of 1036 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs by considering five independent DILI annotations. We found that lipophilicity and the extent of metabolism alone were associated with increased risk for DILI. Moreover, when analyzed in combination with high daily dose (≥100 mg), lipophilicity was statistically significantly associated with the risk of DILI across all datasets ( p < 0.05). Similarly, the combination of extensive hepatic metabolism (≥50%) and high daily dose (≥100 mg) was also strongly associated with an increased risk of DILI among all datasets analyzed ( p < 0.05). Our results suggest that both lipophilicity and the extent of hepatic metabolism can be considered important risk factors for DILI in humans, and that this relationship to DILI risk is much stronger when considered in combination with dose. The proposed paradigm allows the convergence of different published annotations to a more uniform assessment.

  6. Prevalence of metabolic risk factors in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, N.; Sarfraz, T.; Mumtaz, Z.; Rizwan, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of factors leading to metabolic syndrome among non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients at a tertiary care hospital. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Kharian. Study was carried out over a period of six months from Jan 2015 to Jun 2015. Material and Methods: A total of 110 patients were included in this study. Past history was taken to rule out alcohol intake, viral and drug induced etiology, to determine the presence of co-morbidities like obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia. Physical examination was carried to determine the arterial blood pressure and to determine anthropometric data that is weight, height, body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity by measuring waist circumference. Results: Mean age of the patients was 49.95 +- 8.86 years. There were 72 male patients (65.5%) while 38 (34.5%) patients were female. Different metabolic factors were central obesity in 82 patients (74.5%), raised high density lipoprotein (HDL) in 19 patients (17.3%), raised cholesterol in 87 patients (79.1%), raised blood pressure in 65 patients (59.1%) and raised fasting plasma glucose in 82 patients (74.5%). Mean BMI was 26.31 kg/m2 +- 2.68, mean waist circumference was 109.82 cm +- 18.41, mean cholesterol was 237.50 +- 48.47mg/dl, mean systolic blood pressure was 148.88mmHg +- 22.10, mean diastolic blood pressure was 90.41mmHg +- 12.25 and mean fasting plasma glucose was 113.28mg/dl +- 22.80. Stratification with regard to age was carried out. Conclusion: A considerable number of patients with NAFLD had metabolic syndrome. There was a close correlation between NAFLD and metabolic syndrome. (author)

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of ultrasonography screening for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in metabolic syndrome patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phisalprapa, Pochamana; Supakankunti, Siripen; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Apisarnthanarak, Piyaporn; Charoensak, Aphinya; Washirasaksiri, Chaiwat; Srivanichakorn, Weerachai; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can be diagnosed early by noninvasive ultrasonography; however, the cost-effectiveness of ultrasonography screening with intensive weight reduction program in metabolic syndrome patients is not clear. This study aims to estimate economic and clinical outcomes of ultrasonography in Thailand. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis used decision tree and Markov models to estimate lifetime costs and health benefits from societal perspective, based on a cohort of 509 metabolic syndrome patients in Thailand. Data were obtained from published literatures and Thai database. Results were reported as incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) in 2014 US dollars (USD) per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained with discount rate of 3%. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the influence of parameter uncertainty on the results. Results: The ICER of ultrasonography screening of 50-year-old metabolic syndrome patients with intensive weight reduction program was 958 USD/QALY gained when compared with no screening. The probability of being cost-effective was 67% using willingness-to-pay threshold in Thailand (4848 USD/QALY gained). Screening before 45 years was cost saving while screening at 45 to 64 years was cost-effective. Conclusions: For patients with metabolic syndromes, ultrasonography screening for NAFLD with intensive weight reduction program is a cost-effective program in Thailand. Study can be used as part of evidence-informed decision making. Translational Impacts: Findings could contribute to changes of NAFLD diagnosis practice in settings where economic evidence is used as part of decision-making process. Furthermore, study design, model structure, and input parameters could also be used for future research addressing similar questions. PMID:28445256

  8. Contribution of liver alcohol dehydrogenase to metabolism of alcohols in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plapp, Bryce V; Leidal, Kevin G; Murch, Bruce P; Green, David W

    2015-06-05

    The kinetics of oxidation of various alcohols by purified rat liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) were compared with the kinetics of elimination of the alcohols in rats in order to investigate the roles of ADH and other factors that contribute to the rates of metabolism of alcohols. Primary alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol) and diols (1,3-propanediol, 1,3-butanediol, 1,4-butanediol, 1,5-pentanediol) were eliminated in rats with zero-order kinetics at doses of 5-20 mmol/kg. Ethanol was eliminated most rapidly, at 7.9 mmol/kgh. Secondary alcohols (2-propanol-d7, 2-propanol, 2-butanol, 3-pentanol, cyclopentanol, cyclohexanol) were eliminated with first order kinetics at doses of 5-10 mmol/kg, and the corresponding ketones were formed and slowly eliminated with zero or first order kinetics. The rates of elimination of various alcohols were inhibited on average 73% (55% for 2-propanol to 90% for ethanol) by 1 mmol/kg of 4-methylpyrazole, a good inhibitor of ADH, indicating a major role for ADH in the metabolism of the alcohols. The Michaelis kinetic constants from in vitro studies (pH 7.3, 37 °C) with isolated rat liver enzyme were used to calculate the expected relative rates of metabolism in rats. The rates of elimination generally increased with increased activity of ADH, but a maximum rate of 6±1 mmol/kg h was observed for the best substrates, suggesting that ADH activity is not solely rate-limiting. Because secondary alcohols only require one NAD(+) for the conversion to ketones whereas primary alcohols require two equivalents of NAD(+) for oxidation to the carboxylic acids, it appears that the rate of oxidation of NADH to NAD(+) is not a major limiting factor for metabolism of these alcohols, but the rate-limiting factors are yet to be identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of long-term refeeding on protein metabolism in patients with cirrhosis of the liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, J; Nielsen, K; Juul, A

    1997-01-01

    , protein requirement and protein utilization were investigated further by measuring protein synthesis and degradation. In two separate studies, five or six patients with cirrhosis of the liver were refed on a balanced diet for an average of 2 or 4 weeks. Protein and energy intakes were doubled in both...... studies. Initial and final whole-body protein metabolism was measured in the fed state by primed continuous [15N]glycine infusion. Refeeding caused a statistically significant increase of about 30% in protein synthesis in both studies while protein degradation was only slightly affected. The increase...... in protein synthesis was associated with significant increases in plasma concentrations of total amino acids (25%), leucine (58%), isoleucine (82%), valine (72%), proline (48%) and triiodothyronine (27%) while insulin, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein-3 were...

  10. In vitro metabolism of the anti-androgenic fungicide vinclozolin by rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Santoyo, Adolfo; Angeles-Soto, Esperanza; de Lourdes López-González, Ma; Harrison, Randy A; Hughes, Michael F

    2012-03-01

    Vinclozolin (V) is a fungicide used in agricultural settings. V administered to rats is hydrolyzed to 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1) and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2). V, M1 and M2 have antiandrogenic properties by interacting with the androgen receptor. Data on V, M1 and M2 biotransformation are limited. Our objective was to characterize V metabolism by rat liver microsomes. V was incubated with non-treated adult male Long-Evans rat liver microsomes and NADPH. Several metabolites were detected following the extraction of incubate with acetonitrile and analysis by HPLC/DAD/MSD. One metabolite was identified as [3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-5-(1,2-dihydroxyethyl)-1,3-oxazolidine-2,4-dione] (M4), which was gradually converted to 3',5'-dichloro-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutylanilide (M5). Both co-eluted in the same HPLC peak. Another metabolite ([M7]) was detected by UV but was unstable for mass spectral analysis. The K(M app) for co-eluted M4/M5 and [M7] was 53.7 and 135.4 μM, the V(max app) was 0.812 and 0.669 nmoles/min/mg protein, and CL(int) was 15.1 and 4.9 ml/min/g protein, respectively. Pilocarpine, orphenadrine and proadifen and anti-rat cytochrome P450 (CYP)2A, 2B and 3A antibodies inhibited M4/M5 and [M7] formation. These results indicate that V is efficiently metabolized by CYP. Determination of the metabolites of V will provide further insight into the relationship between toxicity and tissue dose of V and its metabolites.

  11. Etiology, clinical spectrum and outcome of metabolic liver diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A.; Samanta, T.; Purkait, R.; Mukherji, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the etiology, clinical spectrum and outcome of metabolic liver diseases (MLD) in children admitted in a tertiary care hospital of Eastern India. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Liver Clinic and Paediatrics Inpatient Department of Nilratan Sircar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, Eastern India, from April 2009 to March 2011. Methodology: All children aged 0 - 12 years having characteristic clinical features along with diagnostic hallmark of any MLDs were included in this study and data were collected on a pre-designed proforma. After appropriate management and discharge, all patients were followed-up for next 6 months. Results: Fifty one children with mean age 4.34 +- 3.78 years (range 2 days +- 12 years), male: female ratio 1.55:1, were studied. The etiologies were Wilson's disease (33.33%, n = 17); glycogen storage disorder (23.53%, n = 12); galactosemia (19.61%, n = 10); non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (11.76%, n = 6); Gaucher disease (5.88%, n = 3); mucopolysaccharidoses (3.92%, n = 2) and familial hyperlipoproteinemia type-I (1.96%, n = 1). Jaundice (n = 24) and hepatomegaly (n = 47), was the commonest symptom and sign respectively. Of the 17 non-responders, most were Wilson's disease (n = 7) cases. There was statistical difference in outcome with respect to INR > 1.3 at diagnosis (p = 0.026). Conclusion: High index of suspicion, early detection and screening, simple dietary modification and cost effective drugs along with good compliance are sufficient to treat and even prevent evolution of most causes of the MLDs. (author)

  12. The Effects of Liver Transplantation on the Bone Metabolism and Gonadal Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Atamaz

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of liver transplantation (LT on the bone mineral density (BMD, characteristics of bone turnover, mineral metabolism and sex hormons. Fifty one patients (34 men, 11 women aged 43.5 ± 12.1, who underwent LT were studied, assessing the following parameters: lumbar spine and proximal femur BMD, osteocalcin, deoxypyridinoline (DPD, parathyroid hormone (PTH, free testesterone (FT, gonadotropins (FSH, LH, tyroid hormones, growth hormone (GH and blood/ 24-hours urine Ca and P. All the measures were obtained at baseline and at 3rd month after LT. At baseline, 12 patients (%23.5 had osteoporosis, 22 patients (%43.1 had osteopenia and the mean BMD was 0.892 ± 0.1 for lumbar spine. Whereas, osteoporosis was seen less at femoral neck and total femur: 5 (%9.8 and 4 (%7.8, respectively. Three months after LT, 3.9% drop for lumbar spine, 5.3% drop for femur neck, 6.3% drop for total femur were observed, in BMD these decreases were statistically significant for all sites (p<0.05. The thyroid hormones, GH, PTH, blood Ca, P and osteocalcin levels and urinary DPD excretion were within normal range, while the levels of FSH and LH in women and level of FT in men were lower than normal range. After LT, statistically significant increases were observed in the PTH, osteocalcin, DPD, FSH, LH and FT levels (p<0.05. There was a highly significant negative correlation between duration of liver disease and all the BMD measures (p<0.01. Consequently, the increased osteoporosis ratio which was characterized by high bone turnover was found in patients who underwent LT in this study. The normalization of liver functions following LT was characterized by an early rise in sex hormones.

  13. Posthemorrhage glycogen and lactate metabolism in the liver: an experimental study with postprandial rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boija, P.O.; Nylander, G.; Suhaili, A.; Ware, J.

    1988-01-01

    Glycogen and lactate metabolism was studied in livers from three groups of postprandial rats sustaining 70 mm Hg hemorrhagic hypotension for variable periods, 60 min (60H group), 120 min (120H group), and nonbled controls. The donor livers were investigated after completed hemorrhage using an in vitro perfusion system with L-lactate as substrate, together with U- 14 C-lactate. The residual glycogen stores were determined after perfusions. The incorporation of labelled lactate to glucose was increased in the 120H group by 66.7% and 116.8% compared to the 60H group and controls (p less than 0.01), but glycogenolysis was still the main source of glucose released in the 120H group. Glycogen formation from labelled lactate was 46.6% higher in the 120H group compared to controls (p less than 0.05) and lactate oxidation was decreased by 67.5% (p less than 0.05). The data suggest that hepatocytes are capable of rapid change from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis during hemorrhagic hypovolemia. However, energy-sparing glycogen breakdown is given priority over gluconeogenesis as long as glycogen remains available

  14. Hereditary angioedema as a metabolic liver disorder: novel therapeutic options and prospects for cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Ameratuga

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema (HAE is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations of the SERPING1 or the Factor 12 genes. It is potentially fatal, particularly if not identified at an early stage. Apart from androgens, which are contraindicated in children and in pregnant women, a range of effective, albeit very expensive treatments have recently become available for HAE patients. The cost of these new treatments is beyond the reach of most developing countries. At this time, there is no cure for the disorder. In spite of mutations of the SERPING1 gene, autoimmunity and infections are not prominent features of the condition. Here we present the argument that HAE should be viewed primarily as a metabolic liver disorder. This conceptual paradigm shift will stimulate basic research and may facilitate new therapeutic approaches to HAE outlined in this paper. We suggest several novel potential treatment options for HAE from the perspectives of clinical immunology, molecular biology and liver transplantation. Many of these offer the prospect of curing the disorder. The effectiveness of these options are rapidly improving in many cases and their risks are decreasing. Given the very high costs of treating HAE, some of these curative options may become feasible in the next decade.

  15. Morphological, functional and metabolic imaging biomarkers: assessment of vascular-disrupting effect on rodent liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huaijun; Li, Junjie; Keyzer, Frederik De; Yu, Jie; Feng, Yuanbo; Marchal, Guy; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng; Nuyts, Johan

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate effects of a vascular-disrupting agent on rodent tumour models. Twenty rats with liver rhabdomyosarcomas received ZD6126 intravenously at 20 mg/kg, and 10 vehicle-treated rats were used as controls. Multiple sequences, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with the microvascular permeability constant (K), were acquired at baseline, 1 h, 24 h and 48 h post-treatment by using 1.5-T MRI. [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose micro-positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG μPET) was acquired pre- and post-treatment. The imaging biomarkers including tumour volume, enhancement ratio, necrosis ratio, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and K from MRI, and maximal standardised uptake value (SUV max ) from FDG μPET were quantified and correlated with postmortem microangiography and histopathology. In the ZD6126-treated group, tumours grew slower with higher necrosis ratio at 48 h (P max dropped at 24 h (P < 0.01). Relative K of tumour versus liver at 48 h correlated with relative vascular density on microangiography (r = 0.93, P < 0.05). The imaging biomarkers allowed morphological, functional and metabolic quantifications of vascular shutdown, necrosis formation and tumour relapse shortly after treatment. A single dose of ZD6126 significantly diminished tumour blood supply and growth until 48 h post-treatment. (orig.)

  16. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome in Hypopituitary Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A; Williamson-Baddorf, Sarah; Waters, Bradford; Wan, Jim Y; Solomon, Solomon S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Increased incidence of cardiovascular mortality and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been reported in hypopituitarism; but previous studies did not correct for obesity in these patients. Therefore it remained unclear if endocrine deficiency in hypopituitarism is associated with metabolic consequences independent of obesity. This study was designed to determine the burden of cardiovascular disease and NAFLD in hypopituitarism. Methods We performed a retrospective case-control analysis of hypopituitary patients at Veterans Affair Medical center, Memphis; from January 1997- June 2007. After matching for age, gender, obesity and race, relevant data were abstracted from the subjects' records to determine the presence of hypopituitarism, cardiovascular risk factors and fatty liver disease. Cases and controls were characterized by descriptive statistics, and compared using Chi-square and Student's t- tests. Results Hypopituitary patients exhibited higher prevalence of hypertension- 88% vs 78% (P0.3). Hypopituitary patients had higher elevations in serum aminotransferase levels and hyperbilirubinemia-24% vs 11% (Phypopituitarism. Although hypopituitary patients had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors than controls, they were not disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease. PMID:19745609

  17. On-line HPLC Analysis System for Metabolism and Inhibition Studies in Precision-Cut Liver Slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Midwoud, Paul M.; Janssen, Joost; Merema, M.T.; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for on-line monitoring of drug metabolism in continuously perifused, precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) in a microfluidic system has been developed using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV). In this approach, PCLS are incubated in a microfluidic device

  18. An observational study on the association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome with gall stone disease requiring cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: We found association of metabolic syndrome with gallstones and NAFLD. Non alcoholic fatty liver was highly prevalent in our study subjects. Huge percentage of first degree relatives of gall stone patients had gallstones and this relation was more pronounced patients who had associated NAFLD.

  19. A nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cirrhosis model in gerbil : the dynamic relationship between hepatic lipid metabolism and cirrhosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Wei; Guan, Zheng; Brisset, Jean C.; Shi, Qiaojuan; Lou, Qi; Ma, Yue; Suriguga, Su; Ying, Huazhong; Sa, Xiaoying; Chen, Zhenwen; Quax, Wim J.; Chu, Xiaofeng

    2018-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) usually takes decades to develop into cirrhosis, which limits the longitudinal study of NAFLD. This work aims at developing a NAFLD-caused cirrhosis model in gerbil and examining the dynamic relationship between hepatic lipid metabolism and cirrhosis. We fed

  20. High folic acid consumption leads to pseudo-MTHFR deficiency, altered lipid metabolism, and liver injury in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, K. E.; Mikael, L. G.; Leung, K. Y.; Lévesque, N.; Deng, L.; Wu, Q.; Malysheva, O. V.; Best, A.; Caudill, M. A.; Greene, N. D.; Rozen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Increased consumption of folic acid is prevalent, leading to concerns about negative consequences. The effects of folic acid on the liver, the primary organ for folate metabolism, are largely unknown. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) provides methyl donors for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthesis and methylation reactions.

  1. Studies on defense mechanism against xenobiotics in rats, using gold as a model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawa-Katayama, Yohko; Kojima, Akiko; Nakano, Yukihiro.

    1994-01-01

    For self-protection, a living organism has a special mechanism to prevent xenobiotics from being absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract. This led to the present study on the defense mechanism of the gastrointestinal tract where foods are digested and absorbed. The results obtained from this study showed that 1) starvation caused an insufficiency of the defense mechanism against xenobiotics in jejunal absorptive cells and Kupffer cells, 2) after refeeding diets, a reparative process occurred at the damaged cell sites, resulting in recovery of the defense mechanism against xenobiotics, and 3) a 5% fat diet seemed to be the best fat level for recovery of the defense mechanism against xenobiotics. In the nutritional point of view, the 5% fat diet is equivalent to 0.11 in fat energy ratio (fat energy/total energy of the diet). These data suggest that a diet with a much lower fat energy (equivalent to 0.11) can give a good effect on recovery of the defense mechanism against xenobiotics in the gastrointestinal tract and the liver. (author)

  2. Liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardino, M.E.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Barton Price, R.; Berkman, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluation of the liver for focal lesions is extremely important because the liver is one of the most common sites for metastatic disease. Most patients with metastatic deposits to the liver have a survival rate of about 6 months. Thus, metastatic disease to the liver has an extremely grave prognosis. In the past patients with hepatic lesions had no therapeutic recourse. However, with recent aggressive surgical advances (such as partial hepatectomies) and hepatic artery embolization, survival of patients with hepatic metastases has increased. Thus it is important for noninvasive imaging not only to detect lesions early in their course, but also to give their true hepatic involvement and the extent of the neoplastic process elsewhere in the body. Recent advances in imaging have been rapidly changing over the past 5 years. These changes have been more rapid in computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound than in radionuclide imaging. Thus, the question addressed in this chapter is: What is the relationship of hepatic ultrasound to the other current diagnostic modalities in detecting metastatic liver disease and other focal liver lesions? Also, what is its possible future relationship to nuclear magnetic resonance?

  3. Metabolic profiling of fatty liver in young and middle‐aged adults: Cross‐sectional and prospective analyses of the Young Finns Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtz, Peter; Suomela, Emmi; Lehtovirta, Miia; Kangas, Antti J.; Jula, Antti; Mikkilä, Vera; Viikari, Jorma S.A.; Juonala, Markus; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Hutri‐Kähönen, Nina; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Soininen, Pasi; Ala‐Korpela, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver is associated with obesity‐related metabolic disturbances, but little is known about the metabolic perturbations preceding fatty liver disease. We performed comprehensive metabolic profiling to assess how circulating metabolites, such as lipoprotein lipids, fatty acids, amino acids, and glycolysis‐related metabolites, reflect the presence of and future risk for fatty liver in young adults. Sixty‐eight lipids and metabolites were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics in the population‐based Young Finns Study from serum collected in 2001 (n = 1,575), 2007 (n = 1,509), and 2011 (n = 2,002). Fatty liver was diagnosed by ultrasound in 2011 when participants were aged 34‐49 years (19% prevalence). Cross‐sectional associations as well as 4‐year and 10‐year risks for fatty liver were assessed by logistic regression. Metabolites across multiple pathways were strongly associated with the presence of fatty liver (P fatty acids including omega‐6 (OR = 0.37, 0.32‐0.42). The metabolic associations were attenuated but remained significant after adjusting for waist, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and smoking (P fatty liver diagnosis. Conclusion: Circulating lipids, fatty acids, and amino acids reflect fatty liver independently of routine metabolic risk factors; these metabolic aberrations appear to precede the development of fatty liver in young adults. (Hepatology 2017;65:491‐500). PMID:27775848

  4. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency and High Fructose Intake in the Development of Metabolic Syndrome, Brain Metabolic Abnormalities, and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Western diets are characterized by both dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and increased fructose intake. The latter found in high amounts in added sugars such as sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS. Both a low intake of omega-3 fatty acids or a high fructose intake contribute to metabolic syndrome, liver steatosis or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, promote brain insulin resistance, and increase the vulnerability to cognitive dysfunction. Insulin resistance is the core perturbation of metabolic syndrome. Multiple cognitive domains are affected by metabolic syndrome in adults and in obese adolescents, with volume losses in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, affecting executive function. Fish oil supplementation maintains proper insulin signaling in the brain, ameliorates NAFLD and decreases the risk to metabolic syndrome suggesting that adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet can cope with the metabolic challenges imposed by high fructose intake in Western diets which is of major public health importance. This review presents the current status of the mechanisms involved in the development of the metabolic syndrome, brain insulin resistance, and NAFLD a most promising area of research in Nutrition for the prevention of these conditions, chronic diseases, and improvement of Public Health.

  5. Clearance of iron oxide particles in rat liver: effect of hydrated particle size and coating material on liver metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C; Johansson, Lars O; Hustvedt, Svein Olaf; Haldorsen, Anita G; Bjørnerud, Atle; Fayad, Zahi A; Ahlstrom, Haakan K

    2006-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect of the particle size and coating material of various iron oxide preparations on the rate of rat liver clearance. The following iron oxide formulations were used in this study: dextran-coated ferumoxide (size = 97 nm) and ferumoxtran-10 (size = 21 nm), carboxydextran-coated SHU555A (size = 69 nm) and fractionated SHU555A (size = 12 nm), and oxidized-starch coated materials either unformulated NC100150 (size = 15 nm) or formulated NC100150 injection (size = 12 nm). All formulations were administered to 165 rats at 2 dose levels. Quantitative liver R2* values were obtained during a 63-day time period. The concentration of iron oxide particles in the liver was determined by relaxometry, and these values were used to calculate the particle half-lives in the liver. After the administration of a high dose of iron oxide, the half-life of iron oxide particles in rat liver was 8 days for dextran-coated materials, 10 days for carboxydextran materials, 14 days for unformulated oxidized-starch, and 29 days for formulated oxidized-starch. The results of the study indicate that materials with similar coating but different sizes exhibited similar rates of liver clearance. It was, therefore, concluded that the coating material significantly influences the rate of iron oxide clearance in rat liver.

  6. The effect of alterations in total coenzyme A on metabolic pathways in the liver and heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, C.A.S.

    1989-01-01

    The first set of experiments involved in vitro experiments using primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. A range of conditions were developed which resulted in cell cultures with variations in total CoA over a range of 1.3 to 2.9 nmol/mg protein with identical hormonal activation which simulated metabolic stress. Elevations of total CoA levels above that of controls due to preincubation with cyanamide plus pantothenate were correlated with diminished rates of total ketone body production, 3-hydroxybutyrate production and ratios of 3 hydroxybutyrate/acetoactetate with palmitate as substrate. In contrast, cells with elevated total CoA levels had higher rates of [ 14 C] CO 2 production from radioactive palmitate which implied greater flux of acetyl CoA units into the TCA cycle and less to the pathway of ketogenesis. The second set of experiments were designed to alter total CoA levels in vivo by maintaining rats on a chronic ethanol diet with or without pantothenate-supplementation. The effect of alterations of CoA on mitochondrial metabolism was evaluated by measuring substrate oxidation rates in liver and heat mitochondria as well as ketone body production with palmitoyl-1-carnitine as substrate

  7. Mechanisms by Which Metabolic Reprogramming in GSD1 Liver Generates a Favorable Tumorigenic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Gjorgjieva PhD Student

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1 is an inherited disorder caused by impaired glucose 6-phosphatase activity. This impairment translates into the inhibition of endogenous glucose production and the subsequent accumulation of cellular glucose 6-phosphate. Excess glucose 6-phosphate enhances glycolysis, increases the production of fatty acids, uric acid, and lactate, causes hepatomegaly due to glycogen and lipid accumulation, and finally results in liver tumor development. Although the exact mechanisms of tumorigenesis in patients with GSD1 remain unclear, GSD1 hepatocytes undergo a Warburg-like metabolic switch. The consequent hyperactivation of specific metabolic pathways renders GSD1 hepatocytes susceptible to tumor development, presumably by providing the building blocks and energy required for cell proliferation. In addition to this, enhanced apoptosis in GSD1 may promote mitotic activity and hence result in DNA replication errors, thereby contributing to tumorigenesis. Increased carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR activity and impaired AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK function likely play key roles in these pro-oncogenic processes.

  8. Altered cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in patients with liver disease and minimal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, A.H.; Yap, E.W.; Rhoades, H.M.; Wong, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    We measured CBF and the CMRglc in normal controls and in patients with severe liver disease and evidence for minimal hepatic encephalopathy using positron emission tomography. Regions were defined in frontal, temporal, parietal, and visual cortex; the thalamus; the caudate; the cerebellum; and the white matter along with a whole-slice value obtained at the level of the thalamus. There was no difference in whole-slice CBF and CMRglc values. Individual regional values were normalized to the whole-slice value and subjected to a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. When normalized CBF and CMRglc values for regions were compared between groups, significant differences were demonstrated (F = 5.650, p = 0.00014 and F = 4.58, p = 0.0073, respectively). These pattern differences were due to higher CBF and CMRglc in the cerebellum, thalamus, and caudate in patients and lower values in the cortex. Standardized coefficients extracted from a discriminant function analysis permitted correct group assignment for 95.5% of the CBF studies and for 92.9% of the CMRglc studies. The similarity of the altered pattern of cerebral metabolism and flow in our patients to that seen in rats subjected to portacaval shunts or ammonia infusions suggests that this toxin may alter flow and metabolism and that this, in turn, causes the clinical expression of encephalopathy

  9. Lipid biomarkers and metabolic effects of lycopene from tomato juice on liver of rats with induced hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Cristina; Martín-Pozuelo, Gala; Lozano, Ana B; Sevilla, Angel; García-Alonso, Javier; Canovas, Manuel; Periago, María J

    2013-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver disorders, covering steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Dietary factors may modulate its evolution, and antioxidants have been proposed as therapeutic agents. Among them, lycopene has been demonstrated to prevent the development of steatohepatitis and even to inhibit NASH-promoted early hepatocarcinogenesis induced by a high-fat diet in rats. These conclusions have been related to its antioxidant activity; however, NAFLD is more complex than a simple redox imbalance state since it disturbs several metabolic systems in the liver. In consequence, there is a lack of information related to the action of lycopene beyond antioxidant biomarkers. In this work, NAFLD was induced in rats using a hypercholesterolemic and high-fat diet to evaluate the effect of lycopene consumption from tomato juice on liver metabolism. Several classical antioxidant biomarkers related to NAFLD were measured to check the state of this disease after 7 weeks of the controlled diet. Moreover, a metabolomics platform was applied to measure more than 70 metabolites. Results showed clear differences in the classical antioxidant biomarkers as well as in the metabolic pattern, attending not only to the diet but also to the intake of lycopene from tomato juice. Interestingly, tomato juice administration partially reverted the metabolic pattern from a high-fat diet to a normal diet even in metabolites not related to the redox state, which could lead to new targets for therapeutic agents against NAFLD and to achieving a better understanding of the role of lycopene in liver metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  11. Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Trichloroethylene Metabolism and Tissue-Specific Toxicity among Inbred Mouse Strains: Liver Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Uehara, Takeki; Collins, Leonard B.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Ball, Louise M.; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent. Although TCE is classified as carcinogenic to humans, substantial gaps remain in our understanding of inter-individual variability in TCE metabolism and toxicity, especially in the liver. We tested a hypothesis that amounts of oxidative metabolites of TCE in mouse liver are associated with liver-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in sub-acute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 days; 7 inbred mouse strains) and sub-chronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 weeks; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation [trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroethanol] and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione] in serum and liver, and various liver toxicity phenotypes. In sub-acute study, inter-strain variability in TCE metabolite amounts was observed in serum and liver. No induction of Cyp2e1 protein levels in liver was detected. Serum and liver levels of TCA and DCA were correlated with increased transcription of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, but not with degree of induction in hepatocellular proliferation. In sub-chronic study, serum and liver levels of oxidative metabolites gradually decreased over time despite continuous dosing. Liver protein levels of Cyp2e1, Adh and Aldh2 were unaffected by treatment with TCE. While the magnitude of induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes also declined, hepatocellular proliferation increased. This study offers a unique opportunity to provide a scientific data-driven rationale for some of the major assumptions in human health assessment of TCE. PMID:25424544

  12. [L-arginine metabolism enzyme activities in rat liver subcellular fractions under condition of protein deprivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopyl'chuk, G P; Buchkovskaia, I M

    2014-01-01

    The features of arginase and NO-synthase pathways of arginine's metabolism have been studied in rat liver subcellular fractions under condition of protein deprivation. During the experimental period (28 days) albino male rats were kept on semi synthetic casein diet AIN-93. The protein deprivation conditions were designed as total absence of protein in the diet and consumption of the diet partially deprived with 1/2 of the casein amount compared to in the regular diet. Daily diet consumption was regulated according to the pair feeding approach. It has been shown that the changes of enzyme activities, involved in L-arginine metabolism, were characterized by 1.4-1.7 fold decrease in arginase activity, accompanied with unchanged NO-synthase activity in cytosol. In mitochondrial fraction the unchanged arginase activity was accompanied by 3-5 fold increase of NO-synthase activity. At the terminal stages of the experiment the monodirectional dynamics in the studied activities have been observed in the mitochondrial and cytosolfractions in both experimental groups. In the studied subcellular fractions arginase activity decreased (2.4-2.7 fold with no protein in the diet and 1.5 fold with partly supplied protein) and was accompanied by NO-synthase activity increase by 3.8 fold in cytosole fraction, by 7.2 fold in mitochondrial fraction in the group with no protein in the diet and by 2.2 and 3.5 fold in the group partialy supplied with protein respectively. The observed tendency is presumably caused by the switch of L-arginine metabolism from arginase into oxidizing NO-synthase parthway.

  13. Metabolic Circuit Involving Free Fatty Acids, microRNA 122, and Triglyceride Synthesis in Liver and Muscle Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Chofit; Rivkin, Mila; Berkovits, Liav; Simerzin, Alina; Zorde-Khvalevsky, Elina; Rosenberg, Nofar; Klein, Shiri; Yaish, Dayana; Durst, Ronen; Shpitzen, Shoshana; Udi, Shiran; Tam, Joseph; Heeren, Joerg; Worthmann, Anna; Schramm, Christoph; Kluwe, Johannes; Ravid, Revital; Hornstein, Eran; Giladi, Hilla; Galun, Eithan

    2017-11-01

    Effective treatments are needed for hepatic steatosis characterized by accumulation of triglycerides in hepatocytes, which leads to hepatocellular carcinoma. MicroRNA 122 (MIR122) is expressed only in the liver, where it regulates lipid metabolism. We investigated the mechanism by which free fatty acids (FFAs) regulate MIR122 expression and the effect of MIR122 on triglyceride synthesis. We analyzed MIR122 promoter activity and validated its target mRNAs by transfection of Luciferase reporter plasmids into Huh7, BNL-1ME, and HEK293 cultured cell lines. We measured levels of microRNAs and mRNAs by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of RNA extracted from plasma, liver, muscle, and adipose tissues of C57BL/6 mice given the FFA-inducer CL316243. MIR122 was inhibited using an inhibitor of MIR122. Metabolic profiles of mice were determined using metabolic chambers and by histologic analyses of liver tissues. We performed RNA sequence analyses to identify metabolic pathways involving MIR122. We validated human Agpat1 and Dgat1 mRNAs, involved in triglyceride synthesis, as targets of MIR122. FFAs increased MIR122 expression in livers of mice by activating the retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha, and induced secretion of MIR122 from liver to blood. Circulating MIR122 entered muscle and adipose tissues of mice, reducing mRNA levels of genes involved in triglyceride synthesis. Mice injected with an inhibitor of MIR122 and then given CL316243, accumulated triglycerides in liver and muscle tissues, and had reduced rates of β-oxidation. There was a positive correlation between level of FFAs and level of MIR122 in plasma samples from 6 healthy individuals, collected before and during fasting. In biochemical and histologic studies of plasma, liver, muscle, and adipose tissues from mice, we found that FFAs increase hepatic expression and secretion of MIR122, which regulates energy storage vs expenditure in liver and peripheral tissues. Strategies to reduce

  14. The Metabolic Role of Gut Microbiota in the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Sanduzzi Zamparelli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes (T2D, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which are common risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD, has dramatically increased worldwide over the last decades. Although dietary habit is the main etiologic factor, there is an imperfect correlation between dietary habits and the development of metabolic disease. Recently, research has focused on the role of the microbiome in the development of these disorders. Indeed, gut microbiota is implicated in many metabolic functions and an altered gut microbiota is reported in metabolic disorders. Here we provide evidence linking gut microbiota and metabolic diseases, focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this association.

  15. Fatty liver and drugs: the two sides of the same coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miele, L; Liguori, A; Marrone, G; Biolato, M; Araneo, C; Vaccaro, F G; Gasbarrini, A; Grieco, A

    2017-03-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a common and underestimated cause of liver disease. Several drugs and other xenobiotics can be the cause of different clinicopathologic patterns of liver disease. Steatosis and steatohepatitis are rare but well-documented types of DILI. Over the past decades commonly used drugs like amiodarone, tamoxifen, irinotecan, methotrexate, valproic acid and glucocorticoids have been recognized to be associated with steatosis. Even though the pathophysiological pathways are still only partially understood, inhibition of mitochondrial beta-oxidation, reduced very low-density lipoprotein secretion, insulin resistance induction and increased de novo synthesis or increased liver uptake of fatty acids are considered the main pathogenic mechanisms through which drugs can lead to hepatic steatosis. On the other hand, fatty liver itself is a very common clinical condition, and there is a growing awareness of the potential risk factors for DILI due to the underlying metabolic condition itself.

  16. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Childhood: Endocrine-Metabolic “Mal-Programming”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manti, Sara; Romano, Claudio; Chirico, Valeria; Filippelli, Martina; Cuppari, Caterina; Loddo, Italia; Salpietro, Carmelo; Arrigo, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Context: Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is the major chronic liver disease in the pediatric population. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of abnormalities (inflammation, fibrosis and cirrhosis), ranging from accumulation of fat (also known as steatosis) towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The development of NAFLD in children is significantly increased. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for the major studies published from 1998 to today. The databases searched were: PubMed, EMBASE, Orphanet, Midline and Cochrane Library. We used the key words: "non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, children, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fatty liver". Results: NAFLD/NASH is probably promoted by “multiple parallel hits”: environmental and genetic factors, systemic immunological disorders (oxidative stress, persistent-low grade of inflammation) as well as obesity and metabolic alterations (insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome). However its exact cause still underdiagnosed and unknown. Conclusions: Pediatric NAFLD/NASH is emerging problem. Longitudinal follow-up studies, unfortunately still insufficient, are needed to better understand the natural history and outcome of NAFLD in children. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathogenesis, environmental, genetic and metabolic factors of disease. The review also highlights the importance of studying the underlying mechanisms of pediatric NAFLD and the need for complete and personalized approach in the management of NAFLD/NASH. PMID:24829591

  17. Ananas comosus L. Leaf Phenols and p-Coumaric Acid Regulate Liver Fat Metabolism by Upregulating CPT-1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect and action mechanisms of pineapple leaf phenols (PLPs on liver fat metabolism in high-fat diet-fed mice. Results show that PLP significantly reduced abdominal fat and liver lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The effects of PLP were comparable with those of FB. Furthermore, at the protein level, PLP upregulated the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1, whereas FB had no effects on CPT-1 compared with the HFD controls. Regarding mRNA expression, PLP mainly promoted the expression of CPT-1, PGC1a, UCP-1, and AMPK in the mitochondria, whereas FB mostly enhanced the expression of Ech1, Acox1, Acaa1, and Ehhadh in peroxisomes. PLP seemed to enhance fat metabolism in the mitochondria, whereas FB mainly exerted the effect in peroxisomes. In addition, p-coumaric acid (CA, one of the main components from PLP, significantly inhibited fat accumulation in oleic acid-induced HepG2 cells. CA also significantly upregulated CPT-1 mRNA and protein expressions in HepG2 cells. We, firstly, found that PLP enhanced liver fat metabolism by upregulating CPT-1 expression in the mitochondria and might be promising in treatment of fatty liver diseases as alternative natural products. CA may be one of the active components of PLP.

  18. Clinical features of male patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis or hepatitis B cirrhosis complicated by abnormal glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Qidan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features of male patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC or hepatitis B cirrhosis (HBC complicated by abnormal glucose metabolism. MethodsA total of 287 patients with liver cirrhosis who were admitted to Guangzhou Panyu Central Hospital from January 2008 to September 2013 were selected. Among these patients, 74 had ALC and were all male, including 54 with abnormal glucose metabolism; the other 213 had HBC, including 97 with abnormal glucose metabolism (69 male patients and 28 female patients. A controlled study was performed for the clinical data of ALC and HBC patients with abnormal glucose metabolism, to investigate the association of patients′ clinical manifestations with the indices for laboratory examination, insulin resistance index, incidence rate of abnormal glucose metabolism, and Child-Pugh class. The t-test was applied for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test was applied for comparison of categorical data between groups, and the Spearman rank correlation was applied for correlation analysis. ResultsCompared with HBC patients, ALC patients had significantly higher incidence rates of abnormal glucose metabolism (730% vs 32.4%, hepatogenous diabetes (35.1% vs 14.6%, fasting hypoglycemia (27.0% vs 10.3%, and impaired glucose tolerance (31.1% vs 14.1% (χ2=4.371, 3.274, 4.784, and 1.633, all P<0.05. The Spearman correlation analysis showed that in ALC and HBC patients, the incidence rate of abnormal glucose metabolism was positively correlated with Child-Pugh class (rs=0.41, P<005. Compared with the HBC patients with abnormal glucose metabolism, the ALC patients with abnormal glucose metabolism had a significantly higher incidence rate of Child-Pugh class A (χ2=7.520, P=0.001, and a significantly lower incidence rate of Child-Pugh class C (χ2=6.542, P=0.003. There were significant differences in the incidence rates of dim complexion, telangiectasia of the

  19. Animal experiments to study the connection between the radioreaction of the RNA metabolism of the liver and the activity of the protein metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, E

    1973-02-05

    After selective deep X-ray irradiation of rat livers with 200 KeV X-rays, an enhanced incorporation of tritium uridine into various RNA species is observed. The extent and the rate of the radioreaction could be modified by experimentally changing the metabolic status of the liver cells. Partial deproteinisation of the plasma by means of an exchange function lead to a marked rise in the RNA synthesis rate of the liver for a short period of time. Additional irradiation had an inhibiting and delaying effect on the induction-dependent increase in tritium uridine incorporation in the case of transfer-RNA and m-RNA, while there was an enhanced incorporation in the messenger RNA of the heavy ribosome and polymer fraction.

  20. Estimation of aerial deposition and foliar uptake of xenobiotics: Assessment of current models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, S.O.; Fellows, R.J.; Cataldo, D.A.; Droppo, J.G.; Van Voris, P.

    1987-10-01

    This report reviews existing mathematical and/or computer simulation models that estimate xenobiotic deposition to and transport through (both curricular and stomatal) vegetative surfaces. The report evaluates the potential for coupling the best of those models to the existing Uptake, Translocation, Accumulation, and Biodegradation model to be used for future xenobiotic exposure assessments. Here xenobiotic compounds are defined as airborne contaminants, both organic and gaseous pollutants, that are introduced into the environment by man. Specifically this document provides a detailed review of the state-of-the-art models that addressed aerial deposition of particles and gases to foliage; foliar and cuticular transport, metabolism, and uptake of organic xenobiotics; and stomatal transport of gaseous and volatile organic xenobiotic pollutants. Where detailed information was available, parameters for each model are provided on a chemical by chemical as well as species by species basis. Sufficient detail is provided on each model to assess the potential for adapting or coupling the model to the existing UTAB plant exposure model. 126 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Altered Systemic Amino Acid Metabolism Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulin Cheng

    Full Text Available Fatty liver is a major cause of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify early metabolic alterations associated with liver fat accumulation in 50- to 55-year-old men (n = 49 and women (n = 52 with and without NAFLD.Hepatic fat content was measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS. Serum samples were analyzed using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR metabolomics platform. Global gene expression profiles of adipose tissues and skeletal muscle were analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays and quantitative PCR. Muscle protein expression was analyzed by Western blot.Increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA, aromatic amino acid (AAA and orosomucoid were associated with liver fat accumulation already in its early stage, independent of sex, obesity or insulin resistance (p<0.05 for all. Significant down-regulation of BCAA catabolism and fatty acid and energy metabolism was observed in the adipose tissue of the NAFLD group (p<0.001for all, whereas no aberrant gene expression in the skeletal muscle was found. Reduced BCAA catabolic activity was inversely associated with serum BCAA and liver fat content (p<0.05 for all.Liver fat accumulation, already in its early stage, is associated with increased serum branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. The observed associations of decreased BCAA catabolism activity, mitochondrial energy metabolism and serum BCAA concentration with liver fat content suggest that adipose tissue dysfunction may have a key role in the systemic nature of NAFLD pathogenesis.

  2. Oxidative Inactivation of Liver Mitochondria in High Fructose Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats: Effect of Glycyrrhizin Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Rajarshi; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a serious health problem in the present world. Glycyrrhizin, a triterpenoid saponin of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root, has been reported to ameliorate the primary complications and hepatocellular damage in rats with the syndrome. In this study, we have explored metabolic syndrome-induced changes in liver mitochondrial function and effect of glycyrrhizin against the changes. Metabolic syndrome was induced in rats by high fructose (60%) diet for 6 weeks. The rats were then treated with glycyrrhizin (50 mg/kg body weight) by single intra-peritoneal injection. After 2 weeks of the treatment, the rats were sacrificed to collect liver tissue. Elevated mitochondrial ROS, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl, and decreased reduced glutathione content indicated oxidative stress in metabolic syndrome. Loss of mitochondrial inner membrane cardiolipin was observed. Mitochondrial complex I activity did not change but complex IV activity decreased significantly. Mitochondrial MTT reduction ability, membrane potential, phosphate utilisation and oxygen consumption decreased in metabolic syndrome. Reduced mitochondrial aconitase activity and increased aconitase carbonyl content suggested oxidative damage of the enzyme. Elevated Fe(2+) ion level in mitochondria might be associated with increased ROS generation in metabolic syndrome. Glycyrrhizin effectively attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress and aconitase degradation, and improved electron transport chain activity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Correlation between liver function tests and metabolic syndrome in hepatitis-free elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Sheng Shang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to investigate the relationship between liver function tests (LFTs and metabolic syndrome (MetS as several studies have shown positive correlations between some of the LFTs, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT, and MetS but have not fully explored the same in the elderly. Owing to the progress in public health, the aging of the general population becomes a major issue. Design: We enrolled subjects aged over 60 years who underwent routine health checkups in a Health Screening Center after excluding subjects with a history of hepatitis B or C infection, excessive alcohol consumption, liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, acute hepatitis, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, or receiving medications for these diseases. Finally, 9,282 participants were eligible for analysis. Statistical Analysis: All data were tested for normal distribution with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and for homogeneity of variances with the Levene′s test. A t-test was used to evaluate the differences between the two groups. Univariate and multivariate regressions were used to observe correlations between different parameters. Receiver operating characteristic curves of each LFT were used to predict MetS. Areas under curves and 95% confidence interval were also estimated and compared. Results: With the exception of aspartate aminotransferase and α-fetal protein, the results of LFTs, including total and direct bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, ALT, and γ-GT, were altered in the group with MetS. Furthermore, the levels of γ-GT in men and ALP in women were independently associated with all MetS components and had the highest areas under receiver operating characteristic curves. Conclusion: Abnormal LFTs are highly correlated with MetS in the hepatitis-free elderly, with levels of γ-GT in men and ALP in women being the most important factors. LFTs may represent an auxiliary tool for the

  4. Review article: coffee consumption, the metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesil, A; Yilmaz, Y

    2013-11-01

    Coffee consumption may modulate the risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To review the experimental, epidemiological and clinical studies investigating the association between coffee consumption and the risk of MetS and NAFLD. A literature search was conducted with the aim of finding original experimental, epidemiological and clinical articles on the association between coffee consumption, MetS and NAFLD. The following databases were used: PubMed, Embase, Scopus and Science Direct. We included articles written in English and published up to July 2013. Three experimental animal studies investigated the effects of coffee in the MetS, whereas five examined whether experimental coffee intake may modulate the risk of fatty liver infiltration. All of the animal studies showed a protective effect of coffee towards the development of MetS and NAFLD. Moreover, we identified eleven epidemiological and clinical studies that met the inclusion criteria. Of them, six were carried out on the risk of the MetS and five on the risk of NAFLD. Four of the six studies reported an inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of MetS. The two studies showing negative results were from the same study cohort consisting of young persons with a low prevalence of the MetS. All of the epidemiological and clinical studies on NAFLD reported a protective effect of coffee intake. Coffee intake can reduce the risk of NAFLD. Whether this effect may be mediated by certain components of the MetS deserves further investigation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Long-Lasting Improvements in Liver Fat and Metabolism Despite Body Weight Regain After Dietary Weight Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Haufe, Sven; Haas, Verena; Utz, Wolfgang; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Jeran, Stephanie; Böhnke, Jana; Mähler, Anja; Luft, Friedrich C.; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Boschmann, Michael; Jordan, Jens; Engeli, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Weight loss reduces abdominal and intrahepatic fat, thereby improving metabolic and cardiovascular risk. Yet, many patients regain weight after successful diet-induced weight loss. Long-term changes in abdominal and liver fat, along with liver test results and insulin resistance, are not known. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed 50 overweight to obese subjects (46 ± 9 years of age; BMI, 32.5 ± 3.3 kg/m2; women, 77%) who had participated in a 6-month hypocaloric diet and were ra...

  6. Shift work or food intake during the rest phase promotes metabolic disruption and desynchrony of liver genes in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C; Saderi, Nadia; Basualdo, María del Carmen; Guerrero-Vargas, Natali N; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2013-01-01

    In the liver, clock genes are proposed to drive metabolic rhythms. These gene rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) mainly by food intake and via autonomic and hormonal pathways. Forced activity during the normal rest phase, induces also food intake, thus neglecting the signals of the SCN, leading to conflicting time signals to target tissues of the SCN. The present study explored in a rodent model of night-work the influence of food during the normal sleep period on the synchrony of gene expression between clock genes and metabolic genes in the liver. Male Wistar rats were exposed to forced activity for 8 h either during the rest phase (day) or during the active phase (night) by using a slow rotating wheel. In this shift work model food intake shifts spontaneously to the forced activity period, therefore the influence of food alone without induced activity was tested in other groups of animals that were fed ad libitum, or fed during their rest or active phase. Rats forced to be active and/or eating during their rest phase, inverted their daily peak of Per1, Bmal1 and Clock and lost the rhythm of Per2 in the liver, moreover NAMPT and metabolic genes such as Pparα lost their rhythm and thus their synchrony with clock genes. We conclude that shift work or food intake in the rest phase leads to desynchronization within the liver, characterized by misaligned temporal patterns of clock genes and metabolic genes. This may be the cause of the development of the metabolic syndrome and obesity in individuals engaged in shift work.

  7. Metabolically induced liver inflammation leads to NASH and differs from LPS- or IL-1β-induced chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wen; Lindeman, Jan H; Menke, Aswin L; Koonen, Debby P; Morrison, Martine; Havekes, Louis M; van den Hoek, Anita M; Kleemann, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The nature of the chronic inflammatory component that drives the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unclear and possible inflammatory triggers have not been investigated systematically. We examined the effect of non-metabolic triggers (lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), administered by slow-release minipumps) and metabolic dietary triggers (carbohydrate, cholesterol) of inflammation on the progression of bland liver steatosis (BS) to NASH. Transgenic APOE3*Leiden.huCETP (APOE3L.CETP) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) developed BS after 10 weeks. Then, inflammatory triggers were superimposed or not (control) for six more weeks. Mouse livers were analyzed with particular emphasis on hallmarks of inflammation which were defined in human liver biopsies with and without NASH. Livers of HFD-treated control mice remained steatotic and did not progress to NASH. All four inflammatory triggers activated hepatic nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) significantly and comparably (≥5-fold). However, HFD+LPS or HFD+IL-1β did not induce a NASH-like phenotype and caused intrahepatic accumulation of almost exclusively mononuclear cells. By contrast, mice treated with metabolic triggers developed NASH, characterized by enhanced steatosis, hepatocellular hypertrophy, and formation of mixed-type inflammatory foci containing myeloperoxidase-positive granulocytes (neutrophils) as well as mononuclear cells, essentially as observed in human NASH. Specific for the metabolic inducers was an activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1), neutrophil infiltration, and induction of risk factors associated with human NASH, that is, dyslipidemia (by cholesterol) and insulin resistance (by carbohydrate). In conclusion, HFD feeding followed by NF-κB activation per se (LPS, IL-1β) does not promote the transition from BS to NASH. HFD feeding followed by metabolically evoked inflammation induces additional inflammatory components

  8. Induced hypoglycemia for 48 hours indicates differential glucose and insulin effects on liver metabolism in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreipe, L; Vernay, M C M B; Oppliger, A; Wellnitz, O; Bruckmaier, R M; van Dorland, H A

    2011-11-01

    Hypoglycemia is a characteristic condition of early lactation dairy cows and is subsequently dependent on, and may affect, metabolism in the liver. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of induced hypoglycemia, maintained for 48 h, on metabolic parameters in plasma and liver of mid-lactation dairy cows. The experiment involved 3 treatments, including a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp (HypoG, n=6) to obtain a glucose concentration of 2.5 mmol/L, a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (EuG, n=6) in which the effect of insulin was studied, and a control treatment with a 0.9% saline solution (NaCl, n=6). Blood samples for measurements of insulin, metabolites, and enzymes were taken at least once per hour. Milk yield was recorded and milk samples were collected before and after treatment. Liver biopsies were obtained before and after treatment to measure mRNA abundance by real-time, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR of 12 candidate genes involved in the main metabolic pathways. Milk yield decreased in HypoG and NaCl cows, whereas it remained unaffected in EuG cows. Energy-corrected milk yield (kg/d) was only decreased in HypoG cows. In plasma, concentration of β-hydroxybutyrate decreased in response to treatment in EuG cows and was lower (0.41±0.04 mmol/L) on d 2 of the treatment compared with that in HypoG and NaCl cows (on average 0.61±0.03 mmol/L, respectively). Nonesterified fatty acids remained unaffected in all treatments. In the liver, differences between treatments for their effects were only observed in case of mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCKm) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). In HypoG, mRNA abundance of PEPCKm was upregulated, whereas in EuG and NaCl cows, it was downregulated. The EuG treatment downregulated mRNA expression of G6PC, a marked effect compared with the unchanged transcript expression in NaCl. The mRNA abundance of the insulin receptor remained unaffected in all treatments, and no

  9. Reduction of liver fructokinase expression and improved hepatic inflammation and metabolism in liquid fructose-fed rats after atorvastatin treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila, Laia; Rebollo, Alba; Adalsteisson, Gunnar S [Pharmacology Unit, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Alegret, Marta; Merlos, Manuel; Roglans, Nuria [Pharmacology Unit, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); IBUB - Institute of Biomedicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); CIBERobn, [Center for Biomedical Investigation Network in Obesity and Nutrition Physiopathology; Spain; Laguna, Juan C., E-mail: jclagunae@ub.edu [Pharmacology Unit, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); IBUB -Institute of Biomedicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); CIBERobn, [Center for Biomedical Investigation Network in Obesity and Nutrition Physiopathology; Spain

    2011-02-15

    Consumption of beverages that contain fructose favors the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome alterations in humans, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Although the only effective treatment for NAFLD is caloric restriction and weight loss, existing data show that atorvastatin, a hydroxymethyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, can be used safely in patients with NAFLD and improves hepatic histology. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of atorvastatin's therapeutic effect on NAFLD, we used an experimental model that mimics human consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages. Control, fructose (10% w/v solution) and fructose + atorvastatin (30 mg/kg/day) Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed after 14 days. Plasma and liver tissue samples were obtained to determine plasma analytes, liver histology, and the expression of liver proteins that are related to fatty acid synthesis and catabolism, and inflammatory processes. Fructose supplementation induced hypertriglyceridemia and hyperleptinemia, hepatic steatosis and necroinflammation, increased the expression of genes related to fatty acid synthesis and decreased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation activity. Atorvastatin treatment completely abolished histological signs of necroinflammation, reducing the hepatic expression of metallothionein-1 and nuclear factor kappa B binding. Furthermore, atorvastatin reduced plasma (x 0.74) and liver triglyceride (x 0.62) concentrations, decreased the liver expression of carbohydrate response element binding protein transcription factor (x0.45) and its target genes, and increased the hepatic activity of the fatty acid {beta}-oxidation system (x 1.15). These effects may be related to the fact that atorvastatin decreased the expression of fructokinase (x 0.6) in livers of fructose-supplemented rats, reducing the metabolic burden on the liver that is imposed by continuous fructose ingestion. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights

  10. Reduction of liver fructokinase expression and improved hepatic inflammation and metabolism in liquid fructose-fed rats after atorvastatin treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, Laia; Rebollo, Alba; Adalsteisson, Gunnar S.; Alegret, Marta; Merlos, Manuel; Roglans, Nuria; Laguna, Juan C.

    2011-01-01

    Consumption of beverages that contain fructose favors the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome alterations in humans, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Although the only effective treatment for NAFLD is caloric restriction and weight loss, existing data show that atorvastatin, a hydroxymethyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, can be used safely in patients with NAFLD and improves hepatic histology. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of atorvastatin's therapeutic effect on NAFLD, we used an experimental model that mimics human consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages. Control, fructose (10% w/v solution) and fructose + atorvastatin (30 mg/kg/day) Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed after 14 days. Plasma and liver tissue samples were obtained to determine plasma analytes, liver histology, and the expression of liver proteins that are related to fatty acid synthesis and catabolism, and inflammatory processes. Fructose supplementation induced hypertriglyceridemia and hyperleptinemia, hepatic steatosis and necroinflammation, increased the expression of genes related to fatty acid synthesis and decreased fatty acid β-oxidation activity. Atorvastatin treatment completely abolished histological signs of necroinflammation, reducing the hepatic expression of metallothionein-1 and nuclear factor kappa B binding. Furthermore, atorvastatin reduced plasma (x 0.74) and liver triglyceride (x 0.62) concentrations, decreased the liver expression of carbohydrate response element binding protein transcription factor (x0.45) and its target genes, and increased the hepatic activity of the fatty acid β-oxidation system (x 1.15). These effects may be related to the fact that atorvastatin decreased the expression of fructokinase (x 0.6) in livers of fructose-supplemented rats, reducing the metabolic burden on the liver that is imposed by continuous fructose ingestion. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights:

  11. Drug and xenobiotic biotransformation in the blood-brain barrier: A neglected issue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A.G. Agúndez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Drug biotransformation is a crucial mechanism for facilitating the elimination of chemicals from the organism and for decreasing their pharmacological activity. Published evidence suggests that brain drug metabolism may play a role in the development of adverse drug reactions and in the clinical response to drugs and xenobiotics. The blood-brain barrier (BBB has been regarded mainly as a physical barrier for drugs and xenobiotics, and little attention has been paid to BBB as a drug-metabolizing barrier. The presence of drug metabolizing enzymes in the BBB is likely to have functional implications because local metabolism may inactivate drugs or may modify the drug's ability to cross the BBB, thus modifying the drug response and the risk of developing adverse drug reactions. In this perspective paper, we discuss the expression of relevant xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in the brain and in the BBB, and we cover current advances and future directions on the potential role of these BBB drug-metabolizing enzymes as modifiers of drug response.

  12. Differential effect of waterborne cadmium exposure on lipid metabolism in liver and muscle of yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Qi-Liang; Gong, Yuan; Luo, Zhi; Zheng, Jia-Lang; Zhu, Qing-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Cd triggered hepatic lipid accumulation through the improvement of lipogenesis. •Lipid homeostasis in muscle after Cd exposure derived from the down-regulation of both lipogenesis and lipolysis. •Our study determines the mechanism of waterborne Cd exposure on lipid metabolism in fish on a molecular level. •Our study indicates the tissue-specific regulatory effect of lipid metabolism under waterborne Cd exposure. -- Abstract: The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of waterborne cadmium (Cd) exposure on lipid metabolism in liver and muscle of juvenile yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. Yellow catfish were exposed to 0 (control), 0.49 and 0.95 mg Cd/l, respectively, for 6 weeks, the lipid deposition, Cd accumulation, the activities and expression level of several enzymes as well as the mRNA expression of transcription factors involved in lipid metabolism in liver and muscle were determined. Waterborne Cd exposure reduced growth performance, but increased Cd accumulation in liver and muscle. In liver, lipid content, the activities and the mRNA expression of lipogenic enzymes (6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), fatty acid synthetase (FAS)) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity increased with increasing waterborne Cd concentrations. However, the mRNA expressions of LPL and peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) α were down-regulated by Cd exposure. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) activity as well as the mRNA expressions of CPT1 and PPARγ showed no significant differences among the treatments. In muscle, lipid contents showed no significant differences among the treatments. The mRNA expression of 6PGD, FAS, CPT1, LPL, PPARα and PPARγ were down-regulated by Cd exposure. Thus, our study indicated that Cd triggered hepatic lipid accumulation through the improvement of lipogenesis, and that lipid homeostasis in muscle was probably conducted by the down

  13. Differential effect of waterborne cadmium exposure on lipid metabolism in liver and muscle of yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qi-Liang; Gong, Yuan [Key Laboratory of Freshwater Animal Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture of P.R.C., Fishery College, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Freshwater Aquaculture Collaborative Innovative Centre of Hubei Province, Wuhan 430070 (China); Luo, Zhi, E-mail: luozhi99@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Freshwater Animal Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture of P.R.C., Fishery College, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Freshwater Aquaculture Collaborative Innovative Centre of Hubei Province, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zheng, Jia-Lang; Zhu, Qing-Ling [Key Laboratory of Freshwater Animal Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture of P.R.C., Fishery College, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Freshwater Aquaculture Collaborative Innovative Centre of Hubei Province, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Cd triggered hepatic lipid accumulation through the improvement of lipogenesis. •Lipid homeostasis in muscle after Cd exposure derived from the down-regulation of both lipogenesis and lipolysis. •Our study determines the mechanism of waterborne Cd exposure on lipid metabolism in fish on a molecular level. •Our study indicates the tissue-specific regulatory effect of lipid metabolism under waterborne Cd exposure. -- Abstract: The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of waterborne cadmium (Cd) exposure on lipid metabolism in liver and muscle of juvenile yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. Yellow catfish were exposed to 0 (control), 0.49 and 0.95 mg Cd/l, respectively, for 6 weeks, the lipid deposition, Cd accumulation, the activities and expression level of several enzymes as well as the mRNA expression of transcription factors involved in lipid metabolism in liver and muscle were determined. Waterborne Cd exposure reduced growth performance, but increased Cd accumulation in liver and muscle. In liver, lipid content, the activities and the mRNA expression of lipogenic enzymes (6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), fatty acid synthetase (FAS)) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity increased with increasing waterborne Cd concentrations. However, the mRNA expressions of LPL and peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) α were down-regulated by Cd exposure. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) activity as well as the mRNA expressions of CPT1 and PPARγ showed no significant differences among the treatments. In muscle, lipid contents showed no significant differences among the treatments. The mRNA expression of 6PGD, FAS, CPT1, LPL, PPARα and PPARγ were down-regulated by Cd exposure. Thus, our study indicated that Cd triggered hepatic lipid accumulation through the improvement of lipogenesis, and that lipid homeostasis in muscle was probably conducted by the down

  14. Oxidative metabolism of 5-o-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid), a bioactive natural product, by metalloporphyrin and rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Michel D; Martins, Patrícia R; dos Santos, Pierre A; Bortocan, Renato; Iamamoto, Y; Lopes, Norberto P

    2005-09-01

    Synthetic metalloporphyrins, in the presence of monooxygen donors, are known to mimic the various reactions of cytochrome P450 enzymes systems in the oxidation and oxygenation of various drugs and biologically active compounds. This paper reports an HPLC-MS-MS investigation of chlorogenic acid (CGA) oxidation by iodosylbenzene using iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride as catalyst. The oxidation products have been detected by sequential MS analyses. In addition, CGA was submitted to an in vitro metabolism assay employing isolated rat liver mitochondria. The single oxidized product obtained from mitochondrial metabolism corresponds to the major product formed by the metalloporphyrin-catalyzed reaction. These results indicate that biomimetic oxidation reactions, in addition to in vitro metabolism assays employing isolated organs/organelles, could replace some in vivo metabolism studies, thus minimizing the problems related to the use of a large number of living animals in experimental research.

  15. Proteomic Profiles of Adipose and Liver Tissues from an Animal Model of Metabolic Syndrome Fed Purple Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala M Ayoub

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MetS is a complex disorder that predisposes an individual to Cardiovascular Diseases and type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Proteomics and bioinformatics have proven to be an effective tool to study complex diseases and mechanisms of action of nutrients. We previously showed that substitution of the majority of carbohydrate in a high fat diet by purple potatoes (PP or purple carrots (PC improved insulin sensitivity and hypertension in an animal model of MetS (obese Zucker rats compared to a control sucrose-rich diet. In the current study, we used TMT 10plex mass tag combined with LC-MS/MS technique to study proteomic modulation in the liver (n = 3 samples/diet and adipose tissue (n = 3 samples/diet of high fat diet-fed rats with or without substituting sucrose for purple vegetables, followed by functional enrichment analysis, in an attempt to elucidate potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the phenotypic changes seen with purple vegetable feeding. Protein folding, lipid metabolism and cholesterol efflux were identified as the main modulated biological themes in adipose tissue, whereas lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and oxidative stress were the main modulated themes in liver. We propose that enhanced protein folding, increased cholesterol efflux and higher free fatty acid (FFA re-esterification are mechanisms by which PP and PC positively modulate MetS pathologies in adipose tissue, whereas, decreased de novo lipogenesis, oxidative stress and FFA uptake, are responsible for the beneficial effects in liver. In conclusion, we provide molecular evidence for the reported metabolic health benefits of purple carrots and potatoes and validate that these vegetables are good choices to replace other simple carbohydrate sources for better metabolic health.

  16. Drug-induced liver toxicity and prevention by herbal antioxidants: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya eSingh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is the center for drug and xenobiotic metabolism, which is influenced most with medication/xenobiotic-mediated toxic activity. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is common and its actual frequency is hard to determine due to underreporting, difficulties in detection or diagnosis, and incomplete observation of exposure. The death rate is high, up to about 10% for medication instigated liver danger. Endorsed medications (counting acetaminophen represented >50% of instances of intense liver failure in a study from the Acute Liver Failure Study Group (ALFSG of the patients admitted in 17 US healing facilities. Albeit different studies are accessible uncovering the mechanistic aspects of medication prompted hepatotoxicity, we are in the dilemma about the virtual story. The expanding prevalence and effectiveness of Ayurveda and herbal products in the treatment of various disorders led the investigators to look into their potential in countering drug-induced liver toxicity. Several plant products have been reported to date to mitigate the drug-induced toxicity. The dietary nature and less side reactions of the herbs provide them an extra edge over other candidates of supplementary medication. In this paper, we have discussed on the mechanism involved in drug-induced liver toxicity and the potential of herbal antioxidants as supplementary medication.

  17. Muscle metabolism and whole blood amino acid profile in patients with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Gitte; Sørensen, Michael; Buhl, Mads; Sandahl, Thomas D; Møller, Niels; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are used in liver cirrhosis to promote protein synthesis, support ammonia detoxification, and treat hepatic encephalopathy. Cirrhosis leads to subnormal BCAA plasma concentrations and studies indicate that levels are decreased due to their role in muscle ammonia removal. Muscle contribution has not been fully elucidated. We studied muscle amino acid metabolism in six healthy subjects, 13 cirrhosis patients and six patients with an episode of alcoholic hepatitis. Subjects had catheters inserted into the femoral artery and vein to obtain arterial (A) and venous (V) concentrations of amino acids (μmol/L blood). BCAA concentrations were lower in patients with cirrhosis compared to healthy subjects (p BCAA uptake was variable and on average higher in patients with alcoholic hepatitis and patients with stable cirrhosis compared to healthy subjects (mean A-V difference 0.5 and 32 vs. - 12 μmol/L blood) (p = 0.22). The release of aromatic amino acids (AAA) was comparable in the three groups (P > 0.30). The BCAA/AAA (Fischer's ratio) was lower in patients with cirrhosis and patients with alcoholic hepatitis compared to healthy subjects (mean 1.65, 1.17 and 2.73, both p BCAA and higher AAA blood concentrations compared to healthy subjects. The trend towards an increased muscle uptake of BCAA may have contributed but this was not significant.

  18. Effects of probiotic yogurt consumption on metabolic factors in individuals with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, S; Rafraf, M; Somi, M H; Homayouni-Rad, A; Asghari-Jafarabadi, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of probiotic yogurt consumption on some metabolic factors in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. This double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted on 72 patients with NAFLD (33 males and 39 females) aged 23 to 63 yr. Subjects in the intervention group (n=36) consumed 300 g/d of probiotic yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and those in the control group (n=36) consumed 300 g/d of conventional yogurt for 8 wk. Fasting blood samples, anthropometric measurements, and dietary records (24h/d for 3 d) were collected at baseline and at the end of the trial. Probiotic yogurt consumption resulted in reductions of 4.67, 5.42, 4.1, and 6.92% in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, respectively, compared with control group. No significant changes were observed in levels of serum glucose, triglycerides, or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in either group. Probiotic yogurt consumption improved hepatic enzymes, serum total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in studied subjects and might be useful in management of NAFLD risk factors. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic crosstalk between the heart and liver impacts familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magida, Jason A; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2014-04-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is largely caused by dominant mutations in genes encoding cardiac sarcomeric proteins, and it is etiologically distinct from secondary cardiomyopathies resulting from pressure/volume overload and neurohormonal or inflammatory stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that decreased left ventricular contractile function in male, but not female, HCM mice is associated with reduced fatty acid translocase (CD36) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. As a result, the levels of myocardial ATP and triglyceride (TG) content are reduced, while the levels of oleic acid and TG in circulating very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and liver are increased. With time, these metabolic changes culminate in enhanced glucose production in male HCM mice. Remarkably, restoration of ventricular TG and ATP deficits via AMPK agonism as well as inhibition of gluconeogenesis improves ventricular architecture and function. These data underscore the importance of the systemic effects of a primary genetic heart disease to other organs and provide insight into potentially novel therapeutic interventions for HCM.

  20. Relationship between obesity, metabolic syndrome, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the elderly agricultural and fishing population of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hsi-Che; Zhao, Zi-Hao; Hu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yu-Fen; Tung, Tao-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the elderly agricultural and fishing population of Taipei, Taiwan. The study participants comprised 6,511 (3,971 male and 2,540 female) healthy elderly subjects voluntarily attending a teaching hospital for a physical check-up in 2010. Blood samples and real-time ultrasound-proven fatty liver sonography results were collected. The prevalence of NAFLD in this elderly population was 27.2%, including mild NAFLD (16.0%), moderate NAFLD (10.3%), and severe NAFLD (0.9%). The prevalence of moderate or severe NAFLD for metabolic syndrome proved to be substantially greater (P<0.0001, χ(2) test) for one or two metabolic factors. Using multinomial logistic regression analysis, age, sex, metabolic syndrome, and higher body mass index had a statistically significant association with mild NAFLD. Age, sex, metabolic syndrome, higher body mass index, and higher alanine aminotransferase were significantly related to moderate NAFLD. In addition, higher body mass index, higher uric acid, and higher alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly related to severe NAFLD. The sensitivity and specificity of body mass index and waist circumference as markers of NAFLD were estimated to be 81% and 84%, respectively, and 77% and 69%, respectively. The prevalence of mild or moderate NAFLD was related to obesity and metabolic syndrome. Higher body mass index was also related to severe NAFLD but not to metabolic syndrome. Targeting this population for control of obesity and improved metabolic function is important.

  1. High folic acid consumption leads to pseudo-MTHFR deficiency, altered lipid metabolism, and liver injury in mice12345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Karen E; Mikael, Leonie G; Leung, Kit-Yi; Lévesque, Nancy; Deng, Liyuan; Wu, Qing; Malysheva, Olga V; Best, Ana; Caudill, Marie A; Greene, Nicholas DE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increased consumption of folic acid is prevalent, leading to concerns about negative consequences. The effects of folic acid on the liver, the primary organ for folate metabolism, are largely unknown. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) provides methyl donors for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthesis and methylation reactions. Objective: Our goal was to investigate the impact of high folic acid intake on liver disease and methyl metabolism. Design: Folic acid–supplemented diet (FASD, 10-fold higher than recommended) and control diet were fed to male Mthfr+/+ and Mthfr+/− mice for 6 mo to assess gene-nutrient interactions. Liver pathology, folate and choline metabolites, and gene expression in folate and lipid pathways were examined. Results: Liver and spleen weights were higher and hematologic profiles were altered in FASD-fed mice. Liver histology revealed unusually large, degenerating cells in FASD Mthfr+/− mice, consistent with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. High folic acid inhibited MTHFR activity in vitro, and MTHFR protein was reduced in FASD-fed mice. 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate, SAM, and SAM/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratios were lower in FASD and Mthfr+/− livers. Choline metabolites, including phosphatidylcholine, were reduced due to genotype and/or diet in an attempt to restore methylation capacity through choline/betaine-dependent SAM synthesis. Expression changes in genes of one-carbon and lipid metabolism were particularly significant in FASD Mthfr+/− mice. The latter changes, which included higher nuclear sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, higher Srepb2 messenger RNA (mRNA), lower farnesoid X receptor (Nr1h4) mRNA, and lower Cyp7a1 mRNA, would lead to greater lipogenesis and reduced cholesterol catabolism into bile. Conclusions: We suggest that high folic acid consumption reduces MTHFR protein and activity levels, creating a pseudo-MTHFR deficiency. This deficiency results in hepatocyte degeneration, suggesting a 2

  2. High folic acid consumption leads to pseudo-MTHFR deficiency, altered lipid metabolism, and liver injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Karen E; Mikael, Leonie G; Leung, Kit-Yi; Lévesque, Nancy; Deng, Liyuan; Wu, Qing; Malysheva, Olga V; Best, Ana; Caudill, Marie A; Greene, Nicholas D E; Rozen, Rima

    2015-03-01

    Increased consumption of folic acid is prevalent, leading to concerns about negative consequences. The effects of folic acid on the liver, the primary organ for folate metabolism, are largely unknown. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) provides methyl donors for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthesis and methylation reactions. Our goal was to investigate the impact of high folic acid intake on liver disease and methyl metabolism. Folic acid-supplemented diet (FASD, 10-fold higher than recommended) and control diet were fed to male Mthfr(+/+) and Mthfr(+/-) mice for 6 mo to assess gene-nutrient interactions. Liver pathology, folate and choline metabolites, and gene expression in folate and lipid pathways were examined. Liver and spleen weights were higher and hematologic profiles were altered in FASD-fed mice. Liver histology revealed unusually large, degenerating cells in FASD Mthfr(+/-) mice, consistent with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. High folic acid inhibited MTHFR activity in vitro, and MTHFR protein was reduced in FASD-fed mice. 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate, SAM, and SAM/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratios were lower in FASD and Mthfr(+/-) livers. Choline metabolites, including phosphatidylcholine, were reduced due to genotype and/or diet in an attempt to restore methylation capacity through choline/betaine-dependent SAM synthesis. Expression changes in genes of one-carbon and lipid metabolism were particularly significant in FASD Mthfr(+/-) mice. The latter changes, which included higher nuclear sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, higher Srepb2 messenger RNA (mRNA), lower farnesoid X receptor (Nr1h4) mRNA, and lower Cyp7a1 mRNA, would lead to greater lipogenesis and reduced cholesterol catabolism into bile. We suggest that high folic acid consumption reduces MTHFR protein and activity levels, creating a pseudo-MTHFR deficiency. This deficiency results in hepatocyte degeneration, suggesting a 2-hit mechanism whereby mutant hepatocytes cannot

  3. The metabolism of 32P-CP-PLLA seed implanted in the liver and its damage to the normal liver tissue: a study in the experimental dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Zhongbao; Liu Lu; Guo Jinhe; Zhu Guangyu; Wang Fuan; Nie Qi; Gao Hailin; Teng Gaojun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of intratumoral implantation of 32 P -CP-PLLA seeds on the normal canine liver tissue and to explore the metabolism of 32 P-CP-PLLA seeds implanted in the liver of experimental dogs. Methods: Twelve beagles were enrolled in this study. The dogs were randomly and equally divided into four groups: group A (185 MBq), group B (370 MBq), group C (740 MBq) and group D (0 MBq). By using laparotomy procedure 32 P-CP-PLLA seeds were implanted into dog's liver. CT scan was performed before operation as well as before the dog was sacrificed. All dogs were sacrificed three months after the implantation. Before the procedure and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the procedure the blood tests and serum biochemical tests were conducted. One dog from group B and group C was selected respectively and was fed in a metabolic cage. Within one month after the procedure the cpm in feces and in urine was determined every 24 hours. One dog was picked out from each of the three groups and was punctured to get its liver tissue for pathologic exam each time at 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the implantation, and SPECT imaging was also performed at the same time. Pathologic study, both macroscopic and microscopic (including optical and electronic microscopy) was made to observe the liver damage after the dog was sacrificed. The statistical analysis was processed by using SPSS 13.0 software and the measuring data were expressed with mean ± standard deviation (x ± s). Results: Two months after the procedure, serological examination found that the serum alkaline phosphatase (BKP) in both group B and group C was significantly higher than that in other groups, the difference was statistically significant (P 32 P-CP-PLLA seeds was manifested as a spherical lesion which was encysted by a layer of fibrous tissue with an edematous zone peripherally. Conclusion: The implantation of 32 P-CP-PLLA seeds in dog's liver causes only localized hepatic damage with no general

  4. Analysis of circulating angiopoietin-like protein 3 and genetic variants in lipid metabolism and liver health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Anne Lundby; Carayol, Jérôme; Blædel, Trine

    2018-01-01

    Background: Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3), a liver-derived protein, plays an important role in the lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Using data available from the DiOGenes study, we assessed the link with clinical improvements (weight, plasma lipid, and insulin levels) and changes in liver...... markers, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), adiponectin, fetuin A and B, and cytokeratin 18 (CK-18), upon low-calorie diet (LCD) intervention. We also examined the role of genetic variation in determining the level of circulating ANGPTL3 and the relation between the identified...... genetic markers and markers of hepatic steatosis. Methods: DiOGenes is a multicenter, controlled dietary intervention where obese participants followed an 8-week LCD (800 kcal/day, using a meal replacement product). Plasma ANGPTL3 and liver markers were measured using the SomaLogic (Boulder, CO) platform...

  5. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I on bone metabolism in patients with liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaohong; Gao Wenjin; Wang Mingtao; Hu Haiqiang

    2006-01-01

    To study the effects of serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) on bone metabolism in liver cirrhosis, 44 patients with hepatic cirrhosis were divided into 3 groups according to disease severity (Child Pugh Score) and 38 healthy subjects served as controls. Serum levels of IGF-I and osteocalcin(BGP) were measured in all patients and controls. Results showed that levels of IGF-I, BGP, and BMD were lower significantly in patients with liver cirrhosis than that in controls. When the condition of cirrhosis more deteriorated, these changes became much lower significantly. Serum levels of BGP and BMD were positively correlated with IGF-I. The decreasing level of IGF-I might be an important factor causing osteoporosis in patients with liver cirrhosis. (authors)

  6. Composition and metabolism of phospholipids of Fasciola hepatica, the common liver fluk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenborg, V.; Vugt, F. van; Golde, L.M.G. van

    1. 1. The phospholipid composition of Fasciola hepatica, the common liver fluke, was compared to that of the liver of the host animals (rats and cattle). Considerable differences were found: monoacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine, hardly detectable in the liver, was found in significant amounts in

  7. Optimisation of graft function in liver transplantation: functional and metabolic aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Jonge (Jeroen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPart one of this thesis contains the general introduction to partial and whole liver transplantation. Chapter 2 addresses the concept of auxiliary partial liver transplantation. Auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation was first introduced as a less invasive procedure for

  8. Vitex agnus-castus L. (Verbenaceae) Improves the Liver Lipid Metabolism and Redox State of Ovariectomized Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Franciele Neves; Campos-Shimada, Lilian Brites; da Costa, Silvio Claudio; Garcia, Ros?ngela Fernandes; Cecchini, Alessandra Louren?o; Natali, Maria Raquel Mar?al; Vitoriano, Adriana de Souza; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Salgueiro-Pagadigorria, Clairce Luzia

    2015-01-01

    Vitex agnus-castus (VAC) is a plant that has recently been used to treat the symptoms of menopause, by its actions on the central nervous system. However, little is known about its actions on disturbances in lipid metabolism and nonalcoholic fat liver disease (NAFLD), frequently associated with menopause. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats exhibit increased adiposity and NAFLD 13 weeks after ovary removal and were used as animal models of estrogen deficiency. The rats were treated with crude extract (...

  9. Eicosapentaenoic Acid-Enriched Phosphatidylcholine Attenuated Hepatic Steatosis Through Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism in Rats with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjun; Shi, Di; Tian, Yingying; Liu, Yuntao; Zhan, Qiping; Xu, Jie; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu

    2017-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the world. Disturbed cholesterol metabolism plays a crucial role in the development of NAFLD. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of EPA-PC extracted from sea cucumber on liver steatosis and cholesterol metabolism in NAFLD. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups (normal control group, model group, lovastatin group, low- and high-dose EPA groups, and low- and high-dose EPA-PC groups). Model rats were established by administering a diet containing 1% orotic acid. To determine the possible cholesterol metabolism promoting mechanism of EPA-PC, we analyzed the transcription of key genes and transcriptional factors involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. EPA-PC dramatically alleviated hepatic lipid accumulation, reduced the serum TC concentration, and elevated HDLC levels in NAFLD rats. Fecal neutral cholesterol excretion was also promoted by EPA-PC administration. Additionally, EPA-PC decreased the mRNA expression of hydroxymethyl glutaric acid acyl (HMGR) and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A), and increased the transcription of sterol carrying protein 2 (SCP2). Moreover, EPA-PC stimulated the transcription of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor α (PPARα) and adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) as well as its modulators, liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CAMKK). Based on the results, the promoting effects of EPA-PC on NAFLD may be partly associated with the suppression of cholesterol synthesis via HMGR inhibition and the enhancement of fecal cholesterol excretion through increased SCP2 transcription. The underlying mechanism may involve stimulation of PPARα and AMPK.

  10. Metabolism of 64Cu and transfer of 125I-MT in the bearing liver ascites tumor (H22) mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huai Qing; Fang Xingwang; Wang Wenqing

    1998-01-01

    The metabolism of 64 Cu in some tissues of the bearing liver ascites tumor mice has been studied. The liver in normal and tumor bearing mice preferentially accumulates intravenous injection copper, however, the liver in the later mice accumulates much less copper than that of the former. It suggests that in the bearing ascites tumor mice, ascites tumor influences the metabolism of copper. It is found that the content of 64 Cu in the tumor cell is more than 85% in ascites tumor. Gel filtration profile of mice liver homogenate on Sephadex G-75 shows that injected 64 Cu is mainly bound with metallothionein. The tissues uptake of 125 I-labelled (Cd, Zn)-MT which is given in abdominal cavity are also reported. Of the tissues studied, the ascites tumor and kidney accumulate the highest concentration of given 125 I-MT, since over 20% of entire dose accumulated in them. After 125 I-MT is given, it soon goes into ascites tumor, and reaches the maximum in ascites as well as in tumor cell. Therefore, 125 I-MT can go through the membrane of tumor cell and reaches in the tumor cell

  11. The mouse liver displays daily rhythms in the metabolism of phospholipids and in the activity of lipid synthesizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorné, Lucas D; Acosta-Rodríguez, Victoria A; Pasquaré, Susana J; Salvador, Gabriela A; Giusto, Norma M; Guido, Mario Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system involves central and peripheral oscillators regulating temporally biochemical processes including lipid metabolism; their disruption leads to severe metabolic diseases (obesity, diabetes, etc). Here, we investigated the temporal regulation of glycerophospholipid (GPL) synthesis in mouse liver, a well-known peripheral oscillator. Mice were synchronized to a 12:12 h light-dark (LD) cycle and then released to constant darkness with food ad libitum. Livers collected at different times exhibited a daily rhythmicity in some individual GPL content with highest levels during the subjective day. The activity of GPL-synthesizing/remodeling enzymes: phosphatidate phosphohydrolase 1 (PAP-1/lipin) and lysophospholipid acyltransferases (LPLATs) also displayed significant variations, with higher levels during the subjective day and at dusk. We evaluated the temporal regulation of expression and activity of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesizing enzymes. PC is mainly synthesized through the Kennedy pathway with Choline Kinase (ChoK) as a key regulatory enzyme or through the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway. The PC/PE content ratio exhibited a daily variation with lowest levels at night, while ChoKα and PEMT mRNA expression displayed maximal levels at nocturnal phases. Our results demonstrate that mouse liver GPL metabolism oscillates rhythmically with a precise temporal control in the expression and/or activity of specific enzymes.

  12. Carboxylesterases in lipid metabolism: from mouse to human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Lian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mammalian carboxylesterases hydrolyze a wide range of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds, including lipid esters. Physiological functions of carboxylesterases in lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis in vivo have been demonstrated by genetic manipulations and chemical inhibition in mice, and in vitro through (overexpression, knockdown of expression, and chemical inhibition in a variety of cells. Recent research advances have revealed the relevance of carboxylesterases to metabolic diseases such as obesity and fatty liver disease, suggesting these enzymes might be potential targets for treatment of metabolic disorders. In order to translate pre-clinical studies in cellular and mouse models to humans, differences and similarities of carboxylesterases between mice and human need to be elucidated. This review presents and discusses the research progress in structure and function of mouse and human carboxylesterases, and the role of these enzymes in lipid metabolism and metabolic disorders.

  13. Metabolic effects of the iodothyronine functional analogue TRC150094 on the liver and skeletal muscle of high-fat diet fed overweight rats: an integrated proteomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Elena; Glinni, Daniela; Cioffi, Federica; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; de Lange, Pieter; Senese, Rosalba; Ceccarelli, Michele; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando

    2012-07-06

    A novel functional iodothyronine analogue, TRC150094, which has a much lower potency toward thyroid hormone receptor (α1/β1) activation than triiodothyronine, has been shown to be effective at reducing adiposity in rats simultaneously receiving a high-fat diet (HFD). Here, by combining metabolic, functional and proteomic analysis, we studied how the hepatic and skeletal muscle phenotypes might respond to TRC150094 treatment in HFD-fed overweight rats. Drug treatment increased both the liver and skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacities without altering mitochondrial efficiency. Coherently, in terms of individual respiratory in-gel activity, blue-native analysis revealed an increased activity of complex V in the liver and of complexes II and V in tibialis muscle in TCR150094-treated animals. Subsequently, the identification of differentially expressed proteins and the analysis of their interrelations gave an integrated view of the phenotypic/metabolic adaptations occurring in the liver and muscle proteomes during drug treatment. TRC150094 significantly altered the expression of several proteins involved in key liver metabolic pathways, including amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, and fructose and mannose metabolism. The canonical pathways most strongly influenced by TRC150094 in tibialis muscle included glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, amino acid, fructose and mannose metabolism, and cell signaling. The phenotypic/metabolic influence of TRC150094 on the liver and skeletal muscle of HFD-fed overweight rats suggests the potential clinical application of this iodothyronine analogue in ameliorating metabolic risk parameters altered by diet regimens.

  14. Associations between liver 18F fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose accumulation and various clinical parameters in a Japanese population. Influence of the metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, Kiyohisa; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Wakamatsu, Hideyuki

    2010-01-01

    Liver demonstrates a heterogeneous 18 F fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) uptake pattern and sometimes shows an abnormally increased uptake even when there is no malignant tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of liver 18 F-FDG uptake as related to physical factors, fatty liver, blood glucose (BG), and other biochemical data. 18 F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed in 101 consecutive subjects for cancer screening. Multiple stepwise regression analysis was used to define the best predictors of the liver standardized uptake value (SUV) among height, weight, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BG and other biochemical data, id est (i.e.), aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, total bilirubin, and alkaline phosphatase. Furthermore, we evaluated the association between liver 18 F-FDG uptake and the metabolic syndrome. The independent factors for increased liver 18 F-FDG uptake (mean SUV >=2) were BMI (P 18 F-FDG uptake. In addition, the liver 18 F-FDG uptake of metabolic syndrome subjects was significantly higher than that of a non-metabolic syndrome subjects. BMI was the strongest determinant of liver 18 F-FDG uptake, and the liver 18 F-FDG uptake of metabolic syndrome subjects was significantly higher than that of non-metabolic syndrome subjects. This result suggests that a subject with a high liver 18 F-FDG uptake should be screened for the metabolic syndrome. (author)

  15. Effect of vitamin E in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with metabolic syndrome: A propensity score-matched cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi Hyun Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsVitamin E improves the biochemical profiles and liver histology in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, but the role of vitamin E is not clearly defined in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD which includes both simple steatosis and steatohepatitis. Co-morbid metabolic syndrome increases the probability of steatohepatitis in NAFLD. In this study, we aimed to determine the short-term effects of vitamin E and off-treatment durability of response in a propensity-score matched cohort of NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome.MethodsA retrospective cohort was constructed by retrieving 526 consecutive NAFLD patients from the electronic medical record data warehouse of a tertiary referral hospital in South Korea. Among them, 335 patients (63.7% had metabolic syndrome and were eligible for vitamin E therapy. In order to assess the effect of vitamin E, propensity score matching was used by matching covariates between control patients (n=250 and patients who received vitamin E (n=85.ResultsThe PS-matched vitamin E group (n=58 and control group (n=58 exhibited similar baseline metabolic profiles. After 6 months of vitamin E therapy, the mean ALT levels decreased significantly compared to PS-matched control (P<0.01. The changes in metabolic profiles (body weight, lipid and glucose levels did not differ between control and vitamin E groups during the study period.ConclusionsShort-term vitamin E treatment significantly reduces ALT levels in NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome, but metabolic profiles are not affected by vitamin E.

  16. Metabolic changes associated with the long winter fast dominate the liver proteome in 13-lined ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Allyson G; Grabek, Katharine R; Epperson, L Elaine; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Martin, Sandra L

    2014-05-15

    Small-bodied hibernators partition the year between active homeothermy and hibernating heterothermy accompanied by fasting. To define molecular events underlying hibernation that are both dependent and independent of fasting, we analyzed the liver proteome among two active and four hibernation states in 13-lined ground squirrels. We also examined fall animals transitioning between fed homeothermy and fasting heterothermy. Significantly enriched pathways differing between activity and hibernation were biased toward metabolic enzymes, concordant with the fuel shifts accompanying fasting physiology. Although metabolic reprogramming to support fasting dominated these data, arousing (rewarming) animals had the most distinct proteome among the hibernation states. Instead of a dominant metabolic enzyme signature, torpor-arousal cycles featured differences in plasma proteins and intracellular membrane traffic and its regulation. Phosphorylated NSFL1C, a membrane regulator, exhibited this torpor-arousal cycle pattern; its role in autophagosome formation may promote utilization of local substrates upon metabolic reactivation in arousal. Fall animals transitioning to hibernation lagged in their proteomic adjustment, indicating that the liver is more responsive than preparatory to the metabolic reprogramming of hibernation. Specifically, torpor use had little impact on the fall liver proteome, consistent with a dominant role of nutritional status. In contrast to our prediction of reprogramming the transition between activity and hibernation by gene expression and then within-hibernation transitions by posttranslational modification (PTM), we found extremely limited evidence of reversible PTMs within torpor-arousal cycles. Rather, acetylation contributed to seasonal differences, being highest in winter (specifically in torpor), consistent with fasting physiology and decreased abundance of the mitochondrial deacetylase, SIRT3. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Metabolic changes associated with the long winter fast dominate the liver proteome in 13-lined ground squirrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Allyson G.; Grabek, Katharine R.; Epperson, L. Elaine; Karimpour-Fard, Anis

    2014-01-01

    Small-bodied hibernators partition the year between active homeothermy and hibernating heterothermy accompanied by fasting. To define molecular events underlying hibernation that are both dependent and independent of fasting, we analyzed the liver proteome among two active and four hibernation states in 13-lined ground squirrels. We also examined fall animals transitioning between fed homeothermy and fasting heterothermy. Significantly enriched pathways differing between activity and hibernation were biased toward metabolic enzymes, concordant with the fuel shifts accompanying fasting physiology. Although metabolic reprogramming to support fasting dominated these data, arousing (rewarming) animals had the most distinct proteome among the hibernation states. Instead of a dominant metabolic enzyme signature, torpor-arousal cycles featured differences in plasma proteins and intracellular membrane traffic and its regulation. Phosphorylated NSFL1C, a membrane regulator, exhibited this torpor-arousal cycle pattern; its role in autophagosome formation may promote utilization of local substrates upon metabolic reactivation in arousal. Fall animals transitioning to hibernation lagged in their proteomic adjustment, indicating that the liver is more responsive than preparatory to the metabolic reprogramming of hibernation. Specifically, torpor use had little impact on the fall liver proteome, consistent with a dominant role of nutritional status. In contrast to our prediction of reprogramming the transition between activity and hibernation by gene expression and then within-hibernation transitions by posttranslational modification (PTM), we found extremely limited evidence of reversible PTMs within torpor-arousal cycles. Rather, acetylation contributed to seasonal differences, being highest in winter (specifically in torpor), consistent with fasting physiology and decreased abundance of the mitochondrial deacetylase, SIRT3. PMID:24642758

  18. (Systemic) phototoxicity of drugs and other xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G M

    1991-08-01

    Xenobiotics extensively used in drugs, cosmetics, food and agricultural chemicals can produce adverse biological effects. These toxic effects are separated into classes, e.g. hepatotoxicity, genotoxicity and neurotoxicity. Skin allergy, part of immunotoxicity, is also a subdivision of toxicology. When light is an essential condition for toxicity, the xenobiotic is called phototoxic. Thus it fits into the logic of toxicology that photoallergic compounds are a subdivision of phototoxic compounds. Phototoxicons as a group do not differ from the group of phototherapeutics with regard to their eventual biological effects. The primary photoreactions, secondary molecular processes, biomolecules involved and cellular and tissue damage are similar. The difference between the two groups is in the appreciation of the photobiological effects: adverse vs. desired. The aim of research is to determine the part of the molecular structure which makes a given compound phototoxic. With that knowledge the structure of the phototoxicon can be changed. This can result in a derivative which still has the desired properties of the parent compound, but is no longer phototoxic. This aim can be reached by combining data from both in vitro and in vivo research. The variety and number of phototoxic compounds is large. This, together with the limited research effort devoted to this subject so far, means that for most phototoxic xenobiotics a relationship between structure and in vivo photoreactivity is not available. In this review, emphasis is placed on xenobiotics whose in vitro and in vivo photochemistry have been studied. Furthermore, possible phototoxic effects which do not concern the skin but involve inner organs (systemic effects) are considered. References in this review mostly concern investigations over the last 10 years. For older literature or for additional information, references to other reviews are given. Important groups of phototoxic xenobiotics not dealt with in this article

  19. The role of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase in the hormonal control of tryptophan metabolism in isolated rat liver cells. Effects of glucocorticoids and experimental diabetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Salter, M; Pogson, C I

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of L-tryptophan by isolated liver cells prepared from control, adrenalectomized, glucocorticoid-treated, acute-diabetic, chronic-diabetic and insulin-treated chronic-diabetic rats was studied. Liver cells from adrenalectomized rats metabolized tryptophan at rates comparable with the minimum diurnal rates of controls, but different from rates determined for cells from control rats 4h later. Administration of dexamethasone phosphate increased the activity of tryptophan 2,3-dioxyg...

  20. An in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, S.; Ciapaite, J.; Wolters, J.C.; van Riel, N.A.; Nicolay, K.; Prompers, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to determine their roles in the development of liver steatosis. Wistar rats received normal chow and either normal drinking water, or

  1. An In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Effects of Caloric and Non-Caloric Sweeteners on Liver Lipid Metabolism in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Sharon; Ciapaite, Jolita; Wolters, Justina C.; van Riel, Natal A.; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to determine their roles in the development of liver steatosis. Wistar rats received normal chow and either normal drinking water, or

  2. [Metabolic parameters in patients with steatosis non alcoholic liver and controlled diabetes type 2 versus uncontrolled diabetes type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda Manrique, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NASH) is widely distributed around the world and is more common in subjects with dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome obese and DM2 (34-74%). However, the prevalence of cirrhosis by NASH in general population is unknown which is still subject of research. To determine if there are significant differences between metabolic parameters of non-alcoholic fatty liver in controlled versus uncontrolled diabetes type 2 of recent diagnosis. retrospective case-control study, performed in the Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, Lima, Peru from November 2014 to February 2015.This study included 231 patients: 147 patients (NASH with DM2 of recent diagnosis and poor control) and 84 patients (NASH with DM2 ofrecent diagnosis and adequate control). Levene test for evaluating homogeneity of variances intra groups and parametric test for independent samples. After applying Levene test of homogeneity and student test, significant metabolic parameters were the triglycerides, HbA1C level, metformin dose and gender. It is important in diabetic patients to diagnose NASH early for a tighter control, not only of glucose but other metabolic parameters mainly triglycerides which strongly supports existing concept of "multiple hits" which considers NASH affects glucose homeostasis, and it could be the starting point of new research to improve interventions for decreasing progression from to cirrhosis in diabetic patients and also to delay progression of diabetes mellitus in patients with non alcoholic steatohepatitis.

  3. Clinical and Metabolic Characterization of Lean Caucasian Subjects With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Alexandra; Eder, Sebastian K; Felder, Thomas K; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Paulweber, Bernhard; Stadlmayr, Andreas; Huber-Schönauer, Ursula; Niederseer, David; Stickel, Felix; Auer, Simon; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth; Patsch, Wolfgang; Datz, Christian; Aigner, Elmar

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is closely linked to obesity; however, 5-8% of lean subjects also have evidence of NAFLD. We aimed to investigate clinical, genetic, metabolic and lifestyle characteristics in lean Caucasian subjects with NAFLD. Data from 187 subjects allocated to one of the three groups according to body mass index (BMI) and hepatic steatosis on ultrasound were obtained: lean healthy (BMI≤25 kg/m 2 , no steatosis, N=71), lean NAFLD (BMI≤25 kg/m 2 , steatosis, N=55), obese NAFLD (BMI≥30 kg/m 2 , steatosis; N=61). All subjects received a detailed clinical and laboratory examination including oral glucose tolerance test. The serum metabolome was assessed using the Metabolomics AbsoluteIDQ p180 kit (BIOCRATES Life Sciences). Genotyping for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with NAFLD was performed. Lean NAFLD subjects had fasting insulin concentrations similar to lean healthy subjects but had markedly impaired glucose tolerance. Lean NAFLD subjects had a higher rate of the mutant PNPLA3 CG/GG variant compared to lean controls (P=0.007). Serum adiponectin concentrations were decreased in both NAFLD groups compared to controls (Pphosphatidylcholines (PCaa C36:3; false discovery rate (FDR)-corrected P-value<0.001) as well as lysine, tyrosine, and valine (FDR<0.001). Lean subjects with evidence of NAFLD have clinically relevant impaired glucose tolerance, low adiponectin concentrations and a distinct metabolite profile with an increased rate of PNPLA3 risk allele carriage.

  4. Regional differences in prostaglandin E2 metabolism in human colorectal cancer liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Alastair L; Chalmers, Claire R; Hawcroft, Gillian; Perry, Sarah L; Treanor, Darren; Toogood, Giles J; Jones, Pamela F; Hull, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E 2 plays a critical role in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Activity of the rate-limiting enzyme for PGE 2 catabolism (15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase [15-PGDH]) is dependent on availability of NAD+. We tested the hypothesis that there is intra-tumoral variability in PGE 2 content, as well as in levels and activity of 15-PGDH, in human CRC liver metastases (CRCLM). To understand possible underlying mechanisms, we investigated the relationship between hypoxia, 15-PGDH and PGE 2 in human CRC cells in vitro. Tissue from the periphery and centre of 20 human CRCLM was analysed for PGE 2 levels, 15-PGDH and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression, 15-PGDH activity, and NAD+/NADH levels. EMT of LIM1863 human CRC cells was induced by transforming growth factor (TGF) β. PGE 2 levels were significantly higher in the centre of CRCLM compared with peripheral tissue (P = 0.04). There were increased levels of 15-PGDH protein in the centre of CRCLM associated with reduced 15-PGDH activity and low NAD+/NADH levels. There was no significant heterogeneity in COX-2 protein expression. NAD+ availability controlled 15-PGDH activity in human CRC cells in vitro. Hypoxia induced 15-PGDH expression in human CRC cells and promoted EMT, in a similar manner to PGE 2 . Combined 15-PGDH expression and loss of membranous E-cadherin (EMT biomarker) were present in the centre of human CRCLM in vivo. There is significant intra-tumoral heterogeneity in PGE 2 content, 15-PGDH activity and NAD+ availability in human CRCLM. Tumour micro-environment (including hypoxia)-driven differences in PGE 2 metabolism should be targeted for novel treatment of advanced CRC

  5. Metabolism of histones and nonhistone proteins of the nuclei and chromatin of liver cells in rats of different ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, A.I.; Malyshev, A.B.; Kulachenko, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    The metabolism of various classes of histones and nonhistone proteins in whole nuclei and liver chromatin of albino Wistar rats 1, 3, 12, and 24 months of age was studied. It was shown that in the course of postnatal ontogenesis, the metabolism of nonhistone proteins, extractable by a 0.14 M solution of NaCl, is increased in the animals. The incorporation of labeled precursors into the HMG 14 and HMG 17 proteins decreases with age of the animals; a higher level of specific radioactivity was established for the HMG 1+2 proteins in the 3- and 24-month old animals. The intensity of the metabolism of nonhistone proteins and histones is higher in the chromatin complex than in the whole nucleus at all stages of postnatal development of the animals. Among the histone proteins, H1 histones possess a higher level of specific radioactivity in animals of all age groups

  6. Alcohol Metabolizing Gene Polymorphisms as Genetic Biomarkers of Alcoholic Liver Disease Susceptibility and Severity: A Northeast India Patient Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun K. Basumatary

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with genetic predisposition to Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD, but there is very limited data on both molecular and genetic aspects of ALD among the Northeast Indian (NEI population. Aim and Objectives: Screening the role of genetic alterations in alcohol metabolizing pathway genes in the pathogenesis of ALD which is prevalent in the ethnically NEI population. Material and Methods: Whole blood was collected from ALD patients (n=150 [alcoholic chronic liver disease (CLD, n=110 and alcoholic cirrhosis (Cirr/cirrhosis, n=40], Alcoholic Without Liver Disease (AWLD, n=93 and healthy controls (HC/controls, n=274 with informed consents along with Fibroscan based liver stiffness measurement (LSM score and clinical data. Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2 and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 genotyping was studied by Polymerase Chain Reaction with Confronting Two Pair Primers (PCR-CTPP; and Alcohol Dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3 by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method. Results:ADH2*2 genotype was predominant and associated with increased risk of cirrhosis compared to healthy controls, AWLD and CLD cases; and CLD compared to AWLD cases. ADH3*1 genotype was associated with significantly increased risk of cirrhosis compared to healthy controls, AWLD and CLD cases (p<0.001. Variant ALDH2 genotype was rare and analysis of the joint effects of genotypes showed that higher variant genotype resulted increased risk of CLD and cirrhosis compared to AWLD, and cirrhosis compared to CLD; thereby confirming the association of the polymorphisms in key alcohol metabolizing genes in the predisposition to ALD susceptibility and severity. Presence of variant ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 genotypes correlated with higher LSM scores in ALD. Conclusion: Alterations in the alcohol metabolizing genes are critically associated with ALD susceptibility and severity.

  7. Metabolic liver function measured in vivo by dynamic (18)F-FDGal PET/CT without arterial blood sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsager, Jacob; Munk, Ole Lajord; Sørensen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic liver function can be measured by dynamic PET/CT with the radio-labelled galactose-analogue 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-galactose ((18)F-FDGal) in terms of hepatic systemic clearance of (18)F-FDGal (K, ml blood/ml liver tissue/min). The method requires arterial blood sampling from a radial artery (arterial input function), and the aim of this study was to develop a method for extracting an image-derived, non-invasive input function from a volume of interest (VOI). Dynamic (18)F-FDGal PET/CT data from 16 subjects without liver disease (healthy subjects) and 16 patients with liver cirrhosis were included in the study. Five different input VOIs were tested: four in the abdominal aorta and one in the left ventricle of the heart. Arterial input function from manual blood sampling was available for all subjects. K*-values were calculated using time-activity curves (TACs) from each VOI as input and compared to the K-value calculated using arterial blood samples as input. Each input VOI was tested on PET data reconstructed with and without resolution modelling. All five image-derived input VOIs yielded K*-values that correlated significantly with K calculated using arterial blood samples. Furthermore, TACs from two different VOIs yielded K*-values that did not statistically deviate from K calculated using arterial blood samples. A semicircle drawn in the posterior part of the abdominal aorta was the only VOI that was successful for both healthy subjects and patients as well as for PET data reconstructed with and without resolution modelling. Metabolic liver function using (18)F-FDGal PET/CT can be measured without arterial blood samples by using input data from a semicircle VOI drawn in the posterior part of the abdominal aorta.

  8. Comparison of xenobiotic-metabolising human, porcine, rodent, and piscine cytochrome P450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkina, Viktoriia; Rasmussen, Martin Krøyer; Pilipenko, Nadezhda; Zamaratskaia, Galia

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The percent identity of porcine, murine and piscine CYPs was compared with human CYPs. • Main similarities and differences were reviewed. • Understanding of molecular mechanisms of CYP system will provide further insights into the CYP regulatory processes, and responses to different factors. - Abstract: Cytochrome P450 proteins (CYP450s) are present in most domains of life and play a critical role in the metabolism of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. The effects of exposure to xenobiotics depend heavily on the expression and activity of drug-metabolizing CYP450s, which is determined by species, genetic background, age, gender, diet, and exposure to environmental pollutants. Numerous reports have investigated the role of different vertebrate CYP450s in xenobiotic metabolism. Model organisms provide powerful experimental tools to investigate Phase I metabolism. The aim of the present review is to compare the existing data on human CYP450 proteins (1–3 families) with those found in pigs, mice, and fish. We will highlight differences and similarities and identify research gaps which need to be addressed in order to use these species as models that mimic human traits. Moreover, we will discuss the roles of nuclear receptors in the cellular regulation of CYP450 expression in select organisms.

  9. An observational study on the association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome with gall stone disease requiring cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farah; Baloch, Qamaruddin; Memon, Zahid Ali; Ali, Iqra

    2017-05-01

    Recognition of Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic syndrome in patients with gallstones undergoing laparoscopic or open cholecystectomy, along with it we will also study the life style of patients with gall stones. Patients with gallstones have associated NAFLD, with concurrent metabolic syndrome and these ailments share similar factors for example obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes mellitus. Factors like body mass index, gender, raised lipid levels, use of contraceptives and alcohol and having diabetes, physical inactiveness, multiparous women, water with excessive iron content, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD are accountable factors for gallstones formation. This was a case series done at Surgical Unit 1 of Civil Hospital Karachi. Selective samples of 88 patients were included. Duration was 3 months. We included both sexes with ultrasound proof of gall stone irrespective of cholecystitis. Excluded patients with history of seropositive viral hepatitis, autoimmune and wilson's disease. As these conditions can act as a confounder to our variables. Nafld was present in 62.5%(n = 55) while 28.4% (n = 25) had metabolic syndrome. 26.94% had BMI less than 18, 32.12 had BMI between 18 and 25 and majority had BMI greater than 25 i.e in 40.93%. Of all 46.6% had a family history of cholelithiasis. Gallstone patients with NAFLD reported about their first degree relative being suffering from cholelithiasis at a significant p-value of 0.034 while this was not significant in cases of metabolic syndrome and the p -value was 0.190. We found association of metabolic syndrome with gallstones and NAFLD. Non alcoholic fatty liver was highly prevalent in our study subjects. Huge percentage of first degree relatives of gall stone patients had gallstones and this relation was more pronounced patients who had associated NAFLD.

  10. Metabolic Response to Heat Stress in Late-Pregnant and Early Lactation Dairy Cows: Implications to Liver-Muscle Crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Franziska; Lamp, Ole; Eslamizad, Mehdi; Weitzel, Joachim; Kuhla, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Climate changes lead to rising temperatures during summer periods and dramatic economic losses in dairy production. Modern high-yielding dairy cows experience severe metabolic stress during the transition period between late gestation and early lactation to meet the high energy and nutrient requirements of the fetus or the mammary gland, and additional thermal stress during this time has adverse implications on metabolism and welfare. The mechanisms enabling metabolic adaptation to heat apart from the decline in feed intake and milk yield are not fully elucidated yet. To distinguish between feed intake and heat stress related effects, German Holstein dairy cows were first kept at thermoneutral conditions at 15°C followed by exposure to heat-stressed (HS) at 28°C or pair-feeding (PF) at 15°C for 6 days; in late-pregnancy and again in early lactation. Liver and muscle biopsies and plasma samples were taken to assess major metabolic pathway regulation using real-time PCR and Western Blot. The results indicate that during heat stress, late pregnant cows activate Cahill but reduce Cori cycling, prevent increase in skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation, and utilize increased amounts of pyruvate for gluconeogenesis, without altering ureagenesis despite reduced plane of nutrition. These homeorhetic adaptations are employed to reduce endogenous heat production while diverting amino acids to the growing fetus. Metabolic adaptation to heat stress in early lactation involves increased long-chain fatty acid degradation in muscle peroxisomes, allowance for muscle glucose utilization but diminished hepatic use of amino acid-derived pyruvate for gluconeogenesis and reduced peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and ATP production in liver of HS compared to PF cows in early lactation. Consequently, metabolic adaptation to heat stress and reduced feed intake differ between late pregnancy and early lactation of dairy cows to maintain energy supply for fetus development or milk production

  11. Metabolic Response to Heat Stress in Late-Pregnant and Early Lactation Dairy Cows: Implications to Liver-Muscle Crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamizad, Mehdi; Weitzel, Joachim; Kuhla, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Climate changes lead to rising temperatures during summer periods and dramatic economic losses in dairy production. Modern high-yielding dairy cows experience severe metabolic stress during the transition period between late gestation and early lactation to meet the high energy and nutrient requirements of the fetus or the mammary gland, and additional thermal stress during this time has adverse implications on metabolism and welfare. The mechanisms enabling metabolic adaptation to heat apart from the decline in feed intake and milk yield are not fully elucidated yet. To distinguish between feed intake and heat stress related effects, German Holstein dairy cows were first kept at thermoneutral conditions at 15°C followed by exposure to heat-stressed (HS) at 28°C or pair-feeding (PF) at 15°C for 6 days; in late-pregnancy and again in early lactation. Liver and muscle biopsies and plasma samples were taken to assess major metabolic pathway regulation using real-time PCR and Western Blot. The results indicate that during heat stress, late pregnant cows activate Cahill but reduce Cori cycling, prevent increase in skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation, and utilize increased amounts of pyruvate for gluconeogenesis, without altering ureagenesis despite reduced plane of nutrition. These homeorhetic adaptations are employed to reduce endogenous heat production while diverting amino acids to the growing fetus. Metabolic adaptation to heat stress in early lactation involves increased long-chain fatty acid degradation in muscle peroxisomes, allowance for muscle glucose utilization but diminished hepatic use of amino acid-derived pyruvate for gluconeogenesis and reduced peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and ATP production in liver of HS compared to PF cows in early lactation. Consequently, metabolic adaptation to heat stress and reduced feed intake differ between late pregnancy and early lactation of dairy cows to maintain energy supply for fetus development or milk production

  12. Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism in Liver: Link to NAFLD and Impact of n-3 PUFAs

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jin-Sik; Oh, Ah-Reum; Cha, Ji-Young

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease that affects one-third of adults in westernized countries. NAFLD represents a wide spectrum of hepatic alterations, ranging from simple triglyceride accumulation in the liver to steatohepatitis. Several pharmaceutical approaches to NAFLD management have been examined, but no particular treatment has been considered both safe and highly effective. Growing evidence reveal that supplemental fish o...

  13. In vitro metabolism of the pro-carcinogen aflatoxin B1 by liver preparations of the calf, nurse shark and clearnose skate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodine, A B; Luer, C A; Gangjee, S A; Walsh, C J

    1989-01-01

    1. Liver postmitochondrial supernatant preparations of calf, clearnose skate, and nurse shark were able to metabolize the fungal toxin aflatoxin B1 to various metabolites. 2. Calf liver produced aflatoxin M1 and Q1 as the major chloroform soluble metabolites, with small amounts of aflatoxicol formed during incubation. 3. Liver preparations of the elasmobranchs, however, produced aflatoxicol as the major chloroform soluble metabolite with no other metabolite being detected. 4. The water soluble metabolite profiles for the three species were also quite different with the tris diol adduct being produced to a much greater extent in calf liver preparations. 5. Aflatoxicol production by the elasmobranch liver homogenates was reversible with the skate reconverting a large amount (30%) of aflatoxicol to AFB1. The nurse shark, however, appeared to convert a portion of aflatoxicol to an unknown metabolite more polar than AFB1. 6. Calf liver DNA bound approximately 3 x more 3H-AFB1 than shark liver DNA.

  14. Iodine 123-17-iodoheptadecanoic acid for metabolic liver studies in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeck, A.S.; Spohr, G.; Schmitz, M.; Notohamiprodjo, G.; Porschen, R.; Vyska, K.; Freundlieb, C.; Shreeve, W.W.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    (17- 123 I)-Iodoheptadecanoic acid ([ 123 I]HA) was used for dynamic planar scintigraphy of the liver in normal individuals (control I), in patients without liver disease but with elevated serum cholesterol and/or triglycerides (control II), and in patient groups with alcohol-induced fatty liver (PG I), fatty liver not due to alcohol (PG II), alcohol-induced liver cirrhosis (PG III), or liver cirrhosis of the posthepatitic type (PG IV). Tracer uptake and elimination time were assayed in different liver regions; mean elimination time was expressed for total liver. In control I, tracer uptake was homogeneous, and mean elimination time was 20.7 +/- 5.3 min without significant local variations. In control II, tracer uptake was reduced but homogeneous and mean elimination time was 59.4 +/- 35.8 min with some local variations. In PG I, uptake was reduced and inhomogeneous and elimination time was the same as in control I, irrespective of cholesterol and triglyceride values. In PG II, uptake was the same as in PG I but mean elimination time was 48 +/- 8.1 min with some local variations. In PG III, uptake was extremely reduced and spotty and elimination time correlated with the severity of disease from 19 to 881 min in different liver regions

  15. Apoptosis and Necrosis in the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicciardi, Maria Eugenia; Malhi, Harmeet; Mott, Justin L.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of its unique function and anatomical location, the liver is exposed to a multitude of toxins and xenobiotics, including medications and alcohol, as well as to infection by hepatotropic viruses, and therefore, is highly susceptible to tissue injury. Cell death in the liver occurs mainly by apoptosis or necrosis, with apoptosis also being the physiologic route to eliminate damaged or infected cells and to maintain tissue homeostasis. Liver cells, especially hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, are particularly susceptible to death receptor-mediated apoptosis, given the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors in the organ. In a quite unique way, death receptor-induced apoptosis in these cells is mediated by both mitochondrial and lysosomal permeabilization. Signaling between the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria promotes hepatocyte apoptosis in response to excessive free fatty acid generation during the metabolic syndrome. These cell death pathways are partially regulated by microRNAs. Necrosis in the liver is generally associated with acute injury (i.e., ischemia/reperfusion injury) and has been long considered an unregulated process. Recently, a new form of “programmed” necrosis (named necroptosis) has been described: the role of necroptosis in the liver has yet to be explored. However, the minimal expression of a key player in this process in the liver suggests this form of cell death may be uncommon in liver diseases. Because apoptosis is a key feature of so many diseases of the liver, therapeutic modulation of liver cell death holds promise. An updated overview of these concepts is given in this article. PMID:23720337

  16. Multi-omic network-based interrogation of rat liver metabolism following gastric bypass surgery featuring SWATH proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Gautham Vivek; D'Alessandro, Matthew; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Bhagat, Vicky; Gagnon, Hugo; Asara, John M; Uygun, Korkut; Yarmush, Martin L; Saeidi, Nima

    2017-09-01

    Morbidly obese patients often elect for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a form of bariatric surgery that triggers a remarkable 30% reduction in excess body weight and reversal of insulin resistance for those who are type II diabetic. A more complete understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms that drive the complex metabolic reprogramming post-RYGB could lead to innovative non-invasive therapeutics that mimic the beneficial effects of the surgery, namely weight loss, achievement of glycemic control, or reversal of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). To facilitate these discoveries, we hereby demonstrate the first multi-omic interrogation of a rodent RYGB model to reveal tissue-specific pathway modules implicated in the control of body weight regulation and energy homeostasis. In this study, we focus on and evaluate liver metabolism three months following RYGB in rats using both SWATH proteomics, a burgeoning label free approach using high resolution mass spectrometry to quantify protein levels in biological samples, as well as MRM metabolomics. The SWATH analysis enabled the quantification of 1378 proteins in liver tissue extracts, of which we report the significant down-regulation of Thrsp and Acot13 in RYGB as putative targets of lipid metabolism for weight loss. Furthermore, we develop a computational graph-based metabolic network module detection algorithm for the discovery of non-canonical pathways, or sub-networks, enriched with significantly elevated or depleted metabolites and proteins in RYGB-treated rat livers. The analysis revealed a network connection between the depleted protein Baat and the depleted metabolite taurine, corroborating the clinical observation that taurine-conjugated bile acid levels are perturbed post-RYGB.

  17. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes allow adaptation of mitochondrial metabolism to glucose availability in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurey, Pierre; Tubbs, Emily; Vial, Guillaume; Jacquemetton, Julien; Bendridi, Nadia; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Alam, Muhammad Rizwan; Le Romancer, Muriel; Vidal, Hubert; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAM) play a key role in mitochondrial dynamics and function and in hepatic insulin action. Whereas mitochondria are important regulators of energy metabolism, the nutritional regulation of MAM in the liver and its role in the adaptation of mitochondria physiology to nutrient availability are unknown. In this study, we found that the fasted to postprandial transition reduced the number of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact points in mouse liver. Screening of potential hormonal/metabolic signals revealed glucose as the main nutritional regulator of hepatic MAM integrity both in vitro and in vivo Glucose reduced organelle interactions through the pentose phosphate-protein phosphatase 2A (PP-PP2A) pathway, induced mitochondria fission, and impaired respiration. Blocking MAM reduction counteracted glucose-induced mitochondrial alterations. Furthermore, disruption of MAM integrity mimicked effects of glucose on mitochondria dynamics and function. This glucose-sensing system is deficient in the liver of insulin-resistant ob/ob and cyclophilin D-KO mice, both characterized by chronic disruption of MAM integrity, mitochondrial fission, and altered mitochondrial respiration. These data indicate that MAM contribute to the hepatic glucose-sensing system, allowing regulation of mitochondria dynamics and function during nutritional transition. Chronic disruption of MAM may participate in hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-lasting improvements in liver fat and metabolism despite body weight regain after dietary weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haufe, Sven; Haas, Verena; Utz, Wolfgang; Birkenfeld, Andreas L; Jeran, Stephanie; Böhnke, Jana; Mähler, Anja; Luft, Friedrich C; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Boschmann, Michael; Jordan, Jens; Engeli, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Weight loss reduces abdominal and intrahepatic fat, thereby improving metabolic and cardiovascular risk. Yet, many patients regain weight after successful diet-induced weight loss. Long-term changes in abdominal and liver fat, along with liver test results and insulin resistance, are not known. We analyzed 50 overweight to obese subjects (46 ± 9 years of age; BMI, 32.5 ± 3.3 kg/m2; women, 77%) who had participated in a 6-month hypocaloric diet and were randomized to either reduced carbohydrates or reduced fat content. Before, directly after diet, and at an average of 24 (range, 17-36) months follow-up, we assessed body fat distribution by magnetic resonance imaging and markers of liver function and insulin resistance. Body weight decreased with diet but had increased again at follow-up. Subjects also partially regained abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. In contrast, intrahepatic fat decreased with diet and remained reduced at follow-up (7.8 ± 9.8% [baseline], 4.5 ± 5.9% [6 months], and 4.7 ± 5.9% [follow-up]). Similar patterns were observed for markers of liver function, whole-body insulin sensitivity, and hepatic insulin resistance. Changes in intrahepatic fat und intrahepatic function were independent of macronutrient composition during intervention and were most effective in subjects with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease at baseline. A 6-month hypocaloric diet induced improvements in hepatic fat, liver test results, and insulin resistance despite regaining of weight up to 2 years after the active intervention. Body weight and adiposity measurements may underestimate beneficial long-term effects of dietary interventions.

  19. Long-Lasting Improvements in Liver Fat and Metabolism Despite Body Weight Regain After Dietary Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haufe, Sven; Haas, Verena; Utz, Wolfgang; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Jeran, Stephanie; Böhnke, Jana; Mähler, Anja; Luft, Friedrich C.; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Boschmann, Michael; Jordan, Jens; Engeli, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Weight loss reduces abdominal and intrahepatic fat, thereby improving metabolic and cardiovascular risk. Yet, many patients regain weight after successful diet-induced weight loss. Long-term changes in abdominal and liver fat, along with liver test results and insulin resistance, are not known. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed 50 overweight to obese subjects (46 ± 9 years of age; BMI, 32.5 ± 3.3 kg/m2; women, 77%) who had participated in a 6-month hypocaloric diet and were randomized to either reduced carbohydrates or reduced fat content. Before, directly after diet, and at an average of 24 (range, 17–36) months follow-up, we assessed body fat distribution by magnetic resonance imaging and markers of liver function and insulin resistance. RESULTS Body weight decreased with diet but had increased again at follow-up. Subjects also partially regained abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. In contrast, intrahepatic fat decreased with diet and remained reduced at follow-up (7.8 ± 9.8% [baseline], 4.5 ± 5.9% [6 months], and 4.7 ± 5.9% [follow-up]). Similar patterns were observed for markers of liver function, whole-body insulin sensitivity, and hepatic insulin resistance. Changes in intrahepatic fat und intrahepatic function were independent of macronutrient composition during intervention and were most effective in subjects with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease at baseline. CONCLUSIONS A 6-month hypocaloric diet induced improvements in hepatic fat, liver test results, and insulin resistance despite regaining of weight up to 2 years after the active intervention. Body weight and adiposity measurements may underestimate beneficial long-term effects of dietary interventions. PMID:23963894

  20. Central melanin-concentrating hormone influences liver and adipose metabolism via specific hypothalamic nuclei and efferent autonomic/JNK1 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Beiroa, Daniel; Vázquez, María J; Morgan, Donald A; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Porteiro, Begoña; Díaz-Arteaga, Adenis; Senra, Ana; Busquets, Silvia; Velásquez, Douglas A; Al-Massadi, Omar; Varela, Luis; Gándara, Marina; López-Soriano, Francisco-Javier; Gallego, Rosalía; Seoane, Luisa M; Argiles, Josep M; López, Miguel; Davis, Roger J; Sabio, Guadalupe; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Rahmouni, Kamal; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2013-03-01

    Specific neuronal circuits modulate autonomic outflow to liver and white adipose tissue. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-deficient mice are hypophagic, lean, and do not develop hepatosteatosis when fed a high-fat diet. Herein, we sought to investigate the role of MCH, an orexigenic neuropeptide specifically expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area, on hepatic and adipocyte metabolism. Chronic central administration of MCH and adenoviral vectors increasing MCH signaling were performed in rats and mice. Vagal denervation was performed to assess its effect on liver metabolism. The peripheral effects on lipid metabolism were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. We showed that the activation of MCH receptors promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through the parasympathetic nervous system, whereas it increases fat deposition in white adipose tissue via the suppression of sympathetic traffic. These metabolic actions are independent of parallel changes in food intake and energy expenditure. In the liver, MCH triggers lipid accumulation and lipid uptake, with c-Jun N-terminal kinase being an essential player, whereas in adipocytes MCH induces metabolic pathways that promote lipid storage and decreases lipid mobilization. Genetic activation of MCH receptors or infusion of MCH specifically in the lateral hypothalamic area modulated hepatic lipid metabolism, whereas the specific activation of this receptor in the arcuate nucleus affected adipocyte metabolism. Our findings show that central MCH directly controls hepatic and adipocyte metabolism through different pathways. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrated modelling of two xenobiotic organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, Erik Ulfson; Gernaey, K.V.; Henze, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic mathematical model that describes the fate and transport of two selected xenobiotic organic compounds (XOCs) in a simplified representation. of an integrated urban wastewater system. A simulation study, where the xenobiotics bisphenol A and pyrene are used as reference...... compounds, is carried out. Sorption and specific biological degradation processes are integrated with standardised water process models to model the fate of both compounds. Simulated mass flows of the two compounds during one dry weather day and one wet weather day are compared for realistic influent flow...... rate and concentration profiles. The wet weather day induces resuspension of stored sediments, which increases the pollutant load on the downstream system. The potential of the model to elucidate important phenomena related to origin and fate of the model compounds is demonstrated....

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of one-carbon metabolism and cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Chih Chang

    Full Text Available One-carbon metabolism (folate metabolism is considered important in carcinogenesis because of its involvement in DNA synthesis and biological methylation reactions. We investigated the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in folate metabolic pathway and the risk of three GI cancers in a population-based case-control study in Taixing City, China, with 218 esophageal cancer cases, 206 stomach cancer cases, 204 liver cancer cases, and 415 healthy population controls. Study participants were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire, and blood samples were collected after the interviews. We genotyped SNPs of the MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, DNMT1, and ALDH2 genes, using PCR-RFLP, SNPlex, or TaqMan assays. To account for multiple comparisons and reduce the chances of false reports, we employed semi-Bayes (SB shrinkage analysis. After shrinkage and adjusting for potential confounding factors, we found positive associations between MTHFR rs1801133 and stomach cancer (any T versus C/C, SB odds-ratio [SBOR]: 1.79, 95% posterior limits: 1.18, 2.71 and liver cancer (SBOR: 1.51, 95% posterior limits: 0.98, 2.32. There was an inverse association between DNMT1 rs2228612 and esophageal cancer (any G versus A/A, SBOR: 0.60, 95% posterior limits: 0.39, 0.94. In addition, we detected potential heterogeneity across alcohol drinking status for ORs relating MTRR rs1801394 to esophageal (posterior homogeneity P = 0.005 and stomach cancer (posterior homogeneity P = 0.004, and ORs relating MTR rs1805087 to liver cancer (posterior homogeneity P = 0.021. Among non-alcohol drinkers, the variant allele (allele G of these two SNPs was inversely associated with the risk of these cancers; while a positive association was observed among ever-alcohol drinkers. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms related to one-carbon metabolism may be associated with cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver. Heterogeneity across alcohol consumption status of

  3. Liver receptor homolog-1 is a critical determinant of methyl-pool metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balance of labile methyl groups (choline, methionine, betaine, and folate) is important for normal liver function. Quantitatively, a significant use of labile methyl groups is in the production of phosphatidylcholines (PCs), which are ligands for the nuclear liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). We stud...

  4. Metabolism of styrene in the human liver in vitro: interindividual variation and enantioselectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenker, M. A.; Kezić, S.; Monster, A. C.; de Wolff, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    1. The interindividual variation and enantioselectivity of the in vitro styrene oxidation by cytochrome P450 have been investigated in 20 human microsomal liver samples. Liver samples were genotyped for the CYP2E1*6 and CYP2E1*5B alleles. 2. Kinetic analysis indicated the presence of at least two

  5. Transcriptome Analyses Reveal Lipid Metabolic Process in Liver Related to the Difference of Carcass Fat Content in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive accumulation of carcass fat in farm animals, including fish, has a significant impact on meat quality and on the cost of feeding. Similar to farmed animals and humans, the liver can be considered one of the most important organs involved in lipid metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss. RNA-seq based whole transcriptome sequencing was performed to liver tissue of rainbow trout with high and low carcass fat content in this study. In total 1,694 differentially expressed transcripts were identified, including many genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as L-FABP, adiponectin, PPAR-α, PPAR-β, and IGFBP1a. Evidence presented in this study indicated that lipid metabolic process in liver may be related to the difference of carcass fat content. The relevance of PPAR-α and PPAR-β as molecular markers for fat storage in liver should be worthy of further investigation.

  6. The effects of size and surface modification of amorphous silica particles on biodistribution and liver metabolism in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Ji, Cai; Jin, Tingting; Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-05-01

    Engineered nanoparticles, with unconventional properties, are promising platforms for biomedical applications. Since they may interact with a wide variety of biomolecules, it is critical to understand the impact of the physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles on biological systems. In this study, the effects of particle size and surface modification alone or in combination of amorphous silica particles (SPs) on biological responses were determined using a suite of general toxicological assessments and metabonomics analysis in mice model. Our results suggested that amino or carboxyl surface modification mitigated the liver toxicity of plain-surface SPs. 30 nm SPs with amino surface modification were found to be the most toxic SPs among all the surface-modified SP treatments at the same dosage. When treatment dose was increased, submicro-sized SPs with amino or carboxyl surface modification also induced liver toxicity. Biodistribution studies suggested that 70 nm SPs were mainly accumulated in liver and spleen regardless of surface modifications. Interestingly, these two organs exhibited different uptake trends. Furthermore, metabonomics studies indicated that surface modification plays a more dominant role to affect the liver metabolism than particle size.

  7. The effects of size and surface modification of amorphous silica particles on biodistribution and liver metabolism in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Ji, Cai; Jin, Tingting; Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles, with unconventional properties, are promising platforms for biomedical applications. Since they may interact with a wide variety of biomolecules, it is critical to understand the impact of the physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles on biological systems. In this study, the effects of particle size and surface modification alone or in combination of amorphous silica particles (SPs) on biological responses were determined using a suite of general toxicological assessments and metabonomics analysis in mice model. Our results suggested that amino or carboxyl surface modification mitigated the liver toxicity of plain-surface SPs. 30 nm SPs with amino surface modification were found to be the most toxic SPs among all the surface-modified SP treatments at the same dosage. When treatment dose was increased, submicro-sized SPs with amino or carboxyl surface modification also induced liver toxicity. Biodistribution studies suggested that 70 nm SPs were mainly accumulated in liver and spleen regardless of surface modifications. Interestingly, these two organs exhibited different uptake trends. Furthermore, metabonomics studies indicated that surface modification plays a more dominant role to affect the liver metabolism than particle size. (paper)

  8. An update on the use of benzoate, phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate ammonia scavengers for interrogating and modifying liver nitrogen metabolism and its implications in urea cycle disorders and liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Las Heras, Javier; Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Martínez-Chantar, María-Luz; Delgado, Teresa C

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia-scavenging drugs, benzoate and phenylacetate (PA)/phenylbutyrate (PB), modulate hepatic nitrogen metabolism mainly by providing alternative pathways for nitrogen disposal. Areas covered: We review the major findings and potential novel applications of ammonia-scavenging drugs, focusing on urea cycle disorders and liver disease. Expert opinion: For over 40 years, ammonia-scavenging drugs have been used in the treatment of urea cycle disorders. Recently, the use of these compounds has been advocated in acute liver failure and cirrhosis for reducing hyperammonemic-induced hepatic encephalopathy. The efficacy and mechanisms underlying the antitumor effects of these ammonia-scavenging drugs in liver cancer are more controversial and are discussed in the review. Overall, as ammonia-scavenging drugs are usually safe and well tolerated among cancer patients, further studies should be instigated to explore the role of these drugs in liver cancer. Considering the relevance of glutamine metabolism to the progression and resolution of liver disease, we propose that ammonia-scavenging drugs might also be used to non-invasively probe liver glutamine metabolism in vivo. Finally, novel derivatives of classical ammonia-scavenging drugs with fewer and less severe adverse effects are currently being developed and used in clinical trials for the treatment of acute liver failure and cirrhosis.

  9. Molecular modifications of cholesterol metabolism in the liver and the brain after chronic contamination with cesium 137.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, R; Grandcolas, L; Grison, S; Gourmelon, P; Guéguen, Y; Veyssière, G; Souidi, M

    2009-07-01

    Twenty years after Chernobyl accident, the daily ingestion of foodstuff grown on contaminated grounds remains the main source for internal exposure to ionizing radiations, and primarily to cesium 137 ((137)Cs). Though the effects of a long-term internal contamination with radionuclides are poorly documented, several non-cancerous pathologies have been described in this population. However, lipid metabolism was never investigated after chronic internal contamination although disturbances were observed in externally-exposed people. In this regard, we assessed the effects of a chronic ingestion of (137)Cs on hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism. To mimic a chronically-exposed population, rats were given (137)Cs-supplemented water at a post-accidental dose (150 Bq/rat/day) during 9 months. The plasma profile, and brain and liver cholesterol concentrations were unchanged. A decrease of ACAT 2, Apo E, and LXRmRNA levels was recorded in the liver. In the brain, a decrease of CYP27A1 and ACAT 1 gene expression was observed. These results clearly show that cholesterol metabolism is not disrupted by a chronic ingestion of (137)Cs, although several molecular alterations are observed. This work would be interestingly completed by studying the influence of (137)Cs in models likely more sensitive to contaminants, such as the fetus or individuals susceptible to a lipidic disease.

  10. Additive Effect of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Metabolic Syndrome-Related Endothelial Dysfunction in Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Perticone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MS is characterized by an increased risk of incident diabetes and cardiovascular (CV events, identifying insulin resistance (IR and endothelial dysfunction as key elements. Moreover, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is bidirectionally linked with MS as a consequence of metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities. We addressed the question if the evolution in NAFLD might worsen endothelium-dependent vasodilating response in MS hypertensives. We recruited 272 Caucasian newly-diagnosed never-treated hypertensive outpatients divided into three groups according to the presence/absence of MS alone or in combination with NAFLD. MS and NAFLD were defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII and non-invasive fatty liver index, respectively. We determined IR by using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA index. Vascular function, as forearm blood flow (FBF, was determined through strain-gauge plethysmography after intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine (ACh and sodium nitroprusside. MS+NAFLD+ group showed worse metabolic, inflammatory and vascular profiles compared with MS−NAFLD− and MS+NAFLD−. HOMA resulted in being the strongest predictor of FBF both in the MS+NAFLD− and in the MS+NAFLD+ groups, accounting for 20.5% and 33.2% of its variation, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MS+NAFLD+ hypertensives show a worse endothelium-dependent vasodilation compared with MS+NAFLD−, allowing for consideration of NAFLD as an early marker of endothelial dysfunction in hypertensives.

  11. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome in Brazilian middle-aged and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Karnikowski

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a complex clinicopathological entity characterized by diffuse or focal fat accumulation in the hepatic parenchyma of patients who deny abusive alcohol consumption. This study aimed to assess idiopathic NAFLD in community-dwelling, middle-aged and older adults living in the Brazilian Federal District. Associations between NAFLD and components of metabolic syndrome and the whole syndrome were investigated. DESIGN AND SETTINGS: This was a cross-sectional study on 139 subjects aged 55 years or older. METHODS: NAFLD was diagnosed by means of clinical procedures, to exclude subjects with signs of liver disorders, abusive alcohol consumption and influence from hepatotoxic drugs. Phenotypes were graded based on ultrasound examination. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the NCEP ATP III criteria. Laboratory tests were performed to assist clinical examinations and define the syndrome. RESULTS NAFLD was present in 35.2% of the subjects. Taken together, the two most intense phenotypes correlated with increased serum fasting glucose, triglyceride and VLDL cholesterol levels. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 25.9% of the sample. In addition to associating NAFLD with specific traits of metabolic syndrome, non-parametric analysis confirmed the existence of a relationship (p < 0.05 between the steatotic manifestation and the syndromic condition. CONCLUSION: Compared with the literature, this study reveals greater frequency of idiopathic NAFLD among Brazilian middle-aged and older adults than is described elsewhere. The findings also suggest that impaired glycemic metabolism coupled with increased fat delivery and/or sustained endogenous biosynthesis is the most likely physiopathogenic mechanisms underlying the onset of NAFLD in this population.

  12. In vitro enantioselective human liver microsomal metabolism and prediction of in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters of tetrabenazine by DLLME-CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocato, Mariana Zuccherato; de Lima Moreira, Fernanda; de Albuquerque, Nayara Cristina Perez; de Gaitani, Cristiane Masetto; de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo Moraes

    2016-09-05

    A new capillary electrophoresis method for the enantioselective analysis of cis- and trans- dihydrotetrabenazine (diHTBZ) after in vitro metabolism by human liver microsomes (HLMs) was developed. The chiral electrophoretic separations were performed by using tris-phosphate buffer (pH 2.5) containing 1% (w/v) carboxymethyl-β-CD as background electrolyte with an applied voltage of +15kV and capillary temperature kept at 15°C. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was employed to extract the analytes from HLMs. Dichloromethane was used as extraction solvent (75μL) and acetone as disperser solvent (150μL). The method was validated according to official guidelines and showed to be linear over the concentration range of 0.29-19.57μmolL(-1) (r=0.9955) for each metabolite enantiomer. Within- and between-day precision and accuracy evaluated by relative standard deviation and relative error were lower than 15% for all enantiomers. The stability assay showed that the analytes kept stable under handling, storage and in metabolism conditions. After method validation, an enantioselective in vitro metabolism and in vivo pharmacokinetic prediction was carried out. This study showed a stereoselective metabolism and the observed kinetic profile indicated a substrate inhibition behavior. DiHTBZ enantiomers were catalyzed mainly by CYP2C19 and the predicted clearance suggests that liver metabolism is the main route for TBZ elimination which supports the literature data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Peroxisomal β-oxidation regulates whole body metabolism, inflammatory vigor, and pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E.; Giles, Daniel A.; Stankiewicz, Traci E.; Sheridan, Rachel; Karns, Rebekah; Cappelletti, Monica; Lampe, Kristin; Mukherjee, Rajib; Sina, Christian; Sallese, Anthony; Bridges, James P.; Hogan, Simon P.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Hoebe, Kasper

    2018-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a metabolic predisposition for development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), represents a disease spectrum ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis to cirrhosis. Acox1, a rate-limiting enzyme in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation, regulates metabolism, spontaneous hepatic steatosis, and hepatocellular damage over time. However, it is unknown whether Acox1 modulates inflammation relevant to NAFLD pathogenesis or if Acox1-associated metabolic and inflammatory derangements uncover and accelerate potential for NAFLD progression. Here, we show that mice with a point mutation in Acox1 (Acox1Lampe1) exhibited altered cellular metabolism, modified T cell polarization, and exacerbated immune cell inflammatory potential. Further, in context of a brief obesogenic diet stress, NAFLD progression associated with Acox1 mutation resulted in significantly accelerated and exacerbated hepatocellular damage via induction of profound histological changes in hepatocytes, hepatic inflammation, and robust upregulation of gene expression associated with HCC development. Collectively, these data demonstrate that β-oxidation links metabolism and immune responsiveness and that a better understanding of peroxisomal β-oxidation may allow for discovery of mechanisms central for NAFLD progression. PMID:29563328

  14. Lack of significant metabolic abnormalities in mice with liver-specific disruption of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lavery, Gareth G

    2012-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are implicated in the development of metabolic syndrome, and patients with GC excess share many clinical features, such as central obesity and glucose intolerance. In patients with obesity or type 2 diabetes, systemic GC concentrations seem to be invariably normal. Tissue GC concentrations determined by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and local cortisol (corticosterone in mice) regeneration from cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone in mice) by the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) enzyme, principally expressed in the liver. Transgenic mice have demonstrated the importance of 11β-HSD1 in mediating aspects of the metabolic syndrome, as well as HPA axis control. In order to address the primacy of hepatic 11β-HSD1 in regulating metabolism and the HPA axis, we have generated liver-specific 11β-HSD1 knockout (LKO) mice, assessed biomarkers of GC metabolism, and examined responses to high-fat feeding. LKO mice were able to regenerate cortisol from cortisone to 40% of control and had no discernible difference in a urinary metabolite marker of 11β-HSD1 activity. Although circulating corticosterone was unaltered, adrenal size was increased, indicative of chronic HPA stimulation. There was a mild improvement in glucose tolerance but with insulin sensitivity largely unaffected. Adiposity and body weight were unaffected as were aspects of hepatic lipid homeostasis, triglyceride accumulation, and serum lipids. Additionally, no changes in the expression of genes involved in glucose or lipid homeostasis were observed. Liver-specific deletion of 11β-HSD1 reduces corticosterone regeneration and may be important for setting aspects of HPA axis tone, without impacting upon urinary steroid metabolite profile. These discordant data have significant implications for the use of these biomarkers of 11β-HSD1 activity in clinical studies. The paucity of metabolic abnormalities in LKO points to important compensatory effects by HPA

  15. Dietary pattern associated with selenoprotein P and MRI-derived body fat volumes, liver signal intensity, and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giuseppe, Romina; Plachta-Danielzik, Sandra; Koch, Manja; Nöthlings, Ute; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Borggrefe, Jan; Both, Marcus; Müller, Hans-Peter; Kassubek, Jan; Jacobs, Gunnar; Lieb, Wolfgang

    2018-02-14

    The association of complex dietary patterns with circulating selenoprotein P (SELENOP) levels in humans is unknown. In a general population sample, we aimed to identify a dietary pattern explaining inter-individual variation in circulating SELENOP concentrations and to study this pattern in relation to prevalent diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MetS), MRI-determined total volumes of visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) abdominal adipose tissue, and liver signal intensity/fatty liver disease. In this cross-sectional study, serum SELENOP levels were measured in 853 individuals. In a subsample of 553 participants, whole-body MRI was performed to assess body fat distribution and liver fat. Dietary intake was assessed by a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and the dietary pattern identified using reduced-rank regression (RRR). Multivariable linear and logistic regressions were used to investigate associations between dietary pattern score and metabolic traits. Characterized by high intake of fruit, vegetables and antioxidant beverages, the RRR-derived dietary pattern displayed inverse associations with VAT, SAT, MetS, and prevalent diabetes in multivariable-adjusted restricted cubic splines. Each unit increase in dietary pattern score was associated with 31% higher SELENOP levels, 12% lower VAT (95% CI: - 19%; - 5%), 13% (95% CI: - 20%; - 6%) lower SAT values and 46% (95% CI: 27%; 60%) and 53% (95% CI: 22%; 72%) lower odds of having MetS or diabetes, respectively. No meaningful relations were observed between the dietary pattern and liver traits. Our observations propose diet-related regulation in SELENOP levels and that the identified dietary pattern is inversely related to VAT, SAT, MetS, and prevalent diabetes.

  16. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jie, E-mail: JLiu@kumc.edu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Lu, Yuan-Fu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Fan, Fang [Cytopathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D. [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Ol