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Sample records for live mycobacterium tuberculosis

  1. Downregulation of vimentin in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, P P; Retnakumar, R J; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists primarily in macrophages after infection and manipulates the host defence pathways in its favour. 2D gel electrophoresis results showed that vimentin, an intermediate filament protein, is downregulated in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv when compared to macrophages infected with heat- killed H37Rv. The downregulation was confirmed by Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, the expression of vimentin in avirulent strain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra- infected macrophages was similar to the expression in heat-killed H37Rv- infected macrophages. Increased expression of vimentin in H2O2- treated live H37Rv-infected macrophages and decreased expression of vimentin both in NAC and DPI- treated heat-killed H37Rv-infected macrophages showed that vimentin expression is positively regulated by ROS. Ectopic expression of ESAT-6 in macrophages decreased both the level of ROS and the expression of vimentin which implies that Mycobacterium tuberculosis-mediated downregulation of vimentin is at least in part due to the downregulation of ROS by the pathogen. Interestingly, the incubation of macrophages with anti-vimentin antibody increased the ROS production and decreased the survival of H37Rv. In addition, we also showed that the pattern of phosphorylation of vimentin in macrophages by PKA/PKC is different from monocytes, emphasizing a role for vimentin phosphorylation in macrophage differentiation.

  2. Revaccination of Guinea Pigs With the Live Attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis Vaccine MTBVAC Improves BCG's Protection Against Tuberculosis.

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    Clark, Simon; Lanni, Faye; Marinova, Dessislava; Rayner, Emma; Martin, Carlos; Williams, Ann

    2017-09-01

    The need for an effective vaccine against human tuberculosis has driven the development of different candidates and vaccination strategies. Novel live attenuated vaccines are being developed that promise greater safety and efficacy than BCG against tuberculosis. We combined BCG with the vaccine MTBVAC to evaluate whether the efficacy of either vaccine would be affected upon revaccination. In a well-established guinea pig model of aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, BCG and MTBVAC delivered via various prime-boost combinations or alone were compared. Efficacy was determined by a reduction in bacterial load 4 weeks after challenge. Efficacy data suggests MTBVAC-associated immunity is longer lasting than that of BCG when given as a single dose. Long and short intervals between BCG prime and MTBVAC boost resulted in improved efficacy in lungs, compared with BCG given alone. A shorter interval between MTBVAC prime and BCG boost resulted in improved efficacy in lungs, compared with BCG given alone. A longer interval resulted in protection equivalent to that of BCG given alone. These data indicate that, rather than boosting the waning efficacy of BCG, a vaccination schedule involving a combination of the 2 vaccines yielded stronger immunity to M. tuberculosis infection. This work supports development of MTBVAC use as a revaccination strategy to improve on the effects of BCG in vaccinated people living in tuberculosis-endemic countries.

  3. Comparative genomics of the Mycobacterium signaling architecture and implications for a novel live attenuated Tuberculosis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peifu; Xie, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), remains a major threat to global public health. A new TB vaccine affording superior immune protection to M. bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is imperative. The advantage of a live attenuated vaccine is that it can mimic the bona fide pathogen, elicit immune responses similar to natural infection, and potentially provide more protection than other vaccines. BCG, the only vaccine and a live attenuated vaccine that is the result of cumulative mutations by serial passage of M. bovis, has provided clues for the construction of novel improved vaccines. A strategy is put forward for identifying a new live attenuated TB vaccine generated by cumulative mutation based on M.tb. Given the important role of the M.tb signaling network consisting of a two-component system, eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr protein kinase system and sigma factor system based on comparisons among M.tb H37Rv, M. bovis, and BCG, we have put a premium on this signaling circuit as the starting point for the generation of an attenuated TB vaccine.

  4. Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Marcel A

    2013-01-01

    Genomic studies have provided a refined understanding of the genetic diversity within the Mycobacterium genus, and more specifically within Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These results have informed a new perspective on the macro- and micro-evolution of the tubercle bacillus. In the first step, a M. kansasii-like opportunistic pathogen acquired new genes, through horizontal gene transfer, that enabled it to better exploit an intracellular niche and ultimately evolve into a professional pathogen. In the second step, different subspecies and strains of the M. tuberculosis complex emerged through mutation and deletion of unnecessary DNA. Understanding the differences between M. tuberculosis and related less pathogenic mycobacteria is expected to reveal key bacterial virulence mechanisms and provide opportunities to understand host resistance to mycobacterial infection. Understanding differences within the M. tuberculosis complex and the evolutionary forces shaping these differences is important for investigating the basis of its success as both a symbiont and a pathogen.

  5. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent... § 866.3370 Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. (a) Identification. Mycobacterium... used to identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly from clinical specimens. The identification...

  6. Mycobacterium Tuberculosis in Spinal Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Sim; Moon, Han-Lim; Kim, Dong-Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Even in an era of remarkable medical advances, there is an issue of why tuberculosis remains in the list of disastrous diseases, afflicting humans and causing suffering. There has not been a plausible answer to this, and it has been suggested that clinicians and medical scientists could presently not win the war against the tubercle bacilli. With regards to this issue, based on the authors' own clinical and research experiences, in this review, the available literature was revisited in order to address the raised questions and to provide recent information on characteristics of tubercle bacilli and possible ways to more effectively treat tuberculosis. PMID:28243382

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: factores de virulencia

    OpenAIRE

    Reinier Borrero; Nadine Álvarez; Fátima Reyes; María Elena Sarmiento; Armando Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis es el agente causal de la tuberculosis, una de las enfermedades infecciosas más letales en el mundo. La única vacuna disponible para su control es el BCG, sin embargo, falla en la protección contra la tuberculosis pulmonar, siendo esta la forma más frecuente y responsable de la diseminación. La identificación de factores de virulencia del microorganismo causal pudiera ayudar en el desarrollo de un nuevo candidato vacunal que sea capaz de neutralizar la acción de eso...

  8. Protection and Long-Lived Immunity Induced by the ID93/GLA-SE Vaccine Candidate against a Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susan L; Reese, Valerie A; Huang, Po-Wei D; Beebe, Elyse A; Podell, Brendan K; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2015-12-09

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 represents a virulent clinical strain from the W-Beijing family, which has been tested in small animal models in order to study its virulence and its induction of host immune responses following infection. This isolate causes death and extensive lung pathology in infected C57BL/6 mice, whereas lab-adapted strains, such as M. tuberculosis H37Rv, do not. The use of this clinically relevant isolate of M. tuberculosis increases the possibilities of assessing the long-lived efficacy of tuberculosis vaccines in a relatively inexpensive small animal model. This model will also allow for the use of knockout mouse strains to critically examine key immunological factors responsible for long-lived, vaccine-induced immunity in addition to vaccine-mediated prevention of pulmonary immunopathology. In this study, we show that the ID93/glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA)-stable emulsion (SE) tuberculosis vaccine candidate, currently in human clinical trials, is able to elicit protection against M. tuberculosis HN878 by reducing the bacterial burden in the lung and spleen and by preventing the extensive lung pathology induced by this pathogen in C57BL/6 mice. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Immune Responses in Cattle Inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle were inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii to compare antigen-specific immune responses to varied patterns of mycobacterial disease. Disease expression ranged from colonization with associated pathology (M. bovis), colonization without path...

  10. Cryopreservation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhiquan; Weigel, Kris M; Soelberg, Scott D; Lakey, Annie; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun; Gao, Dayong

    2012-11-01

    Successful long-term preservation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cells is important for sample transport, research, biobanking, and the development of new drugs, vaccines, biomarkers, and diagnostics. In this report, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin and M. tuberculosis H37Ra were used as models of M. tuberculosis complex strains to study cryopreservation of M. tuberculosis complex cells in diverse sample matrices at different cooling rates. Cells were cryopreserved in diverse sample matrices, namely, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), Middlebrook 7H9 medium with or without added glycerol, and human sputum. The efficacy of cryopreservation was quantified by microbiological culture and microscopy with BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. In all sample matrices examined, the microbiological culture results showed that the cooling rate was the most critical factor influencing cell viability. Slow cooling (a few degrees Celsius per minute) resulted in much higher M. tuberculosis complex recovery rates than rapid cooling (direct immersion in liquid nitrogen) (P tuberculosis complex cells in 7H9 broth for 20 h before culture on solid Middlebrook 7H10 plates did not help the recovery of the cells from cryoinjury (P = 0.14 to 0.71). The BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining kit, based on Syto 9 and propidium iodide (PI), was also applied to assess cell envelope integrity after cryopreservation. Using the kit, similar percentages of "live" cells with intact envelopes were observed for samples cryopreserved under different conditions, which was inconsistent with the microbiological culture results. This implies that suboptimal cryopreservation might not cause severe damage to the cell wall and/or membrane but instead cause intracellular injury, which leads to the loss of cell viability.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: factores de virulencia

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    Reinier Borrero

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis es el agente causal de la tuberculosis, una de las enfermedades infecciosas más letales en el mundo. La única vacuna disponible para su control es el BCG, sin embargo, falla en la protección contra la tuberculosis pulmonar, siendo esta la forma más frecuente y responsable de la diseminación. La identificación de factores de virulencia del microorganismo causal pudiera ayudar en el desarrollo de un nuevo candidato vacunal que sea capaz de neutralizar la acción de esos determinantes patogénicos. El empleo de diferentes modelos animales ha permitido reproducir las etapas de la enfermedad, así como medir o cuantificar la virulencia de las distintas cepas circulantes de Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Las mutaciones génicas y otras técnicas de biología molecular han posibilitado dilucidar los genes específicos involucrados en la virulencia de este microorganismo que codifican para múltiples y complejos factores de diferente naturaleza.

  12. SPECIFIC GYRB SEQUENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS CLINICAL ISOLATED FROM SPUTUM OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS IN INDONESIA

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    N. M. Mertaniasih

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesia have many different geographic areas which could be various on the variant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gyrB gene codes GyrB protein as sub unit compound of Gyrase enzyme that functioning in multiplication of bacteria. Detection of gyrB gene could be a marker of active multiplication of viable bacteria in the specimen from patients; and some of the DNA sequence regions were conserved and specific in the strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that would be a marker for identification. This research aims to analyze the sequence of gyrB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from sputum of pulmonary TB patients in Indonesia, and determine the specific region. Method: Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates have been collected from sputum of the patients with pulmonary TB that live in some area in Indonesia. Isolation and identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates using standard culture method; sequence analysis using PCR-direct sequencing of the part bases region of gyrB. Results: this study revealed that nucleotide sequence on a fragment 764 bases of gyrB gene Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains among clinical isolates almost identically to a wild type strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and subspecies member of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC, with a little difference of SNPs; there are many difference nucleotide sequence with MOTT and Gram positive or negative bacteria, except Corynebacterium diphtheriae identically with MTBC. Conclusion: the gyrB sequence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains among these clinical isolates from sputum of pulmonary TB patients in Indonesia have the conserved specific DNA region that almost identically with wild type strain H37Rv and MTBC.

  13. Mechanism of phagolysosome biogenesis block by viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vergne, Isabelle; Chua, Jennifer; Lee, Hwang-Ho; Lucas, Megan; Belisle, John; Deretic, Vojo

    2005-01-01

    Live Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists in macrophage phagosomes by interfering with phagolysosome biogenesis. Here, using four-dimensional microscopy and in vitro assays, we report the principal difference between phagosomes containing live and dead mycobacteria. Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P), a membrane trafficking regulatory lipid essential for phagosomal acquisition of lysosomal constituents, is retained on phagosomes harboring dead mycobacteria but is continuously eliminated f...

  14. Risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Indonesian children living with a sputum smear-positive case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutherford, M.E.; Hill, P.C.; Maharani, W.; Apriani, L.; Sampurno, H.; Crevel, R. van; Ruslami, R.

    2012-01-01

    SETTING AND OBJECTIVES: Young children living with infectious tuberculosis (TB) cases are at high risk of infection and disease, and screening is recommended. This is rarely conducted in resource-limited settings. Identifying children most at risk of infection may be useful for setting practical scr

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis monoarthritis in a child

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    Rosenberg Alan M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A child with isolated Mycobacterium tuberculosis monoarthritis, with features initially suggesting oligoarthritis subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, is presented. This patient illustrates the need to consider the possibility of tuberculosis as the cause of oligoarthritis in high-risk pediatric populations even in the absence of a tuberculosis contact history and without evidence of overt pulmonary disease.

  16. Copper Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoshan; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a trace element essential for the growth and development of almost all organisms, including bacteria. However, Cu overload in most systems is toxic. Studies show Cu accumulates in macrophage phagosomes infected with bacteria, suggesting Cu provides an innate immune mechanism to combat invading pathogens. To counteract the host-supplied Cu, increasing evidence suggests that bacteria have evolved Cu resistance mechanisms to facilitate their pathogenesis. In particular, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, has evolved multiple pathways to respond to Cu. Here, we summarize what is currently known about Cu homeostasis in Mtb and discuss potential sources of Cu encountered by this and other pathogens in a mammalian host. PMID:25614981

  17. Polymorphisms of twenty regulatory proteins between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis are responsible for tuberculosis in humans or animals, respectively. Both species are closely related and belong to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. tuberculosis is the most ancient species from which M. bovis and the other members o...

  18. Osteoarticular manifestations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zychowicz, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has affected humans for much of our existence. The incidence of global tuberculosis infection continues to rise, especially in concert with HIV coinfection. Many disease processes, such as diabetes, increase the likelihood of tuberculosis infection. Tuberculosis bacteria can infect any bone, joint, tendon, or bursa; however, the most common musculoskeletal site for infection includes the spine and weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee. Many patients who present with osteoarticular tuberculosis infection will have a gradual onset of pain at the site of infection. Many patients who develop a musculoskeletal tuberculosis infection will have no evidence of a pulmonary tuberculosis infection on x-ray film and many will have very mild symptoms with the initial infection. Healthcare providers must remember that many patients who develop tuberculosis infection do not progress to active tuberculosis disease; however, the latent infection may become active with immune compromise.

  19. Peritoneal tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium caprae

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    T. Nebreda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of tuberculosis in humans due to Mycobacterium caprae is very low and is almost confined to Europe. We report a case of a previously healthy 41-year-old Moroccan with a 6 month history of abdominal pain, weight loss, fatigue and diarrhea. A diagnosis of peritoneal tuberculosis due to M. caprae was made.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

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    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  1. Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A minireview

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    Amani M. Alnimr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis play important roles in understanding various aspects of tuberculosis pathogenesis and in the testing of novel therapeutic regimens. By simulating the latent tuberculosis infection, in which the bacteria exist in a non-replicative state, the models demonstrate reduced susceptibility to antimycobacterial agents. This minireview outlines the models available for simulating latent tuberculosis both in vitro and in several animal species. Additionally, this minireview discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these models for investigating the bacterial subpopulations and susceptibilities to sterilization by various antituberculosis drugs.

  2. Diterpene production in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Prach, Lisa; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.; Alber, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes are a structurally diverse class of molecules common in plants, although they are very rarely found in bacteria. We report the identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) of three diterpenes proposed to promote phagolysosome maturation arrest. MS analysis reveals that these diterpenes are novel compounds not previously identified in other organisms. The diterpene with highest abundance in Mtb has a mass fragmentation pattern identical to edaxadiene, which is produced in vitro from geranylgeranyl diphosphate by the enzymes Rv3377c and Rv3378c [Mann FM et al. (2009) J Am Chem Soc 131, 17526–17527]. A second diterpene found in Mtb has a similar mass spectrum, and is always observed in the same proportion relative to edaxadiene, indicating that it is a side product of the Rv3378c reaction in vivo. We name this second diterpene olefin edaxadiene B. The least abundant of the three diterpenes in Mtb extracts is tuberculosinol, a dephosphorylated side-product of the edaxadiene pathway intermediate produced by Rv3377c [Nakano C et al. (2009) Chembiochem 10, 2060–2071; Nakano C et al. (2005) Chem Commun (Camb) 8, 1016–1018]. A frameshift in Rv3377c in Mtb completely eliminates diterpene production, whereas expression of Rv3377c and Rv3378c in the nonpathogenic M. smegmatis is sufficient to produce edaxadiene and edaxadiene B. These studies define the pathway of edaxadiene and edaxadiene B biosynthesis in vivo. Rv3377c and Rv3378c are unique to Mtb and M. bovis, making them candidates for selective therapeutics and diagnostics. PMID:20670276

  3. Chemical engineering of Mycobacterium tuberculosis dodecin hybrids.

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    Vinzenz, Xenia; Grosse, Wolfgang; Linne, Uwe; Meissner, Britta; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2011-10-21

    The suitability for chemical engineering of the highly symmetrical Mycobacterium tuberculosis dodecin was investigated, its inner cavity providing a large compartment shields introduced compounds from bulk solvent. Hybrids were obtained by S-alkylation of cysteine mutants and characterized by spectroscopic methods, including the crystal structures of wild type and biohybrid dodecins.

  4. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection following organ transplantation].

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    Haas, Charles; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2006-11-01

    In transplant recipients, immunosuppressive treatment affects cell-mediated immunity and increases the risk of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis may be transmitted by the donor organ or occur de novo, but such cases are rare. The vast majority of cases of active tuberculosis in transplant recipients result from reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The incidence varies from one region of the globe to another, from 0.5-1.0% in North America, to 0.36-5.5% in Europe and 7.0-11.8% in India. The incidence of tuberculosis among transplant recipients is much higher than in the general population. Diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic liver disease and AIDS all increase the risk of post-transplant tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary and disseminated forms are frequent in this setting. The diagnosis of tuberculosis in transplant recipients is often difficult, and treatment is frequently delayed. Tuberculosis can be life-threatening in such cases. Treatment is difficult because rifampicin is a cytochrome P450 inducer (leading to reduced levels of cyclosporine), and because the hepatotoxicity of isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide is frequently increased in transplant recipients. Treatment of latent tuberculosis before transplantation markedly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis after transplantation.

  5. Asymmetric cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its unique features.

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    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nagaraja, Mukkayyan; Sebastian, Jees; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2014-03-01

    Recently, several reports showed that about 80 % of mid-log phase Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium marinum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG cells divide symmetrically with 5-10 % deviation in the septum position from the median. However, the mode of cell division of the pathogenic mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remained unclear. Therefore, in the present study, using electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy of septum- and nucleoid-stained live and fixed cells, and live cell time-lapse imaging, we show the occurrence of asymmetric cell division with unusually deviated septum/constriction in 20 % of the 15 % septating M. tuberculosis cells in the mid-log phase population. The remaining 80 % of the 15 % septating cells divided symmetrically but with 2-5 % deviation in the septum/constriction position, as reported for M. smegmatis, M. marinum, and M. bovis BCG cells. Both the long and the short portions of the asymmetrically dividing M. tuberculosis cells with unusually deviated septum contained nucleoids, thereby generating viable short and long cells from each asymmetric division. M. tuberculosis short cells were acid fast positive and, like the long cells, further readily underwent growth and division to generate micro-colony, thereby showing that they were neither mini cells, spores nor dormant forms of mycobacteria. The freshly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients' sputum samples, which are known for the prevalence of oxidative stress conditions, also contained short cells at the same proportion as that in the mid-log phase population. The probable physiological significance of the generation of the short cells through unusually deviated asymmetric cell division is discussed.

  6. Mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yujiao, Zhang; Xiaojing, Li; Kaixia, Mi

    2016-10-20

    Tuberculosis, caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest bacterial infectious disease. It is still a global-health threat, particularly because of the drug-resistant forms. Fluoroquinolones, with target of gyrase, are among the drugs used to treat tuberculosis. However, their widespread use has led to bacterial resistance. The molecular mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported, such as DNA gyrase mutations, drug efflux pumps system, bacterial cell wall thickness and pentapeptide proteins (MfpA) mediated regulation of gyrase. Mutations in gyrase conferring quinolone resistance play important roles and have been extensively studied. Recent studies have shown that the regulation of DNA gyrase affects mycobacterial drug resistance, but the mechanisms, especially by post-translational modification and regulatory proteins, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the fluoroquinolone drug development, and the molecular genetics of fluoroquinolone resistance in mycobacteria. Comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis will open a new view on understanding drug resistance in mycobacteria and lead to novel strategies to develop new accurate diagnosis methods.

  7. Cytokinins beyond plants: synthesis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Samanovic, Marie I.; Darwin, K. H.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) resides mainly inside macrophages, which produce nitric oxide (NO) to combat microbial infections. Earlier studies revealed that proteasome-associated genes are required for M. tuberculosis to resist NO via a previously uncharacterized mechanism. Twelve years later, we elucidated the link between proteasome function and NO resistance in M. tuberculosis in Molecular Cell, 57 (2015), pp. 984-994. In a proteasome degradation-defective mutant, Rv1205, a homologue of the plant enzyme LONELY GUY (LOG) that is involved in the synthesis of phytohormones called cytokinins, accumulates and as a consequence results in the overproduction of cytokinins. Cytokinins break down into aldehydes that kill mycobacteria in the presence of NO. Importantly, this new discovery reveals for the first time that a mammalian bacterial pathogen produces cytokinins and leaves us with the question: why is M. tuberculosis, an exclusively human pathogen, producing cytokinins?

  8. Tuberculosis patients co-infected with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in an urban area of Brazil

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    Marcio Roberto Silva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this cross-sectional study, mycobacteria specimens from 189 tuberculosis (TB patients living in an urban area in Brazil were characterised from 2008-2010 using phenotypic and molecular speciation methods (pncA gene and oxyR pseudogene analysis. Of these samples, 174 isolates simultaneously grew on Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ and Stonebrink (SB-containing media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whereas 12 had molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis based on the DNA analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples (paraffin blocks. One patient produced two sputum isolates, the first of which simultaneously grew on LJ and SB media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis, and the second of which only grew on SB media and presented phenotypic profiles of Mycobacterium bovis. One patient provided a bronchial lavage isolate, which simultaneously grew on LJ and SB media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis, but had molecular profiles of M. bovis from paraffin block DNA analysis, and one sample had molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis identified from two distinct paraffin blocks. Moreover, we found a low prevalence (1.6% of M. bovis among these isolates, which suggests that local health service procedures likely underestimate its real frequency and that it deserves more attention from public health officials.

  9. Controlling strategy of dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Yiling; Guo Shuliang

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to review the available literatures on control of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection and propose a new control strategy to shorten the course of TB chemotherapy.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in PubMed.The search terms were "therapy (treatment) of tuberculosis," "therapy (treatment) of latent TB infection," and "vaccine of TB."Study selection Articles regarding treatment and vaccine of TB were selected and reviewed.Results The most crucial reason causing the prolonged course of TB chemotherapy is the dormant state of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis).Nevertheless,there are,to date,no effective drugs that can directly kill the dormant cells of M.tuberculosis in clinical therapy.In accordance with the growth cycle of dormant M.tuberculosis in the body,the methods for controlling dormant M.tuberculosis include direct killing with drugs,prevention of dormant M.tuberculosis resuscitation with vaccines,and resuscitating dormant M.tuberculosis with preparations or drugs and then thoroughly killing these resuscitated M.tuberculosis by using anti-TB therapy.Conclusions The comprehensive analysis of the above three methods suggests that the drugs directly killing dormant cells are in clinical trials,TMC207 is the most beneficial for controlling TB.Because the side effect of vaccines is less and their action period is long,prevention of dormant cells resuscitation with vaccines is promising.The last control method makes it probable that when a huge number of active cells of M.tuberculosis have been killed and eradicated after 1-month short chemotherapy,only a strong short-term subsequent chemotherapy can completely kill and eradicate the remaining M.tuberculosis.This control strategy is expected to significantly shorten the course of TB chemotherapy and bring a new change and breakthrough in TB treatment.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-forms

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    M. tuberculosis L-forms researches done in China during the recent years were reviewed in this article. M. tuberculosis L-forms could be produced spontaneously or induced by isoniazid or D-cyclic serine, that influenced the synthesis of cell walls. Among the acid-fast organisms isolated from the patients, more L-forms were found than vegetative forms. In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, M. tuberculosis disseminated through the blood mainly in L-forms, L-forms could adhere on the surface or harbor...

  11. A live attenuated BCG vaccine overexpressing multistage antigens Ag85B and HspX provides superior protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xuefeng; Teng, Xindong; Jing, Yukai; Ma, Jilei; Tian, Maopeng; Yu, Qi; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Ruibo; Wang, Weihua; Li, Li; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most menacing infectious diseases, although attenuated Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine has been widely used to protect children against primary TB. There are increasing evidences that rapid growing and dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) coexist in vivo after infection. However, BCG vaccine only elicits cell-mediated immune responses to secretory antigens expressed by rapid growing pathogen. BCG vaccine is thus unable to thwart the reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and its protection wanes over age after neonatal immunization. In order to extend its ability for a durable protection, a novel recombinant BCG (rBCG) strain, named rBCG::XB, was constructed by overexpressing immunodominant multistage antigens of Ag85B and HspX, which are expressed by both rapid replicating and dormant M. tuberculosis. Long-term protective effect and immunogenicity of rBCG::XB were compared with the parental BCG in vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that rBCG::XB provided the stronger and long-lasting protection against M. tuberculosis H37Rv intranasal infection than BCG. The rBCG::XB not only elicited the more durable multistage antigen-specific CD4(+)Th1-biased immune responses and specific polyfunctional CD4(+)T cells but also augmented the CD8(+) CTL effects against Ag85B in vivo. In particular, higher levels of CD4(+) TEM and CD8(+) TCM cells, dominated by IL2(+) CD4(+) and CD8(+) TCM cells, were obtained in the spleen of rBCG::XB vaccinated mice. Therefore, our findings indicate that rBCG::XB is a promising candidate to improve the efficacy of BCG.

  12. Mycobacterium marinum: a potential immunotherapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

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    Tian WW

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wei-wei Tian,1 Qian-qiu Wang,1 Wei-da Liu,2 Jian-ping Shen,1 Hong-sheng Wang11Laboratory of Mycobacterial Disease, Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Skin Diseases and STIs, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Mycology, Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Skin Diseases and STIs, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of ChinaPurpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium marinum infection in vitro and the potential of M. marinum as an immunotherapy for M. tuberculosis infection.Methods: The potential human immune response to certain bacillus infections was investigated in an immune cell–bacillus coculture system in vitro. As a potential novel immunotherapy, M. marinum was studied and compared with two other bacilli, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG and live attenuated M. tuberculosis. We examined the changes in both the bacilli and immune cells, especially the time course of the viability of mycobacteria in the coculture system and host immune responses including multinuclear giant cell formation by Wright–Giemsa modified staining, macrophage polarization by cell surface antigen expression, and cytokines/chemokine production by both mRNA expression and protein secretion.Results: The M. marinum stimulated coculture group showed more expression of CD209, CD68, CD80, and CD86 than the BCG and M. tuberculosis (an attenuated strain, H37Ra groups, although the differences were not statistically significant. Moreover, the M. marinum group expressed more interleukin (IL-1B and IL-12p40 on day 3 (IL-1B: P = 0.003 and 0.004, respectively; IL-12p40: P = 0.001 and 0.011, respectively, a higher level of CXCL10 on day 1 (P = 0.006 and 0.026, respectively, and

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis effectors interfering host apoptosis signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minqiang; Li, Wu; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious human public health concern. The coevolution between its pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human host complicated the way to prevent and cure TB. Apoptosis plays subtle role in this interaction. The pathogen endeavors to manipulate the apoptosis via diverse effectors targeting key signaling nodes. In this paper, we summarized the effectors pathogen used to subvert the apoptosis, such as LpqH, ESAT-6/CFP-10, LAMs. The interplay between different forms of cell deaths, such as apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis, is also discussed with a focus on the modes of action of effectors, and implications for better TB control.

  14. The human antibody response to the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Casey C Perley

    Full Text Available Vaccine-induced human antibodies to surface components of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumonia are correlated with protection. Monoclonal antibodies to surface components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also protective in animal models. We have characterized human antibodies that bind to the surface of live M. tuberculosis.Plasma from humans with latent tuberculosis (TB infection (n = 23, active TB disease (n = 40, and uninfected controls (n = 9 were assayed by ELISA for reactivity to the live M. tuberculosis surface and to inactivated M. tuberculosis fractions (whole cell lysate, lipoarabinomannan, cell wall, and secreted proteins.When compared to uninfected controls, patients with active TB disease had higher antibody titers to the surface of live M. tuberculosis (Δ = 0.72 log10, whole cell lysate (Δ = 0.82 log10, and secreted proteins (Δ = 0.62 log10, though there was substantial overlap between the two groups. Individuals with active disease had higher relative IgG avidity (Δ = 1.4 to 2.6 to all inactivated fractions. Surprisingly, the relative IgG avidity to the live M. tuberculosis surface was lower in the active disease group than in uninfected controls (Δ =  -1.53, p = 0.004. Patients with active disease had higher IgG than IgM titers for all inactivated fractions (ratios, 2.8 to 10.1, but equal IgG and IgM titers to the live M. tuberculosis surface (ratio, 1.1. Higher antibody titers to the M. tuberculosis surface were observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 0.55 log10, p = 0.008, foreign-born (Δ = 0.61 log10, p = 0.004, or HIV-seronegative (Δ = 0.60 log10, p = 0.04. Higher relative IgG avidity scores to the M. tuberculosis surface were also observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 1.12, p < 0.001 and foreign-born (Δ = 0.87, p = 0.01.Humans with active TB disease produce antibodies to the surface of M. tuberculosis with low avidity and with a low IgG/IgM ratio

  15. The Human Antibody Response to the Surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, Casey C.; Frahm, Marc; Click, Eva M.; Dobos, Karen M.; Ferrari, Guido; Stout, Jason E.; Frothingham, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccine-induced human antibodies to surface components of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumonia are correlated with protection. Monoclonal antibodies to surface components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also protective in animal models. We have characterized human antibodies that bind to the surface of live M. tuberculosis. Methods Plasma from humans with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (n = 23), active TB disease (n = 40), and uninfected controls (n = 9) were assayed by ELISA for reactivity to the live M. tuberculosis surface and to inactivated M. tuberculosis fractions (whole cell lysate, lipoarabinomannan, cell wall, and secreted proteins). Results When compared to uninfected controls, patients with active TB disease had higher antibody titers to the surface of live M. tuberculosis (Δ = 0.72 log10), whole cell lysate (Δ = 0.82 log10), and secreted proteins (Δ = 0.62 log10), though there was substantial overlap between the two groups. Individuals with active disease had higher relative IgG avidity (Δ = 1.4 to 2.6) to all inactivated fractions. Surprisingly, the relative IgG avidity to the live M. tuberculosis surface was lower in the active disease group than in uninfected controls (Δ = –1.53, p = 0.004). Patients with active disease had higher IgG than IgM titers for all inactivated fractions (ratios, 2.8 to 10.1), but equal IgG and IgM titers to the live M. tuberculosis surface (ratio, 1.1). Higher antibody titers to the M. tuberculosis surface were observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 0.55 log10, p = 0.008), foreign-born (Δ = 0.61 log10, p = 0.004), or HIV-seronegative (Δ = 0.60 log10, p = 0.04). Higher relative IgG avidity scores to the M. tuberculosis surface were also observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 1.12, p<0.001) and foreign-born (Δ = 0.87, p = 0.01). Conclusions/Significance Humans

  16. Erythema nodosum and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

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    Ovgu Kul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema nodosum[EN] is a common form of panniculitis and inflammatory disease of the subcutaneous fat tissue.EN occurs in a variety of disorders including tuberculosis, sarcoidosis, Behcet%u2019s disease, inflammatory bowel disease and streptococcal infection but idiopathic cases account for 55%. A 14 years old patient was diagnosed as Erythema nodosum[EN] with prolonged fever and red subcutaneous nodules in pretibial location. With tuberculin skin and Quantiferon positivity and tree in bud sign in chest x ray she was diagnosed as tuberculosis. On the same dates a 11 years old patient was admitted with EN. She was also diagnosed as tuberculosis due to tuberculin skin and Quantiferon positivity and hilar lymphadenopathy in thorax CT. The other causes were excluded in both cases. We present these two adolescents cases to keep in mind the close relationship between tuberculosis and erythema nodosum.

  17. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Heather L Torrey

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection.

  18. Risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among children in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Bolette; Andersen, Aase Bengaard; Melbye, Mads

    2011-01-01

    To examine the risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTI) among Greenlandic children for the purpose of identifying those at highest risk of infection.......To examine the risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTI) among Greenlandic children for the purpose of identifying those at highest risk of infection....

  19. Beta-lactamases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium kansasii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, C; Salvadó, M

    1997-09-01

    Re-emergence of infectious diseases caused by mycobacteria as well as the emergence of multiresistant strains of Mycobacterium has promoted the research on the use of beta-lactames in the treatment of such diseases. Mycobacteria produce beta-lactamases: M. tuberculosis produces a wide-spectrum beta-lactamase whose behaviour mimicks those of Gram-negative bacteria. M. kansasii produces also beta-lactamase which can be inhibited by clavulanic acid. An overview on beta-lactamases from both species is reported.

  20. Zoonotic tuberculosis in human beings caused by Mycobacterium bovis-a call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Muwonge, Adrian; Perera, Alejandro; Dean, Anna S; Mumford, Elizabeth; Erlacher-Vindel, Elisabeth; Forcella, Simona; Silk, Benjamin J; Ditiu, Lucica; El Idrissi, Ahmed; Raviglione, Mario; Cosivi, Ottorino; LoBue, Philip; Fujiwara, Paula I

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is recognised as the primary cause of human tuberculosis worldwide. However, substantial evidence suggests that the burden of Mycobacterium bovis, the cause of bovine tuberculosis, might be underestimated in human beings as the cause of zoonotic tuberculosis. In 2013, results from a systematic review and meta-analysis of global zoonotic tuberculosis showed that the same challenges and concerns expressed 15 years ago remain valid. These challenges faced by people with zoonotic tuberculosis might not be proportional to the scientific attention and resources allocated in recent years to other diseases. The burden of zoonotic tuberculosis in people needs important reassessment, especially in areas where bovine tuberculosis is endemic and where people live in conditions that favour direct contact with infected animals or animal products. As countries move towards detecting the 3 million tuberculosis cases estimated to be missed annually, and in view of WHO's end TB strategy endorsed by the health authorities of WHO Member States in 2014 to achieve a world free of tuberculosis by 2035, we call on all tuberculosis stakeholders to act to accurately diagnose and treat tuberculosis caused by M bovis in human beings. Copyright © 2017 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd/Inc/BV. All rights reserved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. PET/CT imaging of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred; Werf, van der Tjip; de Vries, Erik; Dierckx, Rudi; Sathekge, M. M.; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.

    Tuberculosis has a high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has a complex pathophysiology; it is an aerobic bacillus capable of surviving in anaerobic conditions in a latent state for a very long time before reactivation to active disease. In the latent tuberculosis

  2. Radiometric studies of mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Edwaldo E. Camargo

    1987-02-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro assay system that included automated radiometric quantification of 14CO2 released as a result of oxidation of 14C- substrates was applied for studying the metabolic activity of M. tuberculosis under various experimental conditions. These experiments included the study of a mtabolic pathways, b detection times for various inoculum sizes, c effect of filtration on reproducibility of results, d influence of stress environment e minimal inhibitory concentrations for isoniazid, streptomycin, ethambutol and rifampin, and f generation times of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. These organisms were found to metabolize 14C-for-mate, (U-14C acetate, (U-14C glycerol, (1-14C palmitic acid, 1-14C lauric acid, (U-14C L-malic acid, (U-14C D-glucose, and (U-14C D-glucose, but not (1-14C L-glucose, (U-14C glycine, or (U-14C pyruvate to 14CO2. By using either 14C-for-mate, (1-14C palmitic acid, or (1-14C lauric acid, 10(7 organisms/vial could be detected within 24 48 hours and as few as 10 organisms/vial within 16-20 days. Reproducible results could be obtained without filtering the bacterial suspension, provided that the organisms were grown in liquid 7H9 medium with 0.05% polysorbate 80 and homogenized prior to the study. Drugs that block protein synthesis were found to have lower minimal inhibitory concentrations with the radiometric method when compared to the conventional agar dilution method. The mean generation time obtained for M. bovis and different strains of M. tuberculosis with various substrates was 9 ± 1 hours.

  3. Inositol monophosphate phosphatase genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Parish Tanya

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacteria use inositol in phosphatidylinositol, for anchoring lipoarabinomannan (LAM, lipomannan (LM and phosphatidylinosotol mannosides (PIMs in the cell envelope, and for the production of mycothiol, which maintains the redox balance of the cell. Inositol is synthesized by conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to inositol-1-phosphate, followed by dephosphorylation by inositol monophosphate phosphatases (IMPases to form myo-inositol. To gain insight into how Mycobacterium tuberculosis synthesises inositol we carried out genetic analysis of the four IMPase homologues that are present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome. Results Mutants lacking either impA (Rv1604 or suhB (Rv2701c were isolated in the absence of exogenous inositol, and no differences in levels of PIMs, LM, LAM or mycothiol were observed. Mutagenesis of cysQ (Rv2131c was initially unsuccessful, but was possible when a porin-like gene of Mycobacterium smegmatis was expressed, and also by gene switching in the merodiploid strain. In contrast, we could only obtain mutations in impC (Rv3137 when a second functional copy was provided in trans, even when exogenous inositol was provided. Experiments to obtain a mutant in the presence of a second copy of impC containing an active-site mutation, in the presence of porin-like gene of M. smegmatis, or in the absence of inositol 1-phosphate synthase activity, were also unsuccessful. We showed that all four genes are expressed, although at different levels, and levels of inositol phosphatase activity did not fall significantly in any of the mutants obtained. Conclusions We have shown that neither impA, suhB nor cysQ is solely responsible for inositol synthesis. In contrast, we show that impC is essential for mycobacterial growth under the conditions we used, and suggest it may be required in the early stages of mycothiol synthesis.

  4. Complex multifractal nature in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Saurav; Roychowdhury, Tanmoy; Chirom, Keilash; Bhattacharya, Alok; Brojen Singh, R. K.

    2017-04-01

    The mutifractal and long range correlation (C(r)) properties of strings, such as nucleotide sequence can be a useful parameter for identification of underlying patterns and variations. In this study C(r) and multifractal singularity function f(α) have been used to study variations in the genomes of a pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Genomic sequences of M. tuberculosis isolates displayed significant variations in C(r) and f(α) reflecting inherent differences in sequences among isolates. M. tuberculosis isolates can be categorised into different subgroups based on sensitivity to drugs, these are DS (drug sensitive isolates), MDR (multi-drug resistant isolates) and XDR (extremely drug resistant isolates). C(r) follows significantly different scaling rules in different subgroups of isolates, but all the isolates follow one parameter scaling law. The richness in complexity of each subgroup can be quantified by the measures of multifractal parameters displaying a pattern in which XDR isolates have highest value and lowest for drug sensitive isolates. Therefore C(r) and multifractal functions can be useful parameters for analysis of genomic sequences.

  5. Adaptation and evolution of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergval, I.L.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on drug resistance and the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Notwithstanding, many molecular mechanisms facilitating the emergence, adaptation and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis have yet to be discovered. This thesis reports studies of the adaptive mech

  6. Exposure of dentists to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Ibadan, Nigeria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadmus, S.I.; Okoje, V.N.; Taiwo, B.O.; Soolingen, D. van

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among dental patients and to assess dentists' risk for exposure, we conducted a study among dental patients at a large tertiary hospital in Nigeria, a country where tuberculosis is endemic. Ten (13%) of 78 sputum samples obtained we

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Wild Asian Elephants, Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Arun; Pandiyan, Jeganathan; Madhavilatha, G K; Mundayoor, Sathish; Chandramohan, Bathrachalam; Sajesh, P K; Santhosh, Sam; Mikota, Susan K

    2017-03-01

    We tested 3 ild Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in southern India and confirmed infection in 3 animals with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate human pathogen, by PCR and genetic sequencing. Our results indicate that tuberculosis may be spilling over from humans (reverse zoonosis) and emerging in wild elephants.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Ximena; Ambroggi, Marta; Cordova, Ezequiel; Brown, Tim; Poggi, Susana; Drobniewski, Francis

    2011-03-01

    To analyze the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains at a hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and mutations related to multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, we conducted a prospective case-control study. Our findings reinforce the value of incorporating already standardized molecular methods for rapidly detecting resistance.

  9. Adaptation and evolution of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergval, I.L.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on drug resistance and the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Notwithstanding, many molecular mechanisms facilitating the emergence, adaptation and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis have yet to be discovered. This thesis reports studies of the adaptive

  10. Benzothiazinones kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis by blocking arabinan synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarov, Vadim; Manina, Giulia; Mikusova, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    New drugs are required to counter the tuberculosis (TB) pandemic. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of 1,3-benzothiazin-4-ones (BTZs), a new class of antimycobacterial agents that kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro, ex vivo, and in mouse models of TB. Using genetics...

  11. Autophagy in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV infections

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    Lucile eEspert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb are among the most lethal human pathogens worldwide, each being responsible for around 1.5 million deaths annually. Moreover, synergy between acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS and tuberculosis (TB has turned HIV/M.tb co-infection into a major public health threat in developing countries. In the past decade, autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic process, has emerged as a major host immune defense mechanism against infectious agents like M.tb and HIV. Nevertheless, in some instances, autophagy machinery appears to be instrumental for HIV infection. Finally, there is mounting evidence that both pathogens deploy various countermeasures to thwart autophagy. This mini-review proposes an overview of the roles and regulations of autophagy in HIV and M.tb infections with an emphasis on microbial factors. We also discuss the role of autophagy manipulation in the context of HIV/M.tb co-infection. In future, a comprehensive understanding of autophagy interaction with these pathogens will be critical for development of autophagy-based prophylactic and therapeutic interventions for AIDS and TB.

  12. Human Lung Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwander, Stephan; Dheda, Keertan

    2011-01-01

    The study of human pulmonary immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) provides a unique window into the biological interactions between the human host and M.tb within the broncho-alveolar microenvironment, the site of natural infection. Studies of bronchoalveolar cells (BACs) and lung tissue evaluate innate, adaptive, and regulatory immune mechanisms that collectively contribute to immunological protection or its failure. In aerogenically M.tb–exposed healthy persons lung immune responses reflect early host pathogen interactions that may contribute to sterilization, the development of latent M.tb infection, or progression to active disease. Studies in these persons may allow the identification of biomarkers of protective immunity before the initiation of inflammatory and disease-associated immunopathological changes. In healthy close contacts of patients with tuberculosis (TB) and during active pulmonary TB, immune responses are compartmentalized to the lungs and characterized by an exuberant helper T-cell type 1 response, which as suggested by recent evidence is counteracted by local suppressive immune mechanisms. Here we discuss how exploring human lung immunity may provide insights into disease progression and mechanisms of failure of immunological protection at the site of the initial host–pathogen interaction. These findings may also aid in the identification of new biomarkers of protective immunity that are urgently needed for the development of new and the improvement of current TB vaccines, adjuvant immunotherapies, and diagnostic technologies. To facilitate further work in this area, methodological and procedural approaches for bronchoalveolar lavage studies and their limitations are also discussed. PMID:21075901

  13. Standartization of broth microdilution method for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Clarice Queico Fujimura Leite; Ana Laura Remédio Zeni Beretta; Ivone Shizuko Anno; Maria Alice da Silva Telles

    2000-01-01

    Indirect drug susceptibility tests of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was done to investigate the accuracy and feasibility of a broth microdilution method (BMM) for determining minimal inhibitory concentrations of conventional drugs against M. tuberculosis. Test drugs included isoniazid (H), rifampicin (R), ethambutol (E), streptomycin (S) and pyrazinamide (Z). Fifty isolates of M. tuberculosis from patients who had never received drug therapy, and H37Rv strain for control, were evaluated in the s...

  14. First molecular epidemiology study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Kiribati.

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    Eman Aleksic

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis incidence rates in Kiribati are among the highest in the Western Pacific Region, however the genetic diversity of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains (MTBC and transmission dynamics are unknown. Here, we analysed MTBC strains isolated from culture positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB cases from the main TB referral centre between November 2007 and October 2009. Strain genotyping (IS6110 typing, spoligotyping, 24-loci MIRU-VNTR and SNP typing was performed and demographic information collected. Among 73 MTBC strains analysed, we identified seven phylogenetic lineages, dominated by Beijing strains (49%. Beijing strains were further differentiated in two main branches, Beijing-A (n = 8 and -B (n = 28, that show distinct genotyping patterns and are characterized by specific deletion profiles (Beijing A: only RD105, RD207 deleted; Beijing B: RD150 and RD181 additionally deleted. Many Kiribati strains (59% based on IS6110 typing of all strains occurred in clusters, suggesting ongoing local transmission. Beijing-B strains and over-crowded living conditions were associated with strain clustering (likely recent transmission, however little evidence of anti-tuberculous drug resistance was observed. We suggest enhanced case finding amongst close contacts and continued supervised treatment of all identified cases using standard first-line drugs to reduce TB burden in Kiribati. Beijing strains can be subdivided in different principle branches that might be associated with differential spreading patterns in the population.

  15. Assessment of the probability of introducing Mycobacterium tuberculosis into Danish cattle herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foddai, Alessandro; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Krogh, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a zoonosis caused by Mycobacterium spp. International trade in cattle is regulated with respect to Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) but not Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), despite that cattle can become infected with both species. In this study we estimated the annual...

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis volatiles for diagnosis of tuberculosis by Cricetomys rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgode, Georgies F; Weetjens, Bart J; Nawrath, Thorben; Lazar, Doris; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Mahoney, Amanda; Kuipers, Dian; Machang'u, Robert S; Weiner, January; Schulz, Stefan; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2012-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in regions with limited resources depends on microscopy with insufficient sensitivity. Rapid diagnostic tests of low cost but high sensitivity and specificity are needed for better point-of-care management of TB. Trained African giant pouched rats (Cricetomys sp.) can diagnose pulmonary TB in sputum but the relevant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific volatile compounds remain unknown. We investigated the odour volatiles of Mtb detected by rats in reference Mtb, nontuberculous mycobacteria, Nocardia sp., Streptomyces sp., Rhodococcus sp., and other respiratory tract microorganisms spiked into Mtb-negative sputum. Thirteen compounds were specific to Mtb and 13 were shared with other microorganisms. Rats discriminated a blend of Mtb-specific volatiles from individual, and blends of shared, compounds (P = 0.001). The rats' sensitivity for typical TB-positive sputa was 99.15% with 92.23% specificity and 93.14% accuracy. These findings underline the potential of trained Cricetomys rats for rapid TB diagnosis in resource-limited settings, particularly in Africa where Cricetomys rats occur widely and the burden of TB is high. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CCL2 responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis are associated with disease severity in tuberculosis.

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    Zahra Hasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leucocyte activating chemokines such as CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL8 together with proinflammatory IFNgamma, TNFalpha and downmodulatory IL10 play a central role in the restriction of M. tuberculosis infections, but is unclear whether these markers are indicative of tuberculosis disease severity. METHODOLOGY: We investigated live M. tuberculosis- and M. bovis BCG-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses in patients with tuberculosis (TB and healthy endemic controls (ECs, n = 36. TB patients comprised pulmonary (PTB, n = 34 and extrapulmonary groups, subdivided into those with less severe localized extrapulmonary TB (L-ETB, n = 16 or severe disseminated ETB (D-ETB, n = 16. Secretion of CCL2, IFNgamma, IL10 and CCL3, and mRNA expression of CCL2, TNFalpha, CCL3 and CXCL8 were determined. RESULTS: M. tuberculosis- and BCG-induced CCL2 secretion was significantly increased in both PTB and D-ETB (p<0.05, p<0.01 as compared with L-ETB patients. CCL2 secretion in response to M. tuberculosis was significantly greater than to BCG in the PTB and D-ETB groups. M. tuberculosis-induced CCL2 mRNA transcription was greater in PTB than L-ETB (p = 0.023, while CCL2 was reduced in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB (p = 0.005 patients. M. tuberculosis-induced IFNgamma was greater in L-ETB than PTB (p = 0.04, while BCG-induced IFNgamma was greater in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB patients (p = 0.036. TNFalpha mRNA expression was raised in PTB as compared with L-ETB group in response to M. tuberculosis (p = 0.02 and BCG (p = 0.03. Mycobacterium-induced CCL3 and CXCL8 was comparable between TB groups. CONCLUSIONS: The increased CCL2 and TNFalpha in PTB patients may support effective leucocyte recruitment and M. tuberculosis localization. CCL2 alone is associated with severity of TB, possibly due to increased systemic inflammation found in severe disseminated TB or due to increased monocyte infiltration to lung parenchyma in pulmonary disease.

  18. Escape of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from oxidative killing by neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corleis, Björn; Korbel, Daniel; Wilson, Robert; Bylund, Johan; Chee, Ronnie; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2012-07-01

    Neutrophils enter sites of infection, where they can eliminate pathogenic bacteria in an oxidative manner. Despite their predominance in active tuberculosis lesions, the function of neutrophils in this important human infection is still highly controversial. We observed that virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis survived inside human neutrophils despite prompt activation of these defence cells' microbicidal effectors. Survival of M. tuberculosis was accompanied by necrotic cell death of infected neutrophils. Necrotic cell death entirely depended on radical oxygen species production since chronic granulomatous disease neutrophils were protected from M. tuberculosis-triggered necrosis. More, importantly, the M. tuberculosis ΔRD1 mutant failed to induce neutrophil necrosis rendering this strain susceptible to radical oxygen species-mediated killing. We conclude that this virulence function is instrumental for M. tuberculosis to escape killing by neutrophils and contributes to pathogenesis in tuberculosis.

  19. Pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a horse: zoonotic concerns and limitations of antemortem testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of disease. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid...

  20. Osteomielite esternal por Mycobacterium tuberculosis Sternal osteomyelitis caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Diego Michelon De Carli

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos o caso de um paciente de 74 anos, masculino, com dor torácica na porção superior do esterno com um ano de evolução associada a eritema, edema e fístula com drenagem de material purulento. Paciente HIV negativo e sem história prévia de contato com TB. A TC de tórax evidenciou lesão osteolítica esternal, e o material de biópsia revelou granuloma caseoso negativo para fungos e bacilos álcool-ácido resistentes no exame microbiológico direto. O diagnóstico de osteomielite esternal por Mycobacterium tuberculosis foi realizado por PCR.We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient with a one-year history of chest pain in the suprasternal notch associated with erythema, edema and drainage of purulent material from a fistulous lesion. The patient was HIV-negative with no history of TB. A CT scan of the chest showed an osteolytic lesion in the sternum, and a biopsy revealed caseous granuloma, which, in the microbiological evaluation, was negative for fungi and acid-fast bacilli. The diagnosis of sternal osteomyelitis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was confirmed using PCR.

  1. Immune responses to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigen ESAT-6 signal subclinical infection among contacts of tuberculosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doherty, T Mark; Demissie, Abebech; Olobo, Joseph;

    2002-01-01

    Diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is considered essential for tuberculosis control but is hampered by the lack of specific reagents. We report that strong recognition of tuberculosis complex-specific antigen ESAT-6 by healthy household contacts of tuberculosis patients...... correlates with the subsequent development of active tuberculosis during a 2-year follow-up period....

  2. Progenitor “Mycobacterium canettii” clone responsible for lymph node tuberculosis epidemic, Djibouti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Yann; Cazajous, Géraldine; Dehan, Céline; Soler, Charles; Vong, Rithy; Hassan, Mohamed Osman; Hauck, Yolande; Boulais, Christian; Andriamanantena, Dina; Martinaud, Christophe; Martin, Émilie; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium canettii,” an opportunistic human pathogen living in an unknown environmental reservoir, is the progenitor species from which Mycobacterium tuberculosis emerged. Since its discovery in 1969, most of the ≈70 known M. canettii strains were isolated in the Republic of Djibouti, frequently from expatriate children and adults. We show here, by whole-genome sequencing, that most strains collected from February 2010 through March 2013, and associated with 2 outbreaks of lymph node tuberculosis in children, belong to a unique epidemic clone within M. canettii. Evolution of this clone, which has been recovered regularly since 1983, may mimic the birth of M. tuberculosis. Thus, recognizing this organism and identifying its reservoir are clinically important.

  3. Tuberculosis:an experience from Mycobacterium smears and culture analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeehaida M; Siti Asma H; Siti Hawa H; Zaidah AR; Norbanee TH

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Simple tests like direct smear of the acid fast bacilli (AFB)and Mycobacterium culture could assist the diagnosis of tuberculosis.This study is aimed at reviewing the outcome of smears,culture results and con-tamination rate among specimens requested for AFB smear and Mycobacterium culture.Methods:Retrospec-tive laboratory data analysis requesting for Mycobacterium culture from January 2005 till December 2006 was done in a tertiary teaching hospital of Universiti Sains Malaysia,Kubang Kerian,Kelantan,Malaysia.Re-sults:Four hundred and sixty seven (36.6%)isolates grew from 1 277 specimens.Of these isolates,314 (67.2%)grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis,23 (4.9%)grew Mycobacterium other than tuberculosis and 38 (8.1%)grew contaminants.Among the M.tuberculosis cultures,165 (52.5%)had growth of more than 100 confluent colonies,whereas 39 cultures (12.4%)had growth of less than 19 colonies.Direct smear for AFB among smear positive cases showed presence of more than 50 bacilli /line in 231 (49.5%)cases and smear negative cases accounted for 63 (13.5%).Among smear positive cases,291 (94.5%)cultures grew Myco-bacterium species and another 17 (5.5%)cultures grew contaminants.In smear negative cases,32 (62.7%) cultures grew Mycobacterium species and 19 (37.3%)cultures grew contaminants.Conclusion:The results from data analysis of the Mycobacterium cultures should be critically utilized in order to review the laboratory performance and to improve its services in the future.Some of the data is also useful to the administrators of the hospital in terms of estimating the risk of occupational hazard faced by the health care workers.

  4. A Case of False-Positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium celatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Gildeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium celatum is a nontuberculous mycobacterium shown to cause symptoms similar to pulmonary M. tuberculosis. Certain strains have been shown to cross-react with the probes used to detect M. tuberculosis, making this a diagnostic challenge. We present a 56-year-old gentleman who developed signs and symptoms of lung infection with computed tomography scan of the chest showing right lung apex cavitation. Serial sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli and nucleic acid amplification testing identified M. tuberculosis ribosomal RNA, resulting in treatment initiation. Further testing with high performance liquid chromatography showed a pattern consistent with M. celatum. This case illustrates the potential for M. celatum to mimic M. tuberculosis in both its clinical history and laboratory testing due to the identical oligonucleotide sequence contained in both. An increasing number of case reports suggest that early reliable differentiation could reduce unnecessary treatment and public health intervention associated with misdiagnosed tuberculosis.

  5. Novel multiplex real-time PCR diagnostic assay for identification and differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium canettii, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddington, K.; O'Grady, J.; Dorai-Raj, S.; Maher, M.; Soolingen, D. van; Barry, T.

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in humans is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). Rapid detection of the MTC is necessary for the timely initiation of antibiotic treatment, while differentiation between members of the complex may be important to guide the appropriate antibiotic treat

  6. Two cases of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp canetti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltgen, Jean; Morillon, Marc; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Varnerot, Anne; Briant, Jean-François; Nguyen, Gilbert; Verrot, Denis; Bonnet, Daniel; Vincent, Véronique

    2002-11-01

    We identified an unusual strain of mycobacteria from two patients with pulmonary tuberculosis by its smooth, glossy morphotype and, primarily, its genotypic characteristics. Spoligotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism typing were carried out with the insertion sequence IS6110 patterns. All known cases of tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium canetti have been contracted in the Horn of Africa.

  7. Sub-speciation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from tuberculosis patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Masako; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Aono, Akio; Murase, Yoshiro; Kuse, Naoyuki; Morimoto, Kozo; Okumura, Masao; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Ogata, Hideo; Yoshimori, Kozo; Kudoh, Shoji; Azuma, Arata; Gemma, Akihiko; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major causative agent of tuberculosis in humans. It is well known that Mycobacterium bovis and other species in the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) can cause respiratory diseases as zoonosis. We analyzed the MTC isolates collected from tuberculosis patients from Japan in 2002 using a multiplex PCR system that detected cfp32, RD9 and RD12. A total of 970 MTC isolates that were representative of the tuberculosis cases throughout Japan, were examined using this method. As a result, 966 (99.6%) M. tuberculosis, two Mycobacterium africanum and two Mycobacterium canettii were identified using a multiplex PCR system, while no M. bovis was detected. Two isolates that lacked RD9 were initially considered to be M. canettii, but further analysis of the hsp65 sequence revealed them to be M. tuberculosis. Also two M. africanum were identified as M. tuberculosis using the -215 narG nucleotide polymorphism. Though PCR-linked methods have been used for a rapid differentiation of MTC and NTM, from our cases we suggest careful interpretation of RD based identification.

  8. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis cluster demonstrating the use of genotyping in urban tuberculosis control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. de Vries (Gerard); R.M. van Hest (Reinier); C.C.A. Burdo (Conny); D. van Soolingen (Dick); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates offers better opportunities to study links between tuberculosis (TB) cases and can highlight relevant issues in urban TB control in low-endemic countries. Methods: A medium-sized molecular cluster of TB cases with iden

  9. Evaluation of susceptibility to antimycobacterial drugs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains isolated from cattle in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajewska-Wędzina Monika

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis is a highly infectious disease affecting humans and animals. It is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC – Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae, which are aetiological factors of bovine tuberculosis (bTB. In Poland, the bTB eradication programme exists. Animals diagnosed with tuberculosis are in the majority of cases not treated, but removed from their herd and then sanitary slaughtered.

  10. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show...... findings are consistent with an important role for siderocalin in protection against M.tb infection and suggest that exogenously administered siderocalin may have therapeutic applications in tuberculosis....

  11. Dramatic reduction of culture time of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, a critical technique for routine diagnosis of tuberculosis, takes more than two weeks. Here, step-by-step improvements in the protocol including a new medium, microaerophlic atmosphere or ascorbic-acid supplement and autofluorescence detection dramatically shortened this delay. In the best case, primary culture and rifampicin susceptibility testing were achieved in 72 hours when specimens were inoculated directly on the medium supplemented by antibiotic at the beginning of the culture.

  12. Protective immunity against tuberculosis induced by vaccination with major extracellular proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the world's leading cause of death in humans from a single infectious agent. A safe and effective vaccine against this scourge is urgently needed. This study demonstrates that immunization with the 30-kDa major secretory protein, alone or in combination with other abundant extracellular proteins of M. tuberculosis, induces strong cell-mediated immune responses and substantial protective immunity against aerosol ...

  13. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D. Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh Jr, C. Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J.; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K.; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3–4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3–4 month rifampicin alone. PMID:26405286

  14. Structural annotation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Anand

    Full Text Available Of the ∼4000 ORFs identified through the genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB H37Rv, experimentally determined structures are available for 312. Since knowledge of protein structures is essential to obtain a high-resolution understanding of the underlying biology, we seek to obtain a structural annotation for the genome, using computational methods. Structural models were obtained and validated for ∼2877 ORFs, covering ∼70% of the genome. Functional annotation of each protein was based on fold-based functional assignments and a novel binding site based ligand association. New algorithms for binding site detection and genome scale binding site comparison at the structural level, recently reported from the laboratory, were utilized. Besides these, the annotation covers detection of various sequence and sub-structural motifs and quaternary structure predictions based on the corresponding templates. The study provides an opportunity to obtain a global perspective of the fold distribution in the genome. The annotation indicates that cellular metabolism can be achieved with only 219 folds. New insights about the folds that predominate in the genome, as well as the fold-combinations that make up multi-domain proteins are also obtained. 1728 binding pockets have been associated with ligands through binding site identification and sub-structure similarity analyses. The resource (http://proline.physics.iisc.ernet.in/Tbstructuralannotation, being one of the first to be based on structure-derived functional annotations at a genome scale, is expected to be useful for better understanding of TB and for application in drug discovery. The reported annotation pipeline is fairly generic and can be applied to other genomes as well.

  15. Preventing Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjabi, Chitra D; Perloff, Sarah R; Zuckerman, Jerry M

    2016-12-01

    Patients with tuberculosis (TB) pose a risk to other patients and health care workers, and outbreaks in health care settings occur when appropriate infection control measures are not used. In this article, we discuss strategies to prevent transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within health care settings. All health care facilities should have an operational TB infection control plan that emphasizes the use of a hierarchy of controls (administrative, environmental, and personal respiratory protection). We also discuss resources available to clinicians who work in the prevention and investigation of nosocomial transmission of M tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Deciphering the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from thecomplete genome sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, S.T.; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1998-01-01

    Countless millions of people have died from tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease caused by the tubercle bacillus. The complete genome sequence of the best-characterized strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, has been determined and analysed in order to improve our understanding....... tuberculosis differs radically from other bacteria in that a very large portion of its coding capacity is devoted to the production of enzymes involved in lipogenesis and lipolysis, and to two new families of glycine-rich proteins with a repetitive structure that may represent a source of antigenic variation....

  17. A strip array for spoligotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yiling; Zeng, Xiaohong; Li, Hui; Zheng, Rongrong; Xu, Ye; Li, Qingge

    2016-03-01

    A novel strip array was developed for a nine-spacer spoligotyping scheme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). The new method was evaluated using 211 MTBC isolates and the results were fully concordant with the traditional spoligotyping approach. The strip array proved to be rapid and convenient for spoligotyping of MTBC.

  18. Autophagy modulates the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced cytokine response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinnijenhuis, J.; Oosting, M.; Plantinga, T.S.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Joosten, L.A.B.; Crevel, R. van; Netea, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Both autophagy and pro-inflammatory cytokines are involved in the host defence against mycobacteria, but little is known regarding the effect of autophagy on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-induced cytokine production. In the present study, we assessed the effect of autophagy on production of monoc

  19. Establisment of Rapid Detection for Live/Dead Mycobacterium tuberculosis with PMA-qPCR%PMA-qPCR快速检测结核活菌方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温书香; 袁莉; 王慧勤; 曹旭东; 赵新霞; 李亚; 张亚丽; 陈鹏博; 纪太旺; 陈创夫

    2014-01-01

    To establish a rapid method for differential diagnosis of live or dead Mycobacterium tuberculosis,PMA dye technology combined with quantitative real-time PCR (PMA-qPCR) was utilized based on 16 sRNA genes of M.tuberculosis strain H37Rv. As a DNA-banding dye,PMA could penetrate damaged cells and inhibit DNA amplification prior to DNA extraction.Our results showed that concentration of 3 μg/mL PMA could effectively inhibit the amplification of dead cells without affecting the amplification of living cells when exposed to 650W halogen lamps for more than 15 min.Concentration of 20 μg/mL PMA significantly inhibited PCR amplification of living cells,indicating that higher concentration of PMA were toxic to living cells.As a rapid diagnostic method,PMA-qPCR can be effectively utilized to identify living cells and may be widely used in the detection of other bacteria.%为建立快速鉴别诊断结核活/死菌的方法,本研究应用PMA染料与实时定量PCR技术结合(PMA-qPCR),以结核标准株16 sRNA基因为靶基因,PMA对样品基因组提取物进行处理,PMA能够与死细胞DNA分子共价交联并抑制DNA分子扩增。结果显示:PMA浓度在3μg/mL,曝光时间大于15 min时,PMA既不影响活菌的的扩增,又能有效抑制死菌的扩增;当PMA浓度大于20μg/mL时,PMA影响活菌DNA的扩增;PMA-qPCR技术能够定量不同比例的结核活/死菌悬液中的活菌。结论:PMA-qPCR技术能够快速准确检测出结核杆菌中的活细胞。

  20. The draft genome of Mycobacterium aurum, a potential model organism for investigating drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody

    2015-06-04

    Mycobacterium aurum (M. aurum) is an environmental mycobacteria that has previously been used in studies of anti-mycobacterial drugs due to its fast growth rate and low pathogenicity. The M. aurum genome has been sequenced and assembled into 46 contigs, with a total length of 6.02 Mb containing 5684 annotated protein-coding genes. A phylogenetic analysis using whole genome alignments positioned M. aurum close to Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, within a clade related to fast-growing mycobacteria. Large-scale genomic rearrangements were identified by comparing the M. aurum genome to those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. M. aurum orthologous genes implicated in resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in M. tuberculosis were observed. The sequence identity at the DNA level varied from 68.6% for pncA (pyrazinamide drug-related) to 96.2% for rrs (streptomycin, capreomycin). We observed two homologous genes encoding the catalase-peroxidase enzyme (katG) that is associated with resistance to isoniazid. Similarly, two embB homologues were identified in the M. aurum genome. In addition to describing for the first time the genome of M. aurum, this work provides a resource to aid the use of M. aurum in studies to develop improved drugs for the pathogenic mycobacteria M. tuberculosis and M. leprae.

  1. MspA-Mycobacterium tuberculosis-transformant with reduced virulence: the "unbirthday paradigm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Ghigo, Eric; Mège, Jean-Louis; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Expressing mspA porin gene from Mycobacterium smegmatis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis attenuated this pathogen. Intracellular growth of the transformants into free-living amoeba and murine and human macrophages decreased. Furthermore, transformants decreased the microbicidal program of human monocyte-derived macrophages. BALB/c mice inoculated with transformants exhibited higher weights, lower histological lesions and lower M. tuberculosis inoculum in the liver, spleen and lungs than control mice challenged with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Preliminary evaluation indicated that mice inoculated with this transformant showed higher weights and lower numbers of lung nodules and tissular mycobacteria than control mice when challenged with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Similar to the paradoxical "unbirthday" gift coined by Lewis Carroll in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, adding mspA gene reduced the virulence of M. tuberculosis and yielded a protective effect. Lost of non-virulence genes is a mechanism for virulence in mycobacteria. Engineering non-virulence genes in M. tuberculosis may yield strains with decreased virulence and increased immunogenicity.

  2. [Signal transduction and drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis--A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Zhe

    2015-08-04

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection kills two million people every year, and the chemotherapy has led to significant amount of drug resistance. Signal transduction systems are used by bacteria to survive or adapt to their living environment, but the relationship to drug resistance is not well understood. In this article, we introduced the two-component signal transduction systems of M. tuberculosis and analyzed their relationship with drug resistance. We identified five two-component system pairs involved in the formation of drug resistance. Therefore, these two-component systems are good targeting sites for small biochemical drugs to target so as to reverse the drug resistance and virulence.

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Medicinal Aqueous Plant Extracts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Mohammed Buzayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a serious health problem in many regions of the world, and the development of resistance to antibiotics by this microbe created the need for new drugs to replace those which have lost effectiveness. This study assesses the medicinal anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis properties of natural products obtained from plants collected from Eastern Libya. In this study aqueous extracts of nine different plants were assayed for their Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibitory activity using the BACTEC MGIT960 susceptibility test method. The aqueous extracts of Ceratonia siliqua L, Helichrysum stoechas (L. Moench and Thymus algeriensis did not show any activity against M. tuberculosis in different concentrations. The aqueous extract of Marrubium vulgare L. from Syria showed high activity against M. tuberculosis. Marrubium alysson L., Marrubium vulgare L., Pistacia lentiscus L, Quercus coccifera L, Thymus capitatus (L. Hoffm. & Link, showed varying degrees of activity against M. tuberculosis. The results of this study show that aqueous extracts from six different medicinal plants have different effects against M. tuberculosis in vitro.

  4. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Tochigi prefecture, a local region of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukoshi, Fuminori; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Iwai, Hiroki; Suzuki, Takako; Kiritani, Reiko; Kirikae, Teruo; Funatogawa, Keiji

    2017-05-25

    Foreign-born patients with tuberculosis (TB) may introduce globally disseminated isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into large cities in Japan. The risk of dissemination of these isolates into local regions, however, has not been determined. This study analyzed the molecular epidemiology of M. tuberculosis isolates obtained from TB patients living in a local region of Japan. Whole genome sequences of 169 M. tuberculosis isolates, obtained from 148 Japanese-born and 21 foreign-born patients living in Tochigi, Japan, were analyzed using the Comprehensive analysis server for the Mycobacterium t u b erculosis complex (CASTB). The 169 isolates were clustered into four clades; Lineage 2 (111 isolates 65.7%), Lineage 4 (43 isolates, 25.4%), Lineage 1 (13 isolates, 7.7%), and Lineage 3 (2 isolates, 1.2%). Of the 111 isolates belonging to Lineage 2, 79 (71.2%) were of the atypical Beijing sub-genotype. Of the 13 Lineage 1 isolates, nine (69.2%) were from foreign-born patients. The isolates belonging to Lineage 4 were further clustered into three clades, two containing isolates shared by both Japanese- and foreign-born patients. The two isolates belonging to Lineage 3 were obtained from foreign-born patients. The genotypic diversity of M. tuberculosis in a local region of Japan is increased primarily by the presence of isolates obtained from foreign-born patients.

  5. High Throughput Phenotypic Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis Strains' Metabolism Using Biolog Phenotype Microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Khatri, Bhagwati; Fielder, Mark; Jones, Gareth; Newell, William; Abu-Oun, Manal; Wheeler, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major human and animal disease of major importance worldwide. Genetically, the closely related strains within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex which cause disease are well-characterized but there is an urgent need better to understand their phenotypes. To search rapidly for metabolic differences, a working method using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray analysis was developed. Of 380 substrates surveyed, 71 permitted tetrazolium dye reduction, the readout over 7 days in the m...

  6. Insights into redox sensing metalloproteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Nicholas; Johnson, Parker M; Goulding, Celia W

    2014-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the pathogen that causes tuberculosis, has evolved sophisticated mechanisms for evading assault by the human host. This review focuses on M. tuberculosis regulatory metalloproteins that are sensitive to exogenous stresses attributed to changes in the levels of gaseous molecules (i.e., molecular oxygen, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide) to elicit an intracellular response. In particular, we highlight recent developments on the subfamily of Whi proteins, redox sensing WhiB-like proteins that contain iron-sulfur clusters, sigma factors and their cognate anti-sigma factors of which some are zinc-regulated, and the dormancy survival regulon DosS/DosT-DosR heme sensory system. Mounting experimental evidence suggests that these systems contribute to a highly complex and interrelated regulatory network that controls M. tuberculosis biology. This review concludes with a discussion of strategies that M. tuberculosis has developed to maintain redox homeostasis, including mechanisms to regulate endogenous nitric oxide and carbon monoxide levels.

  7. Comparative genomics of archived pyrazinamide resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates from Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine tuberculosis is a ‘neglected zoonosis’ and its contribution to the proportion of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infections in humans is unknown. A retrospective study on archived Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) isolates from a reference laboratory in Uganda was undertaken to iden...

  8. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show that sideroc......Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show...... findings are consistent with an important role for siderocalin in protection against M.tb infection and suggest that exogenously administered siderocalin may have therapeutic applications in tuberculosis....

  9. Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Aguado, J M; Noriega, A R

    1996-01-01

    A method based on DNA amplification and hybridization has been used for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in blood samples from 38 hospitalized patients (15 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 23 HIV negative) in whom localized or disseminated forms of tuberculosis were suspected. In 32 of these patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was eventually confirmed by conventional bacteriological or histological procedures. M. tuberculosis DNA was detected with the PCR technique in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 of 11 (82%) HIV-infected patients and in 7 of 21 (33%) HIV-negative patients (P < 0.01), while M. tuberculosis blood cultures were positive in 1 of 8 (12.5%) and 1 of 18 (5.5%) patients, respectively. PCR was positive in all cases with disseminated disease in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and also in the HIV-positive patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Seven samples from patients with documented illness other than tuberculosis and 12 specimens from healthy volunteers, including seven volunteers with a recent positive purified protein derivative test, were used as controls and had a negative PCR. These results suggest that detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may be a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of disseminated and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis, especially in an HIV-positive population. PMID:8904404

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Germano Manuel; Folgosa, Elena; Nquobile, Ndlovu; Gitta, Sheba; Cadir, Nureisha

    2014-01-01

    To determine the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mozambique. We analyzed secondary data from the National Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Maputo, Mozambique, and from the Beira Regional Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Beira, Mozambique. The data were based on culture-positive samples submitted to first-line drug susceptibility testing (DST) between January and December of 2011. We attempted to determine whether the frequency of DST positivity was associated with patient type or provenance. During the study period, 641 strains were isolated in culture and submitted to DST. We found that 374 (58.3%) were resistant to at least one antituberculosis drug and 280 (43.7%) were resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Of the 280 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases, 184 (65.7%) were in previously treated patients, most of whom were from southern Mozambique. Two (0.71%) of the cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were confirmed to be cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was most common in males, particularly those in the 21-40 year age bracket. M. tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs is high in Mozambique, especially in previously treated patients. The frequency of M. tuberculosis strains that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin in combination was found to be high, particularly in samples from previously treated patients.

  11. Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Aguado, J M; Noriega, A R

    1996-03-01

    A method based on DNA amplification and hybridization has been used for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in blood samples from 38 hospitalized patients (15 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 23 HIV negative) in whom localized or disseminated forms of tuberculosis were suspected. In 32 of these patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was eventually confirmed by conventional bacteriological or histological procedures. M. tuberculosis DNA was detected with the PCR technique in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 of 11 (82%) HIV-infected patients and in 7 of 21 (33%) HIV-negative patients (P < 0.01), while M. tuberculosis blood cultures were positive in 1 of 8 (12.5%) and 1 of 18 (5.5%) patients, respectively. PCR was positive in all cases with disseminated disease in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and also in the HIV-positive patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Seven samples from patients with documented illness other than tuberculosis and 12 specimens from healthy volunteers, including seven volunteers with a recent positive purified protein derivative test, were used as controls and had a negative PCR. These results suggest that detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may be a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of disseminated and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis, especially in an HIV-positive population.

  12. Evaluation of DNA microarray for detection of rifampin and isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王峰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of DNA microarray for rapid detection resistance to rifampin and isoniazid in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates and identify suitable target sites for molecular genetic test. Methods Twenty-four clinical Mycobacterium

  13. Modeling Synergistic Drug Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Growth in Murine Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    synergistic drug inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth in murine macrophagesw Xin Fang, Anders Wallqvist and Jaques Reifman* Received 15th...inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in murine macrophage cells. We used it to simulate ex vivo bacterial growth inhibition due to 3-nitropropionate (3...is felt worldwide, with 9.4 million new cases and 1.8 million deaths in 2008.1,2 The causative agent of the disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  14. Determination of Urinary Neopterin/Creatinine Ratio to Distinguish Active Tuberculosis from Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eisenhut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biomarkers to distinguish latent from active Mycobacterium (M. tuberculosis infection in clinical practice are lacking. The urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio can quantify the systemic interferon-gamma effect in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. Methods. In a prospective observational study, urinary neopterin levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with active tuberculosis, in people with latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in healthy controls and the urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio was calculated. Results. We included a total of 44 patients with M. tuberculosis infection and nine controls. 12 patients had active tuberculosis (8 of them culture-confirmed. The median age was 15 years (range 4.5 to 49. Median urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio in patients with active tuberculosis was 374.1 micromol/mol (129.0 to 1072.3, in patients with latent M. tuberculosis infection it was 142.1 (28.0 to 384.1, and in controls it was 146.0 (40.3 to 200.0, with significantly higher levels in patients with active tuberculosis (p<0.01. The receiver operating characteristics curve had an area under the curve of 0.84 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.97 (p<0.01. Conclusions. Urinary neopterin/creatinine ratios are significantly higher in patients with active tuberculosis compared to patients with latent infection and may be a significant predictor of active tuberculosis in patients with M. tuberculosis infection.

  15. Phospholipase C in Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Faramarzi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Phospholipase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays an important role in pathogenesis through breaking up phospholipids and production of diacylglycerol. In this study, we examined the Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from Iranian patients for the genes encoding this enzyme."nMaterials and Methods: DNA extraction was performed using CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide from positive culture specimens in tuberculosis patients. PCR was then used to amplify the plcA, plcB, plcC genes of Beijing strain, and non-Beijing strains were identified by spoligotyping."nResults: Of 200 specimens, 19 (9.5% were Beijing strain and 181 (90.5% were non-Beijing strains. The results of PCR for Beijing strains were as follows: 16 strains (84.2% were positive for plcA, 17 (89.4% were positive for plcB and 17 (89.4% were positive for plcC genes. The standard strain (H37RV was used as control."nConclusion: The majority of Beijing strains have phospholipase C genes which can contribute to their pathogenesis but we need complementary studies to confirm the role of phospholipase C in pathogenecity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  16. Pyrosequencing assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boukadida Jalel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms to the species level is important for diagnostic, therapeutic and epidemiologic perspectives. Indeed, isolates are routinely identified as belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex without further discrimination in agreement with the high genomic similarity of the M. tuberculosis complex members and the resulting complex available identification tools. Findings We herein develop a pyrosequencing assay analyzing polymorphisms within glpK, pykA and gyrB genes to identify members of the M. tuberculosis complex at the species level. The assay was evaluated with 22 M. tuberculosis, 21 M. bovis, 3 M. caprae, 3 M. microti, 2 M. bovis BCG, 2 M. pinnipedii, 1 M. canettii and 1 M. africanum type I isolates. The resulted pyrograms were consistent with conventional DNA sequencing data and successfully identified all isolates. Additionally, 127 clinical M. tuberculosis complex isolates were analyzed and were unambiguously identified as M. tuberculosis. Conclusion We proposed a pyrosequencing-based scheme for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis complex isolates at the species level. The assay is robust, specific, rapid and can be easily introduced in the routine activity.

  17. Proteogenomic Investigation of Strain Variation in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Heunis, Tiaan

    2017-08-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis consists of a large number of different strains that display unique virulence characteristics. Whole-genome sequencing has revealed substantial genetic diversity among clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and elucidating the phenotypic variation encoded by this genetic diversity will be of utmost importance to fully understand M. tuberculosis biology and pathogenicity. In this study we integrated whole-genome sequencing and mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) to reveal strain-specific characteristics in the proteomes of two clinical M. tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean isolates. Using this approach we identified 59 peptides containing single amino acid variants, which covered ~9% of all total coding nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants detected by whole-genome sequencing. Furthermore, we identified 29 distinct peptides that mapped to a hypothetical protein not present in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference proteome. Here we provide evidence for the expression of this protein in the clinical M. tuberculosis SAWC3651 isolate. The strain-specific databases enabled confirmation of genomic differences (i.e. large genomic regions of difference and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants) in these two clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and allowed strain differentiation at the proteome level. Our results contribute to the growing field of clinical microbial proteogenomics and can improve our understanding of phenotypic variation in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  18. Molecular characteristics of "Mycobacterium canettii" the smooth Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabre, M.; Hauck, Y.; Soler, C.; Koeck, J.L.; Ingen, J. van; Soolingen, D. van; Vergnaud, G.; Pourcel, C.

    2010-01-01

    Since the first discovery of the smooth tubercle (SmTB) bacilli "Mycobacterium canettii" less than 60 isolates have been reported, all but one originating from a limited geographical location, the Horn of Africa. In spite of its rarity, the SmTB lineage deserves special attention. Previous investiga

  19. Tracing Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission by whole genome sequencing in a high incidence setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorn-Mortensen, K; Soborg, B; Koch, A;

    2016-01-01

    In East Greenland, a dramatic increase of tuberculosis (TB) incidence has been observed in recent years. Classical genotyping suggests a genetically similar Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain population as cause, however, precise transmission patterns are unclear. We performed whole genome...

  20. Drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype and association with MDR TB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenwinkel, J.E. de; Kate, M.T. Ten; Knegt, G.J. de; Kremer, K.; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Boeree, M.J.; Verbrugh, H.A.; Soolingen, D. van; Bakker-Woudenberg, I.A.

    2012-01-01

    To determine differences in the ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains to withstand antituberculosis drug treatment, we compared the activity of antituberculosis drugs against susceptible Beijing and East-African/Indian genotype M. tuberculosis strains. Beijing genotype strains showed high ra

  1. Drug susceptibility of mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype and association with MDR TB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.M. de Steenwinkel (Jurriaan); M.T. ten Kate (Marian); G.J. de Knegt (Gerjo); K. Kremer (Kristin); E.J. Aarnoutse (E. J.); M. Boeree (Martin); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); D. van Soolingen (Dick); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTo determine differences in the ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains to withstand antituberculosis drug treatment, we compared the activity of antituberculosis drugs against susceptible Beijing and East-African/Indian genotype M. tuberculosis strains. Beijing genotype strains sh

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Strain G-12-005

    OpenAIRE

    Berland, Jean-Luc; Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; Bablishvili, Nino; Gauthier, Marie; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Infection caused by drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a growing concern, especially in eastern Europe. We report an annotated draft genome sequence of M. tuberculosis strain G-12-005 obtained from a patient in Georgia.

  3. Molecular profiling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies tuberculosinyl nucleoside products of the virulence-associated enzyme Rv3378c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Layre, Emilie; Lee, Ho Jun; Young, David C.; Martinot, Amanda Jezek; Buter, Jeffrey; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Annand, John W.; Fortune, Sarah M.; Snider, Barry B.; Matsunaga, Isamu; Rubin, Eric J.; Alber, Tom; Moody, D. Branch

    2014-01-01

    To identify lipids with roles in tuberculosis disease, we systematically compared the lipid content of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis with the attenuated vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin. Comparative lipidomics analysis identified more than 1,000 molecular differences

  4. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Lupus Vulgaris Caused by Drug Resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Muthu S; Narang, Tarun; Jitendriya, Madhukara; Tirumale, Rajalakshmi; Manjunath, Suraj; Savio, Jayanthi

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health problem in the world, with many factors contributing to this burden, including poor living conditions, overcrowding, poverty, malnutrition, illiteracy, and rapid spread of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Cutaneous tuberculosis is a less common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and in this paucibacillary form the diagnosis depends on histopathology, tuberculin positivity, and response to treatment. The diagnosis is even more difficult in cases with drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to lack of awareness and lack of facilities to diagnose drug resistant tuberculosis. In this article, we describe an unusual case of multidrug resistant lupus vulgaris (LV), in a 34-year-old male who responded to anti-tubercular treatment (ATT) initially, but developed recurrent disease which failed to respond to standard four-drug ATT; subsequently, tissue culture showed growth of multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis. Subsequently, he also developed cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. This article aims to exemplify a grave complication that can occur in long-standing case of LV, the limitations faced by clinicians in developing countries where tuberculosis is endemic, and classical methods of proving drug resistance are generally unavailable or fail.

  5. Bim is a crucial regulator of apoptosis induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló, N; Uranga, S; Marinova, D; Martín, C; Pardo, J

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, induces apoptosis in infected macrophages in vitro and in vivo. However, the molecular mechanism controlling this process is not known. In order to study the involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in M. tuberculosis-induced apoptosis, we analysed cell death in M. tuberculosis-infected embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from different knockout mice for genes involved in this route. We found that apoptosis induced by M. tuberculosis is abrogated in the absence of Bak and Bax, caspase 9 or the executioner caspases 3 and 7. Notably, we show that MEF deficient in the BH3-only BCL-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) protein were also resistant to this process. The relevance of these results has been confirmed in the mouse macrophage cell line J774, where cell transfection with siRNA targeting Bim impaired apoptosis induced by virulent mycobacteria. Notably, only infection with a virulent strain, but not with attenuated ESX-1-defective strains, such as Bacillus Calmette-Guerin and live-attenuated M. tuberculosis vaccine strain MTBVAC, induced Bim upregulation and apoptosis, probably implicating virulence factor early secreted antigenic target 6-kDa protein in this process. Our results suggest that Bim upregulation and apoptosis is mediated by the p38MAPK-dependent pathway. Our findings show that Bim is a master regulator of apoptosis induced by M. tuberculosis. PMID:25032866

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex mycobacteria as amoeba-resistant organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Mba Medie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most environmental non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been demonstrated to invade amoebal trophozoites and cysts, but such relationships are largely unknown for members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. An environmental source has been proposed for the animal Mycobacterium bovis and the human Mycobacterium canettii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using optic and electron microscopy and co-culture methods, we observed that 89±0.6% of M. canettii, 12.4±0.3% of M. tuberculosis, 11.7±2% of M. bovis and 11.2±0.5% of Mycobacterium avium control organisms were phagocytized by Acanthamoeba polyphaga, a ratio significantly higher for M. canettii (P = 0.03, correlating with the significantly larger size of M. canetti organisms (P = 0.035. The percentage of intraamoebal mycobacteria surviving into cytoplasmic vacuoles was 32±2% for M. canettii, 26±1% for M. tuberculosis, 28±2% for M. bovis and 36±2% for M. avium (P = 0.57. M. tuberculosis, M. bovis and M. avium mycobacteria were further entrapped within the double wall of <1% amoebal cysts, but no M. canettii organisms were observed in amoebal cysts. The number of intracystic mycobacteria was significantly (P = 10(-6 higher for M. avium than for the M. tuberculosis complex, and sub-culturing intracystic mycobacteria yielded significantly more (P = 0.02 M. avium organisms (34×10(4 CFU/mL than M. tuberculosis (42×10(1 CFU/mL and M. bovis (35×10(1 CFU/mL in the presence of a washing fluid free of mycobacteria. Mycobacteria survived in the cysts for up to 18 days and cysts protected M. tuberculosis organisms against mycobactericidal 5 mg/mL streptomycin and 2.5% glutaraldehyde. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that M. tuberculosis complex organisms are amoeba-resistant organisms, as previously demonstrated for non-tuberculous, environmental mycobacteria. Intercystic survival of tuberculous mycobacteria, except for M. canettii, protect them

  7. Zirconia based nucleic acid sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Maumita; Sumana, Gajjala; Nagarajan, R.; Malhotra, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Nanostructured zirconium oxide (ZrO2) film (particle size˜35 nm), electrochemically deposited onto gold(Au) surface, has been used to immobilize 21-mer oligonucleotide probe (ssDNA) specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis by utilizing affinity between oxygen atom of phosphoric group and zirconium to fabricate DNA biosensor. This DNA-ZrO2/Au bioelectrode, characterized using x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and scanning electron microscopy techniques, can be used for early and rapid diagnosis of M. tuberculosis with detection limit of 0.065 ng/μL within 60s.

  8. The complex evolution of antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Fonseca

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB represent a major threat to the control of the disease worldwide. The mechanisms and pathways that result in the emergence and subsequent fixation of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are not fully understood and recent studies suggest that they are much more complex than initially thought. In this review, we highlight the exciting new areas of research within TB resistance that are beginning to fill these gaps in our understanding, whilst also raising new questions and providing future directions.

  9. Structures of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Davide M; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Rizzi, Menico

    2015-02-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway of all aerobic organisms and is responsible for the synthesis of many important precursors and molecules. TCA cycle plays a key role in the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is involved in the adaptation process of the bacteria to the host immune response. We present here the first crystal structures of M. tuberculosis malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase, two consecutive enzymes of the TCA, at 2.6 Å and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively. General analogies and local differences with the previously reported homologous protein structures are described. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R.G.; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R.; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  11. Carbapenems and Rifampin Exhibit Synergy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Amit; Makkar, Nayani; Pandey, Pooja; Parrish, Nicole; Singh, Urvashi; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2015-10-01

    An effective regimen for treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is comprised of multiple drugs that inhibit a range of essential cellular activities in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The effectiveness of a regimen is further enhanced if constituent drugs act with synergy. Here, we report that faropenem (a penem) or biapenem, doripenem, or meropenem (carbapenems), which belong to the β-lactam class of antibiotics, and rifampin, one of the drugs that forms the backbone of TB treatment, act with synergy when combined. One of the reasons (carba)penems are seldom used for treatment of TB is the high dosage levels required, often at the therapeutic limits. The synergistic combination of rifampin and these (carba)penems indicates that (carba)penems can be administered at dosages that are therapeutically relevant. The combination of faropenem and rifampin also limits the frequency of resistant mutants, as we were unable to obtain spontaneous mutants in the presence of these two drugs. The combinations of rifampin and (carba)penems were effective not only against drug-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis but also against drug-resistant clinical isolates that are otherwise resistant to rifampin. A combination of doripenem or biapenem and rifampin also exhibited synergistic activity against Mycobacterium abscessus. Although the MICs of these three drugs alone against M. abscessus are too high to be of clinical relevance, their concentrations in combinations are therapeutically relevant; therefore, they warrant further evaluation for clinical utility to treat Mycobacterium abscessus infection, especially in cystic fibrosis patients.

  12. Bloodstream Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among HIV patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-23

    This podcast looks at bloodstream infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogens among outpatients infected with HIV in Southeast Asia. CDC health scientist Kimberly McCarthy discusses the study and why bloodstream infections occur in HIV-infected populations.  Created: 9/23/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/23/2010.

  13. Immune subdominant antigens as vaccine candidates against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mark T; Ireton, Gregory C; Beebe, Elyse A; Huang, Po-Wei D; Reese, Valerie A; Argilla, David; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2014-09-15

    Unlike most pathogens, many of the immunodominant epitopes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis are under purifying selection. This startling finding suggests that M. tuberculosis may gain an evolutionary advantage by focusing the human immune response against selected proteins. Although the implications of this to vaccine development are incompletely understood, it has been suggested that inducing strong Th1 responses against Ags that are only weakly recognized during natural infection may circumvent this evasion strategy and increase vaccine efficacy. To test the hypothesis that subdominant and/or weak M. tuberculosis Ags are viable vaccine candidates and to avoid complications because of differential immunodominance hierarchies in humans and experimental animals, we defined the immunodominance hierarchy of 84 recombinant M. tuberculosis proteins in experimentally infected mice. We then combined a subset of these dominant or subdominant Ags with a Th1 augmenting adjuvant, glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant in stable emulsion, to assess their immunogenicity in M. tuberculosis-naive animals and protective efficacy as measured by a reduction in lung M. tuberculosis burden of infected animals after prophylactic vaccination. We observed little correlation between immunodominance during primary M. tuberculosis infection and vaccine efficacy, confirming the hypothesis that subdominant and weakly antigenic M. tuberculosis proteins are viable vaccine candidates. Finally, we developed two fusion proteins based on strongly protective subdominant fusion proteins. When paired with the glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant in stable emulsion, these fusion proteins elicited robust Th1 responses and limited pulmonary M. tuberculosis for at least 6 wk postinfection with a single immunization. These findings expand the potential pool of M. tuberculosis proteins that can be considered as vaccine Ag candidates. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. MTBVAC vaccine is safe, immunogenic and confers protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in newborn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilo, Nacho; Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Monzon, Marta; Badiola, Juan; Martin, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel more efficient preventive vaccines against tuberculosis (TB) is crucial to achieve TB eradication by 2050, one of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) for the current century. MTBVAC is the first and only live attenuated vaccine based on a human isolate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis developed as BCG-replacement strategy in newborns that has entered first-in-human adult clinical trials. In this work, we characterize the safety, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of MTBVAC in a model of newborn C57/BL6 mice. Our data clearly indicate that MTBVAC is safe for newborn mice, and does not affect animal growth or organ development. In addition, MTBVAC-vaccinated mice at birth showed enhanced immunogenicity and better protection against M. tuberculosis challenge in comparison with BCG.

  15. EmbA is an essential arabinosyltransferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Anita G; Goude, Renan; Shi, Libin; Zhang, Jian; Chatterjee, Delphi; Parish, Tanya

    2008-01-01

    The Emb proteins (EmbA, EmbB, EmbC) are mycobacterial arabinosyltransferases involved in the biogenesis of the mycobacterial cell wall. EmbA and EmbB are predicted to work in unison as a heterodimer. EmbA and EmbB are involved in the formation of the crucial terminal hexaarabinoside motif [Arabeta(1-->2)Araalpha(1-->5)] [Arabeta(1-->2)Araalpha(1-->3)]Araalpha(1-->5)Araalpha1-->(Ara(6)) in the cell wall polysaccharide arabinogalactan. Studies conducted in Mycobacterium smegmatis revealed that mutants with disruptions in embA or embB are viable, although the growth rate was affected. In contrast, we demonstrate here that embA is an essential gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, since a deletion of the chromosomal gene could only be achieved when a second functional copy was provided on an integrated vector. Complementation of an embA mutant of M. smegmatis by M. tuberculosis embA confirmed that it encodes a functional arabinosyltransferase. We identified a promoter for M. tuberculosis embA located immediately upstream of the gene, indicating that it is expressed independently from the upstream gene, embC. Promoter activity from P(embA)((Mtb)) was sevenfold lower when assayed in M. smegmatis compared to M. tuberculosis, indicating that the latter is not a good host for genetic analysis of M. tuberculosis embA expression. P(embA)((Mtb)) activity remained constant throughout growth phases and after stress treatment, although it was reduced during hypoxia-induced non-replicating persistence. Ethambutol exposure had no effect on P(embA)((Mtb)) activity. These data demonstrate that M. tuberculosis embA encodes a functional arabinosyltransferase which is constitutively expressed and plays a critical role in M. tuberculosis.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pili (MTP), a putative biomarker for a tuberculosis diagnostic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Natasha; Ramsugit, Saiyur; Pillay, Manormoney

    2014-05-01

    Novel biomarkers are urgently needed for point of care TB diagnostics. In this study, we investigated the potential of the pilin subunit protein encoded by the mtp gene as a diagnostic biomarker. BLAST analysis of the mtp gene on published genome databases, and amplicon sequencing were performed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC) strains and other organisms. The protein secondary structure of the amino acid sequences of non-tuberculous Mycobacteria that partially aligned with the mtp sequence was analysed with PredictProtein software. The mtp gene and corresponding amino acid sequence of MTBC were 100% homologous with H37Rv, in contrast to the partial alignment of the non-tuberculous Mycobacteria. The mtp gene was present in all 91 clinical isolates of MTBC. Except for 2 strains with point mutations, the sequence was 100% conserved among the clinical strains. The mtp gene could not be amplified in all non-tuberculous Mycobacteria and respiratory organisms. The predicted MTP protein structure of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium abscessus differed significantly from that of the M. tuberculosis, which was similar to Mycobacterium marinum. The absence of the mtp gene in non-tuberculous Mycobacteria and other respiratory bacteria suggests that its encoded product, the pilin subunit protein of M. tuberculosis may be a suitable marker for a point of care TB test.

  17. Tuberculosis relapse in Vietnam is significantly associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyen, M.N.; Buu, T.N.; Tiemersma, E.; Lan, N.T.; Dung, N.H.; Kremer, K.; Soolingen, D.V.; Cobelens, F.G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Vietnam, the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype is associated with multi-drug resistance and is emerging. A possible explanation for this genotype's success is an increased rate of relapse. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, isolates from patients with smear-positive tub

  18. The Potential Spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into the Environment in the Creation of Spondylitis Tuberculosis Rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Jabir Rahyussalim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct Mycobacterium tuberculosis inoculation on rabbit vertebral body was used in rabbit spinal infection study. The potential spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into the environment will be observed in order to create the conditions fulfilling biosafety aspects. Two groups of six New Zealand rabbits were treatment group (n=4 and control group (n=2. The treatment group had injection of 0.1 mL (107 cfu/mL suspension of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into the vertebral body T12. They were incubated for 2 to 14 weeks. One rabbit per period of 2, 4, 6, and 14 weeks was euthanized to collect feces, urine, saliva, and tissue lesions. The control group had only feces, urine, and saliva to detect bacteria using AFB staining, culture, and PCR. Both two groups were kept in individual cages. They were put together in a large cage for 3 hours every day to interact with each other. AFB staining, culture, and radiological examination showed negative result, but in one rabbit, histopathological examination showed positive result and PCR examination in another rabbit of the treatment group. Spreading score was 1.05% and infected score was 0 (null. The procedure did not reveal the potential spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into the environment.

  19. The relative frequency of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium infections in HIV positive patients, Ahvaz, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khosravi AD; Alavi SM; Hashemzade M; Abasi E; Seghatoleslami S

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To estimate the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) and Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infections in HIV-positive patients suspected to have pulmonary and extrapulmonary mycobacterial co-infection using PCR technique. Methods:Totally 50 samples comprising sputum, pleural fluid and CSF taken from HIV positive patients suspected to have mycobacterial infection, were processed. The demographic information and results of acid fast staining and culture were recorded for each patient. The PCR for detecting of M. tuberculosis comprised of specific primers targeting IS6110 gene sequence. For detecting of M. avium, PCR with primers that amplifies the mig gene were used. Results:From 50 samples processed, 45 were sputum (90%), 3 pleural fluid (6%) and 2 CSF (4%). In total, 8 (16%) were culture positive, 7 had positive acid fast staining (14%) and 13 samples (26%) were positive using PCR technique. All the positive samples were sputum and belonged to patients with pulmonary infection. Of these, 9 were positive for M. tuberculosis (69.2%) and 4 were identified as M. avium (30.8%), which 2 out of 13 positive samples showed mixed infections by both mycobacteria. Conclusions:The PCR shows the highest detection rate (26%) of mycobacteria compared with culture and acid fast staining. The majority of infections were with M. tuberculosis (18%) and this shows the importance of this mycobacterial co-infection in HIV positive patients in the region of study.

  20. 5-Arylaminouracil Derivatives: New Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyugina, Elena; Novikov, Mikhail; Babkov, Denis; Ozerov, Alexander; Chernousova, Larisa; Andreevskaya, Sofia; Smirnova, Tatiana; Karpenko, Inna; Chizhov, Alexander; Murthu, Pravin; Lutz, Stefan; Kochetkov, Sergei; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L; Khandazhinskaya, Anastasia L

    2015-12-01

    Three series of 5-arylaminouracil derivatives, including 5-(phenylamino)uracils, 1-(4'-hydroxy-2'-cyclopenten-1'-yl)-5-(phenylamino)uracils, and 1,3-di-(4'-hydroxy-2'-cyclopenten-1'-yl)-5-(phenylamino)uracils, were synthesized and screened for potential antimicrobial activity. Most of compounds had a negative effect on the growth of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain, with 100% inhibition observed at concentrations between 5 and 40 μg/mL. Of those, 1-(4'-hydroxy-2'-cyclopenten-1'-yl)-3-(4‴-hydroxy-2‴-cyclopenten-1‴-yl)-5-(4″-butyloxyphenylamino)uracil proved to be the most active among tested compounds against the M. tuberculosis multidrug-resistant strain MS-115 (MIC90 5 μg/mL). In addition, the thymidylate kinase of M. tuberculosis was evaluated as a possible enzymatic target.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a HIV-positive patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Theresa Montales

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection remains a global public health challenge. We report a 40 year old African American male who is a known HIV-positive patient, non-compliant with his antiretrovirals and developed pulmonary tuberculosis. His chief complaints were chronic cough, fever, night sweats and undocumented weight loss. He had a prior positive T-SPOT-TB test; however, chest radiograph and sputum smear examination revealed normal results. PCR-based GeneXPERT MTB/RIF assay was ordered and confirmed MTB infection. The sputum cultures grew MTB and sensitivities showed susceptibility to all primary anti-tuberculosis medications. A delay in diagnosis and initiation of MTB therapy, in the setting of HIV or AIDS, may result in rapid disease progression and worse clinical outcome.

  2. Bisphosphonic acids as effective inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosikowska, Paulina; Bochno, Marta; Macegoniuk, Katarzyna; Forlani, Giuseppe; Kafarski, Paweł; Berlicki, Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS) is one of the most promising strategies for the discovery of novel drugs against tuberculosis. Forty-three bisphosphonic and bis-H-phosphinic acids of various scaffolds, bearing aromatic substituents, were screened against recombinant GS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Most of the studied compounds exhibited activities in micromolar range, with N-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-2-aminoethylidenebisphoshonic acid, N-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-2-aminoethylidene-bisphoshonic acid and N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-hydroxy-1,1-ethanebisphosphonic acid showing the highest potency with kinetic parameters similar to the reference compound - L-methionine-S-sulfoximine. Moreover, these inhibitors were found to be much more effective against pathogen enzyme than against the human ortholog. Thus, with the bone-targeting properties of the bisphosphonate compounds in mind, this activity/selectivity profile makes these compounds attractive agents for the treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  3. Development of a new DNA extraction protocol for PFGE typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghodousi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A modified pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE protocol was developed and applied to clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex to reduce the cost of using lyticase. This protocol reduces the expense of PFGE typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex as it removes the use of lyticase during the spheroplast formation from these bacteria.

  4. Assessment of the probability of introducing Mycobacterium tuberculosis into Danish cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foddai, Alessandro; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Krogh, Kaspar; Alban, Lis

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis is a zoonosis caused by Mycobacterium spp. International trade in cattle is regulated with respect to Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) but not Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), despite that cattle can become infected with both species. In this study we estimated the annual probability (PIntro) of introducing M. tuberculosis into the Danish cattle population, by the import of cattle and/or by immigrants working in Danish cattle herds. Data from 2013 with date, number, and origin of imported live cattle were obtained from the Danish cattle database. Information on immigrants working in Danish cattle herds was obtained through a questionnaire sent to Danish cattle farmers. The gained inputs were fed into three stochastic scenario trees to assess the PIntro for the current and alternative test-and-manage strategies, such as testing of imported animals and/or testing immigrant workers with the tuberculin skin test. We considered the population of Danish farmers and practitioners free of tuberculosis, because in Denmark, the incidence of the disease in humans is low and primarily related to immigrants and socially disadvantaged people. The median annual probability of introducing M. tuberculosis into the Danish cattle population due to imported live cattle was 0.008% (90% P.I.: 0.0007%; 0.03%), while the probability due to immigrant workers was 4.1% (90% P.I.: 0.8%; 12.1%). The median combined probability (PIntro) due to imported cattle plus workers was 4.1% (90% P.I.: 0.8%; 12.6%). Hence, on average at least one introduction each 24 (90% P.I.: 8; 125) years could be expected. Imported live cattle appeared to play a marginal role on the overall annual PIntro, because they represented only approximately 0.2% of the median annual probability. By testing immigrant workers the overall annual PIntro could be reduced to 0.2% (90% P.I.: 0.04%; 0.7%). Thus, testing of immigrant workers could be considered as a risk mitigation strategy to markedly reduce

  5. Mixed Infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sungmin; Wang, Sungho; Shi, Hyejin; Park, Sungrock; Lee, Sangki; Park, Kyoung Taek

    2017-01-01

    A mixed infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus (Mab) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in the lung is an unusual clinical manifestation and has not yet been reported. A 61-year-old woman had been treated for Mab lung disease and concomitant pneumonia, and was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Despite both anti-PTB and anti-Mab therapy, her entire left lung was destroyed and collapsed. She underwent left pneumonectomy and received medical therapy. We were able to successfully treat her mixed infection by pneumonectomy followed by inhaled amikacin therapy. To the best of our knowledge, thus far, this is the first description of a mixed Mab and MTB lung infection. PMID:28180105

  6. Role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pknD in the Pathogenesis of central nervous system tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Be Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system disease is the most serious form of tuberculosis, and is associated with high mortality and severe neurological sequelae. Though recent clinical reports suggest an association of distinct Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains with central nervous system disease, the microbial virulence factors required have not been described previously. Results We screened 398 unique M. tuberculosis mutants in guinea pigs to identify genes required for central nervous system tuberculosis. We found M. tuberculosis pknD (Rv0931c to be required for central nervous system disease. These findings were central nervous system tissue-specific and were not observed in lung tissues. We demonstrated that pknD is required for invasion of brain endothelia (primary components of the blood-brain barrier protecting the central nervous system, but not macrophages, lung epithelia, or other endothelia. M. tuberculosis pknD encodes a "eukaryotic-like" serine-threonine protein kinase, with a predicted intracellular kinase and an extracellular (sensor domain. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry we demonstrated that the M. tuberculosis PknD sensor is sufficient to trigger invasion of brain endothelia, a process which was neutralized by specific antiserum. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate a novel in vivo role for M. tuberculosis pknD and represent an important mechanism for bacterial invasion and virulence in central nervous system tuberculosis, a devastating and understudied disease primarily affecting young children.

  7. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F.; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Clark, Taane G.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:28176867

  8. Multiplex-PCR for differentiation of Mycobacterium bovis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spositto, F L E; Campanerut, P A Z; Ghiraldi, L D; Leite, C Q F; Hirata, M H; Hirata, R D C; Siqueira, V L D; Cardoso, R Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a multiplex-PCR to differentiate Mycobacterium bovis from M. tuberculosis Complex (MTC) by one step amplification based on simultaneous detection of pncA 169 C > G change in M. bovis and the IS6110 present in MTC species. Our findings showed the proposed multiplex-PCR is a very useful tool for complementation in differentiating M. bovis from other cultured MTC species.

  9. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-28

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states.

  10. Culture and molecular method for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messelhäusser, U; Kämpf, P; Hörmansdorfer, S; Wagner, B; Schalch, B; Busch, U; Höller, C; Wallner, P; Barth, G; Rampp, A

    2012-01-01

    A combined molecular and cultural method for the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was developed and tested with artificially contaminated milk and dairy products. Results indicate that the method can be used for a reliable detection as a basis for first risk assessments.

  11. Inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badr, Hesham M., E-mail: heshambadr_aea@yahoo.co.uk [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Research Center, Abou Zaabal, P.O. Box 13759 Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-11-15

    The effectiveness of gamma irradiation on the inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese that prepared from artificially inoculated milk samples was studied. Irradiation at dose of 2 kGy was sufficient for the complete inactivation of these mycobacteria as they were not detected in the treated samples during storage at 4{+-}1 {sup o}C for 15 days. Moreover, irradiation of cheese samples, that were prepared from un-inoculated milk, at this effective dose had no significant effects on their gross composition and contents from riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid, while significant decreases in vitamin A and thiamin were observed. In addition, irradiation of cheese samples had no significant effects on their pH and nitrogen fractions contents, except for the contents of ammonia, which showed a slight, but significant, increases due to irradiation. The analysis of cheese fats indicated that irradiation treatment induced significant increase in their oxidation parameters and contents from free fatty acids; however, the observed increases were relatively low. On the other hand, irradiation of cheese samples induced no significant alterations on their sensory properties. Thus, irradiation dose of 2 kGy can be effectively applied to ensure the safety of soft cheese with regards to these harmful mycobacteria. - Highlights: > We examined the effectiveness of gamma irradiation on inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese. > Irradiation at dose of 2 kGy was sufficient for complete inactivation of these mycobacteria. > Irradiation of cheese samples induced no significant alterations on their sensory properties.

  12. Synthetic Long Peptide Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latency Antigen Rv1733c Protects against Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Wilson, Louis; Franken, Kees L M C; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Geluk, Annemieke

    2015-09-01

    Responsible for 9 million new cases of active disease and nearly 2 million deaths each year, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of overwhelming dimensions. Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine available, fails to confer lifelong protection and to prevent reactivation of latent infection. Although 15 new vaccine candidates are now in clinical trials, an effective vaccine against TB remains elusive, and new strategies for vaccination are vital. BCG vaccination fails to induce immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency antigens. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) combined with adjuvants have been studied mostly for therapeutic cancer vaccines, yet not for TB, and proved to induce efficient antitumor immunity. This study investigated an SLP derived from Rv1733c, a major M. tuberculosis latency antigen which is highly expressed by "dormant" M. tuberculosis and well recognized by T cells from latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. In order to assess its in vivo immunogenicity and protective capacity, Rv1733c SLP in CpG was administered to HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Immunization with Rv1733c SLP elicited gamma interferon-positive/tumor necrosis factor-positive (IFN-γ(+)/TNF(+)) and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) T cells and Rv1733c-specific antibodies and led to a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-challenged mice. This was observed both in a pre- and in a post-M. tuberculosis challenge setting. Moreover, Rv1733c SLP immunization significantly boosted the protective efficacy of BCG, demonstrating the potential of M. tuberculosis latency antigens to improve BCG efficacy. These data suggest a promising role for M. tuberculosis latency antigen Rv1733c-derived SLPs as a novel TB vaccine approach, both in a prophylactic and in a postinfection setting.

  13. Enhanced Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Positive BACTEC 12B Broth Cultures of Respiratory Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The reliability of the Gen-Probe enhanced Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test (MTD) for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in BACTEC 12B broth cultures of respiratory specimens was evaluated by testing aliquots from 268 bottles with a growth index of ≥50. MTD results were compared to those obtained by usual laboratory protocol, whereby MTBC was identified by DNA probe (Gen-Probe, Inc.) testing sediment from broth samples or colonies on a solid medium. For...

  14. Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase as a Novel Antibiotic Strategy against Tuberculosis: Demonstration of Efficacy In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of humankind's greatest killers, and new therapeutic strategies are needed to combat the causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is rapidly developing resistance to conventional antibiotics. Using the highly demanding guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis, we have investigated the feasibility of inhibiting M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (GS), an enzyme that plays a key role in both nitrogen metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis, as a novel antibi...

  15. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains indifferent provinces of Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohadese Mozafari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular epidemiology tools are widely used in determining epidemiology of tuberculosis. Spoligotyping is a molecular epidemiology method that is used for characterization and typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains. The method is based on polymorphism of the chromosomal DR locus consisting of identical 36-bp DRs alternating with 35-41 unique spacers. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of M. tuberculosis spoligotypes in different provinces of Iran.M. tuberculosis strains were isolated from TB patients of Mycobacteriology Research center (MRC. DNA was extracted from patient's clinical samples. PCR was performed by using of specific primers for DR region. The amplified DNA was hybridized to the spoligotyping Membrane. Hybridized DNA was detected with ECL detection kit and by exposing ECL Hyperfilm to the membrane. The obtained result was entered to a binary format and was analyzed using SpolDB4 database.Spoligotyping resulted in 136 different patterns. Out of 1242 M. tuberculosis strains, 1165 strains (93.8% were classified into 59 clusters and the remaining strains (6.2 % were singleton.The results of present study showed that strains of CAS family were more prevalent than other strains in Iran. Other prevalent families were Haarlem, T and Beijing, respectively.

  16. Gene Transfer in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Shuttle Phasmids to Enlightenment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, William R

    2014-04-01

    Infectious diseases have plagued humankind throughout history and have posed serious public health problems. Yet vaccines have eradicated smallpox and antibiotics have drastically decreased the mortality rate of many infectious agents. These remarkable successes in the control of infections came from knowing the causative agents of the diseases, followed by serendipitous discoveries of attenuated viruses and antibiotics. The discovery of DNA as genetic material and the understanding of how this information translates into specific phenotypes have changed the paradigm for developing new vaccines, drugs, and diagnostic tests. Knowledge of the mechanisms of immunity and mechanisms of action of drugs has led to new vaccines and new antimicrobial agents. The key to the acquisition of the knowledge of these mechanisms has been identifying the elemental causes (i.e., genes and their products) that mediate immunity and drug resistance. The identification of these genes is made possible by being able to transfer the genes or mutated forms of the genes into causative agents or surrogate hosts. Such an approach was limited in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the difficulty of transferring genes or alleles into M. tuberculosis or a suitable surrogate mycobacterial host. The construction of shuttle phasmids-chimeric molecules that replicate in Escherichia coli as plasmids and in mycobacteria as mycobacteriophages-was instrumental in developing gene transfer systems for M. tuberculosis. This review will discuss M. tuberculosis genetic systems and their impact on tuberculosis research.

  17. Killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by neutrophils: a nonoxidative process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G S; Amirault, H J; Andersen, B R

    1990-09-01

    To determine the role of oxygen radicals in the killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by neutrophils, the effects of free-radical inhibitors and enzymes, catalase, superoxide dismutase, taurine, deferoxamine, and histidine were evaluated. Changes in the viability of M. tuberculosis were determined by agar plate colony counts and a radiometric assay. No impairment in killing was seen with any of the inhibitors or enzymes. Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) have a defect in the NADPH oxidase pathway, causing their neutrophils to be unable to generate oxygen radicals. If these radicals are involved in killing, then CGD neutrophils should be less effective killers of M. tuberculosis than normal neutrophils. There was no evidence by either measure of M. tuberculosis viability that CGD neutrophils were less bactericidal than normal neutrophils. Killing by normal neutrophils was also effective in the absence of serum. These results lead to the conclusion that the mechanism by which M. tuberculosis is killed by neutrophils is independent of the oxygen metabolic burst.

  18. How B cells shape the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Chan, John

    2009-03-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B-cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against non-viral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against non-viral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought.

  19. Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Djaltou Aboubaker; Phelippeau, Michael; Drancourt, Michel; Musso, Didier

    2017-04-01

    French Polynesia is an overseas territory located in the South Pacific. The incidence of tuberculosis in French Polynesia has been stable since 2000 with an average of 20 cases/y/100,000 inhabitants. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in French Polynesia is unknown because M. tuberculosis isolates have not been routinely genotyped. From 2009 to 2012, 34 isolates collected from 32 French Polynesian patients were identified as M. tuberculosis by probe hybridization. These isolates were genotyped using spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs)-variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR). Spoligotype patterns obtained using commercial kits were compared with the online international database SITVIT. MIRU-VNTR genotyping was performed using an in-house protocol based on capillary electrophoresis sizing for 24-loci MIRU-VNTR genotyping. The results of the spoligotyping method revealed that 25 isolates grouped into six previously described spoligotypes [H1, H3, U likely (S), T1, Manu, and Beijing] and nine isolates grouped into six new spoligotypes. Comparison with the international database MIRU-VNTRplus distributed 30 isolates into five lineages (Haarlem, Latin American Mediterranean, S, X, and Beijing) and four as unassigned isolates. Genotyping identified four phylogenetic lineages belonging to the modern Euro-American subgroup, one Beijing genotype responsible for worldwide pandemics, including remote islands in the South Pacific, and one Manu genotype of the ancestral lineage of M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Masquerading Mycobacterium: Rectal Growth or Tuberculosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabajit Choudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year old male presented to us with history of lower abdominal pain for 6 months. His physical examination revealed a rectal mass of approximately 1centimeter. He was investigated for possible rectal growth with sigmoidoscopy and biopsy. The histopathological examination (HPE showed a non-specific chronic inflammation in the tissue from the mass. Another tissue from the mass was sent for polymerase chain reaction (PCR for tuberculosis, which turned out to be positive. The patient was started on standard anti tubercular (ATT regimen and responded completely to the treatment. We discuss the patient and review some of the available literature on the topic and discuss the issue of considering a diagnosis of tuberculosis in cases with rectal mass specially when it has become a major public health issue with increasing number of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus infected patients.

  1. Dielectrophoretic characterization of antibiotic-treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shinnosuke; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Becker, Annie L; Weigel, Kris M; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has become a serious concern for proper treatment of patients. As a phenotypic method, dielectrophoresis can be useful but is yet to be attempted to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells. This paper investigates the dielectrophoretic behavior of Mycobacterium bovis (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, BCG) cells that are treated with heat or antibiotics rifampin (RIF) or isoniazid (INH). The experimental parameters are designed on the basis of our sensitivity analysis. The medium conductivity (σ(m)) and the frequency (f) for a crossover frequency (f(xo1)) test are decided to detect the change of σ(m)-f(xo1) in conjunction with the drug mechanism. Statistical modeling is conducted to estimate the distributions of viable and nonviable cells from the discrete measurement of f (xo1). Finally, the parameters of the electrophysiology of BCG cells, C(envelope) and σ(cyto), are extracted through a sampling algorithm. This is the first evaluation of the dielectrophoresis (DEP) approach as a means to assess the effects of antimicrobial drugs on M. tuberculosis complex cells.

  2. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: ecology and evolution of a human bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Sanou, Adama; Anh, Nguyen Thi Van; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    Some species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes human tuberculosis (TB), are the first cause of death linked to a single pathogen worldwide. In the last decades, evolutionary studies have much improved our knowledge on MTBC history and have highlighted its long co-evolution with humans. Its ability to remain latent in humans, the extraordinary proportion of asymptomatic carriers (one-third of the entire human population), the deadly epidemics and the observed increasing level of resistance to antibiotics are proof of its evolutionary success. Many MTBC molecular signatures show not only that these bacteria are a model of adaptation to humans but also that they have influenced human evolution. Owing to the unbalance between the number of asymptomatic carriers and the number of patients with active TB, some authors suggest that infection by MTBC could have a protective role against active TB disease and also against other pathologies. However, it would be inappropriate to consider these infectious pathogens as commensals or symbionts, given the level of morbidity and mortality caused by TB.

  4. Genetic Lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyahi Zaniani, Fatemeh; Moghim, Sharareh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Fazeli, Hossein; Salehi, Mahshid; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to identify the genetic lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Isfahan via the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable number tandem repeat typing method based on 15 loci. Forty-nine M. tuberculosis isolates were collected between 2013 and 2015 from Tuberculosis patients in Mollahadi Sabzevari Tuberculosis Center in Isfahan. All isolates were typed by 15-locus MIRU-VNTR typing. The highest percentage of isolates, 44.89 % (22/49), belonged to the Euro-American lineage, while the frequencies of the East-African-Indian, East-Asian, and Indo-Oceanic lineages were 28.57 % (14/49), 24.4 % (12/49), and 2.04 % (1/49), respectively. Among the 22 isolates of the Euro-American lineage, those belonging to the NEW-1 sub-lineage were most prevalent (24.4 %). Approximately, the same proportion of isolates belonging to the Delhi/CAS, Beijing, and NEW-1 sub-lineages were identified in Iranian and Afghan immigrant patients. The Delhi/CAS and Beijing sub-lineage isolates were prevalent among patients who had been previously treated for TB. Results showed that all of the 49 MIRU-VNTR patterns were unique and the clustering rate of the 15-locus MIRU-VNTR was 0.0 (minimum recent transmission). The results of this study show that the lineages of M. tuberculosis isolates in Isfahan are similar to those reported in the Eastern Mediterranean region (indicative of the epidemiological relationship between the countries in the region). The low clustering rate in our results reveals that transmission of tuberculosis in Isfahan is, in most cases, a reactivation of previous tuberculosis infection and the role of recently transmitted disease is minor.

  5. Combating highly resistant emerging pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis with novel salicylanilide esters and carbamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyai, Zsuzsa; Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Szabó, Nóra; Senoner, Zsuzsanna; Horváti, Kata; Stolaříková, Jiřina; Dávid, Sándor; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-08-28

    In the Mycobacterium genus over one hundred species are already described and new ones are periodically reported. Species that form colonies in a week are classified as rapid growers, those requiring longer periods (up to three months) are the mostly pathogenic slow growers. More recently, new emerging species have been identified to lengthen the list, all rapid growers. Of these, Mycobacterium abscessus is also an intracellular pathogen and it is the most chemotherapy-resistant rapid-growing mycobacterium. In addition, the cases of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection are also increasing. Therefore there is an urgent need to find new active molecules against these threatening strains. Based on previous results, a series of salicylanilides, salicylanilide 5-chloropyrazinoates and carbamates was designed, synthesized and characterised. The compounds were evaluated for their in vitro activity on M. abscessus, susceptible M. tuberculosis H37Rv, multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis MDR A8, M. tuberculosis MDR 9449/2006 and on the extremely-resistant Praha 131 (XDR) strains. All derivatives exhibited a significant activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the low micromolar range. Eight salicylanilide carbamates and two salicylanilide esters exhibited an excellent in vitro activity on M. abscessus with MICs from 0.2 to 2.1 μM, thus being more effective than ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. This finding is potentially promising, particularly, as M. abscessus is a threateningly chemotherapy-resistant species. M. tuberculosis H37Rv was inhibited with MICs from 0.2 μM, and eleven compounds have lower MICs than isoniazid. Salicylanilide esters and carbamates were found that they were effective also on MDR and XDR M. tuberculosis strains with MICs ≥1.0 μM. The in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50) was also determined on human MonoMac-6 cells, and selectivity index (SI) of the compounds was established. In general, salicylanilide

  6. Diffuse Type Primary Mycobacterium Tuberculosis of the Breast: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun A; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun; Kim, Hnana; Lee, Ah Won [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Tuberculous mastitis is a rare manifestation of mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. It mimics inflammatory breast cancer or other pyogenic inflammations. In most of the tuberculous mastitis reports, coexisting or prior tuberculosis infection and secondary infection of the breast by direct spread via axillary or cervical lymphadenopathy, or hematogenous spread have been noted. We describe the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings of a case of diffuse type mycobacterium tuberculosis of the breast showing diffuse edema which was confirmed as tuberculosis through biopsy and had no evidence of old or concurrent pulmonary tuberculosis on chest computed tomography

  7. Spoligotype patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from extra pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Puducherry, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Kandhakumari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Genotyping studies like spoligotyping are valuable tools in understanding the genetic diversity and epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Though there are reports of spoligotyping of M. tuberculosis isolates from pulmonary specimens from different parts of India, spoligotyping of extra pulmonary tuberculosis isolates are very few. Puducherry has not yet recorded spoligopatterns of M. tuberculosis from either pulmonary or extra pulmonary (EPTB specimens. The aim of this study is to analyze the spoligotype patterns of EPTB strains circulating in Puducherry and neighboring districts of Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: During June 2011 to December 2013, 570 EPTB specimens were processed by culturing on to Lowenstein Jensen (LJ medium and automated Mycobacterium Growth Indicator Tube system (MGIT960. Identification of M. tuberculosis was carried out as per standard procedures, and MPT 64 antigen positivity in a commercial immunochromatography kit. Spoligotyping was carried out at National Institute of Research in Tuberculosis (ICMR, Chennai. Results: M. tuberculosis was isolated from 67 single EPTB specimens (11.8% like pus/cold abscess (34, TB spine (10, pleural fluid (10, urine (5, tissue bit (2, lymph nodes (2, ascitic fluid (2, synovial fluid (1 and endometrial curetting (1. Among 67 isolates with 41 spoligopatterns, EAI lineage with 28 isolates (41.8% predominated followed by 18 orphans (26.9%, 10 Beijing (14.9% and 8 U (11.9%. BOVIS1_BCG (ST482, T1-T2 (ST78 and H3 (ST50 were represented by one strain each (1.5%. C onclusions: Spoligotyping plays a significant role in the epidemiology of tuberculosis. Three spoligotypes, T1-T2 (ST78, EAI6 (ST292 and U (ST1429 are reported for the first time in India.

  8. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium bovis in a Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, J P S; Carvalho, T F; Fonseca, A A; Sales, E B; Issa, M A; Rezende, L C; Hodon, M A; Tinoco, H P; Malta, M C C; Pessanha, A T; Pierezan, F; Mota, P M P C; Paixão, T A; Santos, R L

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis, associated with Mycobacterium bovis, was diagnosed post mortem in an adult female capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), kept at the Pampulha Ecological Park, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in a large metropolitan area. On post-mortem examination, there were numerous firm white nodules scattered throughout all lobes of both lungs. Tissue samples were collected for histological and microbiological examination. Microscopically, the pulmonary nodules were multifocal to coalescing granulomas and intralesional acid-fast bacilli were evident in Ziehl-Neelsen-stained sections of the lung and spleen. Colonies with morphological features of Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from lung samples and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with genomic DNA from the isolates was positive for M. bovis; sequencing indicated 100% identity with the region of difference 4 (RD4) of M. bovis. In addition, M. bovis DNA was detected in the lung by quantitative PCR. The finding of M. bovis in a capybara indicates a potential public health risk in a zoological collection.

  9. Characterisation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates lacking IS6110 in Viet Nam.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyen, M.N.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Kremer, K.; Haas, P. de; Lan, N.T.; Buu, T.N.; Sola, C.; Cobelens, F.G.; Soolingen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    SETTING: The molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in Viet Nam is often based on the detection of insertion sequence (IS) 6110 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, 8-11% of M. tuberculosis strains in South-East Asia do not contain this target and this undermines the validity of these molecular

  10. The zoonotic importance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis : transmission from human to monkey : case report

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    A.L. Michel

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of zoonotic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a marmoset (Callithrix jacchus is reported. Genomic typing of the relevant M. tuberculosis isolates strongly suggests that the marmoset, which was kept as companion animal, acquired the disease from an infected member in the household who had been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis 8 years prior to this case.

  11. Drug Susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Genotype and Association with MDR TB

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    To determine differences in the ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains to withstand antituberculosis drug treatment, we compared the activity of antituberculosis drugs against susceptible Beijing and East-African/Indian genotype M. tuberculosis strains. Beijing genotype strains showed high rates of mutation within a wide range of drug concentrations, possibly explaining this genotype's association with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

  12. Drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype and association with MDR TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E M; ten Kate, Marian T; de Knegt, Gerjo J; Kremer, Kristin; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Boeree, Martin J; Verbrugh, Henri A; van Soolingen, Dick; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M

    2012-04-01

    To determine differences in the ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains to withstand antituberculosis drug treatment, we compared the activity of antituberculosis drugs against susceptible Beijing and East-African/Indian genotype M. tuberculosis strains. Beijing genotype strains showed high rates of mutation within a wide range of drug concentrations, possibly explaining this genotype's association with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

  13. Prevalence of Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Mycobacteria growth

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    Livani S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Identification and monitoring ofmultidrugresistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains (MDR ishighlighted by the high risk of their spreading in different areas.Prevalence of these strains was evaluated in Golestan province innortheast of Iran.Material and Methods: Drug susceptibility testing to Isoniazid andrifampin was carried out for 148 clinical samples that had grown inMycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT system, according to themanufacturer's instructions (Becton-Dickinson, USA. The associationof drug resistance frequency with demographic characteristics andgrowth time were investigated. The appropriate statistical tests, X2 andstudent Ttest were performed for comparison of these variants. A pvalue>0.05 was considered significant in all cases.Results: The turnaround time required for growth of Mycobacteriumtuberculosis in MGIT system was between 2 to 55 days (mean16.3±10.4 days. Of all samples studied, 17.6% and 3.4% wereresistant to Isoniazid and rifampin, respectively, and 3.4% (5 sampleswere MDR (CI 95%; 1- 6%. The turnaround time required fordetermining MDR cases was 9.6 days. No statistically significantassociation was found between the resistance to the drugs and none ofthe factors including sex, age, type of clinical sample, and positivity ofthe smear.Conclusion: The prevalence of MDR in the studied region wasdetermined to be 3.4% which is similar to the country-wideevaluations. The turnaround time for Mycobacterium growth and antidrug susceptibility result can be shortened by MGIT method.Key words: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium GrowthIndicator Tube, Multidrug Resistant

  14. Characterization of Ffh of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its interaction with 4.5S RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniyandi, Kannan; Veerasamy, Malini; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2012-10-12

    Signal recognition particle (SRP) mediates targeting of proteins to appropriate cellular compartments, which is an important process in all living organisms. In prokaryotes, SRP consists of Ffh, a protein, and 4.5S RNA that recognizes signal peptide emerging from ribosomes. The SRP (Ffh) of one the most successful intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has been investigated with respect to biochemical properties. In the present study, Ffh of M. tuberculosis was overexpressed and was confirmed to be a GTPase using thin layer chromatography and malachite green assay. The GTP binding ability was confirmed by GTP overlay assay. The 4.5S RNA sequence of M. tuberculosis was synthesized by in vitro transcription assay. The interaction between Ffh and 4.5S RNA was confirmed by overlay assay and RNA gel shift assay. The results show that the biochemical properties of M. tuberculosis Ffh have been conserved, and this is the first report that shows the interaction of components of SRP in M. tuberculosis, namely Ffh protein and 4.5S RNA.

  15. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of fungus Phomopsis stipata

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    Karina Andrade de Prince

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to determine the anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of the metabolites produced by the endophitic fungus Phomopsis stipata (Lib. B. Sutton, (Diaporthaceae, cultivated in different media. The antimycobacterial activity was assessed through the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA and the cytotoxicity test performed on macrophage cell line. The extracts derived from fungi grown on Corn Medium and Potato Dextrose Broth presented the smallest values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and low cytotoxicity, which implies a high selectivity index. This is the first report on the chemical composition and antitubercular activity of metabolites of P. stipata, as well as the influence of culture medium on these properties.

  16. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis from human sputum samples through multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Khan, Jafar; Ullah, Aman; Rehman, Hazir; Ali, Ijaz

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has a long history and being present even before the start of recording history. It has left detrimental effects on all aspect of the life and geared the developments in the science of health. TB is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) including five species M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. canetti, and M. microti. M. tuberculosis and M. bovis infect both animals and humans. Therefore, differentiation of these two closely related species is very important for epidemiological and management purpose. We undertook the present study to characterize mycobacteria isolated from sputum of known TB patients by conventional methods and further, by multiplex PCR (mPCR) to detect the prevalence of Zoonotic TB (TB caused by M. bovis). Sputum samples from TB patient were collected from two tertiary care hospitals in Peshawar i.e. Lady Reading Hospital and Hayatabad Medical Complex. All the samples were subjected to Ziehl Neelsen (ZN) stain, culture on Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) and Stone Brink medium, Nitrate reduction test and multiplex PCR. A total of hundred mycobacterial strains were isolated from these samples on the basis of ZN staining, cultural and biochemical methods. Later on, these isolates were subjected to multiplex PCR by using pncATB-1.2 and pncAMT-2 primers specific to M. tuberculosis and JB21, JB22 primers specific to M. bovis. By means of conventional method, these hundred cultures isolates were differentiated into M. tuberculosis (ninety six) and M. bovis (four). Furthermore, by mPCR, it was determined that out of hundred isolates, ninety-eight were identified as M. tuberculosis and two isolates as M. bovis. This molecular method enables to differentiate M. bovis from M. tuberculosis in human sputum.

  17. Immunoinformatics study on highly expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Thi, Le Thuy; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Calero, Romel; Camacho, Frank; Reyes, Fatima; Hossain, Md Murad; Gonzalez, Gustavo Sierra; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Acosta, Armando

    2014-09-01

    The most important targets for vaccine development are the proteins that are highly expressed by the microorganisms during infection in-vivo. A number of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins are also reported to be expressed in-vivo at different phases of infection. In the present study, we analyzed multiple published databases of gene expression profiles of Mtb in-vivo at different phases of infection in animals and humans and selected 38 proteins that are highly expressed in the active, latent and reactivation phases. We predicted T- and B-cell epitopes from the selected proteins using HLAPred for T-cell epitope prediction and BCEPred combined with ABCPred for B-cell epitope prediction. For each selected proteins, regions containing both T- and B-cell epitopes were identified which might be considered as important candidates for vaccine design against tuberculosis.

  18. EVOLUTION OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR VACCINE DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagneux, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a growing public health threat, particularly in the face of the global epidemics of multidrug resistance. Given the limited efficacy of the current TB vaccine and the recent clinical failure of the most advanced new TB vaccine candidate, novel concepts for vaccine design should be explored. Most T cell antigens in the human-adapted Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) are evolutionarily conserved and under strong purifying selection, indicating that host immune responses targeting these antigens might not be protective. By contrast, a few highly variable T cell epitopes have recently been discovered, which could serve as alternative vaccine antigens. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that the human-adapted MTBC has been co-evolving with the human host for a long time. Hence, studying the interaction between bacterial and human genetic diversity might help identify additional targets that could be exploited for TB vaccine development.

  19. Antimycobacterial Metabolism: Illuminating Mycobacterium tuberculosis Biology and Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Divya; Freundlich, Joel S

    2017-09-01

    Bacteria are capable of performing a number of biotransformations that may activate or deactivate xenobiotics. Recent efforts have utilized metabolomics techniques to study the fate of small-molecule antibacterials within the targeted organism. Examples involving Mycobacterium tuberculosis are reviewed and analyzed with regard to the insights they provide as to both activation and deactivation of the antibacterial. The studies, in particular, shed light on biosynthetic transformations performed by M. tuberculosis while suggesting avenues for the evolution of chemical tools, highlighting potential areas for drug discovery, and mechanisms of approved drugs. A two-pronged approach investigating the metabolism of antibacterials within both the host and bacterium is outlined and will be of value to both the chemical biology and drug discovery fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Streptomyces as host for recombinant production of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallin, Carlos; Ramos, Astrid; Pimienta, Elsa; Rodríguez, Caridad; Hernández, Tairí; Hernández, Ivones; Del Sol, Ricardo; Rosabal, Grisel; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Anné, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    The 45/47 kDa APA protein (Rv1860) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was produced by Streptomyces lividans. The recombinant protein could be recovered from the culture medium of an S. lividans clone containing the apa gene under control of the promoter and signal sequence of the Streptomyces coelicolor agarase gene. The recombinant protein production was further scaled-up using fermentation conditions. The APA protein was subsequently purified from the culture supernatant by means of immunochromatography. About 80 mg of recombinant protein were obtained per liter of culture media. In vivo tests with the APA protein purified from S. lividans TK24/pRGAPA1 revealed that the recombinant protein was antigenic and could induce high titers of specific antibodies in the mouse biological model. Results obtained concerning heterologous production of APA, its immunogenic and antigenic capacity, demonstrated the potential of S. lividans as a valuable host for the production of recombinant proteins from M. tuberculosis.

  1. Structural enzymology of sulphur metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Robert; Schneider, Gunter

    2010-05-21

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis poses a serious threat to human health and has led to world-wide efforts focusing on the development of novel vaccines and antibiotics against this pathogen. Sulphur metabolism in this organism has been linked to essential processes such as virulence and redox defence. The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is up-regulated in models of persistent M. tuberculosis infections and provides potential targets for novel anti-mycobacterial agents, directed specifically toward the pathogen in its persistent phase. Functional and structural characterization of enzymes from sulfur metabolism establishes a necessary framework for the design of strong binding inhibitors that might be developed into new drugs. This review summarizes recent progress in the elucidation of the structural enzymology of the sulphate reduction and cysteine biosynthesis pathways.

  2. Benzothiazinones kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis by blocking arabinan synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Vadim; Manina, Giulia; Mikusova, Katarina; Möllmann, Ute; Ryabova, Olga; Saint-Joanis, Brigitte; Dhar, Neeraj; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Buroni, Silvia; Lucarelli, Anna Paola; Milano, Anna; De Rossi, Edda; Belanova, Martina; Bobovska, Adela; Dianiskova, Petronela; Kordulakova, Jana; Sala, Claudia; Fullam, Elizabeth; Schneider, Patricia; McKinney, John D; Brodin, Priscille; Christophe, Thierry; Waddell, Simon; Butcher, Philip; Albrethsen, Jakob; Rosenkrands, Ida; Brosch, Roland; Nandi, Vrinda; Bharath, Sowmya; Gaonkar, Sheshagiri; Shandil, Radha K; Balasubramanian, Venkataraman; Balganesh, Tanjore; Tyagi, Sandeep; Grosset, Jacques; Riccardi, Giovanna; Cole, Stewart T

    2009-05-08

    New drugs are required to counter the tuberculosis (TB) pandemic. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of 1,3-benzothiazin-4-ones (BTZs), a new class of antimycobacterial agents that kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro, ex vivo, and in mouse models of TB. Using genetics and biochemistry, we identified the enzyme decaprenylphosphoryl-beta-d-ribose 2'-epimerase as a major BTZ target. Inhibition of this enzymatic activity abolishes the formation of decaprenylphosphoryl arabinose, a key precursor that is required for the synthesis of the cell-wall arabinans, thus provoking cell lysis and bacterial death. The most advanced compound, BTZ043, is a candidate for inclusion in combination therapies for both drug-sensitive and extensively drug-resistant TB.

  3. Animal-adapted members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex endemic to the southern African subregion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene Clarke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC cause tuberculosis (TB in both animals and humans. In this article, three animal-adapted MTC strains that are endemic to the southern African subregion – that is, Mycobacterium suricattae, Mycobacterium mungi, and the dassie bacillus – are reviewed with a focus on clinical and pathological presentations, geographic distribution, genotyping methods, diagnostic tools and evolution. Moreover, factors influencing the transmission and establishment of TB pathogens in novel host populations, including ecological, immunological and genetic factors of both the host and pathogen, are discussed. The risks associated with these infections are currently unknown and further studies will be required for greater understanding of this disease in the context of the southern African ecosystem.Keywords: dassie bacillus; ecology; evolution; host jump; Mycobacterium mungi; Mycobacterium suricattae; Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex; phylogeny

  4. Genotyping and drug resistance patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains observed in a tuberculosis high-burden municipality in Northeast, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta dos Santos Silva Luiz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study has used a combination of clinical information, spoligotyping, and georeferencing system to elucidate the genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates circulating in a TB-prevalent municipality of Northeast Brazil. METHODS: A total of 115 M. tuberculosis strains were isolated from pulmonary tuberculosis patients from January 2007 to March 2008 in Fortaleza. Drug susceptibility and spoligotyping assays were performed and place of residence of the patients were georeferenced. RESULTS: Of the M. tuberculosis strains studied, 51 (44.3% isolates were resistant to at least one drug (R-TB and 64 (55.7% were sensitive to all the drugs tested (S-TB. A high frequency of resistance was found in previously treated cases (84% and among new cases (16%; p < 0.001. a total of 74 (64% isolates were grouped into 22 spoligotyped lineages, while 41 (36% isolates were identified as new. among the predominant genotypes, 33% were latim american mediterranean (lam, 12% haarlem (h, and 5% u. there was no association of geographic distribution of rt-tb patients as compared to the controls and also the geographic location to the spoligotype patterns. the geospatial analysis revealed that 24 (23% patients (hot spot zones either shared the same residence or lived in a close neighborhood of a case. among these concentration zones, the patients lived in the same residence and shared a common genotype pattern and resistance pattern. DISCUSSION: it was observed that the spoligopatterns family distribution was similar to that reported for south america, prevailing the lam and h lineages. a high rate-case among the resistant TB group occurs as a result of transmitted and acquired resistance. A more effective surveillance program is needed in order to succeed in reducing tuberculosis in Northeast Brazil.

  5. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in a slum area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Joycenea Matsuda; Machado, Silvia Maria Almeida; Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Ferreira, Rosa Maria Carvalho; Fonseca, Leila de Souza; Saad, Maria Helena Feres

    2008-12-01

    This retrospective molecular study involving restriction fragment length polymorphism, using insertion sequence 6110 as a marker, was conducted in order to provide an initial insight into the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in the slums of the Complexo de Manguinhos, located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Of the 67 strains evaluated, 23 (34.3%) were found to belong to clusters (total clusters, 10). Household and social chains of transmission were associated with clustering, in 20% and 60%, respectively. Living in the Conjunto Habitacional Programado 2 slum was associated with clustering. Although not significant, it is relevant that 26% of the clustered strains presented primary resistance. These findings, although possibly underestimating the prevalence due to the failure to analyze all strains, could help improve the local tuberculosis control program.

  6. CODON OPTIMIZATION OF THE POTENTIAL ANTIGENS ENCODING GENES FROM MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Mani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Current approach for controlling of tuberculosis is going on by recommended doses of vaccines. Codon optimization and simulation techniques are used to improve the protein expression in living organism by increasing their translational efficiency of gene of interest. We have designed; optimized the codon and simulated in nineteen indigenous genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv in the Escherichia coli. We minimized the G+C content in optimized genes from 64.75% to 59.67% of the studied genes as the richness of G+C content is reflected in a strong bias. CAI and AT of optimized DNA were enhanced by 1.9 (47.8% and 1.1 (12.5% fold more with respect to its native type. Our finding indicates the optimized genes can be useful for over expression in host and the study provides a new insight for the emerging research in synthetic biology.

  7. Native New Zealand plants with inhibitory activity towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Swift Simon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants have long been investigated as a source of antibiotics and other bioactives for the treatment of human disease. New Zealand contains a diverse and unique flora, however, few of its endemic plants have been used to treat tuberculosis. One plant, Laurelia novae-zelandiae, was reportedly used by indigenous Maori for the treatment of tubercular lesions. Methods Laurelia novae-zelandiae and 44 other native plants were tested for direct anti-bacterial activity. Plants were extracted with different solvents and extracts screened for inhibition of the surrogate species, Mycobacterium smegmatis. Active plant samples were then tested for bacteriostatic activity towards M. tuberculosis and other clinically-important species. Results Extracts of six native plants were active against M. smegmatis. Many of these were also inhibitory towards M. tuberculosis including Laurelia novae-zelandiae (Pukatea. M. excelsa (Pohutukawa was the only plant extract tested that was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our data provide support for the traditional use of Pukatea in treating tuberculosis. In addition, our analyses indicate that other native plant species possess antibiotic activity.

  8. Inhibition studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis salicylate synthase (MbtI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Bulloch, Esther M M; Rutledge, Peter J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Payne, Richard J

    2010-07-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis salicylate synthase (MbtI), a member of the chorismate-utilizing enzyme family, catalyses the first committed step in the biosynthesis of the siderophore mycobactin T. This complex secondary metabolite is essential for both virulence and survival of M. tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB). It is therefore anticipated that inhibitors of this enzyme may serve as TB therapies with a novel mode of action. Herein we describe the first inhibition study of M. tuberculosis MbtI using a library of functionalized benzoate-based inhibitors designed to mimic the substrate (chorismate) and intermediate (isochorismate) of the MbtI-catalyzed reaction. The most potent inhibitors prepared were those designed to mimic the enzyme intermediate, isochorismate. These compounds, based on a 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate scaffold, proved to be low-micromolar inhibitors of MbtI. The most potent inhibitors in this series possessed hydrophobic enol ether side chains at C3 in place of the enol-pyruvyl side chain found in chorismate and isochorismate.

  9. High throughput phenotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis strains' metabolism using biolog phenotype microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwati Khatri

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a major human and animal disease of major importance worldwide. Genetically, the closely related strains within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex which cause disease are well-characterized but there is an urgent need better to understand their phenotypes. To search rapidly for metabolic differences, a working method using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray analysis was developed. Of 380 substrates surveyed, 71 permitted tetrazolium dye reduction, the readout over 7 days in the method. By looking for ≥5-fold differences in dye reduction, 12 substrates differentiated M. tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97. H37Rv and a Beijing strain of M. tuberculosis could also be distinguished in this way, as could field strains of M. bovis; even pairs of strains within one spoligotype could be distinguished by 2 to 3 substrates. Cluster analysis gave three clear groups: H37Rv, Beijing, and all the M. bovis strains. The substrates used agreed well with prior knowledge, though an unexpected finding that AF2122/97 gave greater dye reduction than H37Rv with hexoses was investigated further, in culture flasks, revealing that hexoses and Tween 80 were synergistic for growth and used simultaneously rather than in a diauxic fashion. Potential new substrates for growth media were revealed, too, most promisingly N-acetyl glucosamine. Osmotic and pH arrays divided the mycobacteria into two groups with different salt tolerance, though in contrast to the substrate arrays the groups did not entirely correlate with taxonomic differences. More interestingly, these arrays suggested differences between the amines used by the M. tuberculosis complex and enteric bacteria in acid tolerance, with some hydrophobic amino acids being highly effective. In contrast, γ-aminobutyrate, used in the enteric bacteria, had no effect in the mycobacteria. This study proved principle that Phenotype MicroArrays can be used with slow-growing pathogenic mycobacteria

  10. High throughput phenotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis strains' metabolism using biolog phenotype microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Bhagwati; Fielder, Mark; Jones, Gareth; Newell, William; Abu-Oun, Manal; Wheeler, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major human and animal disease of major importance worldwide. Genetically, the closely related strains within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex which cause disease are well-characterized but there is an urgent need better to understand their phenotypes. To search rapidly for metabolic differences, a working method using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray analysis was developed. Of 380 substrates surveyed, 71 permitted tetrazolium dye reduction, the readout over 7 days in the method. By looking for ≥5-fold differences in dye reduction, 12 substrates differentiated M. tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97. H37Rv and a Beijing strain of M. tuberculosis could also be distinguished in this way, as could field strains of M. bovis; even pairs of strains within one spoligotype could be distinguished by 2 to 3 substrates. Cluster analysis gave three clear groups: H37Rv, Beijing, and all the M. bovis strains. The substrates used agreed well with prior knowledge, though an unexpected finding that AF2122/97 gave greater dye reduction than H37Rv with hexoses was investigated further, in culture flasks, revealing that hexoses and Tween 80 were synergistic for growth and used simultaneously rather than in a diauxic fashion. Potential new substrates for growth media were revealed, too, most promisingly N-acetyl glucosamine. Osmotic and pH arrays divided the mycobacteria into two groups with different salt tolerance, though in contrast to the substrate arrays the groups did not entirely correlate with taxonomic differences. More interestingly, these arrays suggested differences between the amines used by the M. tuberculosis complex and enteric bacteria in acid tolerance, with some hydrophobic amino acids being highly effective. In contrast, γ-aminobutyrate, used in the enteric bacteria, had no effect in the mycobacteria. This study proved principle that Phenotype MicroArrays can be used with slow-growing pathogenic mycobacteria and already has

  11. Impaired Cytokine but Enhanced Cytotoxic Marker Expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Induced CD8+ T Cells in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes and Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a risk factor for tuberculosis among individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To explore the influence of DM on CD8(+) T-cell responses during latent M. tuberculosis infection, we estimated the cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression pattern in individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection with DM and those with latent M. tuberculosis infection without DM. Among individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection, those with DM had diminished frequencies of CD8(+) T-helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17 cells following stimulation by M. tuberculosis antigen and enhanced frequencies of CD8(+) T cells expressing cytotoxic markers, compared with those without DM. Thus, our results suggest that coincident DM modulates CD8(+) T-cell function during latent M. tuberculosis infection.

  12. [Advances in the research of an animal model of wound due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Jia, Chiyu

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis ranks as the second deadly infectious disease worldwide. The incidence of tuberculosis is high in China. Refractory wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection ranks high in misdiagnosis, and it is accompanied by a protracted course, and its pathogenic mechanism is still not so clear. In order to study its pathogenic mechanism, it is necessary to reproduce an appropriate animal model. Up to now the study of the refractory wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is just beginning, and there is still no unimpeachable model for study. This review describes two models which may reproduce a wound similar to the wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, so that they could be used to study the pathogenesis and characteristics of a tuberculosis wound in an animal.

  13. A high-throughput cidality screen for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvinder Kaur

    Full Text Available Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb aerosols is a major threat to tuberculosis (TB researchers, even in bio-safety level-3 (BSL-3 facilities. Automation and high-throughput screens (HTS in BSL3 facilities are essential for minimizing manual aerosol-generating interventions and facilitating TB research. In the present study, we report the development and validation of a high-throughput, 24-well 'spot-assay' for selecting bactericidal compounds against Mtb. The bactericidal screen concept was first validated in the fast-growing surrogate Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm and subsequently confirmed in Mtb using the following reference anti-tubercular drugs: rifampicin, isoniazid, ofloxacin and ethambutol (RIOE, acting on different targets. The potential use of the spot-assay to select bactericidal compounds from a large library was confirmed by screening on Mtb, with parallel plating by the conventional gold standard method (correlation, r2 = 0.808. An automated spot-assay further enabled an MBC90 determination on resistant and sensitive Mtb clinical isolates. The implementation of the spot-assay in kinetic screens to enumerate residual Mtb after either genetic silencing (anti-sense RNA, AS-RNA or chemical inhibition corroborated its ability to detect cidality. This relatively simple, economical and quantitative HTS considerably minimized the bio-hazard risk and enabled the selection of novel vulnerable Mtb targets and mycobactericidal compounds. Thus, spot-assays have great potential to impact the TB drug discovery process.

  14. Modeling Phenotypic Metabolic Adaptations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv under Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    Tuberculosis in humans and its epidemiology , diagnosis and treatment in the United States. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis 14: 1226–1232. 4. Horsburgh CR, Jr., Rubin...Modeling Phenotypic Metabolic Adaptations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv under Hypoxia Xin Fang, Anders Wallqvist, Jaques Reifman* DoD... tuberculosis , the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), to successfully infect human hosts. Adaptations allow the organism to evade the host immune

  15. Novel multiplex real-time PCR diagnostic assay for identification and differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium canettii, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddington, Kate; O'Grady, Justin; Dorai-Raj, Siobhan; Maher, Majella; van Soolingen, Dick; Barry, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in humans is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). Rapid detection of the MTC is necessary for the timely initiation of antibiotic treatment, while differentiation between members of the complex may be important to guide the appropriate antibiotic treatment and provide epidemiological information. In this study, a multiplex real-time PCR diagnostics assay using novel molecular targets was designed to identify the MTC while simultaneously differentiating between M. tuberculosis and M. canettii. The lepA gene was targeted for the detection of members of the MTC, the wbbl1 gene was used for the differentiation of M. tuberculosis and M. canettii from the remainder of the complex, and a unique region of the M. canettii genome, a possible novel region of difference (RD), was targeted for the specific identification of M. canettii. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was tested using 125 bacterial strains (64 MTC isolates, 44 nontuberculosis mycobacteria [NTM], and 17 other bacteria). The assay was determined to be 100% specific for the mycobacteria tested. Limits of detection of 2.2, 2.17, and 0.73 cell equivalents were determined for M. tuberculosis/M. canettii, the MTC, and M. canettii, respectively, using probit regression analysis. Further validation of this diagnostics assay, using clinical samples, should demonstrate its potential for the rapid, accurate, and sensitive diagnosis of TB caused by M. tuberculosis, M. canettii, and the other members of the MTC.

  16. Effect of common and experimental anti-tuberculosis treatments on Mycobacterium tuberculosis growing as biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Dalton

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Much is known regarding the antibiotic susceptibility of planktonic cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium responsible for the lung disease tuberculosis (TB. As planktonically-grown M. tuberculosis are unlikely to be entirely representative of the bacterium during infection, we set out to determine how effective a range of anti-mycobacterial treatments were against M. tuberculosis growing as a biofilm, a bacterial phenotype known to be more resistant to antibiotic treatment. Light levels from bioluminescently-labelled M. tuberculosis H37Rv (strain BSG001 were used as a surrogate for bacterial viability, and were monitored before and after one week of treatment. After treatment, biofilms were disrupted, washed and inoculated into fresh broth and plated onto solid media to rescue any surviving bacteria. We found that in this phenotypic state M. tuberculosis was resistant to the majority of the compounds tested. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs increased by 20-fold to greater than 1,000-fold, underlying the potential of this phenotype to cause significant problems during treatment.

  17. A case report of vascular catheter-associated bacteremia caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a non-immunosuppressed patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETRILLO Victor Flávio

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from a central venous catheter in a non-immunosuppressed patient with systemic tuberculosis. This case report represents a very uncommon form of isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A total improvement was obtained after treatment.

  18. Comparing Galactan Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesener, Darryl A; Levengood, Matthew R; Kiessling, Laura L

    2017-02-17

    The suborder Corynebacterineae encompasses species like Corynebacterium glutamicum, which has been harnessed for industrial production of amino acids, as well as Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which cause devastating human diseases. A distinctive component of the Corynebacterineae cell envelope is the mycolyl-arabinogalactan (mAG) complex. The mAG is composed of lipid mycolic acids, and arabinofuranose (Araf) and galactofuranose (Galf) carbohydrate residues. Elucidating microbe-specific differences in mAG composition could advance biotechnological applications and lead to new antimicrobial targets. To this end, we compare and contrast galactan biosynthesis in C. diphtheriae and M. tuberculosis In each species, the galactan is constructed from uridine 5'-diphosphate-α-d-galactofuranose (UDP-Galf), which is generated by the enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM or Glf). UGM and the galactan are essential in M. tuberculosis, but their importance in Corynebacterium species was not known. We show that small molecule inhibitors of UGM impede C. glutamicum growth, suggesting that the galactan is critical in corynebacteria. Previous cell wall analysis data suggest the galactan polymer is longer in mycobacterial species than corynebacterial species. To explore the source of galactan length variation, a C. diphtheriae ortholog of the M. tuberculosis carbohydrate polymerase responsible for the bulk of galactan polymerization, GlfT2, was produced, and its catalytic activity was evaluated. The C. diphtheriae GlfT2 gave rise to shorter polysaccharides than those obtained with the M. tuberculosis GlfT2. These data suggest that GlfT2 alone can influence galactan length. Our results provide tools, both small molecule and genetic, for probing and perturbing the assembly of the Corynebacterineae cell envelope.

  19. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1994-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of HIV infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The AIDS patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. We proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis.

  20. Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in southern Brazil

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    Laynara Katize Grutzmacher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The aim of this work was to evaluate the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT strains with mutations that could result in resistance to the main drugs used in treatment in a region with one of the highest numbers of tuberculosis (TB cases in southern Brazil. METHODS: Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA from 120 sputum samples from different patients suspicious of pulmonary tuberculosis who attended the Municipal Public Laboratory for Mycobacterium sp. diagnosis was directly amplified and analyzed by PCR-SSCP. The DNA was amplified in known hotspot mutation regions of the genes rpoB, ahpC, embB, katG, inhA, and pncA. RESULTS: The percentage of samples positive by culture was 9.2% (11/120; 5% (6/120 were positive by bacilloscopy and MT-PCR, and DNA fragments of the aforementioned resistance genes could be amplified from seven (7 of the eleven (11 samples with positive results, either by culture or PCR/bacilloscopy. All presented a SSCP pattern similar to a native, nonresistant genotype, with the ATCC strain 25177 as control, except for one sample (0.01%, which presented a SSCP profile demonstrating mutation at the embB gene. CONCLUSIONS: These results are consistent with the empirical observations by physicians treating TB patients in our region of a low occurrence of cases that are refractory to conventional treatment schemes, in contrast to other parts of the country. Continued surveillance, especially molecular, is essential to detect and monitor the outbreak of MT-resistant strains.

  1. Clustering of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cases in Acapulco: Spoligotyping and Risk Factors

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    Elizabeth Nava-Aguilera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrence and reinfection of tuberculosis have quite different implications for prevention. We identified 267 spoligotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from consecutive tuberculosis patients in Acapulco, Mexico, to assess the level of clustering and risk factors for clustered strains. Point cluster analysis examined spatial clustering. Risk analysis relied on the Mantel Haenszel procedure to examine bivariate associations, then to develop risk profiles of combinations of risk factors. Supplementary analysis of the spoligotyping data used SpolTools. Spoligotyping identified 85 types, 50 of them previously unreported. The five most common spoligotypes accounted for 55% of tuberculosis cases. One cluster of 70 patients (26% of the series produced a single spoligotype from the Manila Family (Clade EAI2. The high proportion (78% of patients infected with cluster strains is compatible with recent transmission of TB in Acapulco. Geomatic analysis showed no spatial clustering; clustering was associated with a risk profile of uneducated cases who lived in single-room dwellings. The Manila emerging strain accounted for one in every four cases, confirming that one strain can predominate in a hyperendemic area.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins in virulence and immunity - fighting with a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Katja; Sander, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are secreted membrane-anchored proteins characterized by a lipobox motif. This lipobox motif directs post-translational modifications at the conserved cysteine through the consecutive action of three enzymes: Lgt, LspA and Lnt, which results in di- or triacylated forms. Lipoproteins are abundant in all bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and often involved in virulence and immunoregulatory processes. On the one hand, disruption of the biosynthesis pathway of lipoproteins leads to attenuation of M. tuberculosis in vivo, and mycobacteria deficient for certain lipoproteins have been assessed as attenuated live vaccine candidates. On the other hand, several mycobacterial lipoproteins form immunodominant antigens which promote an immune response. Some of these have been explored in DNA or subunit vaccination approaches against tuberculosis. The immune recognition of specific lipoproteins, however, might also benefit long-term survival of M. tuberculosis through immune modulation, while others induce protective responses. Exploiting lipoproteins as vaccines is thus a complex matter which requires deliberative investigation. The dual role of lipoproteins in the immunity to and pathogenicity of mycobacteria is discussed here. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Inferring patient to patient transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from whole genome sequencing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Bryant (Josephine); A. Schürch (Anita); H. van Deutekom (Henk); S.R. Harris (Simon); J.L. de Beer (Jessica); V. de Jager (Victor); K. Kremer (Kristin); S.A.F.T. van Hijum (Sacha); R.J. Siezen (Roland); M.W. Borgdorff (Martien ); S.D. Bentley (Stephen); J. Parkhill (Julian); D. van Soolingen (Dick)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is characterised by limited genomic diversity, which makes the application of whole genome sequencing particularly attractive for clinical and epidemiological investigation. However, in order to confidently infer transmission events, an accurate kno

  4. Inferring patient to patient transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from whole genome sequencing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bryant, J.M.; Schürch, A.C.; Deutekom, van H.; Harris, S.R.; Beer, de J.L.; Jager, de V.C.L.; Kremer, K.; Hijum, van S.A.F.T.; Siezen, R.J.; Borgdorff, M.; Bentley, S.D.; Parkhill, J.; Soolingen, van D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is characterised by limited genomic diversity, which makes the application of whole genome sequencing particularly attractive for clinical and epidemiological investigation. However, in order to confidently infer transmission events, an accurate knowledge of th

  5. Inferring patient to patient transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from whole genome sequencing data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bryant, J.M.; Schurch, A.C.; Deutekom, H. van; Harris, S.R.; Beer, J.L. de; Jager, V. de; Kremer, K.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Siezen, R.J.; Borgdorff, M.; Bentley, S.D.; Parkhill, J.; Soolingen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is characterised by limited genomic diversity, which makes the application of whole genome sequencing particularly attractive for clinical and epidemiological investigation. However, in order to confidently infer transmission events, an accurate knowledge of th

  6. An Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis Case due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Hale Turan Özden

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM is an inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that is characterized by multifocal involvement of the white matter. Our patient was a 27-year-old female patient who had given birth to a baby with caesarean in another hospital. After four days upon the parturition, she was admitted to our hospital’s general intensive care unit with a poor general status, confusion and a fever. She was diagnosed with ADEM according to the clinical, laboratory and radiological findings. In addition to her antibiotic treatment (meropenem that had been given in the previous health care facility, corticosteroid therapy was also started. The patient passed away due to the ventilator-associated pneumonia infection on the 10th day of her admission. Mycobacterium tuberculosis proliferation was observed in the cerebrospinal fluid after her death. As it is reported in literature, tuberculosis is a rare cause of ADEM. In conclusion, it should be noted that M. tuberculosis can be a rare cause of ADEM in regions where the disease is endemic. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(1: 28-31

  7. PolyTB: A genomic variation map for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    KAUST Repository

    Coll, Francesc

    2014-02-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the second major cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide. Recent advances in DNA sequencing are leading to the ability to generate whole genome information in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC). The identification of informative genetic variants such as phylogenetic markers and those associated with drug resistance or virulence will help barcode Mtb in the context of epidemiological, diagnostic and clinical studies. Mtb genomic datasets are increasingly available as raw sequences, which are potentially difficult and computer intensive to process, and compare across studies. Here we have processed the raw sequence data (>1500 isolates, eight studies) to compile a catalogue of SNPs (n = 74,039, 63% non-synonymous, 51.1% in more than one isolate, i.e. non-private), small indels (n = 4810) and larger structural variants (n = 800). We have developed the PolyTB web-based tool (http://pathogenseq.lshtm.ac.uk/polytb) to visualise the resulting variation and important meta-data (e.g. in silico inferred strain-types, location) within geographical map and phylogenetic views. This resource will allow researchers to identify polymorphisms within candidate genes of interest, as well as examine the genomic diversity and distribution of strains. PolyTB source code is freely available to researchers wishing to develop similar tools for their pathogen of interest. 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular epidemiology and genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated in Baghdad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa Ali, Ruqaya; Trovato, Alberto; Couvin, David; Al-Thwani, Amina N; Borroni, Emanuele; Dhaer, Fahim H; Rastogi, Nalin; Cirillo, Daniela M

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem in Iraq but the strains responsible for the epidemic have been poorly characterized. Our aim was to characterize the TB strains circulating in Bagdad (Iraq). A total of 270 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains isolated between 2010 and 2011 from TB patients attending the Center of Chest and Respiratory diseases in Baghdad were analyzed by Spoligotyping. The analysis indicated that 94.1% of the isolates belong to known genotype clades: CAS 39.6%, ill-defined T clade 29.6%, Manu 7.4%, Haarlem 7%, Ural 4.1%, LAM 3.3%, X 0.7%, LAM7-TUR 0.7%, EAI 0.7%, S 0.7%, and unknown 5.9%. Comparison with the international multimarker database SITVIT2 showed that SIT 309 (CAS1-Delhi) and SIT1144 (T1) were the most common types. In addition, 44 strains were included in SITVIT2 database under 16 new Spoligotype International Types (SITs); of these, 6 SITs (SIT3346, SIT3497, SIT3708, SIT3790, SIT3791, and SIT3800) (n = 32 strains) were created within the present study and 10 were created after a match with an orphan in the database. By using 24-loci MIRU-VNTR-typing on a subset of 110 samples we found a high recent transmission index (RTI) of 33.6%. In conclusion, we present the first unifying framework for both epidemiology and evolutionary analysis of M. tuberculosis in Iraq.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Transcription Machinery: Ready To Respond to Host Attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentie, Kelly; Garner, Ashley L; Stallings, Christina L

    2016-05-01

    Regulating responses to stress is critical for all bacteria, whether they are environmental, commensal, or pathogenic species. For pathogenic bacteria, successful colonization and survival in the host are dependent on adaptation to diverse conditions imposed by the host tissue architecture and the immune response. Once the bacterium senses a hostile environment, it must enact a change in physiology that contributes to the organism's survival strategy. Inappropriate responses have consequences; hence, the execution of the appropriate response is essential for survival of the bacterium in its niche. Stress responses are most often regulated at the level of gene expression and, more specifically, transcription. This minireview focuses on mechanisms of regulating transcription initiation that are required by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to respond to the arsenal of defenses imposed by the host during infection. In particular, we highlight how certain features of M. tuberculosis physiology allow this pathogen to respond swiftly and effectively to host defenses. By enacting highly integrated and coordinated gene expression changes in response to stress,M. tuberculosis is prepared for battle against the host defense and able to persist within the human population.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology and Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolated in Baghdad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaya Mustafa Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major health problem in Iraq but the strains responsible for the epidemic have been poorly characterized. Our aim was to characterize the TB strains circulating in Bagdad (Iraq. A total of 270 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC strains isolated between 2010 and 2011 from TB patients attending the Center of Chest and Respiratory diseases in Baghdad were analyzed by Spoligotyping. The analysis indicated that 94.1% of the isolates belong to known genotype clades: CAS 39.6%, ill-defined T clade 29.6%, Manu 7.4%, Haarlem 7%, Ural 4.1%, LAM 3.3%, X 0.7%, LAM7-TUR 0.7%, EAI 0.7%, S 0.7%, and unknown 5.9%. Comparison with the international multimarker database SITVIT2 showed that SIT 309 (CAS1-Delhi and SIT1144 (T1 were the most common types. In addition, 44 strains were included in SITVIT2 database under 16 new Spoligotype International Types (SITs; of these, 6 SITs (SIT3346, SIT3497, SIT3708, SIT3790, SIT3791, and SIT3800 (n = 32 strains were created within the present study and 10 were created after a match with an orphan in the database. By using 24-loci MIRU-VNTR-typing on a subset of 110 samples we found a high recent transmission index (RTI of 33.6%. In conclusion, we present the first unifying framework for both epidemiology and evolutionary analysis of M. tuberculosis in Iraq.

  11. Immunological consequences of strain variation within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tientcheu, Leopold D; Koch, Anastasia; Ndengane, Mthawelenga; Andoseh, Genevieve; Kampmann, Beate; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    In 2015, there were an estimated 10.4 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) globally, making it one of the leading causes of death due to an infectious disease. TB is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), with human disease resulting from infection by M. tuberculosis sensu stricto and M. africanum. Recent progress in genotyping techniques, in particular the increasing availability of whole genome sequence data, has revealed previously under appreciated levels of genetic diversity within the MTBC. Several studies have shown that this genetic diversity may translate into differences in TB transmission, clinical manifestations of disease, and host immune responses. This suggests the existence of MTBC genotype-dependent host-pathogen interactions which may influence the outcome of infection and progression of disease. In this review, we highlight the studies demonstrating differences in innate and adaptive immunological outcomes consequent on MTBC genetic diversity, and discuss how these differences in immune response might influence the development of TB vaccines, diagnostics and new therapies. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Standartization of broth microdilution method for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Clarice Queico Fujimura

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Indirect drug susceptibility tests of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was done to investigate the accuracy and feasibility of a broth microdilution method (BMM for determining minimal inhibitory concentrations of conventional drugs against M. tuberculosis. Test drugs included isoniazid (H, rifampicin (R, ethambutol (E, streptomycin (S and pyrazinamide (Z. Fifty isolates of M. tuberculosis from patients who had never received drug therapy, and H37Rv strain for control, were evaluated in the system. When comparing this method with the gold standard proportional method in Lowenstein-Jensen medium, sensitivity of 100% for all drugs and specifities of 91, 100, 96, 98 and 85% were observed respectively for H, R, E, S and Z. The BMM was read faster (14-20 days than the proportional method (20-28 days. The microdilution method evaluated allows the testing of multiple drugs in multiple concentrations. It is easy to perform and does not require special equipment or expensive supplies. In contrast to radiometric method it does not use radioactive material.

  13. Systems-based approaches to probing metabolic variation within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma K Lofthouse

    Full Text Available The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex includes bovine and human strains of the tuberculosis bacillus, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain. M. bovis has evolved from a M. tuberculosis-like ancestor and is the ancestor of the BCG vaccine. The pathogens demonstrate distinct differences in virulence, host range and metabolism, but the role of metabolic differences in pathogenicity is poorly understood. Systems biology approaches have been used to investigate the metabolism of M. tuberculosis, but not to probe differences between tuberculosis strains. In this study genome scale metabolic networks of M. bovis and M. bovis BCG were constructed and interrogated, along with a M. tuberculosis network, to predict substrate utilisation, gene essentiality and growth rates. The models correctly predicted 87-88% of high-throughput phenotype data, 75-76% of gene essentiality data and in silico-predicted growth rates matched measured rates. However, analysis of the metabolic networks identified discrepancies between in silico predictions and in vitro data, highlighting areas of incomplete metabolic knowledge. Additional experimental studies carried out to probe these inconsistencies revealed novel insights into the metabolism of these strains. For instance, that the reduction in metabolic capability observed in bovine tuberculosis strains, as compared to M. tuberculosis, is not reflected by current genetic or enzymatic knowledge. Hence, the in silico networks not only successfully simulate many aspects of the growth and physiology of these mycobacteria, but also provide an invaluable tool for future metabolic studies.

  14. Differences in T-cell responses between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium africanum-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tientcheu, Leopold D; Sutherland, Jayne S; de Jong, Bouke C; Kampmann, Beate; Jafali, James; Adetifa, Ifedayo M; Antonio, Martin; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ota, Martin O

    2014-05-01

    In The Gambia, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Mycobacterium africanum (Maf) are major causes of tuberculosis (TB). Maf is more likely to cause TB in immune suppressed individuals, implying differences in virulence. Despite this, few studies have assessed the underlying immunity to the two pathogens in human. In this study, we analyzed T-cell responses from 19 Maf- and 29 Mtb-infected HIV-negative patients before and after TB chemotherapy following overnight stimulation of whole blood with TB-specific antigens. Before treatment, percentages of early secreted antigenic target-6(ESAT-6)/culture filtrate protein-10(CFP-10) and purified protein derivative-specific single-TNF-α-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were significantly higher while single-IL-2-producing T cells were significantly lower in Maf- compared with Mtb-infected patients. Purified protein derivative-specific polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells frequencies were significantly higher before than after treatment, but there was no difference between the groups at both time points. Furthermore, the proportion of CD3(+) CD11b(+) T cells was similar in both groups pretreatment, but was significantly lower with higher TNF-α, IL-2, and IFN-γ production in Mtb- compared with that of Maf-infected patients posttreatment. Our data provide evidence of differences in T-cell responses to two mycobacterial strains with differing virulence, providing some insight into TB pathogenesis with different Mtb strains that could be prospectively explored as biomarkers for TB protection or susceptibility.

  15. A pilot study to determine genetic polymorphism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Desikan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to identify predominant spoligotypes responsible for transmission and prevalence of tuberculosis in central India since there is no data available about the genetic biodiversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in this region. 35 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were subjected to spoligotyping according to the standard protocol. A total of 25 strains out of the 35 (71.42% could be grouped in to 6 clusters. The largest cluster comprised 8 isolates. Unique (Non-clustered spoligotypes were seen in 10 isolates, Nine strains did not match the data base (Spol DB-4 data base. The results indicate that there may be a number of orphan strains unique to this geographical area. Further studies on a larger sample size derived from this area would help us delineate the epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in this area.

  16. Impact of β-lactamase inhibition on the activity of ceftaroline against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubée, Vincent; Soroka, Daria; Cortes, Mélanie; Lefebvre, Anne-Laure; Gutmann, Laurent; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Arthur, Michel; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-01

    The production of β-lactamases Bla(Mab) and BlaC contributes to β-lactam resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively. Ceftaroline was efficiently hydrolyzed by these enzymes. Inhibition of M. tuberculosis BlaC by clavulanate decreased the ceftaroline MIC from ≥ 256 to 16 to 64 μg/ml, but these values are clinically irrelevant. In contrast, the ceftaroline-avibactam combination should be evaluated against M. abscessus since it inhibited growth at lower and potentially achievable drug concentrations.

  17. Prevalence of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Pedro Daibert de; Almeida, Isabela Neves de; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Ceccato, Maria das Graças; Maciel, Mônica Maria Delgado; Carvalho, Wânia da Silva; Miranda, Silvana Spindola de

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of and the factors associated with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in prisoners in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. This was a cross-sectional cohort study conducted in two prisons in Minas Gerais. Tuberculin skin tests were performed in the individuals who agreed to participate in the study. A total of 1,120 individuals were selected for inclusion in this study. The prevalence of LTBI was 25.2%. In the multivariate analysis, LTBI was associated with self-reported contact with active tuberculosis patients within prisons (adjusted OR = 1.51; 95% CI: 1.05-2.18) and use of inhaled drugs (adjusted OR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.03-2.13). Respiratory symptoms were identified in 131 (11.7%) of the participants. Serological testing for HIV was performed in 940 (83.9%) of the participants, and the result was positive in 5 (0.5%). Two cases of active tuberculosis were identified during the study period. Within the prisons under study, the prevalence of LTBI was high. In addition, LTBI was associated with self-reported contact with active tuberculosis patients and with the use of inhaled drugs. Our findings demonstrate that it is necessary to improve the conditions in prisons, as well as to introduce strategies, such as chest X-ray screening, in order to detect tuberculosis cases and, consequently, reduce M. tuberculosis infection within the prison system. Determinar a prevalência e os fatores associados à infecção latente por Mycobacterium tuberculosis (ILTB) em pessoas privadas de liberdade no Estado de Minas Gerais. Estudo de coorte transversal realizado em duas penitenciárias em Minas Gerais. Foi realizada a prova tuberculínica nos indivíduos que aceitaram participar do estudo. Foram selecionados 1.120 indivíduos para a pesquisa. A prevalência da ILTB foi de 25,2%. Na análise multivariada, a ILTB esteve associada com relato de contato com caso de tuberculose ativa dentro da penitenciária (OR ajustada = 1,51; IC95%: 1

  18. Implication of the RD(Rio) Mycobacterium tuberculosis sublineage in multidrug resistant tuberculosis in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Susana; Duarte, Elsa L; Leite, Clarice Queico Fugimura; Ribeiro, João-Nuno; Maio, José-Nuno; Paixão, Eleonora; Portugal, Clara; Sancho, Luísa; Germano de Sousa, José

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug and extensively drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis are a threat to tuberculosis control programs. Genotyping methods, such as spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing (Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units), are useful in monitoring potentially epidemic strains and estimating strain phylogenetic lineages and/or genotypic families. M. tuberculosis Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) family is a major worldwide contributor to tuberculosis (TB). LAM specific molecular markers, Ag85C(103) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and RD(Rio) long-sequence polymorphism (LSP), were used to characterize spoligotype signatures from 859 patient isolates from Portugal. LAM strains were found responsible for 57.7% of all tuberculosis cases. Strains with the RD(Rio) deletion (referred to as RD(Rio)) were estimated to represent 1/3 of all the strains and over 60% of the multidrug resistant (MDR) strains. The major spoligotype signature SIT20 belonging to the LAM1 RD(Rio) sublineage, represented close to 1/5th of all the strains, over 20% of which were MDR. Analysis of published datasets according to stipulated 12loci MIRU-VNTR RD(Rio) signatures revealed that 96.3% (129/134) of MDR and extensively drug resistant (XDR) clusters were RD(Rio). This is the first report associating the LAM RD(Rio) sublineage with MDR. These results are an important contribution to the monitoring of these strains with heightened transmission for future endeavors to arrest MDR-TB and XDR-TB.

  19. DETECTION OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS IN BLOOD FOR DIAGNOSIS OF GENERALISED TUBERCULOSIS IN HIV-POSITIVE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Zimina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the informative value of the detection of mycobacteria in blood with the cultural method in patients with suspected tuberculous sepsis and to determine the most significant clinical and laboratory criteria for testing. Materials and methods: The investigation to detect M.tuberculosis was fulfilled in 159 HIV-positive patients with suspected tuberculosis sepsis. Blood culture was completed with culture medium Myco/F Lytic Culture Vials and analyzer BACTEC 9050. Results: Mycobacteria were detected in blood of 19 patients (11,9% of all patients: in 18 patients the growth of М. tuberculosis complex was detected (25,3% of all patients with diagnosed tuberculosis and in 1 patient it was Mycobacterium avium complex (0,6% of all patients. It was shown, that the probability of M.tuberculosis detection was especially associated with the severity of the disease, immunosupression (less than 100 cells/mkl, hemoglobin quantity less than 90 g/l (levels were determined through the seeking for the most significant cutoffs. It was not proofed, that meningoencephalitis develops more often in patients with proven bacteremia. There were no evident differences in detection frequency of mycobacteria in sputum between patients with tuberculous sepsis and without it.

  20. Characterisation of methionine adenosyltransferase from Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knodel Marvin H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis remains a serious world-wide health threat which requires the characterisation of novel drug targets for the development of future antimycobacterials. One of the key obstacles in the definition of new targets is the large variety of metabolic alterations that occur between cells in the active growth and chronic/dormant phases of tuberculosis. The ideal biochemical target should be active in both growth phases. Methionine adenosyltransferase, which catalyses the formation of S-adenosylmethionine from methionine and ATP, is involved in polyamine biosynthesis during active growth and is also required for the methylation and cyclopropylation of mycolipids necessary for survival in the chronic phase. Results The gene encoding methionine adenosyltransferase has been cloned from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the model organism M. smegmatis. Both enzymes retained all amino acids known to be involved in catalysing the reaction. While the M. smegmatis enzyme could be functionally expressed, the M. tuberculosis homologue was insoluble and inactive under a large variety of expression conditions. For the M. smegmatis enzyme, the Vmax for S-adenosylmethionine formation was 1.30 μmol/min/mg protein and the Km for methionine and ATP was 288 μM and 76 μM respectively. In addition, the enzyme was competitively inhibited by 8-azaguanine and azathioprine with a Ki of 4.7 mM and 3.7 mM respectively. Azathioprine inhibited the in vitro growth of M. smegmatis with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of 500 μM, while the MIC for 8-azaguanine was >1.0 mM. Conclusion The methionine adenosyltransferase from both organisms had a primary structure very similar those previously characterised in other prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. The kinetic properties of the M. smegmatis enzyme were also similar to known prokaryotic methionine adenosyltransferases. Inhibition of the enzyme by 8-azaguanine and azathioprine provides a starting

  1. Inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese by gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Hesham M.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of gamma irradiation on the inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese that prepared from artificially inoculated milk samples was studied. Irradiation at dose of 2 kGy was sufficient for the complete inactivation of these mycobacteria as they were not detected in the treated samples during storage at 4±1 °C for 15 days. Moreover, irradiation of cheese samples, that were prepared from un-inoculated milk, at this effective dose had no significant effects on their gross composition and contents from riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid, while significant decreases in vitamin A and thiamin were observed. In addition, irradiation of cheese samples had no significant effects on their pH and nitrogen fractions contents, except for the contents of ammonia, which showed a slight, but significant, increases due to irradiation. The analysis of cheese fats indicated that irradiation treatment induced significant increase in their oxidation parameters and contents from free fatty acids; however, the observed increases were relatively low. On the other hand, irradiation of cheese samples induced no significant alterations on their sensory properties. Thus, irradiation dose of 2 kGy can be effectively applied to ensure the safety of soft cheese with regards to these harmful mycobacteria.

  2. Consequences of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity in the context of HIV co-infection for laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssengooba, W.

    2017-01-01

    Willy Ssengooba’s thesis evaluates the consequences of the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, for diagnosis of this disease tuberculosis in Africa, often in HIV co-infected patients. It addresses three main sub-themes around M. tuberculosis genetic

  3. [Susceptibilities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains collected from regional tuberculosis laboratories to major antituberculous drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayğan, M Bakir; Ocak, Fatih; Cesur, Salih; Tarhan, Gülnur; Ceyhan, Ismail; Gümüişlü, Feyzullah; Beker, Gülşan; Güner, Uğur; Coşkun, Erol

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the susceptibility rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains sent to Refik Saydam Hygiene Center, Tuberculosis Reference and Research Laboratory, Ankara, from seven different regional tuberculosis laboratories between the 1999-2002 period against major antituberculous drugs. The sensitivities of a total 505 M. tuberculosis strains to isoniazid (INAH), rifampicin (RIF), streptomycin (SM) and ethambutol (EMB) were determined by using proportion method in Lowenstein-Jensen medium. Of the strains, 385 (76.2%) were found sensitive to all of the tested drugs, while 120 strains were resistant to at least one of the antituberculous drugs. The resistant strains showed 14 different resistance patterns. The resistance rates were detected as 13.3% for INAH and RIF (67 strains of each), 9.1% for SM (46 strains), and 3.4% (17 strains) for EMB. Multidrug resistant (INAH+RIF) M. tuberculosis was 7.9% (40 strains). The highest resistance rate to INAH, RIF and EMB (21.2%, 21.2% and 10.6%, respectively) was detected in the isolates which were sent from Bursa province (located in northwestern Turkey); the highest SM (18.8%) and multidrug resistance (INAH+RIF) rates (18.8% and 10.6%, respectively) were detected in the strains sent from Elazig and Van provinces (both located in eastern Turkey). Since the inappropriate use of the first and second line antituberculous drugs leads to the development and spread of the resistant strains, "Directly Observed Therapy Shortcourse (DOTS)" is a very important practice. Therefore regional tuberculosis laboratories should be worth considering as the chains of a well-organized national laboratory network, in order to detect the antituberculous drug resistance patterns of the M. tuberculosis strains over the country.

  4. Application of infrequent-restriction-site amplification for genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Tae Yeal; Kang, Jung Oak

    2002-01-01

    Infrequent restriction site amplification (IRS-PCR) is a method of amplifying DNA sequences, which flank an infrequent restriction site, and produces a strain-specific electrophoretic pattern. We studied the use of IRS-PCR to characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobactria (NTM). One-hundred and sixteen M. tuberculosis and nine NTM isolated at Hanyang University Hospital in Seoul, Korea were used in this study. IRS-PCR using AH1 and PX-G primers produced unique pattern...

  5. Innate and Adaptive Cellular Immune Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Barber, Daniel L

    2015-07-17

    Host resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection requires the coordinated efforts of innate and adaptive immune cells. Diverse pulmonary myeloid cell populations respond to Mtb with unique contributions to both host-protective and potentially detrimental inflammation. Although multiple cell types of the adaptive immune system respond to Mtb infection, CD4 T cells are the principal antigen-specific cells responsible for containment of Mtb infection, but they can also be major contributors to disease during Mtb infection in several different settings. Here, we will discuss the role of different myeloid populations as well as the dual nature of CD4 T cells in Mtb infection with a primary focus on data generated using in vivo cellular immunological studies in experimental animal models and in humans when available. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: an emerging disease of free-ranging wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kathleen A; Pleydell, Eve; Williams, Mark C; Lane, Emily P; Nyange, John F C; Michel, Anita L

    2002-06-01

    Expansion of ecotourism-based industries, changes in land-use practices, and escalating competition for resources have increased contact between free-ranging wildlife and humans. Although human presence in wildlife areas may provide an important economic benefit through ecotourism, exposure to human pathogens may represent a health risk for wildlife. This report is the first to document introduction of a primary human pathogen into free-ranging wildlife. We describe outbreaks of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a human pathogen, in free-ranging banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) in Botswana and suricates (Suricata suricatta) in South Africa. Wildlife managers and scientists must address the potential threat that humans pose to the health of free-ranging wildlife.

  7. An elucidation of neutrophil functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Devin; Nguyen, Thien; Kim, John; Kassissa, Christine; Khurasany, Melissa; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Ly, Judy; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH). We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH) resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection.

  8. An Elucidation of Neutrophil Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

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    Devin Morris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH. We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection.

  9. Genetic variation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis circulating in Kharkiv Oblast, Ukraine

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    Khrapov Eugeny A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A persistent increase of tuberculosis cases has recently been noted in the Ukraine. The reported incidence of drug-resistant isolates of M. tuberculosis is growing steadily; however, data on the genetic variation of isolates of M. tuberculosis circulating in northern Ukraine and on the spectrum and frequency of occurrence of mutations determining resistance to the principal anti-tuberculosis drugs isoniazid and rifampicin have not yet been reported. Methods Isolates of M. tuberculosis from 98 tuberculosis patients living in Kharkiv Oblast (Ukraine were analyzed using VNTR- and RFLP-IS6110-typing methods. Mutations associated with resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid were detected by RFLP-PCR methods, and also confirmed by sequencing. Results We identified 75 different genetic profiles. Thirty four (34% isolates belonged to the Beijing genotype and 23 (23% isolates belonged to the LAM family. A cluster of isolates belonging to the LAM family had significant genetic heterogeneity, indicating that this family had an ancient distribution and circulation in this geographical region. Moreover, we found a significant percentage of the isolates (36% belonged to as yet unidentified families of M. tuberculosis or had individual non-clustering genotypes. Mutations conferring rifampicin and isoniazid resistance were detected in 49% and 54% isolates, respectively. Mutations in codon 531 of the rpoB gene and codon 315 of the katG gene were predominant among drug-resistant isolates. An association was found for belonging to the LAM strain family and having multiple drug resistance (R = 0.27, p = 0.0059 and also for the presence of a mutation in codon 531 of the rpoB gene and belonging to the Beijing strain family (R = 0.2, p = 0.04. Conclusions Transmission of drug-resistant isolates seems to contribute to the spread of resistant TB in this oblast. The Beijing genotype and LAM genotype should be seen as a major cause of drug resistant TB

  10. Gr1(intCD11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

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    Andrés Obregón-Henao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis is one of the world's leading killers, stealing 1.4 million lives and causing 8.7 million new and relapsed infections in 2011. The only vaccine against tuberculosis is BCG which demonstrates variable efficacy in adults worldwide. Human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in the influx of inflammatory cells to the lung in an attempt to wall off bacilli by forming a granuloma. Gr1(intCD11b(+ cells are called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC and play a major role in regulation of inflammation in many pathological conditions. Although MDSC have been described primarily in cancer their function in tuberculosis remains unknown. During M. tuberculosis infection it is crucial to understand the function of cells involved in the regulation of inflammation during granuloma formation. Understanding their relative impact on the bacilli and other cellular phenotypes is necessary for future vaccine and drug design. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the bacterial burden, lung pathology and Gr1(intCD11b(+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell immune responses in M. tuberculosis infected NOS2-/-, RAG-/-, C3HeB/FeJ and C57/BL6 mice. Gr-1(+ cells could be found on the edges of necrotic lung lesions in NOS2-/-, RAG-/-, and C3HeB/FeJ, but were absent in wild-type mice. Both populations of Gr1(+CD11b(+ cells expressed high levels of arginase-1, and IL-17, additional markers of myeloid derived suppressor cells. We then sorted the Gr1(hi and Gr1(int populations from M. tuberculosis infected NOS-/- mice and placed the sorted both Gr1(int populations at different ratios with naïve or M. tuberculosis infected splenocytes and evaluated their ability to induce activation and proliferation of CD4+T cells. Our results showed that both Gr1(hi and Gr1(int cells were able to induce activation and proliferation of CD4+ T cells. However this response was reduced as the ratio of CD4(+ T to Gr1(+ cells increased. Our results

  11. Gr1intCD11b+ Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Orme, Ian M.; Ordway, Diane J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is one of the world’s leading killers, stealing 1.4 million lives and causing 8.7 million new and relapsed infections in 2011. The only vaccine against tuberculosis is BCG which demonstrates variable efficacy in adults worldwide. Human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in the influx of inflammatory cells to the lung in an attempt to wall off bacilli by forming a granuloma. Gr1intCD11b+ cells are called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and play a major role in regulation of inflammation in many pathological conditions. Although MDSC have been described primarily in cancer their function in tuberculosis remains unknown. During M. tuberculosis infection it is crucial to understand the function of cells involved in the regulation of inflammation during granuloma formation. Understanding their relative impact on the bacilli and other cellular phenotypes is necessary for future vaccine and drug design. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the bacterial burden, lung pathology and Gr1intCD11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell immune responses in M. tuberculosis infected NOS2-/-, RAG-/-, C3HeB/FeJ and C57/BL6 mice. Gr-1+ cells could be found on the edges of necrotic lung lesions in NOS2-/-, RAG-/-, and C3HeB/FeJ, but were absent in wild-type mice. Both populations of Gr1+CD11b+ cells expressed high levels of arginase-1, and IL-17, additional markers of myeloid derived suppressor cells. We then sorted the Gr1hi and Gr1int populations from M. tuberculosis infected NOS-/- mice and placed the sorted both Gr1int populations at different ratios with naïve or M. tuberculosis infected splenocytes and evaluated their ability to induce activation and proliferation of CD4+T cells. Our results showed that both Gr1hi and Gr1int cells were able to induce activation and proliferation of CD4+ T cells. However this response was reduced as the ratio of CD4+ T to Gr1+ cells increased. Our results illustrate a yet unrecognized interplay

  12. Added value of IP-10 as a read-out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenum, Synne; Dhanasekaran, Sivmakumaran; Ritz, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    We have explored the added value of IFNγ-inducible protein 10 as a read-out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific immunity in young Indian children where the sensitivity of the IGRA for tuberculosis (TB) is poor. Reduced frequency of indeterminate results and an increased sensitivity for TB...

  13. Increased risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in household child contacts exposed to passive tobacco smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Saranya; Karnani, Nisha; Connell, David W; Millington, Kerry A; Dosanjh, Davinder; Bakir, Mustafa; Soysal, Ahmet; Deeks, Jonathan; Lalvani, Ajit

    2014-12-01

    Risk factors associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection were investigated in a prospective cohort of household child tuberculosis contacts. A significantly increased risk of acquiring infection was associated with exposure to passive cigarette smoke, higher number of index cases, younger age and reduced household monthly income.

  14. Sterilization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Erdman Samples by Antimicrobial Fixation in a Biosafety Level 3 Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Schwebach, J. Reid; Jacobs, William R.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2001-01-01

    Incomplete sterilization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Erdman cultures followed 1 h of incubation in low concentrations of glutaraldehyde (0.5 and 1.0%) or azide. In contrast, 2.5% glutaraldehyde, paraformaldehyde (2 or 4%), Vesphine IIse or 5% formalin sterilized these samples after 1 h. These results suggest caution in removing fixed M. tuberculosis samples from biosafety level 3.

  15. Infection of great apes and a zoo keeper with the same Mycobacterium tuberculosis spoligotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, O.W.; Werf, van de T.S.; Rietkerk, F.; Eger, A.; Soolingen, D.; Loo, v.d. K.; Zanden, v.d. A.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    An animal keeper was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) after bi-annual screening for latent TB infection in zoo employees. In the same period, several bonobos of the zoo were suffering from TB as well. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from both the animal keeper and the bonobos appear

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Strain G-12-005

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; Bablishvili, Nino; Gauthier, Marie; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Infection caused by drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a growing concern, especially in eastern Europe. We report an annotated draft genome sequence of M. tuberculosis strain G-12-005 obtained from a patient in Georgia. PMID:24812221

  17. Population structure of mixed Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is strain genotype and culture medium dependent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanekom, M.; Streicher, E.M.; Berg, D. Van den; Cox, H.; McDermid, C.; Bosman, M.; Pittius, N.C. Gey van; Victor, T.C.; Kidd, M.; Soolingen, D. van; Helden, P.D. van; Warren, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Molecular genotyping methods have shown infection with more than one Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain genotype in a single sputum culture, indicating mixed infection. AIM: This study aimed to develop a PCR-based genotyping tool to determine the population structure of M. tuberculosis st

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1987 induces Th2 immune responses and enhances Mycobacterium smegmatis survival in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Shanshan; Shi, Xiaoxia; Deng, Guoying; Chen, Lina; Xin, Yi; Ma, Yufang

    2017-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can interfere with host immune response and escape clearance through its specific antigens. M. tuberculosis Rv1987 encoded by region of difference (RD)-2 gene is a secretory protein with immunogenic potency. Here, we investigated the impact of Rv1987 on host cytokine responses and T cell polarization in mouse aerosol model. A recombinant M. smegmatis mc(2)155 strain that overexpressed Rv1987 protein (named MS1987) was constructed and used to infect C57BL/6 mice. The mc(2)155 harbored the empty vector (named MSVec) was as a control. The results showed that MS1987 challenged mice promoted Th2-biased cytokine responses with lower secretion of IFN-γ but higher production of IL-4 and Rv1987-specific IgG antibody compared to MSVec infected mice. Neutrophilic inflammation and high bacterial burden were observed in the lung tissues of MS1987 infected mice probably own to the failed Th1 cell immunity. Besides, subcutaneous injection of Rv1987 protein could mediate the Th1 cytokine responses caused by M. bovis BCG in mice. These results indicated that M. tuberculosis Rv1987 protein could modulate host immune response towards Th2 profile, which probably contributed to the immune evasion of bacteria from host elimination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Global Efforts in the Development of Vaccines for Tuberculosis: Requirements for Improved Vaccines Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Samperio, P

    2016-10-01

    Currently, more than 9.0 million people develop acute pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) each year and about 1.5 million people worldwide die from this infection. Thus, developing vaccines to prevent active TB disease remains a priority. This article discusses recent progress in the development of new vaccines against TB and focusses on the main requirements for development of improved vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Over the last two decades, significant progress has been made in TB vaccine development, and some TB vaccine candidates have currently completed a phase III clinical trial. The potential public health benefits of these vaccines are possible, but it will need much more effort, including new global governance investment on this research. This investment would certainly be less than the annual global financial toll of TB treatment.

  20. Validation of a real-time PCR assay for the molecular identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Mariana L; Fonseca Júnior, Antônio Augusto; Orzil, Lívia; Alencar, Andrea Padilha; Silva, Marcio Roberto; Issa, Marina Azevedo; Soares Filho, Paulo Martins; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major cause of tuberculosis in humans. This bacillus gained prominence with the occurrence of HIV, presenting itself as an important opportunistic infection associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The current study aimed to develop a real-time PCR using Eva Green technology for molecular identification of M. tuberculosis isolates. The primers were designed to Rv1510 gene. Ninety nine samples of M. tuberculosis and sixty samples of M. bovis were tested and no sample of the bovine bacillus was detected by the qPCR. Statistical tests showed no difference between the qPCR and biochemical tests used to identify the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The correlation between tests was perfect with Kappa index of 1.0 (p tuberculosis in samples of bacterial suspension. TB reference laboratories (health and agriculture sectors), public health programs and epidemiological studies probably may benefit from such method.

  1. How dormant is Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latency? A study integrating genomics and molecular epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Rosenthal, Mariana; Rosenberg, Noah A;

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis may survive for decades in the human body in a state termed latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). We investigated the occurrence during LTBI of insertion/deletion events in a selected set of mononucleotide simple sequence repeats, DNA sequence changes in four M....... tuberculosis genes, and large sequence variations in 4750 M. tuberculosis open reading frames. We studied 13 paired M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, with each pair representing a reactivation of LTBI more than three decades after primary infection. Absence of sequence variations between paired isolates...

  2. How dormant is Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latency? A study integrating genomics and molecular epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Rosenthal, Mariana; Rosenberg, Noah A; Talarico, Sarah; Zhang, Lixin; Marrs, Carl; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Lillebaek, Troels; Andersen, Aase B

    2011-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis may survive for decades in the human body in a state termed latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). We investigated the occurrence during LTBI of insertion/deletion events in a selected set of mononucleotide simple sequence repeats, DNA sequence changes in four M. tuberculosis genes, and large sequence variations in 4750 M. tuberculosis open reading frames. We studied 13 paired M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, with each pair representing a reactivation of LTBI more than three decades after primary infection. Absence of sequence variations between paired isolates in nearly all investigated loci suggests a low likelihood of bacterial replication during LTBI.

  3. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from tuberculosis patients in the Serengeti ecosystem in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbugi, Erasto V; Katale, Bugwesa Z; Siame, Keith K; Keyyu, Julius D; Kendall, Sharon L; Dockrell, Hazel M; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Michel, Anita L; Rweyemamu, Mark M; Warren, Robin M; Matee, Mecky I; van Helden, Paul D

    2015-03-01

    This study was part of a larger cross-sectional survey that was evaluating tuberculosis (TB) infection in humans, livestock and wildlife in the Serengeti ecosystem in Tanzania. The study aimed at evaluating the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from TB patients attending health facilities in the Serengeti ecosystem. DNA was extracted from 214 sputum cultures obtained from consecutively enrolled newly diagnosed untreated TB patients aged ≥18 years. Spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping) and Mycobacterium Interspersed Repetitive Units and Variable Number Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) were used to genotype M. tuberculosis to establish the circulating lineages. Of the214 M. tuberculosis isolates genotyped, 55 (25.7%) belonged to the Central Asian (CAS) family, 52 (24.3%) were T family (an ill-defined family), 38 (17.8%) belonged to the Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) family, 25 (11.7%) to the East-African Indian (EAI) family, 25 (11.7%) comprised of different unassigned ('Serengeti') strain families, while 8 (3.7%) belonged to the Beijing family. A minority group that included Haarlem, X, U and S altogether accounted for 11 (5.2%) of all genotypes. MIRU-VNTR typing produced diverse patterns within and between families indicative of unlinked transmission chains. We conclude that, in the Serengeti ecosystem only a few successful families predominate namely CAS, T, LAM and EAI families. Other types found in lower prevalence are Beijing, Haarlem, X, S and MANU. The Haarlem, EAI_Somalia, LAM3 and S/convergent and X2 subfamilies found in this study were not reported in previous studies in Tanzania.

  4. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from tuberculosis patients in the Serengeti ecosystem in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbugi, Erasto V.; Katale, Bugwesa Z.; Siame, Keith K.; Keyyu, Julius D.; Kendall, Sharon L.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Streicher, Elizabeth M.; Michel, Anita L.; Rweyemamu, Mark M.; Warren, Robin M.; Matee, Mecky I.; van Helden, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study was part of a larger cross-sectional survey that was evaluating tuberculosis (TB) infection in humans, livestock and wildlife in the Serengeti ecosystem in Tanzania. The study aimed at evaluating the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from TB patients attending health facilities in the Serengeti ecosystem. DNA was extracted from 214 sputum cultures obtained from consecutively enrolled newly diagnosed untreated TB patients aged ≥18 years. Spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping) and Mycobacterium Interspersed Repetitive Units and Variable Number Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) were used to genotype M. tuberculosis to establish the circulating lineages. Of the214 M. tuberculosis isolates genotyped, 55 (25.7%) belonged to the Central Asian (CAS) family, 52 (24.3%) were T family (an ill-defined family), 38 (17.8%) belonged to the Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) family, 25 (11.7%) to the East-African Indian (EAI) family, 25 (11.7%) comprised of different unassigned (‘Serengeti’) strain families, while 8 (3.7%) belonged to the Beijing family. A minority group that included Haarlem, X, U and S altogether accounted for 11 (5.2%) of all genotypes. MIRU-VNTR typing produced diverse patterns within and between families indicative of unlinked transmission chains. We conclude that, in the Serengeti ecosystem only a few successful families predominate namely CAS, T, LAM and EAI families. Other types found in lower prevalence are Beijing, Haarlem, X, S and MANU. The Haarlem, EAI_Somalia, LAM3 and S/convergent and X2 subfamilies found in this study were not reported in previous studies in Tanzania. PMID:25522841

  5. Biochemical Characterization of Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villela, Anne Drumond; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Rosado, Leonardo Astolfi; Bloch, Carlos Junior; Prates, Maura Vianna; Gonçalves, Danieli Cristina; Ramos, Carlos Henrique Inacio; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diogenes Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) catalyzes the conversion of uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) and pyrophosphate (PPi). UPRT plays an important role in the pyrimidine salvage pathway since UMP is a common precursor of all pyrimidine nucleotides. Here we describe cloning, expression and purification to homogeneity of upp-encoded UPRT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUPRT). Mass spectrometry and N-terminal amino acid sequencing unambiguously identified the homogeneous protein as MtUPRT. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that native MtUPRT follows a monomer-tetramer association model. MtUPRT is specific for uracil. GTP is not a modulator of MtUPRT ativity. MtUPRT was not significantly activated or inhibited by ATP, UTP, and CTP. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry studies suggest that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism, in which PRPP binding is followed by uracil, and PPi product is released first followed by UMP. The pH-rate profiles indicated that groups with pK values of 5.7 and 8.1 are important for catalysis, and a group with a pK value of 9.5 is involved in PRPP binding. The results here described provide a solid foundation on which to base upp gene knockout aiming at the development of strategies to prevent tuberculosis. PMID:23424660

  6. Amperometric immunosensor for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraiwa, Morgan; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Inoue, Shinnosuke; Becker, Annie L.; Weigel, Kris M.; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been a major public health problem, which can be better controlled by using accurate and rapid diagnosis in low-resource settings. A simple, portable, and sensitive detection method is required for point-of-care (POC) settings. This paper studies an amperometric biosensor using a microtip immunoassay for a rapid and low-cost detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in sputum. MTB in sputum is specifically captured on the functionalized microtip surface and detected by electric current. According to the numerical study, the current signal on the microtip surface is linearly changed with increasing immersion depth. Using a reference microtip, the immersion depth is compensated for a sensing microtip. On the microtip surface, target bacteria are concentrated and organized by a coffee-ring effect, which amplifies the electric current. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, both the sample processing and rinsing steps are presented with the use of deionized water as a medium for the amperometric measurement. When applied to cultured MTB cells spiked into human sputum, the detection limit was 100 CFU mL-1, comparable to a more labor-intensive fluorescence detection method reported previously.

  7. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium africanum, United States, 2004-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aditya; Bloss, Emily; Heilig, Charles M; Click, Eleanor S

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium africanum is endemic to West Africa and causes tuberculosis (TB). We reviewed reported cases of TB in the United States during 2004-2013 that had lineage assigned by genotype (spoligotype and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit variable number tandem repeats). M. africanum caused 315 (0.4%) of 73,290 TB cases with lineage assigned by genotype. TB caused by M. africanum was associated more with persons from West Africa (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 253.8, 95% CI 59.9-1,076.1) and US-born black persons (aOR 5.7, 95% CI 1.2-25.9) than with US-born white persons. TB caused by M. africanum did not show differences in clinical characteristics when compared with TB caused by M. tuberculosis. Clustered cases defined as >2 cases in a county with identical 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit genotypes, were less likely for M. africanum (aOR 0.1, 95% CI 0.1-0.4), which suggests that M. africanum is not commonly transmitted in the United States.

  8. Succinate dehydrogenase is the regulator of respiration in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis Hartman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In chronic infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli are thought to enter a metabolic program that provides sufficient energy for maintenance of the protonmotive force, but is insufficient to meet the demands of cellular growth. We sought to understand this metabolic downshift genetically by targeting succinate dehydrogenase, the enzyme which couples the growth processes controlled by the TCA cycle with the energy production resulting from the electron transport chain. M. tuberculosis contains two operons which are predicted to encode succinate dehydrogenase enzymes (sdh-1 and sdh-2; we found that deletion of Sdh1 contributes to an inability to survive long term stationary phase. Stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry revealed that Sdh1 functions as a succinate dehydrogenase during aerobic growth, and that Sdh2 is dispensable for this catalysis, but partially overlapping activities ensure that the loss of one enzyme can incompletely compensate for loss of the other. Deletion of Sdh1 disturbs the rate of respiration via the mycobacterial electron transport chain, resulting in an increased proportion of reduced electron carrier (menaquinol which leads to increased oxygen consumption. The loss of respiratory control leads to an inability to recover from stationary phase. We propose a model in which succinate dehydrogenase is a governor of cellular respiration in the adaptation to low oxygen environments.

  9. Structural Basis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Transcription and Transcription Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Mandal, Soma; Degen, David; Liu, Yu; Ebright, Yon W; Li, Shengjian; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Mandal, Sukhendu; Jiang, Yi; Liu, Shuang; Gigliotti, Matthew; Talaue, Meliza; Connell, Nancy; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Ebright, Richard H

    2017-04-20

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the causative agent of tuberculosis, which kills 1.8 million annually. Mtb RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the target of the first-line antituberculosis drug rifampin (Rif). We report crystal structures of Mtb RNAP, alone and in complex with Rif, at 3.8-4.4 Å resolution. The results identify an Mtb-specific structural module of Mtb RNAP and establish that Rif functions by a steric-occlusion mechanism that prevents extension of RNA. We also report non-Rif-related compounds-Nα-aroyl-N-aryl-phenylalaninamides (AAPs)-that potently and selectively inhibit Mtb RNAP and Mtb growth, and we report crystal structures of Mtb RNAP in complex with AAPs. AAPs bind to a different site on Mtb RNAP than Rif, exhibit no cross-resistance with Rif, function additively when co-administered with Rif, and suppress resistance emergence when co-administered with Rif. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Southwest Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ojo, Olabisi O

    2010-10-01

    Tuberculosis has had significant effects on Ireland over the past two centuries, causing persistently higher morbidity and mortality than in neighbouring countries until the last decade. This study describes the results of genotyping and drug susceptibility testing of 171 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated between January 2004 and December 2006 in a region of Ireland centred on the city of Cork. Spoligotype comparisons were made with the SpolDB4 database and clustered 130 strains in 23 groups, forty-one strains showed unique Spoligotyping patterns. The commonest spoligotypes detected were ST0137 (X2) (16.9%), and ST0351 (15.8%) (\\'U\\' clade). The major spoligotype clades were X (26.2%), U (19.3%), T (15.2%), Beijing (5.9%), Haarlem (4.7%), LAM (4.1%), BOVIS (1.75%), with 12.9% unassigned strains. A 24-locus VNTR genotyping produced 15 clusters containing 49 isolates, with high discrimination index (HGDI>0.99). A combination of Spoligotyping and VNTR reduced the number of clustered isolates to 47 in 15 clusters (27.5%). This study identified ST351 as common among Irish nationals, and found a low rate of drug resistance with little evidence of transmission of drug resistant strains. Strain clustering was significantly associated with age under 55 years and Irish nationality. Only strains of Euro-American lineage formed clusters. Molecular typing did not completely coincide with the results of contact investigations.

  11. Roles of Mucosal Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Deng, Guangcun; Li, Min; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is one of the world's leading infectious causes of morbidity and mortality. As a mucosal-transmitted pathogen, Mtb infects humans and animals mainly through the mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Apart from providing a physical barrier against the invasion of pathogen, the major function of the respiratory mucosa may be to serve as the inductive sites to initiate mucosal immune responses and sequentially provide the first line of defense for the host to defend against this pathogen. A large body of studies in the animals and humans have demonstrated that the mucosal immune system, rather than the systemic immune system, plays fundamental roles in the host's defense against Mtb infection. Therefore, the development of new vaccines and novel delivery routes capable of directly inducing respiratory mucosal immunity is emphasized for achieving enhanced protection from Mtb infection. In this paper, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mucosal immunity against Mtb infection, including the development of TB vaccines, and respiratory delivery routes to enhance mucosal immunity are discussed.

  12. Genetics-directed drug discovery for combating Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yuan; Xiong, Le; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2017-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the pathogen of tuberculosis (TB), is one of the most infectious bacteria in the world. The traditional strategy to combat TB involves targeting the pathogen directly; however, the rapid evolution of drug resistance lessens the efficiency of this anti-TB method. Therefore, in recent years, some researchers have turned to an alternative anti-TB strategy, which hinders Mtb infection through targeting host genes. In this work, using a theoretical genetic analysis, we identified 170 Mtb infection-associated genes from human genetic variations related to Mtb infection. Then, the agents targeting these genes were identified to have high potential as anti-TB drugs. In particular, the agents that can target multiple Mtb infection-associated genes are more druggable than the single-target counterparts. These potential anti-TB agents were further screened by gene expression data derived from connectivity map. As a result, some agents were revealed to have high interest for experimental evaluation. This study not only has important implications for anti-TB drug discovery, but also provides inspirations for streamlining the pipeline of modern drug discovery.

  13. Roles of Mucosal Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, is one of the world's leading infectious causes of morbidity and mortality. As a mucosal-transmitted pathogen, Mtb infects humans and animals mainly through the mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Apart from providing a physical barrier against the invasion of pathogen, the major function of the respiratory mucosa may be to serve as the inductive sites to initiate mucosal immune responses and sequentially provide the first line of defense for the host to defend against this pathogen. A large body of studies in the animals and humans have demonstrated that the mucosal immune system, rather than the systemic immune system, plays fundamental roles in the host’s defense against Mtb infection. Therefore, the development of new vaccines and novel delivery routes capable of directly inducing respiratory mucosal immunity is emphasized for achieving enhanced protection from Mtb infection. In this paper, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mucosal immunity against Mtb infection, including the development of TB vaccines, and respiratory delivery routes to enhance mucosal immunity are discussed.

  14. Biochemical characterization of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Drumond Villela

    Full Text Available Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT catalyzes the conversion of uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP to uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP and pyrophosphate (PP(i. UPRT plays an important role in the pyrimidine salvage pathway since UMP is a common precursor of all pyrimidine nucleotides. Here we describe cloning, expression and purification to homogeneity of upp-encoded UPRT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUPRT. Mass spectrometry and N-terminal amino acid sequencing unambiguously identified the homogeneous protein as MtUPRT. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that native MtUPRT follows a monomer-tetramer association model. MtUPRT is specific for uracil. GTP is not a modulator of MtUPRT ativity. MtUPRT was not significantly activated or inhibited by ATP, UTP, and CTP. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry studies suggest that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism, in which PRPP binding is followed by uracil, and PP(i product is released first followed by UMP. The pH-rate profiles indicated that groups with pK values of 5.7 and 8.1 are important for catalysis, and a group with a pK value of 9.5 is involved in PRPP binding. The results here described provide a solid foundation on which to base upp gene knockout aiming at the development of strategies to prevent tuberculosis.

  15. [Risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Jalisco, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloyd, S; López, J L; Mercado, F J; Durning, J

    1991-11-01

    Using a modified cluster sample design, skin tests with two TU PPD were performed on 4,083 first-grade children (mean age 6,7 years) in the state of Jalisco, Mexico, to estimate the annual risk of infection from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The proportion of PPD reactions (a diameter of 10 mm or more of induration) was 7.6% in the Guadalajara metropolitan area and 5.5% in the rest of Jalisco. In the total sample, the proportion was 7.4% among children with scars attributed to BCG vaccine and 4.5% in children without BCG scars. The weighted proportion of children with PPD reactions of 10 mm or more was 6.8% statewide. The average annual risk of infection estimated from the group that had not received BCG vaccine was 0.82%. The results suggest that the incidence of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis is almost 10 times greater than the number of cases registered annually in Jalisco.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Southwest Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Olabisi O; Sheehan, Stella; Corcoran, Daniel G; Nikolayevsky, Vladyslav; Brown, Timothy; O'Sullivan, Margaret; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; Gordon, Stephen V; Drobniewski, Francis; Prentice, Michael B

    2010-10-01

    Tuberculosis has had significant effects on Ireland over the past two centuries, causing persistently higher morbidity and mortality than in neighbouring countries until the last decade. This study describes the results of genotyping and drug susceptibility testing of 171 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated between January 2004 and December 2006 in a region of Ireland centred on the city of Cork. Spoligotype comparisons were made with the SpolDB4 database and clustered 130 strains in 23 groups, forty-one strains showed unique Spoligotyping patterns. The commonest spoligotypes detected were ST0137 (X2) (16.9%), and ST0351 (15.8%) ('U' clade). The major spoligotype clades were X (26.2%), U (19.3%), T (15.2%), Beijing (5.9%), Haarlem (4.7%), LAM (4.1%), BOVIS (1.75%), with 12.9% unassigned strains. A 24-locus VNTR genotyping produced 15 clusters containing 49 isolates, with high discrimination index (HGDI>0.99). A combination of Spoligotyping and VNTR reduced the number of clustered isolates to 47 in 15 clusters (27.5%). This study identified ST351 as common among Irish nationals, and found a low rate of drug resistance with little evidence of transmission of drug resistant strains. Strain clustering was significantly associated with age under 55 years and Irish nationality. Only strains of Euro-American lineage formed clusters. Molecular typing did not completely coincide with the results of contact investigations.

  17. Mixed Infections and Rifampin Heteroresistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao; Li, Song; Luo, Zhongyue; Pi, Rui; Sun, Honghu; He, Qingxia; Tang, Ke; Luo, Mei; Li, Yuqing; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Sun, Qun

    2015-07-01

    Mixed infections and heteroresistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contribute to the difficulty of diagnosis, treatment, and control of tuberculosis. However, there is still no proper solution for these issues. This study aimed to investigate the potential relationship between mixed infections and heteroresistance and to determine the high-risk groups related to these factors. A total of 499 resistant and susceptible isolates were subjected to spoligotyping and 24-locus variable-number tandem repeat methods to analyze their genotypic lineages and the occurrence of mixed infections. Two hundred ninety-two randomly selected isolates were sequenced on their rpoB gene to examine mutations and heteroresistance. The results showed that 12 patients had mixed infections, and the corresponding isolates belonged to Manu2 (n = 8), Beijing (n = 2), T (n = 1), and unknown (n = 1) lineages. Manu2 was found to be significantly associated with mixed infections (odds ratio, 47.72; confidence interval, 9.68 to 235.23; P mutation in the rpoB gene were significantly associated with mixed infections (χ(2), 56.78; P mutation in the rpoB gene to become rifampin resistant. Further studies should focus on this lineage to clarify its relevance to mixed infections.

  18. Characterization and Transcriptome Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Persisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Iris; Minami, Shoko; Rubin, Eric; Lewis, Kim

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculosis continues to be a major public health problem in many parts of the world. Significant obstacles in controlling the epidemic are the length of treatment and the large reservoir of latently infected people. Bacteria form dormant, drug-tolerant persister cells, which may be responsible for the difficulty in treating both acute and latent infections. We find that in Mycobacterium  tuberculosis, low numbers of drug-tolerant persisters are present in lag and early exponential phases, increasing sharply at late exponential and stationary phases to make up ~1% of the population. This suggests that persister formation is governed by both stochastic and deterministic mechanisms. In order to isolate persisters, an exponentially growing population was treated with d-cycloserine, and cells surviving lysis were collected by centrifugation. A transcriptome of persisters was obtained by using hybridization to an Affymetrix array. The transcriptome shows downregulation of metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, consistent with a certain degree of dormancy. A set of genes was upregulated in persisters, and these are likely involved in persister formation and maintenance. A comparison of the persister transcriptome with transcriptomes obtained for several in vitro dormancy models identified a small number of genes upregulated in all cases, which may represent a core dormancy response. PMID:21673191

  19. Dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase is critical for Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuangping; Ehrt, Sabine

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has evolved to persist in host macrophages, where it faces a nutrient-poor environment and is exposed to oxidative and nitrosative stress. To defend itself against oxidative/nitrosative stress, M. tuberculosis expresses an NADH-dependent peroxidase and peroxynitrite reductase that is encoded by ahpC, ahpD, lpd, and dlaT. In addition to its central role in the peroxynitrite reductase complex, dlaT (Rv2215) also encodes the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of dlaT in the chromosome of H37Rv resulted in a mutant (H37RvDeltadlaT) that displayed phenotypes associated with DlaT's role in metabolism and in defense against nitrosative stress. The H37RvDeltadlaT strain showed retarded growth in vitro and was highly susceptible to killing by acidified sodium nitrite. Mouse macrophages readily killed intracellular H37RvDeltadlaT organisms, and in mice dlaT was required for full virulence.

  20. Tuberculosis in Goats and Sheep in Afar Pastoral Region of Ethiopia and Isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gezahegne Mamo Kassa

    2012-01-01

    epidemiology of tuberculosis in goats and sheep using comparative intradermal tuberculin skin test, postmortem examination, mycobacteriological culture and molecular typing methods. The overall animal prevalence of TB in small ruminants was 0.5% (95% CI: 0.2%–0.7% at ≥4 mm and 3.8% (95% CI: 3%–4.7% at cutoff ≥2 mm. The herd prevalence was 20% (95% CI: 12–28% and 47% (95% CI: 37–56% at ≥4 mm and ≥2 mm cut-off points, respectively. The overall animal prevalence of Mycobacterium avium complex infection was 2.8% (95% CI: 2.1–3.5% and 6.8% (95% CI: 5.8–7.9% at ≥4 mm and ≥2 mm cut-off points, respectively. Mycobacteriological culture and molecular characterization of isolates from tissue lesions of tuberculin reactor goats resulted in isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (SIT149 and non-tuberculosis mycobacteria as causative agents of tuberculosis and tuberculosis-like diseases in goats, respectively. The isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in goat suggests a potential transmission of the causative agent from human and warrants further investigation in the role of small ruminants in epidemiology of human tuberculosis in the region.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of the Beijing genotype are rarely observed in tuberculosis patients in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Ritacco

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a cause of tuberculosis (TB in South America was determined by analyzing genotypes of strains isolated from patients that had been diagnosed with the disease between 1997 and 2003 in seven countries of the subcontinent. In total, 19 of the 1,202 (1.6% TB cases carried Beijing isolates, including 11 of the 185 patients from Peru (5.9%, five of the 512 patients from Argentina (1.0%, two of the 252 Brazilian cases (0.8%, one of the 166 patients from Paraguay (0.6% and none of the samples obtained from Chile (35, Colombia (36 and Ecuador (16. Except for two patients that were East Asian immigrants, all cases with Beijing strains were native South Americans. No association was found between carrying a strain with the Beijing genotype and having drug or multi-drug resistant disease. Our data show that presently transmission of M. tuberculosis strains of the Beijing genotype is not frequent in Latin America. In addition, the lack of association of drug resistant TB and infection with M. tuberculosis of the Beijing genotype observed presently demands efforts to define better the contribution of the virulence and lack of response to treatment to the growing spread of Beijing strains observed in other parts of the world.

  2. Fast and efficient detection of tuberculosis antigens using liposome encapsulated secretory proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Dileep; Haque, Shafiul; Tiwari, Ram P; Jawed, Arshad; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2017-04-01

    A rapid and efficient diagnostic test was developed for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in serum samples of active tuberculosis (TB) and extrapulmonary TB patients via a liposomal agglutination-based method. A rapid card test has been developed to facilitate the recognition of high-affinity binding rabbit raised purified culture filtrate protein antibodies coupled on the surface of activated liposomal preparation. In the presence of TB antigens, the polyclonal antibodies bound to the liposomal particles demonstrate a visible agglutination reaction. The developed assay was simple, rapid, reliable, sensitive, and specific as a diagnostic test for the detection of antigens in serum samples of clinically confirmed cases of TB within 4-5 minutes' duration. The test was evaluated at different hospitals, medical colleges, and pathology centers, and involved 1483 participants. This investigation was conducted to detect the presence of these antigens during the period of active growth of the microorganism in serum samples for pulmonary TB and processed tissue biopsy for other extrapulmonary TB. Results obtained using this test were compared with acid-fast bacilli smear and culture results. Our study demonstrated that the newly developed liposome tuberculosis antigen card test detected antigens in our study population with approximately 97.48% sensitivity and 95.79% specificity. This is the first study to report the liposomal encapsulation of culture filtrate proteins from M. tuberculosis for diagnostic application. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The influence of host and bacterial genotype on the development of disseminated disease with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The factors that govern the development of tuberculosis disease are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that some strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) are more capable of causing disseminated disease than others and may be associated with polymorphisms in host genes responsible for the innate immune response to infection. We compared the host and bacterial genotype in 187 Vietnamese adults with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and 237 Vietnamese adults with uncomplicated p...

  4. Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis lymphadenitis patients in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fantahun Biadglegne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The emergence of drug resistance tuberculosis (TB is a significant challenge for TB control and prevention programmes, and the major problem is multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB. The present study was carried out to determine the frequency of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates among newly and retreated TB lymphadenitis patients and risk factors for acquiring this infection. Methods: Two hundred twenty five M. tuberculosis isolates from TB lymphadenitis patients who were diagnosed as new and retreated tuberculosis cases between April 2012 and May 2012 were included in this study. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to isoniazed (INH, rifampicin (RMP, streptomycin (SM, ethambutol (EMB and pyrazinamide (PZA using the BacT/AlerT 3D system protocol. Results: Among 225 isolates, 15 (6.7% were resistant to at least one first line anti-TB drug. Three (1.3% were MDR-TB. Resistance to INH, RMP, SM, and EMB was found in 8 (3.6%, 4 (1.8%, 10 (4.4%, and 4 (1.8% isolates, respectively. Of the 212 new TB lymphadenitis cases three (1.4% were MDR-TB. A rifampicin resistant M. tuberculosis isolate was diagnosed from smear and culture negative newly treated cases. All isolates were susceptible to PZA. Matted cervical lymph nodes were the prominent sites involved. Newly treated TB lymphadenitis patients had a greater risk for presenting resistance to anti-TB drugs ( p =0.046. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed that TB lymphadenitis patients harboured drug resistant TB and MDR-TB, although at a low rate. Resistance was not associated with age, sex, patients′ education and contact history. Further research is required to determine transmission dynamics of drug resistant strains.

  5. Humoral response to low molecular weight antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by tuberculosis patients and contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck S.T.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has been devoted to the identification of immunologically important antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to the combination of target antigens to which antibodies from serum of tuberculous patients could react specifically. We searched for IgG antibodies specific for antigens of 45 to 6 kDa obtained after sonication of the well-characterized wild M. tuberculosis strain in order to detect differences in the antibody response to low molecular weight antigens from M. tuberculosis between patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and contacts. Specific IgG antibodies for these antigens were detected by Western blot analysis of 153 serum samples collected from 51 patients with confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis. Three samples were collected from each patient: before therapy, and after 2 and 6 months of treatment. We also analyzed 25 samples obtained from contacts, as well as 30 samples from healthy individuals with known tuberculin status, 50 samples from patients with other lung diseases and 200 samples from healthy blood donors. The positive predictive value for associated IgG reactivity against the 6-kDa and 16-kDa antigens, 6 and 38 kDa, and 16 and 38 kDa was 100% since simultaneous reactivity for these antigens was absent in healthy individuals and individuals with other lung diseases. This association was observed in 67% of the patients, but in only 8% of the contacts. The humoral response against antigens of 16 and 6 kDa seems to be important for the detection of latent tuberculosis since the associated reactivity to these antigens is mainly present in individuals with active disease.

  6. Longitudinal assessment of an ELISPOT test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip C Hill

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Very little longitudinal information is available regarding the performance of T cell-based tests for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To address this deficiency, we conducted a longitudinal assessment of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot test (ELISPOT test in comparison to the standard tuberculin skin test (TST.In tuberculosis (TB contacts we repeated ELISPOT tests 3 mo (n = 341 and 18 mo (n = 210 after recruitment and TSTs at 18 mo (n = 130. We evaluated factors for association with conversion and reversion and investigated suspected cases of TB. Of 207 ELISPOT-negative contacts, 51 (24.6% had 3-mo ELISPOT conversion, which was associated with a positive recruitment TST (odds ratio [OR] 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-5.0, p = 0.048 and negatively associated with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccination (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.2-1.0, p = 0.06. Of 134 contacts, 54 (40.2% underwent 3-mo ELISPOT reversion, which was less likely in those with a positive recruitment TST (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.8, p = 0.014. Between 3 and 18 mo, 35/132 (26.5% contacts underwent ELISPOT conversion and 28/78 (35.9% underwent ELISPOT reversion. Of the 210 contacts with complete results, 73 (34.8% were ELISPOT negative at all three time points; 36 (17.1% were positive at all three time points. Between recruitment and 18 mo, 20 (27% contacts had ELISPOT conversion; 37 (50% had TST conversion, which was associated with a positive recruitment ELISPOT (OR 7.2, 95% CI 1.4-37.1, p = 0.019; 18 (32.7% underwent ELISPOT reversion; and five (8.9% underwent TST reversion. Results in 13 contacts diagnosed as having TB were mixed, but suggested higher TST sensitivity.Both ELISPOT conversion and reversion occur after M. tuberculosis exposure. Rapid ELISPOT reversion may reflect M. tuberculosis clearance or transition into dormancy and may contribute to the relatively low reported ELISPOT conversion rate. Therefore, a negative ELISPOT test for M. tuberculosis infection should

  7. Evaluation of the results of Mycobacterium tuberculosis direct test (MTD and Mycobacterial culture in urine samples Avaliação de resultados do Teste Direto para Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTD e da cultura para micobacterias em amostras de urina

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    Asli Gamze Sener

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a public health problem in Turkey. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays a key role in control of infection. In this article, the Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test (MTD was evaluated for detection of M. tuberculosis in urine samples. The performance of the MTD was very good and appropriate for routine laboratory diagnosis.A tuberculose continua sendo um problema de saúde pública na Turquia. A detecção rápida de Mycobacterium tuberculosis tem um papel importante no controle da infecção. Nesse artigo, avaliou-se o Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Test (MTD para detecção de M. tuberculosis em amostras de urina. O desempenho do MTD foi muito bom e adequado para diagnóstico laboratorial de rotina.

  8. Networked T cell death following macrophage infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Stephen H-F Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of T cells following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb impairs disease resolution, and interferes with clinical test performance that relies on cell-mediated immunity. A number of mechanisms contribute to this T cell suppression, such as activation-induced death and trafficking of T cells out of the peripheral circulation and into the diseased lungs. The extent to which Mtb infection of human macrophages affects T cell viability however, is not well characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lymphopenia (<1.5 × 10(9 cells/l was prevalent among culture-positive tuberculosis patients, and lymphocyte counts significantly improved post-therapy. We previously reported that Mtb-infected human macrophages resulted in death of infected and uninfected bystander macrophages. In the current study, we sought to examine the influence of infected human alveolar macrophages on T cells. We infected primary human alveolar macrophages (the primary host cell for Mtb or PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells with Mtb H37Ra, then prepared cell-free supernatants. The supernatants of Mtb-infected macrophages caused dose-dependent, caspase-dependent, T cell apoptosis. This toxic effect of infected macrophage secreted factors did not require TNF-α or Fas. The supernatant cytotoxic signal(s were heat-labile and greater than 50 kDa in molecular size. Although ESAT-6 was toxic to T cells, other Mtb-secreted factors tested did not influence T cell viability; nor did macrophage-free Mtb bacilli or broth from Mtb cultures. Furthermore, supernatants from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG- infected macrophages also elicited T cell death suggesting that ESAT-6 itself, although cytotoxic, was not the principal mediator of T cell death in our system. CONCLUSIONS: Mtb-Infected macrophages secrete heat-labile factors that are toxic to T cells, and may contribute to the immunosuppression seen in tuberculosis as well as

  9. Portrait of a pathogen: the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteome in vivo.

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    Nicole A Kruh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, is a facultative intracellular pathogen that can persist within the host. The bacteria are thought to be in a state of reduced replication and metabolism as part of the chronic lung infection. Many in vitro studies have dissected the hypothesized environment within the infected lung, defining the bacterial response to pH, starvation and hypoxia. While these experiments have afforded great insight, the picture remains incomplete. The only way to study the combined effects of these environmental factors and the mycobacterial response is to study the bacterial response in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the guinea pig model of tuberculosis to examine the bacterial proteome during the early and chronic stages of disease. Lungs were harvested thirty and ninety days after aerosol challenge with Mtb, and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. To date, in vivo proteomics of the tubercle bacillus has not been described and this work has generated the first large-scale shotgun proteomic data set, comprising over 500 unique protein identifications. Cell wall and cell wall processes, and intermediary metabolism and respiration were the two major functional classes of proteins represented in the infected lung. These classes of proteins displayed the greatest heterogeneity indicating important biological processes for establishment of a productive bacterial infection and its persistence. Proteins necessary for adaptation throughout infection, such as nitrate/nitrite reduction were found at both time points. The PE-PPE protein class, while not well characterized, represented the third most abundant category and showed the most consistent expression during the infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cumulatively, the results of this work may provide the basis for rational drug design - identifying numerous Mtb proteins, from essential kinases to

  10. Assessment of trends of ofloxacin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    J S Verma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ofloxacin (OFX is one of the potent fluoroquinolone (FQ recommended to treat MDR-TB. Over a decade, the preexposure of this drug for the treatment of other bacterial infections has resulted in acquisition of FQ resistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Considering this possibility, a study was undertaken in a tertiary care center in the capital city (India to assess the drug resistance trends of OFX among susceptible and multidrug resistant (MDR strains of M. tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 102 M. tuberculosis isolates (47 susceptible to first-line drugs and 55 MDR isolates were screened for susceptibility testing of OFX with a critical concentration of 2 μg/ml by Lowenstein Jensen (LJ proportion method. Results: The results showed 40 (85.1% isolates among 47 susceptible isolates and 34 (61.8% isolates among 55 MDR isolates, were found to be susceptible to OFX. Fisher′s exact test showed significant P-value (0.0136 demonstrating 1.377 fold (95% confidence interval increased risk to become resistant to OFX than susceptible isolates. These finding shows decreased OFX susceptibility is not only limited to MDR isolates but also increasingly seen in susceptible strains as a result of drug abuse. Conclusions: Our finding were not alarming, but highlights the general risk of acquiring resistance to OFX, jeopardizing the potential for these drugs to be used as second-line anti-TB agents in the management of drug-resistant TB and creating incurable TB strains .

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Gansu province of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Li-li; ZHU Bing-dong; SI Hong-yan; MU Tao-jun; FAN Wen-bing; WANG Jing; JIANG Wei-min; LI Qing; YANG Biao; ZHANG Ying

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) and Beijing family typing based on detecting the deletion of RD105 sequence are two common genotyping methods used to study the molecular epidemiologic characteristics of Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis.We collected 218 strains of M.tuberculosis between 2004 and 2006 in the Linxia Hui Autonomous Prefecture of Gansu province in Northwest China.Methods MIRU-VNTR analysis and Beijing family typing based on detecting the deletion of RD105 sequence were used to type the 218 strains,and their typing power was evaluated to look for practical and efficient genotyping methods suitable for the region.Results The MIRU typing yielded 115 distinct genotypes,including 98 unique isolates and 17 different clusters containing 120 isolates (55.05%); the cluster rate was 47.25%.By detecting the deletion of RD105 sequence,188 of 218 (86.23%) isolates belonged to Beijing family.Combination of Beijing family typing and MIRU typing yielded 118 distinct patterns,including 101 unique isolates and 17 clusters containing 117 isolates (54.13%).The largest cluster contained 58 strains with MIRU genotype of 223325173533 which contained 50 strains belonging to Beijing family and 8 strains belonging to non-Beijing family.Conclusions The Beijing family strains occupied a large proportion and the Beijing family MIRU genotype 223325173533 is a dominant strain in Linxia of Gansu.Combining detecting the deletion of RD105 and MIRU typing together provides a simple,fast,and effective method which is low in cost and might be practical and suitable for M.tuberculosis genotyping in China.

  12. Characteristics of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in southern Brazil.

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    Perizzolo, Paulo F; Dalla Costa, Elis R; Ribeiro, Andrezza W; Spies, Fernanda S; Ribeiro, Marta O; Dias, Cláudia F; Unis, Gisela; Almeida da Silva, Pedro; Gomes, Harrison M; Suffys, Philip N; Rossetti, Maria Lucia R

    2012-01-01

    A major threat to tuberculosis (TB) control programs is the emergence of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains that cause TB that cannot be cured by standard anti-TB drug regimens. Because few data exist on MDR-TB in this region of the country, we performed an epidemiologic study that combined conventional and molecular analysis of MDR-TB cases from Rio Grande do Sul (RS) that were diagnosed in this period and included cases that were under treatment with second line drug schemes. Included were 121 MDR cases and sequencing of rpoB and katG showed that 106 (87.6%) strains were mutated in rpoB and 97 (80.2%) in katG. Spoligotyping demonstrated that the LAM genotype was predominant (n = 70, 57.8%) and included the largest group composed by 22 (18.1%) strains with the LAM5 ST93 genotype. Other main genotypes belonged to the families T (n = 22, 18.2%), U family (n = 16, 13.2%), Haarlem (n = 5, 4.1%) and X (n = 1, 0.8%). Genotyping by IS6110-RFLP analysis showed 51 distinct fingerprints, 38 (31.4%) of these observed only once and the other 13 patterns being shared among the rest of the isolates (n = 83, 68.6%). Among the 22 strains that were LAM5 ST93, only two had different IS6110-RFLP genotypes. In conclusion, there exists a high degree of M. Tuberculosis genotype clustering among MDR-TB cases in Rio Grande do Sul. Moreover, we observed a large MDR-TB outbreak.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis TlyA Protein Negatively Regulates T Helper (Th) 1 and Th17 Differentiation and Promotes Tuberculosis Pathogenesis.

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    Rahman, Md Aejazur; Sobia, Parveen; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Bhawsar, Aakansha; Singh, Dhiraj Kumar; Sharma, Pawan; Moodley, Prashini; Van Kaer, Luc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2015-06-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is an ancient pathogen and a major cause of death worldwide. Although various virulence factors of M. tuberculosis have been identified, its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. TlyA is a virulence factor in several bacterial infections and is evolutionarily conserved in many Gram-positive bacteria, but its function in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we report that TlyA significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. We show that a TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis strain induces increased IL-12 and reduced IL-1β and IL-10 cytokine responses, which sharply contrasts with the immune responses induced by wild type M. tuberculosis. Furthermore, compared with wild type M. tuberculosis, TlyA-deficient M. tuberculosis bacteria are more susceptible to autophagy in macrophages. Consequently, animals infected with the TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis organisms exhibited increased host-protective immune responses, reduced bacillary load, and increased survival compared with animals infected with wild type M. tuberculosis. Thus, M. tuberculosis employs TlyA as a host evasion factor, thereby contributing to its virulence.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis TlyA Protein Negatively Regulates T Helper (Th) 1 and Th17 Differentiation and Promotes Tuberculosis Pathogenesis*

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    Rahman, Md. Aejazur; Sobia, Parveen; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Bhawsar, Aakansha; Singh, Dhiraj Kumar; Sharma, Pawan; Moodley, Prashini; Van Kaer, Luc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is an ancient pathogen and a major cause of death worldwide. Although various virulence factors of M. tuberculosis have been identified, its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. TlyA is a virulence factor in several bacterial infections and is evolutionarily conserved in many Gram-positive bacteria, but its function in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we report that TlyA significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. We show that a TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis strain induces increased IL-12 and reduced IL-1β and IL-10 cytokine responses, which sharply contrasts with the immune responses induced by wild type M. tuberculosis. Furthermore, compared with wild type M. tuberculosis, TlyA-deficient M. tuberculosis bacteria are more susceptible to autophagy in macrophages. Consequently, animals infected with the TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis organisms exhibited increased host-protective immune responses, reduced bacillary load, and increased survival compared with animals infected with wild type M. tuberculosis. Thus, M. tuberculosis employs TlyA as a host evasion factor, thereby contributing to its virulence. PMID:25847237

  15. Protection against tuberculosis in Eurasian wild boar vaccinated with heat-inactivated Mycobacterium bovis.

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    Joseba M Garrido

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB caused by Mycobacterium bovis and closely related members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex continues to affect humans and animals worldwide and its control requires vaccination of wildlife reservoir species such as Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa. Vaccination efforts for TB control in wildlife have been based primarily on oral live BCG formulations. However, this is the first report of the use of oral inactivated vaccines for controlling TB in wildlife. In this study, four groups of 5 wild boar each were vaccinated with inactivated M. bovis by the oral and intramuscular routes, vaccinated with oral BCG or left unvaccinated as controls. All groups were later challenged with a field strain of M. bovis. The results of the IFN-gamma response, serum antibody levels, M. bovis culture, TB lesion scores, and the expression of C3 and MUT genes were compared between these four groups. The results suggested that vaccination with heat-inactivated M. bovis or BCG protect wild boar from TB. These results also encouraged testing combinations of BCG and inactivated M. bovis to vaccinate wild boar against TB. Vaccine formulations using heat-inactivated M. bovis for TB control in wildlife would have the advantage of being environmentally safe and more stable under field conditions when compared to live BCG vaccines. The antibody response and MUT expression levels can help differentiating between vaccinated and infected wild boar and as correlates of protective response in vaccinated animals. These results suggest that vaccine studies in free-living wild boar are now possible to reveal the full potential of protecting against TB using oral M. bovis inactivated and BCG vaccines.

  16. Protection against tuberculosis in Eurasian wild boar vaccinated with heat-inactivated Mycobacterium bovis.

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    Garrido, Joseba M; Sevilla, Iker A; Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Ballesteros, Cristina; Galindo, Ruth C; Boadella, Mariana; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Romero, Beatriz; Geijo, Maria Victoria; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Aranaz, Alicia; Juste, Ramón A; Vicente, Joaquín; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis and closely related members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex continues to affect humans and animals worldwide and its control requires vaccination of wildlife reservoir species such as Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa). Vaccination efforts for TB control in wildlife have been based primarily on oral live BCG formulations. However, this is the first report of the use of oral inactivated vaccines for controlling TB in wildlife. In this study, four groups of 5 wild boar each were vaccinated with inactivated M. bovis by the oral and intramuscular routes, vaccinated with oral BCG or left unvaccinated as controls. All groups were later challenged with a field strain of M. bovis. The results of the IFN-gamma response, serum antibody levels, M. bovis culture, TB lesion scores, and the expression of C3 and MUT genes were compared between these four groups. The results suggested that vaccination with heat-inactivated M. bovis or BCG protect wild boar from TB. These results also encouraged testing combinations of BCG and inactivated M. bovis to vaccinate wild boar against TB. Vaccine formulations using heat-inactivated M. bovis for TB control in wildlife would have the advantage of being environmentally safe and more stable under field conditions when compared to live BCG vaccines. The antibody response and MUT expression levels can help differentiating between vaccinated and infected wild boar and as correlates of protective response in vaccinated animals. These results suggest that vaccine studies in free-living wild boar are now possible to reveal the full potential of protecting against TB using oral M. bovis inactivated and BCG vaccines.

  17. Detección de la expresión génica in vivo de Mycobacterium tuberculosis durante la tuberculosis pulmonar activa Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vivo-expressed genes detection during active pulmonary tuberculosis

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    Alejandra Otazo M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El estudio de la expresión génica de Mycobacterium tuberculosis ha involucrado la experimentación "in vitro ", "ex vivo " e "in vivo " (modelos animales, pero aún sin el éxito esperado. Proponemos que revelar los factores clave de la tuberculosis humana requiere investigar la expresión génica de M. tuberculosis dentro del ser humano ("in vivo ". Para ello, aislamos el mRNA total de M. tuberculosis, desde muestras clínicas respiratorias de pacientes con diagnóstico de tuberculosis pulmonar; posteriormente, sintetizamos el dscDNA y lo analizamos mediante RT-PCR cualitativo. Detectamos la expresión de la secuencia de inserción IS6110 y de los genes "housekeeping " 16SrRNA y sigA en M. tuberculosis creciendo in vivo (tuberculosis pulmonar así como cultivado in vitro. La expresión de los genes mprA y mprB, que codifican el sistema de transducción de señales MprAB, sólo se detectó en M. tuberculosis crecido in vitro. Con nuestros resultados damos el primer paso hacia la implementación de un método no invasivo para el estudio del transcriptoma de M. tuberculosis, dentro de su único hospedero natural, con el fin de analizar la regulación "in vivo" de los determinantes genéticos requeridos para su virulencia y patogénesis.Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene expression studies have involved "in vitro", "ex vivo" and "in vivo" experiments (animal models, but without the expected success. We propose that key features of human tuberculosis could be discovered by studying the M. tuberculosis gene expression within the human host. Therefore, we isolated totalM. tuberculosis mRNA from human clinical respiratory specimens of patients diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis; after this, we synthesized the dscDNA and tested it by qualitative RT-PCR assays. We detected the expression of IS6110 insertion sequence and of the "housekeeping" genes 16SrRNA andsigA in M. tuberculosis grown in vivo (pulmonary tuberculosis as well as grown in vitro M

  18. Protein export systems of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: novel targets for drug development?

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    Feltcher, Meghan E; Sullivan, Jonathan Tabb; Braunstein, Miriam

    2010-10-01

    Protein export is essential in all bacteria and many bacterial pathogens depend on specialized protein export systems for virulence. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of the disease tuberculosis, the conserved general secretion (Sec) and twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathways perform the bulk of protein export and are both essential. M. tuberculosis also has specialized export pathways that transport specific subsets of proteins. One such pathway is the accessory SecA2 system, which is important for M. tuberculosis virulence. There are also specialized ESX export systems that function in virulence (ESX-1) or essential physiologic processes (ESX-3). The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains makes the development of novel drugs for tuberculosis an urgent priority. In this article, we discuss our current understanding of the protein export systems of M. tuberculosis and consider the potential of these pathways to be novel targets for tuberculosis drugs.

  19. A Defined Tuberculosis Vaccine Candidate Boosts BCG and Protects Against Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Bertholet, Sylvie; Ireton, Gregory C.; Ordway, Diane J.; Windish, Hillarie Plessner; Pine, Samuel O.; Kahn, Maria; Phan, Tony; Orme, Ian M.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Baldwin, Susan L.; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) childhood vaccine, tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global health problem. A successful vaccine against TB that replaces or boosts BCG will include antigens that induce or recall appropriate T cell responses. Four Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens, including members of the virulence factor families PE/PPE and EsX, or antigens associated with latency were produced as a single recombinant fusion protein. When administered with the adjuvant GLA-SE, a stable oil-in-water nanoemulsion, the fusion protein ID93 was immunogenic in mice, guinea pigs, and cynomolgus monkeys. In mice, ID93/GLA-SE combination induced polyfunctional CD4 TH1-cell responses characterized by antigen-specific IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-2, as well as a reduction in the number of bacteria in the lungs of animals subsequently infected with virulent or multidrug resistant Mtb strains. Furthermore, boosting BCG-vaccinated guinea pigs with ID93/GLA-SE resulted in reduced pathology and fewer bacilli, and prevented the death of animals challenged with virulent Mtb. Finally, ID93 elicited polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in BCG-vaccinated or Mtb-exposed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study establishes that the protein subunit vaccine ID93/GLA-SE protects against TB and MDR-TB in animals, and is a candidate for boosting the protective efficacy of the childhood BCG vaccine. PMID:20944089

  20. Drug susceptibility patterns of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from previously treated and new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis at German-Nepal tuberculosis project laboratory, Kathmandu, Nepal

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    Gobinda Thapa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is a serious public health problem in Nepal. It is a major obstacle for the control of the tuberculosis. The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of the multidrug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis and to evaluate the drug susceptibility patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from previously treated and newly diagnosed cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from March 2013 to August 2013 at German-Nepal tuberculosis project (GENETUP laboratory, Kathmandu, Nepal. For this the sputum samples from total of 153 (49 new and 104 previously treated suspected pulmonary tuberculosis patients were used. The diagnosis of the tuberculosis was performed by using fluorescent microscopy and culture, while the drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was performed by proportion method. Lowenstein-Jensen (L-J medium was used for the culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the colonies grown were identified on the basis of the colony morphology, pigment production and biochemical characteristics. Results The prevalence of MDR-TB among all the cases of culture positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 15.6 %. The rate of MDR-TB among previously treated culture positive tuberculosis patients was 19.4 % and that among newly diagnosed culture positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases was 7.1 %. The highest rate of resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was toward streptomycin (24.4 % followed by isoniazid (23 %, rifampicin (17.8 % and ethambutol (15.6 %. Among the total of MDR-TB cases among previously treated patients, highest percentage of the cases were relapse (61.1 % followed by chronic (16.7 %. Conclusions The high prevalence of DR/MDR-TB in our study reflects poor implementation of tuberculosis control program. On the basis of the drug susceptibility patterns of M. tuberculosis we found in our study, we

  1. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium Complexes by Real-Time PCR in Bovine Milk from Brazilian Dairy Farms.

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    Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Dos Reis, Emily Marques; Rodrigues, Rogério Oliveira; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne diseases are a public health problem worldwide. The consumption of contaminated raw milk has been recognized as a major cause of transmission of bovine tuberculosis to humans. Other mycobacteria that may be present in raw milk and may cause diseases are those belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. In this study, molecular biology tools were applied to investigate raw milk contamination with Mycobacterium spp. in family dairy farms from Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Furthermore, different variables related to the source of the milk, herd characteristics, and management were evaluated for their effect on milk contamination. Five hundred and two samples were analyzed, of which 354 were from the Northwest region (102 farms with samples from 93 bulk tanks and 261 animals) and 148 from the South region of the state (22 farms with samples from 23 bulk tanks and 125 animals). Among them, 10 (1.99%) and 7 (1.39%) were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (9 confirmed as Mycobacterium bovis) and M. avium complexes, respectively. There was no difference in the frequencies of positive samples between the regions or the sample sources. Of the positive samples, 4 were collected from a bulk tank (1 positive for M. avium and 3 for M. tuberculosis). Moreover, 1 sample was positive concomitantly for M. tuberculosis and M. avium complexes. On risk analysis, no variable was associated with raw milk contamination by M. tuberculosis complex species. However, washing the udders of all animals and drying them with paper towels were weakly classified as risk factors for M. avium contamination. Positive samples were obtained from both animals and bulk tanks, which emphasizes the importance of tuberculosis control programs and provides evidence that milk monitoring can be used as a control practice. Moreover, the findings of this study reinforce the need for awareness of the problems of raw milk consumption among the general population.

  2. Molecular Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Analysis of Its Resistance to Rifampin in Sputa From Tuberculosis Suspected Patients

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    M. Syaifudin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An accurate identification of different species of Mycobacterium provides to allow appropriate treatment for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Beside that, drug resistance of M. tuberculosis strains to rifampin is not clearly understood in contributing to the spread of tuberculosis in Indonesia. To assess the molecular mechanism of rifampin resistance, a number of clinical specimens of M. tuberculosis were analyzed their molecular nature of a part of the rpoB gene using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP methods. DNA’s extracted from sputum samples were amplified and 32P-labeled by PCR with the specific primers and the product was analyzed their mutation conferring resistance by MDE gel electrophoresis. Of the 70 specimens tested, 57 specimens were positive for M. tuberculosis organism only, three specimens contained a mixture of M. tuberculosis and non tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM, and 10 specimens were negative approved by Duplex PCR. Of these sixty DNA positive samples (thus the sensitivity of PCR was 85.71%, 5 (8.3% of them suspected to contain mutations in rpoB which were associated with rifampin resistance. Even though the frequency of mutation was low, the results from our study clearly indicate that the molecular mechanism of rifampin resistance in M. tuberculosis isolates from Indonesia involves alterations in the rpoB gene. Molecular diagnosis by PCR which is fast and easy to perform is useful for early and rapid detection of TB in sputum specimen.

  3. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in Honduras

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    Ghebremichael Solomon

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis persists as a public health problem in Honduras. A better knowledge of the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains will contribute to understand the transmission dynamics of the disease within the country. The aim of this study was to provide an insight of the genetic biodiversity of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Honduras between 1994 and 2002. Genotyping was performed using spoligotyping and RFLP. The spoligotypes obtained were compared with the SITVIT2 proprietary database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results Spoligotyping grouped 84% of the isolates into 27 clusters (2 to 43 strains per cluster. Of the 44 shared international types (SITs identified among the Honduran stains, 8 SITs were newly identified either within the present study or after match with an orphan type previously identified in the SITVIT2 database. In addition, 16 patterns corresponded to orphan, previously unreported isolates. The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM lineage was the most common in this study; 55% of the strains belonged to this family. Other genotypes found were Haarlem (16%, T (16%, X-clade (6%, Unknown signature (5% and S (1%. Only one Beijing strain was identified (0.5%. We observed a high degree of diversity after characterizing the 43 isolates belonging to the main spoligotyping cluster (SIT 33, LAM3 with IS6110-RFLP. A total of 35 different RFLP-fingerprints were detected, of which 6 patterns corresponded to the same number of clusters comprising 14 strains. Conclusions The findings obtained in this study show that tuberculosis transmission in Honduras is due to modern M. tuberculosis lineages with high level of biodiversity.

  4. Tuberculosis associated factors caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the RDRio genotype

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    Moraes, Eloise Brasil; Slompo, Letícia; Finardi, Amanda Juliane; da Silveira, Heloisa Paro Pedro; Ruiz, Luciana; Gomes, Harrison Magdinier; Richini, Virginia Bodelão; Suffys, Philip; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco; Cavalcanti, Ricardo; Baptista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a disease that affects many countries around the world, including Brazil. Recently, a subtype of Latin American-Mediterranean family strain was identified and characterised by RDRio. The strain has been associated with different characteristics of the disease. OBJECTIVES In the present study we investigated the association of epidemiological, clinical, radiological and bacteriological variables with pulmonary tuberculosis caused by RDRio Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain in large regions of São Paulo. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study in 530 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, diagnosed using sputum culture, from two regions of the São Paulo state in Brazil. The samples were brought to São Paulo reference laboratories for epidemiological, clinical, radiological and bacteriological analyses, and the data were obtained from a TB notification system. RDRio genotyping and Spoligotyping of the samples were performed. For the analysis of the categorical variables we used the chi-square test or the Fisher’s exact test, and for the continuous variables, the Mann-Whitney test. In addition, a logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Differences with p < 0.05 were considered significant. FINDINGS The RDRio deletion was identified in 152 (28.7%) samples. In the univariate analysis, both the age groups above 25 years and alcohol consumption were associated with the RDRio deletion. The multivariate analysis confirmed the association of the RDRio deletion with the age groups: 25-35 years old [OR: 2.28 (1.02-5.07; p = 0.04)] and 36-60 years old (OR: 2.36 (1.11-5.05); p = 0.03], and also with alcohol consumption [OR: 1.63 (1.05-2.54); p = 0,03]. MAIN CONCLUSIONS In this study, we identified new factors associated with the M. tuberculosis of the RDRio deletion strains infection. PMID:28225901

  5. Whole genome analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from recurrent episodes of tuberculosis, Finland, 1995-2013.

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    Korhonen, V; Smit, P W; Haanperä, M; Casali, N; Ruutu, P; Vasankari, T; Soini, H

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent tuberculosis (TB) is caused by an endogenous re-activation of the same strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (relapse) or exogenous infection with a new strain (re-infection). Recurrence of TB in Finland was analysed in a population-based, 19-year study, and genotyping was used to define relapse and re-infection. The M. tuberculosis isolates from patients with suspected relapse were further analysed by whole genome sequencing (WGS) to determine the number and type of mutations occurring in the bacterial genome between the first and second disease episodes. In addition, publicly available tools (PhyResSE and SpolPred) were used to predict drug resistance and spoligotype profile from the WGS data. Of the 8299 notified TB cases, 48 (0.6%) patients had episodes classified as recurrent. Forty-two patients had more than one culture-confirmed TB episode, and isolates from two episodes in 21 patients were available for genotyping. In 18 patients, the M. tuberculosis isolates obtained from the first and second TB episodes had identical spoligotypes. The WGS analysis of the 36 M. tuberculosis isolates from the 18 suspected relapse patients (average time between isolates 2.8 years) revealed 0 to 38 single nucleotide polymorphisms (median 1, mean 3.78) between the first and second isolate. There seemed to be no direct relation between the number of years between the two isolates, or treatment outcome, and the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms. The results suggest that the mutation rate may depend on multiple host-, strain- and treatment-related factors.

  6. The road to tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis elimination in Arkansas; a re-examination of risk groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Berzkalns

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to generate knowledge useful for developing public health interventions for more effective tuberculosis control in Arkansas. METHODS: The study population included 429 culture-confirmed reported cases (January 1, 2004-December 31, 2010. Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotyping data were used to identify cases likely due to recent transmission (clustered versus reactivation (non-clustered. Poisson regression models estimated average decline rate in incidence over time and assessed the significance of differences between subpopulations. A multinomial logistic model examined differences between clustered and non-clustered incidence. RESULTS: A significant average annual percent decline was found for the overall incidence of culture-confirmed (9%; 95% CI: 5.5%, 16.9%, clustered (6%; 95% CI: 0.5%, 11.6%, and non-clustered tuberculosis cases (12%; 95% CI: 7.6%, 15.9%. However, declines varied among demographic groups. Significant declines in clustered incidence were only observed in males, non-Hispanic blacks, 65 years and older, and the rural population. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the Arkansas tuberculosis control program must target both traditional and non-traditional risk groups for successful tuberculosis elimination. The present study also demonstrates that a thorough analysis of TB trends in different population subgroups of a given geographic region or state can lead to the identification of non-traditional risk factors for TB transmission. Similar studies in other low incidence populations would provide beneficial data for how to control and eventually eliminate TB in the U.S.

  7. Distribution of Insertion- and Deletion-Associated Genetic Polymorphisms among Four Mycobacterium tuberculosis Phospholipase C Genes and Associations with Extrathoracic Tuberculosis: a Population-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Y.; Cave, M D; Yang, D.; Zhang,L.; Marrs, C. F.; Foxman, B.; Bates, J H; Wilson, F.; Mukasa, L. N.; Yang, Z. H.

    2005-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome contains four phospholipase C (PLC)-encoding genes, designated plcA, plcB, plcC, and plcD, respectively. Each of the four genes contributes to the overall PLC activity of M. tuberculosis. PLC is hypothesized to contribute to M. tuberculosis virulence. Infection of M. tuberculosis strains carrying a truncated plcD gene is associated with the occurrence of extrathoracic tuberculosis. However, whether the other three plc genes are also associated with extrat...

  8. Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle and white-tailed deer: Translational research of relevance to human tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a premier example of a disease complex with pathogens primarily affecting humans (i.e., Mycobacterium tuberculosis) or livestock and wildlife (i.e., Mycobacterium bovis) and with a long history of inclusive collaborations between physicians and veterinarians. Advances with the s...

  9. Investigation of genetic heterogeneity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis patients using DNA fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi Azar

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB based on IS6110 has been shown to be a powerful epidemiologic tool. Restriction enzyme analysis (REA is a fingerprinting technique, which is used for differentiation and investigation of genetic diversity among mycobacterial species. AIMS: To investigating the genetic heterogeneity in MTB isolates in Ahvaz, Iran. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: It was a cross-sectional study conducted in Ahvaz, Iran. METHODS AND MATERIAL: One hundred and eighty clinical isolates of MTB were collected from TB reference unit, PHLS, Ahvaz, Iran. The PCR-REA employed uses a simple DNA extraction followed by a PCR step involving a single primer based on the insertion sequence IS6110. Restriction enzyme analysis was performed on the amplification products using HaeIII enzyme. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data was analyzed using SPSS software and chi-square test/Fishers′ exact test was applied wherever applicable. RESULTS: The isolates were divided into four clusters based on their REA patterns. Cluster I contained 71.1% of strains with two fragments of 72 and 118. Cluster II with three fragments of 72, 118, and 194; cluster III with three fragments of 118, 194, and 234; and cluster IV with four fragments of 72, 118, 194, and 234 base pairs. As many as 73.8% of the identical fingerprint patterns were seen in male patients. Accounting the men as the major population in the study, there was no significant difference between REA patterns and sex; similarly, with age, patients′ occupation and degree of smear positivity. However, we found significant correlation between REA patterns and patients′ origin. As many as 61.6% of identical patterns were found in the patients who were lived in the same suburb. CONCLUSIONS: By PCR-based REA typing, the isolates studied were grouped into four clusters each containing between two and four fragments. However, in order to ascertain the level of heterogeneity of MTB isolates in their

  10. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22028.001 PMID:28130921

  11. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF RIFAMPICIN-ISONIAZID RESISTANT MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS ISOLATES AGAINST LEVOFLOXACIN

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    A. H. Kurniawan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis (TB is a high burden disease in Indonesia with multidrug-resistant (MDR TB incidence started to increase. Treatment success of MDR-TB globally was low in number than it was targeted which was especially caused by fluoroquinolone resistance. One of the fluoroquinolone is levofloxacin, an antibiotic that has been widely used irrationally as antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, this study investigated the sensitivity and MBC of MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates against Levofloxacin. Method: The susceptibility test for MDR-Mycobacterium tuberculosis on levofloxacin by standard method with levofloxacin were on concentrations 0,5 μg/ml, 1 μg/ml, and 2 μg/ml. Sample of 8 strains MDR-Mycobacterium tuberculosis were cultured with each concentrations on Middlebrook 7H9 for 1 week incubation. Next, each of the incubated concentration was subcultured on solid media Middlebrook 7H10 for 3 weeks incubation. Colonized agar plates after 3 weeks incubation were confirmed with acid-fast stain. Results: On MB 7H10 with levofloxacin concentration 2 μg/ml showed bactericidal effect 100% by no MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis colony grew (0/8 while the MB 7H10 with levofloxacin concentration 1 μg/ml and 0,5 μg/ml showed the bactericidal effect 37,5% and 25% respectively. The colonized agar plate implied that the MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis with levofloxacin concentration 1 μg/ml (5/8 and 0,5 μg/ml (6/8 grew well. Conclusion: Levofloxacin concentration 2 μg/ml was susceptible on MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The concentration 2 μg/ml of levofloxacin could be considered as MBC.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrazinamide resistance determinants: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Paolo; Cabibbe, Andrea M; Feuerriegel, Silke; Casali, Nicola; Drobniewski, Francis; Rodionova, Yulia; Bakonyte, Daiva; Stakenas, Petras; Pimkina, Edita; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Degano, Massimo; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Hoffner, Sven; Mansjö, Mikael; Werngren, Jim; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Niemann, Stefan; Cirillo, Daniela M

    2014-10-21

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is a prodrug that is converted to pyrazinoic acid by the enzyme pyrazinamidase, encoded by the pncA gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular identification of mutations in pncA offers the potential for rapid detection of pyrazinamide resistance (PZA(r)). However, the genetic variants are highly variable and scattered over the full length of pncA, complicating the development of a molecular test. We performed a large multicenter study assessing pncA sequence variations in 1,950 clinical isolates, including 1,142 multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains and 483 fully susceptible strains. The results of pncA sequencing were correlated with phenotype, enzymatic activity, and structural and phylogenetic data. We identified 280 genetic variants which were divided into four classes: (i) very high confidence resistance mutations that were found only in PZA(r) strains (85%), (ii) high-confidence resistance mutations found in more than 70% of PZA(r) strains, (iii) mutations with an unclear role found in less than 70% of PZA(r) strains, and (iv) mutations not associated with phenotypic resistance (10%). Any future molecular diagnostic assay should be able to target and identify at least the very high and high-confidence genetic variant markers of PZA(r); the diagnostic accuracy of such an assay would be in the range of 89.5 to 98.8%. Importance: Conventional phenotypic testing for pyrazinamide resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is technically challenging and often unreliable. The development of a molecular assay for detecting pyrazinamide resistance would be a breakthrough, directly overcoming both the limitations of conventional testing and its related biosafety issues. Although the main mechanism of pyrazinamide resistance involves mutations inactivating the pncA enzyme, the highly diverse genetic variants scattered over the full length of the pncA gene and the lack of a reliable phenotypic gold standard hamper the development of molecular diagnostic

  13. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh, C Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R; Sterling, Timothy R; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3-4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3-4 month rifampicin alone.

  14. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Mozambique

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    Hill Véronique

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mozambique is one of the countries with the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB in Sub-Saharan Africa, and information on the predominant genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis circulating in the country are important to better understand the epidemic. This study determined the predominant strain lineages that cause TB in Mozambique. Results A total of 445 M. tuberculosis isolates from seven different provinces of Mozambique were characterized by spoligotyping and resulting profiles were compared with the international spoligotyping database SITVIT2. The four most predominant lineages observed were: the Latin-American Mediterranean (LAM, n = 165 or 37%; the East African-Indian (EAI, n = 132 or 29.7%; an evolutionary recent but yet ill-defined T clade, (n = 52 or 11.6%; and the globally-emerging Beijing clone, (n = 31 or 7%. A high spoligotype diversity was found for the EAI, LAM and T lineages. Conclusions The TB epidemic in Mozambique is caused by a wide diversity of spoligotypes with predominance of LAM, EAI, T and Beijing lineages.

  15. Immunology in Tuberculosis : Challenges in Monitoring of Disease Activity and Identifying Correlates of Protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Altena, Richard; Duggirala, Sridevi; Groschel, Matthias I. P.; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2011-01-01

    Humans have always lived with tubercle bacilli. Host susceptibility - both inherited and acquired - determines whether an individual infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis will eventually fall ill and develop tuberculosis (TB). After infection with M. tuberculosis, a latent TB infection may ensue

  16. Immunology in Tuberculosis : Challenges in Monitoring of Disease Activity and Identifying Correlates of Protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena ,van Richard; Duggirala, Sridevi; Gröschel, M. I.; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    Humans have always lived with tubercle bacilli. Host susceptibility - both inherited and acquired - determines whether an individual infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis will eventually fall ill and develop tuberculosis (TB). After infection with M. tuberculosis, a latent TB infection may ensue

  17. Multidrug resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehinde, Aderemi Oludiran; Obaseki, Felix Ariebuwa; Ishola, Oluponle Christiana; Ibrahim, Kolo Doko

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The magnitude of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MDR-TB) in Nigeria, the most populous country in sub-Saharan Africa, is largely unknown. This information would assist policymakers to develop intervention strategies against tuberculosis (TB) in the country. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a one-year laboratory-based study. Specimens from suspected new TB patients sent to the TB laboratory of the Department of Medical Microbiology, University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria from May 1, 2005 to April 27, 2006 were processed and analyzed. The specimens were stained with Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N) reagents and cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, incubated at 37 degrees C for 6-8 weeks. Isolates were confirmed as MDR-TB by Z-N reactions and biochemical methods. Drug susceptibility to streptomycin, ethambutol, rifampicin and isoniazid was done using Bactec 460 TB radiometric method. RESULTS: Of the 1,120 specimens processed, 80 (7.1%) were smear positive, while 56 (5.0%) were culture positive, even though the association was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Culture contamination rate was 8.8%. Thirty (53.6%) of the culture positive isolates were resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin, while 26 (46.4%) were susceptible. About half--53.3%--of the resistant isolates were from the antiretroviral clinic, while 10 (33.4%) were from peripheral centers. CONCLUSION: This study shows that MDR-TB is emerging in Nigeria. Further studies on MDR-TB are urgently needed in the country to ascertain the magnitude of the problem and to proffer solutions to it. PMID:17987922

  18. Biosynthesis and translocation of unsulfated acyltrehaloses in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Jones, Victoria; Sorio de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro; McNeil, Michael R; Jackson, Mary

    2014-10-03

    A number of species-specific polymethyl-branched fatty acid-containing trehalose esters populate the outer membrane of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Among them, 2,3-diacyltrehaloses (DAT) and penta-acyltrehaloses (PAT) not only play a structural role in the cell envelope but also contribute to the ability of M. tuberculosis to multiply and persist in the infected host, promoting the intracellular survival of the bacterium and modulating host immune responses. The nature of the machinery, topology, and sequential order of the reactions leading to the biosynthesis, assembly, and export of these complex glycolipids to the cell surface are the object of the present study. Our genetic and biochemical evidence corroborates a model wherein the biosynthesis and translocation of DAT and PAT to the periplasmic space are coupled and topologically split across the plasma membrane. The formation of DAT occurs on the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane through the action of PapA3, FadD21, and Pks3/4; that of PAT occurs on the periplasmic face via transesterification reactions between DAT substrates catalyzed by the acyltransferase Chp2 (Rv1184c). The integral membrane transporter MmpL10 is essential for DAT to reach the cell surface, and its presence in the membrane is required for Chp2 to be active. Disruption of mmpL10 or chp2 leads to an important build-up of DAT inside the cells and to the formation of a novel form of unsulfated acyltrehalose esterified with polymethyl-branched fatty acids normally found in sulfolipids that is translocated to the cell surface.

  19. Cellular immune responses to ESAT-6 discriminate between patients with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium avium complex and those with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lein, A D; von Reyn, C F; Ravn, P;

    1999-01-01

    ESAT-6 (for 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target) is a secreted antigen found almost exclusively in organisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We compared in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells to this antigen in patients with pulmonary...... disease due to either Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) or Mycobacterium tuberculosis with those in healthy, skin test-negative, control subjects. Significant IFN-gamma responses to ESAT-6 were detected in 16 (59%) of 27 M. tuberculosis pulmonary disease patients, 0 (0%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 0...... (0%) of 8 controls. Significant IFN-gamma responses to M. tuberculosis purified protein derivative were detected in 23 (85%) of 27 M. tuberculosis disease patients, 2 (25%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 5 (63%) of 8 healthy controls. M. avium sensitin was recognized in 24 (89%) of 27 M. tuberculosis...

  20. Immunotherapeutical Potential of Mycobacterium Vaccae on M.Tuberculosis Infection in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Xu; Yanyan Wang; Xiaodong Zheng; Xiangdong Gui; Lifeng Tao; Haiming Wei

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains the worldwide infectious disease. To identify the therapeutic potential of M. vaccae in treating tuberculosis, M. vaccae was injected into Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infected mice. The optimal dose of M. vaccae (22.5μg/mouse) treated mice showed lower pathological change index, spleen weight index, lung weight index and vital M. tuberculosis count than those of the untreated group. Treatment with M. vaccae enhanced the percentages of CD3+ and CD4+ T cells, IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells, innate immune cells including NK cells, NK1.1+ T cells and γδ T cells, and reduced the percentage of IL-4+CD4+ T cells. Therefore, M. vaccae could protect the mice from M. tuberculosis infection and improved mouse innate and adaptive ceil-mediated immunity, suggesting that M. vaccae is a potential immunotherapeutic agent in pulmonary tuberculosis.

  1. Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis SB24 isolated from Sabah, Malaysia

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    Noraini Philip

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB that causes millions of death every year. We have sequenced the genome of M. tuberculosis isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of a patient diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis (TBM. The isolated strain was referred as M. tuberculosis SB24. Genomic DNA of the M. tuberculosis SB24 was extracted and subjected to whole genome sequencing using PacBio platform. The draft genome size of M. tuberculosis SB24 was determined to be 4,452,489 bp with a G + C content of 65.6%. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited in NCBI SRA under the accession number SRP076503.

  2. Using a cDNA microarray to study cellular gene expression altered by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永忠; 谢建平; 李瑶; 乐军; 陈建平; 淳于利娟; 王洪海

    2003-01-01

    Objective To examine the global effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis) infection on macrophages. Methods The gene expression profiling of macrophage U937, in response to infection with M.tuberculosis H37Ra, was monitored using a high-density cDNA microarray. Results M.tuberculosis infection caused 463 differentially expressed genes, of which 366 genes are known genes registered in the Gene Bank. These genes function in various cellular processes including intracellular signalling, cytoskeletal rearrangement, apoptosis, transcriptional regulation, cell surface receptors, cell-mediated immunity as well as a variety of cellular metabolic pathways, and may play key roles in M.tuberculosis infection and intracellular survival. Conclusions M.tuberculosis infection alters the expression of host-cell genes, and these genes will provide a foundation for understanding the infection process of M.tuberculosis. The cDNA microarray is a powerful tool for studying pathogen-host cell interaction.

  3. Solution NMR Studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteins for Antibiotic Target Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do-Hee Kim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which triggers severe pulmonary diseases. Recently, multidrug/extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis strains have emerged and continue to threaten global health. Because of the development of drug-resistant tuberculosis, there is an urgent need for novel antibiotics to treat these drug-resistant bacteria. In light of the clinical importance of M. tuberculosis, 2067 structures of M. tuberculsosis proteins have been determined. Among them, 52 structures have been solved and studied using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. The functional details based on structural analysis of M. tuberculosis using NMR can provide essential biochemical data for the development of novel antibiotic drugs. In this review, we introduce diverse structural and biochemical studies on M. tuberculosis proteins determined using NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Validation of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium spp., Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex, and Mycobacterium avium Complex Directly from Clinical Samples by Use of the BD Max Open System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetti, Talita T; Silbert, Suzane; Gostnell, Alicia; Kubasek, Carly; Widen, Raymond

    2016-06-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR was validated on the BD Max open system to detect different Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium spp. directly from clinical samples. The PCR results were compared to those with traditional cultures. The multiplex PCR assay was found to be a specific and sensitive method for the rapid detection of mycobacteria directly from clinical specimens.

  5. T-cell recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate fractions in tuberculosis patients and their household contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demissie, A; Ravn, P; Olobo, J

    1999-01-01

    We examined the immune responses of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and their healthy household contacts to short-term culture filtrate (ST-CF) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or molecular mass fractions derived from it. Our goal was to identify fractions strongly recognized......, to secreted mycobacterial antigens is suggestive of an early stage of infection by M. tuberculosis, which could in time result in overt disease or containment of the infection. This possibility is currently being investigated by follow-up studies of the household contacts....

  6. T-cell recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate fractions in tuberculosis patients and their household contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demissie, A; Ravn, P; Olobo, J

    1999-01-01

    We examined the immune responses of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and their healthy household contacts to short-term culture filtrate (ST-CF) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or molecular mass fractions derived from it. Our goal was to identify fractions strongly recognized......, to secreted mycobacterial antigens is suggestive of an early stage of infection by M. tuberculosis, which could in time result in overt disease or containment of the infection. This possibility is currently being investigated by follow-up studies of the household contacts....

  7. LIGAND-BINDING SITES ON THE MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS UREASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis that remains a serious medical and social health problem. Despite intensive efforts have been made in the past decade, there are no new efficient anti-tuberculosis drugs today, and that need is growing due to the spread of drug-resistant strains of M.tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis urease (MTU, being an important factor of the bacterium viability and virulence, is an attractive target for anti-tuberculosis drugs acting by inhibition of urease activity. However, the commercially available urease inhibitors are toxic and unstable, that prevent their clinical use. Therefore, new more potent anti-tuberculosis drugs inhibiting new targets are urgently needed. A useful tool for the search of novel inhibitors is a computational drug design. The inhibitor design is significantly easier if binding sites on the enzyme are identified in advance. This paper aimed to determine the probable ligand binding sites on the surface of M. tuberculosis urease. Methods. To identify ligand binding sites on MTU surface, сomputational solvent mapping method FTSite was applied by the use of MTU homology model we have built earlier. The method places molecular probes (small organic molecules containing various functional groups on a dense grid defined around the enzyme, and for each probe finds favorable positions. The selected poses are refined by free energy minimization, the low energy conformations are clustered, and the clusters are ranked on the basis of the average free energy. FTSite server outputs the protein residues delineating a binding sites and the probe molecules representing each cluster. To predict allosteric pockets on MTU, AlloPred and AlloSite servers were applied. AlloPred uses the normal mode analysis (NMA and models how the dynamics of a protein would be altered in the presence of a modulator at a specific pocket. Pockets on the enzyme are predicted using the Fpocket

  8. Inadequate hospital ventilation system increases the risk of nosocomial Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubad, B; Lapanje, A

    2012-01-01

    The ambient air in nine locations in a pulmonary hospital and a tuberculosis diagnostic laboratory was analysed to determine the hazard posed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In four locations, between 6 and 20 M. tuberculosis cell equivalents/m(3) were detected. The results indicated that inadequately ventilated corridors had the highest cell equivalents. In these areas healthcare workers were less aware of infection hazard compared to areas with known sources of M. tuberculosis and the wearing of protective masks and passive ventilation were not in place. Based on these results, further infection prevention and control measures need to be implemented.

  9. Protective and therapeutic efficacy of Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing HBHA-hIL12 fusion protein against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmin Zhao

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major worldwide health problem. The only vaccine against TB, Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG, has demonstrated relatively low efficacy and does not provide satisfactory protection against the disease. More efficient vaccines and improved therapies are urgently needed to decrease the worldwide spread and burden of TB, and use of a viable, metabolizing mycobacteria vaccine may be a promising strategy against the disease. Here, we constructed a recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (rMS strain expressing a fusion protein of heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA and human interleukin 12 (hIL-12. Immune responses induced by the rMS in mice and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB were investigated. Administration of this novel rMS enhanced Th1-type cellular responses (IFN-γ and IL-2 in mice and reduced bacterial burden in lungs as well as that achieved by BCG vaccination. Meanwhile, the bacteria load in M. tuberculosis infected mice treated with the rMS vaccine also was significantly reduced. In conclusion, the rMS strain expressing the HBHA and human IL-12 fusion protein enhanced immunogencity by improving the Th1-type response against TB, and the protective effect was equivalent to that of the conventional BCG vaccine in mice. Furthermore, it could decrease bacterial load and alleviate histopathological damage in lungs of M. tuberculosis infected mice.

  10. Specific T-cell epitopes for immunoassay-based diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, I; Weldingh, K; Leyten, EM;

    2004-01-01

    Specific T-cell epitopes for immunoassay-based diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.Brock I, Weldingh K, Leyten EM, Arend SM, Ravn P, Andersen P. Department of Infectious Disease Immunology, Statens Serum Institute, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. The currently used...... method for immunological detection of tuberculosis infection, the tuberculin skin test, has low specificity. Antigens specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to replace purified protein derivative are therefore urgently needed. We have performed a rigorous assessment of the diagnostic potential of four...... recently identified antigens (Rv2653, Rv2654, Rv3873, and Rv3878) from genomic regions that are lacking from the Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine strains as well as from the most common nontuberculous mycobacteria. The fine specificity of potential epitopes in these molecules...

  11. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by recombinase polymerase amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Boyle

    Full Text Available Improved access to effective tests for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB has been designated a public health priority by the World Health Organisation. In high burden TB countries nucleic acid based TB tests have been restricted to centralised laboratories and specialised research settings. Requirements such as a constant electrical supply, air conditioning and skilled, computer literate operators prevent implementation of such tests in many settings. Isothermal DNA amplification technologies permit the use of simpler, less energy intensive detection platforms more suited to low resource settings that allow the accurate diagnosis of a disease within a short timeframe. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA is a rapid, low temperature isothermal DNA amplification reaction. We report here RPA-based detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC DNA in <20 minutes at 39 °C. Assays for two MTC specific targets were investigated, IS6110 and IS1081. When testing purified MTC genomic DNA, limits of detection of 6.25 fg (IS6110 and 20 fg (IS1081were consistently achieved. When testing a convenience sample of pulmonary specimens from suspected TB patients, RPA demonstrated superior accuracy to indirect fluorescence microscopy. Compared to culture, sensitivities for the IS1081 RPA and microscopy were 91.4% (95%CI: 85, 97.9 and 86.1% (95%CI: 78.1, 94.1 respectively (n = 71. Specificities were 100% and 88.6% (95% CI: 80.8, 96.1 respectively. For the IS6110 RPA and microscopy sensitivities of 87.5% (95%CI: 81.7, 93.2 and 70.8% (95%CI: 62.9, 78.7 were obtained (n = 90. Specificities were 95.4 (95% CI: 92.3,98.1 and 88% (95% CI: 83.6, 92.4 respectively. The superior specificity of RPA for detecting tuberculosis was due to the reduced ability of fluorescence microscopy to distinguish Mtb complex from other acid fast bacteria. The rapid nature of the RPA assay and its low energy requirement compared to other amplification technologies suggest RPA-based TB

  12. Micrococcin P1-A bactericidal thiopeptide active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Degiacomi, Giulia; Personne, Yoann; Mondesert, Guillaume; Ge, Xueliang; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Hartkoorn, Ruben C.; Boldrin, Francesca; Goel, Pavitra; Peisker, Kristin; Benjak, Andrej; Barrio, Maria Belen; Ventura, Marcello; Amanda C Brown; Leblanc, Veronique; Bauer, Armin

    2016-01-01

    The lack of proper treatment for serious infectious diseases due to the emergence of multidrug resistance reinforces the need for the discovery of novel antibiotics. This is particularly true for tuberculosis (TB) for which 3.7% of new cases and 20% of previously treated cases are estimated to be caused by multi-drug resistant strains. In addition, in the case of TB, which claimed 1.5 million lives in 2014, the treatment of the least complicated, drug sensitive cases is lengthy and disagreeab...

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of vitamin B12-related metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas B. Young

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of genome sequences from clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with phylogenetically-related pathogens Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium leprae reveals diversity amongst genes associated with vitamin B12-related metabolism. Diversity is generated by gene deletion events, differential acquisition of genes by horizontal transfer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms with predicted impact on protein function and transcriptional regulation. Differences in the B12 synthesis pathway, methionine biosynthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and DNA repair and replication are consistent with adaptations to different environmental niches and pathogenic lifestyles. While there is no evidence of further gene acquisition during expansion of the M. tuberculosis complex, the emergence of other forms of genetic diversity provides insights into continuing host-pathogen co-evolution and has the potential to identify novel targets for disease intervention.

  14. Machine learning and docking models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Kéri, György; Orfi, Lászlo; Pato, János; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Verma, Rinkee; Bradley, Erin K; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2017-03-01

    There is a shortage of compounds that are directed towards new targets apart from those targeted by the FDA approved drugs used against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Topoisomerase I (Mttopo I) is an essential mycobacterial enzyme and a promising target in this regard. However, it suffers from a shortage of known inhibitors. We have previously used computational approaches such as homology modeling and docking to propose 38 FDA approved drugs for testing and identified several active molecules. To follow on from this, we now describe the in vitro testing of a library of 639 compounds. These data were used to create machine learning models for Mttopo I which were further validated. The combined Mttopo I Bayesian model had a 5 fold cross validation receiver operator characteristic of 0.74 and sensitivity, specificity and concordance values above 0.76 and was used to select commercially available compounds for testing in vitro. The recently described crystal structure of Mttopo I was also compared with the previously described homology model and then used to dock the Mttopo I actives norclomipramine and imipramine. In summary, we describe our efforts to identify small molecule inhibitors of Mttopo I using a combination of machine learning modeling and docking studies in conjunction with screening of the selected molecules for enzyme inhibition. We demonstrate the experimental inhibition of Mttopo I by small molecule inhibitors and show that the enzyme can be readily targeted for lead molecule development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The regulation of sulfur metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroula K Hatzios

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb has evolved into a highly successful human pathogen. It deftly subverts the bactericidal mechanisms of alveolar macrophages, ultimately inducing granuloma formation and establishing long-term residence in the host. These hallmarks of Mtb infection are facilitated by the metabolic adaptation of the pathogen to its surrounding environment and the biosynthesis of molecules that mediate its interactions with host immune cells. The sulfate assimilation pathway of Mtb produces a number of sulfur-containing metabolites with important contributions to pathogenesis and survival. This pathway is regulated by diverse environmental cues and regulatory proteins that mediate sulfur transactions in the cell. Here, we discuss the transcriptional and biochemical mechanisms of sulfur metabolism regulation in Mtb and potential small molecule regulators of the sulfate assimilation pathway that are collectively poised to aid this intracellular pathogen in its expert manipulation of the host. From this global analysis, we have identified a subset of sulfur-metabolizing enzymes that are sensitive to multiple regulatory cues and may be strong candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  16. A robust SNP barcode for typing Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains

    KAUST Repository

    Coll, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Strain-specific genomic diversity in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) is an important factor in pathogenesis that may affect virulence, transmissibility, host response and emergence of drug resistance. Several systems have been proposed to classify MTBC strains into distinct lineages and families. Here, we investigate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as robust (stable) markers of genetic variation for phylogenetic analysis. We identify ∼92k SNP across a global collection of 1,601 genomes. The SNP-based phylogeny is consistent with the gold-standard regions of difference (RD) classification system. Of the ∼7k strain-specific SNPs identified, 62 markers are proposed to discriminate known circulating strains. This SNP-based barcode is the first to cover all main lineages, and classifies a greater number of sublineages than current alternatives. It may be used to classify clinical isolates to evaluate tools to control the disease, including therapeutics and vaccines whose effectiveness may vary by strain type. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  17. Glucose phosphorylation is required for Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeli Marrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is thought to preferentially rely on fatty acid metabolism to both establish and maintain chronic infections. Its metabolic network, however, allows efficient co-catabolism of multiple carbon substrates. To gain insight into the importance of carbohydrate substrates for Mtb pathogenesis we evaluated the role of glucose phosphorylation, the first reaction in glycolysis. We discovered that Mtb expresses two functional glucokinases. Mtb required the polyphosphate glucokinase PPGK for normal growth on glucose, while its second glucokinase GLKA was dispensable. (13C-based metabolomic profiling revealed that both enzymes are capable of incorporating glucose into Mtb's central carbon metabolism, with PPGK serving as dominant glucokinase in wild type (wt Mtb. When both glucokinase genes, ppgK and glkA, were deleted from its genome, Mtb was unable to use external glucose as substrate for growth or metabolism. Characterization of the glucokinase mutants in mouse infections demonstrated that glucose phosphorylation is dispensable for establishing infection in mice. Surprisingly, however, the glucokinase double mutant failed to persist normally in lungs, which suggests that Mtb has access to glucose in vivo and relies on glucose phosphorylation to survive during chronic mouse infections.

  18. Pathogen roid rage: cholesterol utilization by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipperman, Matthew F; Sampson, Nicole S; Thomas, Suzanne T

    2014-01-01

    The ability of science and medicine to control the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires an understanding of the complex host environment within which it resides. Pathological and biological evidence overwhelmingly demonstrate how the mammalian steroid cholesterol is present throughout the course of infection. Better understanding Mtb requires a more complete understanding of how it utilizes molecules like cholesterol in this environment to sustain the infection of the host. Cholesterol uptake, catabolism and broader utilization are important for maintenance of the pathogen in the host and it has been experimentally validated to contribute to virulence and pathogenesis. Cholesterol is catabolized by at least three distinct sub-pathways, two for the ring system and one for the side chain, yielding dozens of steroid intermediates with varying biochemical properties. Our ability to control this worldwide infectious agent requires a greater knowledge of how Mtb uses cholesterol to its advantage throughout the course of infection. Herein, the current state of knowledge of cholesterol metabolism by Mtb is reviewed from a biochemical perspective with a focus on the metabolic genes and pathways responsible for cholesterol steroid catabolism.

  19. Chronic helminth infection does not exacerbate Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Hübner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic helminth infections induce a Th2 immune shift and establish an immunoregulatory milieu. As both of these responses can suppress Th1 immunity, which is necessary for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB infection, we hypothesized that chronic helminth infections may exacerbate the course of MTB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Co-infection studies were conducted in cotton rats as they are the natural host for the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis and are an excellent model for human MTB. Immunogical responses, histological studies, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures were assessed two months after MTB challenge in cotton rats with and without chronic L. sigmodontis infection. Spleen cell proliferation and interferon gamma production in response to purified protein derivative were similar between co-infected and MTB-only infected animals. In contrast to our hypothesis, MTB loads and occurrence and size of lung granulomas were not increased in co-infected animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that chronic filaria infections do not exacerbate MTB infection in the cotton rat model. While these results suggest that filaria eradication programs may not facilitate MTB control, they indicate that it may be possible to develop worm-derived therapies for autoimmune diseases that do not substantially increase the risk for infections.

  20. Identification of widespread adenosine nucleotide binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansong, Charles; Ortega, Corrie; Payne, Samuel H.; Haft, Daniel H.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Lewis, Michael P.; Ollodart, Anja R.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shukla, Anil K.; Fortuin, Suereta; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Grundner, Christoph; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-01-24

    The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example of this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.

  1. Differential activation of dendritic cells by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Martínez, Juana Elizabeth; Nieto-Patlán, Erik; Nieto-Patlán, Alejandro; Gonzaga-Bernachi, Job; Santos-Mendoza, Teresa; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Chávez-Blanco, Alma; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) inhibits dendritric cells (DC) function in order to delay T cell response. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that genetic diversity of Mtb strains can affect their interaction with the immune system. Beijing genotype has attracted attention because of its high prevalence and multi-drug resistance. Although it is known that this genotype is hypervirulent and differentially activates macrophages when compared to other genotypes, little is known about its interaction with DC. In order to address this issue, murine bone marrow derived DC (BMDC) were stimulated with soluble extracts (SE) from BCG, H37Rv, Canetti and Beijing genotypes. We observed that unlike other mycobacteria strains, SE-Beijing was unable to induce maturation of DC as assessed by cell surface MHC-II expression. DC stimulated with SE-Beijing failed to produce IL-12 and TNF-α, but did secrete IL-10. Interestingly, SE-Beijing induced CCR7 and PDL-1 on BMDC, but did not induce the expression of CD86. When BMDC stimulated with SE-Beijing were used to activate CD4+ cells they were unable to induce a Th1 response when compared with less virulent genotypes. These results indicate that Beijing is able to modulate DC activation and function, which may be related to the pathogenesis induced by this genotype.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  3. Mycobacterium genotypes in pulmonary tuberculosis infections and their detection by trained African giant pouched rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgode, Georgies F; Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Bedotto, Marielle; Weetjens, Bart J; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Kuipers, Dian; Machang'u, Robert S; Kazwala, Rudovick; Mfinanga, Sayoki G; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in low-income countries is mainly done by microscopy. Hence, little is known about the diversity of Mycobacterium spp. in TB infections. Different genotypes or lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary in virulence and induce different inflammatory and immune responses. Trained Cricetomys rats show a potential for rapid diagnosis of TB. They detect over 28 % of smear-negative, culture-positive TB. However, it is unknown whether these rats can equally detect sputa from patients infected with different genotypes of M. tuberculosis. A 4-month prospective study on diversity of Mycobacterium spp. was conducted in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. 252 sputa from 161 subjects were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and thereafter tested by rats. Mycobacterial isolates were subjected to molecular identification and multispacer sequence typing (MST) to determine species and genotypes. A total of 34 Mycobacterium spp. isolates consisting of 32 M. tuberculosis, 1 M. avium subsp. hominissuis and 1 M. intracellulare were obtained. MST analyses of 26 M. tuberculosis isolates yielded 10 distinct MST genotypes, including 3 new genotypes with two clusters of related patterns not grouped by geographic areas. Genotype MST-67, shared by one-third of M. tuberculosis isolates, was associated with the Mwananyamala clinic. This study shows that diverse M. tuberculosis genotypes (n = 10) occur in Dar es Salaam and trained rats detect 80 % of the genotypes. Sputa with two M. tuberculosis genotypes (20 %), M. avium hominissuis and M. intracellulare were not detected. Therefore, rats detect sputa with different M. tuberculosis genotypes and can be used to detect TB in resource-poor countries.

  4. Sputum is a surrogate for bronchoalveolar lavage for monitoring Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional profiles in TB patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Benjamin J; Loxton, Andre G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Van, Tran T; Davis, J Lucian; de Jong, Bouke C; Voskuil, Martin I; Leach, Sonia M; Schoolnik, Gary K; Walzl, Gerhard; Strong, Michael; Walter, Nicholas D

    2016-09-01

    Pathogen-targeted transcriptional profiling in human sputum may elucidate the physiologic state of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) during infection and treatment. However, whether M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum recapitulates transcription in the lung is uncertain. We therefore compared M. tuberculosis transcription in human sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 11 HIV-negative South African patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. We additionally compared these clinical samples with in vitro log phase aerobic growth and hypoxic non-replicating persistence (NRP-2). Of 2179 M. tuberculosis transcripts assayed in sputum and BAL via multiplex RT-PCR, 194 (8.9%) had a p-value <0.05, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing. Categorical enrichment analysis indicated that expression of the hypoxia-responsive DosR regulon was higher in BAL than in sputum. M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum was distinct from both aerobic growth and NRP-2, with a range of 396-1020 transcripts significantly differentially expressed after multiple testing correction. Collectively, our results indicate that M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum approximates M. tuberculosis transcription in the lung. Minor differences between M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum suggested lower oxygen concentrations or higher nitric oxide concentrations in BAL. M. tuberculosis-targeted transcriptional profiling of sputa may be a powerful tool for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and monitoring treatment responses in vivo.

  5. Diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis using a monoclonal antibody to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasushi Ihama; Akira Hokama; Kenji Hibiya; Kazuto Kishimoto; Manabu Nakamoto; Tetsuo Hirata; Nagisa Kinjo

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the utility of immunohistochemical (IHC) staining with an antibody to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis) for the diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis (TB).METHODS:We retrospectively identified 10 patients (4 males and 6 females; mean age =65.1 ± 13.6 years)with intestinal TB.Clinical characteristics,including age,gender,underlying disease,and symptoms were obtained.Chest radiograph and laboratory tests,including sputum Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining,M.tuberculosis culture,and sputum polymerase chain reaction (PCR)for tubercle bacilli DNA,as well as Tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB gold test (QFT),were examined.Colonoscopic records recorded on the basis of Sato's classification were also reviewed,in addition to data from intestinal biopsies examined for histopathological findings,including hematoxylin and eosin staining,and ZN staining,as well as M.tuberculosis culture,and PCR for tubercle bacilli DNA.For the present study,archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) intestinal tissue samples were immunohistochemically stained using a commercially available species-specific monoclonal antibody to the 38-kDa antigen of the M.tuberculosis complex.These sections were also stained with the pan-macrophage marker CD68 antibody.RESULTS:From the clinical data,we found that no patients were immunocompromised,and that the main symptoms were diarrhea and weight loss.Three patients displayed active pulmonary TB,six patients (60%) had a positive TST,and 4 patients (40%) had a positive QFT.Colonoscopic findings revealed that all patients had type 1 findings (linear ulcers in a circumferential arrangement or linear ulcers arranged circumferentially with mucosa showing multiple nodules),all of which were located in the right hemicolon and/or terminal ileum.Seven patients (70%) had concomitant healed lesions in the ileocecal area.No acid-fast bacilli were detected with ZN staining of the intestinal tissue samples,and both M.tuberculosis

  6. Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by m-AMSA, a eukaryotic type II topoisomerase poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-04-18

    m-AMSA, an established inhibitor of eukaryotic type II topoisomerases, exerts its cidal effect by binding to the enzyme-DNA complex thus inhibiting the DNA religation step. The molecule and its analogues have been successfully used as chemotherapeutic agents against different forms of cancer. After virtual screening using a homology model of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I, we identified m-AMSA as a high scoring hit. We demonstrate that m-AMSA can inhibit the DNA relaxation activity of topoisomerase I from M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. In a whole cell assay, m-AMSA inhibited the growth of both the mycobacteria.

  7. A defined tuberculosis vaccine candidate boosts BCG and protects against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Ireton, Gregory C; Ordway, Diane J; Windish, Hillarie Plessner; Pine, Samuel O; Kahn, Maria; Phan, Tony; Orme, Ian M; Vedvick, Thomas S; Baldwin, Susan L; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2010-10-13

    Despite the widespread use of the childhood vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the disease remains a serious global health problem. A successful vaccine against TB that replaces or boosts BCG would include antigens that induce or recall the appropriate T cell responses. Four Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens--including members of the virulence factor families PE/PPE and EsX or antigens associated with latency--were produced as a single recombinant fusion protein (ID93). When administered together with the adjuvant GLA-SE, a stable oil-in-water nanoemulsion, the fusion protein was immunogenic in mice, guinea pigs, and cynomolgus monkeys. In mice, this fusion protein-adjuvant combination induced polyfunctional CD4 T helper 1 cell responses characterized by antigen-specific interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-2, as well as a reduction in the number of bacteria in the lungs of animals after they were subsequently infected with virulent or multidrug-resistant Mtb strains. Furthermore, boosting BCG-vaccinated guinea pigs with fusion peptide-adjuvant resulted in reduced pathology and fewer bacilli, and prevented the death of animals challenged with virulent Mtb. Finally, the fusion protein elicited polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8 T cell responses in BCG-vaccinated or Mtb-exposed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study establishes that the protein subunit vaccine consisting of the fusion protein and adjuvant protects against TB and drug-resistant TB in animals and is a candidate for boosting the protective efficacy of the childhood BCG vaccine in humans.

  8. Specific T-cell epitopes for immunoassay-based diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, I; Weldingh, K; Leyten, EM

    2004-01-01

    Specific T-cell epitopes for immunoassay-based diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.Brock I, Weldingh K, Leyten EM, Arend SM, Ravn P, Andersen P. Department of Infectious Disease Immunology, Statens Serum Institute, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. The currently used...... method for immunological detection of tuberculosis infection, the tuberculin skin test, has low specificity. Antigens specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to replace purified protein derivative are therefore urgently needed. We have performed a rigorous assessment of the diagnostic potential of four...... selected and combined the specific peptide stretches from the four proteins not recognized by M. bovis BCG-vaccinated individuals. These peptide stretches were tested with peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with microscopy- or culture-confirmed tuberculosis and from healthy M. bovis...

  9. Specific T-cell epitopes for immunoassay-based diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, I; Weldingh, K; Leyten, EM

    2004-01-01

    Specific T-cell epitopes for immunoassay-based diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.Brock I, Weldingh K, Leyten EM, Arend SM, Ravn P, Andersen P. Department of Infectious Disease Immunology, Statens Serum Institute, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. The currently used...... method for immunological detection of tuberculosis infection, the tuberculin skin test, has low specificity. Antigens specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to replace purified protein derivative are therefore urgently needed. We have performed a rigorous assessment of the diagnostic potential of four...... selected and combined the specific peptide stretches from the four proteins not recognized by M. bovis BCG-vaccinated individuals. These peptide stretches were tested with peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with microscopy- or culture-confirmed tuberculosis and from healthy M. bovis...

  10. Resistance to first-line anti-TB drugs is associated with reduced nitric oxide susceptibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idh, Jonna; Mekonnen, Mekidim; Abate, Ebba;

    2012-01-01

    The relative contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to the killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human tuberculosis (TB) is controversial, although this has been firmly established in rodents. Studies have demonstrated that clinical strains of M. tuberculosis differ in susceptibility to NO, but how...

  11. CsoR Is Essential for Maintaining Copper Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a pathogen infecting one third of the world population, faces numerous challenges within the host, including high levels of copper. We have previously shown that M. tuberculosis CsoR is a copper inducible transcriptional regulator. Here we examined the hypothesis that csoR is necessary for maintaining copper homeostasis and surviving under various stress conditions. With an unmarked csoR knockout strain, we were able to characterize the role of csoR in M. tuberculo...

  12. Improved Detection by Next-Generation Sequencing of Pyrazinamide Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Maningi, Nontuthuko E.; Daum, Luke T.; Rodriguez, John D.; Mphahlele, Matsie; Peters, Remco P. H.; Fischer, Gerald W.; Chambers, James P.; Fourie, P. Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The technical limitations of common tests used for detecting pyrazinamide (PZA) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates pose challenges for comprehensive and accurate descriptions of drug resistance in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). In this study, a 606-bp fragment (comprising the pncA coding region plus the promoter) was sequenced using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect associated PZA resistance mutations in 88 recultured MDR-TB isolat...

  13. Use of magnetic beads for tissue DNA extraction and IS6110 Mycobacterium tuberculosis PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    R. Caldarelli-Stefano; Vago, L; Bonetto, S; Nebuloni, M; Costanzi, G

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques are used increasingly for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and can be used on the DNA obtained from both frozen and formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissues. However, the extraction of DNA by means of the conventional phenol/chloroform method is time consuming and requires the use of potentially dangerous chemical reagents. This paper describes a method based upon the use of magnetic beads for the extraction of M tuberculosi...

  14. Comparative analysis of mycobacterium and related actinomycetes yields insight into the evolution of mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire Abigail

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequence of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb strain H37Rv has been available for over a decade, but the biology of the pathogen remains poorly understood. Genome sequences from other Mtb strains and closely related bacteria present an opportunity to apply the power of comparative genomics to understand the evolution of Mtb pathogenesis. We conducted a comparative analysis using 31 genomes from the Tuberculosis Database (TBDB.org, including 8 strains of Mtb and M. bovis, 11 additional Mycobacteria, 4 Corynebacteria, 2 Streptomyces, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, Nocardia farcinia, Acidothermus cellulolyticus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Propionibacterium acnes, and Bifidobacterium longum. Results Our results highlight the functional importance of lipid metabolism and its regulation, and reveal variation between the evolutionary profiles of genes implicated in saturated and unsaturated fatty acid metabolism. It also suggests that DNA repair and molybdopterin cofactors are important in pathogenic Mycobacteria. By analyzing sequence conservation and gene expression data, we identify nearly 400 conserved noncoding regions. These include 37 predicted promoter regulatory motifs, of which 14 correspond to previously validated motifs, as well as 50 potential noncoding RNAs, of which we experimentally confirm the expression of four. Conclusions Our analysis of protein evolution highlights gene families that are associated with the adaptation of environmental Mycobacteria to obligate pathogenesis. These families include fatty acid metabolism, DNA repair, and molybdopterin biosynthesis. Our analysis reinforces recent findings suggesting that small noncoding RNAs are more common in Mycobacteria than previously expected. Our data provide a foundation for understanding the genome and biology of Mtb in a comparative context, and are available online and through TBDB.org.

  15. Potential Inhibitors for Isocitrate Lyase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Non-M. tuberculosis: A Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yie-Vern Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Isocitrate lyase (ICL is the first enzyme involved in glyoxylate cycle. Many plants and microorganisms are relying on glyoxylate cycle enzymes to survive upon downregulation of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle, especially Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. In fact, ICL is a potential drug target for MTB in dormancy. With the urge for new antitubercular drug to overcome tuberculosis treat such as multidrug resistant strain and HIV-coinfection, the pace of drug discovery has to be increased. There are many approaches to discovering potential inhibitor for MTB ICL and we hereby review the updated list of them. The potential inhibitors can be either a natural compound or synthetic compound. Moreover, these compounds are not necessary to be discovered only from MTB ICL, as it can also be discovered by a non-MTB ICL. Our review is categorized into four sections, namely, (a MTB ICL with natural compounds; (b MTB ICL with synthetic compounds; (c non-MTB ICL with natural compounds; and (d non-MTB ICL with synthetic compounds. Each of the approaches is capable of overcoming different challenges of inhibitor discovery. We hope that this paper will benefit the discovery of better inhibitor for ICL.

  16. Prevalence and evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in tuberculosis case contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Paulino Ribeiro Albanese

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : The tuberculin test is a diagnostic method for detecting latent tuberculosis (TB infection, especially among disease contact cases. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence and evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among TB contact cases. METHODS : A retrospective cohort study was performed in a reference center for TB. The study population consisted of 2,425 patients who underwent a tuberculin test from 2003 to 2010 and whose results indicated contact with individuals with TB. The data were collected from the registry book of the tuberculin tests, patient files and the Information System Records of Notification Grievance. To verify the evolution of TB, case records through September 2014 were consulted. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS. In all hypothesis tests, a significance level of 0.05 was used. RESULTS : From the studied sample, 435 (17.9% contacts did not return for reading. Among the 1,990 contacts that completed the test, the prevalence of latent TB infection was 35.4%. Of these positive cases, 50.6% were referred to treatment; the dropout rate was 42.5%. Among all of the contacts, the TB prevalence was 1.8%, from which 13.2% abandoned treatment. CONCLUSIONS : The collected data indicate the need for more effective public policies to improve TB control, including administering tests that do not require a return visit for reading, enhancing contact tracing and encouraging actions that reinforce full treatment adherence.

  17. Strain Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Afar Pastoral Region of Ethiopia

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    Mulugeta Belay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on genotypic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC is important to understand its epidemiology, human adaptation, clinical phenotypes, and drug resistance. This study aimed to characterize MTBC clinical isolates circulating in a predominantly pastoralist area in Ethiopia, a country where tuberculosis is the second leading cause of mortality. Culture of sputum samples collected from a total of 325 pulmonary TB suspects was done to isolate MTBC. Spoligotyping was used to characterize 105 isolates from culture positive slopes and the result was compared with an international database. Forty-four spoligotype patterns were observed to correspond to 35 shared-types (SITs containing 96 isolates and 9 orphan patterns; 27 SITs containing 83 isolates matched a preexisting shared-type in the database, whereas 8 SITs (n=13 isolates were newly created. A total of 19 SITs containing 80 isolates were clustered within this study (overall clustering of 76.19%. Three dominant lineages (T, CAS, and Manu accounted for 76.19% of the isolates. SIT149/T3-ETH was one of the two most dominant sublineages. Unlike previous reports, we show that Manu lineage strains not only constitute a dominant lineage, but are also associated with HIV infection in Afar region of Ethiopia. The high level of clustering suggests the presence of recent transmission that should be further studied using additional genotyping markers.

  18. Molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains: a fundamental tool for tuberculosis control and elimination

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    Angela Cannas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. An improvement of the strategies for disease control is necessary in both low- and high-incidence TB countries. Clinicians, epidemiologists, laboratory specialists, and public health players should work together in order to achieve a significant reduction in TB transmission and spread of drug-resistant strains. Effective TB surveillance relies on early diagnosis of new cases, appropriate therapy, and accurate detection of outbreaks in the community, in order to implement proper TB control strategies. To achieve this goal, information from classical and molecular epidemiology, together with patient clinical data need to be combined. In this review, we summarize the methodologies currently used in molecular epidemiology, namely molecular typing. We will discuss their efficiency to phylogenetically characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates, and their ability to provide information that can be useful for disease control. We will also introduce next generation sequencing as the methodology that potentially could provide in a short time both, detection of new outbreaks and identification of resistance patterns. This could envision a potential of next generation sequencing as an important tool for accurate patient management and disease control.

  19. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Strains: A Fundamental Tool for Tuberculosis Control and Elimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Angela; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Di Caro, Antonino; Delogu, Giovanni; Girardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. An improvement of the strategies for disease control is necessary in both low- and high-incidence TB countries. Clinicians, epidemiologists, laboratory specialists, and public health players should work together in order to achieve a significant reduction in TB transmission and spread of drug-resistant strains. Effective TB surveillance relies on early diagnosis of new cases, appropriate therapy, and accurate detection of outbreaks in the community, in order to implement proper TB control strategies. To achieve this goal, information from classical and molecular epidemiology, together with patient clinical data need to be combined. In this review, we summarize the methodologies currently used in molecular epidemiology, namely molecular typing. We will discuss their efficiency to phylogenetically characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates, and their ability to provide information that can be useful for disease control. We will also introduce next generation sequencing as the methodology that potentially could provide in a short time both, detection of new outbreaks and identification of resistance patterns. This could envision a potential of next generation sequencing as an important tool for accurate patient management and disease control. PMID:27403266

  20. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis cluster demonstrating the use of genotyping in urban tuberculosis control

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    Burdo Conny CA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates offers better opportunities to study links between tuberculosis (TB cases and can highlight relevant issues in urban TB control in low-endemic countries. Methods A medium-sized molecular cluster of TB cases with identical DNA fingerprints was used for the development of a visual presentation of epidemiologic links between cases. Results Of 32 cases, 17 (53% were linked to the index case, and 11 (34% to a secondary case. The remaining four (13% could not be linked and were classified as possibly caused by the index patient. Of the 21 cases related to the index case, TB developed within one year of the index diagnosis in 11 patients (52%, within one to two years in four patients (19%, and within two to five years in six patients (29%. Conclusion Cluster analysis underscored several issues for TB control in an urban setting, such as the recognition of the outbreak, the importance of reinfections, the impact of delayed diagnosis, the contribution of pub-related transmissions and its value for decision-making to extend contact investigations. Visualising cases in a cluster diagram was particularly useful in finding transmission locations and the similarities and links between patients.

  1. IFNG-mediated immune responses enhance autophagy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in patients with active tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetta, Ana I; Peña, Delfina; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Recalde, Gabriela M; Pellegrini, Joaquín; Bigi, Fabiana; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gutierrez, Marisa; Colombo, María I; García, Verónica E

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires IFNG. Besides, IFNG-mediated induction of autophagy suppresses survival of virulent Mtb in macrophage cell lines. We investigated the contribution of autophagy to the defense against Mtb antigen (Mtb-Ag) in cells from tuberculosis patients and healthy donors (HD). Patients were classified as high responders (HR) if their T cells produced significant IFNG against Mtb-Ag; and low responders (LR) when patients showed weak or no T cell responses to Mtb-Ag. The highest autophagy levels were detected in HD cells whereas the lowest quantities were observed in LR patients. Interestingly, upon Mtb-Ag stimulation, we detected a positive correlation between IFNG and MAP1LC3B-II/LC3-II levels. Actually, blockage of Mtb-Ag-induced IFNG markedly reduced autophagy in HR patients whereas addition of limited amounts of IFNG significantly increased autophagy in LR patients. Therefore, autophagy collaborates with human immune responses against Mtb in close association with specific IFNG secreted against the pathogen. PMID:25426782

  2. Differential Recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Epitopes as a Function of Tuberculosis Disease History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, Thomas J; Carpenter, Chelsea; Pro, Sebastian Carrasco; Sidney, John; Musvosvi, Munyaradzi; Rozot, Virginie; Seumois, Grégory; Rosales, Sandy L; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Goletti, Delia; Makgotlho, Edward; Hanekom, Willem; Hatherill, Mark; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Arlehamn, Cecilia S Lindestam

    2017-09-15

    Individuals with a history of tuberculosis (TB) disease are at elevated risk of disease recurrence. The underlying cause is not known, but one explanation is that previous disease results in less-effective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We hypothesized that the repertoire of Mtb-derived epitopes recognized by T cells from individuals with latent Mtb infection differs as a function of previous diagnosis of active TB disease. T-cell responses to peptide pools in samples collected from an adult screening and an adolescent validation cohort were measured by IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay or intracellular cytokine staining. We identified a set of "type 2" T-cell epitopes that were recognized at 10-fold-lower levels in Mtb-infected individuals with a history of TB disease less than 6 years ago than in those without previous TB. By contrast, "type 1" epitopes were recognized equally well in individuals with or without previous TB. The differential epitope recognition was not due to differences in HLA class II binding, memory phenotypes, or gene expression in the responding T cells. Instead, "TB disease history-sensitive" type 2 epitopes were significantly (P < 0.0001) more homologous to sequences from bacteria found in the human microbiome than type 1 epitopes. Preferential loss of T-cell reactivity to Mtb epitopes that are homologous to bacteria in the microbiome in persons with previous TB disease may reflect long-term effects of antibiotic TB treatment on the microbiome.

  3. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the apa gene coding for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 45/47-kilodalton secreted antigen complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laqueyrerie, A; Militzer, P; Romain, F; Eiglmeier, K; Cole, S; Marchal, G

    1995-01-01

    Effective protection against a virulent challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is induced mainly by previous immunization with living attenuated mycobacteria, and it has been hypothesized that secreted proteins serve as major targets in the specific immune response. To identify and purify molecules present in culture medium filtrate which are dominant antigens during effective vaccination, a two-step selection procedure was used to select antigens able to interact with T lymphocytes and/or antibodies induced by immunization with living bacteria and to counterselect antigens interacting with the immune effectors induced by immunization with dead bacteria. A Mycobacterium bovis BCG 45/47-kDa antigen complex, present in BCG culture filtrate, has been previously identified and isolated (F. Romain, A. Laqueyrerie, P. Militzer, P. Pescher, P. Chavarot, M. Lagranderie, G. Auregan, M. Gheorghiu, and G. Marchal, Infect. Immun. 61:742-750, 1993). Since the cognate antibodies recognize the very same antigens present in M. tuberculosis culture medium filtrates, a project was undertaken to clone, express, and sequence the corresponding gene of M. tuberculosis. An M. tuberculosis shuttle cosmid library was transferred in Mycobacterium smegmatis and screened with a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect the clones expressing the proteins. A clone containing a 40-kb DNA insert was selected, and by means of subcloning in Escherichia coli, a 2-kb fragment that coded for the molecules was identified. An open reading frame in the 2,061-nucleotide sequence codes for a secreted protein with a consensus signal peptide of 39 amino acids and a predicted molecular mass of 28,779 Da. The gene was referred to as apa because of the high percentages of proline (21.7%) and alanine (19%) in the purified protein. Southern hybridization analysis of digested total genomic DNA from M. tuberculosis (reference strains H37Rv and H37Ra) indicated that the apa gene was present as a

  4. Extra pulmonary tuberculosis: Rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis grown in Mycobacterium growth indicator tube 960 and Lowenstein-Jensen media, employing Standard diagnostics Bioline Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein 64 antigen detection kit

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    G Kandhakumari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Investigation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB in and around Pondicherry is being carried out since August 2011 in our tertiary care super specialty hospital. Objectives: To compare the rapid Kit SD Bio-Line MPT 64 Ag with conventional and time consuming biochemical tests. Confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at a reasonable time frame is the main thrust. Materials and Methods: Thirty three Mycobacterium tuberculosis and four Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM grown in MGIT960 system/Lowenstein-Jensen media (LJ were examined by the rapid MPT 64 antigen detection as well as a battery of conventional tests like niacin, nitrate reduction, paraminobenzoic acid susceptibility and cord formation. Results and Conclusion: . Both the rapid kit and conventional tests correctly identified 33 M.tuberculosis isolates. Keeping conventional identification as reference, sensitivity and specificity for rapid kit was 100%. Rapid kit which takes only 15 minutes is accurate, cost effective, and facilitates early treatment for these EPTB patients, whose clinical specimens are paucibacillary.

  5. Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium among HIV-infected patients after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. EuroSIDA Study Group JD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Gatell, J M; Mocroft, A;

    2000-01-01

    the introduction of HAART, using data from the EuroSIDA study, a European, multicenter observational cohort of more than 7,000 patients. Overall incidences of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) were 0.8 and 1.4 cases/100 person-years of follow-up (PYF), decreasing from 1.8 (TB...

  6. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and host risk factors in a large urban setting in Brazil.

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    Teresa Gomes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors related to the development of extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis (EPTB are still poorly understood, particularly in high-endemic countries like Brazil. The objective of the paper is to determine host and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB strain-related factors associated with the development of EPTB in Espírito Santo state, Brazil. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a retrospective laboratory-based surveillance study of new tuberculosis (TB cases diagnosed in Espírito Santo state, Brazil between 1998 and 2007. We genotyped 612 isolates of MTB from 606 TB patients using spoligotyping and IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP typing and compared sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients with pulmonary TB (PTB and EPTB. Among 606 patients, 464 (77% had PTB, 79 (13% had EPTB, 51 (8% had both, and 12 (2% had miliary TB. The IS6110 RFLP analysis demonstrated that 250 (41% isolates belonged to clustered RFLP patterns, 27 (11% of which were from EPTB. We identified 73 clusters including 35 (48% composed of 2 isolates each. By spoligotyping, 506 (83% MTB isolates fell into known patterns and 106 (17% fell into patterns with no family assignment; 297 (48% isolates belonged to the Latin-American Mediterranean family. Higher school level (4-7 years OR: 0.16 95% CI 0.34-0.73 and > 8 years of education, OR 0.06 95% CI 0.009-0.50 white ethnicity (OR: 2.54 95% CI 1.03-6.25 and HIV infection (OR: 16.83 95% CI 5.23-54.18 were associated with EPTB. No specific strain lineage or percentage of clustering was associated with EPTB. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that risk factors for EPTB are related more to host than to MTB strain lineage characteristics.

  7. Design of Thymidine Analogues Targeting Thymidilate Kinase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Luc Calvin Owono Owono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We design here new nanomolar antituberculotics, inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis thymidine monophosphate kinase (TMPKmt, by means of structure-based molecular design. 3D models of TMPKmt-inhibitor complexes have been prepared from the crystal structure of TMPKmt cocrystallized with the natural substrate deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP (1GSI for a training set of 15 thymidine analogues (TMDs with known activity to prepare a QSAR model of interaction establishing a correlation between the free energy of complexation and the biological activity. Subsequent validation of the predictability of the model has been performed with a 3D QSAR pharmacophore generation. The structural information derived from the model served to design new subnanomolar thymidine analogues. From molecular modeling investigations, the agreement between free energy of complexation (ΔΔGcom and Ki values explains 94% of the TMPKmt inhibition (pKi=-0.2924ΔΔGcom+3.234;R2=0.94 by variation of the computed ΔΔGcom and 92% for the pharmacophore (PH4 model (pKi=1.0206×pKipred-0.0832,  R2=0.92. The analysis of contributions from active site residues suggested substitution at the 5-position of pyrimidine ring and various groups at the 5′-position of the ribose. The best inhibitor reached a predicted Ki of 0.155 nM. The computational approach through the combined use of molecular modeling and PH4 pharmacophore is helpful in targeted drug design, providing valuable information for the synthesis and prediction of activity of novel antituberculotic agents.

  8. Iron acquisition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing within myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanmi, Oyebode; Kesavalu, Banurekha; Abdalla, Maher Y; Britigan, Bradley E

    2013-12-01

    The pathophysiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection is linked to the ability of the organism to grow within macrophages. Lung myeloid dendritic cells are a newly recognized reservoir of M.tb during infection. Iron (Fe) acquisition is critical for M.tb growth. In vivo, extracellular Fe is chelated to transferrin (TF) and lactoferrin (LF). We previously reported that M.tb replicating in human monocyte-dervied macrophages (MDM) can acquire Fe bound to TF, LF, and citrate, as well as from the MDM cytoplasm. Access of M.tb to Fe may influence its growth in macrophages and dendritic cells. In the present work we confirmed the ability of different strains of M.tb to grow in human myeloid dendritic cells in vitro. Fe acquired by M.tb replicating within dendritic cells from externally added Fe chelates varied with the Fe chelate present in the external media: Fe-citrate > Fe-LF > Fe-TF. Fe acquisition rates from each chelate did not vary over 7 days. M.tb within dendritic cells also acquired Fe from the dendritic cell cytoplasm, with the efficiency of Fe acquisition greater from cytoplasmic Fe sources, regardless of the initial Fe chelate from which that cytoplasmic Fe was derived. Growth and Fe acquisition results with human MDM were similar to those with dendritic cells. M.tb grow and replicate within myeloid dendritic cells in vitro. Fe metabolism of M.tb growing in either MDM or dendritic cells in vitro is influenced by the nature of Fe available and the organism appears to preferentially access cytoplasmic rather than extracellular Fe sources. Whether these in vitro data extend to in vivo conditions should be examined in future studies.

  9. Differential virulence and disease progression following Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Laura E; Weiner, Danielle M; Schimel, Daniel; Lin, Philana Ling; Dayao, Emmanuel; Tankersley, Sarah L; Cai, Ying; Coleman, M Teresa; Tomko, Jaime; Paripati, Praveen; Orandle, Marlene; Kastenmayer, Robin J; Tartakovsky, Michael; Rosenthal, Alexander; Portevin, Damien; Eum, Seok Yong; Lahouar, Saher; Gagneux, Sebastien; Young, Douglas B; Flynn, Joanne L; Barry, Clifton E

    2013-08-01

    Existing small-animal models of tuberculosis (TB) rarely develop cavitary disease, limiting their value for assessing the biology and dynamics of this highly important feature of human disease. To develop a smaller primate model with pathology similar to that seen in humans, we experimentally infected the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) with diverse strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis of various pathogenic potentials. These included recent isolates of the modern Beijing lineage, the Euro-American X lineage, and M. africanum. All three strains produced fulminant disease in this animal with a spectrum of progression rates and clinical sequelae that could be monitored in real time using 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Lesion pathology at sacrifice revealed the entire spectrum of lesions observed in human TB patients. The three strains produced different rates of progression to disease, various extents of extrapulmonary dissemination, and various degrees of cavitation. The majority of live births in this species are twins, and comparison of results from siblings with different infecting strains allowed us to establish that the infection was highly reproducible and that the differential virulence of strains was not simply host variation. Quantitative assessment of disease burden by FDG-PET/CT provided an accurate reflection of the pathology findings at necropsy. These results suggest that the marmoset offers an attractive small-animal model of human disease that recapitulates both the complex pathology and spectrum of disease observed in humans infected with various M. tuberculosis strain clades.

  10. Differential Virulence and Disease Progression following Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Infection of the Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Laura E.; Weiner, Danielle M.; Schimel, Daniel; Lin, Philana Ling; Dayao, Emmanuel; Tankersley, Sarah L.; Cai, Ying; Coleman, M. Teresa; Tomko, Jaime; Paripati, Praveen; Orandle, Marlene; Kastenmayer, Robin J.; Tartakovsky, Michael; Rosenthal, Alexander; Portevin, Damien; Eum, Seok Yong; Lahouar, Saher; Gagneux, Sebastien; Young, Douglas B.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2013-01-01

    Existing small-animal models of tuberculosis (TB) rarely develop cavitary disease, limiting their value for assessing the biology and dynamics of this highly important feature of human disease. To develop a smaller primate model with pathology similar to that seen in humans, we experimentally infected the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) with diverse strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis of various pathogenic potentials. These included recent isolates of the modern Beijing lineage, the Euro-American X lineage, and M. africanum. All three strains produced fulminant disease in this animal with a spectrum of progression rates and clinical sequelae that could be monitored in real time using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Lesion pathology at sacrifice revealed the entire spectrum of lesions observed in human TB patients. The three strains produced different rates of progression to disease, various extents of extrapulmonary dissemination, and various degrees of cavitation. The majority of live births in this species are twins, and comparison of results from siblings with different infecting strains allowed us to establish that the infection was highly reproducible and that the differential virulence of strains was not simply host variation. Quantitative assessment of disease burden by FDG-PET/CT provided an accurate reflection of the pathology findings at necropsy. These results suggest that the marmoset offers an attractive small-animal model of human disease that recapitulates both the complex pathology and spectrum of disease observed in humans infected with various M. tuberculosis strain clades. PMID:23716617

  11. Structural measurements and cell line studies of the copper-PEG-Rifampicin complex against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Thomas; Mikula, Rachel; Wylie, Greg; Phillips, Dennis; Jarvis, Jackie; Zhang, Fengli

    2015-02-01

    The bacterium responsible for tuberculosis is increasing its resistance to antibiotics resulting in new multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). In this study, several analytical techniques including NMR, FT-ICR, MALDI-MS, LC-MS and UV/Vis are used to study the copper-Rifampicin-Polyethylene glycol (PEG-3350) complex. The copper (II) cation is a carrier for the antibiotic Rifampicin as well as nutrients for the bacterium. The NIH-NIAID cell line containing several Tb strains (including antibiotic resistant strains) is tested against seven copper-PEG-RIF complex variations.

  12. [Effect of low-energy helium-neon laser on the biological properties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolzhanskiĭ, V M; Kaliuk, A N; Maliev, B M; Levchenko, T N

    1990-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of M. tuberculosis biological properties tested in guinea pigs which were subjected to different doses of helium-neon laser radiation are given. The functional evidence is compared with the results of electron microscopic study of the irradiated culture. The investigation revealed that laser radiation caused changes in biological properties of M. tuberculosis. A decrease in growth properties and virulence was found to be related to a radiation dose. It is suggested that a drop in the biological activity of M. tuberculosis under laser radiation be associated with its influence on the Mycobacterium lipid layer which contains a cord-factor and responsible for their virulence.

  13. The arabinosyltransferase EmbC is inhibited by ethambutol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goude, R; Amin, A G; Chatterjee, D; Parish, T

    2009-10-01

    Ethambutol (EMB) is an antimycobacterial drug used extensively for the treatment of tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. EMB targets the biosynthesis of the cell wall, inhibiting the synthesis of both arabinogalactan and lipoarabinomannan (LAM), and is assumed to act via inhibition of three arabinosyltransferases: EmbA, EmbB, and EmbC. EmbA and EmbB are required for the synthesis of arabinogalactan, and at least one enzyme (M. tuberculosis EmbA [EmbA(Mt)]) is essential in M. tuberculosis. EmbC(Mt) is also essential for the viability of M. tuberculosis but is involved in the synthesis of LAM. We show that mutations in EmbC(Mt) that reduce its arabinosyltransferase activity result in increased sensitivity to EMB and the production of smaller LAM species in M. tuberculosis. Overexpression of EmbC(Mt) was not tolerated in M. tuberculosis, but overexpression of Mycobacterium smegmatis EmbC (EmbC(Ms)) led to EMB resistance and the production of larger LAM species in M. tuberculosis. Treatment of wild-type M. tuberculosis strains with EMB led to inhibition of LAM synthesis, resulting in the production of smaller species of LAM. In contrast, no change in LAM production was seen in EMB-resistant strains. Overexpression of EmbB(Ms) in M. tuberculosis also resulted in EMB resistance, but at a lower level than that caused by EmbC(Ms). Overexpression of EmbA(Mt) in M. tuberculosis had no effect on EMB resistance. Thus, there is a direct correlation between EmbC activity and EMB resistance, as well as between EmbC activity and the size of the LAM species produced, confirming that EmbC is one of the cellular targets of EMB action.

  14. Characterization of a secretory hydrolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis sheds critical insight into host lipid utilization by M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Khundrakpam Herojit; Jha, Bhavya; Dwivedy, Abhisek; Choudhary, Eira; N, Arpitha G; Ashraf, Anam; Arora, Divya; Agarwal, Nisheeth; Biswal, Bichitra Kumar

    2017-07-07

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis causes tuberculosis in humans and predominantly infects alveolar macrophages. To survive inside host lesions and to evade immune surveillance, this pathogen has developed many strategies. For example, M. tuberculosis uses host-derived lipids/fatty acids as nutrients for prolonged persistence within hypoxic host microenvironments. M. tuberculosis imports these metabolites through its respective transporters, and in the case of host fatty acids, a pertinent question arises: does M. tuberculosis have the enzyme(s) for cleavage of fatty acids from host lipids? We show herein that a previously uncharacterized membrane-associated M. tuberculosis protein encoded by Rv2672 is conserved exclusively in actinomycetes, exhibits both lipase and protease activities, is secreted into macrophages, and catalyzes host lipid hydrolysis. In light of these functions, we annotated Rv2672 as mycobacterial secreted hydrolase 1 (Msh1). Furthermore, we found that this enzyme is up-regulated both in an in vitro model of hypoxic stress and in a mouse model of M. tuberculosis infection, suggesting that the pathogen requires Msh1 under hypoxic conditions. Silencing Msh1 expression compromised the ability of M. tuberculosis to proliferate inside lipid-rich foamy macrophages but not under regular culture conditions in vitro, underscoring Msh1's importance for M. tuberculosis persistence in lipid-rich microenvironments. Of note, this is the first report providing insight into the mechanism of host lipid catabolism by an M. tuberculosis enzyme, augmenting our current understanding of how M. tuberculosis meets its nutrient requirements under hypoxic conditions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Implications of Mycobacterium Major Facilitator Superfamily for Novel Measures against Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zhen; Xie, Longxiang; Xie, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is an important secondary membrane transport protein superfamily conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. The MFS proteins are widespread among bacteria and are responsible for the transfer of substrates. Pathogenic Mycobacterium MFS transporters, their distribution, function, phylogeny, and predicted crystal structures were studied to better understand the function of MFS and to discover specific inhibitors of MFS for better tuberculosis control.

  16. The curative activity of thioridazine on mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Marta; Viveiros, Miguel; Kristiansen, Jette E;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of thioridazine (TZ) at different dose levels on mice that had been infected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with a high dose of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATCC H37Rv strain. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Groups of five female BALB/C mice were...

  17. The prevalence of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection based on an interferon-γ release assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas V; Jensen, Lotte; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel;

    2013-01-01

    Introduction:One third of the world's population is estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LTBI). Surveys of LTBI are rarely performed in resource poor TB high endemic countries like Tanzania although low-income countries harbor the largest burden of the worlds LTBI...

  18. Screening Peptide Inhibitors Using Phage Peptide Library with Isocitrate Lyase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis as Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yu-he; NIU Xue; SUN Bo; TENG Guo-sheng; ZHAO Yun-hui; WU Cong-mei

    2011-01-01

    When devoured by macrophages,Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains persistent in macrophages and gains energy through the glyoxylate bypass to maintain its long-term existence in host cells.Therefore it is possible to stop persistent infections by interdicting the glyoxylate bypass in which the isocitrate lyase(ICL) is the key rate-limiting enzyme and a persistence factor.ICL is the target of anti-TB(TB:tubercular) drugs,which could screen ICL out and effectively inhibit the activity of ICL in Mycobacterium tuberculosis,and because of this,anti-TB drugs can be used to kill persistent Mycobacterium tuberculosis.In this study,the ICL gene of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv was cloned successfully and recombinant protein with bioactivity was obtained through the enzyme characteristic appraisal.The specific activity of the recombined ICL is 24 μmol·mg-1 -min-1.The recombined ICL protein was used as the target,and phages which can specifically combine to ICL were screened in the phage 7 peptide library.According to the results of the ELISA and DNA sequence detection,eventually three 7-peptide chains were synthesized.Then the peptide chains were reacted with ICL,respectively,to detect their inhibitory effects on ICL.The results show that all the three 7-peptide chains possessed varying inhibitory effects on the activity of ICL.This study provided lead compounds for the research and development of new peptide anti-TB drugs.

  19. Substantial molecular evolution and mutation rates in prolonged latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillebaek, Troels; Norman, Anders; Rasmussen, Erik Michael;

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) of latently infected individuals may hold the key to understanding the processes that lead to reactivation and progression to clinical disease. We report here analysis of pairs of Mtb isolates from putative prolonged latent TB cases. We identified two...

  20. A novel two-component system found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, J. P.; Gosmann, S.; Nowak, E.;

    2005-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel two-component system in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We show that the putative histidine kinase with the genomic locus tag Rv3220c is able to self-phosphorylate in the presence of Mg2+/ATP and subsequently transfer the phosphoryl group to a novel response...

  1. Substantial molecular evolution and mutation rates in prolonged latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillebaek, Troels; Norman, Anders; Rasmussen, Erik Michael

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) of latently infected individuals may hold the key to understanding the processes that lead to reactivation and progression to clinical disease. We report here analysis of pairs of Mtb isolates from putative prolonged latent TB cases. We identified tw...

  2. Novel genetic polymorphisms that further delineate the phylogeny of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huard, Richard C; Fabre, Michel; Haas, Petra de; Lazzarini, Luiz Claudio Oliveira; Soolingen, Dick van; Cousins, Debby; Ho, John L

    2006-01-01

    In a previous report, we described a PCR protocol for the differentiation of the various species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) on the basis of genomic deletions (R. C. Huard, L. C. de Oliveira Lazzarini, W. R. Butler, D. van Soolingen, and J. L. Ho, J. Clin. Microbiol. 41:1637-1650

  3. Substantial molecular evolution and mutation rates in prolonged latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillebaek, Troels; Norman, Anders; Rasmussen, Erik Michael;

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) of latently infected individuals may hold the key to understanding the processes that lead to reactivation and progression to clinical disease. We report here analysis of pairs of Mtb isolates from putative prolonged latent TB cases. We identified tw...

  4. Structural and functional aspects of the sensor histidine kinase PrrB from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nowak, E; Panjikar, S; Morth, JP; Jordanova, R; Svergun, DI; Tucker, PA

    2006-01-01

    We describe the solution structures of two- and three-domain constructs of the sensor histidine kinase PrrB from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which allow us to locate the HAMP linker relative to the ATP binding and dimerization domains. We show that the threedomain construct is active both for autoph

  5. Induction in vitro and stability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to ofloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To induct Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB)resistance with ofloxacin(Ofx)of stepwise increasing concentration in vitro,investigate stability to fluoroquinolone(FQs)antibiotic of MTB,and analyze the molecular mechanism and mutation specialty of drug resistance preliminarily.Methods MTB Standard strain

  6. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from phage typing to whole-genome sequencing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurch, A.C.; Soolingen, D. van

    2012-01-01

    Current typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex evolved from simple phenotypic approaches like phage typing and drug susceptibility profiling to DNA-based strain typing methods, such as IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR)

  7. Whole cell screen for inhibitors of pH homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darby, Crystal M; Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Jiang, Xiuju; Shen, Chun; Sun, Mingna; Zhao, Nan; Burns, Kristin; Liu, Gang; Ehrt, Sabine; Warren, J David; Andersen, Olaf S; Anderson, Olaf S; Brickner, Steven J; Nathan, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) encounter acidic microenvironments in the host and must maintain their acid-base homeostasis to survive. A genetic screen identified two Mtb strains that cannot control intrabacterial pH (pHIB) in an acidic environment; infection with either

  8. Design, synthesis and evaluation of small molecule reactive oxygen species generators as selective Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmaraja, Allimuthu T; Alvala, Mallika; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2012-10-25

    Here, we report 5-hydroxy-1,2,3,4,4a,9a-hexahydro-1,4-ethano-9,10-anthraquinone (13), a small molecule generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pH 7.4 buffer under ambient aerobic conditions that has selective and potent Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth inhibitory activity.

  9. DNA Fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Culture Isolates Collected in Brazil and Spotted onto Filter Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Burger,Marion; Raskin, Salmo; Brockelt, Sonia R.; Amthor, Beate; Geiss, Heinrich K.; Haas, Walter H.

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of filter paper for preservation of bacterial cells was shown by mixed-linker DNA fingerprint analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 77 Brazilian patients. DNA fingerprints of samples spotted onto filter paper and conventional culture material were identical. Thus, filter paper specimens analyzed by an amplification-based typing method provide a new resource for epidemiological studies of infectious diseases.

  10. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex culture isolates collected in Brazil and spotted onto filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, M; Raskin, S; Brockelt, S R; Amthor, B; Geiss, H K; Haas, W H

    1998-02-01

    The usefulness of filter paper for preservation of bacterial cells was shown by mixed-linker DNA fingerprint analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 77 Brazilian patients. DNA fingerprints of samples spotted onto filter paper and conventional culture material were identical. Thus, filter paper specimens analyzed by an amplification-based typing method provide a new resource for epidemiological studies of infectious diseases.

  11. Genomes of Two Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Odisha, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Mohammad; Qureshi, Asifa; Yerra, Priyadarshini; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kumar, Mandala Kiran; Tiruvayipati, Suma; Baddam, Ramani; Shaik, Sabiha; Srikantam, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    We report whole-genome sequences of two clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from patients in Odisha, India. The sequence analysis revealed that these isolates are of an ancestral type and might represent some of the “pristine” isolates in India that have not admixed with other lineages. PMID:24652981

  12. Immunologival Consequences of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus coinfection in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tegbaru Erkyhun, B.

    2007-01-01

    Coinfections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) during HIV-infection are a major problem in African countries because they lead to a higher death rate. In this thesis we investigated the interaction and the immunological consequences of HIV/TB coinfection. First we focussed on the burden of HI

  13. Immune responses and immigration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific T lymphocytes in patients with tuberculous pleuritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑建

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the immune responses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis(M.tb)-specific T lymphocy between the peripheral blood and pleural effusion in patients with tuberculous pleurisy.Methods Twelve initially treated cases of tuberculous pleurisy who were hospitalized in Wuxi No.5 People’s Hospital from Oct 2012 to Apr 2013

  14. Immunologival Consequences of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus coinfection in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tegbaru Erkyhun, B.

    2007-01-01

    Coinfections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) during HIV-infection are a major problem in African countries because they lead to a higher death rate. In this thesis we investigated the interaction and the immunological consequences of HIV/TB coinfection. First we focussed on the burden of

  15. Intersubunit ionic interactions stabilize the nucleoside diphosphate kinase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgescauld, Florian; Moynie, Lucile; Habersetzer, Johann;

    2013-01-01

    Most nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPKs) are hexamers. The C-terminal tail interacting with the neighboring subunits is crucial for hexamer stability. In the NDPK from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) this tail is missing. The quaternary structure of Mt-NDPK is essential for full enzymatic acti...

  16. Evidence for the cytotoxic effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phospholipase C towards macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakala N'goma, J C; Schué, M; Carrière, F; Geerlof, A; Canaan, S

    2010-12-01

    Phospholipase Cs (PLCs) contribute importantly to the virulence and pathogenicity of several bacteria. It has been reported in previous studies that mutations in the four predicted plc genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibit the growth of these bacteria during the late phase of infection in mice. These enzymes have not yet been fully characterised, mainly because they are not easy to produce in large quantities. With a view to elucidating the role of all Mycobacterium tuberculosis phospholipase Cs (PLC-A, PLC-B, PLC-C and PLC-D), a large amount of active, soluble recombinant PLCs, were expressed and purified using Mycobacterium smegmatis as expression system. These enzymes showed different pH activity profiles. PLC-C was found to be the most active of the four recombinant PLCs under acidic conditions. All the enzymes tested induced cytotoxic effects on mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cell lines, via direct or indirect enzymatic hydrolysis of cell membrane phospholipids. These results open new prospects for characterising biochemical and structural features of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PLCs, which might lead to the identification of novel anti-tuberculosis drug targets. All mycobacterial phospholipase Cs can now be studied in order to determine their role in the virulence and pathogenicity of bacteria of this kind. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential T-cell recognition of native and recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis GroES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrands, I; Weldingh, K; Ravn, P

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis GroES was purified from culture filtrate, and its identity was confirmed by immunoblot analysis and N-terminal sequencing. Comparing the immunological recognition of native and recombinant GroES, we found that whereas native GroES elicited a strong proliferative response...

  18. Differentiation of clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates by their GyrB polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abass N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the reliability of the gyrB PCR-RFLP technique in differentiating clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates. Materials and Methods: A primer pair MTUB-f and MTUB-r for M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC was used to differentiate 79 mycobacterial isolates by specific amplification of the 1,020-bp fragment of the gyrB gene (gyrB-PCR1. The MTBC isolates were further differentiated using a set of specific primers MTUB-756-Gf and MTUB-1450-Cr that allowed selective amplification of the gyrB fragment specific for M. tuberculosis (gyrB-PCR2. The DNA polymorphisms in the 1,020-bp gyrB fragment for 7 M. tuberculosis strains confirmed by PCR as well as 2 reference strains; M. tuberculosis H37Rv and M. bovis BCG were analyzed with the restriction enzyme Rsa1. Results: Seventy-seven (97.5% isolates were positive for gyrB-PCR1 and thus identified as members of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC and two (2.6% isolates were negative and identified as Mycobacteria other than tuberculosis (MOTT. All the M. tuberculosis isolates showed the typical M. tuberculosis specific Rsa1 RFLP patterns (100, 360, 560-bp while 360 and 480-bp fragments were generated from M. bovis BCG. Conclusion: The gyrB PCR-RFLP using the endonuclease Rsa1 can be used to differentiate M. tuberculosis from M. bovis in clinical isolates.

  19. Activation of the Wnt Pathway by Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Wnt–Wnt Situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor, Tomás; Madrid-Paulino, Edgardo; Maldonado-Bravo, Rafael; Urbán-Aragón, Antonio; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), an intracellular pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium, is the cause of tuberculosis (TB), a major worldwide human infectious disease. The innate immune system is the first host defense against M. tuberculosis. The recognition of this pathogen is mediated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors expressed on the host innate immune cells, including Toll-like receptors, Nod-like receptors, and C-type lectin receptors like Dectin-1, the Mannose receptor, and DC-SIGN. M. tuberculosis interaction with any of these receptors activates multiple signaling pathways among which the protein kinase C, the MAPK, and the NFκB pathways have been widely studied. These pathways have been implicated in macrophage invasion, M. tuberculosis survival, and impaired immune response, thus promoting a successful infection and disease. Interestingly, the Wnt signaling pathway, classically regarded as a pathway involved in the control of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in embryonic development, has recently been involved in immunoregulatory mechanisms in infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as TB, sepsis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. In this review, we present the current knowledge supporting a role for the Wnt signaling pathway during macrophage infection by M. tuberculosis and the regulation of the immune response against M. tuberculosis. Understanding the cross talk between different signaling pathways activated by M. tuberculosis will impact on the search for new therapeutic targets to fuel the rational design of drugs aimed to restore the immunological response against M. tuberculosis. PMID:28203237

  20. Comparison of antigen-specific T-cell responses of tuberculosis patients using complex or single antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, A S; Amoudy, H A; Wiker, H G

    1998-01-01

    We have screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from tuberculosis (TB) patients for proliferative reactivity and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion against a panel of purified recombinant (r) and natural (n) culture filtrate (rESAT-6, nMPT59, nMPT64 and nMPB70) and somatic-derived (r......GroES, rPstS, rGroEL and rDnaK) antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The responses of PBMC to these defined antigens were compared with the corresponding results obtained with complex antigens, such as whole-cell M. tuberculosis, M. tuberculosis culture filtrate (MT-CF) and cell wall antigens, as well...... as the vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). In addition, M. tuberculosis and MT-CF-induced T-cell lines were tested in the same assays against the panel of purified and complex antigens. The compiled data from PBMC and T-cell lines tested for antigen-induced proliferation and IFN...

  1. Comparison of antigen-specific T-cell responses of tuberculosis patients using complex or single antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, A S; Amoudy, H A; Wiker, H G

    1998-01-01

    We have screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from tuberculosis (TB) patients for proliferative reactivity and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion against a panel of purified recombinant (r) and natural (n) culture filtrate (rESAT-6, nMPT59, nMPT64 and nMPB70) and somatic-derived (r......GroES, rPstS, rGroEL and rDnaK) antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The responses of PBMC to these defined antigens were compared with the corresponding results obtained with complex antigens, such as whole-cell M. tuberculosis, M. tuberculosis culture filtrate (MT-CF) and cell wall antigens, as well...... as the vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). In addition, M. tuberculosis and MT-CF-induced T-cell lines were tested in the same assays against the panel of purified and complex antigens. The compiled data from PBMC and T-cell lines tested for antigen-induced proliferation and IFN...

  2. Animal-adapted members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex endemic to the southern African subregion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Charlene; Van Helden, Paul; Miller, Michele; Parsons, Sven

    2016-04-26

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) cause tuberculosis (TB) in both animals and humans. In this article, three animal-adapted MTC strains that are endemic to the southern African subregion - that is, Mycobacterium suricattae, Mycobacterium mungi, and the dassie bacillus - are reviewed with a focus on clinical and pathological presentations, geographic distribution, genotyping methods, diagnostic tools and evolution. Moreover, factors influencing the transmission and establishment of TB pathogens in novel host populations, including ecological, immunological and genetic factors of both the host and pathogen, are discussed. The risks associated with these infections are currently unknown and further studies will be required for greater understanding of this disease in the context of the southern African ecosystem.

  3. Molecular Detection of Mixed Infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains in Sputum Samples from Patients in Karonga District, Malawi ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Mallard, Kim; McNerney, Ruth; Crampin, Amelia C; Houben, Rein; Ndlovu, Richard; Munthali, Lumbani; Warren, Robin M.; French, Neil; Judith R Glynn

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of mixed infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is no longer disputed. However, their frequency, and the impact they may have on our understanding of tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis and epidemiology, remains undetermined. Most previous studies of frequency applied genotyping techniques to cultured M. tuberculosis isolates and found mixed infections to be rare. PCR-based techniques may be more sensitive for detecting multiple M. tuberculosis strains and can be applied to sputum...

  4. The ESX-3 Secretion System Is Necessary for Iron and Zinc Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Agnese; Pisu, Davide; Palù, Giorgio; Rodriguez, G. Marcela; Manganelli, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    ESX-3 is one of the five type VII secretion systems encoded by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome. We recently showed the essentiality of ESX-3 for M. tuberculosis viability and proposed its involvement in iron and zinc metabolism. In this study we confirmed the role of ESX-3 in iron uptake and its involvement in the adaptation to low zinc environment in M. tuberculosis. Moreover, we unveiled functional differences between the ESX-3 roles in M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis showing that in the latter ESX-3 is only involved in the adaptation to iron and not to zinc restriction. Finally, we also showed that in M. tuberculosis this secretion system is essential for iron and zinc homeostasis not only in conditions in which the concentrations of these metals are limiting but also in metal sufficient conditions. PMID:24155985

  5. The Importance of First Impressions: Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Influence Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M. Cadena

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a major health threat in much of the world. New vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are essential for preventing infection, disease, and transmission. However, the host immune responses that need to be induced by an effective vaccine remain unclear. Increasingly, it has become clear that early events in infection are of major importance in the eventual outcome of the infection. Studying such events in humans is challenging, as they occur within the lung and thoracic lymph nodes, and any clinical signs of early infection are relatively nonspecific. Nonetheless, clinical studies and animal models of tuberculosis have provided new insights into the local events that occur in the first few weeks of tuberculosis. Development of an effective vaccine requires a clear understanding of the successful (and detrimental early host responses against M. tuberculosis, with the goal to improve upon natural immune responses and prevent infection or disease.

  6. Strain differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for epidemiology in northwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharzadeh, M; Samadi Kafil, H; Pourostadi, M; Asadi Faezi, N; Rashedi, J; Mahdavipour, B

    2016-07-31

    Tuberculosis is a major health problem throughout the world and there are still a great number of people with the disease. Planning for controlling tuberculosis is required to identify the sources of infection and screening for the disease. The aim of this study is the differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains for better understands the spread of the disease in North West Iran. In this study, 194 positive cultures of M. tuberculosis in North West Iran were evaluated by the MIRU-VNTR method. MIRU-12 differentiated the 194 isolates into 138 different patterns, comprising 30 clusters and 108 unique patterns (HGDI=0.9930). The largest cluster contained twelve isolates. The results showed that the majority of TB cases in North West Iran are due to reactivation and the 12-MIRU typing method can be used as a first-line method for strain differentiation of M. tuberculosis.

  7. Rapid confirmation of drug susceptibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis using MPT 64 Ag based test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Afu Ochang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the possible use of MPT64 based rapid test to detect multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis in antibiotic broth dilution cultures. Methods: Twenty five isolates of M. tuberculosis whose susceptibility pattern had previously been identified by HAIN Genotype MTBDRplus (HainLifecience, Herhen, Germany were processed and cultured according to the microscopic-observation drug susceptibility technique. These included 20 susceptible, two multi-drug resistant M. tuberculosis and three isoniazid mono-resistant isolates. After 10-day incubation, aspirates from each well were tested with the MPT64 rapid test. Results: The rapid test correctly identified all 25 isolates and detected rifampicin and isoniazid resistance in all but one isoniazid mono-resistant isolate. Conclusions: MPT64 rapid test could be useful in detecting M. tuberculosis and drug resistance from Middlebrook 7H9 antimicrobial broth dilution in resource poor settings without an inverted microscope.

  8. The Importance of First Impressions: Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Influence Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Anthony M; Flynn, JoAnne L; Fortune, Sarah M

    2016-04-05

    Tuberculosis remains a major health threat in much of the world. New vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are essential for preventing infection, disease, and transmission. However, the host immune responses that need to be induced by an effective vaccine remain unclear. Increasingly, it has become clear that early events in infection are of major importance in the eventual outcome of the infection. Studying such events in humans is challenging, as they occur within the lung and thoracic lymph nodes, and any clinical signs of early infection are relatively nonspecific. Nonetheless, clinical studies and animal models of tuberculosis have provided new insights into the local events that occur in the first few weeks of tuberculosis. Development of an effective vaccine requires a clear understanding of the successful (and detrimental) early host responses against M. tuberculosis, with the goal to improve upon natural immune responses and prevent infection or disease.

  9. Cutting edge: Vitamin D regulates lipid metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Hugh; Bruiners, Natalie; Lakehal, Karim; Shi, Lanbo; Ravi, Janani; Yamaguchi, Ken D; Pine, Richard; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2014-07-01

    Vitamin D has long been linked to resistance to tuberculosis, an infectious respiratory disease that is increasingly hard to treat because of multidrug resistance. Previous work established that vitamin D induces macrophage antimicrobial functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this article, we report a novel, metabolic role for vitamin D in tuberculosis identified through integrated transcriptome and mechanistic studies. Transcriptome analysis revealed an association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) and lipid metabolism in human tuberculosis and infected macrophages. Vitamin D treatment of infected macrophages abrogated infection-induced accumulation of lipid droplets, which are required for intracellular M. tuberculosis growth. Additional transcriptomics results showed that vitamin D downregulates the proadipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in infected macrophages. PPARγ agonists reversed the antiadipogenic and the antimicrobial effects of VDR, indicating a link between VDR and PPARγ signaling in regulating both vitamin D functions. These findings suggest the potential for host-based, adjunct antituberculosis therapy targeting lipid metabolism.

  10. Activity against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mexican plants used to treat respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Arellanes, Adelina; Meckes, Mariana; Ramirez, Raquel; Torres, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2003-09-01

    The increase of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) demands the search for alternative antimycobacterial drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate plants used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat respiratory diseases for activity against MDR-TB. A group of 22 plants was screened for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium avium at concentrations from 50 to 200 microg/mL. The antimycobacterial effect was determined by a microcolorimetric assay with Alamar blue dye. None of the aqueous extracts had antimycobacterial activity. Hexane extracts from Artemisia ludoviciana, Chamaedora tepejilote, Lantana hispida, Juniperus communis and Malva parviflora, and methanol extracts from Artemisia ludoviciana and Juniperus communis inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium avium was inhibited by Juniperus communis hexane extract and by Malva parviflora methanol extract. The active extracts were tested against monoresistant variants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin and ethambutol resistant) and the hexane extract of Lantana hispida showed the best activity. Lantana hispida hexane extract was also active against a group of MDR-TB clinical isolates. In contrast, it did not inhibit the growth of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. The hexane extract of Lantana hispida was fractionated by column chromatography and one of its fractions (FVI) inhibited the growth of all the MDR-TB clinical isolates at concentrations up to 25 microg/mL. This study supports the fact that selecting plants by ethnobotanical criteria enhances the probability of finding species with activity against mycobacteria, and our results point to Lantana hispida as an important source of potential compounds against MDR-TB.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis evolutionary pathogenesis and its putative impact on drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Chevalier, Fabien; Cascioferro, Alessandro; Majlessi, Laleh; Herrmann, Jean Louis; Brosch, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of human TB, is the most important mycobacterial pathogen in terms of global patient numbers and gravity of disease. The molecular mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis causes disease are complex and the result of host-pathogen coevolution that might have started already in the time of its Mycobacterium canettii-like progenitors. Despite research progress, M. tuberculosis still holds many secrets of its successful strategy for circumventing host defences, persisting in the host and developing resistance, which makes anti-TB treatment regimens extremely long and often inefficient. Here, we discuss what we have learned from recent studies on the evolution of the pathogen and its putative new drug targets that are essential for mycobacterial growth under in vitro or in vivo conditions.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Ruth CM

    2011-10-24

    Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3\\/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity.

  13. Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the Latin American Mediterranean Lineage, Wrongly Identified as Mycobacterium pinnipedii (Spoligotype International Type 863 [SIT863]), Causing Active Tuberculosis in South Brazil

    KAUST Repository

    Dalla Costa, Elis R.

    2015-09-23

    We recently detected the spoligotype patterns of strains of Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, in sputum samples from nine cases with pulmonary tuberculosis residing in Porto Alegre, South Brazil. Because this species is rarely encountered in humans, we further characterized these nine isolates by additional genotyping techniques, including 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing, verification of the loci TbD1, RD9, pks15/1, RDRio, and fbpC, the insertion of IS6110 at a site specific to the M. tuberculosis Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) lineage, and whole-genome sequencing. The combined analysis of these markers revealed that the isolates are in fact M. tuberculosis and more specifically belong to the LAM genotype. Most of these isolates (n = 8) were shown to be multidrug resistant (MDR), which prompted us to perform partial sequencing of the rpoA, rpoB, rpoC, katG, and inhA genes. Seven isolates (77.8%) carried the S315T mutation in katG, and one of these (11%) also presented the C(−17)T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in inhA. Interestingly, six of the MDR isolates also presented an undescribed insertion of 12 nucleotides (CCA GAA CAA CCC) in codon 516 of rpoB. No putative compensatory mutation was found in either rpoA or rpoC. This is the first report of an M. tuberculosis LAM family strain with a convergent M. pinnipedii spoligotype. These spoligotypes are observed in genotype databases at a modest frequency, highlighting that care must be taken when identifying isolates in the M. tuberculosis complex on the basis of single genetic markers.

  14. Evidence of presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bovine tissue samples by multiplex PCR: possible relevance to reverse zoonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, M; Chakravarti, S; Sharma, V; Sanjeeth, B S; Churamani, C P; Kanwar, N S

    2014-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, remains one of the most important zoonotic health concerns worldwide. The transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from humans to animals also occurs especially in countries where there is close interaction of humans with the animals. In the present study, thirty bovine lung tissue autopsy samples from an organized dairy farm located in North India were screened for the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by smear microscopy, histopathological findings and PCR. Differential diagnosis of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis was made based on the deletion of mce-3 operon in M. bovis. The present study found eight of these samples positive for M. tuberculosis by multiplex PCR. Sequencing was performed on two PCR-positive representative samples and on annotation, and BLAST analysis confirmed the presence of gene fragment specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The presence of M. tuberculosis in all the positive samples raises the possibility of human-to-cattle transmission and possible adaptation of this organism in bovine tissues. This study accentuates the importance of screening and differential diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in humans and livestock for adopting effective TB control and eradication programmes.

  15. Distinct effector memory CD4+ T cell signatures in latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, BCG vaccination and clinically resolved tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekambi, Toidi; Ibegbu, Chris C; Kalokhe, Ameeta S; Yu, Tianwei; Ray, Susan M; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Two billion people worldwide are estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and are at risk for developing active tuberculosis since Mtb can reactivate to cause TB disease in immune-compromised hosts. Individuals with latent Mtb infection (LTBI) and BCG-vaccinated individuals who are uninfected with Mtb, harbor antigen-specific memory CD4(+) T cells. However, the differences between long-lived memory CD4(+) T cells induced by latent Mtb infection (LTBI) versus BCG vaccination are unclear. In this study, we characterized the immune phenotype and functionality of antigen-specific memory CD4(+) T cells in healthy BCG-vaccinated individuals who were either infected (LTBI) or uninfected (BCG) with Mtb. Individuals were classified into LTBI and BCG groups based on IFN-γ ELISPOT using cell wall antigens and ESAT-6/CFP-10 peptides. We show that LTBI individuals harbored high frequencies of late-stage differentiated (CD45RA(-)CD27(-)) antigen-specific effector memory CD4(+) T cells that expressed PD-1. In contrast, BCG individuals had primarily early-stage (CD45RA(-)CD27(+)) cells with low PD-1 expression. CD27(+) and CD27(-) as well as PD-1(+) and PD-1(-) antigen-specific subsets were polyfunctional, suggesting that loss of CD27 expression and up-regulation of PD-1 did not compromise their capacity to produce IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2. PD-1 was preferentially expressed on CD27(-) antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, indicating that PD-1 is associated with the stage of differentiation. Using statistical models, we determined that CD27 and PD-1 predicted LTBI versus BCG status in healthy individuals and distinguished LTBI individuals from those who had clinically resolved Mtb infection after anti-tuberculosis treatment. This study shows that CD4(+) memory responses induced by latent Mtb infection, BCG vaccination and clinically resolved Mtb infection are immunologically distinct. Our data suggest that differentiation into CD27(-)PD-1(+) subsets in

  16. Distinct effector memory CD4+ T cell signatures in latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, BCG vaccination and clinically resolved tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toidi Adekambi

    Full Text Available Two billion people worldwide are estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb and are at risk for developing active tuberculosis since Mtb can reactivate to cause TB disease in immune-compromised hosts. Individuals with latent Mtb infection (LTBI and BCG-vaccinated individuals who are uninfected with Mtb, harbor antigen-specific memory CD4(+ T cells. However, the differences between long-lived memory CD4(+ T cells induced by latent Mtb infection (LTBI versus BCG vaccination are unclear. In this study, we characterized the immune phenotype and functionality of antigen-specific memory CD4(+ T cells in healthy BCG-vaccinated individuals who were either infected (LTBI or uninfected (BCG with Mtb. Individuals were classified into LTBI and BCG groups based on IFN-γ ELISPOT using cell wall antigens and ESAT-6/CFP-10 peptides. We show that LTBI individuals harbored high frequencies of late-stage differentiated (CD45RA(-CD27(- antigen-specific effector memory CD4(+ T cells that expressed PD-1. In contrast, BCG individuals had primarily early-stage (CD45RA(-CD27(+ cells with low PD-1 expression. CD27(+ and CD27(- as well as PD-1(+ and PD-1(- antigen-specific subsets were polyfunctional, suggesting that loss of CD27 expression and up-regulation of PD-1 did not compromise their capacity to produce IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2. PD-1 was preferentially expressed on CD27(- antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells, indicating that PD-1 is associated with the stage of differentiation. Using statistical models, we determined that CD27 and PD-1 predicted LTBI versus BCG status in healthy individuals and distinguished LTBI individuals from those who had clinically resolved Mtb infection after anti-tuberculosis treatment. This study shows that CD4(+ memory responses induced by latent Mtb infection, BCG vaccination and clinically resolved Mtb infection are immunologically distinct. Our data suggest that differentiation into CD27(-PD-1(+ subsets in LTBI is

  17. Array microscopy technology and its application to digital detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Brian P.

    Tuberculosis causes more deaths worldwide than any other curable infectious disease. This is the case despite tuberculosis appearing to be on the verge of eradication midway through the last century. Efforts at reversing the spread of tuberculosis have intensified since the early 1990s. Since then, microscopy has been the primary frontline diagnostic. In this dissertation, advances in clinical microscopy towards array microscopy for digital detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are presented. Digital array microscopy separates the tasks of microscope operation and pathogen detection and will reduce the specialization needed in order to operate the microscope. Distributing the work and reducing specialization will allow this technology to be deployed at the point of care, taking the front-line diagnostic for tuberculosis from the microscopy center to the community health center. By improving access to microscopy centers, hundreds of thousands of lives can be saved. For this dissertation, a lens was designed that can be manufactured as 4x6 array of microscopes. This lens design is diffraction limited, having less than 0.071 waves of aberration (root mean square) over the entire field of view. A total area imaged onto a full-frame digital image sensor is expected to be 3.94 mm2, which according to tuberculosis microscopy guidelines is more than sufficient for a sensitive diagnosis. The design is tolerant to single point diamond turning manufacturing errors, as found by tolerance analysis and by fabricating a prototype. Diamond micro-milling, a fabrication technique for lens array molds, was applied to plastic plano-concave and plano-convex lens arrays, and found to produce high quality optical surfaces. The micro-milling technique did not prove robust enough to produce bi-convex and meniscus lens arrays in a variety of lens shapes, however, and it required lengthy fabrication times. In order to rapidly prototype new lenses, a new diamond machining technique was

  18. Granzyme A Is Expressed in Mouse Lungs during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection but Does Not Contribute to Protection In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Martin, Carlos; Pardo, Julián; Aguilo, Nacho

    2016-01-01

    Granzyme A, a serine protease expressed in the granules of cytotoxic T and Natural Killer cells, is involved in the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages. Granzyme A has been described to induce in macrophages in vitro the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways that impair intracellular mycobacterial replication. In the present study, we explored the physiological relevance of Granzyme A in the control of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in vivo. Our results show that, even though Granzyme A is expressed by cytotoxic cells from mouse lungs during pulmonary infection, its deficiency in knockout mice does not have an effect in the control of M. tuberculosis infection. In addition our findings indicate that absence of Granzyme A does not affect the protection conferred by the live-attenuated M. tuberculosis vaccine MTBVAC. Altogether, our findings are in apparent contradiction with previously published in vitro results and suggest that Granzyme A does not have a crucial role in vivo in the protective response to tuberculosis. PMID:27055232

  19. Accidental infection of veterinary personnel with Mycobacterium tuberculosis at necropsy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthaus, H; Bodmer, T; Alves, L; Oevermann, A; Schiller, I; Rhodes, S G; Zimmerli, S

    2011-05-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the main cause of human tuberculosis. Infection in companion animals is mainly acquired from close contact to a diseased human patient and hence rarely diagnosed in countries with low tuberculosis incidence rates. Therefore the general awareness of the disease might be low. Here we report the potential risk of infection for veterinary personnel with M. tuberculosis during the clinical and pathological examination of a dog with unexpected disseminated tuberculosis. The dog had presented with symptoms of a central nervous system disease; rapid deterioration prevented a complete clinical workup, however. Post-mortem examination revealed systemic mycobacteriosis, and M. tuberculosis was identified by PCR amplification of DNA extracts from paraffin-embedded tissue sections and spoligotyping. Contact investigations among the owners and veterinary personnel using an IFN-γ release assay indicated that the index dog did not infect humans during its lifetime. Serological and IFN-γ release assay results of one of two cats in direct contact with the index dog, however, suggested that transmission of M. tuberculosis might have occurred. Importantly, all three pathologists performing the necropsy on the dog tested positive. Accidental infection was most likely due to inhalation of M. tuberculosis containing aerosols created by using an electric saw to open the brain cavity. As a consequence routine necropsy procedures have been adapted and a disease surveillance program, including tuberculosis, has been initiated. Our results highlight the importance of disease awareness and timely diagnosis of zoonotic infectious agents in optimizing work safety for veterinary personnel.

  20. Revisiting the role of phospholipases C in virulence and the lifecycle of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Chevalier, Fabien; Cascioferro, Alessandro; Frigui, Wafa; Pawlik, Alexandre; Boritsch, Eva C; Bottai, Daria; Majlessi, Laleh; Herrmann, Jean Louis; Brosch, Roland

    2015-11-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the agent of human tuberculosis has developed different virulence mechanisms and virulence-associated tools during its evolution to survive and multiply inside the host. Based on previous reports and by analogy with other bacteria, phospholipases C (PLC) of M. tuberculosis were thought to be among these tools. To get deeper insights into the function of PLCs, we investigated their putative involvement in the intracellular lifestyle of M. tuberculosis, with emphasis on phagosomal rupture and virulence, thereby re-visiting a research theme of longstanding interest. Through the construction and use of an M. tuberculosis H37Rv PLC-null mutant (ΔPLC) and control strains, we found that PLCs of M. tuberculosis were not required for induction of phagosomal rupture and only showed marginal, if any, impact on virulence of M. tuberculosis in the cellular and mouse infection models used in this study. In contrast, we found that PLC-encoding genes were strongly upregulated under phosphate starvation and that PLC-proficient M. tuberculosis strains survived better than ΔPLC mutants under conditions where phosphatidylcholine served as sole phosphate source, opening new perspectives for studies on the role of PLCs in the lifecycle of M. tuberculosis.

  1. DNAzymes targeting the icl gene inhibit ICL expression and decrease Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junming; Zhu, Daoyin; Yi, Zhengjun; He, Yongli; Chun, Yang; Liu, Yehua; Li, Na

    2005-01-01

    Latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents a big obstacle for tuberculosis therapy. In this study, we investigated the effects of sequence-specific DNAzymes targeting the mRNA of isocitrate lyase (ICL), an enzyme playing a pivotal role in the metabolism of M. tuberculosis in the latent state, on the expression of ICL and survival of M. tuberculosis. In vitro studies showed that four of five designed DNAzymes, DZ1, DZ3, DZ4, and DZ5 could cleave icl mRNA efficiently and specifically. Treatment of virulent M. tuberculosis with 5microM DZ4 plus a subinhibitory concentration of isoniazid (INH) decreased ICL expression and the survival of M. tuberculosis in macrophages but had no obvious influence on the growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro. This study demonstrates that using INH to soften the cell wall of M. tuberculosis and help the entry of biomolecules is an efficient method of improving the uptake of DNAzymes. Silencing the icl gene by DNAzyme is a promising method to combat latent infection of tuberculosis.

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Wah Wah; Ei, Phyu Win; Nyunt, Wint Wint; Swe, Thyn Lei; Lwin, Thandar; Htwe, Mi Mi; Kim, Kyung Jun; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Chang Ki; Cho, Sang Nae; Song, Sun Dae; Chang, Chulhun L

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most serious health problems in Myanmar. Because TB drug resistance is associated with genetic mutation(s) relevant to responses to each drug, genotypic methods for detecting these mutations have been proposed to overcome the limitations of classic phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST). We explored the current estimates of drug-resistant TB and evaluated the usefulness of genotypic DST in Myanmar. We determined the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from sputum smear-positive patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB at two main TB centers in Myanmar during 2013 by using conventional phenotypic DST and the GenoType MTBDRplus assay (Hain Lifescience, Germany). Discrepant results were confirmed by sequencing the genes relevant to each type of resistance (rpoB for rifampicin; katG and inhA for isoniazid). Of 191 isolates, phenotypic DST showed that 27.7% (n=53) were resistant to at least one first-line drug and 20.9% (n=40) were resistant to two or more, including 18.3% (n=35) multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) strains. Monoresistant strains accounted for 6.8% (n=13) of the samples. Genotypic assay of 189 isolates showed 17.5% (n=33) MDR-TB and 5.3% (n=10) isoniazid-monoresistant strains. Genotypic susceptibility results were 99.5% (n=188) concordant and agreed almost perfectly with phenotypic DST (kappa=0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.96-1.01). The results highlight the burden of TB drug resistance and prove the usefulness of the genotypic DST in Myanmar.

  3. Direct detection of rpoB and katG gene mutations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples

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    Sunil Pandey

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: We can conclude that genetic mutation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be identified directly from the clinical samples. However, we have carried this study in less sample size and to validate research on large number of sample is recommended.

  4. Effects of different cytokines on proliferation and apoptosis of pleural mesothelial cells in human Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊亮

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different cytokines (IL-22,IL-17,IFN-γ) on proliferation and apoptosis of human pleural mesothelial cells (PMC) during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.Methods The

  5. The quiet and controversial: Ural family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrousov, Igor

    2012-06-01

    The absence of lateral gene exchange is a characteristic feature defining the genome evolution and clonal population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Certain of its lineages have justly attracted more attention due to their global dissemination and/or remarkable pathogenic properties. In this critical review, I discuss the population structure and genetic geography of the less 'popular' but in some aspects no less noteworthy M. tuberculosis lineage, Ural family. Its specific signature was initially defined by single copy in MIRU26, and large (>6) copy number in MIRU10 loci, and by 43-spoligotyping as absence of signals 29-31 and 33-36. Here, I suggest to subdivide Ural strains with present and absent spoligosignal 2 into primary Ural-1 and secondary Ural-2 sublineages, respectively, while 1 copy in MIRU26 is specific of Ural-1. Furthermore, three copies were recently described in MIRU10 in Ural-1 strains which highlights a high diversity of this locus in Ural genotype. The data on the two Ural sublineages were extracted from SpolDB4 database and original publications in order to trace their distribution at global and within-country levels. Importantly, the rigorous reanalysis suggested the true rate of the Ural genotype in the Ural area in Russia to be only 7%. In contrast, the frequencies of the Ural sublineages peak elsewhere: in South Ukraine and Georgia/Abkhazia (Ural-1, up to 14-19%), and in southwestern Iran (Ural-2, up to 26%). However, as this name is used since 2005, it seems most parsimonious to continue its use even if misleading. The forest graph was built on the available spoligoprofiles of Ural family strains from Eurasia. It helped to suggest routes of their primary dispersal that are discussed in the context of the known human migrations also influenced by natural barriers. The north/east Pontic area may have been an area of origin and primary dispersal of the Ural (Ural-1) genotype in Eurasia, whereas political and natural borders may have

  6. Cytokine responses in relation to age, gender, body mass index, Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and otitis media among inuit in greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nina Odgaard; Soborg, Bolette; Børresen, Malene

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the cytokine response pattern in Inuit in Greenland in relation to age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTI), and otitis media (OM) to assess whether Inuit may have signs of impaired immune responsiveness to infection.......To evaluate the cytokine response pattern in Inuit in Greenland in relation to age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTI), and otitis media (OM) to assess whether Inuit may have signs of impaired immune responsiveness to infection....

  7. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by nested polymerase chain reaction in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Antônia da Cruz Furini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR with that of cultures in the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens.METHODS: We analyzed 20 and 78 pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens, respectively, of 67 hospitalized patients suspected of having tuberculosis. An automated microbial system was used for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. cultures, and M. tuberculosis IS6110 was used as the target sequence in the NPCR. The kappa statistic was used in order to assess the level of agreement among the results.RESULTS: Among the 67 patients, 6 and 5, respectively, were diagnosed with pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and the NPCR was positive in all of the cases. Among the 98 clinical specimens, smear microscopy, culture, and NPCR were positive in 6.00%, 8.16%, and 13.26%, respectively. Comparing the results of NPCR with those of cultures (the gold standard, we found that NPCR had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 83%, respectively, in pulmonary specimens, compared with 83% and 96%, respectively, in extrapulmonary specimens, with good concordance between the tests (kappa, 0.50 and 0.6867, respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Although NPCR proved to be a very useful tool for the detection of M. tuberculosis complex, clinical, epidemiological, and other laboratory data should also be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

  8. Molecular Strain Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a Review of Frequently Used Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ei, Phyu Win; Aung, Wah Wah; Lee, Jong Seok; Choi, Go Eun; Chang, Chulhun L

    2016-11-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remains one of the most serious global health problems. Molecular typing of M. tuberculosis has been used for various epidemiologic purposes as well as for clinical management. Currently, many techniques are available to type M. tuberculosis. Choosing the most appropriate technique in accordance with the existing laboratory conditions and the specific features of the geographic region is important. Insertion sequence IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis is considered the gold standard for the molecular epidemiologic investigations of tuberculosis. However, other polymerase chain reaction-based methods such as spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping), which detects 43 spacer sequence-interspersing direct repeats (DRs) in the genomic DR region; mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeats, (MIRU-VNTR), which determines the number and size of tandem repetitive DNA sequences; repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), which provides high-throughput genotypic fingerprinting of multiple Mycobacterium species; and the recently developed genome-based whole genome sequencing methods demonstrate similar discriminatory power and greater convenience. This review focuses on techniques frequently used for the molecular typing of M. tuberculosis and discusses their general aspects and applications.

  9. [Insight into tuberculosis pathogenic mechanism from the zebra fish-Mycobacterium marinum model--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Manmei; Xie, Jianping

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global health threat. Nearly one-third of the world population infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis is a typical and most successful intracellular pathogen. The pathogen can evade and manipulate the host immune response. Insights into the interplays between the pathogen and the host was pivotal to develop more sophisticated diagnosis methods and control measures to tuberculosis. No single model can address the full spectrum of this extraordinarily successful pathogen. Multiple models are urgently needed to explore diverse facets of this human being scourge. Zebrafish-M. marinum model was increasingly recognized as an ideal system for preliminary studies. Some key findings emerging from this model were summarized in this paper, such as the interactions between host and M. marinum when the bacterium invades and the contribution of the virulence determinants of M. marinum such as Erp, Esx-1, pmiA, Mel and KasB. Discoveries from different models will be complementary and conducive to find clues to eradicate Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  10. IFNgamma response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, risk of infection and disease in household contacts of tuberculosis patients in Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena del Corral

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Household contacts (HHCs of pulmonary tuberculosis patients are at high risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and early disease development. Identification of individuals at risk of tuberculosis disease is a desirable goal for tuberculosis control. Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs using specific M. tuberculosis antigens provide an alternative to tuberculin skin testing (TST for infection detection. Additionally, the levels of IFNgamma produced in response to these antigens may have prognostic value. We estimated the prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection by IGRA and TST in HHCs and their source population (SP, and assessed whether IFNgamma levels in HHCs correlate with tuberculosis development. METHODS: A cohort of 2060 HHCs was followed for 2-3 years after exposure to a tuberculosis case. Besides TST, IFNgamma responses to mycobacterial antigens: CFP, CFP-10, HspX and Ag85A were assessed in 7-days whole blood cultures and compared to 766 individuals from the SP in Medellín, Colombia. Isoniazid prophylaxis was not offered to child contacts because Colombian tuberculosis regulations consider it only in children under 5 years, TST positive without BCG vaccination. RESULTS: Using TST 65.9% of HHCs and 42.7% subjects from the SP were positive (OR 2.60, p<0.0001. IFNgamma response to CFP-10, a biomarker of M. tuberculosis infection, tested positive in 66.3% HHCs and 24.3% from the SP (OR = 6.07, p<0.0001. Tuberculosis incidence rate was 7.0/1000 person years. Children <5 years accounted for 21.6% of incident cases. No significant difference was found between positive and negative IFNgamma responders to CFP-10 (HR 1.82 95% CI 0.79-4.20 p = 0.16. However, a significant trend for tuberculosis development amongst high HHC IFNgamma producers was observed (trend Log rank p = 0.007. DISCUSSION: CFP-10-induced IFNgamma production is useful to establish tuberculosis infection prevalence amongst HHC and identify those at highest risk

  11. High isoniazid resistance rates in rifampicin susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis pulmonary isolates from Pakistan.

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    Naima Fasih

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid new diagnostic methods (including Xpert MTB/RIF assay use rifampicin resistance as a surrogate marker for multidrug resistant tuberculosis. Patients infected with rifampicin susceptible strains are prescribed first line anti-tuberculosis therapy. The roll out of such methods raises a concern that strains with resistance to other first line anti-tuberculosis drugs including isoniazid will be missed and inappropriate treatment given. To evaluate implications of using such methods review of resistance data from high burden settings such as ours is essential. OBJECTIVE: To determine resistance to first line anti-tuberculosis drugs amongst rifampicin susceptible pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB isolates from Pakistan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH laboratory (2009-2011 was retrospectively analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of rifampicin susceptible isolates was evaluated for resistance to isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, and streptomycin. RESULTS: Pulmonary specimens submitted to AKUH from 2009 to 2011 yielded 7738 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These included 54% (n 4183 rifampicin susceptible and 46% (n: 3555 rifampicin resistant strains. Analysis of rifampicin susceptible strains showed resistance to at least one of the first line drugs in 27% (n:1133 of isolates. Overall isoniazid resistance was 15.5% (n: 649, with an isoniazid mono-resistance rate of 4% (n: 174. Combined resistance to isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol was noted in 1% (n: 40, while resistance to isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, and streptomycin was observed in 1.7% (n: 70 of strains. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that techniques (including Xpert MTB/RIF assay relying on rifampicin susceptibility as an indicator for initiating first line therapy will not detect patients infected with MTB strains resistant to other first line

  12. Prospective evaluation of a whole-blood test using Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10 for diagnosis of active tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Munk, Martin E; Andersen, Ase B

    2005-01-01

    A new immunodiagnostic test based on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens CFP-10/ESAT-6(QFT-RD1) has been launched as an aid in the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI). The aim of this study was to evaluate this test for the diagnosis of active TB. Eighty-two patien...

  13. Consequences of noncompliance for therapy efficacy and emergence of resistance in murine tuberculosis caused by the Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.M. de Steenwinkel (Jurriaan); M.T. ten Kate (Marian); G.J. de Knegt (Gerjo); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); E.J. Aarnoutse (E. J.); M. Boeree (Martin); M.A. den Bakker (Michael); D. van Soolingen (Dick); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDespite great effort by health organizations worldwide in fighting tuberculosis (TB), morbidity and mortality are not declining as expected. One of the reasons is related to the evolutionary development of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in particular the Beijing genotype strains. In a previ

  14. Consequences of Noncompliance for Therapy Efficacy and Emergence of Resistance in Murine Tuberculosis Caused by the Beijing Genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenwinkel, J.E. de; Kate, M.T. Ten; Knegt, G.J. de; Verbrugh, H.A.; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Boeree, M.J.; Bakker, M.A. den; Soolingen, D. van; Bakker-Woudenberg, I.A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite great effort by health organizations worldwide in fighting tuberculosis (TB), morbidity and mortality are not declining as expected. One of the reasons is related to the evolutionary development of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in particular the Beijing genotype strains. In a previous study, w

  15. Comparative study on genotypic and phenotypic second-line drug resistance testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Simons, S.O.; Zwaan, R. de; Laan, T. van der; Kamst-van Agterveld, M.; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D. van

    2010-01-01

    The mycobacterium growth indicator tube (MGIT960) automated liquid medium testing method is becoming the international gold standard for second-line drug susceptibility testing of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates. We performed a comparative study

  16. Whole-genome sequencing to detect recent transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in settings with a high burden of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tao; Yang, Chongguang; Peng, Ying; Lu, Liping; Sun, Guomei; Wu, Jie; Jin, Xiaoping; Hong, Jianjun; Li, Fabin; Mei, Jian; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Gao, Qian

    2014-07-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been used to trace the transmission of M. tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). Previously published studies using WGS were conducted in developed countries with a low TB burden. We sought to evaluate the relative usefulness of traditional VNTR and SNP typing methods, WGS and epidemiological investigations to study the recent transmission of M. tuberculosis in a high TB burden country. We conducted epidemiological investigations of 42 TB patients whose M. tuberculosis isolates were classified into three clusters based on variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing. We applied WGS to 32 (76.2%) of the 42 strains and calculated the pairwise genomic distances between strains within each cluster. Eighteen (56.3%) of the 32 strains had genomic differences ≥100 SNPs with every other strain, suggesting that direct transmission did not likely occurred. Ten strains were grouped into four WGS-based clusters with genomic distances ≤5 SNPs within each cluster, and confirmed epidemiological links were identified in two of these clusters. Our results indicate that WGS provides reliable resolution for tracing the transmission of M. tuberculosis in high TB burden settings. The high resolution of WGS is particularly useful to confirm or exclude the possibility of direct transmission events defined by traditional typing methods.

  17. Aspectos relevantes del uso de Mycobacterium´habana´ como candidato vacunal contra la tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana Valdés

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La eficacia protectora de la actual vacuna (BCG contra la tuberculosis, para contrarrestar las formas pulmonares de esta enfermedad y su reactivación, resulta variable o poco eficiente, lo cual impone la búsqueda urgente de nuevas alternativas profilácticas contra esta enfermedad. Basados en las ventajas inmunogénicas que ofrece el uso de vacunas vivas, se han encaminado diferentes estrategias de este tipo empleando mutantes auxotróficos de Mycobacterium tuberculosis , BCG recombinante o micobacterias no tuberculosas. Existen evidencias experimentales acerca de la protección conferida tras la vacunación con cepas vivas, inactivadas o fracciones proteicas de Mycobacterium'habana' TMC-5135 contra la infección por Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Esta respuesta protectora parece ir aparejada de escasos signos de virulencia en los modelos animales ensayados, lo cual coloca a M.´habana´ dentro de los posibles candidatos vacunales contra la tuberculosis al ajustarse a la condición que impone una vacuna clásica de reproducir la infección y los eventos inmunes que le suceden lo más fielmente posible a como ocurren de manera natural, sin causar extensos daños en el receptor.

  18. Identification of proteins associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence pathway by their polar profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Mancilla, Raul; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego, José Lino; Gimbel, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    With almost one third of the world population infected, tuberculosis is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide and it is a major threat to any healthcare system. With the mathematical-computational method named "Polarity Index Method", already published by this group, we identified, with high accuracy (70%), proteins related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria virulence pathway from the Tuberculist Database. The test considered the totality of proteins cataloged in the main domains: fungi, bacteria, and viruses from three databases: Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD2), Tuberculist Database, Uniprot Database, and four antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: PstS-1, 38-kDa, 19-kDa, and H37Rv ORF. The method described was calibrated with each database to achieve the same performance, showing a high percentage of coincidence in the identification of proteins associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria virulence pathway located in the Tuberculist Database, and identifying a polar pattern regardless of the group studied. This method has already been used in the identification of diverse groups of proteins and peptides, showing that it is an effective discriminant. Its metric considers only one physico-chemical property, i.e. polarity.

  19. Detection of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by a novel tetraplex real-time PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses.

  20. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates from Kermanshah Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Roghieh; Mosavari, Nader; Mahalati, Ardeshir Hesampoor

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases in the world. Rapid diagnosis of the disease and identification of species is extremely important for proper treatment of the disease as some species of the complex are resistant to the first-line of tuberculosis drugs. The aim of present study was molecular identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) complex isolates from Kermanshah Province, Iran, which were submitted to the Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory at Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute (Tehran, Iran). To identify the genus Mycobacterium, all isolates were subjected to 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR-IS6110 was subsequently used to confirm that the isolates belonged to MTB complex. Finally, region of difference (RD) typing was used to identify the species in the complex. The results of 16S rRNA and IS6110 PCR analysis showed the presence of 543-bp and 245-bp bands, respectively. Furthermore, 146bp, 172bp, 235bp, and 369bp at RD1, RD4, RD9, and RD12, respectively, were observed during RD typing. Thus, based on the results, all isolates were identified as MTB. It is worth mentioning that most tuberculosis cases are identified on the basis of acid-fast bacilli detection, and antibiotic therapy is immediately initiated subsequently. Moreover, it should be noted that some of these acid-fast positive cases might not be of genus Mycobacterium, and thus, the antibiotics prescribed might threaten the health of the patients. Additionally, if the identified bacilli are not within MTB complex, the drug therapy would differ. However, Mycobacterium bovis, which is a member of MTB complex and is resistant to pyrazinamide, requires exact strain identification. Based on the findings, individual isolates should be identified by RD typing methods, which could clearly discriminate the species from each other. Copyright © 2016.

  1. At Baltic crossroads: a molecular snapshot of Mycobacterium tuberculosis population diversity in Kaliningrad, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrousov, Igor; Otten, Tatiana; Zozio, Thierry; Turkin, Eugeni; Nazemtseva, Vera; Sheremet, Aleksandra; Vishnevsky, Boris; Narvskaya, Olga; Rastogi, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    The Kaliningrad region is the westernmost part of the Russian Federation; it includes an enclave on the Baltic Sea inside the European Union separated from mainland Russia by Lithuania and Poland. The incidence of tuberculosis in Kaliningrad has shown a steady and dramatic increase from 83/100,000 in 2000 to 134/100,000 in 2006; the rate of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-tuberculosis) in the Kaliningrad region was reported to be 30.5% among newly diagnosed tuberculosis patients. This study presents a first molecular snapshot of the population diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in this region. A total of 90 drug-resistant and susceptible M. tuberculosis strains from Kaliningrad were subjected to spoligotyping, 12-locus MIRU typing and mutation analysis of the drug resistance genes rpoB and katG. A comparison with international databases showed that the M. tuberculosis population in this region shares a joint pool of strains with the European part of Russia, and also exhibits a certain affinity with those of its northern European neighbours, such as Poland and Germany. Comparison of the genotyping and drug resistance data emphasized that the high prevalence of the MDR Beijing genotype strains is a major cause of the adverse epidemiological situation of MDR-tuberculosis in the Kaliningrad region.

  2. Utility value of a T-cell interferon-γ release assay based on recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis 11kD protein in the diagnosis of tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽帆

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of a T-cell interferon-γrelease assay based on recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB)11kD protein for diagnosing tuberculosis.Methods This prospective study enrolled inpatients with suspected tuberculosis at PUMCH to examine the diagnostic sensitivity,specificity,predictive value(PV)and likelihood ratio(LR)of T-cell interferon-γrelease assays based on recombinant MTB-11kD

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Dual M. tuberculosis/M. bovis Infection as the Cause of Tuberculosis in a Gorilla and a Lioness, Respectively, in Ibadan Zoo, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aina Adeogun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB in zoo animals is an important public health problem in places where it occurs. This is even very important in countries where there is little public health awareness about the disease; thus confined animals in the zoo can be infected directly or indirectly by infected humans and vice versa. In Nigeria, the problem of TB is a major concern among both humans and cattle. Here, we present cases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis/M. bovis infections in a female gorilla and a lioness, respectively, in a zoo in Ibadan, Nigeria. These cases were confirmed after bacteriological examinations and DNA from granulomatous lesions of the animals’ carcasses were subjected to the Hain and spoligotyping techniques. Our findings reveal the first documented report of TB infections in a gorilla and a lioness in zoo animals in Nigeria. The public health risks of tuberculosis in zoological settings are therefore reemphasized.

  4. Isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) from dairy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl4

    through unpasteurized milk, contaminated air or conta- gious transmission (Thorn .... were defined as Beijing-like family strains because the. Spoligotyping pattern ... the legal requirements were subjected to mycobacterium isolation and MTBC ...

  5. Line probe assay for differentiation within Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Evaluation on clinical specimens and isolates including Mycobacterium pinnipedii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Marianne Kirstine; Bek, Dorte; Rasmussen, Erik Michael;

    2009-01-01

    A line probe assay (GenoType MTBC) was evaluated for species differentiation within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). We included 387 MTBC isolates, 43 IS6110 low-copy MTBC isolates, 28 clinical specimens with varying microscopy grade, and 30 isolates of non-tuberculous mycobacteria....... The assay was 100% specific and identified all 387 isolates and 98% of all IS6110 low-copy strains in concordance with the gold standard. The 2% discrepancy was caused by 1 isolate showing a faint restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern. The assay could provide specifies identification in 13...

  6. The Immune Interaction between HIV-1 Infection and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Bruyn, Elsa; Wilkinson, Robert John

    2016-12-01

    The modulation of tuberculosis (TB)-induced immunopathology caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coinfection remains incompletely understood but underlies the change seen in the natural history, presentation, and prognosis of TB in such patients. The deleterious combination of these two pathogens has been dubbed a "deadly syndemic," with each favoring the replication of the other and thereby contributing to accelerated disease morbidity and mortality. HIV-1 is the best-recognized risk factor for the development of active TB and accounts for 13% of cases globally. The advent of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has considerably mitigated this risk. Rapid roll-out of ART globally and the recent recommendation by the World Health Organization (WHO) to initiate ART for everyone living with HIV at any CD4 cell count should lead to further reductions in HIV-1-associated TB incidence because susceptibility to TB is inversely proportional to CD4 count. However, it is important to note that even after successful ART, patients with HIV-1 are still at increased risk for TB. Indeed, in settings of high TB incidence, the occurrence of TB often remains the first presentation of, and thereby the entry into, HIV care. As advantageous as ART-induced immune recovery is, it may also give rise to immunopathology, especially in the lower-CD4-count strata in the form of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome will continue to impact the HIV-TB syndemic.

  7. Crystal structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphate binding protein PstS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Davide M; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Rizzi, Menico

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis evades host immune responses by colonizing macrophages. Intraphagosomal M. tuberculosis is exposed to environmental stresses such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates as well as acid shock and inorganic phosphate (Pi) depletion. Experimental evidence suggests that expression levels of mycobacterial protein PstS3 (Rv0928) are significantly increased when M. tuberculosis bacilli are exposed to Pi starvation. Hence, PstS3 may be important for survival of Mtb in conditions where there is limited supply of Pi. We report here the structure of PstS3 from M. tuberculosis at 2.3-Å resolution. The protein presents a structure typical for ABC phosphate transfer receptors. Comparison with its cognate receptor PstS1 showed a different pattern distribution of surface charges in proximity to the Pi recognition site, suggesting complementary roles of the two proteins in Pi uptake. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Substituted aminopyrimidine protein kinase B (PknB) inhibitors show activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Timothy M.; Bouloc, Nathalie; Buxton, Roger S.; Chugh, Jasveen; Lougheed, Kathryn E.A.; Osborne, Simon A.; Saxty, Barbara; Smerdon, Stephen J.; Taylor, Debra L.; Whalley, David

    2012-01-01

    A high-throughput screen against PknB, an essential serine–threonine protein kinase present in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), allowed the identification of an aminoquinazoline inhibitor which was used as a starting point for SAR investigations. Although a significant improvement in enzyme affinity was achieved, the aminoquinazolines showed little or no cellular activity against M. tuberculosis. However, switching to an aminopyrimidine core scaffold and the introduction of a basic amine side chain afforded compounds with nanomolar enzyme binding affinity and micromolar minimum inhibitory concentrations against M. tuberculosis. Replacement of the pyrazole head group with pyridine then allowed equipotent compounds with improved selectivity against a human kinase panel to be obtained. PMID:22469702

  9. Collectin CL-LK Is a Novel Soluble Pattern Recognition Receptor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troegeler, Anthony; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Hansen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular components of immune recognition of the tuberculosis (TB) bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can help designing novel strategies to combat TB. Here, we identify collectin CL-LK as a novel soluble C-type lectin able to bind M. tuberculosis, and characterize...... mycobacterial mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan as a primary ligand for CL-LK. Mice deficient in CL-K1, one of the CL-LK subunits, do not display altered susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. However, we found that the amount of CL-LK in the serum of patients with active TB is reduced, compared to that in controls......, and correlates inversely to the magnitude of the immune response to the pathogen. These findings indicate that CL-LK might be of interest for future diagnostic and treatment monitoring purposes....

  10. Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase: A Potential Drug Target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L. Mowbray

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Globally, tuberculosis is second only to AIDS in mortality and the disease is responsible for over 1.3 million deaths each year. The impractically long treatment schedules (generally 6–9 months and unpleasant side effects of the current drugs often lead to poor patient compliance, which in turn has resulted in the emergence of multi-, extensively- and totally-drug resistant strains. The development of new classes of anti-tuberculosis drugs and new drug targets is of global importance, since attacking the bacterium using multiple strategies provides the best means to prevent resistance. This review presents an overview of the various strategies and compounds utilized to inhibit glutamine synthetase, a promising target for the development of drugs for TB therapy.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamrah, Sapna; Desmond, Edward; Ghosh, Smita; France, Anne Marie; Kammerer, J Steve; Cowan, Lauren S; Heetderks, Andrew; Forbes, Alstead; Moonan, Patrick K

    2014-01-01

    The United States-Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) are part of the US National Tuberculosis (TB) Surveillance System and use laboratory services contracted through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2004, the CDC established the National Tuberculosis Genotyping Service, a system to genotype 1 isolate from each culture-confirmed case of TB. To describe the molecular epidemiology of TB in the region, we examined all Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates submitted for genotyping from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2008. Over this time period, the USAPI jurisdictions reported 1339 verified TB cases to the National Tuberculosis Surveillance System. Among 419 (31%) reported culture-confirmed TB cases, 352 (84%) had complete genotype results. Routine TB genotyping allowed, for the first time, an exploration of the molecular epidemiology of TB in the USAPI.

  12. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a South African community with high HIV prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelkoop, Keren; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Mathema, Barun; Shashkina, Elena; Kurepina, Natalia; Whitelaw, Andrew; Fallows, Dorothy; Morrow, Carl; Kreiswirth, Barry; Kaplan, Gilla; Wood, Robin

    2009-10-15

    To explore the relationship between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes, we performed IS6110-based restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis on M. tuberculosis culture specimens from patients with smear-positive tuberculosis in a periurban community in South Africa from 2001 through 2005. Among 151 isolates, 95 strains were identified within 26 families, with 54% clustering. HIV status was associated with W-Beijing strains (P = .009) but not with clustering per se. The high frequency of clustering suggests ongoing transmission in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive individuals in this community. The strong association between W-Beijing and HIV infection may have important implications for tuberculosis control.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains circulating in the penitentiary system of Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrayeva, A; Kozhamkulov, U; Raiymbek, D; Alenova, A; Igilikova, S; Zholdybayeva, E; Abildaev, T; Momynaliev, K

    2014-03-01

    A total of 60 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates collected from patients in prisons in Kazakhstan and 125 from the civilian sector were examined using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeat analysis in 2012. The proportion of tuberculosis strains with unique genotypes isolated from the civilian patients was 50.4%, while that in the prison patients was 31.7%. This difference was statistically significant (χ(2) 4.42, P 0.035), and may reflect a low genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from prison patients. The frequencies of mutations in the rpoB531 and katG315 genes of the M. tuberculosis strains isolated from the civilians and in the penitentiary system were not significantly different (rpoB531: 82.4% vs. 88.3%, and katG315: 98.4% vs. 100%, respectively).

  14. Inhibition of the in-vitro growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by a phytosiderophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajiv, J; Dam, T; Kumar, S; Bose, M; Aggarwal, K K; Babu, C R

    2001-10-01

    Non-compliance by patients and poor clinical management due to the use of incorrect regimens are the main reasons for the development of drug resistance by mycobacterial strains. New strategies for the control of multi-drug-resistant mycobacterial strains have become a necessity for proper management of tuberculosis, which, according to the WHO report (1997), is estimated to remain among the top 10 mortality-causing diseases of the twenty-first century. One of the strategies is the use of iron-sequestering agents like siderophores as active therapeutic agents in the treatment of tuberculosis. This report describes for the first time the inhibition of the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra in vitro by a phytosiderophore isolated from the root washings of Tephrosia purpurea. This finding may help in the establishment of a new drug regimen which will be more effective in the treatment of tuberculosis.

  15. Integration of published information into a resistance-associated mutation database for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Hugh; Yamaguchi, Ken D; Cirillo, Daniela M; Miotto, Paolo; Schito, Marco; Posey, James; Starks, Angela M; Niemann, Stefan; Alland, David; Hanna, Debra; Aviles, Enrique; Perkins, Mark D; Dolinger, David L

    2015-04-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global public health challenge. Although incidence is decreasing, the proportion of drug-resistant cases is increasing. Technical and operational complexities prevent Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug susceptibility phenotyping in the vast majority of new and retreatment cases. The advent of molecular technologies provides an opportunity to obtain results rapidly as compared to phenotypic culture. However, correlations between genetic mutations and resistance to multiple drugs have not been systematically evaluated. Molecular testing of M. tuberculosis sampled from a typical patient continues to provide a partial picture of drug resistance. A database of phenotypic and genotypic testing results, especially where prospectively collected, could document statistically significant associations and may reveal new, predictive molecular patterns. We examine the feasibility of integrating existing molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility data to identify associations observed across multiple studies and demonstrate potential for well-integrated M. tuberculosis mutation data to reveal actionable findings.

  16. Molecular characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from elephants of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Sarad; Mikota, Susan K; Nakajima, Chie; Gairhe, Kamal P; Maharjan, Bhagwan; Thapa, Jeewan; Poudel, Ajay; Shimozuru, Michito; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Tsubota, Toshio

    2014-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured from the lung tissues of 3 captive elephants in Nepal that died with extensive lung lesions. Spoligotyping, TbD1 detection and multi-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) results suggested 3 isolates belonged to a specific lineage of Indo-Oceanic clade, EAI5 SIT 138. One of the elephant isolates had a new synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) T231C in the gyrA sequence, and the same SNP was also found in human isolates in Nepal. MLVA results and transfer history of the elephants suggested that 2 of them might be infected with M. tuberculosis from the same source. These findings indicated the source of M. tuberculosis infection of those elephants were local residents, presumably their handlers. Further investigation including detailed genotyping of elephant and human isolates is needed to clarify the infection route and eventually prevent the transmission of tuberculosis to susceptible hosts.

  17. Rapid, automated, nonradiometric susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex to four first-line antituberculous drugs used in standard short-course chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Marjamäki, Merja

    2004-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis necessitates rapid and accurate susceptibility testing. The nonradiometric BACTEC Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube 960 (MGIT) system for susceptibility testing was evaluated on 222 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates for ...

  18. Diminished Systemic and Antigen-Specific Type 1, Type 17, and Other Proinflammatory Cytokines in Diabetic and Prediabetic Individuals With Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Kumaran, Paul; Dolla, Chandra Kumar; Thomas B Nutman; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background. Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM) is known to be a major risk factor for the development of active tuberculosis, although its influence on latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (hereafter, “latent infection”) remains poorly characterized.

  19. Selective targeting of the conserved active site cysteine of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methionine aminopeptidase with electrophilic reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Arya, Tarun; Kishor, Chandan; Gumpena, Rajesh; Ganji, Roopa J; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) cleave initiator methionine from ~ 70% of the newly synthesized proteins in every living cell, and specific inhibition or knockdown of this function is detrimental. MetAPs are metalloenzymes, and are broadly classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Bacteria contain only type I MetAPs, and the active site of these enzymes contains a conserved cysteine. By contrast, in type II enzymes the analogous position is occupied by a conserved glycine. Here, we report the reactivity of the active site cysteine in a type I MetAP, MetAP1c, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c) towards highly selective cysteine-specific reagents. The authenticity of selective modification of Cys105 of MtMetAP1c was established by using site-directed mutagenesis and crystal structure determination of covalent and noncovalent complexes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that metal ions in the active site assist in the covalent modification of Cys105 by orienting the reagents appropriately for a successful reaction. These studies establish, for the first time, that the conserved cysteine of type I MetAPs can be targeted for selective inhibition, and we believe that this chemistry can be exploited for further drug discovery efforts regarding microbial MetAPs.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but not vaccine BCG, specifically upregulates matrix metalloproteinase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkington, Paul T G; Nuttall, Robert K; Boyle, Joseph J; O'Kane, Cecilia M; Horncastle, Donna E; Edwards, Dylan R; Friedland, Jon S

    2005-12-15

    Pulmonary cavitation is fundamental to the global success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the mechanisms of this lung destruction are poorly understood. The biochemistry of lung matrix predicts matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) involvement in immunopathology. We investigated gene expression of all MMPs, proteins with a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in M. tuberculosis-infected human macrophages by real-time polymerase chain reaction. MMP secretion was measured by zymography and Western analysis, and expression in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis was localized by immunohistochemistry. MMP-1 and MMP-7 gene expression and secretion are potently upregulated by M. tuberculosis, and no increase in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase expression occurs to oppose their activity. Dexamethasone completely suppresses MMP-1 but not MMP-7 gene expression and secretion. In patients with active tuberculosis, macrophages express MMP-1 and MMP-7 adjacent to areas of tissue destruction. MMP-1 but not MMP-7 expression and secretion are relatively M. tuberculosis specific, are not upregulated by tuberculosis-associated cytokines, and are prostaglandin dependent. In contrast, the vaccine M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) does not stimulate MMP-1 secretion from human macrophages, although M. tuberculosis and BCG do upregulate MMP-7 equally. BCG-infected macrophages secrete reduced prostaglandin E2 concentrations compared with M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages, and prostaglandin pathway supplementation augments MMP-1 secretion from BCG-infected cells. M. tuberculosis specifically upregulates MMP-1 in a cellular model of human infection and in patients with tuberculosis. In contrast, vaccine BCG, which does not cause lung cavitation, does not upregulate prostaglandin E2-dependent MMP-1 secretion.

  1. The influence of host and bacterial genotype on the development of disseminated disease with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine Caws

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The factors that govern the development of tuberculosis disease are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that some strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis are more capable of causing disseminated disease than others and may be associated with polymorphisms in host genes responsible for the innate immune response to infection. We compared the host and bacterial genotype in 187 Vietnamese adults with tuberculous meningitis (TBM and 237 Vietnamese adults with uncomplicated pulmonary tuberculosis. The host genotype of tuberculosis cases was also compared with the genotype of 392 cord blood controls from the same population. Isolates of M. tuberculosis were genotyped by large sequence polymorphisms. The hosts were defined by polymorphisms in genes encoding Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP and Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2. We found a significant protective association between the Euro-American lineage of M. tuberculosis and pulmonary rather than meningeal tuberculosis (Odds ratio (OR for causing TBM 0.395, 95% confidence intervals (C.I. 0.193-0.806, P = 0.009, suggesting these strains are less capable of extra-pulmonary dissemination than others in the study population. We also found that individuals with the C allele of TLR-2 T597C allele were more likely to have tuberculosis caused by the East-Asian/Beijing genotype (OR = 1.57 [95% C.I. 1.15-2.15] than other individuals. The study provides evidence that M. tuberculosis genotype influences clinical disease phenotype and demonstrates, for the first time, a significant interaction between host and bacterial genotypes and the development of tuberculosis.

  2. The Influence of Host and Bacterial Genotype on the Development of Disseminated Disease with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caws, Maxine; Thwaites, Guy; Dunstan, Sarah; Hawn, Thomas R.; Thi Ngoc Lan, Nguyen; Thuong, Nguyen Thuy Thuong; Stepniewska, Kasia; Huyen, Mai Nguyet Thu; Bang, Nguyen Duc; Huu Loc, Tran; Gagneux, Sebastien; van Soolingen, Dick; Kremer, Kristin; van der Sande, Marianne; Small, Peter; Thi Hoang Anh, Phan; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Thi Quy, Hoang; Thi Hong Duyen, Nguyen; Quang Tho, Dau; Hieu, Nguyen T.; Torok, Estee; Hien, Tran Tinh; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Thi Quynh Nhu, Nguyen; Duy, Phan Minh; van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Farrar, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    The factors that govern the development of tuberculosis disease are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that some strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) are more capable of causing disseminated disease than others and may be associated with polymorphisms in host genes responsible for the innate immune response to infection. We compared the host and bacterial genotype in 187 Vietnamese adults with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and 237 Vietnamese adults with uncomplicated pulmonary tuberculosis. The host genotype of tuberculosis cases was also compared with the genotype of 392 cord blood controls from the same population. Isolates of M. tuberculosis were genotyped by large sequence polymorphisms. The hosts were defined by polymorphisms in genes encoding Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) and Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2). We found a significant protective association between the Euro-American lineage of M. tuberculosis and pulmonary rather than meningeal tuberculosis (Odds ratio (OR) for causing TBM 0.395, 95% confidence intervals (C.I.) 0.193–0.806, P = 0.009), suggesting these strains are less capable of extra-pulmonary dissemination than others in the study population. We also found that individuals with the C allele of TLR-2 T597C allele were more likely to have tuberculosis caused by the East-Asian/Beijing genotype (OR = 1.57 [95% C.I. 1.15–2.15]) than other individuals. The study provides evidence that M. tuberculosis genotype influences clinical disease phenotype and demonstrates, for the first time, a significant interaction between host and bacterial genotypes and the development of tuberculosis. PMID:18369480

  3. Aktivitas polisakarida krestin dari ekstrak Coriolus versicolor terhadap peningkatan antibodi Mus musculus akibat paparan Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Puji Astuti Wahyuningsih

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to know the bioactivity of polysaccharide krestin (PSK with a different timing on formation of mice antibodyexposed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was used as infection agent that had an abilitiy to be imunogenicand to lead immune system responsses decreased. Polysaccharides krestin was used as immunopotentiator which had a role to activatemacrophage and stimulate B cell in order to produce antibody. This research involved 30 adult female mice of Mus musculus strain Balb/C in the age of 8 €“10 weeks and in the weight between of 30 €“40 g. Mice were divided into six groups, as follows: group K asa control, was added only aquades; group K+ as positive control, was added only PSK; group K- as negative control, was exposedby M. tuberculosis only; group P1 was added PSK before being exposed by M. tuberculosis; group P2 was added PSK after beingexposed by M. tuberculosis; group P3 was added PSK before and after being exposed by M. tuberculosis. Polysaccharides krestin wasadded by gavage with single dose of 500 μg and M. tuberculosis was exposed intraperitoneally with concentration of 5x108 bacteryper ml. The bioactivity of PSK was observed by formation antibody using indirect ELISA test. The results of research were the averageof OD value of K group was 0,590 ± 0,042, K+ group was 0.641 ± 0.025, K- group was 1.044 ± 0.054, P1 group was 1.032 ± 0.125,P2 group was 1.127 ± 0.042, P3 group was 1.230 ± 0.097. The conclusion of this research showed that the adding of PSK increasedmice formation antibody. The time of adding before and after being exposed M. tuberculosis was the most potential to raise antibodyproduction on mice.

  4. A single-step sequencing method for the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoheira Djelouadji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC comprises closely related species responsible for strictly human and zoonotic tuberculosis. Accurate species determination is useful for the identification of outbreaks and epidemiological links. Mycobacterium africanum and Mycobacterium canettii are typically restricted to Africa and M. bovis is a re-emerging pathogen. Identification of these species is difficult and expensive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Exact Tandem Repeat D (ETR-D; alias Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit 4 was sequenced in MTC species type strains and 110 clinical isolates, in parallel to reference polyphasic identification based on phenotype profiling and sequencing of pncA, oxyR, hsp65, gyrB genes and the major polymorphism tandem repeat. Inclusion of M. tuberculosis isolates in the expanding, antibiotic-resistant Beijing clone was determined by Rv0927c gene sequencing. The ETR-D (780-bp sequence unambiguously identified MTC species type strain except M. pinnipedii and M. microti thanks to six single nucleotide polymorphisms, variable numbers (1-7 copies of the tandem repeat and two deletions/insertions. The ETR-D sequencing agreed with phenotypic identification in 107/110 clinical isolates and with reference polyphasic molecular identification in all isolates, comprising 98 M. tuberculosis, 5 M. bovis BCG type, 5 M. canettii, and 2 M. africanum. For M. tuberculosis isolates, the ETR-D sequence was not significantly associated with the Beijing clone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ETR-D sequencing allowed accurate, single-step identification of the MTC at the species level. It circumvented the current expensive, time-consuming polyphasic approach. It could be used to depict epidemiology of zoonotic and human tuberculosis, especially in African countries where several MTC species are emerging.

  5. Goats challenged with different members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex display different clinical pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezos, J; Casal, C; Díez-Delgado, I; Romero, B; Liandris, E; Álvarez, J; Sevilla, I A; Juan, L de; Domínguez, L; Gortázar, C

    2015-10-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) in goats (Capra hircus) is due to infection with members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), mainly Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae. We report a comparative experimental infection of goats with M. bovis, M. caprae and M. tuberculosis strains. We hypothesized that goats experimentally infected with different members of the MTC would display different clinical pictures. Three groups of goats were challenged with either M. bovis SB0134 (group 1, n=5), M. caprae SB0157 (group 2, n=5) and M. tuberculosis SIT58 (group 3, n=4). The highest mean total lesion score was observed in M. bovis challenged goats (mean 15.2, range 9-19), followed by those challenged with M. caprae (10.8, 2-23). The lowest score was recorded in goats challenged with M. tuberculosis (3, 1-6). Culture results coincided with the lesion scores in yielding more positive pools (7/15) in M. bovis challenged goats. By contrast, only three pools were positive from goats challenged M. tuberculosis (3/12) and with M. caprae (3/15), respectively. Differences in the performance of the intradermal and gamma-interferon (IFN-γ) tests depending of the group were observed since all goats from group 1 were diagnosed using intradermal test and these goats reacted earlier to the IFN-γ assay in comparison to the other groups. This study confirmed that goats experimentally infected with different members of the MTC display different clinical pictures and this fact may have implications for MTC maintenance and bacterial shedding.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype induces differential cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy BCG vaccinated individuals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivera-Ordaz, A.; Gonzaga-Bernachi, J.; Serafin-Lopez, J.; Hernandez-Pando, R.; Soolingen, D. van; Estrada-Parra, S.; Estrada-Garcia, I.; Chacon-Salinas, R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) Beijing genotype are a major concern due to their high prevalence in tuberculosis patients and their high rate of multi-drug resistance. Although it has been shown that Beijing modifies macrophage behavior, little is known about how this genotype could

  7. Added value of IP-10 as a read-out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenum, Synne; Dhanasekaran, Sivmakumaran; Ritz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We have explored the added value of IFNγ-inducible protein 10 as a read-out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific immunity in young Indian children where the sensitivity of the IGRA for tuberculosis (TB) is poor. Reduced frequency of indeterminate results and an increased sensitivity for TB, sug...

  8. The Purinergic P2X7 Receptor Is Not Required for Control of Pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Amy J.; Eilertson, Brandon; Fulton, Scott A; JoAnne L Flynn; Canaday, David H.

    2005-01-01

    The importance in vivo of P2X7 receptors in control of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis was examined in a low-dose aerosol infection mouse model. P2X7−/− mice controlled infection in lungs as well as wild-type mice, suggesting that the P2X7 receptor is not required for control of pulmonary M. tuberculosis infection.

  9. The Search for a Genetic Factor Associating with Immune Restoration Disease in HIV Patients Co-Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Jacquita S. Affandi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Up to 43% of HIV-infected patients co-infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis experience exacerbations of tuberculosis (TB after commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART. These are termed immune restoration disease (IRD. It is unclear why individual susceptibility varies.

  10. Tuberculosis transmission of predominant genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Northern suburbs of Buenos Aires city region Transmisión de la tuberculosis por genotipos predominantes de Mycobacterium tuberculosis en la región Gran Buenos Aires Norte

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    N. Morcillo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, the incidence of tuberculosis in Argentina showed an increase compared to 2002. The severe national crisis at the end of the 90s has probably strongly contributed to this situation. The goal of this work was to estimate the extent of the spread of the most predominant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and to assess the spread of predominant M. tuberculosis clusters as determined by spoligotyping and IS6110 RFLP. The study involved 590 pulmonary, smear-positive TB cases receiving medical attention at health centers and hospitals in Northern Buenos Aires (NBA suburbs, from October 2001 to December 2002. From a total of 208 clinical isolates belonging to 6 major clusters, 63 (30.2% isolates had identical spoligotyping and IS6110 RFLP pattern. Only 22.2% were shown to have epidemiological connections with another member of their respective cluster. In these major clusters, 30.2% of the 208 TB cases studied by both molecular techniques and contact tracing could be convincingly attributable to a recently acquired infection. This knowledge may be useful to assess the clonal distribution of predominant M. tuberculosis clusters in Argentina, which may make an impact on TB control strategies.La incidencia de la tuberculosis en Argentina mostró en 2003 un incremento en comparación con 2002. La grave crisis nacional a fines de los 90 ha probablemente contribuido en gran medida a esta situación. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue determinar la diversidad genética de aislamientos de Mycobacterium tuberculosis y el grado de dispersión de algunas cepas mayoritarias genéticamente relacionadas. El estudio involucró 590 aislamientos clínicos provenientes de muestras respiratorias con examen directo positivo, de pacientes atendidos en los hospitales y centros de salud que conforman la región Gran Buenos Aires Norte (NBA, de octubre de 2001 a diciembre de 2002. De 208 aislamientos que se encontraron en los 6 mayores clusters, 63 (30,2% ten

  11. Thermostability of IFN-γ and IP-10 release assays for latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauenfeldt, Thomas; Wagner, Dirk; Aabye, Martine Grosos;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible protein 10kD (IP-10) and IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are immunodiagnostic tests aiming to identify the presence of specific cellular immune responses, interpreted as markers for latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Incubation at higher...... accuracy of IP-10 release assay and IGRAs. RESULTS: We included 65 patients with confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis and 160 healthy controls from 6 European centres collaborating in the TBnet. In patients, IP-10 responses increased 1.07 (IQR 0.90-1.36) fold and IFN-γ responses decreased 0.88 (IQR 0...

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of Rv3705c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Feifei [East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237, People’s Republic of (China); Gao, Feng [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, People’s Republic of (China); Li, Honglin [East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237, People’s Republic of (China); Gong, Weimin [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, People’s Republic of (China); Zhou, Lin, E-mail: gdtb-bg@vip.163.com [Center for Tuberculosis Control of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of (China); Bi, Lijun, E-mail: gdtb-bg@vip.163.com [East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237, People’s Republic of (China)

    2014-07-23

    The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Rv3705c from M. tuberculosis are described. The conserved protein Rv3705c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as a precipitant. The Rv3705c crystals exhibited space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 198.0, c = 364.1 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and diffracted to a resolution of 3.3 Å.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Multidrug Resistant Strain M Induces an Altered Activation of Cytotoxic CD8+ T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Geffner; Juan Ignacio Basile; Noemí Yokobori; Denise Kviatcovsky; Carmen Sabio y García; Viviana Ritacco; Beatriz López; María del Carmen Sasiain; Silvia de la Barrera

    2014-01-01

    In human tuberculosis (TB), CD8+ T cells contribute to host defense by the release of Th1 cytokines and the direct killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected macrophages via granule exocytosis pathway or the engagement of receptors on target cells. Previously we demonstrated that strain M, the most prevalent multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mtb strain in Argentine, is a weak inducer of IFN-γ and elicits a remarkably low CD8-dependent cytotoxic T cell activity (CTL). In contrast, the closel...

  14. Genome sequencing and annotation of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB PR10 strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zakihalani A. Halim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of a multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain PR10 (MDR-TB PR10 isolated from a patient diagnosed with tuberculosis. The size of the draft genome MDR-TB PR10 is 4.34 Mbp with 65.6% of G + C content and consists of 4637 predicted genes. The determinants were categorized by RAST into 400 subsystems with 4286 coding sequences and 50 RNAs. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010968.

  15. Analytical and Clinical Evaluation of the Epistem Genedrive Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenai, Shubhada; Armstrong, Derek T.; Valli, Eloise; Dolinger, David L.; Nakiyingi, Lydia; Dietze, Reynaldo; Dalcolmo, Margareth Pretti; Nicol, Mark P.; Zemanay, Widaad; Manabe, Yuka; Hadad, David Jamil; Marques-Rodrigues, Patricia; Palaci, Moises; Peres, Renata L.; Gaeddert, Mary; Armakovitch, Sandra; Nonyane, Bareng A. S.; Denkinger, Claudia M.; Banada, Padmapriya; Joloba, Moses L.; Ellner, Jerrold; Boehme, Catharina; Alland, David

    2016-01-01

    The Epistem Genedrive assay rapidly detects the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from sputum and is currently available for clinical use. However, the analytical and clinical performance of this test has not been fully evaluated. The analytical limit of detection (LOD) of the Genedrive PCR amplification was tested with genomic DNA; the performance of the complete (sample processing plus amplification) system was tested by spiking M. tuberculosis mc26030 cells into distilled water and M. tuberculosis-negative sputum. Specificity was tested using common respiratory pathogens and nontuberculosis mycobacteria. A clinical evaluation enrolled adults with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis, obtained three sputum samples from each participant, and compared the accuracy of the Genedrive to that of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay using M. tuberculosis cultures as the reference standard. The Genedrive assay had an LOD of 1 pg/μl (100 genomic DNA copies/reaction). The LODs of the system were 2.5 × 104 CFU/ml and 2.5 × 105 CFU/ml for cells spiked into water and sputum, respectively. False-positive rpoB probe signals were observed in 3/32 (9.4%) of the negative controls and also in few samples containing Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium gordonae, or Mycobacterium thermoresistibile. In the clinical study, among 336 analyzed participants, the overall sensitivities for the tuberculosis case detection of Genedrive, Xpert, and smear microscopy were 45.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 35.2% to 55.8%), 91.8% (95% CI, 84.4% to 96.4%), and 77.3% (95% CI, 67.7% to 85.2%), respectively. The sensitivities of Genedrive and Xpert for the detection of smear-microscopy-negative tuberculosis were 0% (95% CI, 0% to 15.4%) and 68.2% (95% CI, 45.1% to 86.1%), respectively. The Genedrive assay did not meet performance standards recommended by the World Health Organization for a smear microscopy replacement tuberculosis test. Epistem is working on modifications to improve the assay. PMID:26865685

  16. A first insight into the genotypic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Rwanda

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    Gafirita James

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB. Globally, increasing evidence shows that in M. tuberculosis, transmission varies from strain to strain and that different strains exhibit a range of geographical and host specificities, pathogenicity, and drug susceptibility. Therefore rapid and accurate differentiation of the members of MTC is critical in guiding treatment and public health decisions. We carried out a study at different health units and the National Reference Laboratory in Rwanda identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species prevalent in TB patients in Rwanda. We further characterized the isolates using spoligotyping in order to gain an insight into the strain diversity of drug resistant and susceptible isolates of M. tuberculosis in this setting. Methods A total of 151 isolates from culture positive sputum samples were harvested, heat killed at 80°C for two hours, and then shipped to Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Uganda, for speciation and typing. Species identification was achieved by regions of difference (RD analysis, while Spoligotyping was done to identify strain types. Results Region of difference analysis identified all the 151 isolates as M. tuberculosis. Spoligotyping revealed predominance of the T2 family (58.3%, 88/151, with SIT 52 being the most prevalent strain (31.8%, 48/151. Among the 151 isolates, 64 (42.4% were multidrug resistant (MDR with 3 cases on mono-resistance. Of 94 retreatment cases, 48 (51.1% were MDR and of 46 newly presenting cases 14 (30.4% were MDR. There was a significant difference (p=0.01 in anti-TB drug resistance between new and retreatment cases in the sample. However, there was no significant relationship between HIV serostatus and the two major strain types SIT 52 (p =0.15and SIT 152 (p = 0.41. Conclusion Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the most prevalent species of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in Rwanda

  17. Oral Immunogenicity of Plant-Made Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT6 and CFP10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Uvarova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two lines of transgenic carrot plants producing Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins (ESAT6 and CFP10 have been constructed. The target proteins are present in carrot storage roots at a level not less than 0.056% of the total storage protein (TSP for ESAT6 and 0.002% of TSP for CFP10. As has been shown, oral immunization of mice induces both the cell-mediated and humoral immunities. These data suggest that the proteins in question are appropriate as a candidate edible vaccine against tuberculosis.

  18. Meropenem-clavulanic acid has high in vitro activity against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies Forsman, L; Giske, C G; Bruchfeld, J; Schön, T; Juréen, P; Ängeby, K

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the activity of meropenem-clavulanic acid (MEM-CLA) against 68 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. We included predominantly multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) isolates, since the activity of MEM-CLA for resistant isolates has previously not been studied extensively. Using Middlebrook 7H10 medium, all but four isolates showed an MIC distribution of 0.125 to 2 mg/liter for MEM-CLA, below the non-species-related breakpoint for MEM of 2 mg/liter defined by EUCAST. MEM-CLA is a potential treatment option for MDR/XDR-TB.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS17 Promotes the Death of Host Cell and Cytokines Secretion via Erk Kinase Accompanying with Enhanced Survival of Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tian; Zhao, Quanju; Li, Wu

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious threat to global public health, largely due to the successful manipulation of the host immunity by its etiological agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The PE_PGRS protein family of M. tuberculosis might be a contributing factor. To investigate the roles of PE_PGRS17, the gene of PE_PGRS 17 was expressed in nonpathogenic fast growing Mycobacterium smegmatis. We found that the recombinant strain survives better than the control in macrophage cultures, accompanied by more host cell death and a marked higher secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by a recombinant strain compared with control. Blocking the action of Erk kinase by an inhibitor can abolish the above effects. In brief, our data showed that PE_PGRS 17 might facilitate pathogen survival and disserve the host cell via remodeling the macrophages immune niche largely consisting of inflammatory cytokines. This furnishes a novel insight into the immune role of this mycobacterium unique gene family. PMID:23663047

  20. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in a slum area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Diversidade molecular de cepas de Mycobacterium tuberculosis em uma região de favela da cidade do Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joycenea Matsuda Mendes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective molecular study involving restriction fragment length polymorphism, using insertion sequence 6110 as a marker, was conducted in order to provide an initial insight into the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in the slums of the Complexo de Manguinhos, located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Of the 67 strains evaluated, 23 (34.3% were found to belong to clusters (total clusters, 10. Household and social chains of transmission were associated with clustering, in 20% and 60%, respectively. Living in the Conjunto Habitacional Programado 2 slum was associated with clustering. Although not significant, it is relevant that 26% of the clustered strains presented primary resistance. These findings, although possibly underestimating the prevalence due to the failure to analyze all strains, could help improve the local tuberculosis control program.Este estudo retrospectivo envolvendo polimorfismo de fragmento de restrição e utilizando como marcador a seqüência de inserção 6110, foi realizado para fornecer informações iniciais quanto à diversidade genética das cepas de Mycobacterium tuberculosis isoladas em favelas do Complexo de Manguinhos, na cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Das 67 cepas isoladas, 23 (34,3% foram agrupadas em clusters (total de clusters, 10. A transmissão entre comunicantes domiciliares e extra-domicialiares estave associada a 20% e 60% dos clusters, respectivamente. Ser morador do Conjunto Habitacional Programado 2 foi associado à presença de clusters. Embora não significativo, é relevante o fato de que 26% das cepas em cluster apresentaram resistência primária. Estes achados, embora possivelmente subestimados devido à impossibilidade de analisar todas as cepas, fornecem subsídios para a melhoria do programa local de controle da tuberculose.

  1. Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium Avium subsp. Avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvandar, Kaveh; Mayahi, Mansour; Mosavari, Nader; Pajoohi, Reza Aref

    2016-12-01

    Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds. Several mycobacterial species have been identified causing avian tuberculosis, and the organisms confirmed most frequently are Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium genavense. Any species of birds can be infected with M. avium. Generally, domesticated fowl or captive wild birds are affected more frequently than those living in the wild. M. avium can not only infect all species of birds, but can also infect some domesticated mammals to cause disease, usually with localized lesion. In immunocompetent individuals, M. avium complex isolates produce localized soft tissue infections, including chronic pulmonary infections in the elderly and cervical lymphadenitis in children, but rarely any disseminated disease. In patients infected with HIV and AIDS or in other immunocompromised individuals, M. avium complex isolates frequently cause severe systemic infections. The importance of avian tuberculosis and the risk of its zoonotic spread motivated our interest to determine the drug susceptibility testing of M. avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis. Based on their clinical signs, 80 pigeons suspected with avian tuberculosis were subjected to the study. Out of the 51 identified isolates, 20 M. avium subsp. avium were subjected to the test. Drug susceptibly testing was performed according to the guidelines by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and using proportional method. In the drug susceptibility testing, all isolates were resistant to streptomycin, kanamycin, ethionamide, and thiophene carboxylic acid hydrazide. Additionally, 3, 2, and 1 isolates were susceptible to isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol, respectively. To date, no study has documented the drug susceptibility testing of M. avium isolates from infected birds to avian tuberculosis. Pigeons are extensively kept in urban and rural areas for homing and racing

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipolytic enzymes as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Brust

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New diagnosis tests are urgently needed to address the global tuberculosis (TB burden and to improve control programs especially in resource-limited settings. An effective in vitro diagnostic of TB based on serological methods would be regarded as an attractive progress because immunoassays are simple, rapid, inexpensive, and may offer the possibility to detect cases missed by standard sputum smear microscopy. However, currently available serology tests for TB are highly variable in sensitivity and specificity. Lipolytic enzymes have recently emerged as key factors in lipid metabolization during dormancy and/or exit of the non-replicating growth phase, a prerequisite step of TB reactivation. The focus of this study was to analyze and compare the potential of four Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipolytic enzymes (LipY, Rv0183, Rv1984c and Rv3452 as new markers in the serodiagnosis of active TB. METHODS: Recombinant proteins were produced and used in optimized ELISA aimed to detect IgG and IgM serum antibodies against the four lipolytic enzymes. The capacity of the assays to identify infection was evaluated in patients with either active TB or latent TB and compared with two distinct control groups consisting of BCG-vaccinated blood donors and hospitalized non-TB individuals. RESULTS: A robust humoral response was detected in patients with active TB whereas antibodies against lipolytic enzymes were infrequently detected in either uninfected groups or in subjects with latent infection. High specifity levels, ranging from 93.9% to 97.5%, were obtained for all four antigens with sensitivity values ranging from 73.4% to 90.5%, with Rv3452 displaying the highest performances. Patients with active TB usually exhibited strong IgG responses but poor IgM responses. CONCLUSION: These results clearly indicate that the lipolytic enzymes tested are strongly immunogenic allowing to distinguish active from latent TB infections. They appear as potent

  3. Genomic diversity of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Lisbon Portugal: Towards tuberculosis genomic epidemiology

    KAUST Repository

    Perdigão, João

    2015-03-01

    Multidrug- (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) present a challenge to disease control and elimination goals. Lisbon, Portugal, has a high TB incidence rate and unusual and successful XDR-TB strains that have been found in circulation for almost two decades. For the last 20. years, a continued circulation of two phylogenetic clades, Lisboa3 and Q1, which are highly associated with MDR and XDR, have been observed. In recent years, these strains have been well characterized regarding the molecular basis of drug resistance and have been inclusively subjected to whole genome sequencing (WGS). Researchers have been studying the genomic diversity of strains circulating in Lisbon and its genomic determinants through cutting-edge next generation sequencing. An enormous amount of whole genome sequence data are now available for the most prevalent and clinically relevant strains circulating in Lisbon.It is the persistence, prevalence and rapid evolution towards drug resistance that has prompted researchers to investigate the properties of these strains at the genomic level and in the future at a global transcriptomic level. Seventy Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates, mostly recovered in Lisbon, were genotyped by 24-. loci Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit - Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and the genomes sequenced using a next generation sequencing platform - Illumina HiSeq 2000.The genotyping data revealed three major clusters associated with MDR-TB (Lisboa3-A, Lisboa3-B and Q1), two of which are associated with XDR-TB (Lisboa3-B and Q1), whilst the genomic data contributed to elucidating the phylogenetic positioning of circulating MDR-TB strains, showing a high predominance of a single SNP cluster group 5. Furthermore, a genome-wide phylogeny analysis from these strains, together with 19 publicly available genomes of MTB clinical isolates, revealed two major clades responsible for MDR/XDR-TB in the region: Lisboa3 and Q

  4. Rv2607 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase with unusual substrate specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellene H Mashalidis

    Full Text Available Despite intensive effort, the majority of the annotated Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome consists of genes encoding proteins of unknown or poorly understood function. For example, there are seven conserved hypothetical proteins annotated as homologs of pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase (PNPOx, an enzyme that oxidizes pyridoxine 5'-phosphate (PNP or pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP to form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP. We have characterized the function of Rv2607 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and shown that it encodes a PNPOx that oxidizes PNP to PLP. The k(cat and K(M for this reaction were 0.01 s(-1 and 360 µM, respectively. Unlike many PNPOx enzymes, Rv2607 does not recognize PMP as a substrate.

  5. Parallel reaction monitoring of clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages reveals pre-existent markers of rifampicin tolerance in the emerging Beijing lineage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, J. de; Mulder, A.; Ru, A.H. de; Soolingen, D. van; Veelen, P.A. van

    2017-01-01

    The spread of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the major challenges in tuberculosis control. In Eurasia, the spread of multidrug resistant tuberculosis is driven by the M. tuberculosis Beijing genotype. In this study, we examined whether selective advantages are present in th

  6. Parallel reaction monitoring of clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages reveals pre-existent markers of rifampicin tolerance in the emerging Beijing lineage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, J. de; Mulder, A.; Ru, A.H. de; Soolingen, D. van; Veelen, P.A. van

    2017-01-01

    The spread of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the major challenges in tuberculosis control. In Eurasia, the spread of multidrug resistant tuberculosis is driven by the M. tuberculosis Beijing genotype. In this study, we examined whether selective advantages are present in

  7. Growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a Defined Medium Is Very Restricted by Acid pH and Mg2+ Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Piddington, Debra L.; Kashkouli, Ali; Buchmeier, Nancy A.

    2000-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis grows within the phagocytic vacuoles of macrophages, where it encounters a moderately acidic and possibly nutrient-restricted environment. Other mycobacterial species encounter acidic conditions in soil and aquatic environments. We have evaluated the influence of pH and divalent cation levels on the growth of M. tuberculosis and seven other mycobacterial species. In a defined medium, the growth of M. tuberculosis was very restricted by acidic pH. Higher levels of Mg...

  8. Drug-Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Genotype Does Not Develop Mutation-Conferred Resistance to Rifampin at an Elevated Rate

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype has drawn attention because it is often strongly associated with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). A possible reason is that the Beijing strains may have an enhanced capacity to develop drug resistance. In this study, we used the Luria-Delbrück fluctuation test to investigate whether strains of Beijing and non-Beijing genotypes exhibit differences in the acquisition of drug resistance. The M. tuberculosis reference strain H37Rv and 12 f...

  9. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in New World Monkeys in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Marieke; Mendoza, Patricia; Ghersi, Bruno M; Wilbur, Alicia K; Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Cavero Yong, Nancy; Kasper, Matthew R; Montano, Silvia; Zunt, Joseph R; Jones-Engel, Lisa

    2015-06-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex causes tuberculosis in humans and nonhuman primates and is a global public health concern. Standard diagnostics rely upon host immune responses to detect infection in nonhuman primates and lack sensitivity and specificity across the spectrum of mycobacterial infection in these species. We have previously shown that the Oral Swab PCR (OSP) assay, a direct pathogen detection method, can identify the presence of M. tuberculosis complex in laboratory and free-ranging Old World monkeys. Addressing the current limitations in tuberculosis diagnostics in primates, including sample acquisition and pathogen detection, this paper furthers our understanding of the presence of the tuberculosis-causing bacteria among New World monkeys in close contact with humans. Here we use the minimally invasive OSP assay, which includes buccal swab collection followed by amplification of the IS6110 repetitive nucleic acid sequence specific to M. tuberculosis complex subspecies, to detect the bacteria in the mouths of Peruvian New World monkeys. A total of 220 buccal swabs from 16 species were obtained and positive amplification of the IS6110 sequence was observed in 30 (13.6%) of the samples. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of M. tuberculosis complex DNA in a diverse sample of Peruvian Neotropical primates.

  10. CsoR Is Essential for Maintaining Copper Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sarah A; Sidiropoulos, Sarah W; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a pathogen infecting one third of the world population, faces numerous challenges within the host, including high levels of copper. We have previously shown that M. tuberculosis CsoR is a copper inducible transcriptional regulator. Here we examined the hypothesis that csoR is necessary for maintaining copper homeostasis and surviving under various stress conditions. With an unmarked csoR knockout strain, we were able to characterize the role of csoR in M. tuberculosis as it faced copper and host stress. Growth under high levels of copper demonstrated that M. tuberculosis survives copper stress significantly better in the absence of csoR. Yet under minimal levels of copper, differential expression analysis revealed that the loss of csoR results in a cell wide hypoxia-type stress response with the induction of the DosR regulon. Despite the stress placed on M. tuberculosis by the loss of csoR, survival of the knockout strain was increased compared to wild type during the early chronic stages of mouse infection, suggesting that csoR could play an active role in modulating M. tuberculosis fitness within the host. Overall, analysis of CsoR provided an increased understanding of the M. tuberculosis copper response with implications for other intracellular pathogens harboring CsoR.

  11. M2 macrophages or IL-33 treatment attenuate ongoing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeros, A. R.; Campos, L. W.; Fonseca, D. M.; Bertolini, T. B.; Gembre, A. F.; Prado, R. Q.; Alves-Filho, J. C.; Ramos, S. G.; Russo, M.; Bonato, V. L. D.

    2017-01-01

    The protective effects of mycobacterial infections on lung allergy are well documented. However, the inverse relationship between tuberculosis and type 2 immunity is still elusive. Although type 1 immunity is essential to protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis it might be also detrimental to the host due to the induction of extensive tissue damage. Here, we determined whether lung type 2 immunity induced by allergen sensitization and challenge could affect the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. We used two different protocols in which sensitization and allergen challenge were performed before or after M. tuberculosis infection. We found an increased resistance to M. tuberculosis only when allergen exposure was given after, but not before infection. Infected mice exposed to allergen exhibited lower bacterial load and cellular infiltrates in the lungs. Enhanced resistance to infection after allergen challenge was associated with increased gene expression of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) and IL-33 levels. Accordingly, either adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages or systemic IL-33 treatment was effective in attenuating M. tuberculosis infection. Notably, the enhanced resistance induced by allergen exposure was dependent on IL-33 receptor ST2. Our work indicates that IL-33 might be an alternative therapeutic treatment for severe tuberculosis. PMID:28128217

  12. Low rate of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boogaard, Jossy; Semvua, Hadija H; van Ingen, Jakko; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; van der Laan, Tridia; van Soolingen, Dick; Kibiki, Gibson S; Boeree, Martin J; Aarnoutse, Rob E

    2011-08-01

    Fluoroquinolones are used in second-line treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and have a potential role in shortening TB treatment duration. The wide use of fluoroquinolones in the treatment of other infections, including respiratory tract infections in patients with (undiagnosed) active TB, could result in fluoroquinolone-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the rate of fluoroquinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis isolates obtained from Tanzanian patients and linked this to previous fluoroquinolone exposure and mycobacterial resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid. A total of 291 M. tuberculosis isolates were obtained between April 2009 and June 2010 from patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB and tested for susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifampicin and isoniazid. Information on previous fluoroquinolone use was obtained by interviewing patients and checking their medical files. Only 2 (0.7%) of the 291 M. tuberculosis isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin; 1 of which was intermediately resistant to moxifloxacin as well. These two isolates were susceptible to rifampicin and isoniazid. Twenty-two (8%) of the 291 patients had a history of fluoroquinolone use (median: 7 days; interquartile range: 5-10 days). The patients from whom the fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates were obtained had no known history of previous fluoroquinolone use. Our findings indicate that the rate of fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis in Tanzanian patients with TB is low and not related to previous, brief episodes of exposure to fluoroquinolones. The findings favour future application of fluoroquinolones in TB treatment regimens of shorter duration.

  13. CsoR Is Essential for Maintaining Copper Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Marcus

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a pathogen infecting one third of the world population, faces numerous challenges within the host, including high levels of copper. We have previously shown that M. tuberculosis CsoR is a copper inducible transcriptional regulator. Here we examined the hypothesis that csoR is necessary for maintaining copper homeostasis and surviving under various stress conditions. With an unmarked csoR knockout strain, we were able to characterize the role of csoR in M. tuberculosis as it faced copper and host stress. Growth under high levels of copper demonstrated that M. tuberculosis survives copper stress significantly better in the absence of csoR. Yet under minimal levels of copper, differential expression analysis revealed that the loss of csoR results in a cell wide hypoxia-type stress response with the induction of the DosR regulon. Despite the stress placed on M. tuberculosis by the loss of csoR, survival of the knockout strain was increased compared to wild type during the early chronic stages of mouse infection, suggesting that csoR could play an active role in modulating M. tuberculosis fitness within the host. Overall, analysis of CsoR provided an increased understanding of the M. tuberculosis copper response with implications for other intracellular pathogens harboring CsoR.

  14. Clinical Concentrations of Thioridazine Kill Intracellular Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Diane; Viveiros, Miguel; Leandro, Clara; Bettencourt, Rosário; Almeida, Josefina; Martins, Marta; Kristiansen, Jette E.; Molnar, Joseph; Amaral, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    The phenothiazines chlorpromazine (CPZ) and thioridazine (TZ) have equal in vitro activities against antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These compounds have not been used as anti-M. tuberculosis agents because their in vitro activities take place at concentrations which are beyond those that are clinically achievable. In addition, chronic administration of CPZ produces frequent severe side effects. Because CPZ has been shown to enhance the killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis at concentrations in the medium that are clinically relevant, we have investigated whether TZ, a phenothiazine whose negative side effects are less frequent and serious than those associated with CPZ, kills M. tuberculosis organisms that have been phagocytosed by human macrophages, which have nominal killing activities against these bacteria. Both CPZ and TZ killed intracellular antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant M. tuberculosis organisms when they were used at concentrations in the medium well below those present in the plasma of patients treated with these agents. These concentrations in vitro were not toxic to the macrophage, nor did they affect in vitro cellular immune processes. TZ thus appears to be a serious candidate for the management of a freshly diagnosed infection of pulmonary tuberculosis or as an adjunct to conventional antituberculosis therapy if the patient originates from an area known to have a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates. Nevertheless, we must await the outcomes of clinical trials to determine whether TZ itself may be safely and effectively used as an antituberculosis agent. PMID:12604522

  15. Predominance of modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and active transmission of Beijing sublineage in Jayapura, Indonesia Papua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaidir, Lidya; Sengstake, Sarah; de Beer, Jessica; Oktavian, Antonius; Krismawati, Hana; Muhapril, Erfin; Kusumadewi, Inri; Annisa, Jessi; Anthony, Richard; van Soolingen, Dick; Achmad, Tri Hanggono; Marzuki, Sangkot; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotype distribution is different between West and Central Indonesia, but there are no data on the most Eastern part, Papua. We aimed to identify the predominant genotypes of M. tuberculosis responsible for tuberculosis in coastal Papua, their transmission, and the association with patient characteristics. A total of 199 M. tuberculosis isolates were collected. Spoligotyping was applied to describe the population structure of M. tuberculosis, lineage identification was performed using a combination of lineage-specific markers, and genotypic clusters were identified using a combination of 24-locus-MIRU-VNTR and spoligotyping. A high degree of genetic diversity was observed among isolates based on their spoligopatterns. Strains from modern lineage 4 made up almost half of strains (46.9%), being more abundant than the ancient lineage 1 (33.7%), and modern lineage 2 (19.4%). Thirty-five percent of strains belonged to genotypic clusters, especially strains in the Beijing genotype. Previous TB treatment and mutations associated with drug resistance were more common in patients infected with strains of the Beijing genotype. Papua shows a different distribution of M. tuberculosis genotypes compared to other parts of Indonesia. Clustering and drug resistance of modern strains recently introduced to Papua may contribute to the high tuberculosis burden in this region.

  16. Small Molecule-directed Immunotherapy against Recurrent Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debapriya; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Maiga, Mamoudou; Maiga, Mariama; Van Kaer, Luc; Bishai, William R.; Das, Gobardhan

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains the biggest infectious threat to humanity with one-third of the population infected and 1.4 million deaths and 8.7 million new cases annually. Current tuberculosis therapy is lengthy and consists of multiple antimicrobials, which causes poor compliance and high treatment dropout, resulting in the development of drug-resistant variants of tuberculosis. Therefore, alternate methods to treat tuberculosis are urgently needed. Mycobacterium tuberculosis evades host immune responses by inducing T helper (Th)2 and regulatory T (Treg) cell responses, which diminish protective Th1 responses. Here, we show that animals (Stat-6−/−CD4-TGFβRIIDN mice) that are unable to generate both Th2 cells and Tregs are highly resistant to M. tuberculosis infection. Furthermore, simultaneous inhibition of these two subsets of Th cells by therapeutic compounds dramatically reduced bacterial burden in different organs. This treatment was associated with the generation of protective Th1 immune responses. As these therapeutic agents are not directed to the harbored organisms, they should avoid the risk of promoting the development of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis variants. PMID:24711459

  17. The Cell Wall Lipid PDIM Contributes to Phagosomal Escape and Host Cell Exit of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Jeff; Hughitt, V. Keith; Velikovsky, Carlos A.; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is composed of unique lipids that are important for pathogenesis. Indeed, the first-ever genetic screen in M. tuberculosis identified genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of the cell wall lipid PDIM (phthiocerol dimycocerosates) as crucial for the survival of M. tuberculosis in mice. Here we show evidence for a novel molecular mechanism of the PDIM-mediated virulence in M. tuberculosis. We characterized the DNA interaction and the regulon of Rv3167c, a transcriptional repressor that is involved in virulence regulation of M. tuberculosis, and discovered that it controls the PDIM operon. A loss-of-function genetic approach showed that PDIM levels directly correlate with the capacity of M. tuberculosis to escape the phagosome and induce host cell necrosis and macroautophagy. In conclusion, our study attributes a novel role of the cell wall lipid PDIM in intracellular host cell modulation, which is important for host cell exit and dissemination of M. tuberculosis. PMID:28270579

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among persons who inject drugs in San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, R F; Collins, K M; Strathdee, S A; Bulterys, M A; Munoz, F; Cuevas-Mota, J; Chiles, P; Garfein, R S

    2017-04-01

    Persons who inject drugs (PWID) might be at increased risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and reactivation of latent tuberculous infection (LTBI) due to their injection drug use. To determine prevalence and correlates of M. tuberculosis infection among PWID in San Diego, California, USA. PWID aged 18 years underwent standardized interviews and serologic testing using an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) for LTBI and rapid point-of-care assays for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. Independent correlates of M. tuberculosis infection were identified using multivariable log-binomial regression. A total of 500 participants met the eligibility criteria. The mean age was 43.2 years (standard deviation 11.6); most subjects were White (52%) or Hispanic (30.8%), and male (75%). Overall, 86.7% reported having ever traveled to Mexico. Prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection was 23.6%; 0.8% were co-infected with HIV and 81.7% were co-infected with HCV. Almost all participants (95%) had been previously tested for M. tuberculosis; 7.6% had been previously told they were infected. M. tuberculosis infection was independently associated with being Hispanic, having longer injection histories, testing HCV-positive, and correctly reporting that people with 'sleeping' TB cannot infect others. Strategies are needed to increase awareness about and treatment for M. tuberculosis infection among PWID in the US/Mexico border region.

  19. Validation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis dihydroneopterin aldolase as a molecular target for anti-tuberculosis drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, V C A; Villela, A D; Rodrigues-Junior, V S; Pissinate, K; Eichler, P; Pinto, A F M; Basso, L A; Santos, D S; Bizarro, C V

    2017-04-15

    An early step of target validation in antimicrobial drug discovery is to prove that a gene coding for a putative target is essential for pathogen's viability. However, little attention has been paid to demonstrate the causal links between gene essentiality and a particular protein function that will be the focus of a drug discovery effort. This should be considered an important step in target validation since a growing number of proteins are found to exhibit multiple and unrelated tasks. Here, we show that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) folB gene is essential and that this essentiality depends on the dihydroneopterin aldolase/epimerase activities of its protein product, the FolB protein from the folate biosynthesis pathway. The wild-type (WT) MtFolB and point mutants K99A and Y54F were cloned, expressed, purified and monitored for the aldolase, epimerase and oxygenase activities using HPLC. In contrast to the WT MtFolB, both mutants have neither aldolase nor epimerase activities in the conditions assayed. We then performed gene knockout experiments and showed that folB gene is essential for Mtb survival under the conditions tested. Moreover, only the WT folB sequence could be used as a rescue copy in gene complementation studies. When the sequences of mutants K99A or Y54F were used for complementation, no viable colonies were obtained, indicating that aldolase and/or epimerase activities are crucial for Mtb survival. These results provide a solid basis for further work aiming to develop new anti-TB agents acting as inhibitors of the aldolase/epimerase activities of MtFolB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High-contrast imaging of mycobacterium tuberculosis using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Ram; Lee, Eungjang; Park, Seung-Han

    2015-07-01

    Nonlinear optical microcopy has become an important tool in investigating biomaterials due to its various advantages such as label-free imaging capabilities. In particular, it has been shown that third-harmonic generation (THG) signals can be produced at interfaces between an aqueous medium (e.g. cytoplasm, interstitial fluid) and a mineralized lipidic surface. In this work, we have demonstrated that label-free high-contrast THG images of the mycobacterium tuberculosis can be obtained using THG microscopy.

  1. Anthelmintic Avermectins Kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Including Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Leah E.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Ng, Carol; Jacobs, William R.; Ramón-García, Santiago; Thompson, Charles J

    2013-01-01

    Avermectins are a family of macrolides known for their anthelmintic activities and traditionally believed to be inactive against all bacteria. Here we report that members of the family, ivermectin, selamectin, and moxidectin, are bactericidal against mycobacterial species, including multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Avermectins are approved for clinical and veterinary uses and have documented pharmacokinetic and safety profiles....

  2. Molecular Characteristics of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis LAM-RUS Family Prevalent in Central Russia▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiley, Svetlana; Kirillov, Eugene; Ignatova, Anna; Stepanshina, Valentina; Shemyakin, Igor

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed IS6110-associated polymorphisms in the phospholipase C genes of 107 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis selected to be representative of isolates circulating in central Russia. We found that the majority of Latin American-Mediterranean family strains contained an insertion in a unique position in the plcA gene, suggesting a common ancestor. This insertion can serve as a specific genetic marker for this group, which we designate the LAM-RUS family. PMID:17942651

  3. Molecular Characteristics of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis LAM-RUS Family Prevalent in Central Russia▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Dubiley, Svetlana; Kirillov, Eugene; Ignatova, Anna; Stepanshina, Valentina; Shemyakin, Igor

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed IS6110-associated polymorphisms in the phospholipase C genes of 107 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis selected to be representative of isolates circulating in central Russia. We found that the majority of Latin American-Mediterranean family strains contained an insertion in a unique position in the plcA gene, suggesting a common ancestor. This insertion can serve as a specific genetic marker for this group, which we designate the LAM-RUS family.

  4. Exploitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reporter Strains to Probe the Impact of Vaccination at Sites of Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Neelima Sukumar; Shumin Tan; Bree B Aldridge; Russell, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains a major public health problem, with an effective vaccine continuing to prove elusive. Progress in vaccination strategies has been hampered by a lack of appreciation of the bacterium's response to dynamic changes in the host immune environment. Here, we utilize reporter Mtb strains that respond to specific host immune stresses such as hypoxia and nitric oxide (hspX'::GFP), and phagosomal maturation (rv2390c'::GFP), to investigate vaccine-induced alterat...

  5. Paradoxical Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalk, Emma; Technau, Karl; Hendson, Willy; Coovadia, Ashraf

    2013-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome occurs in a subset of HIV-infected individuals as the immune system recovers secondary to antiretroviral therapy. An exaggerated and uncontrolled inflammatory response to antigens of viable or nonviable organisms is characteristic, with clinical deterioration despite improvement in laboratory indicators. We describe a fatal case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected child and review the literature.

  6. Detection of Rifampin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Double Gradient-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpellini, Paolo; Braglia, Sergio; Carrera, Paola; Cedri, Maura; Cichero, Paola; Colombo, Alessia; Crucianelli, Rosella; Gori, Andrea; Ferrari, Maurizio; Lazzarin, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    We applied double gradient-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DG-DGGE) for the rapid detection of rifampin (RMP) resistance from rpoB PCR products of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and clinical samples. The results of this method were fully concordant with those of DNA sequencing and susceptibility testing analyses. DG-DGGE is a valid alternative to the other methods of detecting mutations for predicting RMP resistance. PMID:10508043

  7. Polymorphisms in Isoniazid and Prothionamide Resistance Genes of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Projahn, M.

    2011-06-27

    Sequence analyses of 74 strains that encompassed major phylogenetic lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex revealed 10 polymorphisms in mshA (Rv0486) and four polymorphisms in inhA (Rv1484) that were not responsible for isoniazid or prothionamide resistance. Instead, some of these mutations were phylogenetically informative. This genetic diversity must be taken into consideration for drug development and for the design of molecular tests for drug resistance.

  8. Diterpenes Synthesized from the Natural Serrulatane Leubethanol and Their in Vitro Activities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Escarcena

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seventeen new derivatives of the natural diterpene leubethanol, including some potential pro-drugs, with changes in the functionality of the aliphatic chain or modifications of aromatic ring and the phenolic group, were synthesized and tested in vitro by the MABA technique for their activity against the H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Some compounds showed antimycobacterial selectivity indices higher than leubethanol.

  9. Hypoxia and classical activation limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival by Akt-dependent glycolytic shift in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Matta, S K; Kumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major antibacterial defense mechanism used by macrophages upon activation. Exposure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected macrophages to hypoxia is known to compromise the survival of the pathogen. Here we report that the hypoxia-induced control of intracellular Mtb load in RAW 264.7 macrophages was mediated by regulating the cellular ROS levels. We show that similar to classical activation, hypoxia incubation of macrophages resulted in decre...

  10. Meropenem-clavulanic acid shows activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Kathleen; Boshoff, Helena I M; Arora, Kriti; Weiner, Danielle; Dayao, Emmanuel; Schimel, Daniel; Via, Laura E; Barry, Clifton E

    2012-06-01

    The carbapenems imipenem and meropenem in combination with clavulanic acid reduced the bacterial burden in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages by 2 logs over 6 days. Despite poor stability in solution and a short half-life in rodents, treatment of chronically infected mice revealed significant reductions of bacterial burden in the lungs and spleens. Our results show that meropenem has activity in two in vivo systems, but stability and pharmacokinetics of long-term administration will offer significant challenges to clinical evaluation.

  11. pncA Mutations in Pyrazinamide-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Northwestern Russia

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-six pyrazinamide-resistant and eight pyrazinamide-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Russia were analyzed for their pncA mutations. Thirty-one (86.1%) of the resistant isolates had a mutation either in pncA or upstream of the gene. Twenty of the 23 different mutations found in this study had not been described earlier. pncA genotype correlated well with pyrazinamidase activity and BACTEC 460 susceptibility test results.

  12. Coinfección por Mycobacterium malmoense y Mycobacterium tuberculosis en paciente con el síndrome de inmunodeficiencia humana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian María Mederos Cuervo

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de coinfección por Mycobacterium malmoense y Mycobacterium tuberculosis en un paciente cubano con síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida (sida, que producía enfermedad respiratoria y hepática respectivamente. Los cultivos realizados a partir de las muestras de esputo demostraron la presencia de una cepa micobacteriana no pigmentada de crecimiento lento perteneciente al grupo III de Runyon e identificada como Mycobacterium malmoense. A partir de los cultivos del tejido hepático extraído laparoscópicamente se aisló una cepa posteriormente identificada como Mycobacterium tuberculosis. El estudio anatomopatológico confirmó el diagnóstico de tuberculosis, el paciente recibió tratamiento específico y evolucionó clínicamente bien. Se reporta un caso infrecuente de coinfección por Mycobacterium, el cual describe el primer reporte de tuberculosis hepática en una paciente con sida en Cuba.

  13. Acute and persistent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections depend on the thiol peroxidase TpX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Hu

    Full Text Available The macrophage is the natural niche of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In order to combat oxidative and nitrosative stresses and persist in macrophages successfully, M. tuberculosis is endowed with a very efficient antioxidant complex. Amongst these antioxidant enzymes, TpX is the only one in M. tuberculosis with sequence homology to thiol peroxidase. Previous reports have demonstrated that the M. tuberculosis TpX protein functions as a peroxidase in vitro. It is the dominant antioxidant which protects M. tuberculosis against oxidative and nitrosative stresses. The level of the protein increases in oxidative stress. To determine the roles of tpx gene in M. tuberculosis survival and virulence in vivo, we constructed an M. tuberculosis strain lacking the gene. The characteristics of the mutant were examined in an in vitro stationary phase model, in response to stresses; in murine bone marrow derived macrophages and in an acute and an immune resistant model of murine tuberculosis. The tpx mutant became sensitive to H(2O(2 and NO compared to the wild type strain. Enzymatic analysis using bacterial extracts from the WT and the tpx mutant demonstrated that the mutant contains reduced peroxidase activity. As a result of this, the mutant failed to grow and survive in macrophages. The growth deficiency in macrophages became more pronounced after interferon-gamma activation. In contrast, its growth was significantly restored in the macrophages of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS or NOS2 knockout mice. Moreover, the tpx mutant was impaired in its ability to initiate an acute infection and to maintain a persistent infection. Its virulence was attenuated. Our results demonstrated that tpx is required for M. tuberculosis to deal with oxidative and nitrosative stresses, to survive in macrophages and to establish acute and persistent infections in animal tuberculosis models.

  14. Detection of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Cattle: Possible Public Health Relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Sharma, Mandeep; Katoch, Vipin C.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infect both animals and humans. The disease epidemiology by these agents differs in developed and developing countries due to the differences in the implementation of the prevention and control strategies. The present study describes the detection...... of M. bovis and M. tuberculosis from specimens of lungs and pulmonary lymph nodes of four cattle died in an organized herd of 183 cattle in the state of Himachal Pradesh, India, with inconclusive skin test results. Identification and distinction of these closely related mycobacterial species was done...

  15. PRODUCTION OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS TB10.4 RECOMBINANT PROTEIN IN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Dukhovlinov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays tuberculosis is considered one of the most dangerous infectious diseases occurring everywhere, and it remains a cause of death of millions of people around the world. According to the World Health Organization data, in 2013 tuberculosis caused more than 9 million cases worldwide and about 1.5 million of infected people died. The causative agent of tuberculosis in most cases is Mycobacterium tuberculosis. But sometimes it can be Mycobacterium bovis or Mycobacterium africanum. Mainly as a result of infection, a bacterial infection affects the lungs, but the disease may develop in other organs and tissues. Now for the prevention of tuberculosis vaccination of newborns with attenuated vaccine BCG is widely used. The production of this vaccine is cheap and it is safe to use. Thus today, vaccination is the primary means of prevention of tuberculosis. However dubious efficacy and a number of side effects observed after vaccination, makes the scientific community to develop new effective methods for the treatment of tuberculosis. One of the ways to develop new vaccines against tuberculosis is to provide a subunit vaccine based on recombinant proteins. Advantages of subunit vaccines are that the preparation containing the purified protein is stable and secure, its chemical properties are known, it does not contain additional proteins and nucleic acids, which could cause undesirable effects in the human body. One of the most promising antigens for use as components in new vaccines is considered a low molecular weight secreted protein TB10.4. TB10.4 protein is recognized at an early stage of tuberculous infection and contributes to the proliferation of lymphocytes responsible for the production of IFNγ. TB10.4 protein also possesses an adjuvant effect when administered in combination with mycobacterial proteins. Given these properties, the recombinant protein TB10.4 can be used to generate new candidate vaccines against tuberculosis. During the

  16. A Flow Cytometry Method for Rapidly Assessing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Responses to Antibiotics with Different Modes of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendon-Dunn, Charlotte Louise; Doris, Kathryn Sarah; Thomas, Stephen Richard; Allnutt, Jonathan Charles; Marriott, Alice Ann Neville; Hatch, Kim Alexandra; Watson, Robert James; Bottley, Graham; Marsh, Philip David; Taylor, Stephen Charles; Bacon, Joanna

    2016-07-01

    Current methods for assessing the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are lengthy and do not capture information about viable organisms that are not immediately culturable under standard laboratory conditions as a result of antibiotic exposure. We have developed a rapid dual-fluorescence flow cytometry method using markers for cell viability and death. We show that the fluorescent marker calcein violet with an acetoxy-methyl ester group (CV-AM) can differentiate between populations of M. tuberculosis growing at different rates, while Sytox green (SG) can differentiate between live and dead mycobacteria. M. tuberculosis was exposed to isoniazid or rifampin at different concentrations over time and either dual stained with CV-AM and SG and analyzed by flow cytometry or plated to determine the viability of the cells. Although similar trends in the loss of viability were observed when the results of flow cytometry and the plate counting methods were compared, there was a lack of correlation between these two approaches, as the flow cytometry analysis potentially captured information about cell populations that were unable to grow under standard conditions. The flow cytometry approach had an additional advantage in that it could provide insights into the mode of action of the drug: antibiotics targeting the cell wall gave a flow cytometry profile distinct from those inhibiting intracellular processes. This rapid drug susceptibility testing method could identify more effective antimycobacterials, provide information about their potential mode of action, and accelerate their progress to the clinic.

  17. Evolutionary Landscape of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex from the Viewpoint of PhoPR: Implications for Virulence Regulation and Application to Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broset, Esther

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Different members of the Mycobacterium genus have evolved to cause tuberculosis in diverse human populations and in a variety of animal species. Our cumulative knowledge of mycobacterial genomes indicates that mutations in the PhoPR two-component virulence system were acquired not only during the natural evolution of mycobacterial species but also during in vitro subculture, which has given rise to the attenuated reference strain H37Ra or to different daughter strains of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. PhoPR is a well-known regulator of pathogenic phenotypes, including secretion of the virulence factor ESAT-6, biosynthesis of acyltrehalose-based lipids, and modulation of antigen export, in members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Evolutionarily conserved polymorphisms in PhoPR from Mycobacterium africanum, M. bovis, or M. tuberculosis H37Ra result in loss of functional phenotypes. Interestingly, some members of the MTBC have acquired compensatory mutations to counteract these polymorphisms and, probably, to maintain their pathogenic potential. Some of these compensatory mutations include the insertion of the IS6110 element upstream from phoPR in a particular M. bovis strain that is able to transmit between humans or polymorphisms in M. africanum and M. bovis that affect the regulatory region of the espACD operon, allowing PhoPR-independent ESAT-6 secretion. This review highlights the increasing knowledge of the significance of PhoPR in the evolution of the MTBC and its potential application in the construction of new attenuated vaccines based on phoPR inactivation. In this context, the live attenuated vaccine MTBVAC, based on a phoP fadD26 deletion mutant of M. tuberculosis, is the first vaccine of this kind to successfully enter into clinical development, representing a historic milestone in the field of human vaccinology. PMID:26489860

  18. Detection and molecular characterization of 9,000-year-old Mycobacterium tuberculosis from a Neolithic settlement in the Eastern Mediterranean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Hershkovitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the principal etiologic agent of human tuberculosis. It has no environmental reservoir and is believed to have co-evolved with its host over millennia. This is supported by skeletal evidence of the disease in early humans, and inferred from M. tuberculosis genomic analysis. Direct examination of ancient human remains for M. tuberculosis biomarkers should aid our understanding of the nature of prehistoric tuberculosis and the host/pathogen relationship. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used conventional PCR to examine bone samples with typical tuberculosis lesions from a woman and infant, who were buried together in the now submerged site of Atlit-Yam in the Eastern Mediterranean, dating from 9,250-8,160 years ago. Rigorous precautions were taken to prevent contamination, and independent centers were used to confirm authenticity of findings. DNA from five M tuberculosis genetic loci was detected and had characteristics consistent with extant genetic lineages. High performance liquid chromatography was used as an independent method of verification and it directly detected mycolic acid lipid biomarkers, specific for the M. tuberculosis complex. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Human tuberculosis was confirmed by morphological and molecular methods in a population living in one of the first villages with evidence of agriculture and animal domestication. The widespread use of animals was not a source of infection but may have supported a denser human population that facilitated transmission of the tubercle bacillus. The similarity of the M. tuberculosis genetic signature with those of today gives support to the theory of a long-term co-existence of host and pathogen.

  19. Pentapeptide boronic acid inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MycP1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasinyuk, Mykhaylo S; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Wagner, Jonathan M; Evans, Timothy J; Reed, Robert W; Korotkov, Konstantin V; Watt, David S

    2014-08-01

    Mycosin protease-1 (MycP1) cleaves ESX secretion-associated protein B (EspB) that is a virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and accommodates an octapeptide, AVKAASLG, as a short peptide substrate. Because peptidoboronic acids are known inhibitors of serine proteases, the synthesis and binding of a boronic acid analog of the pentapeptide cleavage product, AVKAA, was studied using MycP1 variants from Mycobacterium thermoresistible (MycP1mth), Mycobacterium smegmatis (MycP1msm) and M. tuberculosis (MycP1mtu). We synthesized the boropentapeptide, HAlaValLysAlaAlaB(OH)2 (1) and the analogous pinanediol PD-protected HAlaValLysAlaAlaBO2(PD) (2) using an Fmoc/Boc peptide strategy. The pinanediol boropentapeptide 2 displayed IC50 values 121.6±25.3 μM for MycP1mth, 93.2±37.3 μM for MycP1msm and 37.9±5.2 μM for MycP1mtu. Such relatively strong binding creates a chance for crystalizing the complex with 2 and finding the structure of the unknown MycP1 catalytic site that would potentially facilitate the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a murine mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Marcela; Yang, Amy L; Lim, JaeHyun; Kolibab, Kristopher; Derrick, Steven; Cadieux, Nathalie; Perera, Liyanage P; Jacobs, William R; Brennan, Michael; Morris, Sheldon L

    2009-07-01

    The development and characterization of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has been impeded by the lack of reproducible and reliable in vitro assays for measuring vaccine activity. In this study, we developed a murine in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating TB vaccines that directly assesses the capacity of immune splenocytes to control the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within infected macrophages. Using this in vitro assay, protective immune responses induced by immunization with five different types of TB vaccine preparations (Mycobacterium bovis BCG, an attenuated M. tuberculosis mutant strain, a DNA vaccine, a modified vaccinia virus strain Ankara [MVA] construct expressing four TB antigens, and a TB fusion protein formulated in adjuvant) can be detected. Importantly, the levels of vaccine-induced mycobacterial growth-inhibitory responses seen in vitro after 1 week of coculture correlated with the protective immune responses detected in vivo at 28 days postchallenge in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. In addition, similar patterns of cytokine expression were evoked at day 7 of the in vitro culture by immune splenocytes taken from animals immunized with the different TB vaccines. Among the consistently upregulated cytokines detected in the immune cocultures are gamma interferon, growth differentiation factor 15, interleukin-21 (IL-21), IL-27, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Overall, we have developed an in vitro functional assay that may be useful for screening and comparing new TB vaccine preparations, investigating vaccine-induced protective mechanisms, and assessing manufacturing issues, including product potency and stability.

  1. Genetic diversity, transmission dynamics and drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, João; Clemente, Sofia; Ramos, Jorge; Masakidi, Pedro; Machado, Diana; Silva, Carla; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Taveira, Nuno; Portugal, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses a serious public health problem in Angola. No surveillance data on drug resistance is available and nothing is known regarding the genetic diversity and population structure of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Here, we have genotyped and evaluated drug susceptibility of 89 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Luanda. Thirty-three different spoligotype profiles corresponding to 24 different Shared International Types (SIT) and 9 orphan profiles were detected. SIT 20 (LAM1) was the most prevalent (n = 16, 18.2%) followed by SIT 42 (LAM9; n = 15, 17.1%). Overall, the M. tuberculosis population structure in this sample was dominated by LAM (64.8%) and T (33.0%) strains. Twenty-four-loci MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed that a total of 13 isolates were grouped in 5 distinct clusters. Drug susceptibility data showed that 22 (24.7%) of the 89 clinical isolates were resistant to one or more antibacillary drugs of which 4 (4.5%) were multidrug resistant. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a high predominance of LAM strains circulating in the Luanda setting and the presence of recent transmission events. The rate and the emergence dynamics of drug resistant TB found in this sample are significant and highlight the need of further studies specifically focused on MDR-TB transmission. PMID:28230095

  2. Whole Genome Sequencing Demonstrates Limited Transmission within Identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clusters in New South Wales, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Outhred, Alexander C.; Jelfs, Peter; McCallum, Nadine; Wang, Qinning; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Marais, Ben J.; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2016-01-01

    Australia has a low tuberculosis incidence rate with most cases occurring among recent immigrants. Given suboptimal cluster resolution achieved with 24-locus mycobacterium interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU-24) genotyping, the added value of whole genome sequencing was explored. MIRU-24 profiles of all Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture-confirmed tuberculosis cases diagnosed between 2009 and 2013 in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, were examined and clusters identified. The relatedness of cases within the largest MIRU-24 clusters was assessed using whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Of 1841 culture-confirmed TB cases, 91.9% (1692/1841) had complete demographic and genotyping data. East-African Indian (474; 28.0%) and Beijing (470; 27.8%) lineage strains predominated. The overall rate of MIRU-24 clustering was 20.1% (340/1692) and was highest among Beijing lineage strains (35.7%; 168/470). One Beijing and three East-African Indian (EAI) clonal complexes were responsible for the majority of observed clusters. Whole genome sequencing of the 4 largest clusters (30 isolates) demonstrated diverse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within identified clusters. All sequenced EAI strains and 70% of Beijing lineage strains clustered by MIRU-24 typing demonstrated distinct SNP profiles. The superior resolution provided by whole genome sequencing demonstrated limited M. tuberculosis transmission within NSW, even within identified MIRU-24 clusters. Routine whole genome sequencing could provide valuable public health guidance in low burden settings. PMID:27737005

  3. Infestation Of Endometrium By Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Bacilli-Cause Of Reproductive Failure

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    Rajib Gon Chowdhury , Suman Kalyan Paine, Basudev Bhattacharjee and Siddhartha Chatterjee

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Tuberculosis is known to be one of the major diseases, causing infertility in India. The prevalence of tuberculosis causing infertility is different in different countries. Established tubercle infection may cause irreversible infertility, on many occasions as it may affect all the reproductive organs. It also produces lower pregnancy rate in Assisted Reproductive Technology program as well. Tubercular bacillary infestation of the endometrium that is mere presence of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (MTB bacilli on the endometrial surface has been found to affect fertility as well. In this study, we have detected Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (MTB infestation of endometrium, causing implantation failure or early embryonic rejection. In many cases of unexplained infertility, tubercular bacilli infestation of endometrium, has come out to be the root cause of infertility. Association of tubercular bacillary infestation and endometriosis is another cause of concern. Recurrent abortions and ectopic pregnancy may be precipitated by the same genital pathology as well. The presence of very small number of bacilli, which escapes detection by AFB smear, culture or histology, may be detected by polymerase chain reaction techniques. These bacillary infections bring an inflammatory change in the endometrium and produces harmful cytokines which are responsible for implantation failure of micro abortion.

  4. Widespread Environmental Contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Revealed by a Molecular Detection Protocol.

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    Santos, Nuno; Santos, Catarina; Valente, Teresa; Gortázar, Christian; Almeida, Virgílio; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) has been considered crucial for bovine tuberculosis persistence in multi-host-pathogen systems. However, MTC contamination has been difficult to detect due to methodological issues. In an attempt to overcome this limitation we developed an improved protocol for the detection of MTC DNA. MTC DNA concentration was estimated by the Most Probable Number (MPN) method. Making use of this protocol we showed that MTC contamination is widespread in different types of environmental samples from the Iberian Peninsula, which supports indirect transmission as a contributing mechanism for the maintenance of bovine tuberculosis in this multi-host-pathogen system. The proportion of MTC DNA positive samples was higher in the bovine tuberculosis-infected than in presumed negative area (0.32 and 0.18, respectively). Detection varied with the type of environmental sample and was more frequent in sediment from dams and less frequent in water also from dams (0.22 and 0.05, respectively). The proportion of MTC-positive samples was significantly higher in spring (p<0.001), but MTC DNA concentration per sample was higher in autumn and lower in summer. The average MTC DNA concentration in positive samples was 0.82 MPN/g (CI95 0.70-0.98 MPN/g). We were further able to amplify a DNA sequence specific of Mycobacterium bovis/caprae in 4 environmental samples from the bTB-infected area.

  5. Relationship Between HIV Coinfection, Interleukin 10 Production, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Lymph Node Granulomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Collin R.; O'Hern, Jennifer; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.; Allie, Nafiesa; Papier, Patricia; Meintjes, Graeme; Coussens, Anna K.; Wainwright, Helen; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)–infected persons are more susceptible to tuberculosis than HIV–uninfected persons. Low peripheral CD4+ T-cell count is not the sole cause of higher susceptibility, because HIV–infected persons with a high peripheral CD4+ T-cell count and those prescribed successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain more prone to active tuberculosis than HIV–uninfected persons. We hypothesized that the increase in susceptibility is caused by the ability of HIV to manipulate Mycobacterium tuberculosis–associated granulomas. Methods. We examined 71 excised cervical lymph nodes (LNs) from persons with HIV and M. tuberculosis coinfection, those with HIV monoinfection, and those with M. tuberculosis monoinfection with a spectrum of peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and ART statuses. We quantified differences in M. tuberculosis levels, HIV p24 levels, cellular response, and cytokine presence within granulomas. Results. HIV increased M. tuberculosis numbers and reduced CD4+ T-cell counts within granulomas. Peripheral CD4+ T-cell depletion correlated with granulomas that contained fewer CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, less interferon γ, more neutrophils, more interleukin 10 (IL-10), and increased M. tuberculosis numbers. M. tuberculosis numbers correlated positively with IL-10 and interferon α levels and fewer CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. ART reduced IL-10 production. Conclusions. Peripheral CD4+ T-cell depletion correlated with increased M. tuberculosis presence, increased IL-10 production, and other phenotypic changes within granulomas, demonstrating the HIV infection progressively changes these granulomas. PMID:27462092

  6. PPE Surface Proteins Are Required for Heme Utilization by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Avishek; Speer, Alexander; Lin, Kan; Ehrt, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron is essential for replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but iron is efficiently sequestered in the human host during infection. Heme constitutes the largest iron reservoir in the human body and is utilized by many bacterial pathogens as an iron source. While heme acquisition is well studied in other bacterial pathogens, little is known in M. tuberculosis. To identify proteins involved in heme utilization by M. tuberculosis, a transposon mutant library was screened for resistance to the toxic heme analog gallium(III)-porphyrin (Ga-PIX). Inactivation of the ppe36, ppe62, and rv0265c genes resulted in resistance to Ga-PIX. Growth experiments using isogenic M. tuberculosis deletion mutants showed that PPE36 is essential for heme utilization by M. tuberculosis, while the functions of PPE62 and Rv0265c are partially redundant. None of the genes restored growth of the heterologous M. tuberculosis mutants, indicating that the proteins encoded by the genes have separate functions. PPE36, PPE62, and Rv0265c bind heme as shown by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and are associated with membranes. Both PPE36 and PPE62 proteins are cell surface accessible, while the Rv0265c protein is probably located in the periplasm. PPE36 and PPE62 are, to our knowledge, the first proline-proline-glutamate (PPE) proteins of M. tuberculosis that bind small molecules and are involved in nutrient acquisition. The absence of a virulence defect of the ppe36 deletion mutant indicates that the different iron acquisition pathways of M. tuberculosis may substitute for each other during growth and persistence in mice. The emerging model of heme utilization by M. tuberculosis as derived from this study is substantially different from those of other bacteria. PMID:28119467

  7. Association between passive smoking and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children with household TB contact

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    Novaily Zuliartha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Tuberculosis (TB and cigarette consumption are relatively high in Indonesia. Passive smoking may increase the risk of infection and disease in adults and children exposed to TB. An association between passive smoking and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children has not been well documented. Objective To assess for an association between passive smoking and M. tuberculosis infection in children who had household contact with a TB patient. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in February and March 2011. Children aged 5 to 18 years who had household contact with a TB patient underwent tuberculin testing for M. tuberculosis infection. Subjects were divided into two groups: those exposed to passive smoke and those not exposed to passive smoke. Chi-square test was used to assess for an association between passive smoking and M. tuberculosis infection. Results There were 140 children enrolled in this study, with 70 exposed to passive smoke and 70 not exposed to passive smoke. Prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection was significantly higher in the passive smoking group than in those not exposed to passive smoke [81.4% and 52.9%, respectively, (P= 0.0001]. In the passive smoking group there were significant associations between nutritional state, paternal and maternal education, and M. tuberculosis infection. But no associations were found between M. tuberculosis infection and familial income or BCG vaccination. Conclusion Among children who had household contact with a TB patient, they who exposed to passive smoke are more likely to have M. tuberculosis infection compared to they who not exposed to passive smoke.

  8. Association between passive smoking and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children with household TB contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaily Zuliartha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Tuberculosis (TB and cigarette consumption are relatively high in Indonesia. Passive smoking may increase the risk of infection and disease in adults and children exposed to TB. An association between passive smoking and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children has not been well documented. Objective To assess for an association between passive smoking and M. tuberculosis infection in children who had household contact with a TB patient. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in February and March 2011. Children aged 5 to 18 years who had household contact with a TB patient underwent tuberculin testing for M. tuberculosis infection. Subjects were divided into two groups: those exposed to passive smoke and those not exposed to passive smoke. Chi-square test was used to assess for an association between passive smoking and M. tuberculosis infection. Results There were 140 children enrolled in this study, with 70 exposed to passive smoke and 70 not exposed to passive smoke. Prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection was significantly higher in the passive smoking group than in those not exposed to passive smoke [81.4% and 52.9%, respectively, (P= 0.0001]. In the passive smoking group there were significant associations between nutritional state, paternal and maternal education, and M. tuberculosis infection. But no associations were found between M. tuberculosis infection and familial income or BCG vaccination. Conclusion Among children who had household contact with a TB patient, they who exposed to passive smoke are more likely to have M. tuberculosis infection compared to they who not exposed to passive smoke. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:29-34.].

  9. The conserved Lysine69 residue plays a catalytic role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase

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    Rodrigues Valnês

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shikimate pathway is an attractive target for the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, but absent in humans. M. tuberculosis aroE-encoded shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the forth reaction in the shikimate pathway. Structural and functional studies indicate that Lysine69 may be involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding in M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Investigation of the kinetic properties of mutant enzymes can bring important insights about the role of amino acid residues for M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Findings We have performed site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetics, equilibrium binding measurements and molecular modeling for both the wild-type M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase and the K69A mutant enzymes. The apparent steady-state kinetic parameters for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase were determined; the catalytic constant value for the wild-type enzyme (50 s-1 is 68-fold larger than that for the mutant K69A (0.73 s-1. There was a modest increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for DHS (K69A = 76 μM; wild-type = 29 μM and NADPH (K69A = 30 μM; wild-type = 11 μM. The equilibrium dissociation constants for wild-type and K69A mutant enzymes are 32 (± 4 μM and 134 (± 21, respectively. Conclusion Our results show that the residue Lysine69 plays a catalytic role and is not involved in substrate binding for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. These efforts on M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase catalytic mechanism determination should help the rational design of specific inhibitors, aiming at the development of antitubercular drugs.

  10. Skin biopsy: a pillar in the identification of cutaneous Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Solis, Alejandro; Herrera González, Norma Estela; Cazarez, Fernando; Mercadillo Pérez, Patricia; Olivera Diaz, Hiram Olivera; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Cortés Ortíz, Ileana; González González, Heleodora; Reding-Bernal, Arturo; Sabido, Raúl Cícero

    2012-08-21

    The present study aimed to establish the frequency and clinical characteristics of cutaneous tuberculosis among Mexican adult patients. Ninety-five patients with clinically compatible lesions to cutaneous tuberculosis participated in the study. All patients were HIV negative and none of them had previous anti-TB treatment. A skin biopsy was taken from every patient suspected of having tuberculosis, and a histopathologic examination was performed as follows: Ziehl-Neelsen staining; culturing of mycobacteria by Löwenstein-Jensen (L-J) medium; Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube detection via BACTEC (MGIT-360); and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the sequence of insertion IS6110 for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Tuberculosis was confirmed in 65 out of 95 cases (68.4%). Identified lesions were scrofuloderma (42 cases, 64.6%); lupus vulgaris (12 cases, 18.4%); warty tuberculosis (six cases, 9.2%); and papulonecrotic tuberculoid (five cases; 7.7%). The Ziehl-Neelsen staining was positive for acid fast bacilli in nine cases (13.8%) and 48 patients were positive for the PCR amplification (73.8%). All skin biopsies resulted positive for tuberculosis. A positive clinical response to the specific treatment was considered a confirmation for tuberculosis. The noninfectious etiology corresponded to 30 cases (31.6%). Tuberculosis in developing countries is still an important cause of skin lesions which must be studied via histopathological examination and culture due to their low bacillary load. A PCR test is necessary to obtain faster confirmation of the disease and to establish an early, specific and effective treatment.

  11. Capsular glucan and intracellular glycogen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: biosynthesis and impact on the persistence in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sambou, Tounkang; Dinadayala, Premkumar; Stadthagen, Gustavo;

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacterial species produce large amounts of a glycogen-like alpha-glucan that represents the major polysaccharide of their outermost capsular layer. To determine the role of the surface-exposed glucan in the physiology and virulence...... of these bacteria, orthologues of the glg genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycogen in Escherichia coli were identified in M. tuberculosis H37Rv and inactivated by allelic replacement. Biochemical analyses of the mutants and complemented strains indicated that the synthesis of glucan and glycogen involves...... the alpha-1,4-glucosyltransferases Rv3032 and GlgA (Rv1212c), the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase GlgC (Rv1213) and the branching enzyme GlgB (Rv1326c). Disruption of glgC reduced by half the glucan and glycogen contents of M. tuberculosis, whereas the inactivation of glgA and Rv3032 affected the production...

  12. Comparison of screening procedures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among patients with inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soborg, Bolette; Ruhwald, Morten; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test if Mycobacterium tuberculosis screening results differ among patients with inflammatory disease depending on whether the QuantiFeron TB-Gold test (QFT) or tuberculin skin test (TST) is used; and to evaluate if a possible difference is influenced by the presence of risk factors...... or immunosuppression. METHODS: The interferon-gamma response to in vitro stimulation of M. tuberculosis-specific antigens was measured with QFT and results were compared with TST. Associations to bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination, risk factors, and immunosuppression were analyzed for both tests. RESULTS: QFT...... and TST results were available for 294/302 and 241/302 patients, respectively; 234 had results from both tests. Twenty-one (7%) tested positive with QFT and 45 (19%) with TST. A positive QFT was associated with risk factors for M. tuberculosis infection: i.e., birth or upbringing in a TB-endemic area...

  13. Delayed bactericidal response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to bedaquiline involves remodelling of bacterial metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koul, A.; Vranckx, L.; Dhar, N.;

    2014-01-01

    microfluidic devices and time-lapse microscopy of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we confirm the absence of significant bacteriolytic activity during the first 3-4 days of exposure to BDQ. BDQ-induced inhibition of ATP synthesis leads to bacteriostasis within hours after drug addition. Transcriptional......Bedaquiline (BDQ), an ATP synthase inhibitor, is the first drug to be approved for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in decades. Though BDQ has shown excellent efficacy in clinical trials, its early bactericidal activity during the first week of chemotherapy is minimal. Here, using...... and proteomic analyses reveal that M. tuberculosis responds to BDQ by induction of the dormancy regulon and activation of ATP-generating pathways, thereby maintaining bacterial viability during initial drug exposure. BDQ-induced bacterial killing is significantly enhanced when the mycobacteria are grown on non...

  14. Conditional silencing of topoisomerase I gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis validates its essentiality for cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Karthik, Pullela V D N B; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-04-01

    Topoisomerases are an important class of enzymes for regulating the DNA transaction processes. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is one of the most formidable pathogens also posing serious challenges for therapeutic interventions. The organism contains only one type IA topoisomerase (Rv3646c), offering an opportunity to test its potential as a candidate drug target. To validate the essentiality of M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I (TopoI(Mt) ) for bacterial growth and survival, we have generated a conditionally regulated strain of topoI in Mtb. The conditional knockdown mutant exhibited delayed growth on agar plate. In liquid culture, the growth was drastically impaired when TopoI expression was suppressed. Additionally, novobiocin and isoniazid showed enhanced inhibitory potential against the conditional mutant. Analysis of the nucleoid revealed its altered architecture upon TopoI depletion. These studies establish the essentiality of TopoI for the M. tuberculosis growth and open up new avenues for targeting the enzyme.

  15. Reconstruction and topological characterization of the sigma factor regulatory network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Rinki; Ravi, Janani; Datta, Pratik; Chen, Tianlong; Schnappinger, Dirk; Bassler, Kevin E; Balázsi, Gábor; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2016-03-31

    Accessory sigma factors, which reprogram RNA polymerase to transcribe specific gene sets, activate bacterial adaptive responses to noxious environments. Here we reconstruct the complete sigma factor regulatory network of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis by an integrated approach. The approach combines identification of direct regulatory interactions between M. tuberculosis sigma factors in an E. coli model system, validation of selected links in M. tuberculosis, and extensive literature review. The resulting network comprises 41 direct interactions among all 13 sigma factors. Analysis of network topology reveals (i) a three-tiered hierarchy initiating at master regulators, (ii) high connectivity and (iii) distinct communities containing multiple sigma factors. These topological features are likely associated with multi-layer signal processing and specialized stress responses involving multiple sigma factors. Moreover, the identification of overrepresented network motifs, such as autoregulation and coregulation of sigma and anti-sigma factor pairs, provides structural information that is relevant for studies of network dynamics.

  16. IS6110 fingerprinting of sensitive and resistant strains (1991-1992 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Colombia

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    Jorge Enrique Gómez-Marin

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The standardized method to study the polymorphism of IS 6110 was used to characterize 53 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis obtained during 1991-1992 from 14 regions in Colombia. In Valle region cluster rate was 25% (4/16. The mean number of IS6110 band was 10 ± 3. Similarity between strains was of 60% in 81% of strains and this tended to be correlated with geographic origin. For the first time M. tuberculosis without IS6110 bands in restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was found in Colombia. Additional studies are necessaries in order to best characterize the situation in relation to human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and recent changes in tuberculosis control program.

  17. [MOLECULAR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS STRAINS IN THE NORTHWEST RUSSIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazovaya, A A; Mokrousov, I V; Zhuravlev, V Yu; Solovieva, N S; Otten, T F; Manicheva, O A; Vishnevsky, B I; Narvskaya, O V

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to study the genotypic characteristics of the multidrug-resistant (MDR, i.e., resistant to at least rifampicine and isoniazid) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in 2011-2012 from tuberculosis (TB) patients in the Northwest Russia. Spoligotyping of 195 M. tuberculosis isolates identified 14 different spoligotypes and assigned isolates to the genetic families Beijing (n = 162, 83%), LAM (n = 15), H3/URAL (n = 14), as well as T, Haarlem and X. Spoligotypes SIT1 (Beijing), SIT42 (LAM) and SIT262 (H3/URAL) were the most prevalent. Irrespective to the genotype, all the isolates were resistant to streptomycin. The multidrug resistance was accompanied by the resistance to ethionamide (56%), amikacin (31%), kanamycin (40%), and capreomycin (33%). The ethambutol resistance was found in 71% (n = 115) and 42% (n = 14) of the Beijing and non-Beijing strains, respectively (p Russia continues to be dominated by the Beijing family strains.

  18. Proteomic profiling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies nutrient-starvation-responsive toxin-antitoxin systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Agner, Jeppe; Piersma, Sander R

    2013-01-01

    In order to successfully enter the latent stage, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must adapt to conditions such as nutrient limitation and hypoxia. In vitro models that mimic latent infection are valuable tools for describing the changes in metabolism that occur when the bacterium exists in a non......-growing form. We used two complementary proteomic approaches, label-free LC-MS/MS analysis and two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, to determine the proteome profile of extracellular proteins from M. tuberculosis cultured under nutrient starvation. Through the label-free LC-MS/MS analysis......, significant differences in the overall metabolism during nutrient starvation were detected. Notably, members of the toxin-antitoxin systems were present in larger quantities in nutrient-starved cultures, supporting a role for these global modules as M. tuberculosis switches its metabolism into dormancy...

  19. Synthesis and Anti–Mycobacterium tuberculosis Evaluation of Aza-Stilbene Derivatives

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    Fernando R. Pavan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a truly global disease, found in every country on earth. One-third of humanity, over 2 billion people, carry the bacillus that causes TB and 2 million people die of the disease each year. Despite that, no new specific drug against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been developed since the 1960s. There are several candidates for new anti-TB agents, but none proven clinically effective. Stilbenes are compounds found in numerous medicinal plants and food products with some known biological and even antimycobacterial activity. This paper describes the synthesis and the anti–M. tuberculosis activity of eight stilbene analogues. The synthesis and characterization of these compounds are shown, and the results compared with one “first”-line drug used in current therapy.

  20. Bioinformatics tools and databases for whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Faksri, Kiatichai; Tan, Jun Hao; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Teo, Yik-Ying; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee

    2016-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease of global public health importance caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) in which M. tuberculosis (Mtb) is the major causative agent. Recent advancements in genomic technologies such as next generation sequencing have enabled high throughput cost-effective generation of whole genome sequence information from Mtb clinical isolates, providing new insights into the evolution, genomic diversity and transmission of the Mtb bacteria, including molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. The large volume of sequencing data generated however necessitated effective and efficient management, storage, analysis and visualization of the data and results through development of novel and customized bioinformatics software tools and databases. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive survey of the current freely available bioinformatics software tools and publicly accessible databases for genomic analysis of Mtb for identifying disease transmission in molecular epidemiology and in rapid determination of the antibiotic profiles of clinical isolates for prompt and optimal patient treatment.