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Sample records for lithium tantalate crystals

  1. Shape of isolated domains in lithium tantalate single crystals at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S.; Chezganov, D. S.; Lobov, A. I.; Smirnov, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The shape of isolated domains has been investigated in congruent lithium tantalate (CLT) single crystals at elevated temperatures and analyzed in terms of kinetic approach. The obtained temperature dependence of the growing domain shape in CLT including circular shape at temperatures above 190 °C has been attributed to increase of relative input of isotropic ionic conductivity. The observed nonstop wall motion and independent domain growth after merging in CLT as opposed to stoichiometric lithium tantalate have been attributed to difference in wall orientation. The computer simulation has confirmed applicability of the kinetic approach to the domain shape explanation

  2. Material modifications in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate crystals by ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeth, Niels Lennart

    2017-01-01

    The artificially produced crystals lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) and the closely related lithium tantalate (LiTaO 3 ) are proven starting materials for producing active and passive devices that can guide, amplify, switch and process light. For this purpose, it is often necessary to be able to influence the refractive index of the substrate targeted, which is possible in addition to other methods by irradiation of the materials with fast light ions. In this work, lithium niobate and lithium tantalate crystals are irradiated with alpha particles, 3 He ions, deuterons, and protons at projectile energies of up to 14 MeV / nucleon. Energy and crystal thickness are chosen so that the projectiles penetrate the entire sample and are not implanted. All isotopes responsible for the unwanted nuclear activation of the crystals due to the irradiation are relatively short-lived and overall the activation decreases fast enough to allow the safe handling of the irradiated samples after a storage period of a few days to a few weeks. The refractive index changes produced in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate by irradiation with the different projectiles are determined interferometrically and can also be measured by suitable choice of the sample geometry as a function of the ion penetration depth: In LiNbO 3 the ordinary refractive index decreases, the extraordinary increases equally. In LiTaO 3 , both the ordinary and the extraordinary refractive indices decrease as a result of the irradiation; the ordinary refractive index change is many times stronger than the extraordinary one. There is an enormous long-term stability at room temperature for both crystal systems: Even after eleven (LiNbO 3 ) or three (LiTaO 3 ) years, no decrease in the ion beam-induced refractive index change can be observed. The ion beam-induced refractive index changes are probably the result of atomic displacements such as vacancies, defect clusters or ''latent tracks''. An explanation for

  3. Temperature and composition dependence of birefringence of lithium-tantalate crystals determined by holographic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastwoeste, K.; Schwalenberg, S.; Baeumer, Ch.; Kraetzig, E.

    2003-01-01

    Iron-doped lithium-tantalate samples with different compositions ranging from the congruently melting to the stoichiometric one are analyzed by anisotropic holographic scattering. The temperature dependence of the birefringence yields information on the composition of the crystals. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Temperature and composition dependence of birefringence of lithium-tantalate crystals determined by holographic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastwoeste, K.; Schwalenberg, S.; Baeumer, Ch.; Kraetzig, E. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Osnabrueck, D-49069 Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Iron-doped lithium-tantalate samples with different compositions ranging from the congruently melting to the stoichiometric one are analyzed by anisotropic holographic scattering. The temperature dependence of the birefringence yields information on the composition of the crystals. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Anomalous dielectric relaxation in lithium-potassium tantalate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doussineau, P.; Farssi, Y.; Frénois, C.; Levelut, A.; Toulouse, J.; Ziolkiewicz, S.

    1994-08-01

    In order to describe the unusual dielectric properties observed in Ki{1-χ}Li{χ}TaO3. crystals a new approchh is proposed. The dynamical Glauber theory, previously applied to spinglasses, is modifiéd by the introduction of the spectral distribution of the random interactions between the dipoles associated with the Li+ ions. Moreover, the dipole corrélations are taken into account by the Onsager réaction field. As a result, the calculated dielectric constant reproduces well the unusual features of the Argand diagrams and, in particular, their finite slope at low frequencies and infinite slope at high frequencies (strophoidal shape). The temperature dépendance of some parameters shows, however, the limits of a spin-glass type model in describing the collective behaviour of randomly distributed dipoles in a highly polarizable medium. Une nouvelle approche est présentée qui permet de décrire les propriétés diélectriques particulières de cristaux mixtes de Ki{1-χ}Li{χ}TaO3. Elle s'appuie sur la théorie dynamique de Glauber, déjà utilisée pour les verres de spins, et modifiée par l'introduction d'une distribution spectrale spécifique aux interactions aléatoires des dipôles électriques associés aux ions Li+. En outre, les corrélations entre dipôles sont prises en compte par le champ de réaction d'Onsager. II s'ensuit que la constante diélectrique complexe ainsi calculée reproduit fidèlement les particularités des diagrammes d'Argand, telles que la pente finie aux basses fréquences et la pente infinie aux hautes fréquences (forme strophoïdale). La dépendance en température de certains paramètres déterminés par le calcul montre les limites de l'analogie avec les verres de spins et met en évidence le rôle d'un réseau très polarisable dans le comportement collectif d'une assemblée de dipôles électriques.

  6. Lithium tantalate single crystal for pyroelectricity-based laser energy-meter: growth, application and phase transition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaumik, Indranil; Ganesamoorthy, S.; Bhatt, R.; Karnal, A.K.; Gupta, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Single crystals of lithium tantalate have been grown. Dielectric-spectroscopy study reveals phase transition in congruent lithium tantalate (CLT) single crystal is diffusive and frequency dependent in contrast to that in near stoichiometric lithium tantalate where it is sharper. The ac conductivity measurements show that the conductivity is lower for 0.5Mg-SLT as compared to 1.0Mg-SLT. This is explained in terms of a Li-vacancy model. Calculation of activation energy from the lnσ vs. 1000/T plot reveals that hopping of Li + ions becomes difficult for 0.5 Mg-SLT. The pyroelectric response of CLT for pulsed Nd:YAG laser output has been tested. (author)

  7. Nanostructured sodium lithium niobate and lithium niobium tantalate solid solutions obtained by controlled crystallization of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radonjic, L.; Todorovic, M.; Miladinovic, J.

    2005-01-01

    Transparent, nanostructured glass ceramics based on ferroelectric solid solutions of the type Na 1-x Li x NbO 3 (in very narrow composition regions for x = 0.12 and 0.93) and LiNb 1-y Ta y O 3 (y = 0.5 unlimited solid solubility), can be obtained by controlled crystallization of glass. The parent glass samples were prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique. Heat-treatment of the parent glasses was performed at the various temperatures, for the same time. The glass structure evolution during the controlled crystallization was examined by FT-IR spectroscopy analysis. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM was used for microstructure characterization. Densities of the crystallized glasses were measured by Archimedean principle. The capacitance and dielectric loss tangent were measured at a frequency of 1 kHz, at the room temperature. It was found that in the all investigated systems crystallize solid solutions Na 1-x Li x NbO 3 and LiNb 1-y Ta y O 3 in the glassy matrix, have crystal size on nanoscale (less than 100 nm), which is one of requirements to get a transparent glass ceramic that could be a good ferroelectric material regarding to the measured properties

  8. Piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of lead-free niobium-rich potassium lithium tantalate niobate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jun, E-mail: lijuna@hit.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Yang [Department of chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou, Zhongxiang [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Guo, Ruyan; Bhalla, Amar S. [Multifunctional Electronic Materials and Device Research Lab, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio 78249 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Lead-free K{sub 0.95}Li{sub 0.05}Ta{sub 1−x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 3} single crystals were grown using the top-seeded melt growth method. • The piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of as-grown crystals were systematically investigated. • The piezoelectric properties are very attractive, e.g. for x = 0.60 composition, k{sub t} ≈ 70%, k{sub 31} ≈ 70%, k{sub 33} ≈ 77%, d{sub 31} ≈ 230 pC/N, d{sub 33} ≈ 600 pC/N. • The coercive fields of P–E hysteresis loops are quite small, about or less than 1 kV/mm. - Abstract: Lead-free potassium lithium tantalate niobate single crystals with the composition of K{sub 0.95}Li{sub 0.05}Ta{sub 1−x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 3} (abbreviated as KLTN, x = 0.51, 0.60, 0.69, 0.78) were grown using the top-seeded melt growth method. Their piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties in as-grown crystals have been systematically investigated. The phase transitions and Curie temperatures were determined from dielectric and pyroelectric measurements. Piezoelectric coefficients and electromechanical coupling factors in thickness mode, length-extensional mode and longitudinal mode were obtained. The piezoelectric properties are very attractive, e.g. for x = 0.60 composition, k{sub t} ≈ 70%, k{sub 31} ≈ 70%, k{sub 33} ≈ 77%, d{sub 31} ≈ 230 pC/N, d{sub 33} ≈ 600 pC/N are comparable to the lead-based PZT composition. The polarization versus electric field hysteresis loops show saturated shapes. In short, lead-free niobium-rich KLTN system possesses comparable properties to those in important lead-based piezoelectric material nowadays.

  9. Search for memory and return to disorder in potassium-lithium tantalate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doussineau, P.; Levelut, A.; Lacerda-Aroso, T. de

    2000-01-01

    Return to disorder, and less frequently memory, have been demonstrated in various disordered materials. In order to find the conditions necessary for the observation of these effects, the evolution of the real part ε' of the dielectric constant of two disordered paraelectric crystals K 1-x Li x TaO 3 (KLT) has been extensively studied by the means of the capacitance C (T, t) around the beginning and the end of a temperature plateau. The return to disorder and memory effects have not been seen in KTL, in contrast to what was recently observed in disordered ferroelectric crystals KTa 1-y Nb y O 3 of a similar family. The variations dC = P (T 0 , t 0 ) dT + Q (T 0 , t 0 ) dt in the vicinity of the point (T 0 , t 0 ) are split into a contribution depending on temperature only and an isothermal contribution only depending on time. All the results of such an analysis of the features observed in KLT can be explained by the domain wall model in its original form. (author)

  10. Material modifications in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate crystals by ion irradiation; Materialmodifikationen in Lithiumniobat- und Lithiumtantalat-Kristallen durch Ionenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeth, Niels Lennart

    2017-02-17

    The artificially produced crystals lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) and the closely related lithium tantalate (LiTaO{sub 3}) are proven starting materials for producing active and passive devices that can guide, amplify, switch and process light. For this purpose, it is often necessary to be able to influence the refractive index of the substrate targeted, which is possible in addition to other methods by irradiation of the materials with fast light ions. In this work, lithium niobate and lithium tantalate crystals are irradiated with alpha particles, {sup 3}He ions, deuterons, and protons at projectile energies of up to 14 MeV / nucleon. Energy and crystal thickness are chosen so that the projectiles penetrate the entire sample and are not implanted. All isotopes responsible for the unwanted nuclear activation of the crystals due to the irradiation are relatively short-lived and overall the activation decreases fast enough to allow the safe handling of the irradiated samples after a storage period of a few days to a few weeks. The refractive index changes produced in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate by irradiation with the different projectiles are determined interferometrically and can also be measured by suitable choice of the sample geometry as a function of the ion penetration depth: In LiNbO{sub 3} the ordinary refractive index decreases, the extraordinary increases equally. In LiTaO{sub 3}, both the ordinary and the extraordinary refractive indices decrease as a result of the irradiation; the ordinary refractive index change is many times stronger than the extraordinary one. There is an enormous long-term stability at room temperature for both crystal systems: Even after eleven (LiNbO{sub 3}) or three (LiTaO{sub 3}) years, no decrease in the ion beam-induced refractive index change can be observed. The ion beam-induced refractive index changes are probably the result of atomic displacements such as vacancies, defect clusters or ''latent tracks

  11. Reduction and radiation effects in lithium tantalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.Y.; Sweeney, K.L.; Halliburton, L.E.

    1984-01-16

    Single crystals of LiTaO/sub 3/ are reduced, in a vacuum at temperatures up to 1100 /sup 0/C, and are electron irradiated at 77 K. Electron spin resonance spectra of Fe/sup 3 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, and Mn/sup 2 +/ impurity ions and the infrared absorption of OH/sup -/ molecules are monitored as a function of increasing vacuum-anneal temperature. Electron irradiation of oxidized samples produces a broad optical absorption band centered at 470 nm and a corresponding hole like ESR spectrum with g/sub c/ = 2.0224. These latter spectra become thermally unstable in the 100 to 200 K range. Differences between LiTaO/sub 3/ and LiNbO/sub 3/ are noted.

  12. Temperature dependence of the thermoelectric coeffiicients of lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachaturyan, O.A.; Gabrielyan, A.I.; Kolesnik, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Thermoelectric Zeebeck,Thomson, Peltier coefficients for LiNbO 3 and LiTaO 3 monocrystals and their dependence on temperature in 300-1400 K range were investigated. It is shown that Zeebeck (α) coefficient changes its sign, depending on temperature change - the higher is α, the higher is material conductivity in the corresponding temperature region. Thomson and Peltier coefficients were calculated analytically for lithium niobate and tantalate

  13. FY 1999 report on the results of R and D projects by local consortiums for immediate effects. R and D regarding high quality/high performance of lithium tantalate single crystal's solidifying growth and SAW wafer; 1999 nendo sankabutsu tankessho no ikusei to wafer no kohinshitsu konoritsuka ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The R and D project has been implemented for establishing, e.g., methods for growing oxide single crystals (e.g., lithium tantalate, LiTaO{sub 3}) to have the large and/or long products, technologies for polishing/cleaing the wafer products, and technologies for evaluating device performance. For solidifying growth and production technologies for lithium tantalate single crystals, pulling-up of the single crystal, 154 mm in body length and 12.9 kg, is succeeded by reducing temperature gradient at the crystal solid-liquid interface, increasing oxygen concentration, and improving the seed-sustaining system. Bright prospects have been obtained for the automated crystal pulling-up system, and high-precision control of crystal weight. For technologies for polishing/cleaning the wafers, the investigated cleaning methods include ELID polishing, mechanochemical polishing, and supersonic cleaning which uses two frequency bands of multi-supersonic and megasonic waves. For development of the technologies for evaluation/examination of the highly functional devices, the non-contact type method has been developed, which can measure the absolute level of SAW speed at a high speed and precision. (NEDO)

  14. FY 1999 report on the results of R and D projects by local consortiums for immediate effects. R and D regarding high quality/high performance of lithium tantalate single crystal's solidifying growth and SAW wafer; 1999 nendo sankabutsu tankessho no ikusei to wafer no kohinshitsu konoritsuka ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The R and D project has been implemented for establishing, e.g., methods for growing oxide single crystals (e.g., lithium tantalate, LiTaO{sub 3}) to have the large and/or long products, technologies for polishing/cleaing the wafer products, and technologies for evaluating device performance. For solidifying growth and production technologies for lithium tantalate single crystals, pulling-up of the single crystal, 154 mm in body length and 12.9 kg, is succeeded by reducing temperature gradient at the crystal solid-liquid interface, increasing oxygen concentration, and improving the seed-sustaining system. Bright prospects have been obtained for the automated crystal pulling-up system, and high-precision control of crystal weight. For technologies for polishing/cleaning the wafers, the investigated cleaning methods include ELID polishing, mechanochemical polishing, and supersonic cleaning which uses two frequency bands of multi-supersonic and megasonic waves. For development of the technologies for evaluation/examination of the highly functional devices, the non-contact type method has been developed, which can measure the absolute level of SAW speed at a high speed and precision. (NEDO)

  15. Piezoelectric excitation of elastic waves in centrosymmetrical potassium tantalate crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, G.A.; Lemanov, V.V.; Sotnikov, A.V.; Syrnikov, P.P.; Yushin, N.K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiment results on excitation of elastic oscillations in potassium tantalate crystals are considered. The experiment has been conducted by usual for supersonic measurements technique: an impulse of the variable electric field has been applied to one of plane-parallel sample end-faces, at the same end-face signals corresponding to elastic pulses propagating in the crystal have been detected. Basic radiopulses parameters: basic frequency 30 MHz, duration 1-2 μs, pulse recurrence frequency 500 Hz, power 10 W. The investigation carried out has shown that the application to the sample at T=80 K temperature of constant external electrical field parallel to direction of elastic wave propagation leads to hysteresis dependence of elastic waves amplitude on the external voltage value. With temperature increase the hysteresis loop is deformed. It has been found when investigating temperature dependence of elastic wave amplitude that in the absence of external constant electrical field in short-circuited by constant current samples the oxillation excitation effect disappears at T approximately equal to 200 K. An essential influence on the elastic wave amplitude value is exerted by illumination of the crystal surface by light with 360-630 nm wave length. At T 130 K bacaee of photovoltaic effect in illuminated samples [ru

  16. Tunable ultraviolet radiation by second-harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium tantalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyn, J P; Fejer, M M

    1997-08-15

    We describe electric-field poling of fine-pitch ferroelectric domain gratings in lithium tantalate and characterization of nonlinear-optical properties by single-pass quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic generation (QPM SHG). With a 7.5-microm-period grating, the observed effective nonlinear coefficient for first-order QPM SHG of 532-nm radiation is 9 pm/V, whereas for a grating with a 2.625-microm period, 2.6 pm/V was observed for second-order QPM SHG of 325-nm radiation. These values are 100% and 55% of the theoretically expected values, respectively. We derive a temperature-dependent Sellmeier equation for lithium tantalate that is valid deeper into the UV than currently available results, based on temperature-tuning experiments at different QPM grating periods combined with refractive-index data in the literature.

  17. Rare-Earth Tantalates and Niobates Single Crystals: Promising Scintillators and Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renqin Dou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare-earth tantalates, with high density and monoclinic structure, and niobates with monoclinic structure have been paid great attention as potential optical materials. In the last decade, we focused on the crystal growth technology of rare-earth tantalates and niobates and studied their luminescence and physical properties. A series of rare-earth tantalates and niobates crystals have been grown by the Czochralski method successfully. In this work, we summarize the research results on the crystal growth, scintillation, and laser properties of them, including the absorption and emission spectra, spectral parameters, energy levels structure, and so on. Most of the tantalates and niobates exhibit excellent luminescent properties, rich physical properties, and good chemical stability, indicating that they are potential outstanding scintillators and laser materials.

  18. Correlated photon-pair generation in a periodically poled MgO doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate reverse proton exchanged waveguide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobino, M.; Marshall, G.D.; Xiong, C.; Clark, A.S.; Bonneau, D.; Natarajan, C.M.; Tanner, M.G.; Hadfield, R.H.; Dorenbos, S.N.; Zijlstra, T.; Zwiller, V.; Marangoni, M.; Ramponi, R.; Thompson, M.G.; Eggleton, B.J.; O'Brien, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate photon-pair generation in a reverse proton exchanged waveguide fabricated on a periodically poled magnesium doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate substrate. Detected pairs are generated via a cascaded second order nonlinear process where a pump laser at wavelength of 1.55 ?m is first

  19. Thermal plasma fabricated lithium niobate-tantalate films on sapphire substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinich, S.A.; Yoshida, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Terashima, K.

    2003-01-01

    We report the deposition of LiNb 1-x Ta x O 3 (0≤x≤1) films on (001) sapphire substrates in soft vacuum using a radio frequency thermal plasma. The growth rate, crystallinity, c-axis orientation, and surface roughness were examined as functions of substrate temperature, precursor feed rate, and substrate surface condition. The film Nb/Ta ratio was well controlled by using an appropriate uniform mixture of lithium-niobium and lithium-tantalum alkoxide solutions. The epitaxy and crystallinity of the films were much improved when the film growth rate was raised from 20 to 180-380 nm/min, where the films with the (006) rocking curve full width at half maximum values as low as 0.12 deg. -0.2 deg. could be produced. The film roughness could be reduced by using a liquid precursor with higher metal concentrations, achieving the root-mean-square value on the order of 5 nm. The refractive indices of the films are in good correspondence with their composition and crystallinity

  20. Are lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) and lithium tantalate (LiTaO{sub 3}) ferroelectrics bioactive?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilarinho, Paula Maria, E-mail: paula.vilarinho@ua.pt; Barroca, Nathalie; Zlotnik, Sebastian; Félix, Pedro; Fernandes, Maria Helena

    2014-06-01

    The use of functional materials, such as ferroelectrics, as platforms for tissue growth in situ or ex situ, is new and holds great promise. But the usage of materials in any bioapplication requires information on biocompatibility and desirably on bioactive behavior when bone tissue engineering is envisaged. Both requirements are currently unknown for many ferroelectrics. Herein the bioactivity of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3} is reported. The formation of apatite-like structures on the surface of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3} powders after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for different soaking periods indicates their bioactive potential. The mechanism of apatite formation is suggested. In addition, the significant release of lithium ions from the ferroelectric powders in the very first minutes of soaking in SBF is examined and ways to overcome this likely hurdle addressed. - Highlights: • LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3} are bioactive ferroelectrics. • Cauliflower apatite type structures indicative of in-vitro bioactivity of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3.} • Negative surface charges anchor Ca{sup 2+} to which PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} attracts forming apatite structure nuclei. • Use of ferroelectrics as platforms for tissue growth in situ or ex situ is new and holds great promise.

  1. Instrinsic defect energies of lithium hydride and lithium deuteride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.; Stoneham, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the defect structure of lithium hydride and lithium deuteride. A potential model is obtained describing the statics and dynamics of these crystals. Intrinsic defect energies are calculated using the Harwell HADES program which is based on a generalised Mott-Littleton method. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data, and suggest that the vacancy and interstitial migration mechanisms of anions and cations are all comparable in their contribution to ionic conduction. (author)

  2. Optical cleaning of lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koesters, Michael

    2010-01-01

    An all-optical method for the removal of photoexcitable electrons from photorefractive centers to get rid of optical damage in lithium niobate crystals is presented, the so-called ''optical cleaning''. The method combines the photovoltaic drift of electrons with ionic charge compensation at sufficiently high temperatures of about 180 C. Optimum choice of the light pattern plus heat dramatically decreases the concentration of photoexcitable electrons in the exposed region leading to a suppression of optical damage. Experiments with slightly iron-doped lithium niobate crystals have shown an increase of the threshold for optical damage of more than 1000 compared to those of untreated crystals. (orig.)

  3. Unactivated yttrium tantalate phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, V.B.; Cheung, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes an unactivated yttrium tantalate phosphor having M prime monoclinic structure and containing one or more additives of Rb and Al in an amount of between about 0.001 to 0.1 moles per mole of yttrium tantalate to improve brightness under X-radiation. This patent also describes an unactivated yttrium tantalate phosphor having M prime monoclinic structure and containing additives of Sr in an amount of between 0.001 to 0.1 moles per mole of yttrium tantalate and one or more of Rb and Al in an amount of between 0.001 to 0.1 moles per mole of yttrium tantalate the phosphor exhibiting a greater brightness under X-radiation than the phosphor absent Rb and Al

  4. Studies on electrochemical lithium insertion in isostructural titanium niobate and tantalate phases with shear ReO3 structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saritha, D.; Varadaraju, U.V.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Electrochemical lithium insertion into ReO 3 type phases TiNb 2 O 7 , TiTa 2 O 7 is feasible. • TiNb 2 O 7 exhibits good cycling behavior and high reversible capacity of 212 mAh g −1 . • TiTa 2 O 7 exhibits reversible capacity of 100 mAh g −1 . - Abstract: TiNb 2 O 7 and TiTa 2 O 7 phases are synthesized by solid-state reaction method and are investigated for electrochemical Li insertion/extraction. The electrochemical insertion of Li in these phases is characterized by both solid solution and two-phase regimes. The structure is stable toward Li insertion/extraction. The first cycle discharge capacity values are 307 mAh g −1 and 215 mAh g −1 in the voltage range of 3.0–1.0 V for TiNb 2 O 7 and TiTa 2 O 7 phases, respectively. The discharge capacities of TiNb 2 O 7 and TiTa 2 O 7 are 212 mAh g −1 and 100 mAh g −1 , respectively, after 20 cycles

  5. Systematic hardness studies on lithium niobate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    crystals with different growth origins, and a Fe-doped sample. The problem of load ... The true hardness of LiNbO3 is found to be 630 ± 30 kg/mm2. .... Experimental. Pure lithium ... the index of d strikes at this simple and meaningful defini-.

  6. Optical cleaning of lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesters, Michael

    2010-01-15

    An all-optical method for the removal of photoexcitable electrons from photorefractive centers to get rid of optical damage in lithium niobate crystals is presented, the so-called ''optical cleaning''. The method combines the photovoltaic drift of electrons with ionic charge compensation at sufficiently high temperatures of about 180 C. Optimum choice of the light pattern plus heat dramatically decreases the concentration of photoexcitable electrons in the exposed region leading to a suppression of optical damage. Experiments with slightly iron-doped lithium niobate crystals have shown an increase of the threshold for optical damage of more than 1000 compared to those of untreated crystals. (orig.)

  7. Improving lithium therapeutics by crystal engineering of novel ionic cocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam J; Kim, Seol-Hee; Duggirala, Naga K; Jin, Jingji; Wojtas, Lukasz; Ehrhart, Jared; Giunta, Brian; Tan, Jun; Zaworotko, Michael J; Shytle, R Douglas

    2013-12-02

    Current United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved lithium salts are plagued with a narrow therapeutic window. Recent attempts to find alternative drugs have identified new chemical entities, but lithium's polypharmacological mechanisms for treating neuropsychiatric disorders are highly debated and are not yet matched. Thus, re-engineering current lithium solid forms in order to optimize performance represents a low cost and low risk approach to the desired therapeutic outcome. In this contribution, we employed a crystal engineering strategy to synthesize the first ionic cocrystals (ICCs) of lithium salts with organic anions. We are unaware of any previous studies that have assessed the biological efficacy of any ICCs, and encouragingly we found that the new speciation did not negatively affect established bioactivities of lithium. We also observed that lithium ICCs exhibit modulated pharmacokinetics compared to lithium carbonate. Indeed, the studies detailed herein represent an important advancement in a crystal engineering approach to a new generation of lithium therapeutics.

  8. Crystal growth and structure of the barium chloride nitrido-tantalate(V) Ba_3Cl_2TaN_3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaschkowski, Bjoern; Duerr, Oliver; Reckeweg, Olaf; Schleid, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Transparent, light yellow single crystals of the barium chloride nitridotantalate(V) Ba_3Cl_2TaN_3 (hexagonal, P6_3cm; a = 1507.39(8) pm, c = 632.98(3) pm, c/a = 0.420; Z = 6) are obtained by the reaction of the barium azide chloride Ba(N_3)Cl or its ternary decomposition products with the container wall of arc-welded tantalum ampoules at 900 C after four days. Its crystal structure displays one-dimensional chains "1_∞{[TaN_2_/_2N_2_/_1]"4"-} consisting of corner-sharing [TaN_4]"7"- tetrahedra (d(Ta-N) = 191-200 pm), which run along [001] and arrange as hexagonal rod packing. Charge compensation of these parallel "1_∞{[TaN_3]"4"-} strands occurs via Ba"2"+ cations and Cl"- anions erecting a three-dimensional network "3_∞{[Ba_3Cl_2]"4"+} (d(Ba-Cl) = 318-339 pm) with narrow channels apt to embed the chains. Several Ba-N contacts ranging between 264 and 319 pm secure the interconnection between both structural arrays and complete the coordination numbers of the Ba"2"+ cations to seven or eight. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Liquid Crystals of Lithium Dodecylbenzenesulfonate for Electric Double Layer Capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, Andrey Vasil’evich; Yurtov, Evgeny V.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic lyotropic liquid crystals based on lithium dodecylbenzenesulfonate were used as electrolytes for electric double layer capacitors with carbon fibrous electrodes. The capacitors were tasted by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge and discharge, and impedance spectroscopy. The highest specific capacitance was achieved for electrical double layer capacitor equipped with ionic lyotropic liquid crystal of lithium dodecylbenzenesulfonate 35 wt% in water. The specific capacitance of capacitor was calculated from galvanostatic discharge curves – 15 F/g of carbon fibrous material

  10. Photorefractive effect at 775 nm in doped lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, G.; Minzioni, P.; Cristiani, I.; Degiorgio, V. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering, and CNISM, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Argiolas, N.; Bazzan, M.; Ciampolillo, M. V.; Pozza, G.; Sada, C. [Physics and Astronomy Departement, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    The photorefractive effect induced by 775-nm laser light on doped lithium niobate crystals is investigated by the direct observation in the far field of the transmitted-beam distortion as a function of time. Measurements performed at various Zr-doping concentrations and different light intensities show that the 775-nm light beam induces a steady-state photorefractive effect comparable to that of 532-nm light, but the observed build-up time of the photovoltaic field is longer by three-orders of magnitude. The 775-nm photorefractivity of lithium niobate crystals doped with 3 mol. % ZrO{sub 2} or with 5.5 mol. % MgO is found to be negligible.

  11. Photorefractive lithium niobate crystals for applications in photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, U.

    2006-12-01

    Lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO 3 ) generally show a photorefractive response, i.e., light-induced refractive index changes. Crystals are investigated at room temperature and at elevated temperatures. As a result 'classical' photorefractive holographic volume-phase gratings, originating from space charge fields and the electro-optic effect, and 'non-classical' photorefractive volume-phase gratings, which can be traced back to strong absorption gratings, emerge. Single domain and periodically poled crystals (PPLN) are investigated. PPLN is typically used in non-linear optics for frequency conversion. The crystals also show non-linear photorefractive response during holographic recording with isotropically polarized light beams of equal intensity and, in the case of PPLN, by mixing of domain and holographic gratings. The results are important for applications combining the photorefractive and non-linear optical properties of LiNbO 3 . (orig.)

  12. Twinning structures in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Shuhua; Chen, Yanfeng

    2010-01-01

    A near-stoichiometric lithium niobate single crystal has been grown by the Czochralski method in a hanging double crucible with a continuous powder supply system. Twins were found at one of the three characteristic growth ridges of the as-grown crystal. The twin structure was observed and analyzed by transmission synchrotron topography. The image shifts ΔX and ΔY in the transmission synchrotron topograph were calculated for the 3 anti 2 anti 12 and 0 anti 222 reflections based on results from high-resolution X-ray diffractometry. It is confirmed that one of the {01 anti 1 anti 2} m planes is the composition face of the twin and matrix crystals. The formation mechanism of these twins is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Isotope effects in lithium hydride and lithium deuteride crystals by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammak, Hichem; Antoshchenkova, Ekaterina; Hayoun, Marc; Finocchi, Fabio

    2012-10-31

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to study isotope effects in lithium hydride and lithium deuteride crystals. Quantum effects on nuclear motion have been included through a quantum thermal bath (QTB). The interatomic forces were described either within the density functional theory (DFT) in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) or by the phenomenological approach using the shell model. For both models, the isotopic shift in the lattice parameter can be successfully predicted by QTB-MD simulations. The slope of the experimental isotopic shift in pressure is satisfactorily reproduced by QTB-MD within DFT-GGA, in contrast to both density functional perturbation theory and QTB-MD with the shell model. We have analyzed the reasons for these discrepancies through the vibrational densities of states and the isotopic shifts in bulk modulus. The results illustrate the importance of anharmonic contributions to vibrations and to the isotopic pressure shift between LiH and LiD.

  14. Photoluminescence of Copper-Doped Lithium Niobate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Pyatyshev, A. Yu.; Sidorov, N. V.

    2018-05-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) of copper-doped lithium niobate single crystals is studied using different UV-Vis light-emitting diodes and a pulse-periodic laser with a wavelength of 266 nm as excitation radiation sources. With the resonance excitation from a 527-nm light-emitting diode, the intensity of PL increases sharply (by two orders of magnitude). When using a 467-nm light-emitting diode for excitation, the PL spectrum is characterized by the presence of multiphonon lines in the range of 520-620 nm.

  15. Generation of ionizing radiation from lithium niobate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlikov, L. N.; Orlikov, N. L.; Arestov, S. I.; Mambetova, K. M.; Shandarov, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    The work done experimentally explores generation of electron and x-ray radiation in the process of heating and cooling monolithic and iron-doped crystals of lithium niobate. Iron doping to the concentrations in the range of 1023 m3 was carried out by adding ferric oxide into the melt during the process of crystal growth. The research into radiation generation was performed at 1-10 Pa. The speed of heating from -10 to 1070 C was 10-20 degrees a minute. Current pulses appeared at 17, 38, 56, 94, 98, 100, 105, 106, 1070 C with the interval of 1-3 minutes. The obtained electron current increased in direct proportion to the crystal surface area. The maximum current was 3mA at the design voltage 11 kV on the crystal with 14,5x10,5x10 mm3 surface area. The article describes the possibility to control the start of generation by introducing priming pulse. The results achieved are explained by the domain repolarization while heating the crystal and the appearance of electric field local strength. Bias and overcharge currents contribute to the appearance of electric strength, which stimulates breakdown and plasma formation. X-ray radiation appears both at the stage of discharge formation and during electron deceleration on gas and target material.

  16. Thermo-electric oxidization of iron in lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO 3 ) are a promising material for nonlinear-optical applications like frequency conversion to generate visible light, e.g., in laser displays, but their achievable output power is greatly limited by the ''optical damage'', i.e., light-induced refractive-index changes caused by excitation of electrons from iron impurities and the subsequent retrapping in unilluminated areas of the crystal. The resulting space-charge fields modify the refractive indices due to the electro-optic effect. By this ''photorefractive effect'' the phase-matching condition, i.e., the avoidance of destructive interference between light generated at different crystal positions due to the dispersion of the fundamental wave and the converted wave, is disturbed critically above a certain light intensity threshold. The influence of annealing treatments conducted in the presence of an externally applied electric field (''thermo-electric oxidization'') on the valence state of iron impurities and thereby on the optical damage is investigated. It is observed that for highly iron-doped LiNbO 3 crystals this treatment leads to a nearly complete oxidization from Fe 2+ to Fe 3+ indicated by the disappearance of the absorption caused by Fe 2+ . During the treatment an absorption front forms that moves through the crystal. The absorption in the visible as well as the electrical conductivity are decreased by up to five orders of magnitude due to this novel treatment. The ratio of the Fe 2+ concentration to the total iron concentration - a measure for the strength of the oxidization - is in the order of 10 -6 for oxidized crystals whereas it is about 10 -1 for untreated samples. Birefringence changes are observed at the absorption front that are explained by the removal of hydrogen and lithium ions from the crystal that compensate for the charges of the also removed electrons from Fe 2+ . A microscopic shock-wave model is developed that explains the observed absorption front by

  17. Interaction of light with impurities in lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwesyg, Judith Renate Marie-Luise

    2011-06-06

    Congruent lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) and 5-mol% MgO-doped LiNbO{sub 3} (MgO:LN) crystals are widely used as nonlinear-optical crystals in frequency-conversion devices due to their large nonlinear-optic coefficients. These devices usually require high optical pump powers, but absorption of photons by impurities limits their usability due to heat accumulation that leads to thermo-optic refractive index changes. These refractive index changes distort the beam shape and disturb the phase-matching condition. Furthermore pyroelectric fields can build up. In this thesis the residual optical absorption in congruent LiNbO{sub 3} (CLN) and MgO:LN crystals is studied. Absorption spectra of CLN and MgO:LN crystals between 400-2000 nm reveal a residual absorption up to 0.04 cm{sup -1}. This absorption is mainly caused by transition metal impurities. Between 2300-2800 nm unknown hydrogen absorption bands in CLN and MgO:LN are revealed on the order of 0.001 cm{sup -1}. High-temperature annealing is applied to the CLN and MgO:LN crystals, which decreases optical absorption by up to one order of magnitude. As an application, the operation of a 1550-nm pumped singly-resonant CW optical parametric oscillator, resonant around 2600 nm, using a low-loss, periodically-poled, annealed CLN crystal is demonstrated. Another issue that affects CLN is photorefractive damage (PRD), i.e. light-induced refractive index changes. In contrast, MgO:LN crystals do not suffer from PRD even at high optical intensities. However, it is shown in this thesis that PRD can occur within seconds in MgO:LN, using green laser light at light intensity levels as low as 100 mW/cm{sup 2}, if the crystal is heated by several degrees Celsius during or before illumination. Photorefractive damage does not occur in CLN crystals under the same conditions. We show that the pyroelectric effect together with an elevated photoconductivity compared to that of CLN causes this beam distortion and that this effect also

  18. Interaction of light with impurities in lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwesyg, Judith Renate Marie-Luise

    2011-01-01

    Congruent lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) and 5-mol% MgO-doped LiNbO 3 (MgO:LN) crystals are widely used as nonlinear-optical crystals in frequency-conversion devices due to their large nonlinear-optic coefficients. These devices usually require high optical pump powers, but absorption of photons by impurities limits their usability due to heat accumulation that leads to thermo-optic refractive index changes. These refractive index changes distort the beam shape and disturb the phase-matching condition. Furthermore pyroelectric fields can build up. In this thesis the residual optical absorption in congruent LiNbO 3 (CLN) and MgO:LN crystals is studied. Absorption spectra of CLN and MgO:LN crystals between 400-2000 nm reveal a residual absorption up to 0.04 cm -1 . This absorption is mainly caused by transition metal impurities. Between 2300-2800 nm unknown hydrogen absorption bands in CLN and MgO:LN are revealed on the order of 0.001 cm -1 . High-temperature annealing is applied to the CLN and MgO:LN crystals, which decreases optical absorption by up to one order of magnitude. As an application, the operation of a 1550-nm pumped singly-resonant CW optical parametric oscillator, resonant around 2600 nm, using a low-loss, periodically-poled, annealed CLN crystal is demonstrated. Another issue that affects CLN is photorefractive damage (PRD), i.e. light-induced refractive index changes. In contrast, MgO:LN crystals do not suffer from PRD even at high optical intensities. However, it is shown in this thesis that PRD can occur within seconds in MgO:LN, using green laser light at light intensity levels as low as 100 mW/cm 2 , if the crystal is heated by several degrees Celsius during or before illumination. Photorefractive damage does not occur in CLN crystals under the same conditions. We show that the pyroelectric effect together with an elevated photoconductivity compared to that of CLN causes this beam distortion and that this effect also influences frequency conversion

  19. Radiation effects and defects in lithium borate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikov, Igor N.; Poryvay, Nikita E.; Pustovarov, Vladimir A.

    2010-11-01

    The paper presents the results of a study of the formation and decay of lattice defects in wide band-gap optical crystals of LiB3O5 (LBO), Li2B4O7 (LTB) and Li6Gd(BO3)3 (LGBO) with a sublattice of mobile lithium cations. By means of thermoluminescence techniques, and luminescent and absorption optical spectroscopy with a nanosecond time resolution under excitation with an electron beam, it was revealed that the optical absorption in these crystals in the visible and ultraviolet spectral ranges is produced by optical hole-transitions from the local defect level to the valence band states. The valence band density of the states determines mainly the optical absorption spectral profile, and the relaxation kinetics is rated by the interdefect non-radiative tunnel recombination between the trapped-hole center and the Li0 trapped-electron centers. At 290 K, the Li0 centers are subject to thermally stimulated migration. Based on experimental results, the overall picture of thermally stimulated recombination processes with the participation of shallow traps was established for these crystals.

  20. Radiation effects and defects in lithium borate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikov, Igor N; Poryvay, Nikita E; Pustovarov, Vladimir A, E-mail: igor.ogorodnikov@bk.ru [Ural Federal University, Mira Street, 19, Ekaterinburg 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-15

    The paper presents the results of a study of the formation and decay of lattice defects in wide band-gap optical crystals of LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} (LBO), Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} (LTB) and Li{sub 6}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (LGBO) with a sublattice of mobile lithium cations. By means of thermoluminescence techniques, and luminescent and absorption optical spectroscopy with a nanosecond time resolution under excitation with an electron beam, it was revealed that the optical absorption in these crystals in the visible and ultraviolet spectral ranges is produced by optical hole-transitions from the local defect level to the valence band states. The valence band density of the states determines mainly the optical absorption spectral profile, and the relaxation kinetics is rated by the interdefect non-radiative tunnel recombination between the trapped-hole center and the Li{sup 0} trapped-electron centers. At 290 K, the Li{sup 0} centers are subject to thermally stimulated migration. Based on experimental results, the overall picture of thermally stimulated recombination processes with the participation of shallow traps was established for these crystals.

  1. Shock compression experiments on Lithium Deuteride single crystals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudson, Marcus D.; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Lemke, Raymond W.

    2014-10-01

    S hock compression exper iments in the few hundred GPa (multi - Mabr) regime were performed on Lithium Deuteride (LiD) single crystals . This study utilized the high velocity flyer plate capability of the Sandia Z Machine to perform impact experiments at flyer plate velocities in the range of 17 - 32 km/s. Measurements included pressure, density, and temperature between %7E200 - 600 GPa along the Principal Hugoniot - the locus of end states achievable through compression by large amplitude shock waves - as well as pressure and density of re - shock states up to %7E900 GPa . The experimental measurements are compared with recent density functional theory calculations as well as a new tabular equation of state developed at Los Alamos National Labs.

  2. Reduction of precursor decay anomaly in single crystal lithium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Yukio

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal that the precursor decay anomaly in single crystal lithium fluoride is reduced by Sano's decay curve [Y. Sano, J. Appl. Phys. 85, 7616 (1999)], which is much smaller in slope than Asay's decay curve [J. R. Asay, G. R. Fowles, G. E. Duvall, M. H. Miles, and R. F. Tinder, J. Appl. Phys. 43, 2132 (1972)]. To this end, strain, particle, velocity, and stress in a precursor and near the leading edge of the follower changing with time along Sano's decay curve are first analyzed quantitatively. The analysis verified the existence of degenerate contraction waves I and II and a subrarefaction wave R', and the decay process [Y. Sano, J. Appl. Phys. 77, 3746 (1995)] caused in sequence by evolving followers C, I, II, R', Rb. Next, inequalities relating decay rates qualitatively to plastic strain rates at the leading edge of the follower, which are derived using the properties of the followers, are incorporated into the analysis. Calculation results showed that the plastic strain rates were reduced by low decay rates. This indicates that the precursor decay anomaly might be greatly reduced by Sano's decay curve.

  3. Investigation of the cluster formation in lithium niobate crystals by computer modeling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voskresenskii, V. M.; Starodub, O. R., E-mail: ol-star@mail.ru; Sidorov, N. V.; Palatnikov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Tananaev Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Rare Earth Elements and Mineral Raw Materials, Kola Science Centre (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The processes occurring upon the formation of energetically equilibrium oxygen-octahedral clusters in the ferroelectric phase of a stoichiometric lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) crystal have been investigated by the computer modeling method within the semiclassical atomistic model. An energetically favorable cluster size (at which a structure similar to that of a congruent crystal is organized) is shown to exist. A stoichiometric cluster cannot exist because of the electroneutrality loss. The most energetically favorable cluster is that with a Li/Nb ratio of about 0.945, a value close to the lithium-to-niobium ratio for a congruent crystal.

  4. Adsorption of lithium on the (112) face of molybdenum crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupalo, M.S.; Medvedev, V.K.; Palyukh, B.M.; Smereka, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    The structure, work function and heat resistance of lithium films on the (112) face of Mo are investigated by the slow electron diffraction method and the contact potential difference technique. The isles of the p(1x4) structure grow in lithium films in the area of coatings 0.6-0.7 14 cm -2 , type one phase transformation between the p(1x4) and p(1x2) structures takes places in the area of 2.1 14 cm -2 , and the phase transformation of the first type between the p(1x2) structure and one-dimensional incoherent structure with n=5.5x10 14 cm -2 occurs in the range of 4.2 14 cm -2 . At n>5.5x10 14 cm -2 the compression of lithium film occurs, which has a one-dimensional incoherent structure, along the direction of atomic lines of the (112) Mo face, leading at n=8.3x10 14 cm -2 to the formation of monolayer coating of the p(1x1) structure. The redistribution of atoms between the first and the second lithium layers is found at the formation of two-layer lithium film. Concentration dependences of work function and absorption heat of lithium are in good agreement with the structural transformations in lithium films taking place with variations in the coating. Investigated are order-disorder transformations in lithium films

  5. Fabrication of lithium ceramic pellets, rings and single crystals for irradiation in BEATRIX-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slagle, O.D.; Noda, K.; Takahashi, T.

    1989-04-01

    BEATRIX-II is an IEA sponsored experiment of lithium ceramic solid breeder materials in the FFTF/MOTA. Li 2 O solid pellets and annular ring specimens were fabricated for in-situ tritium release tests. In addition, a series of single crystal and polycrystalline lithium ceramic samples were fabricated to determine the irradiation behavior and beryllium compatibility. 6 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Gamma radiation effects on photorefractive and photoelectric properties of lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyan, Eh.S.; Ovsepyan, R.K.; Pogosyan, A.R.; Timofeev, A.L.

    1984-08-01

    Investigations into the gamma radiation effect on the photorefractive aned photoelectric properties of lithium niobate crystals have been carried out for the first time. Gamma irradiation has been found to lead to an increase in the photorefractive sensitivity. The effect of optical decoloration has been discovered for the first time along with photorelaxation currents resulting from radiation center decay under the action of light. It has been shown that an increase of photorefractive sensitivity in gamma-irradiated lithium niobate crystals is caused by a new photorefraction mechanism - photorelaxation currents.

  7. Efficient femtosecond mid-infrared pulse generation by dispersivewave radiation in bulk lithium niobate crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Binbin; Guo, Hairun; Bache, Morten

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate efficient mid-infrared pulse generation by dispersive wave radiation in bulk lithium niobate crystal. Femtosecond mid-IR pulses centering from 2.8–2.92 µm are generated using the single pump wavelengths from 1.25–1.45 µm.......We experimentally demonstrate efficient mid-infrared pulse generation by dispersive wave radiation in bulk lithium niobate crystal. Femtosecond mid-IR pulses centering from 2.8–2.92 µm are generated using the single pump wavelengths from 1.25–1.45 µm....

  8. Conversion of broadband thermal radiation in lithium niobate crystals of various compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syuy, A. V.; Litvinova, M. N.; Goncharova, P. S.; Sidorov, N. V.; Palatnikov, M. N.; Krishtop, V. V.; Likhtin, V. V.

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of the broadband thermal radiation in stoichiometric ( R = 1) lithium niobate single crystals that are grown from melt with 58.6 mol % of LiO2, congruent ( R = Li/Nb = 0.946) melt with the K2O flux admixture (4.5 and 6.0 wt %), and congruent melt and in congruent single crystals doped with the Zn2+, Gd3+, and Er3+ cations is studied. It is demonstrated that the conversion efficiency of the stoichiometric crystal that is grown from the melt with 58.6 mol % of LiO2 is less than the conversion efficiency of congruent crystal. In addition, the stoichiometric and almost stoichiometric crystals and the doped congruent crystals exhibit the blue shift of the peak conversion intensity in comparison with a nominally pure congruent crystal. For the congruent crystals, the conversion intensities peak at 520 and 495 nm, respectively.

  9. X-ray diffraction study of lithium hydrazinium sulfate and lithium ammonium sulfate crystals under a static electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, M.T.; Becker, R.A.; Klapper, H.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray diffraction studies are made on proton-conducting polar lithium hydrazinium sulfate and ferroelectric lithium ammonium sulfate. The X-ray rocking curves recorded with in situ electric field along the polar b axis of lithium hydrazinium sulfate (direction of proton conductivity) show a strong enhancement of the 0k0 diffraction intensity. The corresponding 0k0 X-ray topographs reveal extinction contrast consisting of striations parallel to the polar axis. They disappear when the electric field is switched off. The effect is very strong in 0k0 but invisible in h0l reflections. It is present only if the electric field is parallel to the polar axis b. This unusual X-ray topographic contrast is correlated with the proton conduction. It is supposed that, under electric field, an inhomogeneous charge distribution develops, distorting the crystal lattice. Similar experiments on lithium ammonium sulfate also show contrast variations, but of quite different behaviour than before. In this case they result from changes of the ferroelectric domain configuration under electric field. (orig.)

  10. Influence of defects on positron transmission and annihilation in the lithium fluoride crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varisov, A.Z.; Kozlov, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    The positron implantation profile and the angular distribution of annihilation γ quanta were determined for a lithium fluoride crystal under β + and γ irradiation ( 22 Na source). The positron absorption coefficient of the irradiated crystal was α = 76.2 +- 1.5 cm -1 . The angular distribution had a strong narrow component. After thermal bleaching of the crystal, α = 91.9 +- 1.5 cm -1 , the narrow component made a smaller contribution to the angular distribution, and its half-width increased. The positron mobility was found to be μ = 18 +- 8 cm 2 x V -1 x sec -1 . It is suggested that defects influence in two ways the fate of positrons in the lithium fluoride crystal: free positrons may be trapped by some defects (cationic vacancies) or annihilated in collisions with others (F centers). The defect concentration is estimated

  11. Damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal under single and multiple femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Qinglong; Zhang, Bin; Zhong, Sencheng; Zhu, Liguo

    2016-01-01

    The damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal under single and multiple femtosecond laser pulses has been studied theoretically and experimentally. Firstly, the model for the damage threshold prediction of crystal materials based on the improved rate equation has been proposed. Then, the experimental measure method of the damage threshold of crystal materials has been given in detail. On the basis, the variation of the damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal with the pulse duration has also been analyzed quantitatively. Finally, the damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal under multiple laser pulses has been measured and compared to the theoretical results. The results show that the transmittance of lithium niobate crystal is almost a constant when the laser pulse fluence is relative low, whereas it decreases linearly with the increase in the laser pulse fluence below the damage threshold. The damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal increases with the increase in the duration of the femtosecond laser pulse. And the damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal under multiple laser pulses is obviously lower than that irradiated by a single laser pulse. The theoretical data fall in good agreement with the experimental results. (orig.)

  12. Angular distributions of sputtered particles from lithium-implanted aluminium and copper crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Johnson, E.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Steenstrup, S.; Andersen, H.H.; Buhanov, V.M.; Chernysh, V.S.; Ivanov, I.N.; Minnebaev, K.F.

    1991-01-01

    The anisotropy of angular distributions of sputtered ions from lithium implanted aluminium and copper single crystals, measured by SIMS analysis, have been used to obtain information about the microstructure of the implanted layers. Sputtered Al + distributions from the {111} surface show three-fold symmetry with maximum intensity near the and directions respectively, while Li + distributions show maximum intensity only in the directions. From {100} crystals the Al + distributions have four-fold symmetry while there are no preferential ejection directions for the Li + ions. This agrees conceptually with the fact that the implanted layer contains the ordered Al 3 Li (δ') phase, which has earlier been observed by TEM analysis on implanted samples. In contrast, a similar study of Li + implanted copper crystals shows that the implanted lithium is randomly located. (orig.)

  13. Influence of UV light and heat on the ferroelectric properties of lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steigerwald, Hendrik

    2011-08-15

    One of the most important non-linear-optical materials is lithium niobate, due to its ease of fabrication, robustness, transparency in the visible-to-infrared and excellent nonlinear properties. In this thesis the issue of tailoring ferroelectric domain structures in lithium niobate crystals is approached from two sides: interaction of defect structures inside the crystal with growing ferroelectric domains is investigated and also actual domain patterning on all crystal faces by different methods is performed. Special emphasis is given to the Mg-doped material. The fundamental understanding and the methods of domain patterning developed in this thesis are then used to obtain tailored domain structures that meet the requirements of their intended application in non-linear optics. (orig.)

  14. Continuous wave ultraviolet radiation induced frustration of etching in lithium niobate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailis, S.; Riziotis, C.; Smith, P.G.R.; Scott, J.G.; Eason, R.W

    2003-02-15

    Illumination of the -z face of congruent lithium niobate single crystals with continuous wave (c.w.) ultraviolet (UV) laser radiation modifies the response of the surface to subsequent acid etching. A frequency doubled Ar{sup +} laser ({lambda}=244 nm) was used to illuminate the -z crystal face making it resistive to HF etching and thus transforming the illuminated tracks into ridge structures. This process enables the fabrication of relief patterns in a photolithographic manner. Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy indicates preservation of the good crystal quality after irradiation.

  15. Synthesis, crystal structure, and photoluminescence of a lithium isothiocyanate compound with 18-crown-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Shan; Fu, Bo; Zhao, Zhen; Liu, Xi [Chongqing Normal Univ. (China). Chongqing Key Lab. of Inorganic Functional Materials

    2018-04-01

    The investigation of the supramolecular interactions between the lithium isothiocyanate salt and 18-crown-6 (18C-6) in commercial tetrahydrofuran leads to the formation of a lithium compound, LiNCS(H{sub 2}O)(18C-6) (1). In the crystal structure the asymmetric unit contains two similar LiNCS(H{sub 2}O)(18C-6) molecules. Solid-state photoluminescence experiments have shown that compound 1 emits violet luminescence, and its possible emission mechanism was investigated in detail based on theoretical calculations.

  16. The crystallization and properties of sputter deposited lithium niobite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shank, Joshua C.; Brooks Tellekamp, M.; Alan Doolittle, W., E-mail: alan.doolittle@ece.gatech.edu

    2016-06-30

    Sputter deposition of the thin film memristor material, lithium niobite (LiNbO{sub 2}) is performed by co-deposition from a lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O) and a niobium target. Crystalline films that are textured about the (101) orientation are produced under room temperature conditions. This material displays memristive hysteresis and exhibits XPS spectra similar to MBE and bulk grown LiNbO{sub 2}. Various deposition parameters were investigated resulting in variations in the deposition rate, film crystallinity, oxygen to niobium ratio, and mean niobium oxidation state. The results of this study allow for the routine production of large area LiNbO{sub 2} films at low substrate temperature useful in hybrid-integration of memristor, optical, and energy storage applications. - Highlights: • Room temperature sputter deposition of crystalline lithium niobite (LiNbO{sub 2}) • Contrast with previous high temperature corrosive growth methods • Analysis of sputter deposition parameters on the chemical and physical properties of the deposited material.

  17. The crystallization and properties of sputter deposited lithium niobite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, Joshua C.; Brooks Tellekamp, M.; Alan Doolittle, W.

    2016-01-01

    Sputter deposition of the thin film memristor material, lithium niobite (LiNbO_2) is performed by co-deposition from a lithium oxide (Li_2O) and a niobium target. Crystalline films that are textured about the (101) orientation are produced under room temperature conditions. This material displays memristive hysteresis and exhibits XPS spectra similar to MBE and bulk grown LiNbO_2. Various deposition parameters were investigated resulting in variations in the deposition rate, film crystallinity, oxygen to niobium ratio, and mean niobium oxidation state. The results of this study allow for the routine production of large area LiNbO_2 films at low substrate temperature useful in hybrid-integration of memristor, optical, and energy storage applications. - Highlights: • Room temperature sputter deposition of crystalline lithium niobite (LiNbO_2) • Contrast with previous high temperature corrosive growth methods • Analysis of sputter deposition parameters on the chemical and physical properties of the deposited material

  18. Lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; Stillings, Lisa L.; Jaskula, Brian W.; Munk, LeeAnn; McCauley, Andrew D.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Lithium, the lightest of all metals, is used in air treatment, batteries, ceramics, glass, metallurgy, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries are particularly important in efforts to reduce global warming because they make it possible to power cars and trucks from renewable sources of energy (for example, hydroelectric, solar, or wind) instead of by burning fossil fuels. Today, lithium is extracted from brines that are pumped from beneath arid sedimentary basins and extracted from granitic pegmatite ores. The leading producer of lithium from brine is Chile, and the leading producer of lithium from pegmatites is Australia. Other potential sources of lithium include clays, geothermal brines, oilfield brines, and zeolites. Worldwide resources of lithium are estimated to be more than 39 million metric tons, which is enough to meet projected demand to the year 2100. The United States is not a major producer at present but has significant lithium resources.

  19. Effects of crystal refining on wear behaviors and mechanical properties of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Guo, Jiawen; Sun, Yali; Tian, Beimin; Zheng, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Ming; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to improve wear resistance and mechanical properties of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics by refining their crystal sizes. After lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LD) were melted to form precursory glass blocks, bar (N = 40, n = 10) and plate (N = 32, n = 8) specimens were prepared. According to the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of precursory glass, specimens G1-G4 were designed to form lithium disilicate glass-ceramics with different crystal sizes using a two-step thermal treatment. In the meantime, heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (GC-P) and original ingots (GC-O) were used as control groups. Glass-ceramics were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and were tested using flexural strength test, nanoindentation test and toughness measurements. The plate specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350 N up to 2.4 × 10 6 loading cycles. The wear analysis of glass-ceramics was performed using a 3D profilometer after every 300,000 wear cycles. Wear morphologies and microstructures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data. Multiple pairwise comparisons of means were performed by Tukey's post-hoc test. Materials with different crystal sizes (p properties. Specifically, G3 with medium-sized crystals presented the highest flexural strength, hardness, elastic modulus and fracture toughness. G1 and G2 with small-sized crystals showed lower flexural strength, whereas G4, GC-P, and GC-O with large-sized crystals exhibited lower hardness and elastic modulus. The wear behaviors of all six groups showed running-in wear stage and steady wear stage. G3 showed the best wear resistance while GC-P and GC-O exhibited the highest wear volume loss. After crystal refining, lithium disilicate glass-ceramic with medium-sized crystals showed the highest wear resistance and mechanical properties. Copyright © 2018

  20. Shock-wave compression of lithium niobate from 2.4 to 44 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanton, P.L.; Graham, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Shock compression of lithium niobate above the Hugoniot elastic limit (about 2.5 GPa) reveals a succession of unusual features. Just above the Hugoniot elastic limit, the shock velocity is observed to be well below the bulk sound speed, indicative of a drastic reduction of shear strength. The shock velocity is observed to increase with particle velocity at an unusually large rate due to the reduction of strength in a very stiff material and an anomalously large pressure derivative of the bulk modulus. This later behavior may be due to the effects of localized shock heating resulting from heterogeneous shear deformation in ferroelectrics like lithium niobate and lithium tantalate in which increases in temperature are shown to have a strong effect on bulk modulus. A shock-induced polymorphic phase transition occurs at 13.9 GPa. Above the transition point the slope of the Hugoniot curve relating shock velocity and particle velocity is unusually low, indicative of a broad mixed phase region of undetermined extent. Limited work is reported on the isomorphous crystal, lithium tantalate, which exhibits features similar to lithium niobate with a Hugoniot elastic limit of 4 GPa and a phase transition in the vicinity of 19 GPa

  1. Near-field-optical-microscopy studies of micro-modifications caused by femtosecond laser irradiation in lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamela, J.; Jaque, D.; Rodenas, A.; Jaque, F.; Torchia, G.A.; Vazquez, J.R.; Mendez, C.; Roso, L.

    2008-01-01

    Near-field-optical-microscopy has been used to study the micro-modifications caused by femtosecond laser pulses focused at the surface and in the volume of lithium niobate crystals. We have found experimental evidence of the existence, close to femtosecond ablation craters, of periodic modifications in the surface reflectivity. In addition, the potential application of near-field-optical microscopy for the spatial location of permanent modifications caused by femtosecond pulses focused inside lithium niobate crystals has been also demonstrated. (orig.)

  2. Iron single crystal growth from a lithium-rich melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, M.; Schumann, H.; Jantz, S. G.; Breitner, F. A.; Leineweber, A.; Jesche, A.

    2018-03-01

    α -Fe single crystals of rhombic dodecahedral habit were grown from a Li84N12Fe∼3 melt. Crystals of several millimeter along a side form at temperatures around T ≈ 800 ° C. Upon further cooling the growth competes with the formation of Fe-doped Li3N. The b.c.c. structure and good sample quality of α -Fe single crystals were confirmed by X-ray and electron diffraction as well as magnetization measurements and chemical analysis. A nitrogen concentration of 90 ppm was detected by means of carrier gas hot extraction. Scanning electron microscopy did not reveal any sign of iron nitride precipitates.

  3. Effects of crystal size on the mechanical properties of a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Guo, J.W.; Wang, X.S; Zhang, S.F. [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, 145 West Changle Road, Xi’an 710032 (China); He, L., E-mail: helin@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Crystal size of lithium disilicate (LD) phase in a LD glass-ceramic was changed by thermally controlled crystallization of a precursory LD glass at different temperatures. Effects of the crystal size on the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic were investigated. It was found that the flexural strength presented a hump-like variation trend with increasing the crystal size, the hardness monotonously decreased at the same time. It was further confirmed that micro residual compressive stresses existed inside the LD crystals due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the glass matrix and the crystalline phase. The levels of the residual stresses increased with increasing the crystal size. The crystal size performed dual effects on the flexural strength of the glass-ceramic: an “interlocking effect” caused by larger-sized LD crystals and a “micro residual stress effect” related to the balancing tensile stresses in the glass matrix. Higher residual tensile stresses in the glass matrix induced by larger-sized LD crystals would counteract the “interlocking effect” of the crystals, causing the strength degradation. The hardness of the glass-ceramic was mainly controlled by the “micro residual stress effect”.

  4. Propagation of light in the lithium niobate crystal along directions close to an optical axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.V.; Egorova, G.A.; Lonskij, Eh.S.; Potapov, E.V.; Rakov, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are given of studying some characteristics of electrooptical modulator from lithium niobate when propagating in it linear-polarized light in directions close to the optical axis, the electric field being applied along the X axis. It has been shown that an increase in an angle of deviation from the optical axis of a light beam passing in the crystal changes the value of the controlling voltage. This is accompanied by the rotation of the polarization plane and the change in the intensity of the light being passed. The methods have been proposed of increasing the modulator aperture, determining the main refraction indices and some electrooptical coefficients fo the lithium niobate crystal

  5. Solid-state lithium battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  6. XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR Spectroscopy of In Situ Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, T.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Youngman, R.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a Li2O-2SiO2 (LS2) glass was investigated as a function of pressure and temperature up to 6 GPa and 750 C respectively, using XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. Glass densified at 6 GPa has an average Si-O-Si bond angle approx.7deg lower than that found in glass processed at 4.5 GPa. At 4.5 GPa, lithium disilicate crystallizes from the glass, while at 6 GPa a new high pressure form of lithium metasilicate crystallizes. The new phase, while having lithium metasilicate crystal symmetry, contains at least 4 different Si sites. NMR results for 6 GPa sample indicate the presence of Q4 species with (Q(sup 4))Si-O-Si(Q(sup 4)) bond angles of approx.157deg. This is the first reported occurrence of Q(sup 4) species with such large bond angles in alumina free alkali silicate glass. No five- or six- coordinated Si are found.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of lithium fluoride nano crystals doped with silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario M, B. R.; Ramirez C, G.; Encarnacion E, E. K.; Sosa A, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    Thermoluminescence (Tl) is the emission of light by certain materials to be heated below its incandescence temperature, having previously been exposed to an exciting agent such as ionizing radiation. Lithium fluoride (LiF) is the thermoluminescent material used in the manufacture of Tl-100 dosimeters. What morphological characteristics (size, crystallinity) do the nano crystals of pure lithium fluoride (LiF) have when doped with silver (Ag) by the precipitation method? The objective of this study was to synthesize and characterize the LiF nano crystals doped with silver (Ag) in concentrations of 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.1 and 0.2%. The samples were synthesized using as reagents; distilled water, ammonium fluoride (NH 4 F), lithium chloride (LiCl), silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ); and materials such as: 0.1 mg precision balance, spatulas, test piece, magnetic stirrer, beaker, volumetric flask, burette, burette clamp, key and magnetic stirring wand. In the characterization process we used and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) with which we obtained the X-ray diffraction spectrum with well-defined peaks that are characteristic of LiF. Using the Scherrer equation we calculate the sizes of nano crystals. This study demonstrates that is possible to synthesize LiF using new dopant materials. (Author)

  8. Protons in neutron-irradiated and thermochemically reduced MgO crystals doped with lithium impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, R.; Pareja, R.; Chen, Y.

    1992-01-01

    H - (hydride) ions have been observed in lithium-doped MgO crystals which have been neutron irradiated or thermochemically reduced (TCR). Infrared-absorption measurements have been used to identify the local modes of the H - ions in these crystals. The concentration of the H - ions in the neutron-irradiated crystals is found to be far less than that found in the TCR crystals. The thermal stability of H - and oxygen vacancies in both oxidizing and reducing atmospheres are investigated. The emergence of sharp structures due to OH - ions is attributed to the displacements of substitutional Li + ions, leaving behind unperturbed OH - ions, via a mechanism of rapid radiation-induced diffusion during irradiation in a reactor. Results of neutron-irradiated MgO:Li, which had previously been oxidized at high temperature, are also presented

  9. Photorefractive lithium niobate crystals for applications in photonics; Photorefraktive Lithiumniobatkristalle fuer Anwendungen in der Photonik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, U.

    2006-12-15

    Lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO{sub 3}) generally show a photorefractive response, i.e., light-induced refractive index changes. Crystals are investigated at room temperature and at elevated temperatures. As a result 'classical' photorefractive holographic volume-phase gratings, originating from space charge fields and the electro-optic effect, and 'non-classical' photorefractive volume-phase gratings, which can be traced back to strong absorption gratings, emerge. Single domain and periodically poled crystals (PPLN) are investigated. PPLN is typically used in non-linear optics for frequency conversion. The crystals also show non-linear photorefractive response during holographic recording with isotropically polarized light beams of equal intensity and, in the case of PPLN, by mixing of domain and holographic gratings. The results are important for applications combining the photorefractive and non-linear optical properties of LiNbO{sub 3}. (orig.)

  10. Pyroelectric field assisted ion migration induced by ultraviolet laser irradiation and its impact on ferroelectric domain inversion in lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, C. Y. J.; Mailis, S.; Daniell, G. J.; Steigerwald, H.; Soergel, E.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of UV laser irradiation on the distribution of lithium ions in ferroelectric lithium niobate single crystals has been numerically modelled. Strongly absorbed UV radiation at wavelengths of 244–305 nm produces steep temperature gradients which cause lithium ions to migrate and result in a local variation of the lithium concentration. In addition to the diffusion, here the pyroelectric effect is also taken into account which predicts a complex distribution of lithium concentration along the c-axis of the crystal: two separated lithium deficient regions on the surface and in depth. The modelling on the local lithium concentration and the subsequent variation of the coercive field are used to explain experimental results on the domain inversion of such UV treated lithium niobate crystals

  11. Lithium niobate bulk crystallization promoted by CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, N. M.; Costa, F. M.; Nogueira, R. N.; Graça, M. P. F.

    2012-09-01

    The crystallization induced by laser radiation is a very promising technique to promote glass/ceramic transformation, being already used to produce crystalline patterns on glass surfaces. In this work, a SiO2-Li2O-Nb2O5 glass, prepared by the sol-gel route, was submitted to CO2 laser radiation and conventional heat-treatments in order to induce the LiNbO3 crystallization. The structure and morphology of the samples prepared by both routes was analyzed as a function of exposure time, radiation power and heat-treatment temperatures by XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM. The results reveal a correlation between the crystallization degree of LiNbO3 particles and glass matrix with the heat treatment type and experimental parameters. An heat-treatment at 650 °C/4 h was necessary to induce crystallization in heat treatments samples while 4 W/500 s was enough for laser radiation ones, corresponding a reduction time processing of ˜14 000 s.

  12. Effect of Crystallization Firing on Marginal Gap of CAD/CAM Fabricated Lithium Disilicate Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Steven A; Ferracane, Jack L; da Costa, Juliana

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the marginal gaps of CAD/CAM (CEREC 3) produced crowns made from leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (IPS Empress CAD) blocks (LG), and lithium-disilicate (IPS e.max CAD) blocks before (LD-B), and after (LD-A) crystallization firing. A human molar tooth (#19) was mounted with adjacent teeth on a typodont and prepared for a full-coverage ceramic crown. The typodont was assembled in the mannequin head to simulate clinical conditions. After tooth preparation 15 individual optical impressions were taken by the same operator using titanium dioxide powder and a CEREC 3 camera per manufacturer's instructions. One operator designed and machined the crowns in leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic blocks (n = 5) and lithium-disilicate blocks (n = 10) using the CEREC 3 system. The crowns were rigidly seated on the prepared tooth, and marginal gaps (μm) were measured with an optical microscope (500×) at 12 points, 3 on each of the M, B, D, and L surfaces of the leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns and the lithium-disilicate crowns before and after crystallization firing. Results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by a Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α = 0.05). The overall mean marginal gaps (μm) for the crowns evaluated were: LG = 49.2 ± 5.5, LD-B = 42.9 ± 12.2, and LD-A = 57.2 ± 16.0. The marginal gaps for LG and LD-B were not significantly different, but both were significantly less than for LD-A. The type of ceramic material did not affect the marginal gap of CAD/CAM crowns. The crystallization firing process required for lithium-disilicate crowns resulted in a significant increase in marginal gap size, likely due to shrinkage of the ceramic during the crystallization process. The marginal gap of CAD/CAM-fabricated lithium disilicate crowns increases following crystallization firing. The marginal gap still remains within clinically acceptable parameters. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Piezo-optic surfaces of lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mytsyk, B. G.; Dem'yanyshyn, N. M.

    2006-01-01

    A method of construction of the spatial distribution of the piezo-optic effect in crystals is proposed. A particular case of this method is the known technique of construction of indicator surfaces of the piezo-optic effect. The essence of the proposed method consists in determining the difference in the radius vectors of the optical indicatrix perturbed by stress and the free optical indicatrix. It is shown that this difference in the radius vectors is mathematically identical to the law of transformation of the piezo-optic tensor during the rotation of the coordinate system

  14. Fluorescent detection of single tracks of alpha particles using lithium fluoride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilski, P.; Marczewska, B.

    2017-01-01

    Lithium fluoride single crystals were successfully used for fluorescent imaging of single tracks of alpha particles. This was realized with a standard wide-field fluorescent microscope equipped with a 100× objective. Alpha particles create F_2 and F_3"+ color centers in LiF crystals. The subsequent illumination with the blue light (wavelength around 445 nm), excites these centers and produces fluorescence with a broad band peaked at 670 nm. The observed tracks of alpha particles have diameter of about 500 nm. Focusing of the microscope at different depths in a LiF crystal, enables imaging changes of shape and position of tracks, allowing for visualization of their paths. These encouraging results are the first step towards practical application of LiF as fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  15. The photorefractive characteristics of bismuth-oxide doped lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Dahuai; Yao, Jiaying; Kong, Yongfa; Liu, Shiguo; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Shaolin; Xu, Jingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bismuth-doped lithium niobate (LN:Bi) crystals were grown by Czochralski method and their optical damage resistance, photorefraction, absorption spectra, and defect energy levels were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the photorefractive properties of LN:Bi were enhanced as compared with congruent one, the photorefractive response time was greatly shortened, the photorefractive sensitivity was increased, and the diffraction efficiency of near-stoichiometric LN:Bi (SLN:Bi) reached 31.72% and 49.08% at 532 nm and 488 nm laser, respectively (light intensity of 400 mW/cm 2 ). An absorption peak at about 350 nm was observed in the absorption spectrum of LN:Bi. And the defect energy levels simulation indicates new defect levels appear in the forbidden gap of LN:Bi crystals. Therefore bismuth can act as photorefractive centers in LN crystals

  16. The photorefractive characteristics of bismuth-oxide doped lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Dahuai; Yao, Jiaying [School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Kong, Yongfa, E-mail: kongyf@nankai.edu.cn [School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Weak-Light Nonlinear Photonics and TEDA Applied Physics School, Nankai University, Tianjin 300457 (China); R and D Center, Taishan Sports Industry Group, Leling 253600 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Shiguo [School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhang, Ling; Chen, Shaolin [MOE Key Laboratory of Weak-Light Nonlinear Photonics and TEDA Applied Physics School, Nankai University, Tianjin 300457 (China); Xu, Jingjun [School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Weak-Light Nonlinear Photonics and TEDA Applied Physics School, Nankai University, Tianjin 300457 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Bismuth-doped lithium niobate (LN:Bi) crystals were grown by Czochralski method and their optical damage resistance, photorefraction, absorption spectra, and defect energy levels were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the photorefractive properties of LN:Bi were enhanced as compared with congruent one, the photorefractive response time was greatly shortened, the photorefractive sensitivity was increased, and the diffraction efficiency of near-stoichiometric LN:Bi (SLN:Bi) reached 31.72% and 49.08% at 532 nm and 488 nm laser, respectively (light intensity of 400 mW/cm{sup 2}). An absorption peak at about 350 nm was observed in the absorption spectrum of LN:Bi. And the defect energy levels simulation indicates new defect levels appear in the forbidden gap of LN:Bi crystals. Therefore bismuth can act as photorefractive centers in LN crystals.

  17. Preparation of polycrystalline lithium-yttrium fluoride for subsequent mono crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, E.; Radomski, J.; Diduszko, R.; Iwanejko, J.; Kowalczyk, Z.; Grasza, K.

    1994-01-01

    High purity lithium-yttrium (YLF) doped with rare earth elements (Nd, Pr, Ho or Tm) was obtained in a two-stage synthesis consisting of (1) reaction of ammonium fluoride with a mixture of lithium carbonate, yttrium oxide, and oxides of lanthanides, and (2) heating of the obtained reaction products at a temperature of about 700 C in an inert gas atmosphere. The phase and chemical purities of the obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction and mass spectrometry techniques. Single crystal growth tests were carried out by means of the Bridgman method. The results showed that the proposed method for manufacture of polycrystalline YLF doped with rare earth elements is appropriate in principle but some parameters of the preparation process are to be more strictly defined. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  18. Preparation of polycrystalline lithium-yttrium fluoride for subsequent mono crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, E.; Radomski, J.; Diduszko, R.; Iwanejko, J. [Institute of Vacuum Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Kowalczyk, Z. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland); Grasza, K. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. Fizyki

    1994-12-31

    High purity lithium-yttrium (YLF) doped with rare earth elements (Nd, Pr, Ho or Tm) was obtained in a two-stage synthesis consisting of (1) reaction of ammonium fluoride with a mixture of lithium carbonate, yttrium oxide, and oxides of lanthanides, and (2) heating of the obtained reaction products at a temperature of about 700 C in an inert gas atmosphere. The phase and chemical purities of the obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction and mass spectrometry techniques. Single crystal growth tests were carried out by means of the Bridgman method. The results showed that the proposed method for manufacture of polycrystalline YLF doped with rare earth elements is appropriate in principle but some parameters of the preparation process are to be more strictly defined. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab.

  19. Structural, mechanical, electrical and optical properties of a new lithium boro phthalate NLO crystal synthesized by a slow evaporation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, K.; Balasubramanian, D.; Jhansi, N.

    2017-11-01

    A new non-linear optical (NLO) single crystal of lithium boro phthalate (LiBP) was grown by slow solvent evaporation technique. The powder sample was subjected to powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) to find its crystalline nature and the crystal structure of the grown crystal was determined using single crystal X-ray (SXRD) diffraction analysis. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum was recorded for grown crystal to identify the various functional groups present in the compound. The mechanical property of the LiBP single crystal was studied using Vickers microhardness tester. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss measurements were carried out for the grown crystal at various temperatures. The grown crystal was subjected to UV-Visible Spectral Studies to analyze the linear optical behavior of the grown crystal. The Kurtz-Perry Powder technique was employed to measure the Second Harmonic Generation efficiency of the grown crystal.

  20. Isothermal equation of state of a lithium fluoride single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.Y.

    1975-01-01

    An isothermal equation of state of a LiF single crystal was determined from length change measurements of the specimen as a function of hydrostatic pressure up to approximately 7 kbars at 28 to 41/sup 0/C. The length change was measured with an accuracy of approximately 500 A by using a Fabry Perot type He--Ne laser interferometer for a 1-m long specimen at temperatures constant to less than 0.002/sup 0/C. Several two- and three-parameter equations of state were used in analyzing the measured pressure-volume data. The computer fit for each equation of state determines not only the value of its parameters but also the standard deviations associated with them and one dependent variable, either pressure or volume. With the parameters determined, the equations of state are extrapolated to approximately 5 megabars in order to see discrepancies. Using the Born model of ionic solids, two equations of state were derived both from a power law potential and from an exponential form for the repulsive energy of alkali metal halides and used to fit the pressure-volume data of a LiF single crystal. They are also extrapolated to approximately 5 megabars. The Birch's two-parameter equation and the Grover, Getting, and Kennedy equation are indistinguishable from the two equations of state derived from the Born model for pressures approximately equal to or less than 800 kbars within +-20 kbars. The above four equations of state also fit closely the Pagannone and Drickamer static compression data, the Christian shock wave data, and the Kormer et al. shock wave data. The isothermal bulk modulus and its first pressure derivative at atmospheric pressure and 28.83/sup 0/C are 664.5 +- 0.5 kbars and 5.40 +- 0.18, respectively, in close agreement with those values ultrasonically measured by R. A. Miller and C. S. Smith. (auth)

  1. X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of structurally modified lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitova, Tonya

    2008-02-15

    The type and concentration of impurity centers in different valence states are crucial for tuning the photorefractive properties of doped Lithium Niobate (LN) crystals. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is an appropriate tool for studying the local structure of impurity centers. XAS combined with absorption in UV/VIS/IR and High Resolution X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (HRXES) provide information about the valence state of the dopant ions in as-grown, reduced or oxidized doped LN crystals. Cu (Cu{sup 1+} and Cu{sup 2+}) and Fe (Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) atoms are found in two different valence states, whereas there are indications for a third Mn valency, in addition to Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+} in manganese-doped LN crystals. One of the charge compensation mechanisms during reduction of copper- doped LN crystals is outgassing of oxygen atoms. Cu ions in the reduced crystals have at least two different site symmetries: twofold (Cu{sup 1+}) and sixfold (Cu{sup 2+}) coordinated by O atoms. Fe and Mn atoms are coordinated by six O atoms. Cu and Fe ions are found to occupy only Li sites, whereas Mn ions are also incorporated into Li and Nb sites. The refractive index change in LN crystals irradiated with {sup 3}He{sup 2+} ions is caused by structurally disordered centers, where Nb atoms are displaced from normal crystallographic sites and Li or/and O vacancies are present. (orig.)

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of structurally modified lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitova, Tonya

    2008-02-01

    The type and concentration of impurity centers in different valence states are crucial for tuning the photorefractive properties of doped Lithium Niobate (LN) crystals. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is an appropriate tool for studying the local structure of impurity centers. XAS combined with absorption in UV/VIS/IR and High Resolution X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (HRXES) provide information about the valence state of the dopant ions in as-grown, reduced or oxidized doped LN crystals. Cu (Cu 1+ and Cu 2+ ) and Fe (Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ ) atoms are found in two different valence states, whereas there are indications for a third Mn valency, in addition to Mn 2+ and Mn 3+ in manganese-doped LN crystals. One of the charge compensation mechanisms during reduction of copper- doped LN crystals is outgassing of oxygen atoms. Cu ions in the reduced crystals have at least two different site symmetries: twofold (Cu 1+ ) and sixfold (Cu 2+ ) coordinated by O atoms. Fe and Mn atoms are coordinated by six O atoms. Cu and Fe ions are found to occupy only Li sites, whereas Mn ions are also incorporated into Li and Nb sites. The refractive index change in LN crystals irradiated with 3 He 2+ ions is caused by structurally disordered centers, where Nb atoms are displaced from normal crystallographic sites and Li or/and O vacancies are present. (orig.)

  3. Effect of the processing parameters on the crystalline structure of lanthanide ortho tantalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Kisla P.F.; Dias, Anderson, E-mail: anderson_dias@iceb.ufop.br [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2014-08-15

    The influence of the synthesis parameters on the crystalline structures of ortho tantalate ceramics has been investigated. Powder materials were prepared by the solid-state reaction route. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements were employed to investigate the crystal structure of the produced materials. In this work, we analyzed three different examples in which the temperature and time were decisive on the final crystal structure of LnTaO{sub 4} compounds besides the lanthanide ionic size. Firstly, the thermal evolution for NdTaO{sub 4} samples showed that mixed crystal phases are formed up to 1100 °C, while well-crystallized M-NdTaO{sub 4} (I2/a) materials are obtained in temperatures higher than 1200 °C. Also, the influence of the synthesis time was investigated for the LaTaO{sub 4} ceramics: it was necessary 14 h to obtain samples in the P2{sub 1}/c structure. Finally, two polymorphs could be obtained for the DyTaO{sub 4} ceramics: P2/a and I2/a space groups were obtained at 1300 °C and 1500 °C, respectively. This study indicated that the temperature, time and lanthanide size are directly correlated with the crystalline arrangement of the ortho tantalate materials.(author)

  4. Domain-Reversed Lithium Niobate Single-Crystal Fibers are Potentially for Efficient Terahertz Wave Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Lu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear frequency conversion remains one of the dominant approaches to efficiently generate THz waves. Significant material absorption in the THz range is the main factor impeding the progress towards this direction. In this research, a new multicladding nonlinear fiber design was proposed to solve this problem, and as the major experimental effort, periodic domain structure was introduced into lithium niobate single-crystal fibers by electrical poling. The introduced periodic domain structures were nondestructively revealed using a crossly polarized optical microscope and a confocal scanning optical microscope for quality assurance.

  5. Structuring of material parameters in lithium niobate crystals with low-mass, high-energy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peithmann, K.; Eversheim, P.-D.; Goetze, J.; Haaks, M.; Hattermann, H.; Haubrich, S.; Hinterberger, F.; Jentjens, L.; Mader, W.; Raeth, N. L.; Schmid, H.; Zamani-Meymian, M.-R.; Maier, K.

    2011-10-01

    Ferroelectric lithium niobate crystals offer a great potential for applications in modern optics. To provide powerful optical components, tailoring of key material parameters, especially of the refractive index n and the ferroelectric domain landscape, is required. Irradiation of lithium niobate crystals with accelerated ions causes strong structured modifications in the material. The effects induced by low-mass, high-energy ions (such as 3He with 41 MeV, which are not implanted, but transmit through the entire crystal volume) are reviewed. Irradiation yields large changes of the refractive index Δn, improved domain engineering capability within the material along the ion track, and waveguiding structures. The periodic modification of Δn as well as the formation of periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) (supported by radiation damage) is described. Two-step knock-on displacement processes, 3He→Nb and 3He→O causing thermal spikes, are identified as origin for the material modifications.

  6. Ionic diffusion and salt dissociation conditions of lithium liquid crystal electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuria; Hirai, Kenichi; Murata, Shuuhei; Kishii, Yutaka; Kii, Keisuke; Yoshio, Masafumi; Kato, Takashi

    2005-06-16

    Salt dissociation conditions and dynamic properties of ionic species in liquid crystal electrolytes of lithium were investigated by a combination of NMR spectra and diffusion coefficient estimations using the pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR techniques. Activation energies of diffusion (Ea) of ionic species changed with the phase transition of the electrolyte. That is, Ea of the nematic phase was lower than that of the isotropic phase. This indicates that the aligned liquid crystal molecules prepared efficient conduction pathways for migration of ionic species. The dissociation degree of the salt was lower compared with those of the conventional electrolyte solutions and polymer gel electrolytes. This is attributed to the low concentration of polar sites, which attract the dissolved salt and promote salt dissociation, on the liquid crystal molecules. Furthermore, motional restriction of the molecules due to high viscosity and molecular oriented configuration in the nematic phase caused inefficient attraction of the sites for the salt. With a decreased dissolved salt concentration of the liquid crystal electrolyte, salt dissociation proceeded, and two diffusion components attributed to the ion and ion pair were detected independently. This means that the exchange rate between the ion and the ion pair is fairly slow once the salt is dissociated in the liquid crystal electrolytes due to the low motility of the medium molecules that initiate salt dissociation.

  7. Imprinting of slip bands in mechanically deformed MgO crystals using lithium impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orera, V M; Chen, Y; Abraham, M M

    1980-01-01

    Lithium impurities in MgO can be used to imprint slip bands produced by plastic deformation. The imprinting is obtained by means of (Li)/sup 0/ defects (subtitutional Li/sup +/ ions each with an adjacent O/sup -/ ion) which absorb light at 680 nm (1.8 eV). Slip bands are observed as discolored regions against the background of dark blue coloration due to these defects. The decoloration can be achieved by two different processes: either by oxidation at 1275 K of a deformed crystal, or by the reverse procedure - deformation of a previously oxidized crystal. The mechanisms involved in the decoloration are different; the former is due to ionic motion, and the latter is an electronic effect. Similar procedures involving surface indentation by sharp objects also result in decoloration patterns.

  8. Crystallization, Microstructure, and Viscosity Evolutions in Lithium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Fu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramics have found widespread commercial success in areas such as consumer products, telescope mirrors, fireplace windows, etc. However, there is still much to learn regarding the fundamental mechanisms of crystallization, especially related to the evolution of viscosity as a function of the crystallization (ceramming process. In this study, the impact of phase assemblage and microstructure on the viscosity was investigated using high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD, beam bending viscometry (BBV, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Results from this study provide a first direct observation of viscosity evolution as a function of ceramming time and temperature. Sharp viscosity increases due to phase separation, nucleation and phase transformation are noticed through BBV measurement. A near-net shape ceramming can be achieved in TiO2-containing compositions by keeping the glass at a high viscosity (> 109 Pa.s throughout the whole thermal treatment.

  9. Bending waveguides made in x-cut lithium niobate crystals for technological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarepi, V; Perrone, C; Aveni, M; Videla, F; Torchia, GA

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the performance of several designs of integrated optical deviators made in x-cut lithium niobate crystals by means of femtosecond laser writing using the double line approach. Straight and bent guiding structures have been designed and implemented using this technique. Well-confined propagation modes at communication wavelengths (1.55 μm) were conducted in these structures with acceptable overall losses (less than 2 dB cm −1 ). Further, a discussion about the optical propagation losses for curved and straight deviators devices is included in this work. At a low aperture angle (less than 0.2°), as expected, low losses were determined for both structures; however, a weak output light was observed for large angles (greater than 0.2°) in the straight optical circuits. In contrast, a smooth variation of the output was measured for the bent structures. The results presented in this paper support the possibility of the technological implementation of integrated optical circuits for optical communications fabricated with ultrashort laser writing in lithium niobate crystals. In addition, some hypotheses of loss mechanisms that are normally not considered are discussed in order to explain the differences between the measured values and predictions obtained by calculating with the usual models. (paper)

  10. Real-time qualitative study of forsterite crystal - Melt lithium distribution by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, V. F.; Makarchuk, P. S.; Stepanov, D. N.

    2017-11-01

    A factor of lithium distribution between single-crystal forsterite (Cr,Li:Mg2SiO4) and its melt are studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Lithium content in the crystalline phase is found to achieve a saturation at relatively low Li concentration in the melt (about 0.02%wt.). An algorithm and software are developed for real-time analysis of the studied spectra of lithium trace amounts at wide variation of the plasma radiation intensity. The analyzed plasma spectra processing method is based on the calculation of lithium emission part in the total emission of the target plasma for each recorded spectrum followed by the error estimation for the series of measurements in the normal distribution approximation.

  11. Microindentation deformation of lithium dihydrogen phosphate single crystals: Microhardness measurement and indentation size effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iurchenko, Anton [Institute for Single Crystals, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Avenue 60, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Borc, Jarosław, E-mail: j.borc@pollub.pl [Department of Applied Physics, Lublin University of Technology, ul. Nadbystrzycka 38, 20-618 Lublin (Poland); Sangwal, Keshra [Department of Applied Physics, Lublin University of Technology, ul. Nadbystrzycka 38, 20-618 Lublin (Poland); Voronov, Alexei [Institute for Single Crystals, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Avenue 60, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2016-02-15

    The Vickers microhardness H{sub V} of the (110) and (111) as-grown faces of lithium dihydrogen phosphate (LDP) crystals was investigated as a function of applied load P. The microhardness H{sub V} of the two faces increases with load P i.e. reverse indentation size effect (reverse ISE) and the hardness of the (110) face is somewhat lower than that of the (111) face but this difference is not easily recognized for these planes due to large scatter in the data. The origin of observed ISE was analyzed using different approaches. It was found that: (1) Hays–Kendall's and Begley–Hutchinson's relations do not explain the origin of reverse ISE but Meyer's law describes the reverse ISE satisfactorily and its constants provide a link between ISE and formation of radial cracks with applied indentation load P, (2) reverse ISE is associated with tensile surface stresses, (3) despite its failure to explain reverse ISE, Begley–Hutchinson's relation is reliable to obtain load-independent hardness H{sub 0}, is 2337 MPa for LDP, and (4) the value of fracture toughness K{sub C} of LDP crystals lies between 4.7 and 12 MPa m{sup 1/2}. The load-independent hardness H{sub 0} of LDP is higher by a factor of 1.5 than that reported for undoped KDP and ADP crystals whereas its fracture toughness K{sub C} is higher by factor of about 20 than that of undoped KDP crystals. - Highlights: • Vickers indentations on the (110) and (111) faces of LDP crystals were made. • The microhardness H{sub V} was investigated as a function of applied load P. • Reverse indentation size effect was observed. • Fracture toughness K{sub C} from the radial cracks was calculated.

  12. Photonic guiding structures in lithium niobate crystals produced by energetic ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng

    2009-10-01

    A range of ion beam techniques have been used to fabricate a variety of photonic guiding structures in the well-known lithium niobate (LiNbO3 or LN) crystals that are of great importance in integrated photonics/optics. This paper reviews the up-to-date research progress of ion-beam-processed LiNbO3 photonic structures and reports on their fabrication, characterization, and applications. Ion beams are being used with this material in a wide range of techniques, as exemplified by the following examples. Ion beam milling/etching can remove the selected surface regions of LiNbO3 crystals via the sputtering effects. Ion implantation and swift ion irradiation can form optical waveguide structures by modifying the surface refractive indices of the LiNbO3 wafers. Crystal ion slicing has been used to obtain bulk-quality LiNbO3 single-crystalline thin films or membranes by exfoliating the implanted layer from the original substrate. Focused ion beams can either generate small structures of micron or submicron dimensions, to realize photonic bandgap crystals in LiNbO3, or directly write surface waveguides or other guiding devices in the crystal. Ion beam-enhanced etching has been extensively applied for micro- or nanostructuring of LiNbO3 surfaces. Methods developed to fabricate a range of photonic guiding structures in LiNbO3 are introduced. Modifications of LiNbO3 through the use of various energetic ion beams, including changes in refractive index and properties related to the photonic guiding structures as well as to the materials (i.e., electro-optic, nonlinear optic, luminescent, and photorefractive features), are overviewed in detail. The application of these LiNbO3 photonic guiding structures in both micro- and nanophotonics are briefly summarized.

  13. Microindentation deformation of lithium dihydrogen phosphate single crystals: Microhardness measurement and indentation size effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iurchenko, Anton; Borc, Jarosław; Sangwal, Keshra; Voronov, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    The Vickers microhardness H_V of the (110) and (111) as-grown faces of lithium dihydrogen phosphate (LDP) crystals was investigated as a function of applied load P. The microhardness H_V of the two faces increases with load P i.e. reverse indentation size effect (reverse ISE) and the hardness of the (110) face is somewhat lower than that of the (111) face but this difference is not easily recognized for these planes due to large scatter in the data. The origin of observed ISE was analyzed using different approaches. It was found that: (1) Hays–Kendall's and Begley–Hutchinson's relations do not explain the origin of reverse ISE but Meyer's law describes the reverse ISE satisfactorily and its constants provide a link between ISE and formation of radial cracks with applied indentation load P, (2) reverse ISE is associated with tensile surface stresses, (3) despite its failure to explain reverse ISE, Begley–Hutchinson's relation is reliable to obtain load-independent hardness H_0, is 2337 MPa for LDP, and (4) the value of fracture toughness K_C of LDP crystals lies between 4.7 and 12 MPa m"1"/"2. The load-independent hardness H_0 of LDP is higher by a factor of 1.5 than that reported for undoped KDP and ADP crystals whereas its fracture toughness K_C is higher by factor of about 20 than that of undoped KDP crystals. - Highlights: • Vickers indentations on the (110) and (111) faces of LDP crystals were made. • The microhardness H_V was investigated as a function of applied load P. • Reverse indentation size effect was observed. • Fracture toughness K_C from the radial cracks was calculated.

  14. Investigation of pyroelectric electron emission from monodomain lithium niobate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourim, El Mostafa; Moon, Chang-Wook; Lee, Seung-Woon; Kyeong Yoo, In

    2006-01-01

    The behaviors of thermally stimulated electron emission from pyroelectric monodomain lithium niobate single crystal (LiNbO 3 ) were investigated by utilizing a Si p-n junction photodiode as electron detector and a receptive electron beam resist (E-beam resist) as electron collector. In high vacuum (10 -6 Torr), the pyroelectric electron emission (PEE) was found to depend on the exposed emitting polar crystal surface (+Z face or -Z face) and was significantly influenced by the emitter-electron receiver gap distances. Thus, the PEE from +Z face was detected during heating and was activated, in small gaps ( 2 mm) the emission was simply mastered by field emission effect. Whereas, The PEE from -Z face was detected during cooling and was solely due to the field ionization effect. Therewith, for small gaps ( 2 mm) PEE was governed by field ionization generating a soft and continuous plasma ambient atmosphere. Significant decrease of electron emission current was observed from +Z face after successive thermal cycles. A fast and fully emission recovery was established after a brief exposure of crystal to a poor air vacuum of 10 -1 Torr

  15. Thermoluminescence kinetic features of Lithium Iodide (LiI) single crystal grown by vertical Bridgman technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, D. Joseph; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Sunghwan; Khan, Sajid

    2017-08-01

    Single crystal of pure Lithium Iodide (LiI) has been grown from melt by using the vertical Bridgman technique. Thermoluminescence (TL) Measurements were carried out at 1 K/s following X-ray irradiation. The TL glow curve consists of a dominant peak at (peak-maximum Tm) 393 K and one low temperature peak of weaker intensity at 343 K. The order of kinetics (b), activation energy (E), and the frequency factor (S) for a prominent TL glow peak observed around 393 K for LiI crystals are reported for the first time. The peak shape analysis of the glow peak indicates the kinetics to be of the first order. The value of E is calculated using various standard methods such as initial rise (IR), whole glow peak (WGP), peak shape (PS), computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) and Variable Heating rate (VHR) methods. An average value of 1.06 eV is obtained in this case. In order to validate the obtained parameters, numerically integrated TL glow curve has been generated using experimentally determined kinetic parameters. The effective atomic number (Zeff) for this material was determined and found to be 52. X-ray induced emission spectra of pure LiI single crystal are studied at room temperature and it is found that the sample exhibit sharp emission at 457 nm and broad emission at 650 nm.

  16. Pulsed Traveling-wave Quadrature Squeezing Using Quasi-phase Matched Lithium Niobate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Hsiang

    Interests in generating higher quantum noise squeezing in order to develop methods to enhance optical measurement below the shot-noise limit in various applications has grown in recent years. The noise suppression from squeezing can improve the SNR in coherent optical systems when the returning signal power is weak, such as optical coherence tomography, LADAR, confocal microscopy and low-light coherent imaging. Unlike the generation of squeezing with a continuous wave, which is currently developed mainly for gravitational wave detection in LIGO project, the study of pulsed-traveling waves is focused on industrial, medical and other commercial interests. This dissertation presents the experimental results of pulsed traveling wave squeezing. The intention of the study is to explore the possibility of using quasi-phase matched crystals to generate the highest possible degree of quadrature squeezing. In order to achieve this goal, efforts to test the various effects from spatial Gaussian modes and relative beam waist placement for the second-harmonic pump were carried out in order to further the understanding of limiting factors to pulsed traveling wave squeezing. 20mm and 30mm-long periodically poled lithium noibate (PPLN) crystals were used in the experiment to generate a squeezed vacuum state. A maximum of 4.2+/-0.2dB quadrature squeezing has been observed, and the measured anti-squeezing exceeds 20dB.The phase sensitive amplification (PSA) gain and de-gain performance were also measured to compare the results of measured squeezing. The PPLN crystals can produce high conversion efficiency of second-harmonic generation (SHG) without a cavity. When a long PPLN crystal is used in a squeezer, the beam propagation in the nonlinear medium does not follow the characteristics in thin crystals. Instead, it is operated under the long-crystal criteria, which the crystal length is multiple times longer than the Rayleigh range of the injected beam i n the crystals. Quasi

  17. Shock compression experiments on Lithium Deuteride (LiD) single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, M. D.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Lemke, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    Shock compression experiments in the few hundred GPa (multi-Mbar) regime were performed on Lithium Deuteride single crystals. This study utilized the high velocity flyer plate capability of the Sandia Z Machine to perform impact experiments at flyer plate velocities in the range of 17-32 km/s. Measurements included pressure, density, and temperature between ˜190 and 570 GPa along the Principal Hugoniot—the locus of end states achievable through compression by large amplitude shock waves—as well as pressure and density of reshock states up to ˜920 GPa. The experimental measurements are compared with density functional theory calculations, tabular equation of state models, and legacy nuclear driven results that have been reanalyzed using modern equations of state for the shock wave standards used in the experiments.

  18. Crystal structures and phase transformation of deuterated lithium imide, Li2ND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, Michael P.; Jones, Camille Y.; Herbst, J.F.; Hector, Louis G.; Kundrat, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the crystal structure of deuterated lithium imide, Li 2 ND, by means of neutron and X-ray diffraction. An order-disorder transition occurs near 360K. Below that temperature Li 2 ND can be described to the same level of accuracy as a disordered cubic (Fd3-bar m) structure with partially occupied Li 32e sites or as a fully occupied orthorhombic (Ima2 or Imm2) structure. The high temperature phase is best characterized as disordered cubic (Fm3-bar m) with D atoms randomized over the 192l sites. Density functional theory calculations complement and support the diffraction analyses. We compare our findings in detail with previous studies

  19. Conversion of broadband IR radiation and structural disorder in lithium niobate single crystals with low photorefractive effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, Man Nen; Syuy, Alexander V.; Krishtop, Victor V.; Pogodina, Veronika A.; Ponomarchuk, Yulia V.; Sidorov, Nikolay V.; Gabain, Aleksei A.; Palatnikov, Mikhail N.; Litvinov, Vladimir A.

    2016-11-01

    The conversion of broadband IR radiation when the noncritical phase matching condition is fulfilled in lithium niobate (LiNbO3) single crystals with stoichiometric (R = Li/Nb = 1) and congruent (R = 0.946) compositions, as well as in congruent single crystals doped with zinc has been investigated. It is shown that the spectrum parameters of converted radiation, such as the conversion efficiency, spectral width and position of maximum, depend on the ordering degree of structural units of the cation sublattice along the polar axis of crystal.

  20. Complex capacitance in the representation of modulus of the lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alim, Mohammad A.; Batra, A.K.; Bhattacharjee, Sudip; Aggarwal, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    The lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 or LN) single crystal is grown in-house. The ac small-signal electrical characterization is conducted over a temperature range 35≤T≤150 o C as a function of measurement frequency (10≤f≤10 6 Hz). Meaningful observation is noted only in a narrow temperature range 59≤T≤73 o C. These electrical data when analyzed via complex plane formalisms revealed single semicircular relaxation both in the complex capacitance (C * ) and in the modulus (M * ) planes. The physical meaning of this kind of observation is obtained on identifying the relaxation type, and then incorporating respective equivalent circuit model. The simplistic non-blocking nature of the equivalent circuit model obtained via M * -plane is established as the lumped relaxation is identified in the C * -plane. The feature of the eventual equivalent circuit model allows non-blocking aspect for the LN crystal attributing to the presence of the operative dc conduction process. Identification of this leakage dc conduction via C * -plane is portrayed in the M * -plane where the blocking nature is removed. The interacting interpretation between these two complex planes is successfully presented.

  1. Effect of defects induced by doping and fast neutron irradiation on the thermal properties of lithium ammonium sulphate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, S.H.; Ramadan, T.A.; Darwish, M.M.; Kassem, M.E.; El-Khatib, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Structural defects were introduced in lithium ammonium sulphate crystals (LAS) either in the process of crystal growth (in the form of foreign ions) or by neutron irradiation. The effect of such defects on the thermal properties of LAS crystals was studied in the temperature range 300-500 K. It was assumed that the doped LAS crystals are composed of a two-phase system having different thermal parameters in each phase. The specific heat at constant pressure, C p , of irradiated samples was found to decrease with increasing irradiation doses. The thermal expansion of LAS crystals was found to be dependent on neutron irradiation, and was attributed to two processes: the release of new species and the trapping process. (author)

  2. Effect of defects induced by doping and fast neutron irradiation on the thermal properties of lithium ammonium sulphate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandil, S.H.; Ramadan, T.A.; Darwish, M.M. (Alexandria Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Materials Science); Kassem, M.E.; El-Khatib, A.M. (Alexandria Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Physics)

    1994-05-01

    Structural defects were introduced in lithium ammonium sulphate crystals (LAS) either in the process of crystal growth (in the form of foreign ions) or by neutron irradiation. The effect of such defects on the thermal properties of LAS crystals was studied in the temperature range 300-500 K. It was assumed that the doped LAS crystals are composed of a two-phase system having different thermal parameters in each phase. The specific heat at constant pressure, C[sub p], of irradiated samples was found to decrease with increasing irradiation doses. The thermal expansion of LAS crystals was found to be dependent on neutron irradiation, and was attributed to two processes: the release of new species and the trapping process. (author).

  3. Generation of 14  W at 589  nm by frequency doubling of high-power CW linearly polarized Raman fiber laser radiation in MgO:sPPLT crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surin, A A; Borisenko, T E; Larin, S V

    2016-06-01

    We introduce an efficient, single-mode, linearly polarized continuous wave (CW) Raman fiber laser (RFL), operating at 1178 nm, with 65 W maximum output power and a narrow linewidth of 0.1 nm. Single-pass second-harmonic generation was demonstrated using a 20 mm long MgO-doped stoichiometric periodically polled lithium tantalate (MgO:sPPLT) crystal pumped by RFL radiation. Output power of 14 W at 589 nm with 22% conversion efficiency was achieved. The possibility of further power scaling is considered, as no crystal degradation was observed at these power levels.

  4. Domain wall kinetics of lithium niobate single crystals near the hexagonal corner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ju Won [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Do-Kyeong [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Nan Ei, E-mail: neyu@gist.ac.kr, E-mail: jhro@pnu.edu [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kitamura, Kenji [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Ro, Jung Hoon, E-mail: neyu@gist.ac.kr, E-mail: jhro@pnu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-09

    A mesospheric approach based on a simple microscopic 2D Ising model in a hexagonal lattice plane is proposed to explain macroscopic “asymmetric in-out domain wall motion” observation in the (0001) plane of MgO-doped stoichiometric lithium niobate. Under application of an electric field that was higher than the conventional coercive field (E{sub c}) to the ferroelectric crystal, a natural hexagonal domain was obtained with walls that were parallel to the Y-axis of the crystal. When a fraction of the coercive field of around 0.1E{sub c} is applied in the reverse direction, this hexagonal domain is shrunk (moved inward) from the corner site into a shape with a corner angle of around 150° and 15° wall slopes to the Y-axis. A flipped electric field of 0.15E{sub c} is then applied to recover the natural hexagonal shape, and the 150° corner shape changes into a flat wall with 30° slope (moved outward). The differences in corner domain shapes between inward and outward domain motion were analyzed theoretically in terms of corner and wall site energies, which are described using the domain corner angle and wall slope with respect to the crystal Y-axis, respectively. In the inward domain wall motion case, the energy levels of the evolving 150° domain corner and 15° slope walls are most competitive, and could co-exist. In the outward case, the energy levels of corners with angles >180° are highly stable when compared with the possible domain walls; only a flat wall with 30° slope to the Y-axis is possible during outward motion.

  5. Kinetic study of the dehydration reaction of lithium sulfate monohydrate crystals using microscopy and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Shuiquan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Zondag, Herbert [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Energy research Center of the Netherlands – ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Steenhoven, Anton van [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Rindt, Camilo, E-mail: c.c.m.rindt@tue.nl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-12-10

    Highlights: • Kinetics of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O single crystals were modeled based on elementary processes. • Kinetics of nucleation and nuclei growth were studied by using optical microscopy. • A novel experiment was designed to visualize the reaction front into crystal bulk. • Fractional conversion was calculated and compared with TGA-experiments. - Abstract: Simulation of gas–solid reactions occurring in industrial processes requires a robust kinetic model to be applicable in a wide range of complicated reaction conditions. However, in literature it is often seen that even the same reaction under specific controlled conditions is interpreted with different kinetic models. In the present work, a phenomenological model based on nucleation and nuclei growth processes is presented to study the kinetics of the dehydration reaction of lithium sulfate monohydrate single crystals. The two elementary processes of the reaction, nucleation and nuclei growth, are characterized and quantified as a function of temperature by using optical microscopy experiments. The in-situ measured characteristics of the dehydration reaction provided confirmatory evidence that the rate of nucleation obeys an exponential law and the rate of nuclei growth is approximately constant. With knowledge acquired from the optical observations as inputs of the kinetic model, the fractional conversion of the dehydration reaction was calculated and compared with experimental results from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). A satisfactory comparison was found both in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. It is demonstrated that this knowledge-based model has a great potential to represent the gas–solid reaction kinetics in a wide range of process conditions regarding temperature, pressure and particle geometry.

  6. Crystal growth and characterization of europium doped lithium strontium iodide scintillator as an ionizing radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uba, Samuel

    High performance detectors used in the detection of ionizing radiation is critical to nuclear nonproliferation applications and other radiation detectors applications. In this research we grew and tested Europium doped Lithium Strontium Iodide compound. A mixture of lithium iodide, strontium iodide and europium iodide was used as the starting materials for this research. Congruent melting and freezing temperature of the synthesized compound was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) using a Setaram Labsys Evo DSC-DTA instrument. The melting temperatures were recorded at 390.35°C, 407.59°C and freezing temperature was recorded at 322.84°C from a graph of heat flow plotted against temperature. The synthesized material was used as the charge for the vertical Bridgeman growth, and a 6.5 cm and 7.7cm length boule were grown in a multi-zone transparent Mullen furnace. A scintillating detector of thickness 2.53mm was fabricated by mechanical lapping in mineral oil, and scintillating response and timing were obtained to a cesium source using CS-137 isotope. An energy resolution (FWHM over peak position) of 12.1% was observed for the 662keV full absorption peak. Optical absorption in the UV-Vis wavelength range was recorded for the grown crystal using a U-2900 UV/VIS Spectrophotometer. Absorption peaks were recorded at 194nm, 273nm, and 344nm from the absorbance spectrum, various optical parameters such as absorption coefficient, extinction coefficient, refractive index, and optical loss were derived. The optical band gap energy was calculated using Tauc relation expression at 1.79eV.

  7. TL and OSL studies on lithium borate single crystals doped with Cu and Ag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, N.S.; Kulkarni, M.S.; Tyagi, M.; Ratna, P.; Mishra, D.R.; Singh, S.G.; Tiwari, B.; Soni, A.; Gadkari, S.C.; Gupta, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium borate (LBO) single crystals doped with Cu and Ag (0.25 mol% each) (Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu,Ag) are grown by the Czochralski method. The thermoluminescence readout on Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu,Ag crystals showed three glow peaks at∼375, 441 and 516 K for the heating rate of 1 K/s. The thermoluminescence sensitivity of the grown Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu,Ag single crystals is found to be 5 times TLD-100 and a linear dose response in the range 1 mGy to 1 kGy. The glow curve deconvolution reveals nearly first order kinetics for all the three peaks with trap depths 0.77, 1.25 and 1.34 eV respectively and corresponding frequency factors 1.6×10 9 , 1.3×10 13 and 6.8×10 11 s −1 . The continuous wave optically stimulated luminescence (CW-OSL) measurements were performed on the LBO:Cu,Ag single crystals using blue light stimulation. The traps responsible for the three thermoluminescence peaks in Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu,Ag are found to be OSL sensitive. The qualitative correlation between TL peaks and CW-OSL response is established. The photoluminescence studies show that in case of co-doping of Ag in LBO:Cu the emission at 370 nm in Cu states dominates over the transitions in Ag states implying doping of Ag plays a role as sensitizer when co-doped with Cu and increases overall emission. - Highlights: ► Growth of crack free single crystals of Li2B4O7 :Cu and Ag. ► Study of TL and OSL parameters for Li2B4O7 :Cu and Ag. ► Correlation of OSL with TL peaks. ► Optimization of OSL readout time with respect to residual TL.

  8. Quasicharacteristic radiation of relativistic electrons at orientation motion in lithium halides crystals along charged planes and axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksyuta, N. V.; Vysotskii, V. I.; Efimenko, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of the orientation motion of relativistic electrons in charged (111) planes and charged [110] axes of lithium halides ionic crystals of LiF, LiCl, LiBr and LiI. On the basis of these investigations the spectra of quasicharacteristic radiation for the electron beams with various Lorentz-factors both in planar and axial cases have been calculated numerically.

  9. The mechanism of deceleration of nucleation and crystal growth by the small addition of transition metals to lithium disilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Katrin; Avramov, Isak; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of niobium or tantalum oxide to lithium disilicate glass provokes a drastic decrease of the steady-state nucleation rates and the crystal growth velocities. The viscosity of the residual glassy matrix is considered as a function of the crystallization degree in the course of a non-isothermal crystallization. For simplification, a homogeneous distribution of the added oxides in the glass matrix is assumed. While the viscosity initially decreases, it significantly increases again for higher crystallization degrees hindering crystal growth. However, it was shown that the additives are enriched at the crystal interface. Several possible reasons for the inhibition of nucleation and growth kinetics such as viscosity, interfacial energy crystal/glassy phase, thermodynamic driving force or impingement rate are discussed. Since the crystallization front is blocked by the additives the impingement rate is decreased with increasing additive concentration. Since small concentrations of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 have a drastic effect on the nucleation, these components should be enriched at the interface crystal/glass. This will only take place, if it leads to a decrease in the interfacial energy. Since this effect alone should result in an increase of the nucleation rate, it must be overcompensated by kinetic effects. PMID:27150844

  10. Linear diffraction of light waves on periodically poled domain structures in lithium niobate crystals: collinear, isotropic, and anisotropic geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shandarov, S M; Mandel, A E; Akylbaev, T M; Borodin, M V; Savchenkov, E N; Smirnov, S V; Akhmatkhanov, A R; Shur, V Ya

    2017-01-01

    The possible variants of experimental observation of light diffraction on periodically poled domain structures (PPDS) in the lithium niobate crystal with 180-degree domain Y-walls are considered. We experimentally investigated isotropic and anisotropic diffraction of coherent light (λ = 655nm) on the PPDS with spatial period Λ = 8.79 μm produced by poling method in a LiNbO 3 : 5% MgO crystal. The central wavelength of irradiation experiencing a collinear diffraction on these PPDS is estimated as λ c = 455 nm. (paper)

  11. Crystal structure of a supramolecular lithium complex of p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Yamada

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Crystals of a supramolecular lithium complex with a calix[4]arene derivative, namely tetramethanollithium 5,11,17,23-tetra-tert-butyl-25,26,27-trihydroxy-28-oxidocalix[4]arene methanol monosolvate, [Li(CH3OH4](C44H55O4·CH3OH or [Li(CH3OH4]+·(calix[4]arene−]·CH3OH (where calix[4]arene− represents a mono-anion species because of deprotonation of one H atom of the calixarene hydroxy groups, were obtained from p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene reacted with LiH in tetrahydrofuran, followed by recrystallization from methanol. The asymmetric unit comprises one mono-anionic calixarene molecule, one Li+ cation coordinated to four methanol molecules, and one methanol molecule included in the calixarene cavity. The calixarene molecule maintains a cone conformation by intramolecular hydrogen bonding between one phenoxide (–O− and three pendent calixarene hydroxy groups (–OH. The coordinated methanol molecules around the metal cation play a significant role in forming the supramolecular assembly. The crystal structure of this assembly is stabilized by three sets of intermolecular interactions: (i hydrogen bonds involving the –OH and –O− moieties of the calixarene molecules, the –OH groups of the coordinated methanol molecules, and the –OH group of the methanol molecule included in the calixarene cavity; (ii C—H...π interactions between the calixarene molecules and/or the coordinated methanol molecules; (iii O—H...π interactions between the calixarene molecule and the included methanol molecule.

  12. The accumulation of femtosecond laser radiation energy in crystals of lithium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresvyanskiy, V. P.; Glazunov, D. S.; Alekseev, S. V.; Losev, V. F.; Chadraa, B.; Bukhtsooj, O.; Baasankhuu, N.; Zandan, B.; Martynovich, E. F.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of studies of energy accumulation during the non-destructive interaction of extremely intense near infrared laser radiation with model wide band gap dielectric crystals of lithium fluoride, when the intensity of pulses is sufficient for effective highly nonlinear absorption of light and for the excitation of the electron subsystem of matter and the energy of pulses is still not sufficient for significant heating, evaporation, laser breakdown or other destruction to occur. We studied the emission of energy in the form of light sum of thermally stimulated luminescence accumulated under conditions of self-focusing and multiple filamentation of femtosecond laser radiation. It was established that it's the F2 and F3+ color centers and supplementary to them centers of interstitial type which accumulate energy under the action of a single femtosecond laser pulses. When irradiated by series of pulses the F3, F3- and F4 centers additionally appear. F2 centers are the main centers of emission in the process of thermally stimulated luminescence of accumulated energy. The interstitial fluoride ions (I-centers) are the kinetic particles. They split off from the X3- centers in the result of thermal decomposition of latter on the I-centers and molecules X20. I-centers recombine with F3+ centers and form F2 centers in excited state. The latter produce the characteristic emission spectrum emitted in the form of thermally stimulated luminescence.

  13. Anisotropic surface acoustic waves in tungsten/lithium niobate phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Hong; Yu, Yuan-Hai

    2018-02-01

    Phononic crystals (PnC) were known for acoustic band gaps for different acoustic waves. PnCs were already applied in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices as reflective gratings based on the band gaps. In this paper, another important property of PnCs, the anisotropic propagation, was studied. PnCs made of circular tungsten films on a lithium niobate substrate were analyzed by finite element method. Dispersion curves and equal frequency contours of surface acoustic waves in PnCs of various dimensions were calculated to study the anisotropy. The non-circular equal frequency contours and negative refraction of group velocity were observed. Then PnC was applied as an acoustic lens based on the anisotropic propagation. Trajectory of SAW passing PnC lens was calculated and transmission of SAW was optimized by selecting proper layers of lens and applying tapered PnC. The result showed that PnC lens can suppress diffraction of surface waves effectively and improve the performance of SAW devices.

  14. Growth and Characterization of Lithium Potassium Phthalate (LiKP) Single Crystals for Third Order Nonlinear Optical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, B.; Mohan, R. [Preidency College, Bangalore (India); Raj, S. Gokul [RR and Dr. SR Technical Univ., Avadi (India); Kumar, G. Ramesh [Anna Univ., Arni (India)

    2012-11-15

    Single crystals of lithium potassium phthalate (LiKP) were successfully grown from aqueous solution by solvent evaporation technique. The grown crystals were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The lithium potassium phthalate C{sub 16} H{sub 12} K Li{sub 3} O{sub 11} belongs to triclinic system with the following unit-cell dimensions at 298(2) K; a = 7.405(5) A; b = 9.878(5) A; c = 13.396(5) A; α = 71.778(5) .deg.; β = 87.300(5) .deg.; γ = 85.405(5) .deg.; having a space group P1. Mass spectrometric analysis provides the molecular weight of the compound and possible ways of fragmentations occurs in the compound. Thermal stability of the crystal was also studied by both simultaneous TGA/DTA analyses. The UV-Vis-NIR spectrum shows a good transparency in the whole of Visible and as well as in the near IR range. Third order nonlinear optical studies have also been studied by Z-scan technique. Nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refractive index were found out and the third order bulk susceptibility of compound was also estimated.

  15. Formation and evaluation of convex-curved crystals of lithium fluoride for use in analyzing x-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellick, B.O.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium fluoride as received from the vendor in boule form is 38 x 38 x 13 mm thick. This block is cleaved to wafers of the desired thickness, x-ray-evaluated for ''d'' spacing and greatest intensity, bent to the required radius, and then acid-etched to remove foreign material. The diffraction and dispersion characteristics of a wafer are analyzed using well-collimated tungsten x rays that strike the crystal and are diffracted onto no-screen x-ray film. If the crystal is satisfactory, it is mounted in a spectrogoniometer and rotated through an x-ray beam while a detector is set at the optimized angle for the diffracted x rays. The average intensity across the length of the crystal is recorded by multichannel scaling. Any imperfections appear as peaks or dips compared to the average intensity. The crystal next goes to a 10-channel, filter-fluorescer x-ray unit that compares zero-order intensity to diffracted Kα and Kβ intensity. Counts for 100-s intervals are taken in groups of three and averaged. Correction factors for instrument geometry, air, pinhole diameter at zero order, Kα-Kβ, barometric pressure, temperature, etc., are added to the efficiency calculations to obtain the crystal efficiency (epsilon) vs keV data. The crystal is mounted in the spectrograph or spectrometer and calibrated to either the detector or film plane by using direct radiation with proper x-ray filters or absorbers. The crystal is then ready for use

  16. Facile crystal-structure-controlled synthesis of iron oxides for adsorbents and anode materials of lithium batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Yao; Liu, Lihu; Qiao, Wencan; Liu, Fan; Zhang, Yashan; Tan, Wenfeng; Qiu, Guohong

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides exhibit excellent physicochemical properties as functional materials because of the diversity of crystal structure. Nano-sized iron oxides, including akaganite (β-FeOOH), maghemite (γ-Fe_2O_3), ferrihydrite (Fe_5HO_8∙4H_2O) and hematite (α-Fe_2O_3), were prepared by a facile reflux treatment of iron powder in NaClO solution at 50 °C for 12 h. The crystal structures were controlled by adjusting the pH values of reaction systems. Akaganite, maghemite, ferrihydrite, and hematite were formed when pHs were adjusted to 2–4, 6, 8, and 10, respectively. They showed excellent adsorption performance for As(III), and the adsorption capacity was affected by crystal structure as well as specific surface area. The maximum adsorption capacity for akaganite, maghemite, ferrihydrite, and hematite reached 89.8, 79.1, 78.4, and 63.4 mg g"−"1, respectively. Hematite showed lithium storage capacity of 2043 mAh g"−"1 for the first cycle and then kept stable after twenty cycles at a current density of 100 mA g"−"1. The discharge specific capacity stabilized at 639 mAh g"−"1 after 100 cycles. The as-prepared iron oxides might be applied as potential adsorbents and anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion battery. - Highlights: • Nano-sized ferric oxides were fabricated by refluxing iron powder in NaClO solutions. • Crystal structures were controlled by adjusting pHs from 2.0 to 10.0 in systems. • Akaganite exhibited the largest As(III) adsorption capacity of 89.8 mg g"−"1. • Hematite had lithium storage capacity of 639 mAh g"−"1 after 100 cycles.

  17. Using a helium--neon laser to convert infrared radiation to visible emission on lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurtyunyan, E.A.; Kostanyan, R.B.; Mkrtchyan, V.S.; Mkrtchyan, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    The conversion of infrared emission to the visible region was investigated by mixing with helium-neon laser emission in lithium niobate crystals. The infrared source was a Globar, and the laser was the LG-75. Emission of the sum frequencies was filtered out. The spectral composition of the converted radiation was analyzed by the ISP-51 spectrograph with an FEU-79 photomultiplier at the output. The amplified photomultiplier signal was recorded by the ChZ-33 frequency meter. By varying the angle between the optical axis of the crystal and the incident emission, infrared radiation in the 1.75 to 3.3 ..mu..m wavelength band could be converted to visible emission. It is suggested that measurement of the wavelength of converted emission might be used to study the distribution of concentration nonhomogeneities in crystals.

  18. radiation and electric field induced effects on the order-disorder phase in lithium sodium sulphate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, A. E.; Kassem, M. E.; El-Wahidy, E. F.; El-Abshehy, M. A.

    1995-03-01

    The temperature dependence of specific heat at constant pressure, Cp(T), has been measured for lithium sodium sulphate, LiNaSo4 crystals, at different ?-radiation doses and external bias electric field (Eb), in the temperature range 300-900 K. A nonlinear dependence of transition temperature, T1 and a remarkable change in the thermodynamic parameters, were obtained as the effect of both electric field and ?-radiation. The effect of ?-radiation doses on the phase transition in LiNaSO4 crystals was explained as due to an internal bias field, Eb, originating from the interaction of polar defects with the order parameter of the host lattice. The internal bias field effect on the behaviour of Cp(T) in LiNaSO4 crystals was similar to that of the external electric field (E).

  19. Studying effect of MoO{sub 3} on elastic and crystallization behavior of lithium diborate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaaban, KH.S.; Abd Elnaeim, A.M. [El-Azhar University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut (Egypt); Abo-naf, S.M. [National Research Centre, Glass Research Department, Cairo (Egypt); Hassouna, M.E.M. [Beni-Suef University, Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Beni Suef (Egypt)

    2017-06-15

    The effect of MoO{sub 3} addition on the crystallization characteristics of 2Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-23Li{sub 2}O-(75 - x) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass (where x MoO{sub 3} = 0, 10, 20, and 40 mol %) has been investigated. The compositional dependence of the glass transition (T{sub g}), and crystallization (T{sub c}) temperatures was determined by the differential thermal analysis (DTA). It was found that both the T{sub g} and T{sub c} decrease with increasing MoO{sub 3} content. The amorphous nature of the as-quenched glass and crystallinity of the produced glass-ceramics were confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis. Glass-ceramics embedded with diomignite (lithium diborate, Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) were produced from all investigated glasses by heat-treating the as-quenched glasses at the appropriate temperatures obtained from the DTA traces. Addition of MoO{sub 3} to the glass composition at 10% MoO{sub 3}, causes the formation of lithium molybdenum oxide (Li{sub 4}MoO{sub 5}) crystalline phase in addition to the diomignite phase. Increasing MoO{sub 3} content to 20% causes a phase transformation of lithium molybdenum oxide from the (Li{sub 4}MoO{sub 5}) to the (Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) phase and the formation of another lithium borate (Li{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 5}) phase in addition to the diomignite. Further increase of MoO{sub 3} content to 40% results in another phase transformation to the lithium aluminum molybdenum oxide [LiAl(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}], and, in this case, the molybdenum content was excess enough to crystallize the molybdate (MoO{sub 3}) itself. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the morphology and microstructure of the formed solid solution phases. The values of the T{sub g} decrease with increasing the MoO{sub 3} content. The ultrasonic wave velocities and elastic moduli were determined using the pulse-echo method. Both velocities (v{sub L} and v{sub T}) were increased as the MoO{sub 3} content, this increase can be

  20. Thermal formation of mesoporous single-crystal Co3O4 nano-needles and their lithium storage properties

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xiong Wen; Deng, Da; Lee, Jim Yang; Archer, Lynden A.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we report the simple solid-state formation of mesoporous Co3O4 nano-needles with a 3D single-crystalline framework. The synthesis is based on controlled thermal oxidative decomposition and re-crystallization of precursor β-Co(OH)2 nano-needles. Importantly, after thermal treatment, the needle-like morphology can be completely preserved, despite the fact that there is a large volume contraction accompanying the process: β-Co(OH)2 → Co3O 4. Because of the intrinsic crystal contraction, a highly mesoporous structure with high specific surface area has been simultaneously created. The textual properties can be easily tailored by varying the annealing temperature between 200-400 °C. Interestingly, thermal re-crystallization at higher temperatures leads to the formation of a perfect 3D single-crystalline framework. Thus derived mesoporous Co3O4 nano-needles serve as a good model system for the study of lithium storage properties. The optimized sample manifests very low initial irreversible loss (21%), ultrahigh capacity, and excellent cycling performance. For example, a reversible capacity of 1079 mA h g-1 can be maintained after 50 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance and ease of synthesis may suggest their practical use in lithium-ion batteries. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2008.

  1. EPR and optical absorption study of Cu{sup 2+} doped lithium sulphate monohydrate (LSMH) single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheela, K. Juliet; Subramanian, P., E-mail: psubramaniangri@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural Institute-Deemed University, Gandhigram, Dindigul-624302, Tamilnadu (India); Krishnan, S. Radha; Shanmugam, V. M. [CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi-63006, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-05-23

    EPR study of Cu{sup 2+} doped NLO active Lithium Sulphate monohydrate (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4.}H{sub 2}O) single crystals were grown successfully by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The principal values of g and A tensors indicate existence of orthorhombic symmetry around the Cu{sup 2+} ion. From the direction cosines of g and A tensors, the locations of Cu{sup 2+} in the lattice have been identified as interstitial site. Optical absorption confirms the rhombic symmetry and ground state wave function of the Cu{sup 2+} ion in a lattice as d{sub x2-y2}.

  2. Raman spectra of lithium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Bi, Dongxue; Voinov, Y. P.; Vodchits, A. I.; Gorshunov, B. P.; Yurasov, N. I.; Yurasova, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the results of investigating the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra in the lithium compounds crystals in a wide spectral range by the fibre-optic spectroscopy method. We also present the stimulated Raman scattering spectra in the lithium hydroxide and lithium deuteride crystals obtained with the use of powerful laser source. The symmetry properties of the lithium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide monohydrate and lithium deuteride crystals optical modes were analyzed by means of the irreducible representations of the point symmetry groups. We have established the selection rules in the Raman and infrared absorption spectra of LiOH, LiOH·H2O and LiD crystals.

  3. Results from a Novel Method for Corrosion Studies of Electroplated Lithium Metal Based on Measurements with an Impedance Scanning Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Winter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to study the chemical stability of electrodeposited lithium on a copper metal substrate via measurements with a fast impedance scanning electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance is presented. The corrosion of electrochemically deposited lithium was compared in two different electrolytes, based on lithium difluoro(oxalato borate (LiDFOB and lithium hexafluorophosphate, both salts being dissolved in solvent blends of ethylene carbonate and diethyl carbonate. For a better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms, scanning electron microscopy images of electrodeposited lithium were also consulted. The results of the EQCM experiments were supported by AC impedance measurements and clearly showed two different corrosion mechanisms caused by the different salts and the formed SEIs. The observed mass decrease of the quartz sensor of the LiDFOB-based electrolyte is not smooth, but rather composed of a series of abrupt mass fluctuations in contrast to that of the lithium hexafluorophosphate-based electrolyte. After each slow decrease of mass a rather fast increase of mass is observed several times. The slow mass decrease can be attributed to a consolidation process of the SEI or to the partial dissolution of the SEI leaving finally lithium metal unprotected so that a fast film formation sets in entailing the observed fast mass increases.

  4. Facile crystal-structure-controlled synthesis of iron oxides for adsorbents and anode materials of lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yao; Liu, Lihu; Qiao, Wencan; Liu, Fan [College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Zhang, Yashan [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States); Tan, Wenfeng [College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Qiu, Guohong, E-mail: qiugh@mail.hzau.edu.cn [College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxides exhibit excellent physicochemical properties as functional materials because of the diversity of crystal structure. Nano-sized iron oxides, including akaganite (β-FeOOH), maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), ferrihydrite (Fe{sub 5}HO{sub 8}∙4H{sub 2}O) and hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), were prepared by a facile reflux treatment of iron powder in NaClO solution at 50 °C for 12 h. The crystal structures were controlled by adjusting the pH values of reaction systems. Akaganite, maghemite, ferrihydrite, and hematite were formed when pHs were adjusted to 2–4, 6, 8, and 10, respectively. They showed excellent adsorption performance for As(III), and the adsorption capacity was affected by crystal structure as well as specific surface area. The maximum adsorption capacity for akaganite, maghemite, ferrihydrite, and hematite reached 89.8, 79.1, 78.4, and 63.4 mg g{sup −1}, respectively. Hematite showed lithium storage capacity of 2043 mAh g{sup −1} for the first cycle and then kept stable after twenty cycles at a current density of 100 mA g{sup −1}. The discharge specific capacity stabilized at 639 mAh g{sup −1} after 100 cycles. The as-prepared iron oxides might be applied as potential adsorbents and anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion battery. - Highlights: • Nano-sized ferric oxides were fabricated by refluxing iron powder in NaClO solutions. • Crystal structures were controlled by adjusting pHs from 2.0 to 10.0 in systems. • Akaganite exhibited the largest As(III) adsorption capacity of 89.8 mg g{sup −1}. • Hematite had lithium storage capacity of 639 mAh g{sup −1} after 100 cycles.

  5. UV laser-assisted fabrication of ridge waveguides in lithium niobate crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Sones, C.L.; Ying, C.Y.J.; Eason, R.W.; Mailis, S.; Ganguly, P.; Soergel, E.

    2010-01-01

    We present a UV laser-assisted method for the fabrication of ridge waveguides in lithium niobate. The UV laser irradiation step provides the refractive index change required for the vertical light confinement in the waveguide and also defines the ferroelectric domain pattern which produces the ridge structures after chemical etching.

  6. EPR and optical absorption studies of paramagnetic molecular ion (VO2+) in Lithium Sodium Acid Phthalate single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbulakshmi, N.; Kumar, M. Saravana; Sheela, K. Juliet; Krishnan, S. Radha; Shanmugam, V. M.; Subramanian, P.

    2017-12-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies of VO2+ ions as paramagnetic impurity in Lithium Sodium Acid Phthalate (LiNaP) single crystal have been done at room temperature on X-Band microwave frequency. The lattice parameter values are obtained for the chosen system from Single crystal X-ray diffraction study. Among the number of hyperfine lines in the EPR spectra only two sets are reported from EPR data. The principal values of g and A tensors are evaluated for the two different VO2+ sites I and II. They possess the crystalline field around the VO2+ as orthorhombic. Site II VO2+ ion is identified as substitutional in place of Na1 location and the other site I is identified as interstitial location. For both sites in LiNaP, VO2+ are identified in octahedral coordination with tetragonal distortion as seen from the spin Hamiltonian parameter values. The ground state of vanadyl ion in the LiNaP single crystal is dxy. Using optical absorption data the octahedral and tetragonal parameters are calculated. By correlating EPR and optical data, the molecular orbital bonding parameters have been discussed for both sites.

  7. Enhanced Cherenkov phase matching terahertz wave generation via a magnesium oxide doped lithium niobate ridged waveguide crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Takeya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When combined with a nonlinear waveguide crystal, Cherenkov phase matching allows for highly effective generation of high power and broadband terahertz (THz waves. Using a ridged Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3 waveguide coupled with a specially designed silicon lens, we successfully generated THz waves with intensity of approximately three orders of magnitude stronger than those from conventional photoconductive antenna. The broadband spectrum was from 0.1 THz to 7 THz with a maximum dynamic range of 80 dB. The temporal shape of time domain pulse is a regular single cycle which could be used for high depth resolution time of flight tomography. The generated THz wave can also be easily monitored by compact room-temperature THz camera, enabling us to determine the spatial characteristics of the THz propagation.

  8. Radiation-damage recovery in undoped and oxidized Li doped Mg O crystals implanted with lithium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, E. E-mail: ealves@itn.pt; Silva, R.C. da; Pinto, J.V.; Monteiro, T.; Savoini, B.; Caceres, D.; Gonzalez, R.; Chen, Y

    2003-05-01

    Undoped MgO and oxidized Li-doped MgO single crystals were implanted with 1 x 10{sup 17} Li{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at 175 keV. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)/channeling data obtained after implantation shows that damage was produced throughout the entire range of the implanted ions. Optical absorption measurements indicate that after implantation the most intense band occurs at {approx}5.0 eV, which has been associated with anion vacancies. After annealing at 450 K the intensity of the oxygen-vacancy band decreases monotonically with temperature and completely disappears at 950 K. A broad extinction band centered at {approx}2.14 eV associated with lithium precipitates emerges gradually and anneals out at 1250 K. RBS/channeling shows that recovery of the implantation damage is completed after annealing the oxidized samples at 1250 K.

  9. Synthesis of N-doped potassium tantalate perovskite material for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Martha Purnachander; Nandhini, Vellangattupalayam Ponnusamy; Wu, Jerry J.; Syed, Asad; Ameen, Fuad; Anandan, Sambandam

    2018-02-01

    Nitrogen containing potassium tantalate perovskite material has been synthesized by the solvothermal method using urea (CH4N2O) as a nitrogen source. The as-prepared sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The particle size of nitrogen containing KTaO3 observed from SEM images was found to be 100-150 nm. Doping KTaO3 with nitrogen causes reduction of band gap from 3.5 to 2.54 eV. The incorporation of Nitrogen into the crystal lattice of KTaO3 not only extended the absorption of light from UV (ultraviolet) region to visible region and also enhanced the photocatalytic activity. As prepared nitrogen containing KTaO3 samples exhibit cubic-like morphology and noticed efficient photocatalytic activity towards methylene blue dye degradation under visible light illumination. The intermediates formed during photodegradation were identified by mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and proposed suitable degradation pathway.

  10. EPR and ENDOR Studies of Point Defects in Lithium Tetraborate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    the US and its allies. Terrorist groups have shown interest in seeking and deploying weapons of mass destruction and mass disruption--weapons that...5]. Lithium tetraborate, has been grown pure and doped with many different elements including transition metals, actinides , and rare earth...microwave cavity is said to be “ critically coupled” when there is no reflected microwave power. Absorption of microwaves, which occurs when the magnetic

  11. Optical spectroscopy and microscopy of radiation-induced light-emitting point defects in lithium fluoride crystals and films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montereali, R. M.; Bonfigli, F.; Menchini, F.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    Broad-band light-emitting radiation-induced F2 and F3+ electronic point defects, which are stable and laser-active at room temperature in lithium fluoride crystals and films, are used in dosimeters, tuneable color-center lasers, broad-band miniaturized light sources and novel radiation imaging detectors. A brief review of their photoemission properties is presented, and their behavior at liquid nitrogen temperatures is discussed. Some experimental data from optical spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy of these radiation-induced point defects in LiF crystals and thin films are used to obtain information about the coloration curves, the efficiency of point defect formation, the effects of photo-bleaching processes, etc. Control of the local formation, stabilization, and transformation of radiation-induced light-emitting defect centers is crucial for the development of optically active micro-components and nanostructures. Some of the advantages of low temperature measurements for novel confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy techniques, widely used for spatial mapping of these point defects through the optical reading of their visible photoluminescence, are highlighted.

  12. Crystallization kinetic study of the lithium-disilicate bioceramic obtained from rice-husk silica starting powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, F.A.; Santos, C.; Pinatti, D.G.; Davim, E.; Fernandes, M.H.F.V.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the study of crystallization of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic produced for alternative source (rice husk silica), and comparatively by commercial source (commercial silica) it was carried through. The stoichiometry 66%.mol SiO_2: 33%.mol LiO_2 was used. The kinetic studies of crystallization and calculations had been carried through thermal analysis (DTA), and were possible to study the behavior of the curves in accordance with the variation of taxes (5; 10; 15; e 20°C/min), of the granulometries 63 μm, 250μm and 1mm), and for the influence of the substitution commercial SiO_2 by rice husk. The structural characterization was carried through by X-Ray diffractometry (DRX) and scanning electron microscopy (MEV), for chemical characterization used X-Ray fluorescence (FRX). The preliminary results show that the substitution of the silica source is sufficiently promising, since the gotten properties are similar. (author)

  13. Tip-induced domain growth on the non-polar cuts of lithium niobate single-crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikin, D. O.; Ievlev, A. V.; Turygin, A. P.; Lobov, A. I.; Kalinin, S. V.; Shur, V. Ya.

    2015-05-01

    Currently, ferroelectric materials with designed domain structures are considered as a perspective material for new generation of photonic, data storage, and data processing devices. Application of external electric field is the most convenient way of the domain structure formation. Lots of papers are devoted to the investigation of domain kinetics on polar surface of crystals while the forward growth remains one of the most mysterious stages due to lack of experimental methods allowing to study it. Here, we performed tip-induced polarization reversal on X- and Y-non-polar cuts in single-crystal of congruent lithium niobate which allows us to study the forward growth with high spatial resolution. The revealed difference in the shape and length of domains induced on X- and Y-cuts is beyond previously developed theoretical approaches used for the theoretical consideration of the domains growth at non-polar ferroelectric surfaces. To explain experimental results, we used kinetic approach with anisotropy of screening efficiency along different crystallographic directions.

  14. The structural, microhardness and thermal properties of a semiorganic NLO crystal: Lithium paranitrophenolate trihydrate (NO2-C6H4-OLi.3H2O)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boaz, B. Milton; Raman, P. Santhana; Raja, S. Xavier Jesu; Das, S. Jerome

    2005-01-01

    The crystallographic parameters, morphology, microhardness anisotropy and thermal properties including differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) of a new nonlinear optical material lithium paranitrophenolate trihydrate (NPLi.3H 2 O) are reported. The single crystals of NPLi.3H 2 O show effective phase matchable second harmonic generation properties for frequency conversion. Optically clear single crystals having dimensions up to 12 mm x 8 mm x 4 mm have been grown successfully within a period of 60 days by isothermal solvent evaporation technique. The title compound crystallizes in monoclinic system with space group Pa. Microhardness measurement on different planes verifies the hardness anisotropy and thermal studies reveal good thermal stability of the material. The NLO property of the crystal is verified by employing Kurtz powder test. The crystal has a wide range of optical transparency from 400 nm to 1500 nm

  15. Control of coercive field in lithium niobate crystals with repeated polarization reversal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Jung Hoon; Jeong, Doun; Park, Taeyong; Kim, Chulhan; Kwon, Soon-Bok; Cha, Myoungsik; Choi, Byeong Cheol; Yu, Nanei; Kurimura, Sunao; Jeon, Gyerok

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the amount of decrease in coercive field of congruent lithium niobate during repeated poling and back-poling was measured. The polarization is reversed in 300 ms and then back-poled during the rest period. The coercive field can be decreased around 1 kV/mm with a repeated poling interval of 5 s. As the interval prolonged, the poling field decrease became smaller, and a stretched exponential function is suggested for the experimental fitting resulting in a set of meaningful parameters. These values are essential for the design of high quality domain engineering

  16. Distribution of the solute in the lithium niobate crystal grown by the Stepanov method in a periodically changing external electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanov, A.; Nikolayeva, L.; Red'kin, B.

    2000-01-01

    The Iithium niobate crystals with the periodic domain structure are characterised by the capacity for the light frequency adoption of the laser light. Consequently, they are promising for the development of compact light sources. There are several methods of producing periodic ferroelectric domain structures of the lithium niobate crystals in the growth process. It is evident that the main method of production of the periodic structures in the lithium niobate is the Stepanov method. The development of the mathematical model of the variation of the concentration of the alloying solute with the periodic variation of the conditions of growth of the crystal in the growth of the crystal by the Stepanov methods in the conditions of periodic changes of the drawing rate of the crystal V and the temperature of the thermal junction T have been investigated elsewhere. The formation of the domain structure is also possible in the case of the periodic variation of the electric field, during the supply of the alternating voltage between the shaper and the seed. In this work, we proposed mathematical model discounting the process of formation of the domain structure in the alternating electric field during the growth of the lithium niobate crystal by the Stepanov method. In the mathematical modelling we obtain the numerical solutions of the unidimensional nonstationary problem of the Stepanov type, the diffusion equation for concentration, and the Laplace capillary equation. The proposed mathematical model is at the present and the most complete and accurate description of the variation of the concentration of the solute in the growing crystal. The semi-discrete Galerkin method was used for the equations

  17. New ways for the optimization of the photorefractive response of lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luennemann, M.

    2003-11-01

    In the framework of this thesis three different approaches for the increasement of the photorefractive response of LiNbO 3 crystals are pursued: First an extremely large external electric field is applied as additional charge driver in order to support the photorefractive process and to improve the characteristic quantities. Furthermore the photorefractive properties of LiNbO 3 crystals doped with manganese are studied, because iron-doped crystals exhibit a relatively low practical upper limit of the doping concentration. The third approach for the optimization of the photorefractive response in LiNbO 3 crystals is the sensibilization of LiNbO 3 :Fe for infrared light by a temperature-dependent absorption change

  18. Combining piracetam and lithium salts: ionic co-crystals and co-drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Dario; Grepioni, Fabrizia; Maini, Lucia; Capucci, Davide; Nanna, Saverio; Wouters, Johan; Aerts, Luc; Quéré, Luc

    2012-08-25

    Mechanochemical reaction of solid piracetam with the inorganic salts LiCl and LiBr yields ionic co-crystals which are also co-drugs, characterized by markedly different thermal properties with respect to pure components, also depending on the method for preparation and/or conditions of measurements; single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction at variable temperatures, DSC, TGA, hot stage microscopy (HSM) and intrinsic dissolution rate have been used to fully characterize the solid products.

  19. Periodic domain inversion in x-cut single-crystal lithium niobate thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackwitz, P., E-mail: peterm@mail.upb.de; Rüsing, M.; Berth, G.; Zrenner, A. [Department Physik, Universität Paderborn, 33095 Paderborn (Germany); Center for Optoelectronics and Photonics Paderborn, 33095 Paderborn (Germany); Widhalm, A.; Müller, K. [Department Physik, Universität Paderborn, 33095 Paderborn (Germany)

    2016-04-11

    We report the fabrication of periodically poled domain patterns in x-cut lithium niobate thin-film. Here, thin films on insulator have drawn particular attention due to their intrinsic waveguiding properties offering high mode confinement and smaller devices compared to in-diffused waveguides in bulk material. In contrast to z-cut thin film lithium niobate, the x-cut geometry does not require back electrodes for poling. Further, the x-cut geometry grants direct access to the largest nonlinear and electro-optical tensor element, which overall promises smaller devices. The domain inversion was realized via electric field poling utilizing deposited aluminum top electrodes on a stack of LN thin film/SiO{sub 2} layer/Bulk LN, which were patterned by optical lithography. The periodic domain inversion was verified by non-invasive confocal second harmonic microscopy. Our results show domain patterns in accordance to the electrode mask layout. The second harmonic signatures can be interpreted in terms of spatially, overlapping domain filaments which start their growth on the +z side.

  20. Deformation, Stress Relaxation, and Crystallization of Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers Below the Glass Transition Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Brow, Richard K.; Kim, Cheol W.; Reis, Signo T.

    2004-01-01

    The deformation and crystallization of Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 2SiO2 and Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 1.6SiO2 glass fibers subjected to a bending stress were measured as a function of time over the temperature range -50 to -150 C below the glass transition temperature (Tg). The glass fibers can be permanently deformed at temperatures about 100 C below T (sub)g, and they crystallize significantly at temperatures close to, but below T,, about 150 C lower than the onset temperature for crystallization for these glasses in the no-stress condition. The crystallization was found to occur only on the surface of the glass fibers with no detectable difference in the extent of crystallization in tensile and compressive stress regions. The relaxation mechanism for fiber deformation can be best described by a stretched exponential (Kohlrausch-Williams-Watt (KWW) approximation), rather than a single exponential model.The activation energy for stress relaxation, Es, for the glass fibers ranges between 175 and 195 kJ/mol, which is considerably smaller than the activation energy for viscous flow, E, (about 400 kJ/mol) near T, for these glasses at normal, stress-free condition. It is suspected that a viscosity relaxation mechanism could be responsible for permanent deformation and crystallization of the glass fibers below T,

  1. Molecular packing and magnetic properties of lithium naphthalocyanine crystals: hollow channels enabling permeability and paramagnetic sensitivity to molecular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Ramasamy P.; Dolgos, Michelle; Marginean, Camelia; Woodward, Patrick M.; Hammel, P. Chris; Manoharan, Periakaruppan T.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis, structural framework, magnetic and oxygen-sensing properties of a lithium naphthalocyanine (LiNc) radical probe are presented. LiNc was synthesized in the form of a microcrystalline powder using a chemical method and characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, and mass spectrometry. X-Ray powder diffraction studies revealed a structural framework that possesses long, hollow channels running parallel to the packing direction. The channels measured approximately 5.0 × 5.4 Å2 in the two-dimensional plane perpendicular to the length of the channel, enabling diffusion of oxygen molecules (2.9 × 3.9 Å2) through the channel. The powdered LiNc exhibited a single, sharp EPR line under anoxic conditions, with a peak-to-peak linewidth of 630 mG at room temperature. The linewidth was sensitive to surrounding molecular oxygen, showing a linear increase in pO2 with an oxygen sensitivity of 31.2 mG per mmHg. The LiNc microcrystals can be further prepared as nano-sized crystals without the loss of its high oxygen-sensing properties. The thermal variation of the magnetic properties of LiNc, such as the EPR linewidth, EPR intensity and magnetic susceptibility revealed the existence of two different temperature regimes of magnetic coupling and hence differing columnar packing, both being one-dimensional antiferromagnetic chains but with differing magnitudes of exchange coupling constants. At a temperature of ∼50 K, LiNc crystals undergo a reversible phase transition. The high degree of oxygen-sensitivity of micro- and nano-sized crystals of LiNc, combined with excellent stability, should enable precise and accurate measurements of oxygen concentration in biological systems using EPR spectroscopy. PMID:19809598

  2. Theoretical Exploration of Various Lithium Peroxide Crystal Structures in a Li-Air Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kah Chun Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a series of metastable Li2O2 crystal structures involving different orientations and displacements of the O22− peroxy ions based on the known Li2O2 crystal structure. Within the vicinity of the chemical potential ΔG ~ 0.20 eV/Li from the thermodynamic ground state of the Li2O2 crystal structure (i.e., Föppl structure, all of these newly found metastable Li2O2 crystal structures are found to be insulating and high-k materials, and they have a common unique signature of an O22− O-O vibration mode (ω ~ 799–865 cm−1, which is in the range of that commonly observed in Li-air battery experiments, regardless of the random O22− orientations and the symmetry in the crystal lattice. From XRD patterns analysis, the commercially available Li2O2 powder is confirmed to be the thermodynamic ground state Föppl-like structure. However, for Li2O2 compounds that are grown electrochemically under the environment of Li-O2 cells, we found that the XRD patterns alone are not sufficient for structural identification of these metastable Li2O2 crystalline phases due to the poor crystallinity of the sample. In addition, the commonly known Raman signal of O22− vibration mode is also found to be insufficient to validate the possible existence of these newly predicted Li2O2 crystal structures, as all of them similarly share the similar O22− vibration mode. However considering that the discharge voltage in most Li-O2 cells are typically several tenths of an eV below the thermodynamic equilibrium for the formation of ground state Föppl structure, the formation of these metastable Li2O2 crystal structures appears to be thermodynamically feasible.

  3. Crystal Engineering of Naphthalenediimide-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks: Structure-Dependent Lithium Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bingbing; Ning, Guo-Hong; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Li-Min; Tang, Wei; Chen, Zhongxin; Su, Chenliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-11-16

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) possess great structural diversity because of the flexible design of linker groups and metal nodes. The structure-property correlation has been extensively investigated in areas like chiral catalysis, gas storage and absorption, water purification, energy storage, etc. However, the use of MOFs in lithium storage is hampered by stability issues, and how its porosity helps with battery performance is not well understood. Herein, through anion and thermodynamic control, we design a series of naphthalenediimide-based MOFs 1-4 that can be used for cathode materials in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Complexation of the N,N'-di(4-pyridyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide (DPNDI) ligand and CdX 2 (X = NO 3 - or ClO 4 - ) produces complexes MOFs 1 and 2 with a one-dimensional (1D) nonporous network and a porous, noninterpenetrated two-dimensional (2D) square-grid structure, respectively. With the DPNDI ligand and Co(NCS) 2 , a porous 1D MOF 3 as a kinetic product is obtained, while a nonporous, noninterpenetrated 2D square-grid structure MOF 4 as a thermodynamic product is formed. The performance of LIBs is largely affected by the stability and porosity of these MOFs. For instance, the initial charge-discharge curves of MOFs 1 and 2 show a specific capacity of ∼47 mA h g -1 with a capacity retention ratio of >70% during 50 cycles at 100 mA g -1 , which is much better than that of MOFs 3 and 4. The better performances are assigned to the higher stability of Cd(II) MOFs compared to that of Co(II) MOFs during the electrochemical process, according to X-ray diffraction analysis. In addition, despite having the same Cd(II) node in the framework, MOF 2 exhibits a lithium-ion diffusion coefficient (D Li ) larger than that of MOF 1 because of its higher porosity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis indicate that metal nodes in these MOFs remain intact and only the DPNDI ligand undergoes the revisible redox reaction

  4. Recombination luminescence of Cu and/or Ag doped lithium tetraborate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romet, I. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str. 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Aleksanyan, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str. 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); A. Alikhanyan National Science Laboratory, 2 Br. Alikhanyan Str., 0036 Yerevan (Armenia); Brik, M.G. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str. 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 400065 Chongqing (China); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Armii Krajowej 13/15, PL-42200 Czestochowa (Poland); Corradi, G. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Kotlov, A. [Photon Science at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Nagirnyi, V., E-mail: vitali.nagirnoi@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str. 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Polgár, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-09-15

    Complex investigations of thermostimulated luminescence (TSL) and radioluminescence properties of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} (LTB), LTB:Cu, LTB:Ag and LTB:Cu, Ag crystals suitable for tissue equivalent dosimeters were carried out in the temperature range 4.2–700 K. TSL, cathodoluminescence and X-ray excited luminescence spectra are compared to those measured under photoexcitation. The emission band at 4.6 eV in LTB:Ag is reliably related to Ag{sup +} ions based on the comparison of the results of optical spectroscopy studies and first principle calculations. Energy transfer from the relaxed exited state of the Ag{sup +} ion to the Cu{sup +} ion in double-doped LTB:Cu, Ag crystals is demonstrated. Thermostimulated recombination of charge carriers in irradiated crystals is seen to take place mainly at oxygen sites at low temperatures and at impurity sites at high temperatures. For the first time, the appearance of the low-temperature TSL peak at 90 K is assigned to ionic processes in LTB crystals. The appearance of pyroelectric flashes due to the lattice relaxation in the temperature region 90–240 K is demonstrated and their surface-related nature clarified. In accordance with EPR studies the dosimetric TSL peaks in copper and silver doped LTB crystals are attributed to thermally released electrons recombining with Cu{sup 2+} and Ag{sup 2+} centres.

  5. Structure and crystallization of SiO2 and B2O3 doped lithium disilicate glasses from theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlebach, Andreas; Thieme, Katrin; Sierka, Marek; Rüssel, Christian

    2017-09-27

    Solid solutions of SiO 2 and B 2 O 3 in Li 2 O·2SiO 2 are synthesized and characterized for the first time. Their structure and crystallization mechanisms are investigated employing a combination of simulations at the density functional theory level and experiments on the crystallization of SiO 2 and B 2 O 3 doped lithium disilicate glasses. The remarkable agreement of calculated and experimentally determined cell parameters reveals the preferential, kinetically controlled incorporation of [SiO 4 ] and [BO 4 ] at the Li + lattice sites of the Li 2 O·2SiO 2 crystal structure. While the addition of SiO 2 increases the glass viscosity resulting in lower crystal growth velocities, glasses containing B 2 O 3 show a reduction of both viscosities and crystal growth velocities. These observations could be rationalized by a change of the chemical composition of the glass matrix surrounding the precipitated crystal phase during the course of crystallization, which leads to a deceleration of the attachment of building units required for further crystal growth at the liquid-crystal interface.

  6. Crystallization kinetics and optical properties of titanium-lithium tetraborate glass containing europium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, E.A. [Al Azhar University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Girl' s Branch), Cairo (Egypt); Ratep, A. [Ain Shams University, Physics Department, Faculty of Girls, Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Khalek, E.K.; Kashif, I. [Al-Azhar University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-07-15

    The crystallization kinetics and optical properties of [60 Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}-30 TiO{sub 2}-10 Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}] (mol%) glass sample have been investigated. The present glass sample exhibits three crystallization exothermic peaks (T{sub p1}, T{sub p2,} and T{sub p3}) corresponding to the formation of LiBO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7,} and EuTiO{sub 3} phases, respectively. The presence of phase separation in the glass sample has been confirmed by scanning electron microscopic (SEM). The mean values of Avrami exponent (n = 3.1 and 4) around T{sub p1} and T{sub p2}, indicate that the bulk crystallization with a constant number of nuclei and with an increasing number of nuclei, respectively. The values of the local activation energy as a function of the fraction of crystallization (0.1 ≤ χ ≤ 0.9) decrease for the crystallization of LiBO{sub 2} and EuTiO{sub 3} and increase for the crystallization of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. The values of n(χ) for T{sub p3} and T{sub p2} in the range (0.1 ≤ χ ≤ 0.9) and (0.1 ≤ χ ≤ 0.4), respectively, are larger than 4 indicate that the presence of anomalous in Avrami exponent. The trend of Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ω{sub 2} > Ω{sub 4} > Ω{sub 6}) and the bonding parameter (δ) indicate that the lower symmetry and the highest covalent nature of the bonding around Eu{sup 3+} ions. (orig.)

  7. Fast neutron irradiation and thermal properties of doped nonstoichiometric lithium potassium sulphate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, M.E.; Gomaa, N.G.; El-Khatib, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of point defects introduced by fast neutron irradiations with neutron fluences up to 1.08 x 10 10 n/cm 2 on the thermal properties of pure and doped Li 1.4 K 0.6 SO 4 single crystals are studied in the vicinity of high temperature phase transition at 705 K. The temperature dependence of specific heat is found to be shifted towards lower temperature with the increase of neutron fluence, and can be affected by the presence of Cu 2+ dopant. The change in the value of the specific heat can be attributed to the presence of internal strain generated inside the crystal. (author)

  8. Optical and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in lead doped lithium fluoride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somma, F; Aloe, P; D' Acapito, F; Montereali, R M; Polosan, S; Secu, M; Vincenti, M A, E-mail: somma@fis.uniroma3.it

    2010-11-15

    LiF:Pb doped crystals were successfully grown by Kyropoulos method, starting with drying powders. The presence of Pb{sup 2+} ions in the LiF crystals were evidenced by the absorption band at 278 nm and by 375 nm photoluminescence. The presence of some other Pb structures with oxygen compounds in the as made samples was evidenced, decreasing after some annealing procedures. The local environment and valence state of Pb in LiF were studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at the Pb L{sub III} and L{sub I} edges. XANES data reveal that Pb is present as Pb{sup 2+} whereas EXAFS data show that it is incorporated in the crystal and not forming PbF{sub 2} precipitates. Identical spectra are obtained for samples as prepared and after thermal annealing up to 650 deg. C demonstrating the stability of the incorporation site. Also the concentration of Pb in the crystal has no effect on the location site of the metal as the same spectrum is obtained for specimens with different dopant concentrations.

  9. Lithium ions in the van der Waals gap of Bi2Se3 single crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bludská, Jana; Jakubec, Ivo; Karamazov, S.; Horák, Jaromír; Uher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 12 (2010), s. 2813-2817 ISSN 0022-4596 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : intercalation * van Der Waals gap * Bi2Se3 crystals Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.261, year: 2010

  10. Lithium-bearing fluor-arfvedsonite from Hurricane Mountain, New Hampshire: A crystal-chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, F.C.; Oberti, R.; Ottolini, L.; Foord, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    The structures of two crystals of Li-bearing fluor-arfvedsonite (1) (K0.32Na0.68)Na2(Li0.48Fe 2+2.83Mn2+0.10Zn 0.06Fe3+1.46Ti0.07) (Si7.88Al0.12)O22[Fu1.15(OH) 0.85] and (2) (K0.25Na0.75)Na2(Li0.48Fe 2+2.84Mn2+0.11Zn 0.05Fe3+1.45Ti0.07)(Si 7.89Al0.11)O22[F1.35(OH) 0.65] from a granitic pegmatite, Hurricane Mountain, New Hampshire, have been refined to R indices of 1.5(1.6)% based on 1380(1387) reflections measured with MoK?? X-radiation. The unit cell parameters are (1) a 9.838(4), b 17.991(6), c 5.315(2) A??, 103.78(3)??, V 913.7 A??3 and (2) a 9.832(3), b 17.990(7), c 5.316(3) A??, ?? 103.79(3)??, V 913.2 A??3. Site-scattering refinement shows Li to be completely ordered at the M(3) site in these crystals. The amphibole composition is intermediate between fluor-arfvedsonite and fluor-ferro-leakeite with a small component (???10%) of fluor-ferro-ferri-nybo??ite. These amphibole crystals project into miarolitic cavities in a pegmatitic phase of a riebeckite granite. The early-crystallizing amphibole is close to fluor-ferro-leakeite in composition, but becomes progressively depleted in Li and F as crystals project out into miarolitic cavities; the final amphibole to crystallize is a fibrous Li-poor riebeckite. Li plays a significant role in late-stage fractionation involving the crystallization of alkali amphibole in peralkaline granitic environments.

  11. CRYSTALLIZATION AND THERMAL EXPANSION CHARACTERISTICS OF In2O3-CONTAINING LITHIUM IRON SILICATE-DIOPSIDE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. SALMAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization characteristics of glasses based on lithium iron silicate (LiFeSi2O6-diopside (CaMgSi2O6 composition with addition of Al2O3 at the expense of Fe2O3 were described. The effect of LiInSi2O6/CaMgSi2O6 replacements was also investigated. The thermal treatment, the crystal phases, and the micro-structural properties of (LiFeSi2O6–CaMgSi2O6 glasses, replacing partial Fe2O3 with Al2O3 and partial CaMgSi2O6 with LiInSi2O6, have been studied by a differential thermal analysis, an X-ray diffraction, and a scanning electron microscopy. The glasses show the intense uniform bulkcrystallization with the fine grained microstructure by increasing the replacement of Al2O3/Fe2O3 and LiInSi2O6/CaMgSi2O6. The crystallizing phases of Ca(Fe,Mg(SiO32, a-LiFe5O8, Li2SiO3, a-SiO2 and CaMgSi2O6 are mostly formed together, in most case, with Li0.6Al0.6Si2.4O6, β-eucryptite solid solution, LiInSi2O6, In2Si2O7, and LiFeSi2O6. The Al2O3 partial replacement increases the transformation temperature (Tg and softening one (Ts for the glasses and the glass-ceramics, and decreases the thermal expansion coefficient (a-value for the glasses. The LiInSi2O6 partial replacement decreases Tg and Ts and increases the a-value for the glasses, while the Al2O3 and LiInSi2O6 partial replacements decrease the a-value for the glassceramics. The crystallization characters of the glasses are correlated to the internal structure, as well as role played by the glass-forming cations. However, the one of the glass-ceramics are mainly attributed to the crystalline phases formed in the material.

  12. Lithium niobate bulk crystallization promoted by CO{sub 2} laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, N.M., E-mail: nmferreira@ua.pt [i3N - Aveiro, Physics Department, Aveiro University, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Costa, F.M. [i3N - Aveiro, Physics Department, Aveiro University, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Nogueira, R.N. [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Graca, M.P.F. [i3N - Aveiro, Physics Department, Aveiro University, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallization of LiNbO{sub 3} nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} matrix by CO{sub 2} laser irradiation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples heat-treated at 650 Degree-Sign C (4 h) and laser treated (4 W/500 s) show similar morphology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glass-ceramics produced by laser process requires a very low processing time. - Abstract: The crystallization induced by laser radiation is a very promising technique to promote glass/ceramic transformation, being already used to produce crystalline patterns on glass surfaces. In this work, a SiO{sub 2}-Li{sub 2}O-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass, prepared by the sol-gel route, was submitted to CO{sub 2} laser radiation and conventional heat-treatments in order to induce the LiNbO{sub 3} crystallization. The structure and morphology of the samples prepared by both routes was analyzed as a function of exposure time, radiation power and heat-treatment temperatures by XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM. The results reveal a correlation between the crystallization degree of LiNbO{sub 3} particles and glass matrix with the heat treatment type and experimental parameters. An heat-treatment at 650 Degree-Sign C/4 h was necessary to induce crystallization in heat treatments samples while 4 W/500 s was enough for laser radiation ones, corresponding a reduction time processing of {approx}14 000 s.

  13. Controlled parallel crystallization of lithium disilicate and diopside using a combination of internal and surface nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Rampf

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-19th century, Dr. Donald Stookey identified the importance and usability of nucleating agents and mechanisms for the development of glass-ceramic materials. Today, a number of various internal and surface mechanisms as well as combinations thereof have been established in the production of glass-ceramic materials. In order to create new innovative material properties the present study focuses on the precipitation of CaMgSiO6 as a minor phase in Li2Si2O5 based glass-ceramics. In the base glass of the SiO2-Li2O-P2O5-Al2O3-K2O-MgO-CaO system P2O5 serves as nucleating agent for the internal precipitation of Li2Si2O5 crystals while a mechanical activation of the glass surface by means of ball milling is necessary to nucleate the minor CaMgSi2O6 crystal phase. For a successful precipitation of CaMgSi2O6 a minimum ratio of MgO and CaO in the range between 1.4 mol% and 2.9 mol% in the base glasses was determined. The nucleation and crystallization of both crystal phases takes place during sintering a powder compact. Dependent on the quality of the sintering process the dense Li2Si2O5-CaMgSi2O6 glass-ceramics show a mean biaxial strength of up to 392 ± 98 MPa. The microstructure of the glass-ceramics is formed by large (5-10 µm bar like CaMgSi2O6 crystals randomly embedded in a matrix of small (≤ 0.5 µm plate like Li2Si2O5 crystals arranged in an interlocking manner. While there is no significant influence of the minor CaMgSi2O6 phase on the strength of the material, the translucency of the material decreases upon precipitation of the minor phase.

  14. separation of strontium and cesium from ternary and quaternary lithium chloride-potassium chloride salts via melt crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammon N. Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Separation of cesium chloride (CsCl and strontium chloride (SrCl2 from the lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl salt was studied using a melt crystallization process similar to the reverse vertical Bridgeman growth technique. A ternary SrCl2-LiCl-KCl salt was explored at similar growth rates (1.8–5 mm/h and compared with CsCl ternary results to identify similarities. Quaternary experiments were also conducted and compared with the ternary cases to identify trends and possible limitations to the separations process. In the ternary case, as much as 68% of the total salt could be recycled per batch process. In the quaternary experiments, separation of Cs and Sr was nearly identical at the slower rates; however, as the growth rate increased, SrCl2 separated more easily than CsCl. The quaternary results show less separation and rate dependence than in both ternary cases. As an estimated result, only 51% of the total salt could be recycled per batch. Furthermore, two models have been explored to further understand the growth process and separation. A comparison of the experimental and modeling results reveals that the nonmixed model fits reasonably well with the ternary and quaternary data sets. A dimensional analysis was performed and a correlation was identified to semipredict the segregation coefficient.

  15. Separation of strontium and cesium from ternary and quaternary lithium chloride-potassium chloride salts via melt crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ammon n.; Pack, Michael [Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (United States); Phongikaroon, Spathorn [Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Idaho, Idaho Falls (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Separation of cesium chloride (CsCl) and strontium chloride (SrCl{sub 2}) from the lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) salt was studied using a melt crystallization process similar to the reverse vertical Bridgeman growth technique. A ternary SrCl2-LiCl-KCl salt was explored at similar growth rates (1.8-5 mm/h) and compared with CsCl ternary results to identify similarities. Quaternary experiments were also conducted and compared with the ternary cases to identify trends and possible limitations to the separations process. In the ternary case, as much as 68% of the total salt could be recycled per batch process. In the quaternary experiments, separation of Cs and Sr was nearly identical at the slower rates; however, as the growth rate increased, SrCl{sub 2} separated more easily than CsCl. The quaternary results show less separation and rate dependence than in both ternary cases. As an estimated result, only 51% of the total salt could be recycled per batch. Furthermore, two models have been explored to further understand the growth process and separation. A comparison of the experimental and modeling results reveals that the nonmixed model fits reasonably well with the ternary and quaternary data sets. A dimensional analysis was performed and a correlation was identified to semipredict the segregation coefficient.

  16. Synthesis and crystal structure of lithium beryllium deuteride Li2BeD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulychev, Boris M; Shpanchenko, Roman V; Antipov, Evgeny V; Sheptyakov, Denis V; Bushmeleva, Svetlana N; Balagurov, Anatoly M

    2004-10-04

    Single-phase ternary deuteride Li(2)BeD(4) was synthesized by a high-pressure high-temperature technique from LiD and BeD(2). The crystal structure of Li(2)BeD(4) was solved from X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with lattice parameters a = 7.06228(9) A, b = 8.3378(1) A, c = 8.3465(1) A, beta =93.577(1) degrees, and Z = 8. Its structure contains isolated BeD(4) tetrahedra and Li atoms that are located in the structure interstices. Li(2)BeD(4) does not undergo any structural phase transitions at temperatures down to 8 K.

  17. Radiation-induced defects in LiAlO{sub 2} crystals: Holes trapped by lithium vacancies and their role in thermoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holston, M.S.; McClory, J.W.; Giles, N.C. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Halliburton, L.E., E-mail: Larry.Halliburton@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to identify the primary hole trap in undoped lithium aluminate (LiAlO{sub 2}) crystals. Our interest in this material arises because it is a candidate for radiation detection applications involving either optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) or thermoluminescence (TL). During an x-ray irradiation at room temperature, holes are trapped at oxygen ions adjacent to lithium vacancies. Large concentrations of these lithium vacancies are introduced into the crystal during growth. With the magnetic field along the [001] direction, the EPR spectrum from these trapped-hole centers consists of eleven lines, evenly spaced but with varying intensities, caused by nearly equal hyperfine interactions with two {sup 27}Al nuclei (I=5/2, 100% abundant). The g matrix is determined from the angular dependence of the EPR spectrum and has principal values of 2.0130, 2.0675, and 2.0015. These g shifts strongly support the model of a hole in a p orbital on an oxygen ion. The adjacent lithium vacancy stabilizes the hole on the oxygen ion. A sequence of pulsed thermal anneals above room temperature shows that the EPR spectrum from the holes trapped adjacent to the lithium vacancies disappears in the 90–120 °C range. The thermal decay of these hole centers directly correlates with an intense TL peak near 105 °C. Signals at lower magnetic field in the 9.4 GHz EPR spectra suggest that the electron trap associated with this TL peak at 105 °C may be a transition-metal-ion impurity, most likely Fe, located at a cation site. Additional less intense TL peaks are observed near 138, 176, and 278 °C. - Highlights: • Undoped LiAlO{sub 2} crystals are irradiated at room temperature with x-rays. • EPR is used to identify holes trapped at oxygen ions adjacent to lithium vacancies. • Thermal decay of the EPR spectrum correlates with an intense TL peak at 105 °C.

  18. Radiation effect on conductivity of oxygen-containing crystals of lithium fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shchepina, L.I.; Alekseeva, L.I.; Lobanov, B.D.; Kostyukov, V.M. (Irkutskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Prikladnoj Fiziki)

    1984-07-01

    The data are presented on an anomalous behaviour of the conductivity, sigma of oxygen-enriched LiF crystals irradiated by approximately 10/sup 5/ J/kg doses. The ultraviolet absorption spectra were used to measure the oxygen content. The samples were exposed to ..gamma..-radiation of a /sup 60/Co source. The anomalous behaviour of tau is manifested by deviation of the sigma temperature dependence from the exponential law and occurrence of the minimum on the curve. The anomalous behaviour covers the range of 580-660 K and terminates by the tau recovery up to the values of an intact samples.

  19. Face-centered-cubic lithium crystals formed in mesopores of carbon nanofiber electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Sun; Seo, Jong-Hyun; Son, Seoung-Bum; Kim, Seul Cham; Choi, In-Suk; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Se-Hee; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2013-07-23

    In the foreseeable future, there will be a sharp increase in the demand for flexible Li-ion batteries. One of the most important components of such batteries will be a freestanding electrode, because the traditional electrodes are easily damaged by repeated deformations. The mechanical sustainability of carbon-based freestanding electrodes subjected to repeated electrochemical reactions with Li ions is investigated via nanotensile tests of individual hollow carbon nanofibers (HCNFs). Surprisingly, the mechanical properties of such electrodes are improved by repeated electrochemical reactions with Li ions, which is contrary to the conventional wisdom that the mechanical sustainability of carbon-based electrodes should be degraded by repeated electrochemical reactions. Microscopic studies reveal a reinforcing mechanism behind this improvement, namely, that inserted Li ions form irreversible face-centered-cubic (FCC) crystals within HCNF cavities, which can reinforce the carbonaceous matrix as strong second-phase particles. These FCC Li crystals formed within the carbon matrix create tremendous potential for HCNFs as freestanding electrodes for flexible batteries, but they also contribute to the irreversible (and thus low) capacity of HCNFs.

  20. Ar-ion etching effects on the XPS spectra of the ferroelectric potassium lithium niobate crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Byeong-Eog; Kim, Chung-Sik; Kim, Hyung-Kook; Kim, Jung-Nam; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae; Chae, Jong-Suk

    2005-01-01

    Ar + -ion-sputtered surface of KLN crystal was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to investigate the oxidation states and chemical environments of K, Li, Nb and O ions. As Ar + -sputtering time increased, the decreasing binding energy of Nb 3d and the peak broadening of mixed Nb 4s and Li 1s (namely Nb* 4s) levels were observed. Also, the binding-energy difference between O 1s and Nb* 4s increased as Ar + -ion-sputtering time increased. The broad peak of Nb* 4s was considered to be related to the site occupancy of Li ion in A1 and C in tetragonal tungsten-bronze structure.

  1. Effect of irradiation on differential thermal properties and crystallization behavior of some lithium borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Alaily, N.A.; Mohamed, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    Differential thermal properties and the crystallization behavior of binary system Li 2 O-B 2 O 3 glasses were investigated. The effects of the presence of oxides of aluminum, lead or one of the transition metals TiO 2 or V 2 O 5 or Fe 2 O 3 in the parent glass were also studied. The effects of three different heat treatments on the crystalline structure of all the studied glasses were also investigated. The results showed that all glass samples were amorphous before the heat treatment, with the most common formed phase being tetraborate Li 2 B 8 O 13 (Li 2 O-4B 2 O 3 ). The exposure of the glass samples to either gamma rays or fast neutrons resulted in considerable changes in their thermal behavior. The results also showed that T g increases for all studied glasses when subjected to irradiation either by fast neutron or gamma rays, while T c decreased only at higher doses

  2. Nanotechnology in lithium niobate for integrated optic frequency conversion in the UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busacca, Alessandro C.; Santini, Claudia; Oliveri, Luigi; Riva-Sanseverino, Stefano; Parisi, Antonino; Cino, Alfonso C.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2017-11-01

    In the domain of Earth Explorer satellites nanoengineered nonlinear crystals can optimize UV tunable solid-state laser converters. Lightweight sources can be based on Lithium Niobate (LN) domain engineering by electric field poling and guided wave interactions. In this Communication we report the preliminary experimental results and the very first demonstration of UltraViolet second-harmonic generation by first-order quasi-phase-matching in a surface-periodically-poled proton-exchanged LN waveguide. The pump source was a Ti-Sapphire laser with a tunability range of 700- 980 nm and a 40 GHz linewidth. We have measured UV continuous-wave light at 390 nm by means of a lock-in amplifier and of a photodiode with enhanced response in the UV. Measured conversion efficiency was about 1%W-1cm-2. QPM experiments show good agreement with theory and pave the way for a future implementation of the technique in materials less prone to photorefractive damage and wider transparency in the UV, such as Lithium Tantalate.

  3. Crystal structure and lithium ion conductivity of A-site deficient perovskites La1/3-xLi3xTaO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Katsuyoshi; Hayashi, Shinsuke

    1997-01-01

    The crystal structure and lithium ion conductivity of La 1/3-x Li 3x TaO 3 solid solutions with the A-site deficient perovskite structure have been studied. Single phase solid solutions were obtained in the range of x=0 to 1/6. Change from tetragonal to cubic structure and decrease in the lattice volume were observed with increasing the x value. The maximum conductivity obtained was 7 x 10 -3 S·m -1 at x=0.06. The composition-dependence on the carrier concentration was calculated and compared with conductivity data. (author)

  4. Antiphase inversion domains in lithium cobaltite thin films deposited on single-crystal sapphire substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, S.J.; Fisher, C.A.J.; Hitosugi, T.; Kumatani, A.; Shiraki, S.; Ikuhara, Y.H.; Kuwabara, A.; Moriwake, H.; Oki, H.; Ikuhara, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Antiphase inversion domains in LiCoO 2 thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on sapphire single-crystal substrates are analyzed using a combination of (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Domains form epitaxially on the substrates with orientation relationships of [112 ¯ 0] LiCoO 2 (0001) LiCoO 2 //[11 ¯ 00] α-Al 2 O 3 (0001) α-Al 2 O 3 and [1 ¯ 1 ¯ 20] LiCoO 2 (0001) LiCoO 2 //[11 ¯ 00] α-Al 2 O 3 (0001) α-Al 2 O 3 . In addition, substrate/film interfaces with the above orientation relationships always have the same stacking sequence of Al–O–Co–O–Li–O. This is confirmed to be the most energetically stable stacking arrangement according to first-principles calculations. Individual domains form as a result of steps one (0 0 0 1) O–Al–O spacing in height on the otherwise flat substrate surface. Because the orientation of adjacent (0 0 0 1) AlO 6 octahedra in Al 2 O 3 are rotated by 180°, while LiO 6 and CoO 6 octahedra in LiCoO 2 are all aligned in the same direction, substrate steps produce LiCoO 2 domains rotated 180° relative to their neighbors. The similar size of oxygen octahedra in the two materials also means that the step height is close to the layer spacing in LiCoO 2 , so that (0 0 0 1) Li and Co layers of adjacent domains are shifted by one layer relative to each other at each domain boundary, aligning Li layers with Co layers across the boundary. The combination of these two effects generates antiphase inversion domains. The domain boundaries effectively sever Li-ion diffusion pathways in the (0 0 0 1) planes between domains and thus are expected to have a detrimental effect on Li-ion conductivity

  5. Desired crystal oriented LiFePO4 nanoplatelets in situ anchored on a graphene cross-linked conductive network for fast lithium storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Anmin; Abdulla, Wael Al; Wang, Dianlong; Zhao, X S

    2015-05-21

    Electron transfer and lithium ion diffusion rates are the key factors limiting the lithium ion storage in anisotropic LiFePO4 electrodes. In this work, we employed a facile solvothermal method to synthesize a "platelet-on-sheet" LiFePO4/graphene composite (LFP@GNs), which is LiFePO4 nanoplatelets in situ grown on graphene sheets with highly oriented (010) facets of LiFePO4 crystals. Such a two-phase contact mode with graphene sheets cross-linked to form a three-dimensional porous network is favourable for both fast lithium ion and electron transports. As a result, the designed LFP@GNs displayed a high rate capability (∼56 mA h g(-1) at 60 C) and long life cycling stability (∼87% capacity retention over 1000 cycles at 10 C). For comparison purposes, samples ex situ modified with graphene (LFP/GNs) as well as pure LiFePO4 platelets (LFP) were also prepared and investigated. More importantly, the obtained LFP@GNs can be used as a basic unit for constructing more complex structures to further improve electrochemical performance, such as coating the exposed LFP surface with a thin layer of carbon to build a C@LFP@GN composite to further enhance its cycling stability (∼98% capacity retention over 1000 cycles at 10 C).

  6. Triangles and squares for a unique molecular crystal structure. Unsupported two-coordinate lithium cations and CC agostic interactions in cyclopropyllithium derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufrois, Quentin; Daran, Jean-Claude; Vendier, Laure; Dinoi, Chiara; Etienne, Michel [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination du CNRS (LCC), Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LCC, Toulouse (France)

    2018-02-12

    Understanding and controlling the aggregation state is germane to alkyllithium chemistry. Lewis base-free alkyllithium compounds normally form tetrahedral tetramers or octahedral hexamers in the solid state with the lithium cations being three-coordinate. We report that the unsupported cyclopropyl derivative 1-(trimethylsilyl)cyclopropyllithium [{μ-c-C(SiMe_3)C_2H_4}Li]{sub 4} (1), synthesized by the reduction of 1-(phenylthio)-1-(trimethylsilyl)cyclopropane, crystallizes as a tetramer in the space group I-4 with the two-coordinate lithium atoms forming a square. CC agostic interactions complete the coordination sphere around each lithium. The aggregate is preserved in hydrocarbon solution. Furthermore, CC agostic interactions compete intra- and intermolecularly with Lewis base donation as in the unsaturated dimer of 1-(phenylthio)cyclopropyllithium [Li(thf){sub 2}{μ-c-C(SPh)C_2H_4}{sub 2}Li (thf)] (3) which is also fully characterized. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Polar and chemical domain structures of lead scandium tantalate (PST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, J.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The local structure of chemical and polar domains and domain walls is determined directly by atomic resolution high-resolution electron microscopy. Thus the Pb, Ta and Sc atomic positions may be located in the images of very thin crystals. Furthermore the Pb cation displacements away from the ideal perovskite A-site have been measured directly for the first time. Local variations in polarization direction may be mapped directly off the images, provided certain electron optical conditions are met. The results are relevant to recent theories of polar-glass behaviour in relaxor-type complex oxide functional ceramics. 17 refs., 9 figs

  8. Preparation of potassium tantalate niobate thin films by chemical solution deposition and their characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buršík, Josef; Železný, Vladimír; Vaněk, Přemysl

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 12 (2005), s. 2151-2154 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0238; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A028; GA MŠk OC 528.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : films * tantalates * chemical solution deposition Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.567, year: 2005

  9. Iron site location in Fe-diffused lithium niobate crystals by combined RBS-PIXE-NRA analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaltron, A. [University of Padova and CNISM, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Argiolas, N., E-mail: nicola.argiolas@unipd.it [University of Padova and CNISM, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); De Salvador, D.; Bazzan, M. [University of Padova and CNISM, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Ciampolillo, M.V.; Bacci, L.; Sada, C. [University of Padova and CNISM, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    Iron diffused x-cut lithium niobate samples have been studied from a structural point of view by ion beam analysis techniques in channeling conditions. The aim of this work is to determine the most probable position of iron atoms after high temperature diffusion treatment in pure oxygen atmosphere and to verify their location after an additional full reducing annealing at low temperature. The results are compared with the bulk doping case that can be considered the final equilibrium state of the diffusion process. By comparing the iron signal with niobium and lithium counterparts in angular scans along proper crystallographic directions, we demonstrate that iron occupies in any case the lithium site or a very close position regardless of the reduction degree, just as in the case of bulk doped samples.

  10. On-chip steering of entangled photons in nonlinear photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, H Y; Yu, X Q; Gong, Y X; Xu, P; Xie, Z D; Jin, H; Zhang, C; Zhu, S N

    2011-08-16

    One promising technique for working toward practical photonic quantum technologies is to implement multiple operations on a monolithic chip, thereby improving stability, scalability and miniaturization. The on-chip spatial control of entangled photons will certainly benefit numerous applications, including quantum imaging, quantum lithography, quantum metrology and quantum computation. However, external optical elements are usually required to spatially control the entangled photons. Here we present the first experimental demonstration of on-chip spatial control of entangled photons, based on a domain-engineered nonlinear photonic crystal. We manipulate the entangled photons using the inherent properties of the crystal during the parametric downconversion, demonstrating two-photon focusing and beam-splitting from a periodically poled lithium tantalate crystal with a parabolic phase profile. These experimental results indicate that versatile and precise spatial control of entangled photons is achievable. Because they may be operated independent of any bulk optical elements, domain-engineered nonlinear photonic crystals may prove to be a valuable ingredient in on-chip integrated quantum optics.

  11. Facile synthesis of single-crystal mesoporous CoNiO2 nanosheets assembled flowers as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanguo; Zhao, Yanyan; Yu, Yanlong; Ahmad, Mashkoor; Sun, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mesoporous CoNiO 2 microflowers have been synthesized. • Li-ion batteries performance of CoNiO 2 has been investigated. • CoNiO 2 structure delivers high capacity, good cycling stability and high rate capability. • The electrochemical performance is attributed to the mesoporous nature and the 3D structure. • CoNiO 2 can be considered to be an attractive candidate as an electrode material for LIBs. - Abstract: Mesoporous CoNiO 2 microflowers assembled with single-crystal nanosheets were successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal method and subsequent annealing process and their lithium storage capacity were investigated. The structural and compositional analysis of the mesoporous CoNiO 2 microflowers has been studied by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Bruauer–Emmett–Teller specific surface area of CoNiO 2 microflowers has been calculated by the nitrogen isotherm curve and pore size distribution has been determined by the Barret–Joyner–Halenda method. It has been found that the as-prepared CoNiO 2 electrodes delivered satisfied capacity, good cycling stability and rate capability. The improved electrochemical performance is attributed to the mesoporous nature and the 3D assembled structure. Therefore, such a structure can be considered to be an attractive candidate as an electrode material for lithium-ion batteries

  12. Extraction of lithium Carbonate from Petalite Ore (Momeik District, Myanmar)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tun Tun Moe

    2011-12-01

    The methods for preparing high purity lithium carbonate which can be used for pharmaceutical applications, electronic grade crystals of lithium or to prepare battery-grade lithium metal are disclosed. Lithium carbonate as commercially produced from mineral extraction, lithium containing brines or sea water. One method for the production of pure lithium carbonate from mineral source (petalite ore) obtained from Momeik District, Myanmar is disclosed. Method for mineral processing of ore concentrate is also disclosed.

  13. Nonlinear excitations and charge transport in lithium niobate crystals investigated using femtosecond-light gratings; Nichtlineare Anregungen und Ladungstransport in Lithiumniobatkristallen untersucht mit Femtosekunden-Lichtgittern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxein, Karl Dominik

    2009-12-15

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) is a widely employed material in nonlinear optics and photonics. Its usage is hampered by the photorefractive effect, which can destroy beam profiles and phase matching conditions. Existing methods to suppress photorefraction fail for the interesting regime of very high intensities and short pulses. Therefore, the photorefractive effect is investigated using femtosecond laser pulses: By utilizing so-called 2K holography, the occupation of energetically shallow traps is observed to occur in less than 100 fs after a two-photon excitation. Writing of photorefractive gratings into oxidized iron-doped LiNbO{sub 3} is much faster with pulses than with cw light. This is explained by the sensitization of the crystal due to charge trapping in photorefractive centers after nonlinear excitations. Finally, light-induced scattering of pulse light is suppressed compared to the scattering of cw light due to the small coherence length of pulses. (orig.)

  14. Proton beam spatial distribution and Bragg peak imaging by photoluminescence of color centers in lithium fluoride crystals at the TOP-IMPLART linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Picardi, L.; Nenzi, P.; Trinca, E.; Vadrucci, M.; Bonfigli, F.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2017-11-01

    Solid-state radiation detectors based on the photoluminescence of stable point defects in lithium fluoride crystals have been used for advanced diagnostics during the commissioning of the segment up to 27 MeV of the TOP-IMPLART proton linear accelerator for proton therapy applications, under development at ENEA C.R. Frascati, Italy. The LiF detectors high intrinsic spatial resolution and wide dynamic range allow obtaining two-dimensional images of the beam transverse intensity distribution and also identifying the Bragg peak position with micrometric precision by using a conventional optical fluorescence microscope. Results of the proton beam characterization, among which, the estimation of beam energy components and dynamics, are reported and discussed for different operating conditions of the accelerator.

  15. High Lithium Insertion Voltage Single-Crystal H2 Ti12 O25 Nanorods as a High-Capacity and High-Rate Lithium-Ion Battery Anode Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Chen, Li; Shan, Zizhao; Lee, Wee Siang Vincent; Xiao, Wen; Liu, Zhifang; Liang, Jingjing; Yang, Gaoli; Xue, Junmin

    2018-01-10

    H 2 Ti 12 O 25 holds great promise as a high-voltage anode material for advanced lithium-ion battery applications. To enhance its electrochemical performance, control of the crystal orientation and morphology is an effective way to cope with slow Li + -ion diffusion inside H 2 Ti 12 O 25 with severe anisotropy. In this report, Na 2 Ti 6 O 13 nanorods, prepared from Na 2 CO 3 and anatase TiO 2 in molten NaCl medium, were used as a precursor in the synthesis of long single-crystal H 2 Ti 12 O 25 nanorods with reactive facets. The as-prepared H 2 Ti 12 O 25 nanorods with a diameter of 100-200 nm showed higher charge (extraction) specific capacity and better rate performance than previously reported systems. The reversible capacity of H 2 Ti 12 O 25 was 219.8 mAh g -1 at 1C after 100 cycles, 172.1 mAh g -1 at 10C, and 144.4 mAh g -1 at 20C after 200 cycles; these values are higher than those of H 2 Ti 12 O 25 prepared by the conventional soft-chemical method. Moreover, the as-prepared H 2 Ti 12 O 25 nanorods exhibited superior cycle stability with more than 94 % retention of capacity with nearly 100 % coulombic efficiency after 100 cycles at 1C. On the basis of the above results, long single-crystal H 2 Ti 12 O 25 nanorods synthesized in molten NaCl with outstanding electrochemical characteristics hold a significant amount of promise for hybrid electric vehicles and energy-storage systems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Growth of large size lithium niobate single crystals of high quality by tilting-mirror-type floating zone method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Abdur Razzaque, E-mail: razzaque_ru2000@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of Rajshahi (Bangladesh)

    2016-05-15

    Large size high quality LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals were grown successfully by tilting-mirror-type floating zone (TMFZ) technique. The grown crystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, etch pits density measurement, Impedance analysis, Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and UV-Visible spectrometry. The effect of mirror tilting during growth on the structural, electrical, optical properties and defect density of the LiNbO{sub 3} crystals were investigated. It was found that the defect density in the crystals reduced for tilting the mirror in the TMFZ method. The chemical analysis revealed that the grown crystals were of high quality with uniform composition. The single crystals grown by TMFZ method contains no low-angle grain boundaries, indicating that they can be used for high efficiency optoelectronic devices. (author)

  17. Phase transition in a rechargeable lithium battery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreyer, W.; Gaberscek, M.; Guhlke, C.; Huth, R.; Jamnik, J.

    We discuss the lithium storage process within a single-particle cathode of a lithium-ion battery. The single storage particle consists of a crystal lattice whose interstitial lattice sites may be empty or reversibly filled with lithium atoms. The resulting evolution equations describe diffusion with

  18. LiTaO.sub.3./sub. crystals with near-zero birefringence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glazier, A. M.; Zhang, N.; Bartasyte, A.; Keeble, D.S.; Huband, S.; Thomas, P.A.; Gregora, Ivan; Borodavka, Fedir; Margueron, S.; Hlinka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 5 (2012), s. 1030-1037 ISSN 0021-8898 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : lithium tantalate * birefringence * domains * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.343, year: 2012

  19. Fabrication of nanoscale patterns in lithium fluoride crystal using a 13.5 nm Schwarzschild objective and a laser produced plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xin; Mu Baozhong; Jiang Li; Zhu Jingtao; Yi Shengzhen; Wang Zhanshan; He Pengfei

    2011-01-01

    Lithium fluoride (LiF) crystal is a radiation sensitive material widely used as EUV and soft x-ray detector. The LiF-based detector has high resolution, in principle limited by the point defect size, large field of view, and wide dynamic range. Using LiF crystal as an imaging detector, a resolution of 900 nm was achieved by a projection imaging of test meshes with a Schwarzschild objective operating at 13.5 nm. In addition, by imaging of a pinhole illuminated by the plasma, an EUV spot of 1.5 μm diameter in the image plane of the objective was generated, which accomplished direct writing of color centers with resolution of 800 nm. In order to avoid sample damage and contamination due to the influence of huge debris flux produced by the plasma source, a spherical normal-incidence condenser was used to collect EUV radiation. Together with a description of experimental results, the development of the Schwarzschild objective, the influence of condenser on energy density and the alignment of the imaging system are also reported.

  20. Atomic Layer-Deposited Molybdenum Oxide/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Electrodes: The Influence of Crystal Structure on Lithium-Ion Capacitor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Simon; Zeiger, Marco; Quade, Antje; Kruth, Angela; Presser, Volker

    2018-05-25

    Merging of supercapacitors and batteries promises the creation of electrochemical energy storage devices that combine high specific energy, power, and cycling stability. For that purpose, lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) that store energy by lithiation reactions at the negative electrode and double-layer formation at the positive electrode are currently investigated. In this study, we explore the suitability of molybdenum oxide as a negative electrode material in LICs for the first time. Molybdenum oxide-carbon nanotube hybrid materials were synthesized via atomic layer deposition, and different crystal structures and morphologies were obtained by post-deposition annealing. These model materials are first structurally characterized and electrochemically evaluated in half-cells. Benchmarking in LIC full-cells revealed the influences of crystal structure, half-cell capacity, and rate handling on the actual device level performance metrics. The energy efficiency, specific energy, and power are mainly influenced by the overpotential and kinetics of the lithiation reaction during charging. Optimized LIC cells show a maximum specific energy of about 70 W·h·kg -1 and a high specific power of 4 kW·kg -1 at 34 W·h·kg -1 . The longevity of the LIC cells is drastically increased without significantly reducing the energy by preventing a deep cell discharge, hindering the negative electrode from crossing its anodic potential limit.

  1. Holographic recording in a doubly doped lithium niobate crystal with two wavelengths: a blue laser diode and a green laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Yuichi; Ishii, Yukihiro

    2010-08-01

    A doubly-doped LiNbO3 (LN) crystal has been well used as a nonvolatile two-wavelength recording material. By using two levels of the crystal, two-kind holograms can be recorded on one crystal; a hologram is recorded with a 405-nm blue laser diode (LD) for a deep Mn level, and another hologram is with a 532-nm green laser for a shallow Fe level. The recording capacity doubles. A 780-nm LD is non-volatile reconstructing source since the LD line is insensitive to both levels. Multiplexed reconstructed images are demonstrated by using a sharp angular selectivity of a volume LN crystal keeping Bragg condition with spherical reconstructions.

  2. Kinetics of non-equilibrium processes in non-linear crystals of lithium borates excited with synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ogorodnikov, I N; Isaenko, L I; Zinin, E I; Kruzhalov, A V

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a study of the LiB sub 3 O sub 5 and Li sub 2 B sub 4 O sub 7 crystals by the use of the luminescent spectroscopy with the sub-nanosecond time resolution under excitation of the high-power synchrotron radiation. The commonness in the origin of the non-equilibrium processes in these crystals as well as the observed differences in the luminescence manifestations is discussed.

  3. Kinetics of non-equilibrium processes in non-linear crystals of lithium borates excited with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikov, I.N. E-mail: ogo@dpt.ustu.ru; Pustovarov, V.A.; Isaenko, L.I.; Zinin, E.I.; Kruzhalov, A.V

    2000-06-21

    The paper presents the results of a study of the LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} crystals by the use of the luminescent spectroscopy with the sub-nanosecond time resolution under excitation of the high-power synchrotron radiation. The commonness in the origin of the non-equilibrium processes in these crystals as well as the observed differences in the luminescence manifestations is discussed.

  4. crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Huang, Yisheng; Zhang, Lizhen; Lin, Zhoubin; Sun, Shijia; Wang, Guofu

    2014-07-01

    A Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal with dimensions of ϕ 17 × 30 mm3 was grown by the Czochralski method. The thermal expansion coefficients of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal are 1.32 × 10-5 K-1 along c-axis and 1.23 × 10-5 K-1 along a-axis, respectively. The spectroscopic characteristics of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal were investigated. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied to calculate the spectral parameters. The absorption cross sections at 805 nm are 2.17 × 10-20 cm2 with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 15 nm for π-polarization, and 2.29 × 10-20 cm2 with a FWHM of 14 nm for σ-polarization. The emission cross sections are 3.19 × 10-20 cm2 for σ-polarization and 2.67 × 10-20 cm2 for π-polarization at 1,064 nm. The fluorescence quantum efficiency is 67 %. The quasi-cw laser of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal was performed. The maximum output power is 80 mW. The slope efficiency is 7.12 %. The results suggest Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal as a promising laser crystal fit for laser diode pumping.

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure, and vibrational spectra of the anhydrous lithium dicyanamide Li[N(CN){sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reckeweg, Olaf [Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); DiSalvo, Francis J. [Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Schulz, Armin [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Blaschkowski, Bjoern; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Jagiella, Stefan [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Crystals of Li[N(CN){sub 2}] were synthesized from a metathesis reaction of stoichiometric amounts of aqueous solutions of Na[N(CN){sub 2}] and Li{sub 2}[SO{sub 4}] followed by subsequent treatment with ethanol and evaporation of the filtered-off solution at 80 C under normal atmospheric conditions. The single crystals of the title compound are transparent, colorless, and extremly hygroscopic. X-ray structure analysis showed that Li[N(CN){sub 2}] crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2/c with the cell parameters a = 530.79(8) pm, b = 524.89(9) pm, c = 1149.77(17) pm, β = 101.551(7) , and Z = 4. The crystal structure contains Li{sup +} cations in both tetrahedral and octahedral nitrogen coordination of the boomerang-shaped [N≡C-N-C≡N]{sup -} anions. The vibrational spectra of Li[N(CN){sub 2}] are reported as well, together with ab initio calculations for geometry and harmonic frequencies of the free dicyanamide anion. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Lithium ion intercalation in thin crystals of hexagonal TaSe2 gated by a polymer electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yueshen; Lian, Hailong; He, Jiaming; Liu, Jinyu; Wang, Shun; Xing, Hui; Mao, Zhiqiang; Liu, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Ionic liquid gating has been used to modify the properties of layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), including two-dimensional (2D) crystals of TMDCs used extensively recently in the device work, which has led to observations of properties not seen in the bulk. The main effect comes from the electrostatic gating due to the strong electric field at the interface. In addition, ionic liquid gating also leads to ion intercalation when the ion size of the gate electrolyte is small compared to the interlayer spacing of TMDCs. However, the microscopic processes of ion intercalation have rarely been explored in layered TMDCs. Here, we employed a technique combining photolithography device fabrication and electrical transport measurements on the thin crystals of hexagonal TaSe2 using multiple channel devices gated by a polymer electrolyte LiClO4/Polyethylene oxide (PEO). The gate voltage and time dependent source-drain resistances of these thin crystals were used to obtain information on the intercalation process, the effect of ion intercalation, and the correlation between the ion occupation of allowed interstitial sites and the device characteristics. We found a gate voltage controlled modulation of the charge density waves and a scattering rate of charge carriers. Our work suggests that ion intercalation can be a useful tool for layered materials engineering and 2D crystal device design.

  7. Fatigue effect in ferroelectric crystals: Growth of the frozen domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S.

    2012-06-01

    The model of the fatigue effect during cyclic switching caused by growth of the frozen domain area with charged domain walls has been proposed. It was claimed on the basis of the previous experimental results that for switching in increasing field the frozen domain area started to grow at the given sub-threshold field value and stopped at the threshold field. The influence of the shape and frequency of the field pulses used for cyclic switching has been considered. The uniaxial ferroelectric stoichiometric lithium tantalate single crystals produced by vapor transport equilibration with record low value of coercive field have been chosen as a model material for experimental verification of the model. The formation of the charged domain walls as a result of cyclic switching has been revealed by analysis of the domain images obtained by optical and Raman confocal microscopy. It has been shown that the fatigue degree is equal to the fraction of the frozen domain area. The experimental dependence of the switched charge on the cycle number has been successfully fitted by modified Kolmogorov-Avrami formula. The experimentally observed frequency independence of fatigue profile for rectangular pulses and frequency dependence for triangular pulses has been explained by proposed model.

  8. Crystal structure and characterization of a novel layered copper-lithium phosphonate with antiferromagnetic intrachain Cu(II)···Cu(II) interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelbaky, Mohammed S.M. [Departments of Physical and Analytical Chemistry and Organic and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Amghouz, Zakariae [Scientific and Technical Services, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus Universitario, 33203 Gijón (Spain); Blanco, David Martínez [Scientific and Technical Services, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R. [Departments of Physical and Analytical Chemistry and Organic and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    Novel metal phosphonate [CuLi(PPA)] [H{sub 3}PPA=3-phosphonopropionic acid] was synthesized hydrothermally and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. It crystallizes in the space group C2/c, with cell parameters a=21.617(2) Å, b=4.9269(2) Å, c=14.342(1) Å, β=132.3(2)°, and Z=8. Its framework is built up from a main trimer, acting as a secondary building unit (SBU), which is formed by vertex-shared between two (LiO{sub 4}) and one (Cu(1)O{sub 4}) polyhedra. These units repeat along b-axis forming infinite inorganic chains, these chains are in turn cross-linked by corner sharing with (Cu(2)O{sub 4}) polyhedra to produce inorganic layers lying in the bc-plane. The neighboring layers are connected through the PPA ligand, leading to a 3D pillared-layered structure. The topological analysis reveals that the compound exhibits 3,4,10-c net. Finally, magnetic susceptibility measurement of this compound over the temperature range of 2–300 K reveals the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic intrachain interactions. - Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal synthesis and structural characterization of a novel lithium-copper phosphonate, formulated as [CuLi(PPA)] (H{sub 3}PPA=3-phosphonopropionic acid), have been reported. This compound has a 3D pillared-layered structure with 3,4,10-c net topology. The magnetic susceptibility data over the temperature range of 2–300 K reveals the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions. - Highlights: • Novel metal phosphonate, [CuLi(PPA)] (1), has been synthesized and characterized. • Compound 1 has a 3D pillared-layered structure with 3,4,10-c net topology. • Magnetic susceptibility data reveals the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions.

  9. Conformal spinel/layered heterostructures of Co3O4 shells grown on single-crystal Li-rich nanoplates for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yue; Lan, Xiwei; Chang, Peng; Huang, Yaqun; Wang, Libin; Hu, Xianluo

    2018-07-01

    Lithium-rich layered materials have received much attention because of their high specific capacity and high energy density. Unfortunately, they suffer from irreversible capacity loss, low initial Coulombic efficiency and poor cyclability. Here we report a facile co-precipitation method to synthesize uniform single-crystal Li-rich Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 nanoplates without using any template. Subsequently, a Co3O4 shell is in situ grown on the Li-rich nanoplates through a hydrothermal method, leading to spinel/layered heterostructures. The electrode made of conformal heterostructured Li-rich/Co3O4 nanoplates delivers a high discharge capacity of 296 mA h g-1 at 0.1 C with an initial Coulombic efficiency of 84%. The capacity retention reaches 83.2% with a discharge capacity of 223 mA h g-1 after 160 cycles at 0.2 C during the potential window ranging from 2.0 to 4.8 V. The enhanced electrochemical performance of the resulting Li-rich/Co3O4 nanoplates benefits from the unique conformal heterostructure as well as the electrochemically active LixCoOy generated between the reaction of Co3O4 shells and the extracted Li2O during charging/discharging processes.

  10. Effects in a lithium tantalate waveguide structure exposed to radiation from a flash X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, R.H.; Dowling, S. [Royal Military Coll. of Science, Shrivenham (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The effects of radiation from a flash X ray machine on an optical waveguide formed in LiTaO{sub 3} are described. Transient induced losses are accompanied by effects of an electric field generated by the radiation. At low temperatures, radiation-induced photorefraction dominates the response. (author). 11 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Study of the diffusion of lithium and sodium ions in solids under regardment of the dimensionality of the crystal lattice; Untersuchung der Diffusion von Lithium- und Natrium-Ionen in Festkoerpern unter Beruecksichtigung der Dimensionalitaet des Kristallgitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volgmann, Kai Tristan

    2016-07-29

    Low-dimensional diffusion was investigated to improve the understanding of the fundamentals of ion movement in condensed matter. Different model systems with different dimensionality of cation migration pathways were investigated using solidstate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy. Both experimental methods made it possible to complementarily study both Li and Na mobility over a wide range of jump rates. Metallic lithium as a well-known model system for isotropic diffusion was investigated using {sup 7}Li field-cycling NMR. The spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) rates were separated into an electronic contribution and a diffusion-induced contribution. The Korringa product was calculated from the actual measurements. The main focus was the comparison of different theoretical models describing the Li motion in metallic lithium. The well-known model by Bloembergen, Purcell and Pound already reproduced the data well, but two models by Sholl improved the results taking into account the type of crystal lattice and jump correlation effects. A single-vacancy diffusion mechanism was observed, but a double-vacancy mechanism was not excluded as elevated temperatures near the melting point of lithium were not available. Li{sub 0.7}Nb{sub 3}S{sub 4} is isostructural to Li{sub 0.7}Nb{sub 3}Se{sub 4} which was reported as possible 1D Li ion conductor due to its channel structure. Thus, Li{sub 0.7}Nb{sub 3}S{sub 4} was investigated as 1D model system using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy gave insights into structural properties. Li dynamics was observed by several NMR methods over a wide temperature range. {sup 7}Li NMR motional narrowing led to an estimate of the activation energy for local Li hopping. {sup 7}Li NMR spin-alignment echo (SAE) was used for the determination of Li jump rates on a macroscopic scale. Possible dimensionality effects were investigated by {sup 7}Li NMR SLR. Out of the phase system Li{sub 2}O

  12. Elastic (stress-strain) halo associated with ion-induced nano-tracks in lithium niobate: role of crystal anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, A; Garcia, G; Olivares, J; Crespillo, M L; Agulló-López, F

    2011-01-01

    The elastic strain/stress fields (halo) around a compressed amorphous nano-track (core) caused by a single high-energy ion impact on LiNbO 3 are calculated. A method is developed to approximately account for the effects of crystal anisotropy of LiNbO 3 (symmetry 3m) on the stress fields for tracks oriented along the crystal axes (X, Y or Z). It only considers the zero-order (axial) harmonic contribution to the displacement field in the perpendicular plane and uses effective Poisson moduli for each particular orientation. The anisotropy is relatively small; however, it accounts for some differential features obtained for irradiations along the crystallographic axes X, Y and Z. In particular, the irradiation-induced disorder (including halo) and the associated surface swelling appear to be higher for irradiations along the X- or Y-axis in comparison with those along the Z-axis. Other irradiation effects can be explained by the model, e.g. fracture patterns or the morphology of pores after chemical etching of tracks. Moreover, it offers interesting predictions on the effect of irradiation on lattice parameters.

  13. Structural studies on actinides carboxylates. 3. Preparation, properties and crystal structure of lithium glutarate hydrogenglutarate dioxouranate(VI)tetrahydrate UO/sub 2/(C/sub 5/H/sub 6/O/sub 4/)Li(C/sub 5/H/sub 7/O/sub 4/). 4H/sub 2/O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetollo, F; Bombieri, G [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Padua (Italy). Lab. di Chimica e Tecnologia dei Radioelementi; Herrero, J A; Rojas, R M

    1979-01-01

    The synthesis, thermal behaviour and crystal structure of lithium glutaratehydrogenglutaratedioxouranate(VI) tetrahydrate is described. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2/sub 1//n. The two glutarato ligands behave differently; one is bridging the uranyl groups in infinite chains running approximately in the a axis direction, the second is bridging the uranyl and the lithium ions. The carboxylic groups are chelated on the uranium and monodentate on the lithium. The structure is linked through a network of hydrogen bonding involving water molecules and oxygen atoms from the carboxylato groups. The geometry around the uranium is approximately hexagonal bipyramidal while the lithium is tetrahedrally coordinated with one glutarate oxygen and 3 water oxygens.

  14. Copper oxide content dependence of crystallization behavior, glass forming ability, glass stability and fragility of lithium borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, A.A.; Kashif, I.

    2010-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been employed to investigate the copper oxide content dependence of the glass transition temperatures data, activation energy for the glass transition E t , glass stability GS, fragility index Fi, the glass-forming ability (GFA) and crystallization behavior of {(100-x) mol% Li 2 B 4 O 7 -x mol% CuO} glass samples, where x=0-40 mol% CuO. From the dependence of the glass transition temperature T g on the heating rate β, the fragility, F i , and the activation energy, E t , have been calculated. It is seen that F i and E t are attained their minimum values at 0 x -T g , SCL region and the GS. The GFA has been investigated on the basis of Hruby parameter K H , which is a strong indicator of GFA, and the relaxation time. Results of GFA are in good agreement with the fragility index, F i , calculations indicating that {90Li 2 B 4 O 7 .10CuO} is the best glass former. The stronger glass forming ability has decreasing the fragility index. XRD result indicates that no fully amorphous samples but a mixture of crystalline and amorphous phases are formed in the samples containing x>25 mol% CuO and below it composed of glassy phase. Increasing the CuO content above 25 mol% helps the crystallization process, and thus promotes a distinct SCL region. XRD suggests the presence of micro-crystallites of remaining residual amorphous matrix by increasing the CuO content.

  15. Lithium Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lithium has been commonly used for the treatment of several mood disorders particularly bipolar disorder in the last 60 years. Increased intake and decreased excretion of lithium are the main causes for the development of lithium intoxication. The influence of lithium intoxication on body is evaluated as two different groups; reversible or irreversible. Irreversible damage is usually related with the length of time passed as intoxicated. Acute lithium intoxication could occur when an overdose of lithium is received mistakenly or for the purpose of suicide. Patients may sometimes take an overdose of lithium for self-medication resulting in acute intoxication during chronic, while others could develop chronic lithium intoxication during a steady dose treatment due to a problem in excretion of drug. In such situations, it is crucial to be aware of risk factors, to recognize early clinical symptoms and to conduct a proper medical monitoring. In order to justify or exclude the diagnosis, quantitative evaluation of lithium in blood and toxicologic screening is necessary. Following the monitoring schedules strictly and urgent intervention in case of intoxication would definitely reduce mortality and sequela related with lithium intoxication. In this article, the etiology, frequency, definition, clinical features and treatment approaches to the lithium intoxication have been briefly reviewed.

  16. Electrochemical characterization of electrolytes and electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. Development of a new measuring method for electrochemical investigations on electrodes with the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM); Elektrochemische Charakterisierung von Elektrolyten und Elektroden fuer Lithium-Ionen-Batterien. Entwicklung einer neuen Messmethode fuer elektrochemische Untersuchungen an Elektroden mit der EQCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moosbauer, Dominik Johann

    2010-11-09

    In this work the conductivities of four different lithium salts, LiPF6, LiBF4, LiDFOB, and LiBOB in the solvent mixture EC/DEC (3/7) were investigated. Furthermore, the influence of eight ionic liquids (ILs) as additives on the conductivity and electrochemical stability of lithium salt-based electrolytes was studied. The investigated salts were the well-known lithium LiPF6 and LiDFOB. Conductivity studies were performed over the temperature range (238.15 to 333.15) K. The electrochemical stabilities of the solutions were determined at aluminum electrodes. The salt solubility of LiBF4 and LiDFOB in EC/DEC (3/7) was measured with the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), a method developed in our group. Moreover, a method to investigate interactions between the electrolyte and electrode components with the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) was developed. First, investigations of corrosion and passivation effects on aluminum with different lithium salts were performed and masses of deposited products estimated. Therefore, the quartzes were specially prepared with foils. Active materials of cathodes, in this work lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4), were also investigated with the EQCM by a new method. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurden die Leitfaehigkeiten von vier unterschiedlichen Salzen, LiPF6, LiBF4, LiDFOB und LiBOB in dem Loesemittelgemisch EC/DEC (3/7) untersucht. Des Weiteren wurde der Einfluss von acht Ionischen Fluessigkeiten (ILs) als Additive fuer Lithium-Elektrolyte auf die elektrochemische Stabilitaet und die Leitfaehigkeit studiert. Die untersuchten Salze waren LiPF6 und LiDFOB. Die Leitfaehigkeitsmessungen wurden in einem Temperaturbereich von (238,15 bis 333,15) K durchgefuehrt. Die elektrochemischen Stabilitaeten der Elektrolyte fanden an Aluminium statt. Mit einer an der Arbeitsgruppe entwickelten neuen Methode wurden zudem die Salzloeslichkeiten von LiBF4 und LiDFOB in EC/DEC (3/7) mit der Quarzmikrowaage (QCM) bestimmt. Weiterhin wurden

  17. Phenomenological theory of the dielectric response of lead magnesium niobate and lead scandium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, H.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the random field effects originating from charges chemical defects and non-domain textures of the formation and dynamics of polar clusters is analyzed. The spatial distribution of the local fields is not totally random but contains some correlations in direction and strength. Polar clusters are classified to be dynamic or frozen according to their dynamic characteristics in the random fields. The relaxation formula of a dipolar moment in an anisotropic double-well potential is deduced. Two percolation models are introduced, one to account for frustration effects associated with multiple orientations of polar clusters, which results in a broad diffuse dielectric response and the second to account for the case whereby there may be a phase transition to a ferroelectric state. The dielectric permittivity and dissipation factor of the typical relaxors lead magnesium niobate and lead scandium tantalate are predicted as a function of both temperature and frequency, which results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. 30 refs., 9 figs

  18. Phase Composition of Samarium Niobate and Tantalate Thin Films Prepared by Sol-Gel Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruncková, H.; Medvecký, Ľ.; Múdra, E.; Kovalčiková, A.; Ďurišin, J.; Šebek, M.; Girman, V.

    2017-12-01

    Samarium niobate SmNbO4 (SNO) and tantalate SmTaO4 (STO) thin films ( 100 nm) were prepared by sol-gel/spin-coating process on alumina substrates with PZT interlayer and annealing at 1000°C. The precursors of films were synthesized using Nb or Ta tartrate complexes. The improvement of the crystallinity of monoclinic M'-SmTaO4 phase via heating was observed through the coexistence of small amounts of tetragonal T-SmTa7O19 phase in STO precursor at 1000°C. The XRD results of SNO and STO films confirmed monoclinic M-SmNbO4 and M'-SmTaO4 phases, respectively, with traces of orthorhombic O-SmNbO4 (in SNO). In STO film, the single monoclinic M'-SmTaO4 phase was revealed. The surface morphology and topography of thin films were investigated by SEM and AFM analysis. STO film was smoother with roughness 3.2 nm in comparison with SNO (6.3 nm). In the microstructure of SNO film, small spherical ( 50 nm) and larger cuboidal particles ( 100 nm) of the SmNbO4 phase were observed. In STO, compact clusters composed of fine spherical SmTaO4 particles ( 20-50 nm) were found. Effect of samarium can contribute to the formation different polymorphs of these films for the application to environmental electrolytic thin film devices.

  19. Optimized Wavelength-Tuned Nonlinear Frequency Conversion Using a Liquid Crystal Clad Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    An optimized wavelength-tuned nonlinear frequency conversion process using a liquid crystal clad waveguide. The process includes implanting ions on a top surface of a lithium niobate crystal to form an ion implanted lithium niobate layer. The process also includes utilizing a tunable refractive index of a liquid crystal to rapidly change an effective index of the lithium niobate crystal.

  20. Lithium Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baird-Gunning, Jonathan; Lea-Henry, Tom; Hoegberg, Lotte C G

    2017-01-01

    Lithium is a commonly prescribed treatment for bipolar affective disorder. However, treatment is complicated by lithium's narrow therapeutic index and the influence of kidney function, both of which increase the risk of toxicity. Therefore, careful attention to dosing, monitoring, and titration...... is required. The cause of lithium poisoning influences treatment and 3 patterns are described: acute, acute-on-chronic, and chronic. Chronic poisoning is the most common etiology, is usually unintentional, and results from lithium intake exceeding elimination. This is most commonly due to impaired kidney...... function caused by volume depletion from lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus or intercurrent illnesses and is also drug-induced. Lithium poisoning can affect multiple organs; however, the primary site of toxicity is the central nervous system and clinical manifestations vary from asymptomatic...

  1. Lithium ion behavior in lithium oxide by neutron scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshinobu; Morii, Yukio; Katano, Susumu; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Satoru; Ohno, Hideo; Nicklow, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Lithium ion behavior in lithium oxide, Li 2 O, was studied in the temperature range from 293 K to 1120 K by the High-Resolution Powder Diffractometer (HRPD) installed in the JRR-3M. The diffraction patterns were analyzed with the RIETAN program. At room temperature, the thermal parameters related to the mean square of the amplitude of vibration of the lithium and the oxygen ions were 6 x 10 -21 m 2 and 4 x 10 -21 m 2 , respectively. AT 1120 K the thermal parameter of the lithium ion was 34 x 10 -21 m 2 . On the other hand, the parameter of the oxygen ion was 16 x 10 -21 m 2 . Inelastic neutron scattering studies for the lithium oxide single crystal were also carried out on the triple-axis neutron spectrometers installed at the JRR-2 and the HFIR. Although the value of a phonon energy of a transverse acoustic mode (Σ 3 ) at zone boundary was 30.6 meV at room temperature, this value was decreased to 25.1 meV at 700 K. This large softening was caused by anharmonicity of the crystal potential of lithium oxide. (author)

  2. Suitability of Cadmium Tantalate and Indium Tantalate as Control Materials for High-Temperature Reactors; Le Tantalate de Cadmium et le Tantalate d'Indium Comme Absorbants pour les Reacteurs a Haute Temperature; Vozmozhnosti ispol'zovaniya tantalatov kadmiya i indiya v kachestve kontrol'nogo materiala dlya vysokotemperaturnykh reaktorov; Empleo del Tantalato de Cadmio y del Tantalato de Indio Como Materiales de Control Para Reactores de Alta Temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preisler, E.; Haessner, F.; Petzow, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1964-06-15

    Control materials for practical use in high-temperature reactors should, independently of the requirements of the individual case, have the following properties: (a ) high absorption cross-section for neutrons in a wide range of energies; (b ) high absorption capacity for neutrons; (c ) small sensitivity for radiation damage; (d) good thermal resistance; (e ) low reactivity with the environment; and ( f ) low costs and good availability. With these points and the avoidance of the disadvantages of n, {alpha} -reactions taken into consideration, attention should be paid chiefly to the elements cadmium, tungsten, indium and tantalum. It is important to combine a good thermal absorber with an epithermal absorber so that the resulting material is stable at elevated temperatures ( Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 700 Degree-Sign C). For this purpose the double-oxides CdWO{sub 4}, Cd {sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7} and CdIn{sub 2}O{sub 2} are suitable. Among these, cadmium tantalate has the highest thermal resistance. Another double-oxide which in combination with cadmium tantalate possesses an advantageous absorption spectrum for neutrons is indium tantalate. It has also good thermal resistance. Because ceramic absorber materials often have to be shaped by plastic deformation, they usually are used as cermets. Therefore, they must be compatible with metals. Cadmium tantalate is compatible with silver and copper and up to 700 Degree-Sign C with nickel; indium, tantalate is completely compatible with silver, copper and nickel and up to 700 Degree-Sign C with molybdenum also and to some degree with iron. These results are in agreement with thermodynamical calculations. For an estimation of the behaviour of the absorber materials under reactor conditions the daughter products originating from neutron absorption have to be considered. While Cd{sup 113} transforms into the stable Cd{sup 114}, tantalum transmutes into tungsten and indium into tin. Both daughter products can bind more

  3. Growth and characterization of pure and lithium doped strontium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Abstract. The effect of lithium ion as dopant on the size and transparency of strontium tartrate tetrahydrate. (SrC4H4O6⋅4H2O) crystals are presented in this paper. Growth of single crystals of undoped and lithium doped strontium tartrate tetrahydrate by controlled diffusion of strontium nitrate into the gel charged with.

  4. Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division Lithium Batteries Resources with Additional thin-film lithium batteries for a variety of technological applications. These batteries have high essentially any size and shape. Recently, Teledyne licensed this technology from ORNL to make batteries for

  5. Vacancy ordering and superstructure formation in dry and hydrated strontium tantalate perovskites: A TEM perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashok, Anuradha M.; Haavik, Camilla; Norby, Poul

    2014-01-01

    Crystal structures of Sr4(Sr2Ta2)O11 and Sr4(Sr1.92Ta2.08)O11.12, synthesized by solid state reaction technique in dry and hydrated state have been studied mainly using Transmission Electron Microscopy. Due to the lesser ability of X-rays to probe details in oxygen sublattice, the change in crystal...... and corresponding unit cells of all the perovskites based on the ordering of oxygen vacancies is deduced. Crystal unit cells based on the observations are proposed with ideal atomic coordinates. Finally an attempt is made to explain the water uptake behaviour of these perovskites based on the proposed crystal...

  6. Effect of the structure and mechanical properties of the near-surface layer of lithium niobate single crystals on the manufacture of integrated optic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosunov, A. V.; Ponomarev, R. S.; Yur'ev, V. A.; Volyntsev, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper shows that the near-surface layer of a lithium niobate single layer 15 μm in depth is essentially different from the rest of the volume of the material from the standpoint of composition, structure, and mechanical properties. The pointed out differences are due to the effect of cutting, polishing, and smoothing of the lithium niobate plates, which increase the density of point defects and dislocations. The increasing density of the structural defects leads to uncontrollable changes in the conditions of the formations of waveguides and the drifting of characteristics of integrated optical circuits. The results obtained are very important for the manufacture of lithium niobate based integrated optical circuits.

  7. Lithium neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraya, Y; Yoong, K Y

    2001-09-01

    Inspite of the advent of newer antimanic drugs, lithium carbonate remains widely used in the treatment and prevention of manic-depressive illness. However care has to be exercised due to its low therapeutic index. The central nervous system and renal system are predominantly affected in acute lithium intoxication and is potentially lethal. The more common side effect involves the central nervous system. It occurs early and is preventable. We describe three cases of lithium toxicity admitted to Johor Bahru Hospital, with emphasis on its neurological preponderance.

  8. The influence of Al2O3, MgO and ZnO on the crystallization characteristics and properties of lithium calcium silicate glasses and glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salman, S.M.; Darwish, H.; Mahdy, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    The crystallization characteristics of glasses based on the Li 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 eutectic (954 ± 4 deg. C) system containing Al 2 O 3 , MgO and ZnO has been investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The partial replacement of Li 2 O by Al 2 O 3 and CaO by MgO or ZnO in the studied glass-ceramics led to the development of different crystalline phase assemblages, including lithium meta- and di-silicates, lithium calcium silicates, α-quartz, diopside, clinoenstatite, wollastonite, β-eucryptite ss, β-spodumene, α-tridymite, lithium zinc orthosilicate, hardystonite and willemite using various heat-treatment processes. The dilatometric thermal expansion of the glasses and their corresponding glass-ceramics were determined. A wide range of thermal expansion coefficient values were obtained for the investigated glasses and their corresponding crystalline products. The thermal expansion coefficients of the investigated glasses were decreased by Al 2 O 3 , MgO or ZnO additions. The α-values of the investigated glasses were ranged from (+18) to (+108) x 10 -7 K -1 (25-300 deg. C), while those of the glass-ceramics were (+3) to (+135) x 10 -7 K -1 (25-700 deg. C). The chemical durability of the glass-ceramics, towards the attack of 0.1N HCl solution, was markedly improved by Al 2 O 3 with MgO replacements. The composition containing 11.5 mol% Al 2 O 3 and 6.00 mol% MgO exhibited low thermal expansion values and good chemical durability

  9. Random-field Potts model for the polar domains of lead magnesium niobate and lead scandium tantalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, H.; Bursill, L.A

    1997-06-01

    A random filed Potts model is used to establish the spatial relationship between the nanoscale distribution of charges chemical defects and nanoscale polar domains for the perovskite-based relaxor materials lead magnesium niobate (PMN) and lead scandium tantalate (PST). The random fields are not set stochastically but are determined initially by the distribution of B-site cations (Mg, Nb) or (Sc, Ta) generated by Monte Carlo NNNI-model simulations for the chemical defects. An appropriate random field Potts model is derived and algorithms developed for a 2D lattice. It is shown that the local fields are strongly correlated with the chemical domain walls and that polar domains as a function of decreasing temperature is simulated for the two cases of PMN and PST. The dynamics of the polar clusters is also discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Crystallization kinetic study of the lithium-disilicate bioceramic obtained from rice-husk silica starting powder; Estudo cinetico da cristalizacao da bioceramica de dissilicato de litio obtida atraves da silica da casca de arroz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, F.A.; Santos, C.; Pinatti, D.G., E-mail: elipeantunes@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Lazar, D.R.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Davim, E.; Fernandes, M.H.F.V. [Universidade de Aveiro, Campos Universitario de Santiago, Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-07-01

    In this work, the study of crystallization of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic produced for alternative source (rice husk silica), and comparatively by commercial source (commercial silica) it was carried through. The stoichiometry 66%.mol SiO{sub 2}: 33%.mol LiO{sub 2} was used. The kinetic studies of crystallization and calculations had been carried through thermal analysis (DTA), and were possible to study the behavior of the curves in accordance with the variation of taxes (5; 10; 15; e 20°C/min), of the granulometries 63 μm, 250μm and 1mm), and for the influence of the substitution commercial SiO{sub 2} by rice husk. The structural characterization was carried through by X-Ray diffractometry (DRX) and scanning electron microscopy (MEV), for chemical characterization used X-Ray fluorescence (FRX). The preliminary results show that the substitution of the silica source is sufficiently promising, since the gotten properties are similar. (author)

  11. RECOVERY OF LITHIUM FROM WASTE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JITKA JANDOVÁ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, processes based on roasting-leaching-crystallization steps and condensation-precipitation steps for Li2CO3 separation from spent Li/MnO2 batteries and lithium-containing wastewaters were developed and verified on a laboratory scale. Spent Li/MnO2 batteries were roasted under reduced pressure at 650°C, which split the castings and deactivated the batteries by reduction of LiMnO2 and MnO2 with residual lithium metal and graphite to form MnO and Li2CO3. The resultant lithium carbonate was selectively solubilised in water with manganese remaining in the leach residue. Li2CO3 of 99.5 % purity was obtained after evaporation of 95 % water. Processing of lithium-containing alkaline wastewaters from the production of liquid rubber comprises condensation up to lithium concentration of 12-13 g/l Li and a two-step precipitation of lithium carbonate using CO2 as a precipitation agent. Sparingly soluble Li2CO3 was produced in the second step at 95°C, whilst most impurities remain in the solution. Obtained lithium carbonate products contained on average more than 99.5 % Li2CO3. The lithium precipitation efficiency was about 90 %.

  12. Changing of optical absorption and scattering coefficients in nonlinear-optical crystal lithium triborate before and after interaction with UV-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkin, Artem S.; Nikitin, Dmitriy G.; Ryabushkin, Oleg A.

    2016-04-01

    In current work optical properties of LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal with ultraviolet (UV) (λ= 266 nm) induced volume macroscopic defect (track) are investigated using novel piezoelectric resonance laser calorimetry technique. Pulsed laser radiation of 10 W average power at 532 nm wavelength, is consecutively focused into spatial regions with and without optical defect. For these cases exponential fitting of crystal temperature kinetics measured during its irradiation gives different optical absorption coefficients α1 = 8.1 • 10-4 cm-1 (region with defect) and α =3.9ṡ10-4 cm-1 (non-defected region). Optical scattering coefficient is determined as the difference between optical absorption coefficients measured for opaque and transparent lateral facets of the crystal respectively. Measurements reveal that scattering coefficient of LBO in the region with defect is three times higher than the optical absorption coefficient.

  13. Exchange reactions in the systems of alkali metal, silver and thallium, sulfates, niobates and tantalates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, I.N.; Lupejko, T.G.; Nalbandyan, V.B.; Abanina, E.V.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated are exchange interactions in diagonal cross sections of twenty triple mutual systems with A and A' cations and SO 4 and MO 3 anions where A and A'-Li, Na, K, Ag, Tl, M-Nb, Ta using the methods of X-ray phase, chemical and differential thermal analyses. Exchange reaction between crystal complex oxide and melted salt are effective synthesis method. These reactions in particular permitted to obtain pure AgNbO 3 , AgTaO 3 and their solid solutions at temperatures hundreds degrees lower than in displacement reactions. Equilibrium samples of AMO 3 -A'MO 3 systems, continuous or discontinuous solid solutions, compounds (except NaMO 3 -KMO 3 , and also LiTaO 3 -KTaO 3 ) are formed in exchange reactions when there is sulfate shortage. Thus, exchange reactions can be applied for solid solution synthesis, and also for phase diagram study

  14. Complete sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of pure and MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrushchak, A. S.; Laba, H. P.; Yurkevych, O. V.; Mytsyk, B. G.; Solskii, I. M.; Kityk, A. V.; Sahraoui, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of ultrasonic measurements of LiNbO 3 and LiNbO 3 :MgO crystals. The tensors of piezoelectric coefficients, elastic stiffness constants, and elastic compliances are determined for both crystals at room temperature. Combining these data with the results of piezo-optical measurements, a complete set of photoelastic tensor coefficients is also calculated. Doping of LiNbO 3 crystals by MgO does not lead to a considerable modification of their elastic and photoelastic properties. However, LiNbO 3 :MgO is characterized by a considerably higher resistance with respect to powerful light radiation, making it promising for future application in acousto-optic devices that deal with superpowerful laser radiation. Presented here are the complete tensor sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of LiNbO 3 and LiNbO 3 :MgO crystals that may be used for a geometry optimization of acousto-optical interaction providing the best diffraction efficiency of acousto-optical cells made of these materials.

  15. Influence of sintering parameters in the ferroelectric properties os strontium bismuth tantalate samples obtained by oxide mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, R.R. de; Pereira, A.S.; Sousa, V.C.; Egea, J.R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The family of compounds layered-type perovskite, know as Aurivilius presents great alternative not only by the absence of lead in the composition, but because the polarization retention, replacing PZT in FeRAM devices. The strontium bismuth tantalate (SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 ) or SBT is ferroelectric material that has attracted considerable interest, since it has high fatigue resistance, supporting high hysteresis loops, with the change in polarization.Checking polarization and depolarization currents stimulated by temperature it is possible to obtain, for example, information about the nature of charges and about the activation energy for the process of dielectric relaxation. For analysis of ferroelectric properties of this compound, it is essential to obtain specimens with a relative density around 95%. Thus, it is important the optimization of the sintering process in order to obtain a ceramic body with a high densification. The influence of sintering parameters to obtain SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 in the polarization properties and in the microstructure of sintered samples was investigated by thermostimulated currents and electronic microscopy, respectively. Results show that variation of these parameters may cause changes in the ferroelectric properties of the material. (author)

  16. Homogenization Experiments of Crystal-Rich Inclusions in Spodumene from Jiajika Lithium Deposit, China, under Elevated External Pressures in a Hydrothermal Diamond-Anvil Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiankang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive studies of the crystal-rich inclusions (CIs hosted in minerals in pegmatite have resulted in substantially different models for the formation mechanism of the pegmatite. In order to evaluate these previously proposed formation mechanisms, the total homogenization processes of CIs hosted in spodumene from the Jiajika pegmatite deposit in Sichuan, China, were observed in situ under external H2O pressures in a new type of hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC. The CIs in a spodumene chip were loaded in the sample chamber of HDAC with water, such that the CIs were under preset external H2O pressures during heating to avoid possible decrepitation. Our in situ observations showed that the crystals within the CIs were dissolved in carbonic-rich aqueous fluid during heating and that cristobalite was usually the first mineral being dissolved, followed by zabuyelite and silicate minerals until their total dissolution at temperatures between 500 and 720°C. These observations indicated that the minerals within the CIs were daughter minerals crystallized from an entrapped carbonate- and silica-rich aqueous solution and therefore provided useful information for evaluating the formation models of granitic pegmatites.

  17. Single crystal fibers growth of double lithium, lanthanium molybdate and adjustment of a micro-pulling down furnace for high vacuum setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Fernando Rodrigues da

    2013-01-01

    In this work we investigated crystal growth procedures aiming the development of single crystal fiber (SCF) for laser applications. For quality optimization in the fabrication of fluorides SCF a new growth chamber for a micro-pulling down furnace (μ-PD) was constructed targeting the fibers fabrication with strict atmosphere control (high vacuum, gas flux and static atmospheres). Simultaneously, the SCF growth process of rare earth double molybdates was studied. The growth of pure and Nd 3+ -doped SCF of LiLa(MoO 4 ) 2 (LLM) was studied in the range of 0,5 - 10mol% doping. The designed furnace growth chamber with controlled atmosphere was successfully constructed and tested under different conditions. Specially, it was tested with the growth of LiF SFC under CF 4 atmosphere showing the expected results. Transparent and homogeneous SCF of Nd:LLM were grown. In the pure fibers was observed facets formation, however, these defects were minimized after tuning of the growth parameters and additionally with the fibers doping. X-ray analysis showed the crystallization of a single phase (space group I4 1 /a); the optical coherence tomography showed the presence of scattering centers only in regions were some growth stability occurred due to the manual process control. The measured Nd 3+ distribution showed uniform incorporation, indicative of a segregation coefficient close to unity in LLM. The potential laser gain of the system was determined using a numerical solution of the rate equations system for the 805nm, CW pumping regime, showing the maximum laser emission gain at 1.064 μm for a Nd 3+ -doping of 5mol%. (author)

  18. Recovery of lithium from geothermal water by amorphous hydrous aluminium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Hideo; Kitamura, Takao; Ooi, Kenta; Katoh, Shunsaku

    1984-01-01

    Effects of chemical composition, temperature, and lithium concentration of geothermal water on lithium recovery by amorphous hydrous aluminium oxide (a-HAO) were investigated in order to evaluate the feasibility of this process. The results are summarized as follows: (1) Among various chemical consituents in geothermal water, silica interfered with the lithium adsorption. The lithium uptake decreased when silica concentration exceeded 73 mg/l under 100 mg/50 ml a-HAO to solution ratio. (2) The lithium uptake decreased with an increase of adsorption temperature and was not observed above 40 deg C. At higher temperature, the crystallization of a-HAO to bayerite occurred prior to lithium adsorption. (3) The lithium uptake increased with an increase of lithium concentration. Lithium uptake comparable with lithium contents in lithium ores was obtained at the lithium concentration of 30 mg/l at 20 deg C. These results show that a-HAO is applicable to collect lithium from geothermal water if silica can be removed before lithium adsorption. (author)

  19. Application of titanates, niobates, and tantalates to neutralized defense waste decontamination: materials properties, physical forms, and regeneration techniques. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the application of sodium titanate (ST) to the decontamination of neutralized defense waste has been completed. The work was directed at Sr removal from dissolved salt cake, simulated in this work with a 6.0 N NaNO 3 - 0.6 N NaOH solution. Three physical forms of the titanates were developed including powder, pellets, and titanate-loaded resin beads and all were found to be superior to conventional organic ion exchange in this application. When spent, the titanate materials can be calcined to an oxide from which is a stable waste form in itself or can be added directly to a glass melter to become part of a vitrified waste form. Radiation stability of titanate powder and resin forms was assessed in tests in which these materials were exposed to 60 Co radiation. The strontium exchange capacity of the powder remained constant through a dose of 3 x 10 7 rads and retained 50% capacity after a dose of 2 x 10 9 rads. The primary mechanism involved in loss of capacity was believed to be heating associated with the irradiation. The resin forms were unchanged through a dose of 5 x 10 8 rads and retained 30% capacity after a dose of 2 x 10 9 rads. The latter dose resulted in visible degradation of the resin matrix. Anion exchange resins loaded with sodium niobate and sodium tantalate were also prepared by similar methods and evaluated for this application. These materials had Sr sorption properties comparable to the titanate material; however, they would have to provide a significant improvement to justify their higher cost

  20. A novel lithium copper iron phosphate with idealized formula Li5Cu22+Fe3+(PO44: crystal structure and distribution of defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Upreti

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Gray–green single crystals were obtained under high-pressure, high-temperature hydrothermal conditions. A refinement of atom occupancies gave the composition Li3.68Cu2+Fe3+(Cu0.55Li0.452Fe2+0.15(PO44. The structure is built from triplets of edge-sharing (Cu,LiO5–FeO6–(Cu,LiO5 polyhedra, CuO4 quadrilaterals and PO4 tetrahedra. In the (Cu,LiO5 polyhedra the Cu and Li positions are statistically occupied in a 0.551 (2:0.449 (2 ratio. Both FeO6 and CuO4 polyhedra exhibit overline1 symmetry. The positions of additional Li atoms with vacancy defects are in the interstices of the framework.

  1. Promotion of the oxidation of carbon monoxide at stepped platinum single-crystal electrodes in alkaline media by lithium and beryllium cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffelsma, Chantal; Rodriguez, Paramaconi; Garcia, Gonzalo; Garcia-Araez, Nuria; Strmcnik, Dusan; Marković, Nenad M; Koper, Marc T M

    2010-11-17

    The role of alkali cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Cs(+), and Be(2+)) on the blank voltammetric response and the oxidative stripping of carbon monoxide from stepped Pt single-crystal electrodes in alkaline media has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. A strong influence of the nature of the cation on both the blank voltammetric profile and the CO oxidation is observed and related to the influence of the cation on the specific adsorption of OH on the platinum surface. Especially Li(+) and Be(2+) cations markedly affect the adsorption of OH and thereby have a significant promoting effect on CO(ads) oxidation. The voltammetric experiments suggest that, on Pt(111), the influence of Li(+) (and Be(2+)) is primarily through a weakening of the repulsive interactions between the OH in the OH adlayer, whereas in the presence of steps also, the onset of OH adsorption is at a lower potential, both on steps and on terraces.

  2. Characterization of lithium evaporators for LTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Perez, M.; Majeski, R.; Timberlake, J.; Lundberg, D.; Kaita, R.; Arevalo-Torres, B.

    2010-11-01

    The presence of lithium on the internal components of fusion devices has proven to be beneficial for reactor performance. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) will be the first experimental fusion device operating with a significant portion of its internal surface coated with lithium. One of the key capabilities in the device is the reliable production of lithium films inside the reactor. This task is accomplished with the use of lithium evaporators, specially designed for LTX using resistively heated yttria crucibles. In the present work, results from the operation of one of these evaporators on a separate test stand are presented. Deposition measurements at different power levels were performed using a quartz crystal deposition monitor, and temperature distributions in the evaporator crucible and its content were obtained using an infrared camera and a dip-in thermocouple probe. Modeling of the evaporation cloud was done with the raytracing software OptiCAD, and comparisons between the computations and the temperature and flux measurements were performed, in order to accurately predict spatial lithium deposition rates in different locations of the LTX device.

  3. Lithium batteries; Les accumulateurs au lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This workshop on lithium batteries is divided into 4 sections dealing with: the design and safety aspects, the cycling, the lithium intercalation and its modeling, and the electrolytes. These 4 sections represent 19 papers and are completed by a poster session which corresponds to 17 additional papers. (J.S.)

  4. Lithium batteries; Les accumulateurs au lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This workshop on lithium batteries is divided into 4 sections dealing with: the design and safety aspects, the cycling, the lithium intercalation and its modeling, and the electrolytes. These 4 sections represent 19 papers and are completed by a poster session which corresponds to 17 additional papers. (J.S.)

  5. Lithium use in batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium has a number of uses but one of the most valuable is as a component of high energy-density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Because of concerns over carbon dioxide footprint and increasing hydrocarbon fuel cost (reduced supply), lithium may become even more important in large batteries for powering all-electric and hybrid vehicles. It would take 1.4 to 3.0 kilograms of lithium equivalent (7.5 to 16.0 kilograms of lithium carbonate) to support a 40-mile trip in an electric vehicle before requiring recharge. This could create a large demand for lithium. Estimates of future lithium demand vary, based on numerous variables. Some of those variables include the potential for recycling, widespread public acceptance of electric vehicles, or the possibility of incentives for converting to lithium-ion-powered engines. Increased electric usage could cause electricity prices to increase. Because of reduced demand, hydrocarbon fuel prices would likely decrease, making hydrocarbon fuel more desirable. In 2009, 13 percent of worldwide lithium reserves, expressed in terms of contained lithium, were reported to be within hard rock mineral deposits, and 87 percent, within brine deposits. Most of the lithium recovered from brine came from Chile, with smaller amounts from China, Argentina, and the United States. Chile also has lithium mineral reserves, as does Australia. Another source of lithium is from recycled batteries. When lithium-ion batteries begin to power vehicles, it is expected that battery recycling rates will increase because vehicle battery recycling systems can be used to produce new lithium-ion batteries.

  6. Methods of tritium recovery from molten lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farookhi, R.; Rogers, J.E.

    1968-01-01

    It is important to keep the tritium inventory in a blanket of a thermonuclear reactor at a low level both to eliminate possible hydriding of structural components and to reduce inventory cost. Removing the tritium from a lithium blanket by fractional distillation, flash vaporization, and fractional crystallization was investigated. No definitive data are available either on the vapor-liquid equilibrium between lithium and tritium at low T 2 concentrations, or on the rate of formation and decomposition of lithium tritide. The final distinction between the recovery systems discussed in this report will depend on such data, but presently distillation appears to be the best alternate to the diffusion scheme proposed by A.P. Fraas. The capital cost of equipment necessary to remove tritium by distillation appears to be greater than 10 million dollars for a 5000 MW system, whereas the capital cost associated with the diffusion process has been estimated to be 4 million dollars

  7. Chitosan-gold-Lithium nanocomposites as solid polymer electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, S N Suraiya; Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Aswal, Vinod K; Ramasamy, Radha Perumal

    2014-08-01

    Lithium micro batteries are emerging field of research. For environmental safety biodegradable films are preferred. Recently biodegradable polymers have gained wide application in the field of solid polymer electrolytes. To make biodegradable polymers films plasticizers are usually used. However, use of plasticizers has disadvantages such as inhomogenities in phases and mechanical instability that will affect the performance of Lithium micro batteries. We have in this research used gold nanoparticles that are environmentally friendly, instead of plasticizers. Gold nanoparticles were directly template upon chitosan membranes by reduction process so as to enhance the interactions of Lithium with the polymer. In this article, for the first time the characteristics of Chitosan-gold-Lithium nanocomposite films are investigated. The films were prepared using simple solution casting technique. We have used various characterization tools such as Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS), XRD, FTIR, Raman, FESEM, and AFM, Light scattering, Dielectric and electrical conductivity measurements. Our investigations show that incorporation of gold results in enhancement of conductivity in Lithium containing Chitosan films. Also it affects the dielectric characteristics of the films. We conclude through various characterization tools that the enhancement in the conductivity was due to the retardation of crystal growth of lithium salt in the presence of gold nanoparticles. A model is proposed regarding the formation of the new nanocomposite. The conductivity of these biodegradable films is comparable to those of the current inorganic Lithium micro batteries. This new chitosan-Au-Li nanocomposite has potential applications in the field of Lithium micro batteries.

  8. Press forging and optical properties of lithium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready, J. F.; Vora, H.

    1980-07-01

    Lithium fluoride is an important candidate material for windows on high power, short-pulse ultraviolet and visible lasers. Lithium fluoride crystals were press forged in one step over the temperature range 300 to 600 C to obtain fine grained polycrystalline material with improved mechanical properties. The deformation that can be given to a lithium fluoride crystal during forging is limited by the formation of internal cloudiness (veiling) with the deformation limit increasing with increasing forging temperature from about 40 percent at 400 C to 65 percent at 600 C. To suppress veiling, lithium fluoride crystals were forged in two steps over the temperature range 300 to 600 C, to total deformations of 69 to 76 percent, with intermediate annealing at 700 C. This technique yields a material which has lower scattering with more homogeneous microstructure than that obtained in one step forging. The results of characterization of various optical and mechanical properties of single crystal and forged lithium fluoride, including scattering, optical homogeneity, residual absorption, damage thresholds, environmental stability, and thresholds for microyield are described.

  9. Press forging and optical properties of lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ready, J.F.; Vora, H.

    1979-01-01

    Lithium fluoride is an important candidate material for windows on high-power, short-pulse ultraviolet and visible lasers. Lithium fluoride crystals have been press forged in one step over the temperature range 300 to 600 0 c to obtain fine-grained polycrystalline material with improved mechanical properties. The deformation that can be given to a lithium fluoride crystal during forging is limited by the formation of internal cloudiness (veiling) with the deformation limit increasing with increasing forging temperature from about 40% at 400 0 C to 65% at 600 0 C. To suppress veiling, lithium fluoride crystals were forged in two steps over the temperature range 300 to 600 0 C, to total deformations of 69-76%, with intermediate annealing at 700 0 C. This technique yields a material which has lower scattering with more homogeneous microstructure than that obtained in one-step forging. The results of characterization of various optical and mechanical properties of single-crystal and forged lithium fluoride, including scattering, optical homogeneity, residual absorption, damage thresholds, environmental stability, and thresholds for microyield are described

  10. Enriched lithium collection from lithium plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karchevsky, A.I.; Laz'ko, V.S.; Muromkin, Y.A.; Pashkovsky, V.G.; Ustinov, A.L.; Dolgolenko, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    In order to understand the physical processes concerned with the selective heating by ion cyclotron resonance and with the subsequent collection of heated particles, experiments were carried out with the extraction of lithium samples, enriched with 6 Li isotopes. Probe and integral extractors allow to collect enriched Li at the end of the selective heating region. Surface density distribution on the collector and local isotopic content of lithium are measured, as a function of the screen height and the retarding potential. Dependence of the collected amount of lithium and of its isotopic content on the value of the magnetic field is also measured. 4 figs., 2 tabs., 5 refs

  11. Lithium ion mobility in lithium phosphidosilicates: Crystal structure, {sup 7}Li, {sup 29}Si, and {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectroscopy, and impedance spectroscopy of Li{sub 8}SiP{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}SiP{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toffoletti, Lorenzo; Landesfeind, Johannes; Klein, Wilhelm; Gasteiger, Hubert A.; Faessler, Thomas F. [Department of Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, 85747, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Kirchhain, Holger; Wuellen, Leo van [Department of Physics, University of Augsburg, Universitaetsstrasse 1, 86159, Augsburg (Germany)

    2016-12-05

    The need to improve electrodes and Li-ion conducting materials for rechargeable all-solid-state batteries has drawn enhanced attention to the investigation of lithium-rich compounds. The study of the ternary system Li-Si-P revealed a series of new compounds, two of which, Li{sub 8}SiP{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}SiP{sub 2}, are presented. Both phases represent members of a new family of Li ion conductors that display Li ion conductivity in the range from 1.15(7) x 10{sup -6} Scm{sup -1} at 0 C to 1.2(2) x 10{sup -4} Scm{sup -1} at 75 C (Li{sub 8}SiP{sub 4}) and from 6.1(7) x 10{sup -8} Scm{sup -1} at 0 C to 6(1) x 10{sup -6} Scm{sup -1} at 75 C (Li{sub 2}SiP{sub 2}), as determined by impedance measurements. Temperature-dependent solid-state {sup 7}Li NMR spectroscopy revealed low activation energies of about 36 kJ mol{sup -1} for Li{sub 8}SiP{sub 4} and about 47 kJ mol{sup -1} for Li{sub 2}SiP{sub 2}. Both compounds were structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (single crystal and powder methods) and by {sup 7}Li, {sup 29}Si, and {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectroscopy. Both phases consist of tetrahedral SiP{sub 4} anions and Li counterions. Li{sub 8}SiP{sub 4} contains isolated SiP{sub 4} units surrounded by Li atoms, while Li{sub 2}SiP{sub 2} comprises a three-dimensional network based on corner-sharing SiP{sub 4} tetrahedra, with the Li ions located in cavities and channels. (copyright 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. System of lithium, sodium, and strontium bromides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinova, G.N.; Yagub'yan, E.S.; Bukhalova, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The visual-polythermal and partially differential thermal methods of analysis have been applied to investigate the meltability diagram of the Li 2 Br 2 -Na 2 Br 2 -SrBr 2 ternary system. Three fields of crystallization belonging to strontium bromide, to the compound LiSr 2 Br 5 and solid solutions of lithium and sodium bromides are found. Two points complying with nonvariant equilibria are discovered

  13. Experimental lithium system experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, J.M.; Berg, J.D.; Kolowith, R.; Miller, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Experimental Lithium System is a test loop built to support design and operation of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility. ELS has achieved over 15,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program has demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including an electromagnetic pump, lithium jet target, and vacuum system. Data on materials corrosion and behavior of lithium impurities are also presented. (author)

  14. Neutron diffraction investigations of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altorfer, F.

    1990-03-01

    Statics and dynamics of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide were investigated using the following experimental methods: elastic scattering on sodium sulfide powder in the temperature range 20 - 1000 C, elastic scattering on a lithium sulfide single crystal in the temperature range 20 - 700 C, inelastic scattering on a 7 Li 2 S single crystal at 10 K. 34 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs

  15. Multinary lithium (oxo)nitridosilicates. Syntheses, structures and their materials properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horky, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was the synthesis, identification and characterization of novel lithium(oxo)nitridosilicates in order to investigate as well as to expand the materials properties of this compound class. Therefore, different synthesis strategies were carried out. Crystal structure elucidation with single-crystal X-ray diffraction was carried out on new compounds. Moreover, investigations of physical properties like luminescence and lithium ion conductivity were performed.

  16. Multinary lithium (oxo)nitridosilicates. Syntheses, structures and their materials properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horky, Katrin

    2017-11-06

    The objective of this thesis was the synthesis, identification and characterization of novel lithium(oxo)nitridosilicates in order to investigate as well as to expand the materials properties of this compound class. Therefore, different synthesis strategies were carried out. Crystal structure elucidation with single-crystal X-ray diffraction was carried out on new compounds. Moreover, investigations of physical properties like luminescence and lithium ion conductivity were performed.

  17. Electrodeposition of high-density lithium vanadate nanowires for lithium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Kang; Li, Xiujuan; Fang, Dong; Yi, Jianhong; Bao, Rui; Luo, Zhiping

    2018-07-01

    Lithium vanadate nanowires have been electrodeposited onto a titanium (Ti) foil by a direct current electrodeposition without template. The morphology, crystal structure, and the effects of deposition voltage, temperature and time on the prepared samples were tested and presented. The as-prepared lithium vanadate nanowires/Ti composite can be used as electrode for lithium-ion battery. Electrochemical measurements showed that the electrode displayed a specific discharge capacitance as high as 235.1 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 30 mA g-1. This research provides a new pathway to explore high tap density vanadates nanowires on metals with enhanced electrochemical performance.

  18. Self-assembled, rare earth tantalate pyrochlore nanoparticles for superior flux pinning in YBa2Cu3O7-δ films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, S A; Durrell, J H; Wimbush, S C; Kursumovic, A; MacManus-Driscoll, J L; Maiorov, B; Wang, H; Lee, J H

    2009-01-01

    Addition of pyrochlore rare earth tantalate phases, RE 3 TaO 7 (RTO, where RE = rare earth, Er, Gd and Yb) to YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) is shown to vastly improve pinning, without being detrimental to the superconducting transition temperature. The closely lattice matched to RTO phase provides a lower interfacial energy with YBCO than BaZrO 3 (BZO) and produces very fine (∼5 nm) particles with high linearity in their self-assembly along c. Critical current densities of 0.86, 0.38 MA cm -2 at 1 and 3 T (for fields) parallel to the c axis were recorded at 77 K in 0.5-1.0 μm thick films and a transition temperature of 92 K was observed even in the highest level doped sample (8 mol%). (rapid communication)

  19. Structures and ion conduction pathways of amorphous lithium ion conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Onodera, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    For ( 7 Li 2 S) x (P 2 S 5 ) 100-x glasses (x = 50, 60, and 70) and 7 Li 7 P 3 S 11 metastable crystal, time-of-flight neutron diffraction and synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments were performed, and three-dimensional structures and conduction pathways of lithium ions were studied using the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling and the bond valence sum (BVS) approach. The conduction pathways of the lithium ions could be classified into two types: lithium 'stable' and 'metastable' regions, respectively. Moreover, it was found that there is a significant relationship between the activation energy of the electrical conduction and the topology of the conduction pathways of the lithium ions. (author)

  20. Structure and phase formation behavior and dielectric and magnetic properties of lead iron tantalate-lead zirconate titanate multiferroic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongmaneerung, R.; Tipakontitikul, R.; Jantaratana, P.; Bootchanont, A.; Jutimoosik, J.; Yimnirun, R.; Ananta, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The multiferroic ceramics consisted of PFT and PZT. • Crystal structure changed from cubic to mixedcubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. • Dielectric showed the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior. • Magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops. - Abstract: Multiferroic (1 − x)Pb(Fe_0_._5Ta_0_._5)O_3–xPb(Zr_0_._5_3Ti_0_._4_7)O_3 (or PFT–PZT) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure and phase formation of the ceramics were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The local structure surrounding Fe and Ti absorbing atoms was investigated by synchrotron X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) measurement. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of frequency and temperature using a LCR meter. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to determine the magnetic hysteresis loops. XRD study indicated that the crystal structure of the sample changed from pure cubic to mixed cubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. XANES measurements showed that the local structure surrounding Fe and Ti ions was similar. Dielectric study showed that the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior while the magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops.

  1. Structure and phase formation behavior and dielectric and magnetic properties of lead iron tantalate-lead zirconate titanate multiferroic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongmaneerung, R., E-mail: re_nok@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Tipakontitikul, R. [Department of Physics, Ubonratchathani University, Ubonratchathani 31490 (Thailand); Jantaratana, P. [Department of Physics, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Bootchanont, A.; Jutimoosik, J.; Yimnirun, R. [School of Physics, Institute of Science, and NANOTEC-SUT Center of Excellence on Advanced Functional Nanomaterials, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Ananta, S. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • The multiferroic ceramics consisted of PFT and PZT. • Crystal structure changed from cubic to mixedcubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. • Dielectric showed the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior. • Magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops. - Abstract: Multiferroic (1 − x)Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}–xPb(Zr{sub 0.53}Ti{sub 0.47})O{sub 3} (or PFT–PZT) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure and phase formation of the ceramics were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The local structure surrounding Fe and Ti absorbing atoms was investigated by synchrotron X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) measurement. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of frequency and temperature using a LCR meter. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to determine the magnetic hysteresis loops. XRD study indicated that the crystal structure of the sample changed from pure cubic to mixed cubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. XANES measurements showed that the local structure surrounding Fe and Ti ions was similar. Dielectric study showed that the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior while the magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops.

  2. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Manis Kumar; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-01

    In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H(2)O(2) (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75°C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H(2)O(2) in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1-(1-X)(1/3)=k(c)t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model 'ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles' i.e. 1-3(1-X)(2/3)+2(1-X)=k(c)t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  5. Startup of Experimental Lithium System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, D.L.

    1980-06-01

    The Experimental Lithium System (ELS) is designed for full-scale testing of targets and other lithium system components for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. The system also serves as a test bed for development of lithium purification and characterization equipment, provides experience in operation of large lithium systems, and helps guide FMIT design

  6. Lithium purity and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, G.E.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-02-01

    The accurate measurement of impurities in lithium is basic to the study of lithium compatibility with fusion reactor materials. In the last year the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) has had the opportunity to develop sampling and analytical techniques and to apply them in support of the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) as a part of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Project. In this paper we present the analytical results from the fill, start-up and operation of the ELS. In addition, the analysis and purification of navy surplus ingot lithium which is being considered for use in a larger system will be discussed. Finally, the analytical techniques used in our laboratory will be summarized and the results of a recent round robin lithium analysis will be presented

  7. Lithium and Renal Impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Ernst; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Nolen, Willem A

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lithium is established as an effective treatment of mania, of depression in bipolar and unipolar disorder, and in maintenance treatment of these disorders. However, due to the necessity of monitoring and concerns about irreversible adverse effects, in particular renal impairment......, after long-term use, lithium might be underutilized. METHODS: This study reviewed 6 large observational studies addressing the risk of impaired renal function associated with lithium treatment and methodological issues impacting interpretation of results. RESULTS: An increased risk of renal impairment...... associated with lithium treatment is suggested. This increased risk may, at least partly, be a result of surveillance bias. Additionally, the earliest studies pointed toward an increased risk of end-stage renal disease associated with lithium treatment, whereas the later and methodologically most sound...

  8. Novel Approach for in Situ Recovery of Lithium Carbonate from Spent Lithium Ion Batteries Using Vacuum Metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jiefeng; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhenming

    2017-10-17

    Lithium is a rare metal because of geographical scarcity and technical barrier. Recycling lithium resource from spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs) is significant for lithium deficiency and environmental protection. A novel approach for recycling lithium element as Li 2 CO 3 from spent LIBs is proposed. First, the electrode materials preobtained by mechanical separation are pyrolyzed under enclosed vacuum condition. During this process the Li is released as Li 2 CO 3 from the crystal structure of lithium transition metal oxides due to the collapse of the oxygen framework. An optimal Li recovery rate of 81.90% is achieved at 973 K for 30 min with a solid-to-liquid ratio of 25 g L -1 , and the purity rate of Li 2 CO 3 is 99.7%. The collapsed mechanism is then presented to explain the release of lithium element during the vacuum pyrolysis. Three types of spent LIBs including LiMn 2 O 4 , LiCoO 2 , and LiCo x Mn y Ni z O 2 are processed to prove the validity of in situ recycling Li 2 CO 3 from spent LIBs under enclosed vacuum condition. Finally, an economic assessment is taken to prove that this recycling process is positive.

  9. High temperature flow behaviour of SiC reinforced lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The compressive flow behaviour of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) glass, with and without SiC particulate reinforcements, was studied. The LAS glass crystallized to spodumene during high-temperature testing. The flow behaviour of LAS glass changed from Newtonian to non-Newtonian due to the presence of crystalline ...

  10. Low pressure lithium condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadkins, R.P.; Oh, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    A low pressure experiment to evaluate the laminar film condensation coefficients of lithium was conducted. Some thirty-six different heat transfer tests were made at system pressures ranging from 1.3 to 26 Pa. Boiled lithium was condensed on the inside of a 7.6-cm (ID), 409 stainless-steel pipe. Condensed lithium was allowed to reflux back to the pool boiling region below the condensing section. Fourteen chromel/alumel thermocouples were attached in various regions of the condensing section. The thermocouples were initially calibrated with errors of less than one degree Celsius

  11. A hybrid lithium oxalate-phosphinate salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Andrew R; Deligonul, Nihal; Scherson, Daniel A; Protasiewicz, John D

    2010-12-06

    The novel organophosphorus-containing lithium salt Li(THF)[(C(2)O(4))B(O(2)PPh(2))(2)] (1; THF = tetrahydrofuran) was synthesized and characterized using a variety of spectroscopic techniques. An X-ray structural analysis on crystals of 1 grown from THF reveals a dimeric structure [Li(THF)(C(2)O(4))B(O(2)PPh(2))(2)](2)·THF, whereby the two units of 1 are bridged via P-O···Li interactions. Compound 1 displays high air and water stability and is also thermally robust, properties needed of electrolytes for their possible use as electrolytes and/or additives in lithium-ion battery applications.

  12. CCDC 894982: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(mu~3~-2-(1,3-bis(2-Methylphenyl)-1,3,2-diazaphospholidin-2-yl)benzenesulfonato)-bis(mu~2~-chloro)-bis(acetone)-dimethyl-di-lithium-di-palladium(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Wucher, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  13. Micro- and nanostructuration of lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung, Holger

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the application of the ion-beam-enhanced-etching (IBEE) technique for the fabrication of different optical elements, among these photonic crystals, in lithium niobate, was studied. The development of a mask technology fitted to the requirements of the IBEE technique as well as a simulation of the process were performed. Hereby the limitations of the technique in view on minimal structure sizes and structure quality were analyzed. In chapter 1 first the material lithium niobate with its properties and the structuration procedures studied hitherto in the literature is presented. Chapter 2 presents the functionality of the IBEE process and describes the studies on the application of IBEE in lithium niobate performed in the framework of this thesis. In chapter 3 the experimental conditions of all applied processes of the IBEE procedure, the processes used for the mask fabrication, as well all further applied methods and technologies are summarized. Chapter 4 deals with the mask fabrication. The requirements on the masks and the developments necessary for their fulfilment are studied. In chapter 5 the performed simulation of the irradiation, annealing, and etching process is described. This simulation makes the prediciton of the geometry of the components from the process parameters and vice versa the determination of parameters for the reaching of an optimal element geometry possible. In chapter 6 the application of the technique for the fabrication of photonic-crystal membranes and their optical characterization is described. Chapter 7 shows the fabrication of different waveguide and diffractive elements in lithium niobate by means of IBEE.

  14. APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

    1961-08-22

    Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

  15. Lithium niobate packaging challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.J.; Holmes, R.J.; Jander, R.B.; Schelling, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The use of lithium niobate integrated optic devices outside of the research laboratory is predicated on the development of a sound packaging method. The authors present a discussion of the many issues that face the development of a viable, robust packaging technology. The authors emphasize the interaction of lithium niobate's physical properties with available packaging materials and technologies. The broad range of properties (i.e. electro-optic, piezo-electric, pyro-electric, photorefractive...) that make lithium niobate an interesting material in many device applications also make it a packaging challenge. The package design, materials and packaging technologies must isolate the device from the environment so that lithium niobate's properties do not adversely affect the device performance

  16. Characterization lithium mineralized pegmatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.F.S.; Luz Ferreira, O. da; Cancado, R.Z.L.

    1986-01-01

    Lithium economic importance has increased in the last years. In Brazil its reserves, generally pegmatites bodies, are found in Itinga-Aracuai-MG. This study of characterization belongs to a global plan of lithium mineralized bodies research of 'Arqueana de Minerios e Metais Ltda', which purpose is to give subsidies for implementation of pegmatite unit, in order to make better use of them. (F.E.) [pt

  17. Lithium battery management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Thomas J [Waukesha, WI

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  18. Programming scale-free optics in disordered ferroelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parravicini, Jacopo; Conti, Claudio; Agranat, Aharon J; DelRe, Eugenio

    2012-06-15

    Using the history dependence of a dipolar glass hosted in a compositionally disordered lithium-enriched potassium tantalate niobate (KTN:Li) crystal, we demonstrate scale-free optical propagation at tunable temperatures. The operating equilibration temperature is determined by previous crystal spiralling in the temperature/cooling-rate phase space.

  19. Programming scale-free optics in disordered ferroelectrics

    OpenAIRE

    Parravicini, Jacopo; Conti, Claudio; Agranat, Aharon J.; DelRe, Eugenio

    2012-01-01

    Using the history-dependence of a dipolar glass hosted in a compositionally-disordered lithium-enriched potassium-tantalate-niobate (KTN:Li) crystal, we demonstrate scale-free optical propagation at tunable temperatures. The operating equilibration temperature is determined by previous crystal spiralling in the temperature/cooling-rate phase-space.

  20. Solid Lithium Ion Conductors (SLIC) for Lithium Solid State Batteries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To identify the most lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes for lithium solid state batteries from the emerging types of solid electrolytes, based on a...

  1. Lithium isotope effect accompanying electrochemical intercalation of lithium into graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Yanase, S; Oi, T

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has been electrochemically intercalated from a 1:2 (v/v) mixed solution of ethylene carbonate (EC) and methylethyl carbonate (MEC) containing 1 M LiClO sub 4 into graphite, and the lithium isotope fractionation accompanying the intercalation was observed. The lighter isotope was preferentially fractionated into graphite. The single-stage lithium isotope separation factor ranged from 1.007 to 1.025 at 25 C and depended little on the mole ratio of lithium to carbon of the lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (Li-GIC) formed. The separation factor increased with the relative content of lithium. This dependence seems consistent with the existence of an equilibrium isotope effect between the solvated lithium ion in the EC/MEC electrolyte solution and the lithium in graphite, and with the formation of a solid electrolyte interfaces on graphite at the early stage of intercalation. (orig.)

  2. Comparative microstructure and electrical property studies of lead scandium tantalate thin films as prepared by LDCVD, sol-gel and sputtering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z; Donohue, P P; Zhang, Q; Williams, D J; Anthony, C J; Whatmore, R W; Todd, M A

    2003-01-01

    Lead scandium tantalate (PST) thin films for uncooled infrared (IR) detector applications have been deposited by liquid delivery chemical vapour deposition (LDCVD), sputtering and sol-gel techniques. The sol-gel and sputtered films were deposited at low temperature into a non-ferroelectric phase with the required perovskite structure being formed using a high temperature rapid thermal anneal (RTA). In contrast to this, the LDCVD films were deposited at high temperature directly into the perovskite phase but were found to still require a high temperature RTA step to optimize their merit for IR detection. Detailed structural and electrical characterization of the PST films deposited by these different methods have revealed that there is no simple relationship between microstructure and electrical properties. The sol-gel and LDCVD techniques produce thin films with excellent microstructures, as determined by x-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy, but inferior electrical properties and relatively low merit figures. By contrast, the sputtered and then rapid thermal annealed films have inferior microstructures, characterized by extensive voiding, but excellent electrical properties and high merit figures

  3. Luminescence of yttrium niobium-tantalate doubly activated by europium and/or terbium under X-ray and electron beam excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, I.D., E-mail: arellano@utp.edu.co [Department of Physics, Technological University of Pereira, Vereda La Julita, Pereira (Colombia); Nazarov, M.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Cortes, J.A. [Department of Physics, Technological University of Pereira, Vereda La Julita, Pereira (Colombia); Ahmad Fauzi, M.N [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2012-09-15

    This paper reports the luminescence emission spectra of Y(Ta,Nb)O{sub 4} activated by rare earth ions such as Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}. The influence of these rare earth ions on the luminescence of yttrium niobium-tantalate phosphors was investigated. The luminescent properties were studied under X-ray and electron beam excitations. Under these excitations, the emission centers of the rare earth activators (Eu{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+}) were found to contribute efficiently to the overall luminescence. Changing the mol concentration of the incorporated activators resulted in a broad variation of visible photoluminescence. Color cathodoluminescence images showed clearly the dependence of chromaticity on the different activators. With their various luminescence chromaticities, these rare earth activated phosphors are promising materials for solid-state lighting applications as well as for X-ray intensifying screens in medical diagnosis, providing a broad variation of visible photoluminescence from blue to red. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Y(Ta,Nb)O{sub 4} phosphors were activated by rare earth ions such as Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphors were studied under X-ray and electron beam excitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The emission centers contribute efficiently to the overall luminescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changing the concentration of the activators resulted in a broad luminescence.

  4. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  5. Analysis of the October 5, 1979 lithium spill and fire in the Lithium Processing Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.; Beatty, R.A.; Brown, H.L.; Coleman, L.F.; Foose, R.M.; McPheeters, C.C.; Slawecki, M.; Smith, D.L.; Van Deventer, E.H.; Weston, J.R.

    1981-12-01

    On October 5, 1979, the Lithium Processing Test Loop (LPTL) developed a lithium leak in the electromagnetic (EM) pump channel, which damaged the pump, its surrounding support structure, and the underlying floor pan. A thorough analysis of the causes and consequences of the pump failure was conducted by personnel from CEN and several other ANL divisions. Metallurgical analyses of the elliptical pump channel and adjacent piping revealed that there was a significant buildup of iron-rich crystallites and other solid material in the region of the current-carrying bus bars (region of high magnetic field), which may have resulted in a flow restriction that contributed to the deterioration of the channel walls. The location of the failure was in a region of high residual stress (due to cold work produced during channel fabrication); this failure is typical of other cold work/stress-related failures encountered in components operated in forced-circulation lithium loops. Another important result was the isolation of crystals of a compound characterized as Li/sub x/CrN/sub y/. Compounds of this type are believed to be responsible for much of the Fe, Cr, and Ni mass transfer encountered in lithium loops constructed of stainless steel. The importance of nitrogen in the mass-transfer mechanism has long been suspected, but the existence of stable ternary Li-M-N compounds (M = Fe, Cr, Ni) had not previously been verified

  6. Lithium: for harnessing renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, which has the chemical symbol Li and an atomic number of 3, is the first metal in the periodic table. Lithium has many uses, the most prominent being in batteries for cell phones, laptops, and electric and hybrid vehicles. Worldwide sources of lithium are broken down by ore-deposit type as follows: closed-basin brines, 58%; pegmatites and related granites, 26%; lithium-enriched clays, 7%; oilfield brines, 3%; geothermal brines, 3%; and lithium-enriched zeolites, 3% (2013 statistics). There are over 39 million tons of lithium resources worldwide. Of this resource, the USGS estimates there to be approximately 13 million tons of current economically recoverable lithium reserves. To help predict where future lithium supplies might be located, USGS scientists study how and where identified resources are concentrated in the Earth’s crust, and they use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered resources also exist.

  7. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Manis Kumar, E-mail: mkjha@nmlindia.org; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Recovery of valuable metals from scrap batteries of mobile phone. - Highlights: • Recovery of Co and Li from spent LIBs was performed by hydrometallurgical route. • Under the optimum condition, 99.1% of lithium and 70.0% of cobalt were leached. • The mechanism of the dissolution of lithium and cobalt was studied. • Activation energy for lithium and cobalt were found to be 32.4 kJ/mol and 59.81 kJ/mol, respectively. • After metal recovery, residue was washed before disposal to the environment. - Abstract: In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75 °C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1 − (1 − X){sup 1/3} = k{sub c}t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model ‘ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles’ i.e. 1 − 3(1 − X){sup 2/3} + 2(1 − X) = k{sub c}t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

  8. Lithium-induced downbeat nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Flora; Manoli, Pierre; Cathébras, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    We report the case of a 76-year old lady under lithium carbonate for a bipolar disorder who presented with a suspected optic neuritis. A typical lithium-induced downbeat nystagmus was observed. Discontinuation of lithium therapy resulted in frank improvement in visual acuity and disappearance of the nystagmus.

  9. The aggregation and characteristics of radiation-induced defects in lithium fluoride nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitovich, A. P.; Kalinov, V. S.; Korzhik, M. V.; Martynovich, E. F.; Runets, L. P.; Stupak, A. P.

    2013-02-01

    It has been established that diffusion activation energies for anion vacancies and centres ? in lithium fluoride nanocrystals are higher than those in bulk crystals. In nanocrystals, ? centres migrating in the range of the temperature close to room temperature is not observed and these centres remain stable. The ratio of centres ? and F 2 concentrations in nanocrystals is higher than in bulk crystals. A new type of colour centres, which is absent in bulk crystals, is discovered in nanocrystals.

  10. A study on structure defects in irradiated lithium fluoride (thermal neutrons); Etude des imperfections de structure du fluorure de lithium irradie (neutrons thermiques)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M

    1958-06-19

    A study was made of the behavior of atomic defects, vacancies and interstitials, generated from the Li{sup 6}(n,{alpha})H{sup 3} reaction in Lip crystals. Defects appear as cavities and platelets around ten angstrom in size and increase both with neutron dose and annealing temperature. For longer irradiations, metallic lithium precipitates out, in epitaxy with LiF lattice, and later, lithium salts appear due to the penetration of atmospheric gases through the cracks present in the damaged crystal. Various x-ray experiments followed the formation and evolution of these imperfections when their atomic concentration reached 10{sup -4}. (author)

  11. Structural and thermodynamic similarities of phases in the Li-Tt (Tt = Si, Ge) systems: redetermination of the lithium-rich side of the Li-Ge phase diagram and crystal structures of Li17Si4.0-xGex for x = 2.3, 3.1, 3.5, and 4 as well as Li4.1Ge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Michael; Fässler, Thomas F

    2014-10-28

    A reinvestigation of the lithium-rich section of the Li-Ge phase diagram reveals the existence of two new phases, Li17Ge4 and Li4.10Ge (Li16.38Ge4). Their structures are determined by X-ray diffraction experiments of large single crystals obtained from equilibrated melts with compositions Li95Ge5 and Li85Ge15. Excess melt is subsequently removed through isothermal centrifugation at 400 °C and 530 °C, respectively. Li17Ge4 crystallizes in the space group F4[combining macron]3m (a = 18.8521(3) Å, V = 6700.1(2) Å(3), Z = 20, T = 298 K) and Li4.10Ge (Li16.38Ge4) in Cmcm (a = 4.5511(2) Å, b = 22.0862(7) Å, c = 13.2751(4) Å, V = 1334.37(8) Å(3), Z = 16, T = 123 K). Both phases are isotypic with their Si counterparts and are further representative of the Li17Pb4 and Li4.11Si structure types. Additionally, the solid solutions Li17Si4-xGex follows Vegard's law. A comparison of the GeLin coordination polyhedra shows that isolated Ge atoms are 13- and 14-coordinated in Li17Ge4, whereas in Li16.38Ge4 the Ge atoms possess coordination numbers 12 and 13. Regarding the thermodynamic stability, Li16.38Ge4 is assigned a high-temperature phase existing between ∼400 °C and 627 °C, whereas Li17Ge4 decomposes peritectically at 520-522 °C. Additionally, the decomposition of Li16.38Ge4 below ∼400 °C was found to be very sluggish. These findings are manifested by differential scanning calorimetry, long-term annealing experiments and the results from melt equilibration experiments. Interestingly, the thermodynamic properties of the lithium-rich tetrelides Li17Tt4 and Li4.1Tt (Li16.4Tt4) are very similar (Tt = Si, Ge). Besides Li15Tt4, Li14Tt6, Li12Tt7, and LiTt, the title compounds are further examples of isotypic tetrelides in the systems Li-Tt.

  12. Lithium extractive metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josa, J.M.; Merino, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Fusion National Program depends on lithium supplies. Extractive metallurgy development is subordinate to the localization and evaluation of ore resources. Nowadays lithium raw materials usable with present technology consist of pegmatite ore and brine. The Instituto Geologico y Minero Espanol (IGME) found lepidolite, ambligonite and spodrimene in pegmatite ores in different areas of Spain. However, an evaluation of resources has not been made. Different Spanish surface and underground brines are to be sampled and analyzed. If none of these contain significant levels of lithium, the Junta de Energia Nuclear (JEN) will try an agreement with IGME for ENUSA (Empresa Nacional del Uranio, S.A.) to explore pegmatite-ore bodies from different locations. Different work stages, laboratory tests, pilots plants tests and commercial plant, are foreseen, if the deposits are found. (author)

  13. Absorption and reflectivity of the lithium niobate surface masked with a graphene layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Salas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed simulations of the interaction of a graphene layer with the surface of lithium niobate utilizing density functional theory and molecular dynamics at 300K and atmospheric pressure. We found that the graphene layer is physisorbed on the lithium niobate surface with an adsorption energy of -0.8205 eV/(carbon-atom. Subsequently, the energy band structure, the optical absorption and reflectivity of the new system were calculated. We found important changes in these physical properties with respect to the corresponding ones of a graphene layer and of a lithium niobate crystal.

  14. Compatibility of AlN ceramics with molten lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneoka, Toshiaki; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Sato, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Satoru [Tokyo Univ., Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    AlN ceramics were a candidate for electrically insulating materials and facing materials against molten breeder in a nuclear fusion reactor. In the nuclear fusion reactor, interactions of various structural materials with solid and liquid breeder materials as well as coolant materials are important. Therefore, corrosion tests of AlN ceramics with molten lithium were performed. AlN specimens of six kinds, different in sintering additives and manufacturing method, were used. AlN specimens were immersed into molten lithium at 823 K. Duration for the compatibility tests was about 2.8 Ms (32 days). Specimens with sintering additive of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} by about 5 mass% formed the network structure of oxide in the crystals of AlN. It was considered that the corrosion proceeded by reduction of the oxide network and the penetration of molten lithium through the reduced pass of this network. For specimens without sintering additive, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing by about 1.3% in raw material was converted to fine oxynitride particles on grain boundary or dissolved in AlN crystals. After immersion into lithium, these specimens were found to be sound in shape but reduced in electrical resistivity. These degradation of the two types specimens were considered to be caused by the reduction of oxygen components. On the other hand, a specimen sintered using CaO as sintering additive was finally became appreciably high purity. This specimen showed good compatibility for molten lithium at least up to 823 K. It was concluded that the reduction of oxygen concentration in AlN materials was essential in order to improve the compatibility for molten lithium. (author)

  15. Large lithium loop experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolowith, R.; Owen, T.J.; Berg, J.D.; Atwood, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    An engineering design and operating experience of a large, isothermal, lithium-coolant test loop are presented. This liquid metal coolant loop is called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) and has operated safely and reliably for over 6500 hours through September 1981. The loop is used for full-scale testing of components for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Main system parameters include coolant temperatures to 430 0 C and flow to 0.038 m 3 /s (600 gal/min). Performance of the main pump, vacuum system, and control system is discussed. Unique test capabilities of the ELS are also discussed

  16. Lithium Combustion: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    Rev. 2-89) Precribed by ANSI Std 239.18 298-102 UNCLASSIFIED SECURIT CLASSIRCTIO OF THIS PAGE (Whun Data Entered) Lade Form 296 ledk (Row. 2-49...did not burn spontaneously in water, and the hydrogen formed did not ignite in air. When a pea-sized piece of lithium was dropped into a container of...Lithium metal flowed through the cracks in the coating and started to burn brilliantly. The LiOH coating was initially protective; but, as it became

  17. Dissolution behavior of lithium compounds in ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Furukawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to exchange the components which received irradiation damage during the operation at the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, the adhered lithium, which is partially converted to lithium compounds such as lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide, should be removed from the components. In this study, the dissolution experiments of lithium compounds (lithium nitride, lithium hydroxide, and lithium oxide were performed in a candidate solvent, allowing the clarification of time and temperature dependence. Based on the results, a cleaning procedure for adhered lithium on the inner surface of the components was proposed.

  18. First-Principles Investigations of the Working Mechanism of 2D h-BN as an Interfacial Layer for the Anode of Lithium Metal Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Le; Xu, Ao; Zhao, Tianshou

    2017-01-18

    An issue with the use of metallic lithium as an anode material for lithium-based batteries is dendrite growth, causing a periodic breaking and repair of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer. Adding 2D atomic crystals, such as h-BN, as an interfacial layer between the lithium metal anode and liquid electrolyte has been demonstrated to be effective to mitigate dendrite growth, thereby enhancing the Columbic efficiency of lithium metal batteries. But the underlying mechanism leading to the reduced dendrite growth remains unknown. In this work, with the aid of first-principle calculations, we find that the interaction between the h-BN and lithium metal layers is a weak van der Waals force, and two atomic layers of h-BN are thick enough to block the electron tunneling from lithium metal to electrolyte, thus prohibiting the decomposition of electrolyte. The interlayer spacing between the h-BN and lithium metal layers can provide larger adsorption energies toward lithium atoms than that provided by bare lithium or h-BN, making lithium atoms prefer to intercalate under the cover of h-BN during the plating process. The combined high stiffness of h-BN and the low diffusion energy barriers of lithium at the Li/h-BN interfaces induce a uniform distribution of lithium under h-BN, therefore effectively suppressing dendrite growth.

  19. Radiolysis of lithium hydride and deuteride under the action of helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belykh, T.A.; Pilipenko, G.I.

    1999-01-01

    Creation of Li metallic particles in the LiH and LiD crystals irradiated with 4.6 MeV He + ions is studies by the optical absorption method and the Rutherford backscattering technique. Crystal structure, shape and size of small lithium metallic particles in irradiated with the 10 13 - 10 14 cm -2 ion flux samples are determined by means of optical adsorption spectra. The lithium metallic particles have body centered crystal structure as the parent metal. The metallic particles have shape of prolate spheroid of revolution with form factor a/b ∼ 1.1 and mean size is equal to 20 nm. Process for storage of the lithium metallic particles in the range of ion flux 10 13 - 10 14 cm -2 reveals on its one stage character. Critical meaning of the ion flux equal to 2 x 10 16 cm -2 causing the surface metallization of irradiated crystal is established by means of the Rutherford backscattering method. It is studied the lithium atom distribution versus ion penetration into an irradiated crystal which revealed that the Li metallic particles are created less easily in LiD crystals in comparison with LiH [ru

  20. Lithium alloy negative electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Robert A.

    The 1996 announcement by Fuji Photo Film of the development of lithium batteries containing convertible metal oxides has caused a great deal of renewed interest in lithium alloys as alternative materials for use in the negative electrode of rechargeable lithium cells. The earlier work on lithium alloys, both at elevated and ambient temperatures is briefly reviewed. Basic principles relating thermodynamics, phase diagrams and electrochemical properties under near-equilibrium conditions are discussed, with the Li-Sn system as an example. Second-phase nucleation, and its hindrance under dynamic conditions plays an important role in determining deviations from equilibrium behavior. Two general types of composite microstructure electrodes, those with a mixed-conducting matrix, and those with a solid electrolyte matrix, are discussed. The Li-Sn-Si system at elevated temperatures, and the Li-Sn-Cd at ambient temperatures are shown to be examples of mixed-conducting matrix microstructures. The convertible oxides are an example of the solid electrolyte matrix type. Although the reversible capacity can be very large in this case, the first cycle irreversible capacity required to convert the oxides to alloys may be a significant handicap.

  1. Lithium thionyl chloride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saathoff, D.J.; Venkatasetty, H.V.

    1982-10-19

    The discharge rate and internal conductivity of electrochemical cell including a lithium anode, and a cathode and an electrolyte including LiAlCl4 and SOC2 is improved by the addition of an amount of a mixture containing AlCl3 and butyl pyridinium chloride.

  2. Synthesis of lithium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz G, D.; Bulbulian, S.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, lithium silicates were synthesised by the combustion technique, the mixtures were prepared with different molar ratios and using urea as fuel. Its characterization was realized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the percentages of its sizes were determined measuring the area under curve of the peaks in the diffractogram. (Author)

  3. Solubility of lithium deuteride in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veleckis, E.; Yonco, R.M.; Maroni, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The solubility of LiD in liquid lithium between the eutectic and monotectic temperatures was measured using a direct sampling method. Solubilities were found to range from 0.0154 mol.% LiD at 199 0 C to 3.32 mol.% LiD at 498 0 C. The data were used in the derivation of an expression for the activity coefficient of LiD as a function of temperature and composition and an equation relating deuteride solubility and temperature, thus defining the liquidus curve. Similar equations were also derived for the Li-LiH system using the existing solubility data. Extrapolation of the liquidus curves yielded the eutectic concentrations (0.040 mol.% LiH and 0.035 mol.% LiD) and the freezing point depressions (0.23 0 C for Li-LiH and 0.20 0 C for Li-LiD) at the eutectic point. The results are compared with the literature data for hydrogen and deuterium. The implications of the relatively high solubility of hydrogen isotopes in lithium just above the melting point are discussed with respect to the cold trapping of tritium in fusion reactor blankets. (Auth.)

  4. Study of structural differences between stoichiometric and congruent lithium niobate

    CERN Document Server

    Kling, A; Correia, J G; Da Silva, M F A; Diéguez, E; Agulló-López, F; Soares, J C

    1996-01-01

    The structural differences between stoichiometric and congruent (lithium deficient) lithium niobate single crystals were studied by RBS- and NRA-channeling as well as perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements. The d-PAC111Cd-PAC investigations point out that a second Li site can be detected in congruent material, while only one is present in stoichiometric. Channeling studies of different axes and the comparison of the results with computer simulations corroborated former indications that this additional lattice site can be attributed to the formation of ilmenite type stacking faults. A comparative study of the energy dependence of the dechanneling showed that a remarkable disorder is also present in the Nb sublattice of the congruent crystals and that these defects have a point-like character.

  5. Approach to lithium burn-up effect in lithium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasneur, B.

    1994-01-01

    The lithium burn-up in Li 2 ZrO 3 is simulated by removing lithium under Li 2 O form and trapping it in high specific surface area powder while heating during 15 days or 1 month at moderate temperature so that lithium mobility be large enough without causing any sintering neither of the specimens nor of the powder. In a first treatment at 775 deg C during 1 month. 30% of the lithium content could be removed inducing a lithium concentration gradient in the specimen and the formation of a lithium-free monoclinic ZrO 2 skin. Improvements led to similar results at 650 deg C and 600 deg C, the latter temperatures are closer to the operating temperature of the ceramic breeder blanket of a fusion reactor. (author) 4 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  6. Growth and decomposition of Lithium and Lithium hydride on Nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the deposition, structure and decomposition of lithium and lithium-hydride films on a nickel substrate. Using surface sensitive techniques it was possible to quantify the deposited Li amount, and to optimize the deposition procedure for synthesizing lithium......-hydride films. By only making thin films of LiH it is possible to study the stability of these hydride layers and compare it directly with the stability of pure Li without having any transport phenomena or adsorbed oxygen to obscure the results. The desorption of metallic lithium takes place at a lower...... temperature than the decomposition of the lithium-hydride, confirming the high stability and sintering problems of lithium-hydride making the storage potential a challenge. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Anomalous Lithium Adsorption Propensity of Monolayer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    longer life cycle, thus an ideal candidate to replace the conventional ... tion in the development of lithium ion batteries as they ... interaction of graphene with lithium based on density ... aromatic hydrocarbons.30 Lithium doping increases.

  8. Negative thermal expansion of lithium aluminosilicate ceramics at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Moreno, Olga; Fernandez, Adolfo; Khainakov, Sergei; Torrecillas, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Five lithium aluminosilicate compositions of the LAS system have been synthesized and sintered. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the sintered samples has been studied down to cryogenic conditions. The data presented here under cryogenic conditions will be of value in the future design of new composite materials with very low thermal expansion values. The variation in thermal expansion properties with composition and sintering temperature was studied and is discussed in relation to composition and crystal structure.

  9. Confrontation of thermoluminescence models in lithium fluoride with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewiadomski, T.

    1976-12-01

    The thermoluminescent properties of lithium fluoride depend on numerous factors and are much more complex than those of other phosphors. The so far developed fragmentary models are meant to explain the relationships between crystal defect structure and the processes involved in TL. An attempt has been made to compare these models with the veryfied experimental data and to point out the observations which are inconsistant with the models. (author)

  10. Cracking phenomena in lithium-di-silicate glass ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Lithium-di-silicate glass ceramic (Li2O, SiO2) with uniformly oriented crystals was placed on a. Vickers indentation with extrusion axis horizontally parallel to the base axis. The material was rotated through. 0°– 90° and at each angle a 20 N load was applied to ascertain the crack path. It was observed that the crack.

  11. Method of producing spherical lithium aluminate particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Medico, R.R.; Baugh, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Spherical particles of lithium aluminate are formed by initially producing aluminium hydroxide spheroids, and immersing the spheroids in a lithium ion-containing solution to infuse lithium ions into the spheroids. The lithium-infused spheroids are rinsed to remove excess lithium ion from the surface, and the rinsed spheroids are soaked for a period of time in a liquid medium, dried and sintered to form lithium aluminate spherical particles. (author)

  12. Process for recovery of lithium from spent lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunugita, Eiichi; Jonghwa, Kim; Komasawa, Isao [Osaka Univ., Faculty of Engineering Science, Osaka, (Japan)

    1989-07-10

    An experimental study of the recovery and purification of lithium from spent lithium batteries was carried out, taking advantage of the characterisitics of lithium ion and its carbonate. More than 75% of the lithium contained in the whole battery or its anode component can be leached with sulfuric acid where the pH of the final pregnant liquor is 7.7 or higher, the other metals being left in the residue is their hydroxides. The extracted liquor is evaporated/concentrated, added with saturated sodium carbonate solution at around 100{sup 0}C to precipitate lithium as a carbonate. The coprecipitated sodium carbonate is washed/removed with a hotwater to give 99% pure lithium carbonate. Separation of lithium and sodium in the barren liquor is conducted with LIX 51, a chelating/extracting agent, and TOPO, a neutral organic phosphate, which have a synergic effect, to selectively extract lithium; the organic phase is reverse-extracted with a dilute hydrochloric acid to obtain lithium of 99% purity. 9 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m 3 lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion

  14. Lithium clearance in chronic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1989-01-01

    1. Lithium clearance measurements were made in 72 patients with chronic nephropathy of different aetiology and moderate to severely reduced renal function. 2. Lithium clearance was strictly correlated with glomerular filtration rate, and there was no suggestion of distal tubular reabsorption...... of lithium or influence of osmotic diuresis. 3. Fractional reabsorption of lithium was reduced in most patients with glomerular filtration rates below 25 ml/min. 4. Calculated fractional distal reabsorption of sodium was reduced in most patients with glomerular filtration rates below 50 ml/min. 5. Lithium...... that lithium clearance may be a measure of the delivery of sodium and water from the renal proximal tubule. With this assumption it was found that adjustment of the sodium excretion in chronic nephropathy initially takes place in the distal parts of the nephron (loop of Henle, distal tubule and collecting duct...

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigation of lattice defect structures in a series of Zn, Fe-doped nonstoichiometric lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Fengyun; Lue Qiang; Sun Liang; Li Hongtao; Zhen Xihe; Xu Yuheng; Zhao Liancheng

    2006-01-01

    A series of the double doped lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 , LN) single crystals had been grown by Czochralski method. The Curie temperatures of various concentrations doped or [Li]/[Nb] ratio LN crystals measured by differential thermal analysis (DTA) were discussed to investigate their defect structures with Safaryan et al. new approach about LN lattice defect structure using Curie temperatures calculated. Infrared transmission spectra of various concentrations doped were used to compare the investigation above. The results show that the lithium vacancy model is the more probable to describe the lattice defect structure of the doped LN single crystal

  16. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Hou, Junbo

    2012-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed. PMID:24958286

  17. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo Hou

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed.

  18. Recovery of lithium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, Kenta; Miyai, Yoshitaka; Katoh, Shunsaku; Abe, Mitsuo.

    1989-01-01

    Lithium has been used for air conditioners, aluminum refining, ceramics, organic metal compounds, batteries and many other uses. Besides, attention is paid as the aluminum-lithium alloys as aircraft materials, and the raw materials for large capacity batteries and nuclear fusion reactors for the future. The amount of lithium resources has been estimated as 14 million tons, and is relatively abundant, but when the future increase of demand is considered, it is not necessarily sufficient. Japan lacks lithium resources, and the stable ensuring of the resources has become an important problem. Seawater contains lithium by 170 μg/l, and its total amount reaches 230 billion tons. The process of recovering lithium from seawater, geothermal water and natural gas brine has been actively researched since 10 years ago centering around Japan. At present, the search for the adsorbent that effectively collects lithium is the main subject. Also the recovery by coprecipitation has been investigated basically. The inorganic adsorbent for lithium is classified into aluminum type, compound antimonic acid type, layered compound type, ion sieve oxide type and others. Their lithium adsorption performance and adsorption mechanism are different remarkably, therefore, these of each group are described. (K.I.) 70 refs

  19. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of lithium diffusion in tetragonal Li{sub 7}La{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriyevsky, B., E-mail: bohdan.andriyevskyy@tu.koszalin.pl [Faculty of Electronics and Computer Sciences, Koszalin University of Technology, 2 Śniadeckich Str., PL-75-453, Koszalin (Poland); Institute of Electrochemistry, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, D-89069, Ulm (Germany); Doll, K. [Institute of Electrochemistry, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, D-89069, Ulm (Germany); Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569, Stuttgart (Germany); Jacob, T. [Institute of Electrochemistry, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, D-89069, Ulm (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Ulm (HIU) for Electrochemical Energy Storage, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081, Ulm (Germany)

    2017-01-01

    Using ab initio density functional theory the thermally-stimulated migration of lithium ions in the garnet-type material Li{sub 7}La{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 12} is investigated. The methods of ab initio molecular dynamics have been applied to calculate the lithium ion self-diffusion coefficient and the diffusion barriers as function of lithium ion concentration. The concentration of lithium in the initial Li{sub 7}La{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 12} crystal unit cell is varied from 53 to 59 atoms, where 56 lithium atoms represent the stoichiometric concentration. Almost monotonous dependencies of the main characteristics on the number of lithium atoms N{sup (Li)} have been found, except for a non-monotonous peculiarity of the stoichiometric compound (N{sup (Li)} = 56). Finally, the influence of the unit cell volume change on lithium ion diffusion parameters as well as lithium ion hopping rates has been studied. - Highlights: • Partial lithium atoms subtraction from LLZO increases diffusion coefficient D{sup (Li)}. • Partial subtraction of lithium atoms from LLZO decreases activation energy E{sub a}{sup (Li)}. • Activation energy E{sub a}{sup (Li)} is the smallest for tetrahedral oxygen surrounding. • Compression of LLZO leads to a decrease of lithium ion diffusion coefficient D{sup (Li)}.

  20. Lithium reserves and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    As a result of accelerating research efforts in the fields of secondary batteries and thermonuclear power generation, concern has been expressed in certain quarters regarding the availability, in sufficient quantities, of lithium. As part of a recent study by the National Research Council on behalf of the Energy Research and Development Administration, a subpanel was formed to consider the outlook for lithium. Principal areas of concern were reserves, resources and the 'surplus' available for energy applications after allowing for the growth in current lithium applications. Reserves and resources were categorized into four classes ranging from fully proved reserves to resources which are probably dependent upon the marketing of co-products to become economically attractive. Because of the proprietary nature of data on beneficiation and processing recoveries, the tonnages of available lithium are expressed in terms of plant feed. However, highly conservative assumptions have been made concerning mining recoveries and these go a considerable way to accounting for total losses. Western World reserves and resources of all classes are estimated at 10.6 million tonnes Li of which 3.5 million tonnes Li are located in the United States. Current United States capacity, virtually equivalent to Western World capacity, is 4700 tonnes Li and production in 1976 approximated to 3500 tonnes Li. Production for current applications is expected to grow to approx. 10,000 tonnes in year 2000 and 13,000 tonnes a decade later. The massive excess of reserves and resources over that necessary to support conventional requirements has limited the amount of justifiable exploration expenditures; on the last occasion, there was a a major increase in demand (by the USAEA) reserves and capacity were increased rapidly. There are no foreseeable reasons why this shouldn't happen again when the need is clear. (author)

  1. Magnetic properties of lithium rare-earth fluorides: Ferromagnetism in LiErF4 and LiHoF4 and crystal-field parameters at the rare-earth and Li sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P. E.; Johansson, Torben; Nevald, Rolf

    1975-01-01

    Single crystals of LiErF4 and LiHoF4 have been grown and their magnetic properties measured from 1.3 K to 300 K. LiHoF4 turned out to be a nearly ideal Ising ferromagnet with TC=1.30±0.05 K and a saturation magnetization along the crystalline c axis of (6.98±0.02)μB. In LiErF4 no ordering...... was observed, but extrapolation indicates that below 0.5 K it will be ferromagnetic with the magnetic moments in the crytalline ab plane. From the susceptibilities the crystal-field parameters Bnm with (n, m)=(2, 0), (4, 0), (4, 4), (6, 0), (6, 4) have been extracted giving for Er3+ in LiErF4: 430., -985......., 1185., -5., 740.+i135. (cm-1) and for Ho3+ in LiHoF4: 470., -825., 1050., -10., 760.+i150 (cm-1). The exchange constants were found to be small compared to the dipole interactions. Furthermore the 7Li NMR spectra have been obtained in these materials as well as in LiTbF4 thereby determining the second...

  2. Kinetics that govern the release of tritium from neutron-irradiated lithium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertone, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    The Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) program being conducted at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory requires that tritium concentrations as low as 0.1 nCi/g, bred in both LBM lithium oxide pellets and gram-size lithium samples, be measured with an uncertainty not exceeding +/-6%. This thesis reports two satisfactory methods of assaying LBM pellets and one satisfactory method of assaying lithium samples. Results of a fundamental kinetic investigation are also reported. The thermally driven release of tritium from neutron-irradiated lithium oxide pellets is studied between the temperatures of 300 and 400 0 C. The observed release clearly obeys first-order kinetics, and the governing activation energy appears to be 28.4 kcal/mole. Finally, a model is presented that may explain the thermally driven release of tritium from a lithium oxide crystal and assemblies thereof. It predicts that under most circumstances the release is controlled by either the diffusion of a tritiated species through the crystal, or by the desorption of tritiated water from it

  3. The testing report of the development for the lithium grains and lithium rod automatic machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Zongkui; Kong Xianghong; Huang Yong

    2008-06-01

    With the development of lithium industry, the lithium grains and lithium rod, as additive or catalyzer, having a big comparatively acreage and a strong activated feature, have a broad application. The lithium grains and lithium rod belong to the kind of final machining materials. The principle of the lithium grains and lithium rod that how to take shape through the procedures of extrusion, cutting, anti-conglutination, threshing and so on are analysed, A sort of lithium grains and lithium rod automatic machine is developed. (authors)

  4. Crown-ether functionalized carbon nanotubes for purification of lithium compounds: computational and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Deb, A.K.; Arora, S.K.; Joshi, J.M.; Ali, Sk. M.; Shenoy, K.T.; Goyal, Aiana

    2015-01-01

    Lithium compounds finds several applications in nuclear science and technology, viz, lithium fluoride/hydroxide/alloys are used as dosimetric materials in luminescence devices, molten-salt breeder reactor, international thermonuclear experimental reactor, single crystal based neutron detectors etc. The lithium compounds should be in a proper state of purity; especially it should not contain other alkali metal cations which can downgrade the performance. Hence, there is a need to develop a process for purification of the lithium salt to achieve the desired quality. Therefore an attempt has been made to develop advanced nanomaterials for purification of the lithium salts. In this work, benzo-15-crown-5(B15C5) functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), owing to the good adsorption properties of CNT and alkali metal encapsulation behaviour of B15C5, were showed to bind preferentially with sodium and potassium ions compared to lithium ions. DFT based computation calculations have shown that the free energy of complexation of Na + and K + by B15C5-CNT is higher than that of Li + , implying that B15C5-CNT selectively binds Na + and K + . The experimental batch solid-liquid extraction has also revealed the same trend as in the calculations. The crown-ethers functionalized CNTs have the potentiality for use in purifying lithium compounds. (author)

  5. Design and Characterisation of Solid Electrolytes for All-Solid-State Lithium Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinbjörnsson, Dadi Þorsteinn

    The development of all-solid-state lithium batteries, in which the currently used liquid electrolytes are substituted for solid electrolyte materials, could lead to safer batteries offering higher energy densities and longer cycle lifetimes. Designing suitable solid electrolytes with sufficient...... chemical and electrochemical stability, high lithium ion conduction and negligible electronic conduction remains a challenge. The highly lithium ion conducting LiBH4-LiI solid solution is a promising solid electrolyte material. Solid solutions with a LiI content of 6.25%-50% were synthesised by planetary......-rich microstructures during ball milling is found to significantly influence the conductivity of the samples. The long-range diffusion of lithium ions was measured using quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The solid solutions are found to exhibit two-dimensional conduction in the hexagonal plane of the crystal structure...

  6. Mass spectrometric analysis of lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitambar, S.A.; Kavimandan, V.D.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Ramasubramanian, P.A.; Shah, P.M.; Almoula, A.I.; Acharya, S.N.; Parab, A.R.; Jain, H.C.; Mathews, C.K.; Ramaniah, M.V.

    1978-01-01

    The details of investigations carried out on the isotopic analysis of lithium using surface ionisation mass spectrometry are presented. Various parameters affecting the precision in isotopic analysis of lithium are discussed. A precision of 1% is achieved in the relative isotope abundance measurement. (author)

  7. Acoustically determined linear piezoelectric response of lithium niobate up to 1100 V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Branch, D. W.; Cular, S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Schamiloglu, E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    We present a method to measure high voltages using the piezoelectric crystal lithium niobate without using voltage dividers. A 36° Y-X cut lithium niobate crystal was coupled to two acoustic transducers, where direct current voltages were applied from 128–1100 V. The time-of-flight through the crystal was determined to be linearly dependent on the applied voltage. A model was developed to predict the time-delay in response to the applied voltage. The results show a sensitivity of 17 fs/V with a measurement error of 1 fs/V was achievable using this method. The sensitivity of this method can be increased by measuring the acoustic wave after multiple passes through the crystal. This method has many advantages over traditional techniques such as: favorable scalability for larger voltages, ease of use, cost effectiveness, and compactness.

  8. Metabolic Side Effects of Lithium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cagdas Eker

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Lithium is an alkaline ion being used since 19th century. After its widespread use in psychiatric disorders, observed side effects caused skepticism about its therapeutic efficacy. Despite several disadvantages, lithium is one of the indispensible drugs used in affective disorders, especially in bipolar disorder. It became a necessity for physicians to recognize its side effects since lithium is still accepted as a gold standard in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Adverse effects of chronic administration of lithium on several organ systems are widely known. In this article metabolic effects of lithium on thyroid and parathyroid glands, body mass index and kidneys will be discussed along with their mechanisms, clinical findings, possible risk factors and treatment. One of the most common side effect of lithium is hypothyroidism. It has the same clinical and biochemical properties as primary hypothyroidism and observed as subclinical hypothyroidism in the first place. Hypothyroidism, even its subclinical form, may be associated with non-response or inadequate response and is indicated as a risk factor for development of rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Therefore, hypothyroidism should be screened no matter how severe it is and should be treated with thyroid hormone in the presence of clinical hypothyroidism. Weight gain due to lithium administration disturbs the compliance to treatment and negatively affects the course of the illness. Increased risk for diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and stroke because of weight gain constitute other centers of problem. Indeed, it is of importance to determine the risk factors before treatment, to follow up the weight, to re-organize nutritional habits and to schedule exercises. Another frequent problematic side effect of lithium treatment is renal dysfunction which clinically present as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with the common symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia. Nephrogenic diabetes

  9. 77 FR 28259 - Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 111 Mailings of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION... international mailing of lithium batteries and devices containing lithium batteries. This prohibition also extends to the mailing of lithium batteries to and from an APO, FPO, or DPO location. However, this...

  10. Lithium in the barium stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsonneault, M.H.; Sneden, C.

    1984-01-01

    New high-resolution spectra of the lithium resonance doublet have provided lithium abundances or upper limits for 26 classical and mild barium stars. The lithium lines always are present in the classical barium stars. Lithium abundances in these stars obey a trend with stellar masses consistent with that previously derived for ordinary K giants. This supports the notion that classical barium stars are post-core-He-flash or core-He-burning stars. Lithium contents in the mild barium stars, however, often are much smaller than those of the classical barium stars sometimes only upper limits may be determined. The cause for this difference is not easily understood, but may be related to more extensive mass loss by the mild barium stars. 45 references

  11. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Lithium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Damkier, Per; Petersen, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum lithium is monitored to ensure levels within the narrow therapeutic window. This study examines the interlaboratory variation and inaccuracy of lithium monitoring in Denmark. METHODS: In 16 samples consisting of (1) control materials (n = 4), (2) pooled patient serum (n = 5......), and (3) serum from individual patients (n = 7), lithium was measured in 19 laboratories using 20 different instruments. The lithium concentrations were targeted by a reference laboratory. Ion-selective electrode (n = 5), reflective spectrophotometric (RSM, n = 5), and spectrophotometric (n = 10) methods...... of >12%. Seven of these instruments had a systematic positive or negative bias and more so at lower lithium concentrations. Three poorly calibrated instruments were found in the ion-selective electrode group, 3 in the spectrophotometric group, and 2 in the RSM group. The instruments using reflectance...

  12. Mineral-deposit model for lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; McCauley, Andrew D.; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2017-06-20

    Lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) pegmatites comprise a compositionally defined subset of granitic pegmatites. The major minerals are quartz, potassium feldspar, albite, and muscovite; typical accessory minerals include biotite, garnet, tourmaline, and apatite. The principal lithium ore minerals are spodumene, petalite, and lepidolite; cesium mostly comes from pollucite; and tantalum mostly comes from columbite-tantalite. Tin ore as cassiterite and beryllium ore as beryl also occur in LCT pegmatites, as do a number of gemstones and high-value museum specimens of rare minerals. Individual crystals in LCT pegmatites can be enormous: the largest spodumene was 14 meters long, the largest beryl was 18 meters long, and the largest potassium feldspar was 49 meters long.Lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatites account for about one-fourth of the world’s lithium production, most of the tantalum production, and all of the cesium production. Giant deposits include Tanco in Canada, Greenbushes in Australia, and Bikita in Zimbabwe. The largest lithium pegmatite in the United States, at King’s Mountain, North Carolina, is no longer being mined although large reserves of lithium remain. Depending on size and attitude of the pegmatite, a variety of mining techniques are used, including artisanal surface mining, open-pit surface mining, small underground workings, and large underground operations using room-and-pillar design. In favorable circumstances, what would otherwise be gangue minerals (quartz, potassium feldspar, albite, and muscovite) can be mined along with lithium and (or) tantalum as coproducts.Most LCT pegmatites are hosted in metamorphosed supracrustal rocks in the upper greenschist to lower amphibolite facies. Lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatite intrusions generally are emplaced late during orogeny, with emplacement being controlled by pre-existing structures. Typically, they crop out near evolved, peraluminous granites and leucogranites from which they are inferred to be

  13. Phase transition and hysteresis in a rechargeable lithium battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Wolfgang [Weierstrass-Institut fuer Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany); Gaberscek, Miran; Jamnik, Janko [Kemijski Institut Ljubljana Slovenija (Slovenia). L10 Lab. for Materials Electrochemistry

    2007-07-01

    We develop a model which describes the evolution of a phase transition that occurs in some part of a rechargeable lithium battery during the process of charging/discharging. The model is capable to simulate hysteretic behavior of the voltage - charge characteristics. During discharging of the battery, the interstitial lattice sites of a small crystalline host system are filled up with lithium atoms and these are released again during charging. We show within the context of a sharp interface model that two mechanical phenomena go along with a phase transition that appears in the host system during supply and removal of lithium. At first the lithium atoms need more space than it is available by the interstitial lattice sites, which leads to a maximal relative change of the crystal volume of about 6%. Furthermore there is an interface between two adjacent phases that has very large curvature of the order of magnitude 100 m, which evoke here a discontinuity of the normal component of the stress. In order to simulate the dynamics of the phase transitions and in particular the observed hysteresis we establish a new initial and boundary value problem for a nonlinear PDE system that can be reduced in some limiting case to an ODE system. (orig.)

  14. Lithium aluminate spheroids prepared by emulsion procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, A.G.; DiBello, P.M.; Zaleski, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Lithium aluminate powders were prepared by emulsion evaporation method. The procedure involved preparation of water-in-oil emulsion, with the aqueous phase being a solution of Li and Al nitrates. The mixed salts precursor crystallized to gamma-LiAlO 2 at 700C. Single phase LiAlO 2 occurred as μm spherical particles with average crystallite size of 81 angstrom and surface area of 14 M 2 /g. After prolonged heating at 900C, the aluminate powder crystallite size grew by 5 times with a reduction in particle porosity. The emulsion technique promotes close control of particle size and shape of product and the technique facilitates chemical reaction of constituents and sinterability of resulting product

  15. Positive electrode for a lithium battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-04-07

    A method for producing a lithium alkali transition metal oxide for use as a positive electrode material for lithium secondary batteries by a precipitation method. The positive electrode material is a lithium alkali transition metal composite oxide and is prepared by mixing a solid state mixed with alkali and transition metal carbonate and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain a small amount of alkali metal residual in the lithium transition metal composite oxide cathode material.

  16. Iron titanium phosphates as high-specific-capacity electrode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Essehli, R.; El Bali, B.; Faik, A.; Naji, M.; Benmokhtar, S.; Zhong, Y.R.; Su, L.W.; Zhou, Z.; Kim, J.; Kang, K.; Dušek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 585, FEB (2014), s. 434-441 ISSN 0925-8388 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : crystal structure * electrolyte * nasicon * oxyphosphate * lithium -ion batteries Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2014

  17. In operando phase transitions and Lithium ion transport in LiFePO4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy storage in Li-ion batteries is a key technology for the future renewable society. Their energy and power density is largely determined by electrode materials that are able to host lithium in their crystal structure. Aiming at faster and more efficient energy storage, one of the key

  18. Crystals in crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Schmidt, I.; Carlsson, A.

    2005-01-01

    A major factor governing the performance of catalytically active particles supported on a zeolite carrier is the degree of dispersion. It is shown that the introduction of noncrystallographic mesopores into zeolite single crystals (silicalite-1, ZSM-5) may increase the degree of particle dispersion....... As representative examples, a metal (Pt), an alloy (PtSn), and a metal carbide (beta-Mo2C) were supported on conventional and mesoporous zeolite carriers, respectively, and the degree of particle dispersion was compared by TEM imaging. On conventional zeolites, the supported material aggregated on the outer surface...

  19. A diethylhydroxylaminate based mixed lithium/beryllium aggregate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Raphael J.F. [Paris-Lodron Universitaet Salzburg (Austria). Fachbereich fuer Materialwissenschaften und Physik; Jana, Surajit [Asansol Girls College, West-Bengal (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Froehlich, Roland [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Organisch-Chemisches Inst.; Mitzel, Norbert W. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Anorganische Chemie und Strukturchemie

    2015-07-01

    A mixed lithium/beryllium diethylhydroxylaminate compound containing {sup n}butyl beryllium units of total molecular composition {sup n}Be(ONEt{sub 2}){sub 2} [(LiONEt{sub 2}){sup 2} {sup n}BuBeONEt{sub 2}]{sub 2} (1) was isolated from a reaction mixture of {sup n}butyl lithium, N,N-diethylhydroxylamine and BeCl{sub 2} in diethylether/thf. The crystal structure of 1 has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The aggregate is composed of two ladder-type subunits connected in a beryllium-centered distorted tetrahedron of four oxygen atoms. Only the lithium atoms are engaged in coordination with the nitrogen donor atoms. The DFT calculations support the positional occupation determined for Li and Be in the crystal structure. The DFT and the solid-state structure are in excellent agreement, indicating only weak intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Structural details of metal atom coordination are discussed.

  20. Diode laser heat treatment of lithium manganese oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pröll, J.; Kohler, R.; Mangang, A.; Ulrich, S.; Bruns, M.; Seifert, H.J.; Pfleging, W.

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization of lithium manganese oxide thin films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on stainless steel substrates under 10 Pa argon pressure is demonstrated by a laser annealing technique. Laser annealing processes were developed as a function of annealing time and temperature with the objective to form an electrochemically active lithium manganese oxide cathode. It is demonstrated, that laser annealing with 940 nm diode laser radiation and an annealing time of 2000 s at 600 °C delivers appropriate parameters for formation of a crystalline spinel-like phase. Characteristic features of this phase could be detected via Raman spectroscopy, showing the characteristic main Raman band at 627 cm -1 . Within cyclic voltammetric measurements, the two characteristic redox pairs for spinel lithium manganese oxide in the 4 V region could be detected, indicating that the film was well-crystallized and de-/intercalation processes were reversible. Raman post-analysis of a cycled cathode showed that the spinel-like structure was preserved within the cycling process but mechanical degradation effects such as film cracking were observed via scanning electron microscopy. Typical features for the formation of an additional surface reaction layer could be detected using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  1. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-01-01

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  2. Virtual Crystallizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, T A; Dylla-Spears, R; Thorsness, C B

    2006-08-29

    Large dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are grown in large crystallizers to provide raw material for the manufacture of optical components for large laser systems. It is a challenge to grow crystal with sufficient mass and geometric properties to allow large optical plates to be cut from them. In addition, KDP has long been the canonical solution crystal for study of growth processes. To assist in the production of the crystals and the understanding of crystal growth phenomena, analysis of growth habits of large KDP crystals has been studied, small scale kinetic experiments have been performed, mass transfer rates in model systems have been measured, and computational-fluid-mechanics tools have been used to develop an engineering model of the crystal growth process. The model has been tested by looking at its ability to simulate the growth of nine KDP boules that all weighed more than 200 kg.

  3. single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-05-18

    May 18, 2018 ... Abstract. 4-Nitrobenzoic acid (4-NBA) single crystals were studied for their linear and nonlinear optical ... studies on the proper growth, linear and nonlinear optical ..... between the optic axes and optic sign of the biaxial crystal.

  4. Crystal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Verner; Lingafelter, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of crystal systems, comparing (in table format) crystal systems with lattice types, number of restrictions, nature of the restrictions, and other lattices that can accidently show the same metrical symmetry. (JN)

  5. Examination results on reaction of lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asada, Takashi

    2000-12-01

    Before the material corrosion tests in lithium, the reactions of lithium with air and ammonia that will be used for lithium cleaning were examined, and the results were as follows. 1. When lithium put into air, surface of lithium changes to black first but soon to white, and the white layer becomes gradually thick. The first black of lithium surface is nitride (Li 3 N) and it changes to white lithium hydroxide (LiOH) by reaction with water in air, and it grows. The growth rate of the lithium hydroxide is about 1/10 in the desiccator (humidity of about 10%) compare with in air. 2. When lithium put into nitrogen, surface of lithium changes to black, and soon changes to brown and cracks at surface. At the same time with this cracking, weight of lithium piece increases and nitridation progresses respectively rapidly. This nitridation completed during 1-2 days on lithium rod of 10 mm in diameter, and increase in weight stopped. 3. Lithium melts in liquid ammonia and its melting rate is about 2-3 hour to lithium of 1 g. The liquid ammonia after lithium melting showed dark brown. (author)

  6. Crystal phase transition in LixNa1-xGdF4 solid solution nanocrystals - Tuning of optical properties

    KAUST Repository

    Bański, Mateusz; Afzaal, Mohammad; Cha, Dong Kyu; Wang, X.; Tan, Hua; Misiewicz, Jan J.; Podhorodecki, Artur P.

    2014-01-01

    field symmetry and emission properties from doped europium (Eu3+) ions. We report that for lithium (Li+) substitution <15%, the hexagonal crystal field is preferred, while the Eu3+ emission is already tuned, whereas at higher Li+ substitution, a phase

  7. Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water using multivariate curve resolution of near-infrared spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba, M. Isabel [Group of Research in Applied Thermal Engineering-CREVER, Mechanical Engineering Dept. (Spain); Larrechi, M. Soledad, E-mail: mariasoledad.larrechi@urv.cat [Analytical and Organic Chemistry Dept., Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Coronas, Alberto [Group of Research in Applied Thermal Engineering-CREVER, Mechanical Engineering Dept. (Spain)

    2016-05-05

    The hydration process of lithium iodide, lithium bromide, lithium chloride and lithium nitrate in water was analyzed quantitatively by applying multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to their near infrared spectra recorded between 850 nm and 1100 nm. The experiments were carried out using solutions with a salt mass fraction between 0% and 72% for lithium bromide, between 0% and 67% for lithium nitrate and between 0% and 62% for lithium chloride and lithium iodide at 323.15 K, 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. Three factors were determined for lithium bromide and lithium iodide and two factors for the lithium chloride and lithium nitrate by singular value decomposition (SVD) of their spectral data matrices. These factors are associated with various chemical environments in which there are aqueous clusters containing the ions of the salts and non-coordinated water molecules. Spectra and concentration profiles of non-coordinated water and cluster aqueous were retrieved by MCR-ALS. The amount of water involved in the process of hydration of the various salts was quantified. The results show that the water absorption capacity increases in the following order LiI < LiBr < LiNO{sub 3} < LiCl. The salt concentration at which there is no free water in the medium was calculated at each one of the temperatures considered. The values ranged between 62.6 and 65.1% for LiBr, 45.5–48.3% for LiCl, 60.4–61.2% for LiI and 60.3–63.7% for LiNO{sub 3}. These values are an initial approach to determining the concentration as from which crystal formation is favored. - Highlights: • Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water. • The absorption capacity of the electrolytes in function of the salt is evaluated. • The lithium salt concentration is estimated when the crystal formation is favored.

  8. Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water using multivariate curve resolution of near-infrared spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barba, M. Isabel; Larrechi, M. Soledad; Coronas, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The hydration process of lithium iodide, lithium bromide, lithium chloride and lithium nitrate in water was analyzed quantitatively by applying multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to their near infrared spectra recorded between 850 nm and 1100 nm. The experiments were carried out using solutions with a salt mass fraction between 0% and 72% for lithium bromide, between 0% and 67% for lithium nitrate and between 0% and 62% for lithium chloride and lithium iodide at 323.15 K, 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. Three factors were determined for lithium bromide and lithium iodide and two factors for the lithium chloride and lithium nitrate by singular value decomposition (SVD) of their spectral data matrices. These factors are associated with various chemical environments in which there are aqueous clusters containing the ions of the salts and non-coordinated water molecules. Spectra and concentration profiles of non-coordinated water and cluster aqueous were retrieved by MCR-ALS. The amount of water involved in the process of hydration of the various salts was quantified. The results show that the water absorption capacity increases in the following order LiI < LiBr < LiNO_3 < LiCl. The salt concentration at which there is no free water in the medium was calculated at each one of the temperatures considered. The values ranged between 62.6 and 65.1% for LiBr, 45.5–48.3% for LiCl, 60.4–61.2% for LiI and 60.3–63.7% for LiNO_3. These values are an initial approach to determining the concentration as from which crystal formation is favored. - Highlights: • Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water. • The absorption capacity of the electrolytes in function of the salt is evaluated. • The lithium salt concentration is estimated when the crystal formation is favored.

  9. Lithium - no shortage in supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Over the last five years the face of the lithium industry has changed with new sources coming onto the market. The result of developments in supply is a buyers' market and, in the absence of major consumer developments, all things point to an increasing severely overcrowded market through the turn of the decade. As such lithium is likely to maintain charismatic appeal as developments unfold. This article provides an overview of the world's lithium industry and looks at the various market uses and potential. (author)

  10. Lithium ion implantation effects in MgO(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huis, M.A. van; Fedorov, A.V.; Veen, A. van; Labohm, F.; Schut, H.; Mijnarends, P.E.; Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.T.M. de

    2001-01-01

    Single crystals of MgO(100) were implanted with 10 16 6 Li ions cm -2 at an energy of 30 keV. After ion implantation the samples were annealed isochronally in air at temperatures up to 1200K. After implantation and after each annealing step, the defect evolution was monitored with optical absorption spectroscopy and depth-sensitive Doppler Broadening positron beam analysis (PBA). A strong increase in the S-parameter is observed in the implantation layer at a depth of approximately 100 nm. The high value of the S-parameter is ascribed to positron annihilation in small lithium precipitates. The results of 2D-ACAR and X-TEM analysis show evidence of the presence of lithium precipitates. The depth distribution of the implanted 6 Li atoms was monitored with neutron depth profiling (NDP). It was observed that detrapping and diffusion of 6 Li starts at an annealing temperature of 1200K. (orig.)

  11. Computational research on lithium ion battery materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ping

    Crystals of LiFePO4 and related materials have recently received a lot of attention due to their very promising use as cathodes in rechargeable lithium ion batteries. This thesis studied the electronic structures of FePO 4 and LiMPO4, where M=Mn, Fe, Co and Ni within the framework of density-functional theory. The first study compared the electronic structures of the LiMPO 4 and FePO4 materials in their electrochemically active olivine form, using the LAPW (linear augmented plane wave) method [1]. A comparison of results for various spin configurations suggested that the ferromagnetic configuration can serve as a useful approximation for studying general features of these systems. The partial densities of states for the LiMPO4 materials are remarkably similar to each other, showing the transition metal 3d states forming narrow bands above the O 2p band. By contrast, in absence of Li, the majority spin transition metal 3d states are well-hybridized with the O 2p band in FePO4. The second study compared the electronic structures of FePO4 in several crystal structures including an olivine, monoclinic, quartz-like, and CrVO4-like form [2,3]. For this work, in addition to the LAPW method, PAW (Projector Augmented Wave) [4], and PWscf (plane-wave pseudopotential) [5] methods were used. By carefully adjusting the computational parameters, very similar results were achieved for the three independent computational methods. Results for the relative stability of the four crystal structures are reported. In addition, partial densities of state analyses show qualitative information about the crystal field splittings and bond hybridizations and help rationalize the understanding of the electrochemical and stability properties of these materials.

  12. Monomial Crystals and Partition Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingley, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Recently Fayers introduced a large family of combinatorial realizations of the fundamental crystal B(Λ0) for ^sln, where the vertices are indexed by certain partitions. He showed that special cases of this construction agree with the Misra-Miwa realization and with Berg's ladder crystal. Here we show that another special case is naturally isomorphic to a realization using Nakajima's monomial crystal.

  13. Equilibrium dissociation pressures of lithium hydride and lithium deuteride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.M.; Webb, R.E.

    1977-12-01

    The equilibrium dissociation pressures of plateau composition lithium hydride and lithium deuteride have been measured from 450 to 750 0 C. These data were used to derive the relationship of dissociation pressure with temperature over this range and to calculate several thermodynamic properties of these materials. Thermodynamic properties determined included the enthalpy, entropy, and free energy of formation; the enthalpy and entropy of fusion; and the melting points

  14. Lithium ceramics: sol-gel preparation and tritium release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoult, O.

    1994-04-01

    Ceramics based on lithium aluminate (LiA1O 2 ), lithium zirconate (Li 2 ZrO 3 ) and lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) are candidates as tritium breeder blanket materials for forthcoming nuclear fusion reactors. Lithium silico-aluminate Li 4+x A1 4-3x Si 2x O 8 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0,25) powders were synthetized from alkoxyde-hydroxyde sol-gel route. By direct sintering at 850-1100 deg C (without prior calcination), ceramics with controlled stoichiometry and homogenous microstructure were obtained. We have also prepared, using a comparable method, Li 2 Zr 1-x Ti x O 3 (x = 0, x = 0,1 et x = 1) materials. All these ceramics, with different microstructures and compositions, have been tested in out-of-reactor experiments. Concerning lithium aluminate microporous ceramics, the silicon substitution leads to a significant improvement of the tritrium release. Classical models taking into account independent surface mechanisms are not able to describe correctly the observed tritium release kinetics. We show, using a simple model, that the release kinetics is in fact limited by an intergranular diffusion followed by a desorption. The delay in tritium release, which occurs when the ceramic compacity increases, is explained in terms of an enhancement of the ionic T + diffusion path length. The energy required for desorption includes a leading term independent of hydrogen contained in the sweep gas. This term is attributed to the limiting recombination step of T + in molecular species HTO. For similar microstructures, the facility of tritium release for the different studied materials is explained by three properties: the crystal structure of the ceramic, the acidity of oxides and finally the presence of electronic non-stoichiometric defects. (author). 89 refs., 50 figs., 2 tabs., 1 annexe

  15. Enhanced Flux Pinning and Critical Current Density via Incorporation of Self-Assembled Rare-Earth Barium Tantalate Nanocolumns within YBa2Cu3O7-δ Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Cook, Sylvester W [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We report rare earth barium tantalates, Ba2RETaO6 (BRETO, RE = rare earth elements) as a new class of additives for superior flux-pinning in YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO) films. BRETO compounds have excellent chemical inertness to and large lattice mismatch with YBCO. This results in phase separation and strain minimization driven self-assembly of BRETO nanocolumns within YBCO films. YBCO+4 vol% Ba2GdTaO6 films show similar Tc to that of an un-doped film of ~ 88.3 K, a higher self-field Jc of 3.8 MA/cm2 at 77 K, and significantly improved in-field Jc higher by a factor of 1.5-6 over entire magnetic field and angular ranges.

  16. Reversible Lithium Neurotoxicity: Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Lithium neurotoxicity may be reversible or irreversible. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity has been defined as cases of lithium neurotoxicity in which patients recovered without any permanent neurologic sequelae, even after 2 months of an episode of lithium toxicity. Cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity differ in clinical presentation from those of irreversible lithium neurotoxicity and have important implications in clinical practice. This review aims to study the clinical presentation of cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity. Data Sources: A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), 1950 to November 2010; PsycINFO, 1967 to November 2010; and SCOPUS (EMBASE), 1950 to November 2010. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched by using the OvidSP interface. Study Selection: A combination of the following search terms was used: lithium AND adverse effects AND central nervous system OR neurologic manifestation. Publications cited include articles concerned with reversible lithium neurotoxicity. Data Extraction: The age, sex, clinical features, diagnostic categories, lithium doses, serum lithium levels, precipitating factors, and preventive measures of 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity were extracted. Data Synthesis: Among the 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity, patients ranged in age from 10 to 80 years and a greater number were female (P = .008). Most patients had affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, and/or depression (P lithium levels were less than or equal to 1.5 mEq/L (P lithium, underlying brain pathology, abnormal tissue levels, specific diagnostic categories, and elderly populations were some of the precipitating factors reported for reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The preventive measures were also described. Conclusions: Reversible lithium neurotoxicity presents with a certain clinical profile and precipitating factors for which there are appropriate

  17. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity: review of the literatur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Ivan; Phutane, Vivek H

    2012-01-01

    Lithium neurotoxicity may be reversible or irreversible. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity has been defined as cases of lithium neurotoxicity in which patients recovered without any permanent neurologic sequelae, even after 2 months of an episode of lithium toxicity. Cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity differ in clinical presentation from those of irreversible lithium neurotoxicity and have important implications in clinical practice. This review aims to study the clinical presentation of cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity. A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), 1950 to November 2010; PsycINFO, 1967 to November 2010; and SCOPUS (EMBASE), 1950 to November 2010. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched by using the OvidSP interface. A combination of the following search terms was used: lithium AND adverse effects AND central nervous system OR neurologic manifestation. Publications cited include articles concerned with reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The age, sex, clinical features, diagnostic categories, lithium doses, serum lithium levels, precipitating factors, and preventive measures of 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity were extracted. Among the 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity, patients ranged in age from 10 to 80 years and a greater number were female (P = .008). Most patients had affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, and/or depression (P lithium levels were less than or equal to 1.5 mEq/L (P lithium, underlying brain pathology, abnormal tissue levels, specific diagnostic categories, and elderly populations were some of the precipitating factors reported for reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The preventive measures were also described. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity presents with a certain clinical profile and precipitating factors for which there are appropriate preventive measures. This recognition will help in early diagnosis and prompt treatment of

  18. Precipitation of lithium in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaik, M.; Furgolle, B.

    1969-01-01

    The precipitation of Lithium in Germanium was studied. Taking account of the interactions Ga LI, LiO, we calculated the oxygen content in germanium samples from the resistivity measurements. (authors)

  19. FTU cooled liquid lithium upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iafrati, M., E-mail: matteo.iafrati@enea.it [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C. R. Frascati, C. P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Apicella, M.L.; Boncagni, L. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C. R. Frascati, C. P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Lyublinski, I. [JSC “RED STAR”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mazzitelli, G. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C. R. Frascati, C. P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Vertkov, A. [JSC “RED STAR”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    In the framework of the liquid lithium limiter experiment in Frascati a new auxiliary system was developed in order to provide a better control of the energy fluid vector. The cooled liquid lithium system (CLL) was installed for the first time at the end of 2013, it uses overheated water to heat the lithium and to extract, at the same time, the heat from the metal surface when it gets wet by the plasma. A first version of the system, developed and presented in previous papers, has been modified to optimize the heat flux measurement on the liquid lithium surface. The changes include a new power supply logic for the heating system, new sensors and new read-out electronics compatible with the implementation of a real time control system. The prototype was updated with the aim of achieving a low cost and versatile control system.

  20. Probing quantum effects in lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemyad, Shanti; Zhang, Rong

    2018-05-01

    In periodic table lithium is the first element immediately after helium and the lightest metal. While fascinating quantum nature of condensed helium is suppressed at high densities, lithium is expected to adapt more quantum solid behavior under compression. This is due to the presence of long range interactions in metallic systems for which an increase in the de-Boer parameter (λ/σ, where σ is the minimum interatomic distance and λ is the de-Broglie wavelength) is predicted at higher densities [1,2]. Physics of dense lithium offers a rich playground to look for new emergent quantum phenomena in condensed matter and has been subject of many theoretical and experimental investigations. In this article recent progress in studying the quantum nature of dense lithium will be discussed.

  1. Lithium isotopic separation: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Sandra Helena Goulart de

    1998-01-01

    In order to get the separation of natural isotopes of lithium by electrolytic amalgamation, an electrolytic cell with a confined mercury cathode was used to obtain data for the design of a separation stage. The initial work was followed by the design of a moving mercury cathode electrolytic cell and three experiments with six batches stages were performed for the determination of the elementary separation factor. The value obtained, 1.053, was ill agreement: with the specialized literature. It was verified in all experiments that the lithium - 6 isotope concentrated in the amalgam phase and that the lithium - 7 isotope concentrated in the aqueous phase. A stainless-steel cathode for the decomposition of the lithium amalgam and the selective desamalgamation were also studied. In view of the results obtained, a five stages continuous scheme was proposed. (author)

  2. Does lithium protect against dementia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Forman, Julie Lyng; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether treatment with lithium in patients with mania or bipolar disorder is associated with a decreased rate of subsequent dementia. METHODS: Linkage of register data on prescribed lithium in all patients discharged from psychiatric health care service with a diagnosis...... exposed to lithium (50.4%), 1,781 to anticonvulsants (36.7%), 4,280 to antidepressants (88.1%), and 3,901 to antipsychotics (80.3%) during the study period. A total of 216 patients received a diagnosis of dementia during follow-up (103.6/10,000 person-years). During the period following the second...... prescription of lithium, the rate of dementia was decreased compared to the period following the first prescription. In contrast, the rates of dementia during multiple prescription periods with anticonvulsants, antidepressants, or antipsychotics, respectively, were not significantly decreased compared...

  3. Optimizing lithium dosing in hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnason, N H; Munkner, R; Kampmann, J P

    2006-01-01

    We studied a 62-year-old female hemodialysis patient during initiation and maintenance of lithium carbonate therapy. Three different methods were applied to estimate the regimen: a scenario based on volume of distribution (V(d)), a scenario based on glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and a scenario...... estimates. Furthermore, the maintenance dose estimated from the central compartment (V1) led to plasma concentrations within the therapeutic range. Thus, a regimen where 12.2 mmol lithium was given after each hemodialysis session resulted in stable between-dialysis plasma lithium concentrations...... in this patient with no residual kidney function. We did not observe adverse effects related to this regimen, which was monitored from 18 days to 8 months of therapy, and the patient experienced relief from her severe depressive disorder. In conclusion, dialysis patients may be treated with lithium administrated...

  4. Laser generated soliton waveguides in photorefractive crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, V.I.; Fazio, E.; Bertolotti, M.; Bosco, A.; Petris, A.

    2005-01-01

    Non-linear photo-excited processes using the photorefractive effect are revisited with emphasis on spatial soliton generation in special laser beam propagation conditions. The soliton beams can create reversible or irreversible single-mode waveguides in the propagating materials. The important features are the 3D orientation and graded index profile matched to the laser fundamental mode. Bright spatial solitons are theoretically demonstrated and experimentally observed for the propagation of c.w. and pulsed femtosecond laser beams in photorefractive materials such as Bi 12 SiO 20 (BSO) and lithium niobate crystals. Applications in high coupling efficiency, adaptive optical interconnections and photonic crystal production are possible

  5. Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Lopes Rocha

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.

  6. The lithium air battery fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Bruce, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    Lithium air rechargeable batteries are the best candidate for a power source for electric vehicles, because of their high specific energy density. In this book, the history, scientific background, status and prospects of the lithium air system are introduced by specialists in the field. This book will contain the basics, current statuses, and prospects for new technologies. This book is ideal for those interested in electrochemistry, energy storage, and materials science.

  7. Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Fábio Lopes; Rocha, Maria Elizabete Guimarães

    1992-01-01

    Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy. Os ...

  8. Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha,Fábio Lopes; Rocha,Maria Elizabete Guimarães

    1992-01-01

    Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.

  9. Modeling the Lithium Ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, John

    2013-01-01

    The lithium ion battery will be a reliable electrical resource for many years to come. A simple model of the lithium ions motion due to changes in concentration and voltage is presented. The battery chosen has LiCoO[subscript 2] as the cathode, LiPF[subscript 6] as the electrolyte, and LiC[subscript 6] as the anode. The concentration gradient and…

  10. Tritium breeding and release-rate kinetics from neutron-irradiated lithium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quanci, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The research encompasses the measurement of the tritium breeding and release-rate kinetics from lithium oxide, a ceramic tritium-breeding material. A thermal extraction apparatus which allows the accurate measurement of the total tritium inventory and release rate from lithium oxide samples under different temperatures, pressures and carrier-gas compositions with an uncertainty not exceeding 3% was developed. The goal of the Lithium Blanket Module program was to determine if advanced computer codes could accurately predict the tritium production in the lithium oxide blanket of a fusion power plant. A fusion blanket module prototype, was built and irradiated with a deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron source. The tritium production throughout the module was modeled with the MCNP three dimensional Monte Carlo code and was compared to the assay of the tritium bred in the module. The MCNP code accurately predicted tritium-breeding trends but underestimated the overall tritium breeding by 30%. The release rate of tritium from small grain polycrystalline sintered lithium oxide with a helium carrier gas from 300 to 450 C was found to be controlled by the first order surface desorption of mono-tritiated water. When small amounts of hydrogen were added to the helium carrier gas, the first order rate constant increased from the isotopic exchange of hydrogen for tritium at the lithium oxide surface occurring in parallel with the first order desorption process. The isotopic-exchange first order rate constant temperature dependence and hydrogen partial pressure dependence were evaluated. Large single crystals of lithium oxide were fabricated by the vacuum fusion technique. The release rate of tritium from the large single crystals was found to be controlled by diffusion, and the mixed diffusion-desorption controlled release regime

  11. Lithium Oxysilicate Compounds Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apblett, Christopher A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Coyle, Jaclyn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the structure and composition of lithium silicate thin films deposited by RF magnetron co-sputtering is investigated. Five compositions ranging from Li2Si2O5 to Li8SiO6 were confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and structure analysis on the evolution of non-bridging oxygens in the thin films was conducted with fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. It was found that non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) increased as the silicate network breaks apart with increasing lithium content which agrees with previous studies on lithium silicates. Thin film impurities were examined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOFSIMS) and traced back to target synthesis. This study utilizes a unique synthesis technique for lithium silicate thin films and can be referred to in future studies on the ionic conductivity of lithium silicates formed on the surface of silicon anodes in lithium ion batteries.

  12. Extracorporeal Treatment for Lithium Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decker, Brian S; Goldfarb, David S; Dargan, Paul I

    2015-01-01

    The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning Workgroup was created to provide evidence-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments in poisoning. Here, the EXTRIP workgroup presents its recommendations for lithium poisoning. After a systematic literature search, clinical and toxico......The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning Workgroup was created to provide evidence-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments in poisoning. Here, the EXTRIP workgroup presents its recommendations for lithium poisoning. After a systematic literature search, clinical...... extraction of patient-level data. The workgroup concluded that lithium is dialyzable (Level of evidence=A) and made the following recommendations: Extracorporeal treatment is recommended in severe lithium poisoning (1D). Extracorporeal treatment is recommended if kidney function is impaired and the [Li...... treatment (1D), but continuous RRT is an acceptable alternative (1D). The workgroup supported the use of extracorporeal treatment in severe lithium poisoning. Clinical decisions on when to use extracorporeal treatment should take into account the [Li(+)], kidney function, pattern of lithium toxicity...

  13. Aqueous lithium air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J.; Nimon, Yevgeniy S.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Petrov, Alexei; Goncharenko, Nikolay

    2017-05-23

    Aqueous Li/Air secondary battery cells are configurable to achieve high energy density and prolonged cycle life. The cells include a protected a lithium metal or alloy anode and an aqueous catholyte in a cathode compartment. The aqueous catholyte comprises an evaporative-loss resistant and/or polyprotic active compound or active agent that partakes in the discharge reaction and effectuates cathode capacity for discharge in the acidic region. This leads to improved performance including one or more of increased specific energy, improved stability on open circuit, and prolonged cycle life, as well as various methods, including a method of operating an aqueous Li/Air cell to simultaneously achieve improved energy density and prolonged cycle life.

  14. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  15. Lithium germanium detectors reactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolai, J.A.; Marti, G.V.; Riso, J.M.; Gimenez, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A convenient method to regenerate the characteristics of damaged Ge(li) detectors, that has been applied in the authors' laboratory, is described. The procedure consists in warming-up the crystal in its cryostat to temperatures between 10 deg C and 30 deg C above room temperature, in order to clean its surface. Subsequent cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperature, followed by one or more clean-up drifting processes, are applied to the crystals. This paper summarizes the results obtained with several detectors; this method was applied successfully to 15 detectors more. (author) [es

  16. Lithium availability and future production outlooks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikström, Hanna; Davidsson, Simon; Höök, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Review of reserves, resources and key properties of 112 lithium deposits. • Discussions of widely diverging results from recent lithium supply estimates. • Forecasting future lithium production by resource-constrained models. • Exploring implications for future deployment of electric cars. - Abstract: Lithium is a highly interesting metal, in part due to the increasing interest in lithium-ion batteries. Several recent studies have used different methods to estimate whether the lithium production can meet an increasing demand, especially from the transport sector, where lithium-ion batteries are the most likely technology for electric cars. The reserve and resource estimates of lithium vary greatly between different studies and the question whether the annual production rates of lithium can meet a growing demand is seldom adequately explained. This study presents a review and compilation of recent estimates of quantities of lithium available for exploitation and discusses the uncertainty and differences between these estimates. Also, mathematical curve fitting models are used to estimate possible future annual production rates. This estimation of possible production rates are compared to a potential increased demand of lithium if the International Energy Agency’s Blue Map Scenarios are fulfilled regarding electrification of the car fleet. We find that the availability of lithium could in fact be a problem for fulfilling this scenario if lithium-ion batteries are to be used. This indicates that other battery technologies might have to be implemented for enabling an electrification of road transports

  17. Radiation-damage-assisted ferroelectric domain structuring in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentjens, L.; Peithmann, K.; Maier, K.; Steigerwald, H.; Jungk, T.

    2009-06-01

    Irradiation of 5% magnesium-doped lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO3:Mg) with high-energy, low-mass 3He ions, which are transmitted through the crystal, changes the domain reversal properties of the material. This enables easier domain engineering compared to non-irradiated material and assists the formation of small-sized periodically poled domains in LiNbO3:Mg. Periodic domain structures exhibiting a width of ≈520 nm are obtained in radiation-damaged sections of the crystals. The ferroelectric poling behavior between irradiated and non-treated material is compared.

  18. Wetting properties of liquid lithium on lithium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krat, S.A., E-mail: stepan.krat@gmail.com [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Popkov, A.S. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gasparyan, Yu. M.; Pisarev, A.A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fiflis, Peter; Szott, Matthew; Christenson, Michael; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Contact angles of liquid lithium and Li{sub 3}N, Li{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were measured. • Liquid lithium wets lithium compounds at relatively low temperatures: Li{sub 3}N at 257 °C, Li{sub 2}O at 259 °C, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 323 °C. • Li wets Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 3}N better than previously measured fusion-relevant materials (W, Mo, Ta, TZM, stainless steel). • Li wets Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} better than most previously measured fusion-relevant materials (W, Mo, Ta). - Abstract: Liquid metal plasma facing components (LMPFC) have shown a potential to supplant solid plasma facing components materials in the high heat flux regions of magnetic confinement fusion reactors due to the reduction or elimination of concerns over melting, wall damage, and erosion. To design a workable LMPFC, one must understand how liquid metal interacts with solid underlying structures. Wetting is an important factor in such interaction, several designs of LMPFC require liquid metal to wet the underlying solid structures. The wetting of lithium compounds (lithium nitride, oxide, and carbonate) by 200 °C liquid lithium at various surface temperature from 230 to 330 °C was studied by means of contact angle measurements. Wetting temperatures, defined as the temperature above which the contact angle is less than 90°, were measured. The wetting temperature was 257 °C for nitride, 259 °C for oxide, and 323 °C for carbonate. Surface tensions of solid lithium compounds were calculated from the contact angle measurements.

  19. Grain Boundary Engineering of Lithium-Ion-Conducting Lithium Lanthanum Titanate for Lithium-Air Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Titanate for Lithium-Air Batteries by Victoria L Blair, Claire V Weiss Brennan, and Joseph M Marsico Approved for public...Air Batteries by Victoria L Blair and Claire V Weiss Brennan Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Joseph M Marsico Rochester...Titanate for Lithium-Air Batteries 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Victoria L Blair, Claire V

  20. Crystallization mechanisms of acicular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puel, François; Verdurand, Elodie; Taulelle, Pascal; Bebon, Christine; Colson, Didier; Klein, Jean-Paul; Veesler, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution, we present an experimental investigation of the growth of four different organic molecules produced at industrial scale with a view to understand the crystallization mechanism of acicular or needle-like crystals. For all organic crystals studied in this article, layer-by-layer growth of the lateral faces is very slow and clear, as soon as the supersaturation is high enough, there is competition between growth and surface-activated secondary nucleation. This gives rise to pseudo-twinned crystals composed of several needle individuals aligned along a crystallographic axis; this is explained by regular over- and inter-growths as in the case of twinning. And when supersaturation is even higher, nucleation is fast and random. In an industrial continuous crystallization, the rapid growth of needle-like crystals is to be avoided as it leads to fragile crystals or needles, which can be partly broken or totally detached from the parent crystals especially along structural anisotropic axis corresponding to weaker chemical bonds, thus leading to slower growing faces. When an activated mechanism is involved such as a secondary surface nucleation, it is no longer possible to obtain a steady state. Therefore, the crystal number, size and habit vary significantly with time, leading to troubles in the downstream processing operations and to modifications of the final solid-specific properties. These results provide valuable information on the unique crystallization mechanisms of acicular crystals, and show that it is important to know these threshold and critical values when running a crystallizer in order to obtain easy-to-handle crystals.

  1. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2015-01-01

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started

  2. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J. [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kubota, S. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  3. Predictors of excellent response to lithium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hellmund, Gunnar; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify sociodemographic and clinical predictors of excellent response, that is, 'cure' of future affective episodes, to lithium in monotherapy. We used nationwide registers to identify all patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in psychiatric hospital settings...... who were prescribed lithium from 1995 to 2006 in Denmark (N=3762). Excellent lithium responders were defined as patients who after a stabilization lithium start-up period of 6 months, continued lithium in monotherapy without getting hospitalized. The rate of excellent response to lithium...... with somatic comorbidity had increased rates of non-response to lithium compared with patients without somatic comorbidity (HR=1.23, 95% CI: 1.00-1.52).It is concluded that the prevalence of excellent response to lithium monotherapy is low and such patients are characterized by few earlier psychiatric...

  4. Domain wall width of lithium niobate poled during growth

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, R; Hole, D E; Callejo, D; Bermudez, V; Diéguez, E

    2003-01-01

    Good quality crystals of periodically poled lithium niobate can be generated directly during growth. However, the temperature gradients at the zone boundaries define the width of the regions where the polarity is reversed. Hence, the region influenced the domain transition may be a significant fraction of the overall poling period for material poled during growth. Evidence for the scale of this feature is reported both by chemical etching and by the less common method of ion beam luminescence and the 'domain wall' width approximately 1 mu m for these analyses. The influence of the reversal region may differ for alternative techniques but the relevance to device design for second harmonic generation is noted.

  5. Using {sup 233}U-doped crystals to access the few-eV isomeric transition in {sup 229}Th

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellmer, Simon; Schreitl, Matthias; Kazakov, Georgy A.; Sterba, Johannes H.; Schumm, Thorsten [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology (VCQ) and Atominstitut, TU Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    The isotope {sup 229}Th possesses an exceptionally low-lying isomeric state at an energy of only a few eV. While direct laser excitation of the isomer is a tantalizing future prospect, the stage is not yet set for nuclear laser spectroscopy: too little is known about the energy, lifetime, and internal conversion pathways of the isomer. Alternative routes to populate the isomer are needed for further investigations. We use the alpha decay {sup 233}U →{sup 229g,m}Th to populate the isomer with a probability of 2%. The {sup 233}U is embedded into VUV-transparent crystals, as the isomer transition is expected around 160 nm. The wavelength of the gamma ray, emitted upon de-excitation of the isomer into the ground state, is measured with a spectrometer. Calculations show that the isomer emission is not obscured by radioluminescence of the crystal. We report on the current status of the experiment.

  6. Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2014-05-13

    Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

  7. Lithium Ion Battery Anode Aging Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agubra, Victor; Fergus, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms such as lithium plating, growth of the passivated surface film layer on the electrodes and loss of both recyclable lithium ions and electrode material adversely affect the longevity of the lithium ion battery. The anode electrode is very vulnerable to these degradation mechanisms. In this paper, the most common aging mechanisms occurring at the anode during the operation of the lithium battery, as well as some approaches for minimizing the degradation are reviewed. PMID:28809211

  8. Solid composite electrolytes for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Binod; Scanlon, Jr., Lawrence G.

    2000-01-01

    Solid composite electrolytes are provided for use in lithium batteries which exhibit moderate to high ionic conductivity at ambient temperatures and low activation energies. In one embodiment, a ceramic-ceramic composite electrolyte is provided containing lithium nitride and lithium phosphate. The ceramic-ceramic composite is also preferably annealed and exhibits an activation energy of about 0.1 eV.

  9. Anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Meduri, Praveen; Sumanasekera, Gamini

    2014-12-30

    An anode material for lithium-ion batteries is provided that comprises an elongated core structure capable of forming an alloy with lithium; and a plurality of nanostructures placed on a surface of the core structure, with each nanostructure being capable of forming an alloy with lithium and spaced at a predetermined distance from adjacent nanostructures.

  10. Lithium. Effects on excitable cell membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeger, Egbert Johan

    1974-01-01

    LITHIUM: Effects on excitable cell membranes. Lithium salts have been used in the treatment of manic-depressive psychosis for many years but their mechanism of action is not well understood. Many workers assume that the action of lithium on catecholamine metabolism and/or on electrolyte distribution

  11. Lithium alloys and metal oxides as high-capacity anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Chu; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge; Liu, Yongfeng; Yan, Mi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Progress in lithium alloys and metal oxides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries is reviewed. •Electrochemical characteristics and lithium storage mechanisms of lithium alloys and metal oxides are summarized. •Strategies for improving electrochemical lithium storage properties of lithium alloys and metal oxides are discussed. •Challenges in developing lithium alloys and metal oxides as commercial anodes for lithium-ion batteries are pointed out. -- Abstract: Lithium alloys and metal oxides have been widely recognized as the next-generation anode materials for lithium-ion batteries with high energy density and high power density. A variety of lithium alloys and metal oxides have been explored as alternatives to the commercial carbonaceous anodes. The electrochemical characteristics of silicon, tin, tin oxide, iron oxides, cobalt oxides, copper oxides, and so on are systematically summarized. In this review, it is not the scope to retrace the overall studies, but rather to highlight the electrochemical performances, the lithium storage mechanism and the strategies in improving the electrochemical properties of lithium alloys and metal oxides. The challenges and new directions in developing lithium alloys and metal oxides as commercial anodes for the next-generation lithium-ion batteries are also discussed

  12. Preliminary design and analysis of a process for the extraction of lithium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, M.; Dang, V.D.

    1975-09-01

    The U.S. demand for lithium by the industrial sector and by a fusion power economy in the future is discussed. For a one million MW(e) CTR (D-T fuel cycle) economy, growing into the beginning of the next century (the years 2000 to 2030), the cumulative demand for lithium is estimated to range from (0.55 to 4.7) x 10 7 to 1.0 x 10 9 kg. Present estimates of the available U.S. supply are 6.9 x 10 8 kg of lithium from mineral resources and 4.0 x 10 9 kg of lithium from concentrated natural brines. There is, however, a vast supply of lithium in seawater: 2.5 x 10 14 kg. A preliminary process design for the extraction of lithium from seawater is presented: seawater is first evaporated by solar energy to increase the concentration of lithium and to decrease the concentration of other cations in the bittern which then passes into a Dowex-50 ion exchange bed for cation adsorption. Lithium ions are then eluted with dilute hydrochloric acid forming an aqueous lithium chloride which is subsequently concentrated and electrolyzed. The energy requirement for lithium extraction varies between 0.08 and 2.46 kWh(e)/gm for a range of production rates varying between 10 4 and 10 8 kg/y; this is small compared to the energy produced from the use of lithium in a CTR having a value of 3400 kWh(e)/g Li. Production cost of the process is estimated to be in the range of 2.2 to 3.2 cents/g Li. As a basis for the process design, it is recommended that a phase equilibria study of the solid--liquid crystallization processes of seawater be conducted. Uncertainties exist in the operation of large solar ponds for concentrating large quantities of seawater. A search for a highly selective adsorbent or extractant for Li from low concentration aqueous solutions should be made. Other physical separation processes such as using membranes should be investigated. 9 tables

  13. The lithium vapor box divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R J; Schwartz, J; Myers, R

    2016-01-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m −2 , implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma. (paper)

  14. Research, Development and Fabrication of Lithium Solar Cells, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development and fabrication of lithium solar cells are discussed. Several single-step, lithium diffusion schedules using lower temperatures and times are described. A comparison was made using evaporated lithium metal as the lithium source, and greatly improved consistency in lithium concentrations was obtained. It was possible to combine all processing steps to obtain lithium doped cells of high output which also contained adequate lithium to ensure good recoverability.

  15. Effect of chemical and isotope substitution in LiH crystals on polariton emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plekhanov, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of fine structure of phonon-free line of free exciton radiation in mixed crystals LiH x F 1-x (o x D 1-x (O x F 1-x crystals a sharp increase in the intensity of phonon-free line of free exciton radiation as compared with its LO repetitions is observed. The experimental results suggest manifestation of polariton effects in mixed crystals produced on the basis of lithium hydride. 17 refs., 2 figs

  16. Imaging Lithium Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2005-01-03

    John Cowley and his group at ASU were pioneers in the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Three decades ago they achieved images showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4A resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  17. Electrolytes for lithium and lithium-ion batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Jow, T Richard; Borodin, Oleg; Ue, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Electrolytes for Lithium and Lithium-ion Batteries provides a comprehensive overview of the scientific understanding and technological development of electrolyte materials in the last?several years. This book covers key electrolytes such as LiPF6 salt in mixed-carbonate solvents with additives for the state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries as well as new electrolyte materials developed recently that lay the foundation for future advances.?This book also reviews the characterization of electrolyte materials for their transport properties, structures, phase relationships, stabilities, and impurities.

  18. Comment on "Rapid cooling and cold storage in a silicic magma reservoir recorded in individual crystals".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Colin J N; Morgan, Daniel J; Charlier, Bruce L A; Barker, Simon J

    2017-12-22

    Rubin et al (Reports, 16 June 2017, p. 1154) proposed that gradients in lithium abundance in zircons from a rhyolitic eruption in New Zealand reflected short-lived residence at magmatic temperatures interleaved with long-term "cold" (<650°C) storage. Important issues arise with the interpretation of these lithium gradients and consequent crystal thermal histories that raise concerns about the validity of this conclusion. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Deuterium retention in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, M.J.; Doerner, R.P.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Conn, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of deuterium retention in samples of lithium exposed in the liquid state to deuterium plasma are reported. Retention was measured as a function of plasma ion dose in the range 6x10 19 -4x10 22 D atoms and exposure temperature between 523 and 673 K using thermal desorption spectrometry. The results are consistent with the full uptake of all deuterium ions incident on the liquid metal surface and are found to be independent of the temperature of the liquid lithium over the range explored. Full uptake, consistent with very low recycling, continues until the sample is volumetrically converted to lithium deuteride. This occurs for exposure temperatures where the gas pressure during exposure was both below and slightly above the corresponding decomposition pressure for LiD in Li. (author)

  20. Nuclear spectroscopy with lithium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, C.

    1977-02-01

    A survey of the state of nuclear spectroscopy with lithium ions is given. Proceeding from the physical and nuclear properties the specific topics arising by the acceleration of these ions are discussed. The results obtained from measurements of excitation functions of different lithium reactions, particularly of compound reactions, with several target nuclei are summarized. Besides compound reactions direct reactions are important, especially transfer reactions, elastic and inelastic scattering and exchange reactions. The results on high spin states obtained by in-beam gamma-spectroscopy are discussed in detail. Finally the possibilities are considered for accelerating lithium ions in the cyclotron U-120 and in the tandem generator EGP-10 of the ZfK. (author)

  1. Lithium-based neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yursova, L.

    1977-01-01

    The problems of using scintillation lithium-based detectors (LiJ(Eu) and 6 LiJ(Eu)), as well as lithium glasses for neutron detection are described. As compared with the glasses the LiJ(Eu) monocrystal possesses substantially higher energy resolution, its luminescence yield is considerably higher (in some cases ten fold), its application makes possible gamma radiation discrimination with the energy approximately four times higher and its higher specific mass ensures better efficiency of gamma radiation counting. The only 6 LiJ(Eu) drawback is its high hydroscopicity as well as its possibility to be used only in a limited temperature range (maximum temperature +35 deg C). The lithium glass can be used (with the exception of spectrometric measurements and radiation mixed regions measurement) with more than 1 MeV gamma radiation energy in a wide temperature range, in agressive, corroding and acid media

  2. Three Dimensional Positron Annihilation Momentum Spectroscopy of Lithium Tetraborate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    Mount Design 1- I l~"! Ovuq,JQ_ fta ..c~\\ ’"’ r.ont "’ _ , \\.A•r ’fj ::..--", ~,·r ( . ’ •/?..’ ’ ~,..,_ .. {-.J.. n""’’f"’\\..+ ..... N>~ sj...Technique Applied to Measure Oxygen-Atom Defects in 6H Silicon Carbide." AFIT PhD Dissertation. AFIT/DS/ENP/10-M02, ( Mar 2010) [4] Charlton, M., and...University of Michigan Positron Research Website. http://positrons.physics.lsa.umich.edu/current/nanopos/PALS- intro/psitronphysics.htm Accessed 6 Mar

  3. The creation of radiation defects in lithium fluoride single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flerov, A. [Inst. of Phys. (Latvia); Flerov, V. [Nucl. Res. Center, Salaspils (Latvia)

    1997-10-01

    Frenkel pair creation occurs in LiF through the interaction of a self-trapped exciton and a free exciton. This has been confirmed by the dependence of the F center formation yield on the 4th power of the dose rate. The F center production efficiency was increased and V{sub k} center decreased by increasing the temperature from 77 to 300 K, each having an activation energy of 0.028 eV. The lifetime of the self-trapped exciton at room temperature was about 0.7 {mu}s. (orig.)

  4. Novel lithium titanate-graphene hybrid containing two graphene conductive frameworks for lithium-ion battery with excellent electrochemical performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiyi, Li; Tengyuan, Chen; Beibei, Sun [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Zaijun, Li [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Key Laboratory of Food Colloids and Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, Wuxi 214122 (China); Zhiquo, Gu; Guangli, Wang; Junkang, Liu [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: We developed a new Novel lithium titanate-graphene nanohybrid containing two graphene conductive frameworks. The unique architecture creates fast electron transfer and rapid mass transport of electrolyte. The hybrid electrode provides excellent electrochemical performances for lithium-ion batteries, including high specific capacity, outstanding rate capability and intriguing cycling stability. - Highlights: • We reported a new LTO-graphene nanohybrid containing two graphene conductive frameworks. • One graphene framework greatly improves the electrical conductivity of LTO crystal. • Another graphene framework enhances electrical conductivity of between LTO crystals and electrolyte transport. • The unique architecture creates big tap density, ultrafast electron transfer and rapid mass transport. • The hybrid electrode provides excellent electrochemical performance for lithium-ion batteries. - ABSTRACT: The paper reported the synthesis of lithium titanate(LTO)-graphene hybrid containing two graphene conductive frameworks (G@LTO@G). Tetrabutyl titanate and graphene were dispersed in tertbutanol and heated to reflux state by microwave irradiation. Followed by adding lithium acetate to produce LTO precursor/graphene (p-LTO/G). The resulting p-LTO/G offers homogeneous morphology and ultra small size. All graphene sheets were buried in the spherical agglomerates composed of primitive particles through the second agglomeration. The p-LTO/G was calcined to LTO@graphene (LTO@G). To obtain G@LTO@G, the LTO@G was further hybridized with graphene. The as-prepared G@LTO@G shows well-defined three-dimensional structure and hierarchical porous distribution. Its unique architecture creates big tap density, fast electron transfer and rapid electrolyte transport. As a result, the G@LTO@G provides high specific capacity (175.2 mA h g{sup −1} and 293.5 mA cm{sup −3}), outstanding rate capability (155.7 mAh g{sup −1} at 10C) and intriguing cycling

  5. Problem of the lithium peroxide thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefedov, R A; Ferapontov, Yu A; Kozlova, N P

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of lithium peroxide and lithium peroxide monohydrate samples under heating in atmospheric air was studied by the method of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). It was found that in the temperature range of 32°C to 82°C the interaction of lithium peroxides and steam with the formation of lithium peroxide monohydrate occurs, which was confirmed chemically and by X-ray Single-qualitative analysis. It was experimentally found that lithium peroxide starts to decompose into the lithium oxide and oxygen in the temperature range of 340 ÷ 348°C. It was established that the resulting thermal decomposition of lithium oxide, lithium peroxide at the temperature of 422°C melts with lithium carbonate eutecticly. The manifestation of polymorphism was not marked(seen or noticed) under the heating of studied samples of lithium peroxide and lithium peroxide monohydrate in the temperature range of 25°C ÷ 34°C. (paper)

  6. Solid solution lithium alloy cermet anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    2013-07-09

    A metal-ceramic composite ("cermet") has been produced by a chemical reaction between a lithium compound and another metal. The cermet has advantageous physical properties, high surface area relative to lithium metal or its alloys, and is easily formed into a desired shape. An example is the formation of a lithium-magnesium nitride cermet by reaction of lithium nitride with magnesium. The reaction results in magnesium nitride grains coated with a layer of lithium. The nitride is inert when used in a battery. It supports the metal in a high surface area form, while stabilizing the electrode with respect to dendrite formation. By using an excess of magnesium metal in the reaction process, a cermet of magnesium nitride is produced, coated with a lithium-magnesium alloy of any desired composition. This alloy inhibits dendrite formation by causing lithium deposited on its surface to diffuse under a chemical potential into the bulk of the alloy.

  7. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of the...

  8. Evolving Structural Diversity and Metallicity in Compressed Lithium Azide

    KAUST Repository

    Prasad, Dasari L. V. K.

    2013-10-10

    In pursuit of new stable nitrogen-rich phases and of a possible insulator-metal transition, the ground-state electronic structure of lithium azide, LiN3, is investigated from 1 atm to 300 GPa (∼2-fold compression) using evolutionary crystal structure exploration methods coupled with density functional theoretical calculations. Two new LiN3 phases, containing slightly reduced and well-separated N2 units, are found to be enthalpically competitive with the known lithium azide crystal structure at 1 atm. At pressures above 36 GPa nitrogen-rich assemblies begin to evolve. These incorporate NN bond formation beyond that in N2 or N3 -. N6 rings and infinite one-dimensional linear nitrogen chains (structural analogues to polyacetylene) appear. Above 200 GPa quasi-one- and two-dimensional extended puckered hexagonal and decagonal nitrogen layers emerge. The high-pressure phase featuring linear chains may be quenchable to P = 1 atm. With increasing pressure the progression in electrical conductivity is from insulator to metal. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. Deuterium and lithium-6 MAS NMR studies of manganese oxide electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Younkee

    Electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) is used world wide as the cathode materials in both lithium and alkaline primary (non-rechargeable) batteries. We have developed deuterium and lithium MAS NMR techniques to study EMD and related manganese oxides and hydroxides, where diffraction techniques are of limited value due to a highly defective nature of the structures. Deuterons in EMD, manganite, groutite, and deuterium-intercalated pyrolusite and ramsdellite were detected by NMR, for the first time, and their locations and motions in the structures were analyzed by applying variable temperature NMR techniques. Discharge mechanisms of EMD in alkaline (aqueous) electrolytes were studied, in conjunction with step potential electrochemical spectroscopic (SPECS) method, and five distinctive discharge processes were proposed. EMD is usually heat-treated at about 300--400°C to remove water to be used in lithium batteries. Details of the effects of heat-treatment, such as structural and compositional changes as a function of heat-treatment temperature, were studied by a combination of MAS NMR, XRD, and thermogravimetric analysis. Lithium local environments in heat-treated EMD (HEMD) that were discharged in lithium cells, were described in terms of related environments found in model compounds pyrolusite and ramsdellite where specific Li + sites were detected by MAS NMR and the hyperfine shift scale method of Grey et al. Acid-leaching of Li2MnO3 represents an approach for synthesizing new or modified manganese oxide electrode materials for lithium rechargeable batteries. Progressive removal of lithium from specific crystallographic sites, followed by a gradual change of the crystal structure, was monitored by a combination of NMR and XRD techniques.

  10. A stable organic-inorganic hybrid layer protected lithium metal anode for long-cycle lithium-oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinhui; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Jingjing; Zhang, Tao; Li, Lei; Wang, Jiulin; Nuli, Yanna

    2017-10-01

    A stable organic-inorganic hybrid layer (OIHL) is direct fabricated on lithium metal surface by the interfacial reaction of lithium metal foil with 1-chlorodecane and oxygen/carbon dioxide mixed gas. This favorable OIHL is approximately 30 μm thick and consists of lithium alkyl carbonate and lithium chloride. The lithium-oxygen batteries with OIHL protected lithium metal anode exhibit longer cycle life (340 cycles) than those with bare lithium metal anode (50 cycles). This desirable performance can be ascribed to the robust OIHL which prevents the growth of lithium dendrites and the corrosion of lithium metal.

  11. Synthesis of Lithium Fluoride from Spent Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S. Suarez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lithium (Li is considered a strategic element whose use has significantly expanded. Its current high demand is due to its use in lithium ion batteries for portable electronic devices, whose manufacture and market are extensively growing every day. These days there is a great concern about the final disposal of these batteries. Therefore, the possibility of developing new methodologies to recycle their components is of great importance, both commercially and environmentally. This paper presents results regarding important operational variables for the dissolution of the lithium and cobalt mixed-oxide (LiCoO2 cathodes from spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs with hydrofluoric acid. The recovery and synthesis of Co and Li compounds were also investigated. The dissolution parameters studied were: temperature, reaction time, solid-liquid ratio, stirring speed, and concentration of HF. The investigated recovery parameters included: pH, temperature, and time with and without stirring. The final precipitation of lithium fluoride was also examined. The results indicate that an increase in the HF concentration, temperature, and reaction time favors the leaching reaction of the LiCoO2. Dissolutions were close to 60%, at 75 °C and 120 min with a HF concentration of 25% (v/v. The recovery of Co and Li were 98% and 80%, respectively, with purities higher than 94%. Co and Li compounds, such as Co3O4 and LiF, were synthesized. Furthermore, it was possible to almost completely eliminate the F− ions as CaF2.

  12. Structural and optical investigations of sol–gel derived lithium titanate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Łapiński, M.; Kościelska, B.; Sadowski, W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Lithium titanate thin films were deposited on glass substrates by sol–gel method. ► After annealing at 550 °C samples had lithium titanate spinel structure. ► Above 80 h of annealing mixture of lithium titanate and titanium oxides was appeared. ► Optical transmittance decreased with increasing of annealing time. - Abstract: In this paper structural and optical studies of lithium titanate (LTO) thin films are presented. Nanocrystalline thin films with 800 nm thickness were prepared by sol–gel method. To examine the influence of the annealing time on as-prepared films crystallization, the coatings were heated at 550 °C for 10, 20 and 80 h. Structure of manufactured thin films was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The most visible lithium titanate phase was obtained after 20 h annealing. Increasing of annealing time over 20 h revealed appearance of titanium oxides phase. On the basis of transmission characteristic optical properties were calculated. It was found that transmission through the thin films was reduced and position of the fundamental absorption edge was shifted toward a longer wavelength with increasing of annealing time. The optical band gap was calculated for direct allowed and indirect allowed transitions from optical absorption spectra.

  13. SnO2/ZnO composite structure for the lithium-ion battery electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Mashkoor; Yingying, Shi; Sun, Hongyu; Shen, Wanci; Zhu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    In this article, SnO 2 /ZnO composite structures have been synthesized by two steps hydrothermal method and investigated their lithium storage capacity as compared with pure ZnO. It has been found that these composite structures combining the large specific surface area, stability and catalytic activity of SnO 2 micro-crystals, demonstrate the higher initial discharge capacity of 1540 mA h g −1 with a Coulombic efficiency of 68% at a rate of 120 mA h g −1 between 0.02 and 2 V and found much better than that of any previously reported ZnO based composite anodes. In addition, a significantly enhanced cycling performance, i.e., a reversible capacity of 497 mA h g −1 is retained after 40 cycles. The improved lithium storage capacity and cycle life is attributed to the addition of SnO 2 structure, which act as good electronic conductors and better accommodation of the large volume change during lithiation/delithiation process. - Graphical abstract: SnO 2 /ZnO composite structures demonstrate the improved lithium storage capacity and cycle life as compared with pure ZnO nanostructure. Highlights: ► Synthesis of SnO 2 /ZnO composite structures by two steps hydrothermal approach. ► Investigation of lithium storage capacity. ► Excellent lithium storage capacity and cycle life of SnO 2 /ZnO composite structures.

  14. Phase diagram, thermodynamic investigations, and modelling of systems relevant to lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuertauer, Siegfried; Beutl, Alexander; Flanorfer, Hans; Henriques, David; Giel, Hans; Markus, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on two consecutive joint projects titled ''Experimental Thermodynamics and Phase Relations of New Electrode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries'', which were performed in the framework of the WenDeLIB 1473 priority program ''Materials with new Design for Lithium Ion Batteries''. Hundreds of samples were synthesized using experimental techniques specifically developed to deal with highly reactive lithium and lithium-containing compounds to generate electrochemical, phase diagram and crystal structure data in the Cu-Li, Li-Sn, Li-Sb, Cu-Li-Sn, Cu-Li-Sb and selected oxide systems. The thermochemical and phase diagram data were subsequently used to develop self-consistent thermodynamic descriptions of several binary systems. In the present contribution, the experimental techniques, working procedures, results and their relevance to the development of new electrode materials for lithium ion batteries are discussed and summarized. The collaboration between the three groups has resulted in more than fifteen (15) published articles during the six-year funding period.

  15. On the electrochemistry of tin oxide coated tin electrodes in lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böhme, Solveig; Edström, Kristina; Nyholm, Leif

    2015-01-01

    As tin based electrodes are of significant interest in the development of improved lithium-ion batteries it is important to understand the associated electrochemical reactions. In this work it is shown that the electrochemical behavior of SnO_2 coated tin electrodes can be described based on the SnO_2 and SnO conversion reactions, the lithium tin alloy formation and the oxidation of tin generating SnF_2. The CV, XPS and SEM data, obtained for electrodeposited tin crystals on gold substrates, demonstrates that the capacity loss often observed for SnO_2 is caused by the reformed SnO_2 layer serving as a passivating layer protecting the remaining tin. Capacities corresponding up to about 80 % of the initial SnO_2 capacity could, however, be obtained by cycling to 3.5 V vs. Li"+/Li. It is also shown that the oxidation of the lithium tin alloy is hindered by the rate of the diffusion of lithium through a layer of tin with increasing thickness and that the irreversible oxidation of tin to SnF_2 at potentials larger than 2.8 V vs. Li"+/Li is due to the fact that SnF_2 is formed below the SnO_2 layer. This improved electrochemical understanding of the SnO_2/Sn system should be valuable in the development of tin based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

  16. Phase diagram, thermodynamic investigations, and modelling of systems relevant to lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuertauer, Siegfried; Beutl, Alexander; Flanorfer, Hans [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry - Functional Materials; Li, Dajian; Cupid, Damian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials - Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP); Henriques, David; Giel, Hans; Markus, Thorsten [Mannheim Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany). Inst. for Thermo- and Fluiddynamics

    2017-11-15

    This article reports on two consecutive joint projects titled ''Experimental Thermodynamics and Phase Relations of New Electrode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries'', which were performed in the framework of the WenDeLIB 1473 priority program ''Materials with new Design for Lithium Ion Batteries''. Hundreds of samples were synthesized using experimental techniques specifically developed to deal with highly reactive lithium and lithium-containing compounds to generate electrochemical, phase diagram and crystal structure data in the Cu-Li, Li-Sn, Li-Sb, Cu-Li-Sn, Cu-Li-Sb and selected oxide systems. The thermochemical and phase diagram data were subsequently used to develop self-consistent thermodynamic descriptions of several binary systems. In the present contribution, the experimental techniques, working procedures, results and their relevance to the development of new electrode materials for lithium ion batteries are discussed and summarized. The collaboration between the three groups has resulted in more than fifteen (15) published articles during the six-year funding period.

  17. Hydrothermal Crystal Growth of Lithium Tetraborate and Lithium Gamma-Metaborate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    specific reaction conditions, both thermal and chemical. Purification is more likely with small temperature differentials , in a thermodynamic growth regime...7 facilities maintenance, wages , management overhead, etc.) the smaller the operating cost per run, and the faster that the autoclave can pay itself...operation, and not decomposable . Any single entity with symmetry has a point group associated with it—which is a good pedagogical starting point from which

  18. A soft chemical route to multicomponent lithium transition metal oxide nanowires as promising cathode materials for lithium secondary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dae-Hoon; Lim, Seung-Tae; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2006-01-01

    We have synthesized 1D nanowires of lithium nickel manganese oxides with two different crystal structures through the chemical oxidation reaction of solid-state precursor LiMn 0.5 Ni 0.5 O 2 under hydrothermal condition. According to X-ray diffraction and elemental analyses, the nanowires obtained by persulfate treatments at 65 and 120 deg. C crystallize with a hexagonal layered and an α-MnO 2 -type structure, respectively, in which nickel and manganese ions exist in octahedral sites. Electron microscopic analyses reveal that the platelike crystallites of the precursor are changed into nanowires with the diameter of ∼20 nm after the persulfate treatment. Thermal and infrared spectroscopic analyses clearly demonstrate that, in comparison with α-MnO 2 -structured nanowires, the hexagonal layered nanowires contain less water molecules in the lattice, which makes them suitable for the application as electrode materials for lithium secondary batteries. According to electrochemical measurements, the hexagonal layered nanowires show a larger discharge capacity and an excellent cyclability with respect to repeated Li intercalation-disintercalation process. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic analyses on the samples subjected to electrochemical analysis reveal that the layered structure and 1D morphology of the nanowires are still maintained after the electrochemical cyclings, which is responsible for their excellent electrochemical performances

  19. Liquid lithium blanket processing studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J.B.; Clinton, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of tritium on yttrium from flowing molten lithium and the subsequent release of tritium from yttrium for regeneration of the metal sorbent were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of such a tritium-recovery process for a fusion reactor blanket of liquid lithium. In initial experiments with the forced convection loop, yttrium samples were contacted with lithium at 300 0 C. A mass transfer coefficient of 2.5 x 10 - cm/sec, which is more than an order of magnitude less than the value measured in earlier static experiments, was determined for the flowing lithium system. Rates of tritium release from yttrium samples were measured to evaluate possible thermal regeneration of the sorbent. Values for diffusion coefficients at 505, 800, and 900 0 C were estimated to be 1.1 x 10 -13 , 4.9 x 10 -12 , and 9.3 x 10 -10 cm 2 /sec, respectively. Tritium release from yttrium was investigated at higher temperatures and with hydrogen added to the argon sweep gas to provide a reducing atmosphere

  20. Interfacial reactions in lithium batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil; Amine, Rachid; Ma, Zi-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The lithium-ion battery was first commercially introduced by Sony Corporation in 1991 using LiCoO 2 as the cathode material and mesocarbon microbeads (MCMBs) as the anode material. After continuous research and development for 25 years, lithium-ion batteries have been the dominant energy storage device for modern portable electronics, as well as for emerging applications for electric vehicles and smart grids. It is clear that the success of lithium-ion technologies is rooted to the existence of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that kinetically suppresses parasitic reactions between the lithiated graphitic anodes and the carbonate-based non-aqueous electrolytes. Recently, major attention has been paid to the importance of a similar passivation/protection layer on the surface of cathode materials, aiming for a rational design of high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries with extended cycle/calendar life. In this article, the physical model of the SEI, as well as recent research efforts to understand the nature and role of the SEI are summarized, and future perspectives on this important research field will also be presented. (topical review)

  1. Interfacial reactions in lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Rachid; Ma, Zi-Feng; Amine, Khalil

    2017-08-01

    The lithium-ion battery was first commercially introduced by Sony Corporation in 1991 using LiCoO2 as the cathode material and mesocarbon microbeads (MCMBs) as the anode material. After continuous research and development for 25 years, lithium-ion batteries have been the dominant energy storage device for modern portable electronics, as well as for emerging applications for electric vehicles and smart grids. It is clear that the success of lithium-ion technologies is rooted to the existence of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that kinetically suppresses parasitic reactions between the lithiated graphitic anodes and the carbonate-based non-aqueous electrolytes. Recently, major attention has been paid to the importance of a similar passivation/protection layer on the surface of cathode materials, aiming for a rational design of high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries with extended cycle/calendar life. In this article, the physical model of the SEI, as well as recent research efforts to understand the nature and role of the SEI are summarized, and future perspectives on this important research field will also be presented.

  2. Lithium target simulation in TECHNOFUSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colomer, C.; Arino, X.; Reig, J.; Aleman, A.

    2010-01-01

    This project aims to build a facility where testing, under neutronic irradiation, the necessary materials for the construction of future fusion reactors. The intention is produced irradiation in a controlled way by deuterons bombing on a high speed lithium surface specially designed for that.

  3. Lithium inputs to subduction zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, C.; Elliott, T.R.; Vroon, P.Z.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the sedimentary and basaltic inputs of lithium to subduction zones. Various sediments from DSDP and ODP drill cores in front of the Mariana, South Sandwich, Banda, East Sunda and Lesser Antilles island arcs have been analysed and show highly variable Li contents and δ

  4. Control of Internal and External Short Circuits in Lithium Ion and Lithium Batteries, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has identified needs for compact high-energy-density primary and secondary batteries. Lithium and Lithium Ion cells, respectively, are meeting these needs for...

  5. Synthesis and Electrochemical Performance of a Lithium Titanium Phosphate Anode for Aqueous Lithium-Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Wessells, Colin; La Mantia, Fabio; Deshazer, Heather; Huggins, Robert A.; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries that use aqueous electrolytes offer safety and cost advantages when compared to today's commercial cells that use organic electrolytes. The equilibrium reaction potential of lithium titanium phosphate is -0.5 V with respect

  6. Shear Bond Strength of Resin Buttons to Lithium Disilicate and Leucite Reinforced Feldspathic Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    utilizing enamel bonding procedures. These fixed orthodontic appliances are the gold standard in orthodontic treatment and can be used to correct... enamel of teeth. When this same procedure needs to be done on a restorative material such as lithium disilicate, or leucite reinforced feldspathic...toughness from its crystal size and orientation which causes cracks to deflect instead of propagate. The second material being tested, IPS Empress

  7. Measuring nanocurie quantities of tritium bred in metallic lithium and lithium oxide samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertone, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    The LBM program requires that nanocurie quantities of tritium, bred in both lithium oxide pellets and lithium samples, be measured with an uncertainty not exceeding + or - 6%. Two methods of accurately measuring nanocurie quantities of tritium bred in LBM lithium oxide pellets and one method of accurately measuring nanocurie quantities of tritium bred in lithium samples are described. Potential errors associated with these tritium measurement techniques are also discussed

  8. Explosion of lithium-thionyl-chloride battery due to presence of lithium nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Hennesø, E.; Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2015-01-01

    An explosion of a lithium–thionyl-chloride (Li–SOCl2) battery during production (assembly) leads to serious worker injury. The accident cell batch had been in a dry-air intermediate storage room for months before being readied with thionyl chloride electrolyte. Metallic lithium can react with atmospheric nitrogen to produce lithium nitride. Nodules of lithium nitride were found to be present on the lithium foil in other cells of the accident batch. The investigation attributed the explosion t...

  9. Helium crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Hexagonal close-packed helium crystals in equilibrium with superfluid have been found to be one of the few systems in which an anisotropic solid comes into true thermodynamic equilibrium with its melt. The discovery of roughening transitions at the liquid-solid interface have shown this system to be ideal for the study of the statistical mechanics of interface structures. We describe the effect of roughening on the shape and growth of macroscopic crystals from both the theoretical and experimental points of view. (author)

  10. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  11. Stabilized Lithium-Metal Surface in a Polysulfide-Rich Environment of Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Chenxi; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2014-08-07

    Lithium-metal anode degradation is one of the major challenges of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, hindering their practical utility as next-generation rechargeable battery chemistry. The polysulfide migration and shuttling associated with Li-S batteries can induce heterogeneities of the lithium-metal surface because it causes passivation by bulk insulating Li2S particles/electrolyte decomposition products on a lithium-metal surface. This promotes lithium dendrite formation and leads to poor lithium cycling efficiency with complicated lithium surface chemistry. Here, we show copper acetate as a surface stabilizer for lithium metal in a polysulfide-rich environment of Li-S batteries. The lithium surface is protected from parasitic reactions with the organic electrolyte and the migrating polysulfides by an in situ chemical formation of a passivation film consisting of mainly Li2S/Li2S2/CuS/Cu2S and electrolyte decomposition products. This passivation film also suppresses lithium dendrite formation by controlling the lithium deposition sites, leading to a stabilized lithium surface characterized by a dendrite-free morphology and improved surface chemistry.

  12. Lithium in drinking water and suicide mortality: The interplay with lithium prescriptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbich, M; Leitner, M; Kapusta, N

    Background Little is known about the effects of lithium intake through drinking water on suicide. This intake originates either from natural rock and soil elution and/or accumulation of lithium-based pharmaceuticals in ground water. Aims To examine the interplay between natural lithium in drinking

  13. Influence of electron acceptor on lyoluminescence of irradiated lithium and sodium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrts, D.P.; Dzelme, Yu.R.; Malin'sh, A.A.; Gasyavichus, I.G.; Tiliks, Yu.E.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of nitrate ions and the dissolution rate upon the stationary and non-stationary lyoluminescence has been studied for gamma-irradiated at 45 deg C and dose 10 4 Gy/h lithium and sodium fluorides when dissolving in a concentrated sulfuric acid under variuos disslution conditions. The lyoluminescence of both types is shown to depend on the acceptor concentration in the solvent and the dependence change is determined by reactions between chemically active defects at various depths of the crystal's surface layer affected by the solvent and the dissolution rate. The former reactions depend on the radiation defects' distibution in the crystal volume

  14. Tuning characteristics of narrowband THz radiation generated via optical rectification in periodically poled lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, C; Torosyan, G; Meyn, J P; Wallenstein, R; Beigang, R; Avetisyan, Y

    2001-04-23

    The tuning properties of pulsed narrowband THz radiation generated via optical rectification in periodically poled lithium niobate have been investigated. Using a disk-shaped periodically poled crystal tuning was easily accomplished by rotating the crystal around its axis and observing the generated THz radiation in forward direction. In this way no beam deflection during tuning was observed. The total tuning range extended from 180 GHz up to 830 GHz and was limited by the poling period of 127 microm which determines the maximum THz frequency in forward direction.

  15. Aperture scaling effects with monolithic periodically poled lithium niobate optical parametric oscillators and generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missey, M; Dominic, V; Powers, P; Schepler, K L

    2000-02-15

    We used elliptical beams to demonstrate aperture scaling effects in nanosecond single-grating and multigrating periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) monolithic optical parametric oscillators and generators. Increasing the cavity Fresnel number in single-grating crystals broadened both the beam divergence and the spectral bandwidth. Both effects are explained in terms of the phase-matching geometry. These effects are suppressed when a multigrating PPLN crystal is used because the individual gratings provide small effective subapertures. A flood-pumped multigrating optical parametric generator displayed a low output beam divergence and contained 19 pairs of signal and idler frequencies.

  16. Direct extraction of negative lithium ions from a lithium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.; Tsuda, H.; Sasao, M.

    1990-01-01

    Negative lithium ions (Li - ) were directly extracted from a lithium plasma in a multiline cusp plasma container. A pair of permanent magnets mounted near the extractor electrode created the filter magnetic field that separated the extraction region plasma from the main discharge plasma. The plasma electrode facing the extraction region plasma was biased with respect to the other parts of the chamber wall, which acted as discharge anodes. The larger filter magnetic field resulted larger Li - current. When the bias to the plasma electrode was several volts positive against the anode potential, extracted Li - current took the maximum for a fixed strength of the filter field. These dependences of Li - upon the filter magnetic field and the plasma electrode bias are similar to the ones of negative hydrogen ions

  17. Electrode materials and lithium battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil [Downers Grove, IL; Belharouak, Ilias [Westmont, IL; Liu, Jun [Naperville, IL

    2011-06-28

    A material comprising a lithium titanate comprising a plurality of primary particles and secondary particles, wherein the average primary particle size is about 1 nm to about 500 nm and the average secondary particle size is about 1 .mu.m to about 4 .mu.m. In some embodiments the lithium titanate is carbon-coated. Also provided are methods of preparing lithium titanates, and devices using such materials.

  18. Secondary lithium solid polymer electrolyte cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, K.A.; Sammells, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    A strategy for developing morphologically invariant lithium/solid polymer electrolyte interface is being investigated via the use of lithium intercalated electrodes. Emphasis is being placed upon the rutile material Li/sub x/WO/sub 2/ 0.1 < x < 1.0. An absence of shape change at this interface is expected to result in both long cycle life electrochemical cells and the simultaneous maintenance of small interelectrode spacing so that low IR losses can be maintained. During fabrication of cells investigated here both electrochemical and chemical lithium intercalation of WO/sub 2/ was pursued. In the case of larger WO/sub 2/ electrodes initially prepared for fully discharged state cells, electrochemical intercalation during cell charge was found to require significant time, and the reproducible achievement of complete uniform intercalation across the negative electrode became an issue. Emphasis was consequently placed upon cells fabricated using Li/sub x/WO/sub 2/ electrodes initially chemically intercalated by lithium prior to cell assembly. Previous work has demonstrated direct lithium intercalation of metal dichalcogenides using n-BuLi. Lithium activity in n-BuLi is, however, insufficient to achieve lithium intercalation of WO/sub 2//sup 4/. However, recent work has shown that WO/sub 2/ can be directly lithium intercalated upon immersion in lithium naphthalide. Li/sub x/WO/sub 2/ electrodes prepared in this work were intercalated using lithium naphthalide (0.8M) in 2MeTHF. Lithium intercalation was found to readily occur at room temperature, being initially rapid and slowing as bulk intercalation within the electrode proceeded. For electrodes intercalated in this manner, a relationship was identified between the degree of lithium intercalation and initial open-circuit potential in liquid non-aqueous electrolyte

  19. Abundance of lithium in Pleiades F stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilachowski, C.A.; Booth, J.; Hobbs, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    The abundance of lithium has been determined for 18 stars in the Pleiades cluster with spectral types from A7V to G0V. The pronounced dip in the lithium abundance among the mid-F stars which has been reported for other, older star clusters is not present in the Pleiades. The removal of lithium from the surfaces of middle-F dwarfs therefore occurs principally after about 100 Myr on the main sequence. 25 references

  20. Spectral emission measurements of lithium on the lithium tokamak experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, T. K.; Biewer, T. M.; Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Boyle, D. P.; Granstedt, E. M.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    There has been a long-standing collaboration between ORNL and PPPL on edge and boundary layer physics. As part of this collaboration, ORNL has a large role in the instrumentation and interpretation of edge physics in the lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). In particular, a charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) diagnostic is being designed and undergoing staged testing on LTX. Here we present results of passively measured lithium emission at 5166.89 A in LTX in anticipation of active spectroscopy measurements, which will be enabled by the installation of a neutral beam in 2013. Preliminary measurements are made in transient LTX plasmas with plasma current, I{sub p} < 70 kA, ohmic heating power, P{sub oh}{approx} 0.3 MW and discharge lifetimes of 10-15 ms. Measurements are made with a short focal length spectrometer and optics similar to the CHERS diagnostics on NSTX [R. E. Bell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68(2), 1273-1280 (1997)]. These preliminary measurements suggest that even without the neutral beam for active spectroscopy, there is sufficient passive lithium emission to allow for line-of-sight profile measurements of ion temperature, T{sub i}; toroidal velocity and v{sub t}. Results show peak T{sub i} = 70 eV and peak v{sub t} = 45 km/s were reached 10 ms into the discharge.

  1. Electrode nanomaterials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaroslavtsev, A B; Kulova, T L; Skundin, A M

    2015-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in the field of cathode and anode nanomaterials for lithium-ion batteries is considered. The use of these nanomaterials provides higher charge and discharge rates, reduces the adverse effect of degradation processes caused by volume variations in electrode materials upon lithium intercalation and deintercalation and enhances the power and working capacity of lithium-ion batteries. In discussing the cathode materials, attention is focused on double phosphates and silicates of lithium and transition metals and also on vanadium oxides. The anode materials based on nanodispersions of carbon, silicon, certain metals, oxides and on nanocomposites are also described. The bibliography includes 714 references

  2. Lithium-ion batteries fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-Ion Batteries: Fundamentals and Applications offers a comprehensive treatment of the principles, background, design, production, and use of lithium-ion batteries. Based on a solid foundation of long-term research work, this authoritative monograph:Introduces the underlying theory and history of lithium-ion batteriesDescribes the key components of lithium-ion batteries, including negative and positive electrode materials, electrolytes, and separatorsDiscusses electronic conductive agents, binders, solvents for slurry preparation, positive thermal coefficient (PTC) materials, current col

  3. Lithium-Oxygen Batteries: At a Crossroads?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Siegel, Donald Jason

    2017-01-01

    In this current opinion, we critically review and discuss some of the most important recent findings in the field of rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries. We discuss recent discoveries like the evolution of reactive singlet oxygen and the use of organic additives to bypass reactive LiO2 reaction...... intermediates, and their possible implications on the potential for commercialization of lithium-oxygen batteries. Finally, we perform a critical assessment of lithium-superoxide batteries and the reversibility of lithium-hydroxide batteries....

  4. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Mohamed; Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.

    1993-01-01

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride).

  5. Electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughey, John; Jansen, Andrew N.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2014-08-05

    A family of electrolytes for use in a lithium ion battery. The genus of electrolytes includes ketone-based solvents, such as, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone; 3,3-dimethyl 2-butanone(pinacolone) and 2-butanone. These solvents can be used in combination with non-Lewis Acid salts, such as Li.sub.2[B.sub.12F.sub.12] and LiBOB.

  6. Lithium aluminates and tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Palacios G, O.; Bosch G, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this work it is studied the crystalline structure of lithium aluminates prepared by three different methods, namely: solid state reaction, humid reaction and sol-gel reaction. The analysis methods are the X-ray diffractometry and the scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This study is realized as in original materials as in irradiated materials at the TRIGA Mark reactor, to correlate the synthesis method with response of these materials to the mixed irradiation of nuclear reactor. (Author)

  7. High energy density lithium batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Aifantis, Katerina E; Kumar, R Vasant

    2010-01-01

    Cell phones, portable computers and other electronic devices crucially depend on reliable, compact yet powerful batteries. Therefore, intensive research is devoted to improving performance and reducing failure rates. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries promise significant advancement and high application potential for hybrid vehicles, biomedical devices, and everyday appliances. This monograph provides special focus on the methods and approaches for enhancing the performance of next-generation batteries through the use of nanotechnology. Deeper understanding of the mechanisms and strategies is

  8. Lithium ion storage between graphenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Yue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we investigate the storage of lithium ions between two parallel graphene sheets using the continuous approximation and the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential. The continuous approximation assumes that the carbon atoms can be replaced by a uniform distribution across the surface of the graphene sheets so that the total interaction potential can be approximated by performing surface integrations. The number of ion layers determines the major storage characteristics of the battery, and our results show three distinct ionic configurations, namely single, double, and triple ion forming layers between graphenes. The number densities of lithium ions between the two graphenes are estimated from existing semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations, and the graphene sheets giving rise to the triple ion layers admit the largest storage capacity at all temperatures, followed by a marginal decrease of storage capacity for the case of double ion layers. These two configurations exceed the maximum theoretical storage capacity of graphite. Further, on taking into account the charge-discharge property, the double ion layers are the most preferable choice for enhanced lithium storage. Although the single ion layer provides the least charge storage, it turns out to be the most stable configuration at all temperatures. One application of the present study is for the design of future high energy density alkali batteries using graphene sheets as anodes for which an analytical formulation might greatly facilitate rapid computational results.

  9. Lithium actinide recycle process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.K.; Pierce, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Several pyrochemical processes have been developed in the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne Laboratory for recovery of actinide elements from LWR spent fuel. The lithium process was selected as the reference process from among the options. In this process the LWR oxide spent fuel is reduced by lithium at 650{degrees}C in the presence of molten LiCl. The Li{sub 2}O formed during the reduction process is soluble in the salt. The spent salt and lithium are recycled after the Li{sub 2}O is electrochemically reduced. The oxygen is liberated as CO{sub 2} at a carbon anode or oxygen at an inert anode. The reduced metal components of the LWR spent fuel are separated from the LiCL salt phase and introduced into an electrorefiner. The electrorefining step separates the uranium and transuranium (TRU) elements into two product streams. The uranium product, which comprises about 96% of the LWR spent fuel mass, may be enriched for recycle into the LWR fuel cycle, stored for future use in breeder reactors, or converted to a suitable form for disposal as waste. The TRU product can be recycled as fast reactor fuel or can be alloyed with constituents of the LWR cladding material to produce a stable waste form.

  10. Lithium Pharmacogenetics: Where Do We Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanu, Claudia; Melis, Carla; Squassina, Alessio

    2016-11-01

    Preclinical Research Bipolar disorder (BPD) is a chronic and disabling psychiatric disorder with a prevalence of 0.8-1.2% in the general population. Although lithium is considered the first-line treatment, a large percentage of patients do not respond sufficiently. Moreover, lithium can induce severe side effects and has poor tolerance and a narrow therapeutic index. The genetics of lithium response has been largely investigated, but findings have so far failed to identify reliable biomarkers to predict clinical response. This has been largely determined by the highly complex phenotipic and genetic architecture of lithium response. To this regard, collaborative initiatives hold the promise to provide robust and standardized methods to disantenagle this complexity, as well as the capacity to collect large samples of patietnts, a crucial requirement to study the genetics of complex phenotypes. The International Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen) has recently published the largest study so far on lithium response reporting significant associations for two long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). This result provides relevant insights into the pharmacogenetics of lithium supporting the involvement of the noncoding portion of the genome in modulating clinical response. Although a vast body of research is engaged in dissecting the genetic bases of response to lithium, the several drawbacks of lithium therapy have also stimulated multiple efforts to identify new safer treatments. A drug repurposing approach identified ebselen as a potential lithium mimetic, as it shares with lithium the ability to inhibit inositol monophosphatase. Ebselen, an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase mimetic, represents a valid and promising example of new potential therapeutic interventions for BD, but the paucity of data warrant further investigation to elucidate its potential efficacy and safety in the management of BPD. Nevertheless, findings provided by the growing field of pharmacogenomic

  11. Magnetophotonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, M [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Fujikawa, R [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Baryshev, A [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Khanikaev, A [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Lim, P B [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012, Japan (Japan); Uchida, H [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Aktsipetrov, O [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Fedyanin, A [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Murzina, T [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Granovsky, A [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2006-04-21

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are magnetic, or even only a defect introduced in PCs is magnetic, the resultant PCs exhibit very unique optical and magneto-optical properties. The strong photon confinement in the vicinity of magnetic defects results in large enhancement in linear and nonlinear magneto-optical responses of the media. Novel functions, such as band Faraday effect, magnetic super-prism effect and non-reciprocal or magnetically controllable photonic band structure, are predicted to occur theoretically. All the unique features of the media arise from the existence of magnetization in media, and hence they are called magnetophotonic crystals providing the spin-dependent nature in PCs. (topical review)

  12. Magnetophotonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, M; Fujikawa, R; Baryshev, A; Khanikaev, A; Lim, P B; Uchida, H; Aktsipetrov, O; Fedyanin, A; Murzina, T; Granovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are magnetic, or even only a defect introduced in PCs is magnetic, the resultant PCs exhibit very unique optical and magneto-optical properties. The strong photon confinement in the vicinity of magnetic defects results in large enhancement in linear and nonlinear magneto-optical responses of the media. Novel functions, such as band Faraday effect, magnetic super-prism effect and non-reciprocal or magnetically controllable photonic band structure, are predicted to occur theoretically. All the unique features of the media arise from the existence of magnetization in media, and hence they are called magnetophotonic crystals providing the spin-dependent nature in PCs. (topical review)

  13. Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air, Lithium-Water & Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Steven J

    2015-11-30

    The global demand for rechargeable batteries is large and growing rapidly. Assuming the adoption of electric vehicles continues to increase, the need for smaller, lighter, and less expensive batteries will become even more pressing. In this vein, PolyPlus Battery Company has developed ultra-light high performance batteries based on its proprietary protected lithium electrode (PLE) technology. The Company’s Lithium-Air and Lithium-Seawater batteries have already demonstrated world record performance (verified by third party testing), and we are developing advanced lithium-sulfur batteries which have the potential deliver high performance at low cost. In this program PolyPlus Battery Company teamed with Corning Incorporated to transition the PLE technology from bench top fabrication using manual tooling to a pre- commercial semi-automated pilot line. At the inception of this program PolyPlus worked with a Tier 1 battery manufacturing engineering firm to design and build the first-of-its-kind pilot line for PLE production. The pilot line was shipped and installed in Berkeley, California several months after the start of the program. PolyPlus spent the next two years working with and optimizing the pilot line and now produces all of its PLEs on this line. The optimization process successfully increased the yield, throughput, and quality of PLEs produced on the pilot line. The Corning team focused on fabrication and scale-up of the ceramic membranes that are key to the PLE technology. PolyPlus next demonstrated that it could take Corning membranes through the pilot line process to produce state-of-the-art protected lithium electrodes. In the latter part of the program the Corning team developed alternative membranes targeted for the large rechargeable battery market. PolyPlus is now in discussions with several potential customers for its advanced PLE-enabled batteries, and is building relationships and infrastructure for the transition into manufacturing. It is likely

  14. A consideration of lithium cell safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobishima, Shin-ichi; Yamaki, Jun-ichi

    The safety characteristics of commercial lithium ion cells are examined in relation to their use as batteries for cellular phones. This report describes a theoretical approach to an understanding of cell safety, example results of safety tests that we performed on lithium ion cells, and also presents our views regarding cell safety.

  15. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    CERN Document Server

    Olivares, I E

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the sup 6 LiD sub 2 and the sup 7 LiD sub 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  16. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, I.E.; Rojas, C.

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the 6 LiD 2 and the 7 LiD 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  17. Cationic flotation of some lithium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valadao, G.E.S.; Peres, A.E.C.; Silva, H.C. da

    1984-01-01

    The cationic flotation of some lithium ores (spodumene, amblygonite, petalite, lepidolite) is studied by the measure of zeta potential and micro-flotation tests in Hallimond tube. The effect of some modifier agents (corn starch, meta sodium silicate) on the lithium flotation is studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Lithium and sodium batteries with polysulfide electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Mengliu; Ming, Jun; Li, Lain-Jong

    2017-01-01

    A battery comprising: at least one cathode, at least one anode, at least one battery separator, and at least one electrolyte disposed in the separator, wherein the anode is a lithium metal or lithium alloy anode or an anode adapted for intercalation

  19. The lithium-ion accumulators in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzari, O.

    2006-07-01

    This document takes stock on the different technologies of lithium based batteries developed in Japan as the materials used to produce their different elements. The today tendencies of the japanese researches are discussed. The applications of the lithium-ion are presented. A list of the main public and private laboratories in the domain and the research programs is provided. (A.L.B.)

  20. Lithium use and the risk of fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilting, Ingeborg; de Vries, Frank; Thio, Brahm M. K. S.; Cooper, Cyrus; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Leutkens, Hubert G. M.; Nolen, Willem A.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.; van Staa, Tjeerd P.

    A recent study reported a decreased risk of fractures among lithium users. We conducted a case-control study within the UK General Practice Research Database, comparing never, ever, current, recent and past lithium use in 231,778 fracture cases to matched controls. In addition, the risk of fractures

  1. Treatment of lithium induced tremor with atenolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davé, M

    1989-03-01

    This is the first report on the successful treatment of one patient with lithium induced tremor with hydrophilic atenolol, which is a relatively selective beta 1 adrenergic receptor blocker. Atenolol's advantages over lipophilic beta blockers in the treatment of lithium induced tremor are discussed.

  2. Patterns and clinical outcomes of lithium treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilting, I.

    2008-01-01

    Patterns and consequences of lithium use’. In chapter 2.1 we studied lithium use patterns in out-patients within the last decade. In line with the increase in alternatives and the Dutch guidelines, we observed an increase in use of atypical antipsychotics and valproic acid and a decrease in use

  3. 77 FR 68069 - Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 20 Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Postal... primary and secondary lithium cells or lithium batteries internationally, or to and from an APO, FPO, or... prohibited the mailing of lithium batteries and cells internationally and when sent to and from any Army Post...

  4. 76 FR 55799 - Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 20 Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Postal... would incorporate new maximum limits for the outbound mailing of lithium batteries to international, or... equipment with lithium metal or lithium-ion batteries that were to be effective October 3, 2011. These...

  5. 75 FR 1302 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT... transportation of lithium cells and batteries, including lithium cells and batteries packed with or contained in equipment. The proposed changes are intended to enhance safety by ensuring that all lithium batteries are...

  6. Synthesis of lithium niobate and monocrystal growth by Czochralski method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balzuweit, K.

    1988-01-01

    The qualitative analysis of lithium niobate by x-ray analysis and optical microscopy is presented. The lithium niobate compound was obtained by synthesis using niobium oxides and lithium carbonates. The lithium niobate monocrystal growth was done by Czochralski method. (M.C.K.)

  7. See Also:physica status solidi (b)physica status solidi (c)Copyright © 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, WeinheimGet Sample CopyFree Online Trial -->Recommend to Your LibrarianSave Title to My ProfileSet E-Mail Alert var homepagelinks = new Array(new Array("Journal Home","/cgi-bin/jhome/40000761",""),new Array("Issues","/cgi-bin/jtoc/40000761/",""),new Array("Early View","/cgi-bin/jeview/40000761/",""),new Array("News","/cgi-bin/jabout/40000761/news/index.html",""),new Array("Reviews","/cgi-bin/jabout/40000761/reviews.html",""),new Array("Read Cover Story","/cgi-bin/jabout/40000761/cover/2231/current.html","e"),new Array("","","s"),new Array("Product Information","/cgi-bin/jabout/40000761/2231_info.html",""),new Array("Editorial Board","/cgi-bin/jabout/40000761/edbd.html",""),new Array("For Authors","/cgi-bin/jabout/40000761/authors.html",""),new Array("For Referees","/cgi-bin/jabout/40000761/refserv.html",""),new Array("Subscribe","http://jws-edcv.wiley.com/jcatalog/JournalsCatalogOrder/JournalOrder?PRINT_ISSN=0031-8965",""),new Array("Contact","/cgi-bin/jabout/40000761/contact.html",""),new Array("Online Submission","http://www.manuscriptxpress.org/osm/",""),new Array("","","x"));writeJournalLinks("", "40000761");issue nav --> Previous Issue | Next Issue >issue nav -->Volume 201, Issue13 (October 2004)Articles in the Current Issue:Rapid Research NoteScintillation properties of lead tungstate crystals doped with the monovalent ion lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanlin; Seo, Hyo Jin; Zhu, Wenliang

    2004-10-01

    Lithium-doped PbWO4 crystals have been grown by the Czochralski method. Optical absorbance, X-ray excited luminescence, light yield measurements and X-ray pulsed excited decays have been investigated. Li+ doping has a very good uniformity and could enhance the luminescence of PbWO4, give some contributions to the fast decay components.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of activated lithium fluoride with silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encarnacion E, E. K.; Guerrero S, Z.; Reyes A, J.

    2017-10-01

    The present work shows part of the results obtained in the development of the research that has been carried out since 2015 entitled -Synthesis and characterization of new thermoluminescent materials for the radiation dosimetry and its applications in health-. In the development of this research, the synthesis of crystals of pure lithium fluoride (LiF) and activated with different concentrations of silver (LiF:Ag); synthesized samples are also presented using different temperatures, as well as varying the concentration of the solvent (water-ethanol). The synthesized materials were characterized through different techniques: scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Specifically, the results of the calculation of the size of the LiF crystals are presented using the Scherrer equation. Within the results, a dependence on the size of the crystals is highlighted by means of the following factors: the amount of activator in the sample, the temperature at which the sample was synthesized, as well as the amount of solvent in the synthesis. The samples have a simple cubic crystalline phase. (Author)

  9. A lithium-oxygen battery based on lithium superoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Lee, Yun Jung; Luo, Xiangyi; Lau, Kah Chun; Asadi, Mohammad; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Brombosz, Scott; Wen, Jianguo; Zhai, Dengyun; Chen, Zonghai; Miller, Dean J; Jeong, Yo Sub; Park, Jin-Bum; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Kumar, Bijandra; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Sun, Yang-Kook; Curtiss, Larry A; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-21

    Batteries based on sodium superoxide and on potassium superoxide have recently been reported. However, there have been no reports of a battery based on lithium superoxide (LiO2), despite much research into the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery because of its potential high energy density. Several studies of Li-O2 batteries have found evidence of LiO2 being formed as one component of the discharge product along with lithium peroxide (Li2O2). In addition, theoretical calculations have indicated that some forms of LiO2 may have a long lifetime. These studies also suggest that it might be possible to form LiO2 alone for use in a battery. However, solid LiO2 has been difficult to synthesize in pure form because it is thermodynamically unstable with respect to disproportionation, giving Li2O2 (refs 19, 20). Here we show that crystalline LiO2 can be stabilized in a Li-O2 battery by using a suitable graphene-based cathode. Various characterization techniques reveal no evidence for the presence of Li2O2. A novel templating growth mechanism involving the use of iridium nanoparticles on the cathode surface may be responsible for the growth of crystalline LiO2. Our results demonstrate that the LiO2 formed in the Li-O2 battery is stable enough for the battery to be repeatedly charged and discharged with a very low charge potential (about 3.2 volts). We anticipate that this discovery will lead to methods of synthesizing and stabilizing LiO2, which could open the way to high-energy-density batteries based on LiO2 as well as to other possible uses of this compound, such as oxygen storage.

  10. Novel lithium iron phosphate materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, Jelena

    2011-06-15

    Conventional energy sources are diminishing and non-renewable, take million years to form and cause environmental degradation. In the 21st century, we have to aim at achieving sustainable, environmentally friendly and cheap energy supply by employing renewable energy technologies associated with portable energy storage devices. Lithium-ion batteries can repeatedly generate clean energy from stored materials and convert reversely electric into chemical energy. The performance of lithium-ion batteries depends intimately on the properties of their materials. Presently used battery electrodes are expensive to be produced; they offer limited energy storage possibility and are unsafe to be used in larger dimensions restraining the diversity of application, especially in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs). This thesis presents a major progress in the development of LiFePO4 as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. Using simple procedure, a completely novel morphology has been synthesized (mesocrystals of LiFePO4) and excellent electrochemical behavior was recorded (nanostructured LiFePO4). The newly developed reactions for synthesis of LiFePO4 are single-step processes and are taking place in an autoclave at significantly lower temperature (200 deg. C) compared to the conventional solid-state method (multi-step and up to 800 deg. C). The use of inexpensive environmentally benign precursors offers a green manufacturing approach for a large scale production. These newly developed experimental procedures can also be extended to other phospho-olivine materials, such as LiCoPO4 and LiMnPO4. The material with the best electrochemical behavior (nanostructured LiFePO4 with carbon coating) was able to deliver a stable 94% of the theoretically known capacity.

  11. Size effects in lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Hu-Rong; Yin Ya-Xia; Guo Yu-Gao

    2016-01-01

    Size-related properties of novel lithium battery materials, arising from kinetics, thermodynamics, and newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms, are reviewed. Complementary experimental and computational investigations of the use of the size effects to modify electrodes and electrolytes for lithium ion batteries are enumerated and discussed together. Size differences in the materials in lithium ion batteries lead to a variety of exciting phenomena. Smaller-particle materials with highly connective interfaces and reduced diffusion paths exhibit higher rate performance than the corresponding bulk materials. The thermodynamics is also changed by the higher surface energy of smaller particles, affecting, for example, secondary surface reactions, lattice parameter, voltage, and the phase transformation mechanism. Newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms that result in superior storage capacity are also briefly highlighted. (topical review)

  12. Tritium recovery from lithium oxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertone, P.C.; Jassby, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    The TFTR Lithium Blanket Module is an assembly containing 650 kg of lithium oxide that will be used to test the ability of neutronics codes to model the tritium breeding characteristics of limited-coverage breeding zones in a tokamak. It is required that tritium concentrations as low as 0.1 nCi/g bred in both metallic lithium samples and lithium oxide pellets be measured with an uncertainty not exceeding +- 6%. A tritium assay technique for the metallic samples which meets this criterion has been developed. Two assay techniques for the lithium oxide pellets are being investigated. In one, the pellets are heated in a flowing stream of hydrogen, while in the other, the pellets are dissolved in 12 M hydrochloric acid

  13. Operation of the lithium pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlopenkov, K.V.; Sudo, S.; Sergeev, V.Yu.

    1996-05-01

    A lithium pellet injection requires an accurate handling with lithium and special technique of loading the pellets. Thus, the technology for this has been developed based on the following conditions: 1) Because of chemical activity of lithium it is necessary to operate in a glove-box with the noble gas atmosphere (He, Ar, etc.). 2) A special procedure of replacing the glove-box atmosphere allows to achieve high purity of the noble gas. 3) When making the pellets it is better to keep the clean lithium in the liquid hexane so as to maintain lithium purity. 4) The pressure of the accelerating gas for Li pellets should be not less than 30 atm. (author)

  14. A lithium deposition system for tokamak devices*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziul, Christopher; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Hoffman, Daniel; Timberlake, John; Card, David

    2002-11-01

    The production of a lithium deposition system using commercially available components is discussed. This system is intended to provide a fresh lithium wall coating between discharges in a tokamak. For this purpose, a film 100-200 Å thick is sufficient to ensure that the plasma interacts solely with the lithium. A test system consisting of a lithium evaporator and a deposition monitor has been designed and constructed to investigate deposition rates and coverage. A Thermionics 3kW e-gun is used to rapidly evaporate small amounts of solid lithium. An Inficon XTM/2 quartz deposition monitor then measures deposition rate at varying distances, positions and angles relative to the e-gun crucible. Initial results from the test system will be presented. *Supported by US DOE contract #DE-AC02-76CH-03073

  15. Module of lithium divertor for KTM tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyublinski, I., E-mail: yublinski@yandex.ru [FSUE ' Red Star' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Vertkov, A.; Evtikhin, V.; Balakirev, V.; Ionov, D.; Zharkov, M. [FSUE ' Red Star' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Tazhibayeva, I. [IAE NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Mirnov, S. [TRINITI, Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Khomiakov, S.; Mitin, D. [OJSC Dollezhal Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mazzitelli, G. [ENEA RC Frascati (Italy); Agostini, P. [ENEA RC Brasimone (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Problems of PFE degradation, tritium accumulation and plasma pollution can be overcome by the use of liquid lithium-metal with low Z. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Capillary-porous system (CPS) - new material in which liquid lithium fill a solid matrix from porous material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lithium divertor module for KTM tokamak is under development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lithium filled tungsten felt is offered as the base plasma facing material of divertor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of this project addresses to the progress in the field of fusion neutrons source and fusion energy source creation. - Abstract: Activity on projects of ITER and DEMO reactors has shown that solution of problems of divertor target plates and other plasma facing elements (PFEs) based on the solid plasma facing materials cause serious difficulties. Problems of PFE degradation, tritium accumulation and plasma pollution can be overcome by the use of liquid lithium-metal with low Z. Application of lithium will allow to create a self-renewal and MHD stable liquid metal surface of the in-vessel devices possessing practically unlimited service life; to reduce power flux due to intensive re-irradiation on lithium atoms in plasma periphery that will essentially facilitate a problem of heat removal from PFE; to reduce Z{sub eff} of plasma to minimally possible level close to 1; to exclude tritium accumulation, that is provided with absence of dust products and an opportunity of the active control of the tritium contents in liquid lithium. Realization of these advantages is based on use of so-called lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) - new material in which liquid lithium fill a solid matrix from porous material. The progress in development of lithium technology and also activity in lithium experiments in the tokamaks TFTR, T-11M, T-10, FTU, NSTX, HT-7 and stellarator TJ II permits of solving the problems in development of

  16. Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harilal, S.S.; Allain, J.P.; Hassanein, A.; Hendricks, M.R.; Nieto-Perez, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium as a plasma-facing component has many attractive features in fusion devices. We investigated chemical properties of the lithiated graphite surfaces during deposition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. In this study we try to address some of the known issues during lithium deposition, viz., the chemical state of lithium on graphite substrate, oxide layer formation mechanisms, Li passivation effects over time, and chemical change during exposure of the sample to ambient air. X-ray photoelectron studies indicate changes in the chemical composition with various thickness of lithium on graphite during deposition. An oxide layer formation is noticed during lithium deposition even though all the experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum. The metal oxide is immediately transformed into carbonate when the deposited sample is exposed to air.

  17. Lithium ion batteries based on nanoporous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Sarah H.; Nemanick, Eric J.; Kang, Chris Byung-Hwa

    2015-09-22

    A lithium ion battery that incorporates an anode formed from a Group IV semiconductor material such as porous silicon is disclosed. The battery includes a cathode, and an anode comprising porous silicon. In some embodiments, the anode is present in the form of a nanowire, a film, or a powder, the porous silicon having a pore diameters within the range between 2 nm and 100 nm and an average wall thickness of within the range between 1 nm and 100 nm. The lithium ion battery further includes, in some embodiments, a non-aqueous lithium containing electrolyte. Lithium ion batteries incorporating a porous silicon anode demonstrate have high, stable lithium alloying capacity over many cycles.

  18. A Lithium Vapor Box Divertor Similarity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert A.; Emdee, Eric D.; Goldston, Robert J.; Jaworski, Michael A.; Schwartz, Jacob A.

    2017-10-01

    A lithium vapor box divertor offers an alternate means of managing the extreme power density of divertor plasmas by leveraging gaseous lithium to volumetrically extract power. The vapor box divertor is a baffled slot with liquid lithium coated walls held at temperatures which increase toward the divertor floor. The resulting vapor pressure differential drives gaseous lithium from hotter chambers into cooler ones, where the lithium condenses and returns. A similarity experiment was devised to investigate the advantages offered by a vapor box divertor design. We discuss the design, construction, and early findings of the vapor box divertor experiment including vapor can construction, power transfer calculations, joint integrity tests, and thermocouple data logging. Heat redistribution of an incident plasma-based heat flux from a typical linear plasma device is also presented. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and The Princeton Environmental Institute.

  19. Properties of lithium and its handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asada, Takashi; Kano, Shigeki; Tachi, Toshiaki; Kawai, Masataka

    2000-09-01

    Lithium is one of good coolants because of high boiling point (1317degC), small specific gravity (0.47 at 600degC) and large specific heat (1 cal/g/degC). Therefore if lithium will be used in fast reactor for coolant, the heat efficiency of reactor will largely increase. Here the fundamental properties of lithium and the results of examination on chemical reaction, combustion and extinction are shown. These examinations were also carried out on sodium to compare with lithium. The differences between both are that lithium reacts more moderately with water, not explosive, and is not combustible but after ignition burns at higher temperature and longer. (author)

  20. Suicide risk in patients treated with lithium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Søndergård, Lars; Kvist, Kajsa

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: Prior observational studies suggest that treatment with lithium may be associated with reduced risk of suicide in bipolar disorder. However, these studies are biased toward patients with the most severe disorders, and the relation to sex and age has seldom been investigated. OBJECTIVE......: To investigate whether treatment with lithium reduces the risk of suicide in a nationwide study. DESIGN: An observational cohort study with linkage of registers of all prescribed lithium and recorded suicides in Denmark during a period from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 1999. SETTING: All patients treated...... with lithium in Denmark, ie, within community psychiatry, private specialist practice settings, and general practice. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 13 186 patients who purchased at least 1 prescription of lithium and 1.2 million subjects from the general population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: All suicides identified...

  1. Highly Accurate Calculations of the Phase Diagram of Cold Lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulenburger, Luke; Baczewski, Andrew

    The phase diagram of lithium is particularly complicated, exhibiting many different solid phases under the modest application of pressure. Experimental efforts to identify these phases using diamond anvil cells have been complemented by ab initio theory, primarily using density functional theory (DFT). Due to the multiplicity of crystal structures whose enthalpy is nearly degenerate and the uncertainty introduced by density functional approximations, we apply the highly accurate many-body diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method to the study of the solid phases at low temperature. These calculations span many different phases, including several with low symmetry, demonstrating the viability of DMC as a method for calculating phase diagrams for complex solids. Our results can be used as a benchmark to test the accuracy of various density functionals. This can strengthen confidence in DFT based predictions of more complex phenomena such as the anomalous melting behavior predicted for lithium at high pressures. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Lithium ion implantation effects in MgO(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huis, M.A. van; Fedorov, A.V.; Veen, A. van; Labohm, F.; Schut, H.; Mijnarends, P.E. [Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.T.M. de [Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Materials Science Centre

    2001-07-01

    Single crystals of MgO(100) were implanted with 10{sup 16} {sup 6}Li ions cm{sup -2} at an energy of 30 keV. After ion implantation the samples were annealed isochronally in air at temperatures up to 1200K. After implantation and after each annealing step, the defect evolution was monitored with optical absorption spectroscopy and depth-sensitive Doppler Broadening positron beam analysis (PBA). A strong increase in the S-parameter is observed in the implantation layer at a depth of approximately 100 nm. The high value of the S-parameter is ascribed to positron annihilation in small lithium precipitates. The results of 2D-ACAR and X-TEM analysis show evidence of the presence of lithium precipitates. The depth distribution of the implanted {sup 6}Li atoms was monitored with neutron depth profiling (NDP). It was observed that detrapping and diffusion of {sup 6}Li starts at an annealing temperature of 1200K. (orig.)

  3. Hemispherand-Strapped Calix[4]pyrrole: An Ion-pair Receptor for the Recognition and Extraction of Lithium Nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Zhang, Zhan; Brewster, James T; Lynch, Vincent M; Kim, Sung Kuk; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2016-08-10

    The hemispherand-strapped calix[4]pyrrole (1) acts as an ion pair receptor that exhibits selectivity for lithium salts. In organic media (CD2Cl2 and CD3OD, v/v, 9:1), receptor 1 binds LiCl with high preference relative to NaCl, KCl, and RbCl. DFT calculations provided support for the observed selectivity. Single crystal structures of five different lithium ion-pair complexes of 1 were obtained. In the case of LiCl, a single bridging water molecule between the lithium cation and chloride anion was observed, while tight contact ion pairs were observed in the case of the LiBr, LiI, LiNO3, and LiNO2 salts. Receptor 1 proved effective as an extractant for LiNO2 under both model solid-liquid and liquid-liquid extraction conditions.

  4. Bis[2,6-bis(trimethylsilylaminopyridine-κN1]{[6-bis(trimethylsilylaminopyridin-2-yl-κN1](trimethylsilylazanido-κN}lithium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin A. Rave

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The title complex, [Li(C11H22N3Si2(C11H23N3Si22], contains a single lithium cation coordinated to three ligands. This is the first reported example of the ligand 2,6-bis(trimethylsilylaminopyridine supporting a monometallic complex. One ligand is mono-anionic and forms a four-membered chelate ring with the lithium cation via the pyridine and silylamido N atoms. The other two ligands are neutral and bind via the pyridine nitrogen. The lithium cation is coordinated in a tetrahedral environment. No intra- or intermolecular hydrogen bonding is observed in the crystal structure, likely indicating that weak electrostatic interactions are the dominant feature of the crystal packing.

  5. Determination of reduction yield of lithium metal reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In Kyu; Cho, Young Hwan; Kim, Taek Jin; Jee, Kwang Young

    2004-01-01

    Metal reduction of spent oxide fuel is the first step for the effective storage of spent fuel in Korea as well as transmutation purpose of long-lived radio-nuclides. During the reduction of uranium oxide by lithium metal to uranium metal, lithium oxide is stoichiometrically produced. By determining the concentration of lithium oxide in lithium chloride, we can estimate that how much uranium oxide is converted to uranium metal. Previous method to determine the lithium oxide concentration in lithium chloride is tedious and timing consuming. This paper describe the on-line monitoring method of lithium oxide during the reduction process

  6. Tracking Lithium Ions via Widefield Fluorescence Microscopy for Battery Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nicolas A; Rea, Morgan T; Foy, Michael; Upadhyay, Sunil P; Desrochers, Kyle A; Derus, Tyler; Knapper, Kassandra A; Hunter, Nathanael H; Wood, Sharla; Hinton, Daniel A; Cavell, Andrew C; Masias, Alvaro G; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2017-07-28

    Direct tracking of lithium ions with time and spatial resolution can provide an important diagnostic tool for understanding mechanisms in lithium ion batteries. A fluorescent indicator of lithium ions, 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)naphthoxazole, was synthesized and used for real-time tracking of lithium ions via widefield fluorescence microscopy. The fluorophore can be excited with visible light and was shown to enable quantitative determination of the lithium ion diffusion constant in a microfluidic model system for a plasticized polymer electrolyte lithium battery. The use of widefield fluorescence microscopy for in situ tracking of lithium ions in batteries is discussed.

  7. Dual-wavelength green laser with a 4.5 THz frequency difference based on self-frequency- doubling in Nd3+ -doped aperiodically poled lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, H; Torregrosa, A J; Fernández-Pousa, C R; Rico, M L; Capmany, J

    2008-05-01

    We report a dual-wavelength continuous-wave laser at 542.4 and 546.8 nm based on an Nd(3+)-doped aperiodically poled lithium niobate crystal. Two fundamental infrared (IR) wavelengths at 1084.8 and 1093.6 nm are simultaneously oscillated and self-frequency-doubled to green. The aperiodic domain distribution patterned in the crystal allows for quasi-phase matched self-frequency-doubling of both IR fundamentals while avoiding their sum-frequency mixing.

  8. Phosphoryl-rich flame-retardant ions (FRIONs): towards safer lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rectenwald, Michael F; Gaffen, Joshua R; Rheingold, Arnold L; Morgan, Alexander B; Protasiewicz, John D

    2014-04-14

    The functionalized catecholate, tetraethyl (2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-phenylene)bis(phosphonate) (H2 -DPC), has been used to prepare a series of lithium salts Li[B(DPC)(oxalato)], Li[B(DPC)2], Li[B(DPC)F2], and Li[P(DPC)3]. The phosphoryl-rich character of these anions was designed to impart flame-retardant properties for their use as potential flame-retardant ions (FRIONs), additives, or replacements for other lithium salts for safer lithium-ion batteries. The new materials were fully characterized, and the single-crystal structures of Li[B(DPC)(oxalato)] and Li[P(DPC)3] have been determined. Thermogravimetric analysis of the four lithium salts show that they are thermally stable up to around 200 °C. Pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry reveals that these salts produce high char yields upon combustion. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Experimental results of a direct air-cooled ammonia–lithium nitrate absorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llamas-Guillén, S.U.; Cuevas, R.; Best, R.; Gómez, V.H.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption thermal cooling systems driven by renewable energy are a viable option in order to reduce fossil fuel consumption and the associated emissions. This work shows the results of an air cooled absorption cooling prototype working with an ammonia–lithium nitrate mixture at high ambient temperatures. An absorption refrigeration system was designed and built. The prototype is a one stage ammonia–lithium nitrate air cooled chiller. The experimental system was instrumented to evaluate each component. This paper shows the operation conditions in the experimental unit as well as some of the heat loads encountered at different operating conditions. The system was operated successfully at ambient temperatures in the range of 25–35 °C. A series of test showed that even at ambient temperatures it can be operated at evaporator temperatures below 10 °C producing chilled water for air conditioning applications such as radiative cooling panels. The system proved to stabilize very quickly and no risk of crystallization was encountered so the first results are promising in order to continue with the development of a more advanced prototype. - Highlights: •Experimental results of a direct air-cooled ammonia–lithium nitrate system. •The prototype is a one stage ammonia–lithium nitrate air cooled chiller. •The absorption system was operated successfully at ambient temperatures. •Cooling loads of 4.5 kW were reached in the chilled water side

  10. Recycling metals from lithium ion battery by mechanical separation and vacuum metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jiefeng; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhengming

    2017-09-15

    The large-batch application of lithium ion batteries leads to the mass production of spent batteries. So the enhancement of disposal ability of spent lithium ion batteries is becoming very urgent. This study proposes an integrated process to handle bulk spent lithium manganese (LiMn 2 O 4 ) batteries to in situ recycle high value-added products without any additives. By mechanical separation, the mixed electrode materials mainly including binder, graphite and LiMn 2 O 4 are firstly obtained from spent batteries. Then, the reaction characteristics for the oxygen-free roasting of mixed electrode materials are analyzed. And the results show that mixed electrode materials can be in situ converted into manganese oxide (MnO) and lithium carbonate (Li 2 CO 3 ) at 1073K for 45min. In this process, the binder is evaporated and decomposed into gaseous products which can be collected to avoid disposal cost. Finally, 91.30% of Li resource as Li 2 CO 3 is leached from roasted powders by water and then high value-added Li 2 CO 3 crystals are further gained by evaporating the filter liquid. The filter residues are burned in air to remove the graphite and the final residues as manganous-manganic oxide (Mn 3 O 4 ) is obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lithium uptake and the corrosion of zirconium alloys in aqueous lithium hydroxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasubramanian, N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on corrosion films on zirconium alloys that were analyzed for lithium by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRAS). The oxides grown in reactor in dilute lithium hydroxide solution, specimens cut from Zircaloy, and Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tubes removed from CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium, Registered Trademark) reactors showed low concentrations of lithium (4 to 50 ppm). The lithium was not leachable in a warm dilute acid. 6 Li undergoes transmutation by the 6 Li(n,t) 4 He reaction. However, SIMS profiles for d 7 Li were identical through the bulk oxide and the isotopic ratio was close to the natural abundance value. The lithium in the oxide, existing as adsorbed lithium on the surface, has been in dynamic equilibrium with lithium in the coolant, and, in spite of many Effective Full Power Years (EFPY) of operation, lithium added to the CANDU coolant at ∼2.5 ppm is not concentrating in the oxides. On the other hand, corrosion films grown in the laboratory in concentrated lithium hydroxide solutions were very porous and contained hundreds of ppm of lithium in the oxide

  12. Neutron Imaging with Timepix Coupled Lithium Indium Diselenide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elan Herrera

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The material lithium indium diselenide, a single crystal neutron sensitive semiconductor, has demonstrated its capabilities as a high resolution imaging device. The sensor was prepared with a 55 μ m pitch array of gold contacts, designed to couple with the Timepix imaging ASIC. The resulting device was tested at the High Flux Isotope Reactor, demonstrating a response to cold neutrons when enriched in 95% 6 Li. The imaging system performed a series of experiments resulting in a <200 μ m resolution limit with the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI Siemens star mask and a feature resolution of 34 μ m with a knife-edge test. Furthermore, the system was able to resolve the University of Tennessee logo inscribed into a 3D printed 1 cm 3 plastic block. This technology marks the application of high resolution neutron imaging using a direct readout semiconductor.

  13. Integrated optics on Lithium Niobate for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaltron, A.; Bettella, G.; Pozza, G.; Zamboni, R.; Ciampolillo, M.; Argiolas, N.; Sada, C.; Kroesen, S.; Esseling, M.; Denz, C.

    2015-05-01

    In micro-analytical chemistry and biology applications, optofluidic technology holds great promise for creating efficient lab-on-chip systems where higher levels of integration of different stages on the same platform is constantly addressed. Therefore, in this work the possibility of integrating opto-microfluidic functionalities in lithium niobate (LiNbO3) crystals is presented. In particular, a T-junction droplet generator is directly engraved in a LiNbO3 substrate by means of laser ablation process and optical waveguides are realized in the same material by exploiting the Titanium in-diffusion approach. The coupling of these two stages as well as the realization of holographic gratings in the same substrate will allow creating new compact optical sensor prototypes, where the optical properties of the droplets constituents can be monitored.

  14. Lithium treatment of manio-depressive disorder. Two examples of treatment regimes with varying serum lithium concentration curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veimer Jensen, H.

    1998-07-01

    The importance of serum lithium profile in lithium maintenance treatment of manic-depressive disorder was studied by comparing pro-phylactic efficacy, side-effects and brain lithium level in patients on daily or alternate-day lithium dosing schedules. The aim of the study was to determine firstly, whether it is only necessary for the serum lithium concentration to periodically reach a certain level in order to ensure good prophylactic efficacy, and secondly, whether periodical lowering of the serum lithium level diminishes lithium-related side-effects. This was examined by extending the interval between lithium doses from 1 to 2 days, while maintaining the 12-h serum lithium concentration unchanged so as to achieve an unchanged serum lithium profile during the first 24-h period after lithium intake. The 12-h brain lithium concentration measured by 7 Li-magnetic resonance spectroscopy seemed to be independent of lithium dosing schedule, but correlated significantly with the 12-h serum lithium concentration, suggesting that at identical 12-h serum lithium concentrations, the 12-h brain lithium concentration is similar with both treatment regimens. (EG)

  15. Diagnostics of high-speed liquid lithium jet for IFMIF/EVEDA lithium test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemura, Takuji; Kondo, Hiroo; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Sugiura, Hirokazu; Horiike, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Nobuo; Ida, Mizuho; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Matsushita, Izuru

    2011-01-01

    Regarding R and Ds on the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), hydraulic stability of the liquid Li jet simulating the IFMIF Li target is planned to be validated using EVEDA Li Test Loop (ELTL). IFMIF is an accelerator-based deuteron-lithium (Li) neutron source for research and development of fusion reactor materials. The stable Li target is required in IFMIF to maintain the quality of the neutron fluence and integrity of the Li target itself. This paper presents diagnostics of the Li jet to be implemented in validation tests of the jet stability in ELTL, and those specifications and methodologies are introduced. In the tests, the following physical parameters need to be measured; thickness of the jet; surface structure (height, length/width and frequency of free-surface waves); local flow velocity at the free surface; and Li evaporation rate. With regard to measurement of jet thickness and the surface wave height, a contact-type liquid level sensor is to be used. As for measurement of wave velocity and visual understanding of detailed free-surface structure, a high-speed video camera is to be leveraged. With respect to Li evaporation measurement, weight change of specimens installed near the free surface and frequency change of a crystal quartz are utilized. (author)

  16. CW frequency doubling of 1029 nm radiation using single pass bulk and waveguide PPLN crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiodo, N.; Du Burck, F.; Hrabina, Jan; Candela, Y.; Wallerand, J. P.; Acef, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 311, 15 January (2013), s. 239-244 ISSN 0030-4018 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P820 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : IR laser * second harmonic generation * waveguide and bulk crystals * periodically poled lithium niobate * 1029 nm wavelength Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.542, year: 2013

  17. The formation of radiation defects in monohydrate of lithium sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahytzhan, A.B.; Zhussupov, A.A.; Kim, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The crystals of lithium sulfate are monohydrate. At heating it pass waterless form. This crystals are represented the convenient for study of the crystal water influence on the radiation-induced processes. After irradiation in Li 2 SO 4 · H 2 O it was established the radicals SO 3 - and SO 4 - by the EPR method. The similar radiation induced centres are characteristic for the all sulphates. We established that at after irradiation by X-rays monohydrate sulphate lithium have not the absorption bands in a range 200-800 nm. It complicates study of the given systems. The dominant peak of recombination luminescence (TL) has a maximum in area 100 K. On its high-temperature wing there is 'shoulder' showing of more high-temperature and weak luminescence. At higher temperatures some very weak of TL peaks are observed. The dehydration of the samples does not essential influence for this weak TL. Because we have concentrated the basic attention only on low temperature peaks of recombination luminescence. The TL peak of a luminescence with a maximum at 100 K as a result of thermo treatment has disappeared. Dominant emission became the TL peak with a maximum at 130 K. It is necessary to note, that after dehydration the radiative sensitivity of sulphate lithium sharply has increased. Our rough estimation for this change give value almost two orders. In monohydrate the maximum of TL peak is observed at 130 K radiation by UV. This peak can be divided into two peaks with maximums at 100 K and 130 K. At an irradiation dehydrated samples by ultraviolet light the TL peaks are not observed. The given results allow connecting a luminescence at 100 K with disintegration of defects in the subsystem of crystal water. The products radiolysis of water molecules essential influence on recombination processes in sulphate subsystem. The one hand they suppress them, with another - there is a new channel of disintegration complex anions. It is established that photoconductivity of the

  18. Growth, defect structure, and THz application of stoichiometric lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lengyel, K.; Péter, Á.; Kovács, L.; Corradi, G.; Dravecz, G.; Hajdara, I.; Szaller, Zs.; Polgár, K. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege M. út 29-33 (Hungary); Pálfalvi, L.; Unferdorben, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Pécs, 7624 Pécs, Ifjúság útja 6 (Hungary); Hebling, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Pécs, 7624 Pécs, Ifjúság útja 6 (Hungary); MTA-PTE High Field Terahertz Research Group, 7624 Pécs (Hungary)

    2015-12-15

    Owing to the extraordinary richness of its physical properties, congruent lithium niobate has attracted multidecade-long interest both for fundamental science and applications. The combination of ferro-, pyro-, and piezoelectric properties with large electro-optic, acousto-optic, and photoelastic coefficients as well as the strong photorefractive and photovoltaic effects offers a great potential for applications in modern optics. To provide powerful optical components in high energy laser applications, tailoring of key material parameters, especially stoichiometry, is required. This paper reviews the state of the art of growing large stoichiometric LiNbO{sub 3} (sLN) crystals, in particular, the defect engineering of pure and doped sLN with emphasis on optical damage resistant (ODR) dopants (e.g., Mg, Zn, In, Sc, Hf, Zr, Sn). The discussion is focused on crystals grown by the high temperature top seeded solution growth (HTTSSG) technique using alkali oxide fluxing agents. Based on high-temperature phase equilibria studies of the Li{sub 2}O–Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}–X{sub 2}O ternary systems (X = Na, K, Rb, Cs), the impact of alkali homologue additives on the stoichiometry of the lithium niobate phase will be analyzed, together with a summary of the ultraviolet, infrared, and far-infrared absorption spectroscopic methods developed to characterize the composition of the crystals. It will be shown that using HTTSSG from K{sub 2}O containing flux, crystals closest to the stoichiometric composition can be grown characterized by a UV-edge position of at about 302 nm and a single narrow hydroxyl band in the IR with a linewidth of less than 3 cm{sup −1} at 300 K. The threshold concentrations for ODR dopants depend on crystal stoichiometry and the valence of the dopants; Raman spectra, hydroxyl vibration spectra, and Z-scan measurements prove to be useful to distinguish crystals below and above the photorefractive threshold. Crystals just above the threshold are

  19. Significantly enhanced electrochemical performance of lithium titanate anode for lithium ion battery by the hybrid of nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiyi, Li; Yuanyuan, Jiang; Xiaoyan, Zhou; Zaijun, Li; Zhiguo, Gu; Guangli, Wang; Junkang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The study reported a facile synthesis of Li4Ti5O12/nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene quantum dots (LTO/N,S-GQDs). The unique architecture and the introduction of N,S-GQDs create both ultrafast electron transfer and electrolyte transport. The as-prepared LTO/N,S-GQDs anode provides prominent advantage of specific capacity, high-rate performance and cycle stability. - Highlights: • We reported a new lithium titanate/nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene quantum dots hybrid • The synthesis creates a crystalline interconnected porous framework composed of nanoscale LTO • The unique architecture achieves to maximize the rate performance and enhance the power density • Introduction of N,S-GQDs greatly enhances the electron transfer and the storage lithium capacity • The hybrid anode provides an excellent electrochemical performance for lithium-ion batteries - ABSTRACT: The paper reported a facile synthesis of lithium titanate/nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene quantum dots(LTO/N,S-GQDs). Tetrabutyl titanate was dissolved in tertbutanol and heated to refluxing state by microwave irradiation. Then, lithium acetate was added into the mixed solution to produce LTO precursor. The precursor was hybridized with N,S-GQDs in ethanol. Followed by drying and thermal annealing at 500 °C in Ar/H_2 to obtain LTO/N,S-GQDs. The synthesis creates fully crystalline interconnected porous framework composed of nanoscale LTO crystals. The unique architecture achieves to maximize the high-rate performance and enhance the power density. More importantly, the introduction of N,S-GQDs don't almost influence on the electrolyte transport, but greatly improve the electron transfer and the storage lithium capacity. The LTO/N,S-GQDs anode exhibits remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance for lithium ion battery. The specific discharge capacity is 254.2 mAh g"−"1 at 0.1C and 126.5 mAh g"−"1 at 10C. The capacity remains 96.9% at least after 2000 cycles

  20. Radiation defects in some oxide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczmarek, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Yttrium aluminium garnets, yttrium aluminium perovskite, strontium and barium lanthanum and gadolinium gallates, lithium niobate and tantalate as-grown crystals and doped by diffusion with rare-earth (Nd, Dy, Er, Tm, Ho, Pr, Ce, Eu) and ions of the first transition series (Mn, Cr, Cu, Fe) were investigated optically and using electron spin resonance method before and after gamma, electron and proton irradiation. (author)

  1. Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

  2. Roles of surface chemistry on safety and electrochemistry in lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Tae; Jeong, Sookyung; Cho, Jaephil

    2013-05-21

    Motivated by new applications including electric vehicles and the smart grid, interest in advanced lithium ion batteries has increased significantly over the past decade. Therefore, research in this field has intensified to produce safer devices with better electrochemical performance. Most research has focused on the development of new electrode materials through the optimization of bulk properties such as crystal structure, ionic diffusivity, and electric conductivity. More recently, researchers have also considered the surface properties of electrodes as critical factors for optimizing performance. In particular, the electrolyte decomposition at the electrode surface relates to both a lithium ion battery's electrochemical performance and safety. In this Account, we give an overview of the major developments in the area of surface chemistry for lithium ion batteries. These ideas will provide the basis for the design of advanced electrode materials. Initially, we present a brief background to lithium ion batteries such as major chemical components and reactions that occur in lithium ion batteries. Then, we highlight the role of surface chemistry in the safety of lithium ion batteries. We examine the thermal stability of cathode materials: For example, we discuss the oxygen generation from cathode materials and describe how cells can swell and heat up in response to specific conditions. We also demonstrate how coating the surfaces of electrodes can improve safety. The surface chemistry can also affect the electrochemistry of lithium ion batteries. The surface coating strategy improved the energy density and cycle performance for layered LiCoO2, xLi2MnO3·(1 - x)LiMO2 (M = Mn, Ni, Co, and their combinations), and LiMn2O4 spinel materials, and we describe a working mechanism for these enhancements. Although coating the surfaces of cathodes with inorganic materials such as metal oxides and phosphates improves the electrochemical performance and safety properties of

  3. Crystallisation mechanism of a multicomponent lithium alumino-silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurth, R.; Pascual, M.J.; Mather, G.C.; Pablos-Martín, A.; Muñoz, F.; Durán, A.; Cuello, G.J.; Rüssel, C.

    2012-01-01

    A base glass of composition 3.5 Li 2 O∙0.15 Na 2 O∙0.2 K 2 O∙1.15 MgO∙0.8 BaO∙1.5 ZnO∙20 Al 2 O 3 ∙67.2 SiO 2 ∙2.6 TiO 2 ∙1.7 ZrO 2 ∙1.2 As 2 O 3 (in wt.%), melted and provided by SCHOTT AG (Mainz), was used to study the crystallisation mechanism of lithium alumino-silicate glass employing X-ray diffraction combined with neutron diffraction and non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A high-quartz solid solution of LiAlSi 2 O 6 with nanoscaled crystals forms at 750 °C. Quantitative Rietveld refinement of samples annealed at 750 °C for 8 h determined a crystallised fraction of around 59 wt.%. The room temperature crystallised phase adopts an ordered, β-eucryptite-like structure (2 × 2 × 2 cell) with Li ordered in the structural channels. The Avrami parameter (n ∼ 4), calculated from DSC data using different theoretical approaches, indicates that bulk crystallisation occurs and that the number of nuclei increases during annealing. The activation energy of the crystallisation is 531 ± 20 kJ mol −1 . - Highlights: ► Nanoscaled high-quartz crystals from a multicomponent lithium alumino-silicate glass. ► Combined X-ray and neutron diffraction structural refinement. ► β-Eucryptite-like structure (2 × 2×2 cell) with Li ordered in the structural channels. ► 3-Dimensional bulk crystallisation mechanism with an increasing number of nuclei. ► Usage and validation of an alternative approach to calculate the Avrami parameter.

  4. Optimizing lithium dosing in hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnason, N H; Munkner, R; Kampmann, J P

    2006-01-01

    in which we developed an algorithm based on a 2-compartment distribution without elimination. The GFR estimate led to plasma concentrations 3-4 times lower than those anticipated. In contrast, the estimates based on V(d) and the algorithm derived from pharmacokinetic modeling led to comparable loading dose...... in this patient with no residual kidney function. We did not observe adverse effects related to this regimen, which was monitored from 18 days to 8 months of therapy, and the patient experienced relief from her severe depressive disorder. In conclusion, dialysis patients may be treated with lithium administrated...

  5. Lithium concentration dependence of implanted helium retention in lithium silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szocs, D.E., E-mail: szocsd@rmki.kfki.h [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Szilagyi, E.; Bogdan, Cs.; Kotai, E. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Horvath, Z.E. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2010-06-15

    Helium ions of 500 keV were implanted with a fluence of 1.4 x 10{sup 17} ion/cm{sup 2} into various lithium silicates to investigate whether a threshold level of helium retention exists in Li-containing silicate ceramics similar to that found in SiO{sub x} in previous work. The composition and phases of the as prepared lithium silicates were determined by proton backscattering spectrometry (p-BS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods with an average error of {+-}10%. Electrostatic charging of the samples was successfully eliminated by wrapping the samples in Al foil. The amounts of the retained helium within the samples were determined by subtracting the non-implanted spectra from the implanted ones. The experimental results show a threshold in helium retention depending on the Li concentration. Under 20 at.% all He is able to escape from the material; at around 30 at.% nearly half of the He, while over 65 at.% all implanted He is retained. With compositions expressed in SiO{sub 2} volume percentages, a trend similar to those reported of SiO{sub x} previously is found.

  6. Electronic Structure of Lithium Tetraborate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    and Optical Properties of Li2B4O7 Single Crystals Pure and Doped with Yb, Co and Mn Ions for Nonlinear Applications," Acta Physica Polonica A 107...34Growth and Optical Properties of Li2B4O7 Single Crystals Pure and Doped with Yb, Co and Mn Ions for Nonlinear Applications," Acta Physica ... Polonica A 107, 507 (2005). 22. Y. V. Burak, B. V. Padlyak, and V. M. Shevel, "Radiation-induced centers in the Li2B4O7 single crystals," Nuclear

  7. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium?sulfur battery design

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium?sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understandin...

  8. Explosion of lithium-thionyl-chloride battery due to presence of lithium nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennesø, E.; Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2015-01-01

    An explosion of a lithium–thionyl-chloride (Li–SOCl2) battery during production (assembly) leads to serious worker injury. The accident cell batch had been in a dry-air intermediate storage room for months before being readied with thionyl chloride electrolyte. Metallic lithium can react...... with atmospheric nitrogen to produce lithium nitride. Nodules of lithium nitride were found to be present on the lithium foil in other cells of the accident batch. The investigation attributed the explosion to the formation of porous lithium nitride during intermediate storage and a violent exothermal...... decomposition with the SOCl2–LiAlCl4 electrolyte triggered by welding. The literature is silent on hazards of explosion of Li–SOCl2 cells associated with the presence of lithium nitride. The silence is intriguing. Possible causes may be that such explosions are very rare, that explosions go unpublished...

  9. Lithium Azide as an Electrolyte Additive for All-Solid-State Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshetu, Gebrekidan Gebresilassie; Judez, Xabier; Li, Chunmei; Bondarchuk, Oleksandr; Rodriguez-Martinez, Lide M; Zhang, Heng; Armand, Michel

    2017-11-27

    Of the various beyond-lithium-ion battery technologies, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have an appealing theoretical energy density and are being intensely investigated as next-generation rechargeable lithium-metal batteries. However, the stability of the lithium-metal (Li°) anode is among the most urgent challenges that need to be addressed to ensure the long-term stability of Li-S batteries. Herein, we report lithium azide (LiN 3 ) as a novel electrolyte additive for all-solid-state Li-S batteries (ASSLSBs). It results in the formation of a thin, compact and highly conductive passivation layer on the Li° anode, thereby avoiding dendrite formation, and polysulfide shuttling. It greatly enhances the cycling performance, Coulombic and energy efficiencies of ASSLSBs, outperforming the state-of-the-art additive lithium nitrate (LiNO 3 ). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Lithium technologies for edge plasma control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, Vladimir Yu.; Kuteev, Boris V.; Bykov, Aleksey S.; Krylov, Sergey V.; Skokov, Viacheslav G.; Timokhin, Vladimir M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have investigated two new modes of operation been in T-10 limiter tokamak experiments with a novel rotary feeder of lithium dust. ► The observed decreases of bolometer and D β signals, with increase of the electron density during the lithium dust injection, reveal the effects of the first wall conditioning. ► The lithium technology may provide inherent safety mission for major disruption mitigation in a tokamak reactor, which requires demonstration in contemporary tokamak experiments. - Abstract: We have investigated two new modes of operation been in T-10 limiter tokamak experiments with a novel rotary feeder of lithium dust. Quasi steady-state mode I and pulse mode II of dust delivery were realized in both OH and OH + ECRH disruption free plasmas at the lithium flow rate up to 2 × 10 21 atoms/s. A higher flow rate in mode II with injection rate of ∼5 × 10 21 atoms/s caused a series of minor disruptions, which was completed by discharge termination after the major disruption. The observed decreases of bolometer and D β signals, with increase of the electron density during the lithium dust injection, reveal the effects of the first wall conditioning. The lithium technology may provide inherent safety pathway for major disruption mitigation in a tokamak reactor, which requires demonstration in contemporary tokamak experiments.

  11. Lithium-mediated protection against ethanol neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Luo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lithium has long been used as a mood stabilizer in the treatment of manic-depressive (bipolar disorder. Recent studies suggest that lithium has neuroprotective properties and may be useful in the treatment of acute brain injuries such as ischemia and chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. One of the most important neuroprotective properties of lithium is its anti-apoptotic action. Ethanol is a neuroteratogen and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD are caused by maternal ethanol exposure during pregnancy. FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation. Ethanol exposure causes neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Ethanol-induced loss of neurons in the central nervous system underlies many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. Excessive alcohol consumption is also associated with Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and neurodegeneration in the adult brain. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that lithium is able to ameliorate ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. Lithium is an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 which has recently been identified as a mediator of ethanol neurotoxicity. Lithium’s neuroprotection may be mediated by its inhibition of GSK3. In addition, lithium also affects many other signaling proteins and pathways that regulate neuronal survival and differentiation. This review discusses the recent evidence of lithium-mediated protection against ethanol neurotoxicity and potential underlying mechanisms.

  12. Lithium protects ethanol-induced neuronal apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Jin; Yang Xianlin; Yao Weiguo; Lee Weihua

    2006-01-01

    Lithium is widely used for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Recent studies have demonstrated its neuroprotective effect. Ethanol is a potent neurotoxin that is particularly harmful to the developing nervous system. In this study, we evaluated lithium's neuroprotection against ethanol-induced apoptosis. Transient exposure of infant mice to ethanol caused apoptotic cell death in brain, which was prevented significantly by administering a low dose of lithium 15 min later. In cultured cerebellar granule neurons, ethanol-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3/9, both of which were prevented by lithium. However, lithium's protection is not mediated by its commonly known inhibition of glycogen synthase3β, because neither ethanol nor lithium has significant effects on the phosphorylation of Akt (ser473) or GSK3β (ser9). In addition, the selective GSK-3β inhibitor SB-415286 was unable to prevent ethanol-induced apoptosis. These data suggest lithium may be used as a potential preventive measure for ethanol-induced neurological deficits

  13. Photonic time crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Chengen; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Yuting; Zeng, Jing; Song, Runxia

    2017-12-07

    When space (time) translation symmetry is spontaneously broken, the space crystal (time crystal) forms; when permittivity and permeability periodically vary with space (time), the photonic crystal (photonic time crystal) forms. We proposed the concept of photonic time crystal and rewritten the Maxwell's equations. Utilizing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, we simulated electromagnetic wave propagation in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal, the simulation results show that more intensive scatter fields can obtained in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal.

  14. Method of producing p-i-n structures by compensation of lithium ions from both side of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muminov, R.A.; Radjapov, S.A.; Saymbetov, A.K.; Tursunkulov, O.M.; Pindurin, Yu.S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors are needed to solve certain problems in nuclear spectroscopy. The development of efficiency detectors became possible with advances in growing high purify silicon single crystals with the required properties, satisfying the requirements for obtaining detectors based on them. One important requirement for obtaining detectors with sensitive area is that its resistance must be high. This is achieved by using the lithium ion drift process in the volume of the semiconductor detector. Thus it has been developed and created silicon semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors with vide range of diameter of sensitive area up to 100 mm and thickness (from 1mm to 10mm). At present work a new method for producing p-i-n structures was developed to decrease substantially the time required for compensation of silicon by lithium ions and to eliminate at the same time the negative consequences of holding the crystal at a high temperature and under a high voltage. Drift of lithium ions from two ends of prepared samples is conducted to a depth sufficient for the required compensation of the initial acceptor impurity in silicon. The method described above was used to fabricate a batch of Si(Li) detectors with a 1-10 mm thick and 10-110 mm in diameter sensitive region. The thickness of the sensitive region was determined by performing standard measurements and chemical pigmentation. Advantages of detectors are they have improved properties and less time for compensation of lithium ions. (authors)

  15. CRITIC-I: Instrumented lithium oxide irradiation: Part 1, Lithium oxide fabrication and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applegate, D.S.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1987-06-01

    Fine-grained, sinterable lithium oxide powder was prepared by high-temperature vacuum calcination of molten lithium carbonate. The product was ball milled, cold pressed, and fired in an oxygen atmosphere. The fired density, grain size, and surface roughness varied widely with firing schedule. Most variations were attributed to moisture content. Rings of high-density, sintered lithium oxide will be used in an in-reactor experiment to measure tritium release. 2 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. Stemming the obesity epidemic : a tantalizing prospect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J Lennert; Barendregt, Jan J; van Beeck, Ed F; Seidell, Jacob C; Mackenbach, Johan P

    OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a growing problem worldwide, but there are no good methods to assess the future course of the epidemic and the potential influence of interventions. We explore the behavior change needed to stop the obesity epidemic in the U.S. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: We modeled the

  17. Thermochemical investigation of lithium-vanadium bronzes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippova, S.E.; Kesler, Ya.A.; Tret'yakov, Yu.D.; Gordeev, I.V.

    1979-01-01

    A thermochemical investigation was carried out of lithium-vanadium bronzes. The enthalpies of solution and the standard enthalpies of formation of the bronzes β-Lisub(x)Vsub(2)Osub(5) were determined. Investigated was the dependence of the enthalpy of mixing bronzes on the composition; a linear character of the dependence evidences of negligibly small, as compared to the experimental error, energy variations of the matrix V 2 O 5 on introduction of lithium. The variation was calculated of the partial molar enthalpy of lithium in the formation of β-Lisub(x)Vsub(2)Osub(5)

  18. Design of liquid lithium pumps for FMIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkins, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    In the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility, a jet of liquid lithium is bombarded by accelerated deuterons to generate high energy neutrons for materials testing. The lithium system will include two electromagnetic pumps, a 750 gpm main pump and a 10 gpm auxiliary pump. The larger pump was designed and built in 1982, following extensive testing of a similar pump in the Experimental Lithium System. Design of the auxiliary pump has been completed, but fabrication has not started. This paper discusses the design considerations leading to selection of the Annular Linear Induction Pump (ALIP) concept for these applications. Design parameters, fabrication procedures, and results of pump testing are also reviewed

  19. Lithium-ion batteries advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pistoia, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-Ion Batteries features an in-depth description of different lithium-ion applications, including important features such as safety and reliability. This title acquaints readers with the numerous and often consumer-oriented applications of this widespread battery type. Lithium-Ion Batteries also explores the concepts of nanostructured materials, as well as the importance of battery management systems. This handbook is an invaluable resource for electrochemical engineers and battery and fuel cell experts everywhere, from research institutions and universities to a worldwi

  20. Lithium batteries advanced technologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Scrosati, Bruno; Schalkwijk, Walter A van; Hassoun, Jusef

    2013-01-01

    Explains the current state of the science and points the way to technological advances First developed in the late 1980s, lithium-ion batteries now power everything from tablet computers to power tools to electric cars. Despite tremendous progress in the last two decades in the engineering and manufacturing of lithium-ion batteries, they are currently unable to meet the energy and power demands of many new and emerging devices. This book sets the stage for the development of a new generation of higher-energy density, rechargeable lithium-ion batteries by advancing battery chemistry and ident