WorldWideScience

Sample records for lisavad auru mushy

  1. Density of Ni-Cr Alloy in the Mushy State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The density of Ni-Cr alloy in the mushy state has been measured using the modified sessile drop method. The density of Ni-Cr alloy in the mushy state was found to decrease with increasing temperature and Cr concentration in alloy.The molar volume of Ni-Cr alloy in the mushy state therefore increases with increasing the Cr concentration in alloy.The ratio of the difference of density divided by the temperature difference between liquidus and solidus temperatures decreases with increasing Cr concentration. The density of the alloy increased with the precipitation of a solid phase in alloy during the solidification process. The temperature dependence of the density of alloy in the mushy state was not linear but biquadratic.

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of mushy layers induced by external stochastic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Dmitri V; Bashkirtseva, Irina A; Ryashko, Lev B

    2018-02-28

    The time-dependent process of directional crystallization in the presence of a mushy layer is considered with allowance for arbitrary fluctuations in the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity. A nonlinear set of mushy layer equations and boundary conditions is solved analytically when the heat and mass fluxes at the boundary between the mushy layer and liquid phase are induced by turbulent motion in the liquid and, as a result, have the corresponding convective form. Namely, the 'solid phase-mushy layer' and 'mushy layer-liquid phase' phase transition boundaries as well as the solid fraction, temperature and concentration (salinity) distributions are found. If the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity are constant, the analytical solution takes a parametric form. In the more common case when they represent arbitrary functions of time, the analytical solution is given by means of the standard Cauchy problem. The deterministic and stochastic behaviour of the phase transition process is analysed on the basis of the obtained analytical solutions. In the case of stochastic fluctuations in the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity, the phase transition interfaces (mushy layer boundaries) move faster than in the deterministic case. A cumulative effect of these noise contributions is revealed as well. In other words, when the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity fluctuate simultaneously due to the influence of different external processes and phenomena, the phase transition boundaries move even faster. This article is part of the theme issue 'From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.This article is part of the theme issue 'From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  3. Mushy Zone Properties and Castability of Aluminium Foundry Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahle, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The growing application and market share of aluminium castings demand better understanding of the mechanisms of defect formation during casting. Although casting is a cost-effective production route, inadequate reproducibility and quality of the cast structure often restrict the utilization of castings. This doctoral thesis aims to (1) determine how the solidification conditions affect the rheological behaviour in the partially solidified state, (2) to measure how alterations in solidification variables influence castability, and (3) to investigate the relationship between mushy zone rheology and castability. The development of mechanical strength in the mushy zone was measured as a function of chemical composition. Measurements of the dendrite coherency point provided accurate determination of the point where the dendrite network is established. The strength measurements confirm that the dendrites are largely independent and free-floating before dendrite coherency. The point and rate of strength development in the subsequently established interdendritic network strongly depend on the size and morphology of the dendrites and fraction solid. The castability investigation was limited to evaluations of fluidity and feeding. Fluidity measurements showed a complex effect of increased grain refinement. Alterations of the concentration and type of main alloying element gave a direct relationship between mushy zone rheology and fluidity. The range of the operating feeding mechanisms during solidification is directly related to the rheological properties of the mushy zone. 251 refs., 77 refs., 25 tabs.

  4. Structure of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, R.; Huguet, L.; Bergman, M. I.; Labrosse, S.; Alboussiere, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental results on the solidification of ammonium chloride from an aqueous solution, yielding a mushy zone, under hyper-gravity. A commercial centrifuge has been equipped with a slip-ring so that electric power, temperature and ultrasonic signals could be transmitted between the experimental setup and the laboratory. A Peltier element provides cooling at the bottom of the cell. Probes monitor the temperature along the height of the cell. Ultrasound measurements (2 to 6 MHz) is used to detect the position of the front of the mushy zone and to determine attenuation in the mush. A significant increase of solid fraction (or decrease of mushy layer thickness) and attenuation in the mush is observed as gravity is increased. Kinetic undercooling is significant in our experiments and has been included in a macroscopic mush model. The other ingredients of the model are conservation of energy and chemical species, along with heat/species transfer between the mush and the liquid phase: boundary-layer exchanges at the top of the mush and bulk convection within the mush (formation of chimneys). The outputs of the model compare well with our experiments. We have then run the model in a range of parameters suitable for the Earth's inner core, which has shown the role of bulk mush convection for the inner core and the reason why a solid fraction very close to unity should be expected. We have also run melting experiments: after crystallization of a mush, the liquid has been heated from above until the mush started to melt, while the bottom cold temperature was maintained. These melting experiments were motivated by the possible local melting at the inner core boundary that has been invoked to explain the formation of the anomalously slow F-layer at the bottom of the outer core or inner core hemispherical asymmetry. Oddly, the consequences of melting are an increase in solid fraction and a decrease in attenuation. It is hence possible that surface seismic velocity

  5. Solute redistribution and Rayleigh number in the mushy zone during directional solidifi cation of Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ling

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The interdendritic segregation along the mushy zone of directionally solidifi ed superalloy Inconel 718 has been measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersion analysis spectrometry (EDAXtechniques and the corresponding liquid composition profile was presented. The liquid density and Rayleigh number (Ra profi les along the mushy zone were calculated as well. It was found that the liquid density difference increased from top to bottom in the mushy zone and there was no density inversion due to the segregation of Nb and Mo. However carbide formation in the freezing range and the preferred angle of the orientated dendrite array could prompt the fl uid fl ow in the mushy zone although there was no liquid density inversion. The largest relative Rayleigh number appeared at 1,326 篊 for Inconel 718 where the fl uid fl ow most easily occurred.

  6. Finite bandwidth, nonlinear convective flow in a mushy layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riahi, D N, E-mail: daniel.riahi@utrgv.edu [School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, One West University Boulevard, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Finite amplitude convection with a continuous finite bandwidth of modes in a horizontal mushy layer during the solidification of binary alloys is investigated. We analyze the nonlinear convection for values of the Rayleigh number close to its critical value by using multiple scales and perturbation techniques. Applying a combined temporal and spatial evolution approach, we determine a set of three coupled differential equations for the amplitude functions of the convective modes. A large number of new subcritical or supercritical stable solutions to these equations in the form of steady rolls and hexagons with different horizontal length scales are detected. We find, in particular, that depending on the parameter values and on the magnitude and direction of the wave number vectors for the amplitude functions, hexagons with down-flow or up-flow at the cells’ centers or rolls can be stable. Rolls or hexagons with longer horizontal wave length can be stable at higher amplitudes, and there are cases where hexagons are unstable for any value of the Rayleigh number, while rolls are stable only for the values of the Rayleigh number beyond some value. We also detected new stable and irregular flow patterns with two different horizontal scales in the form of superposition of either two sets of hexagons or two sets of inclined rolls. (paper)

  7. Use of the Niyama criterion to predict porosity of the mushy zone with deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Polyakov

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents new results on the use of the Niyama criterion to estimate porosity appearance in castings under hindered shrinkage. The effect of deformation of the mushy zone on filtration is shown. A new form of the Niyama criterion accounting for the hindered shrinkage and the range of deformation localization has been obtained. The results of this study are illustrated by the examp le of the Niyama criterion calculated for Al-Cu alloys under different diffusion conditions of solidification and rate of deformation in the mushy zone. Derived equations can be used in a mathematical model of the casting solidification as well as for interpretation of the simulation results of casting solidification under hindered shrinkage. The presented study resulted in a new procedure of using the Niyama criterion under mushy zone deformation.

  8. Seismological evidence for a localized mushy zone at the Earth?s inner core boundary

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Dongdong; Wen, Lianxing

    2017-01-01

    Although existence of a mushy zone in the Earth?s inner core has been hypothesized several decades ago, no seismic evidence has ever been reported. Based on waveform modeling of seismic compressional waves that are reflected off the Earth?s inner core boundary, here we present seismic evidence for a localized 4?8?km thick zone across the inner core boundary beneath southwest Okhotsk Sea with seismic properties intermediate between those of the inner and outer core and of a mushy zone. Such a ...

  9. Global conservation model for a mushy region over a moving substrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselica, Juraj; Šimkanin, Ján

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 276, March (2018), s. 60-67 ISSN 0031-9201 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : solidification * binary alloy * mushy region * global conservation * boundary-layer flow Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.075, year: 2016

  10. Global conservation model for a mushy region over a moving substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyselica, J.; Šimkanin, J.

    2018-03-01

    We study solidification over a cool substrate moving with a relative velocity with respect to the rest of the fluid. A mathematical model based on global conservation of solute is presented. The explicit solutions of the governing equations are found and analysed via the asymptotic methods. The assessment of how the boundary-layer flow influences the physical characteristics of the mushy region is given, together with the discussion of a possible connection with the solidification at the inner core boundary.

  11. Analytical solutions of mushy layer equations describing directional solidification in the presence of nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Dmitri V.; Ivanov, Alexander A.; Alexandrova, Irina V.

    2018-01-01

    The processes of particle nucleation and their evolution in a moving metastable layer of phase transition (supercooled liquid or supersaturated solution) are studied analytically. The transient integro-differential model for the density distribution function and metastability level is solved for the kinetic and diffusionally controlled regimes of crystal growth. The Weber-Volmer-Frenkel-Zel'dovich and Meirs mechanisms for nucleation kinetics are used. We demonstrate that the phase transition boundary lying between the mushy and pure liquid layers evolves with time according to the following power dynamic law: , where Z1(t)=βt7/2 and Z1(t)=βt2 in cases of kinetic and diffusionally controlled scenarios. The growth rate parameters α, β and ε are determined analytically. We show that the phase transition interface in the presence of crystal nucleation and evolution propagates slower than in the absence of their nucleation. This article is part of the theme issue `From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.

  12. Massive Formation of Equiaxed Crystals by Avalanches of Mushy Zone Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, A.; Stefan-Kharicha, M.; Kharicha, A.; Wu, M.

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that the growth and motion of equiaxed crystals govern important microstructural features, especially in larger castings such as heavy ingots. To determine the origin of the equiaxed crystals, heterogeneous nucleation, and/or fragmentation of dendrite arms from columnar regions are often discussed. In the present study, we demonstrate that under certain conditions relatively large areas of mushy regions slide downward and form spectacular crystal avalanches. These avalanches crumble into thousands of dendritic fragments, whereby the larger fragments immediately sediment and the smaller proceed to behave as equiaxed crystals. Traces of such crystal avalanches can be seen by conspicuous equiaxed layers in the lower part of the casting. From the arguments in the discussion, it is believed that such a phenomenon may occur in alloys which reveal an upward solutal buoyancy in the interdendritic mush. This would include certain steels and other alloys such as Cu-Al, Pb-Sn, or Ni-Al-alloys. Moreover, the occurrence of crystal avalanches contribute to the formation of V-segregations.

  13. Effect of homogeneity of particle distribution on tensile crack propagation in mushy state rolled in situ Al–4.5Cu–5TiB2 particulate composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, A.; Siddhalingeshwar, I.G.; Mitra, R.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of mushy state rolling with 20 vol% liquid at 626 °C for 5% thickness reduction per pass on homogeneity of TiB 2 and CuAl 2 particle distribution in the in situ Al–4.5Cu–5TiB 2 composite has been examined. These particles, appearing as segregated at grain boundaries in the as-cast composite, are redistributed on mushy state rolling. The homogeneity of particle distribution has been quantitatively evaluated by developing a computer program for multi-scalar analysis of area-fractions in scanning electron microscope (SEM) images to estimate homogeneous length scales. The optimum homogeneity is found in the composite subjected to two mushy state roll passes. The matrix microhardness increases with decrease in the homogeneous length scale. In situ tensile straining experiments inside SEM have shown linkage of particle–matrix interfacial microcracks at particle-clusters as fracture mechanism in as-cast or 4-pass mushy state rolled composites. In contrast, crack propagation through matrix is favored in the 2-pass mushy state rolled composite

  14. Modeling of macrosegregation caused by volumetric deformation in a coherent mushy zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolli, Lilia C.; Mo, Asbjørn; M'hamdi, Mohammed

    2005-02-01

    A two-phase volume-averaged continuum model is presented that quantifies macrosegregation formation during solidification of metallic alloys caused by deformation of the dendritic network and associated melt flow in the coherent part of the mushy zone. Also, the macrosegregation formation associated with the solidification shrinkage (inverse segregation) is taken into account. Based on experimental evidence established elsewhere, volumetric viscoplastic deformation (densification/dilatation) of the coherent dendritic network is included in the model. While the thermomechanical model previously outlined (M. M’Hamdi, A. Mo, and C.L. Martin: Metall. Mater. Trans. A, 2002, vol. 33A, pp. 2081-93) has been used to calculate the temperature and velocity fields associated with the thermally induced deformations and shrinkage driven melt flow, the solute conservation equation including both the liquid and a solid volume-averaged velocity is solved in the present study. In modeling examples, the macrosegregation formation caused by mechanically imposed as well as by thermally induced deformations has been calculated. The modeling results for an Al-4 wt pct Cu alloy indicate that even quite small volumetric strains (≈2 pct), which can be associated with thermally induced deformations, can lead to a macroscopic composition variation in the final casting comparable to that resulting from the solidification shrinkage induced melt flow. These results can be explained by the relatively large volumetric viscoplastic deformation in the coherent mush resulting from the applied constitutive model, as well as the relatively large difference in composition for the studied Al-Cu alloy in the solid and liquid phases at high solid fractions at which the deformation takes place.

  15. Structure of a mushy layer under hypergravity with implications for Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Alboussière, Thierry; Bergman, Michael I.; Deguen, Renaud; Labrosse, Stéphane; Lesœur, Germain

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization experiments in the dendritic regime have been carried out in hypergravity conditions (from 1 to 1300 g) from an ammonium chloride solution (NH4Cl and H2O). A commercial centrifuge was equipped with a slip ring so that electric power (needed for a Peltier device and a heating element), temperature and ultrasonic signals could be transmitted between the experimental setup and the laboratory. Ultrasound measurements (2-6 MHz) were used to detect the position of the front of the mushy zone and to determine attenuation in the mush. Temperature measurements were used to control a Peltier element extracting heat from the bottom of the setup and to monitor the evolution of crystallization in the mush and in the liquid. A significant increase of solid fraction and attenuation in the mush is observed as gravity is increased. Kinetic undercooling is significant in our experiments and has been included in a macroscopic mush model. The other ingredients of the model are conservation of energy and chemical species, along with heat/species transfer between the mush and the liquid phase: boundary-layer exchanges at the top of the mush and bulk convection within the mush (formation of chimneys). The outputs of the model compare well with our experiments. We have then run the model in a range of parameters suitable for the Earth's inner core. This has shown the role of bulk mush convection for the inner core and the reason why a solid fraction very close to unity should be expected. We have also run melting experiments: after crystallization of a mush, the liquid has been heated from above until the mush started to melt, while the bottom cold temperature was maintained. These melting experiments were motivated by the possible local melting at the inner core boundary that has been invoked to explain the formation of the anomalously slow F-layer at the bottom of the outer core or inner core hemispherical asymmetry. Oddly, the consequences of melting are an increase in

  16. Effect of mushy state rolling on age-hardening and tensile behavior of Al-4.5Cu alloy and in situ Al-4.5Cu-5TiB2 composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddhalingeshwar, I.G.; Herbert, M.A.; Chakraborty, M.; Mitra, R.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Mushy state rolling of composites reduces peak-aging times to ∼7.5-10% of that of as-cast alloy. → Uniform Cu atom distribution achieved in matrices by mushy state rolling enhances aging kinetics. → Uniform precipitate distribution obtained by mushy state rolling leads to higher microhardness. → Peak-age tensile strength and strain hardening rates are found to increase on mushy state rolling. - Abstract: The effect of mushy state rolling on aging kinetics of stir-cast Al-4.5Cu alloy and in situ Al-4.5Cu-5TiB 2 composite and their tensile behavior in solution-treated (495 deg. C) or differently aged (170 deg. C) conditions, has been investigated. As-cast or pre-hot rolled alloy and composite samples were subjected to single or multiple mushy state roll passes to 5% thickness reduction at temperatures for 20% liquid content. Peak-aging times of mushy state rolled composite matrices have been found as ∼7.5-10% of that of as-cast alloy. Such enhancement in aging kinetics is attributed to homogeneity in Cu atom distribution as well as increase in matrix dislocation density due to thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Al and TiB 2 , matrix grain refinement and particle redistribution, achieved by mushy state rolling. Uniform precipitate distribution in mushy state rolled composite matrices leads to greater peak-age microhardness with higher yield and ultimate tensile strengths than those in as-cast alloy and composite.

  17. Pisiplastika ajab välja auru ja maitseb magus / Raimu Hanson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hanson, Raimu, 1957-

    2008-01-01

    Margus Meinarti maalide näitus "Aru anne" ja Eesti pisiplastika näitus (koostaja Anne Rudanovski) Tartu Kunstimajas. Pisiplastika väljapanekul eksponeeriti Simson von Seakyli, Janet Varinurme, Jevgeni Zolotko ja Kaie Pungase jt. töid

  18. Making mushy magma chambers in the lower continental crust: Cold storage and compositional bimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew; Blundy, Jon; Sparks, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Increasing geological and geophysical evidence suggests that crustal magma reservoirs are normally low melt fraction 'mushes' rather than high melt fraction 'magma chambers'. Yet high melt fractions must form within these mush reservoirs to explain the observed flow and eruption of low crystallinity magmas. In many models, crystallinity is linked directly to temperature, with higher temperature corresponding to lower crystallinity (higher melt fraction). However, increasing temperature yields less evolved (silicic) melt composition for a given starting material. If mobile, low crystallinity magmas require high temperature, it is difficult to explain how they can have evolved composition. Here we use numerical modelling to show that reactive melt flow in a porous and permeable mush reservoir formed by the intrusion of numerous basaltic sills into the lower continental crust produces magma in high melt fraction (> 0.5) layers akin to conventional magma chambers. These magma-chamber-like layers contain evolved (silicic) melt compositions and form at low (close to solidus) temperatures near the top of the mush reservoir. Evolved magma is therefore kept in 'cold storage' at low temperature, but also at low crystallinity so the magma is mobile and can leave the mush reservoir. Buoyancy-driven reactive flow and accumulation of melt in the mush reservoir controls the temperature and composition of magma that can leave the reservoir. The modelling also shows that processes in lower crustal mush reservoirs produce mobile magmas that contain melt of either silicic or mafic composition. Intermediate melt compositions are present but are not within mobile magmas. Silicic melt compositions are found at high melt fraction within the magma-chamber like layers near the top of the mush reservoir. Mafic melt compositions are found at high melt fraction within the cooling sills. Melt elsewhere in the reservoir has intermediate composition, but remains trapped in the reservoir because the local melt fraction is too low to form a mobile magma. The model results are consistent with geochemical data suggesting that lower crustal magma reservoirs supply silicic and mafic melts to arc volcanoes, but intermediate magmas are formed by mixing in shallower reservoirs. We suggest here that lower crustal magma chambers primarily form in response to changes in bulk composition caused by melt migration and chemical reaction in a mush reservoir. This process is different to the conventional and widely applied models of magma chamber formation. Similar processes are likely to operate in shallow mush reservoirs, but will likely be further complicated by the presence of volatile phases, and mixing of different melt compositions sourced from deeper mush reservoirs.

  19. Phase selection in the mushy-zone: LODESTARS and ELFSTONE projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matson, D M; Hyers, R W; Volkmann, T; Fecht, H-J

    2011-01-01

    In a collaboration sponsored by ESA and NASA, international partners have developed a work plan to successfully address key issues relating to understanding the role of convection on alloy phase selection for commercially important structural alloys using the MSL-EML facility aboard the International Space Station. The approach is two-pronged. First, ground and space-based experiments will develop a baseline database to anchor subsequent modelling predictions. Tasks include sample preparation and verification, ground-based transformation evaluation, space-based experiments, and thermophysical property evaluation to support modelling activities. Second, modelling and theoretical analysis tasks will lead to a new understanding of the role of convection in phase selection for this class of materials. These models will allow prediction and control of microstructural evolution during solidification processing. Tasks include modelling of macroconvection induced by the EM levitation field, modelling of microconvection within the dendrite array, nucleation modelling, and modelling of the transformation kinetics specific to each alloy system. This paper outlines how two NASA-sponsored projects relate to the goals of the international collaboration.

  20. Phase selection in the mushy-zone: LODESTARS and ELFSTONE projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, D. M.; Hyers, R. W.; Volkmann, T.; Fecht, H.-J.

    2011-12-01

    In a collaboration sponsored by ESA and NASA, international partners have developed a work plan to successfully address key issues relating to understanding the role of convection on alloy phase selection for commercially important structural alloys using the MSL-EML facility aboard the International Space Station. The approach is two-pronged. First, ground and space-based experiments will develop a baseline database to anchor subsequent modelling predictions. Tasks include sample preparation and verification, ground-based transformation evaluation, space-based experiments, and thermophysical property evaluation to support modelling activities. Second, modelling and theoretical analysis tasks will lead to a new understanding of the role of convection in phase selection for this class of materials. These models will allow prediction and control of microstructural evolution during solidification processing. Tasks include modelling of macroconvection induced by the EM levitation field, modelling of microconvection within the dendrite array, nucleation modelling, and modelling of the transformation kinetics specific to each alloy system. This paper outlines how two NASA-sponsored projects relate to the goals of the international collaboration.

  1. Tanggapan Terhadap Kami No Shiten dan Mushi No Shiten No Gengo Bunka dari Prof. Someya Yoshimichi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheddy N. Tjandra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a preliminary study about Japanese conception of the world’s language and culture. Prof. Someya Yoshimichi, emeritus professor from Shizuoka Unversity Japan, in an international conferene on Japanese studies held at Universitas Nasional Jakarta on February 2012, has pointed out that the present world’s language and culture can be divided into two categories. One is God’s Language and Culture, and the other is Insect’s Language a Culture. According to him, the God’s Language and Culture is mainly from European and American (Europe, and the Insect’s Laguage and Culture is mainly from Asian especially from Japan and South-east Asia. The writer does not understand why the Japanese takes God and Insect as a pair of contrastive culture. Therefore, the writer collected data from Indonesian indigenous culture, mainly from public beliefs and religions to argue about the Japanese pair of contrastive culture.  This writing uses qualitative interpretation method (hermeneutics and a method of descriptive analysis to understand Indonesian data, and to present the results of interpretation. For previous studies, the writer took the Japanese and Chinese In-yooron to check the realities of Japanese conception, and also took hipernym and hyponym theory from semantics to check the contrastive meaning of the word God and Insect. In short, the writer sees that God and Insect are not an antonym, and also have no contrastive meaning in any sense of semantics and logics.  

  2. The Parastatal Sector in Tanzania: Fiscal Impact, 1984-1995 | Mushi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings tend to provide a further justification on the action taken by the government to either privatize the solvent commercial firms or liquidate the insolvent ones or restructure and rationalize the quasi-government firms. It is concluded that the pace of closing the parastatals has to be expedited to avoid further depletion ...

  3. The Thickness of the Mushy Layer on the Floor of the Skaergaard Magma Chamber at Apatite Saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holness, Marian B.; Tegner, Christian; Nielsen, Troels F. D.

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel way of constraining the thickness of the crystal mush in fractionated layered intrusions using detailed microstructural analysis. The results are combined with geochemical data to create a snapshot of the crystal mush on the floor of the Skaergaard magma chamber in the period i...

  4. Kolmest Tallinna Ülikooli Humboldti stipendiaadist / Tiina Tamkivi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tamkivi, Tiina

    2014-01-01

    Tallinna Ülikooli külastas jaanuaris teadlasi toetava fondi Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung president ja Berliini Tehnikaülikooli keemiaprofessor Helmut Schwarz. Tallinna Ülikoolist on Humboldti stipendiumi pälvinud kolm teadlast - professor Peeter Järvelaid, ajaloolane Juhan Kreem ja kunstiajaloolane Kersti Markus, kes lisavad artiklis ka omapoolsed selgitused

  5. Betoonkamakas rannamändide vahel / Urmas Oja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Oja, Urmas, 1981-2012

    2006-01-01

    Omapäraselt karm, ent loodusega kontakti otsiv luksuslik betoonist rannavilla Tallinna lähedal asuvas eramurajoonis. Villale lisavad läbipaistvust nurgapostideta nurgaaknad. Projekteerija: OÜ Eensalu & Pihel. Arhitektid Laur Pihel ja Tauno Aadma. Sisearhitekt Jaak Jõevee. Projekt 2004, valmis 2006. Ill.: I ja II korruse plaan, 4 värv. välis- ja 8 sisevaadet

  6. Viga võib tekitada liigse süükoorma / Piret Bristol

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Bristol, Piret, 1961-

    2006-01-01

    Õppivas organisatsioonis ei peaks ruumi olema õpitud abitusel, süüdistamisel ja häbistamisel. Vt. samas: Eksinud ja murest murtud töökaaslasel saab aidata auru välja lasta; Tänitamine tekitab tõrke; Õpitud optimism lubab eksida

  7. Baby Poop: What's Normal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I'm breast-feeding my newborn and her bowel movements are yellow and mushy. Is this normal for baby poop? Answers from Jay L. Hoecker, M.D. Yellow, mushy bowel movements are perfectly normal for breast-fed babies. Still, ...

  8. Term majas - kes võiks arvata / Marta Tamm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tamm, Marta

    2007-01-01

    Tüüpmaja uuselamurajoonis Tartu maantee ääres, mille sisearhitekt on Ville Lausmäe ja kus pearõhk on avatusel ning kodu südameks on auru- ja leilisaunaga hiiglaslik vannituba. Suur osa mööblist on valmistatud spetsiaalselt maja mõõtude järgi ja elutoa diivanid on Pascal Mourgue disainitud. Põhiplaan

  9. AuRu/meso-Mn2O3: A Highly Active and Stable Catalyst for Methane Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z.; Fang, J. Y.; Xie, S. H.; Deng, J. G.; Liu, Y. X.; Dai, H. X.

    2018-05-01

    Three-dimensionally ordered mesoporous Mn2O3 (meso-Mn2O3) and its supported Au, Ru, and AuRu alloy (0.49 wt% Au/meso-Mn2O3, 0.48 wt% Ru/meso-Mn2O3, and 0.97 wt% AuRu/meso-Mn2O3 (Au/Ru molar ratio = 0.98)) nanocatalysts were prepared using the KIT-6-templating and polyvinyl alcohol-protected reduction methods, respectively. Physicochemical properties of the samples were characterized by means of numerous techniques, and their catalytic activities were evaluated for the combustion of methane. It is found that among all of the samples, 0.48 wt% Ru/meso-Mn 2O3 and 0.97 wt% AuRu/meso-Mn2O3 performed the best (the reaction temperature (T90% ) at 90% methane conversion was 530-540°C), but the latter showed a better thermal stability than the former. The partial deactivation of 0.97 wt% AuRu/meso-Mn2O3 due to H2O or CO2 introduction was reversible. It is concluded that the good catalytic activity and thermal stability of 0.97 wt% AuRu/meso-Mn2O3 was associated with the high dispersion of AuRu alloy NPs (2-5 nm) on the surface of meso-Mn2O3 and good low-temperature reducibility.

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 204 ... ... note on the distribution and relative importance of bean Bruchid species Aconthoscelides obtectus (Say.) ... DE Mushi, LA Mtenga, LO Eik ... MC Kalumuna, ST Ikerra, GJ Ley, B Kiwambo, JA Kamasho, RR Weil.

  11. A dendritic solidification experiment under large gravity - implications for the Earth's inner core solidification regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, R.; Alboussière, T.; Brito, D.; La Rizza, P.; Masson, J.

    2009-05-01

    The Earth's inner core solidification regime is usually thought to be dendritic, which should results in the formation of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary, possibly extending deep in the inner core. The release of latent heat and solute associated with crystallization provides an important boyancy source to drive thermo- chemical convection in the core. In the laboratory, two modes of convection associated with the crystallization of mushy layers have been observed. One is a boundary layer mode originating from the destabilisation of the chemical boundary layer present at the mush-liquid interface; the second is the so-called 'mushy layer mode' which involves the whole mushy layer. In the mushy layer mode, convection usually takes the form of narrow plumes rising through crystal free conduits called chimneys. One particularity of inner core crystallization is its extremely small solidification rate compared to typical outer core convective timescales. We have designed and build an experiment devoted to the study of crystallization under a large gravity field, using a centrifuge, of an aqueous solution of ammonium chloride, which is a good analogue to metallic alloys. The large gravity field allows to reach Rayleigh numbers much larger than in typical solidification experiments. Under large gravity fields, we observe the disappearance of chimney convection and show that the large gravity field promotes the boundary layer convection mode at the expent of the mushy layer mode. As the gravitationnal forcing is increased, convective heat and solute transport are significantly enhanced, which results in larger solid fraction directly below the mush-liquid interface. The increase in solid fraction results in a dramatic decrease of the permeability in the mushy layer, which eventually becomes subcritical in respect to the mushy layer mode. Because of the very slow solidification rate of the inner core, convective transport of heat and solute from the ICB is

  12. Steady-state solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppin, S. S. L.; Huppert, Herbert E.; Worster, M. Grae

    We report on a series of experiments in which a Hele-Shaw cell containing aqueous solutions of NH4Cl was translated at prescribed rates through a steady temperature gradient. The salt formed the primary solid phase of a mushy layer as the solution solidified, with the salt-depleted residual fluid driving buoyancy-driven convection and the development of chimneys in the mushy layer. Depending on the operating conditions, several morphological transitions occurred. A regime diagram is presented quantifying these transitions as a function of freezing rate and the initial concentration of the solution. In general, for a given concentration, increasing the freezing rate caused the steady-state system to change from a convecting mushy layer with chimneys to a non-convecting mushy layer below a relatively quiescent liquid, and then to a much thinner mushy layer separated from the liquid by a region of active secondary nucleation. At higher initial concentrations the second of these states did not occur. At lower concentrations, but still above the eutectic, the mushy layer disappeared. A simple mathematical model of the system is developed which compares well with the experimental measurements of the intermediate, non-convecting state and serves as a benchmark against which to understand some of the effects of convection. Movies are available with the online version of the paper.

  13. Crystal phase-based epitaxial growth of hybrid noble metal nanostructures on 4H/fcc Au nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qipeng; Wang, An-Liang; Gong, Yue; Hao, Wei; Cheng, Hongfei; Chen, Junze; Li, Bing; Yang, Nailiang; Niu, Wenxin; Wang, Jie; Yu, Yifu; Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Ye; Fan, Zhanxi; Wu, Xue-Jun; Chen, Jinping; Luo, Jun; Li, Shuzhou; Gu, Lin; Zhang, Hua

    2018-03-01

    Crystal-phase engineering offers opportunities for the rational design and synthesis of noble metal nanomaterials with unusual crystal phases that normally do not exist in bulk materials. However, it remains a challenge to use these materials as seeds to construct heterometallic nanostructures with desired crystal phases and morphologies for promising applications such as catalysis. Here, we report a strategy for the synthesis of binary and ternary hybrid noble metal nanostructures. Our synthesized crystal-phase heterostructured 4H/fcc Au nanowires enable the epitaxial growth of Ru nanorods on the 4H phase and fcc-twin boundary in Au nanowires, resulting in hybrid Au-Ru nanowires. Moreover, the method can be extended to the epitaxial growth of Rh, Ru-Rh and Ru-Pt nanorods on the 4H/fcc Au nanowires to form unique hybrid nanowires. Importantly, the Au-Ru hybrid nanowires with tunable compositions exhibit excellent electrocatalytic performance towards the hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline media.

  14. Heat transfer and fluid flow during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel

    CERN Document Server

    He, X; Debroy, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and velocity fields during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel was studied using a transient, heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the weld pool. The weld pool geometry, weld thermal cycles and various solidification parameters were calculated. The fusion zone geometry, calculated from the transient heat transfer and fluid flow model, was in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values for various welding conditions. Dimensional analysis was used to understand the importance of heat transfer by conduction and convection and the roles of various driving forces for convection in the weld pool. During solidification, the mushy zone grew at a rapid rate and the maximum size of the mushy zone was reached when the pure liquid region vanished. The solidification rate of the mushy zone/liquid interface was shown to increase while the temperature gradient in the liquid zone at...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1817 - U.S. No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Unhealed skin breaks; and, (3) Wormy fruit. (c) Free from serious damage caused by: (1) Ammoniation; (2...; (8) Dryness or mushy condition; (9) Green spots; (10) Hail; (11) Insects; (12) Oil spots; (13) Scab; (14) Scale; (15) Scars; (16) Skin breakdown; (17) Sprayburn; (18) Sunburn; and (19) Other means. (d...

  16. 7 CFR 51.1812 - U.S. No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... well colored; (3) Firm; (4) Mature; and, (5) Well formed. (b) Free from: (1) Decay; (2) Unhealed skin... mushy condition; (9) Green spots; (10) Hail; (11) Insects; (12) Oil spots; (13) Scab; (14) Scale; (15) Scars; (16) Skin breakdown; (17) Sprayburn; (18) Sunburn; and (19) Other means. (d) For tolerances see...

  17. Ice-­Ocean Thermodynamic Interface and Small-­Scale Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Adrian K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-02

    This presentation discusses: (1) Stefan condition, (2) lower boundary condition of mushy layers, (3) salt flux to ocean from gravity drainage, (4) distribution of salt flux in the ocean, (5) under ice melt ponds and false bottoms, and (6) basal ablation.

  18. Modelling of convection during solidification of metal and alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    material parameters on double-diffusive convection is illustrated through comparative study of ... In the majority of the cases, the transition from liquid to solid takes place in the ... The role of mush model on macrosegregation is examined through ..... flow field through the resistance of the mushy phase only. The specific role ...

  19. Effect of Feeder Configuration on the Microstructure of Ductile Cast Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Smith, Nikolaj Kjelgaard; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2014-01-01

    influence the soundness of different sections of the castings. Moreover, the microstructural changes due to variations in thermal gradients are classified, and the variations in the mushy zone described. The paper discusses how solidification and segregation influence porosity and microstructure of ductile...

  20. Veni, vidi, vici : üheksa intervjuud tulevaste infotöötajatega / interv. Sirje Virkus, inglise keelest tõlkinud Tiina Vilberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Tallinna Ülikoolis Euroopa Liidu Erasmus Munduse magistriõppeprogrammis "Digitaalraamatukoguõpe" osalenud välisüliõpilastest andsid intervjuu Eric Boamah Ghanast, Doreen Kerubo Mageto Kenyast, Besim Kokollari Kosovost, Tsigereda Asfaw Demisse Etioopiast, Reuben Mushi Tansaaniast, Sithong Sikhao Laosest, Liliana M. Melgar Estrada Colombiast, Getaneh Agegn Alemu Etioopiast, Katherine Jane Howard Austaaliast

  1. AFRREV STECH

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    making transport and landuse plans, it is thought more revealing to internalise ... Badag ry. Oshodi/I solo. Lagos. Mainland. Eti-. Osa. Lag os. Isla nd. Apa pa. Mushi n ... 3: Graph representation of road network with travel time values. It was not ...

  2. Notes on the ecology and status of some forest mammals in four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Notes on the ecology and status of some forest mammals in four Eastern Arc Mountains, Tanzania. Norbert J Cordeiro, Nathalie Seddon, David R Capper, Jonathan MM Ekstrom, Kim M Howell, Isabel S Isherwood, Charles AM Msuya, Jonas T Mushi, Andrew W Perkin, Robert G Pople, William T Stanley ...

  3. Planning a Family: Priorities and Concerns in Rural Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Planning a Family: Priorities and Concerns in Rural Tanzania. T Marchant, AK Mushi, R Nathan, O Mukasa, S Abdulla, C Lengeler, JRM Armstrong Schellenberg. Abstract. A fertility survey using qualitative and quantitative techniques described a high fertility setting (TFR 5.8) in southern Tanzania where family planning use ...

  4. Effects of impurities on hydrogen permeability through palladium alloy membrane at comparatively high pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Konishi, Satoshi; Katsuta, Hiroji; Naruse, Yuji

    1982-02-01

    Palladium alloy membrane method is considered to be a useful technique for fusion reactor fuel purification process. To study the feasibility of this method, the effects of impurities on permeation characteristics of palladium alloy membrane were examined. Experiments were carried out at practical conditions: pressure; 120 - 1200 kPa, temperature; about 700 K. No poisoning effect on hydrogen permeability of commercial Pd-Ag (Au.Ru) alloy was observed for impurities such as NH 3 , CH 4 , CO, CO 2 , O 2 and N 2 , which were mixed with hyper-pure H 2 at low concentration level (10 - 10000 ppm). Deterioration occurred by contamination with oil vapor. However, regeneration of the membrane was easily performed by air baking followed by hydrogen reduction. Chemical reactions in the permeation cell were also examined. (author)

  5. Antibacterial screening of traditional herbal plants and standard antibiotics against some human bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Uzma Azeem; Andleeb, Saiqa; Kiyani, Ayesha; Zafar, Atiya; Shafique, Irsa; Riaz, Nazia; Azhar, Muhammad Tehseen; Uddin, Hafeez

    2013-11-01

    Chloroformic and isoamyl alcohol extracts of Cinnnamomum zylanicum, Cuminum cyminum, Curcuma long Linn, Trachyspermum ammi and selected standard antibiotics were investigated for their in vitro antibacterial activity against six human bacterial pathogens. The antibacterial activity was evaluated and based on the zone of inhibition using agar disc diffusion method. The tested bacterial strains were Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aurues, Serratia marcesnces, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin showed highly significant action against K. pneumonia and S. epidermidis while Ampicillin and Amoxicillin indicated lowest antibacterial activity against tested pathogens. Among the plants chloroform and isoamyl alcohol extracts of C. cyminum, S. aromaticum and C. long Linn had significant effect against P. aeruginosa, S. marcesnces and S. pyogenes. Comparison of antibacterial activity of medicinal herbs and standard antibiotics was also recorded via activity index. Used medicinal plants have various phytochemicals which reasonably justify their use as antibacterial agent.

  6. A computational/directional solidification method to establish saddle points on the Mg-Al-Ca liquidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Hongbo; Zhang Chuan; Zhu Jun; Cao Guoping; Kou Sindo; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer; Chang, Y. Austin

    2008-01-01

    We established two saddle point maxima, L + α(Mg) + C14 and L + α(Mg) + C36, on the monovariant liquidus, calculated from a previously presented thermodynamic description, by characterizing the microstructures of several directionally solidified alloys in the near-solidification front zone, the mushy zone, and the steady-state zone using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

  7. Truncated Dual-Cap Nucleation Site Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Douglas M.; Sander, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    During heterogeneous nucleation within a metastable mushy-zone, several geometries for nucleation site development must be considered. Traditional spherical dual cap and crevice models are compared to a truncated dual cap to determine the activation energy and critical cluster growth kinetics in ternary Fe-Cr-Ni steel alloys. Results of activation energy results indicate that nucleation is more probable at grain boundaries within the solid than at the solid-liquid interface.

  8. Numerical analysis of the fusion of nuclear combustible rods under LOCA - type accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idelsohn, S.R.; Crivelli, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the melting of combustible rods is of great importance for the safety analysis of nuclear reactors. Due to the special characteristics of the problem, a sharp interface between the solid and liquid region does not exist, but appears a 'mushy' region in which the material is partially melted. The Finite Element Method is employed here, together with a regularized enthalpy formulation. Finally, the results obtained are presented and discussed. (Author) [pt

  9. Microstructure and thermoelectric properties of doped p-type CoSb3 under TGZM effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongqiang; Li, Shuangming; Li, Xin; Zhong, Hong

    2017-05-01

    The Co-96.9 wt% Sb hypoeutectic alloy doped by 0.12 wt% YbFe was solidified in a Bridgman-type furnace based on temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM) effect. A mushy zone was observed between the complete liquid zone and the solid zone at different thermal stabilization time ranging from 15 min to 40 h. The mushy-zone solidified microstructures of the alloy only consist of CoSb3 and Sb phase. After 40 h thermal stabilization time, the volume fraction of CoSb3 in the mushy zone increases significantly up to 99.6% close to the solid-liquid interface. The hardness and fracture toughness of doped CoSb3 can reach 7.01 ± 0.69 GPa and 0.78 ± 0.08 MPa·m1/2, respectively. Meanwhile, the thermoelectric properties of the alloy were measured ranging from room temperature (RT) to 850 K. The Seebeck coefficient of the specimen prepared by TGZM effect after 40 h could reach 155 μV/K and the ZT value is 0.47 at 660 K, showing that it is feasible to prepare CoSb3 bulk material via TGZM effect. As a simple and one-step solidification method, the TGZM technique could be applied in the preparation of skutterudite compounds.

  10. Mathematical Analysis of the Solidification Behavior of Plain Steel Based on Solute- and Heat-Transfer Equations in the Liquid-Solid Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Toshio; Takeshita, Kunimasa; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2018-04-01

    An analytical approximate solution to non-linear solute- and heat-transfer equations in the unsteady-state mushy zone of Fe-C plain steel has been obtained, assuming a linear relationship between the solid fraction and the temperature of the mushy zone. The heat transfer equations for both the solid and liquid zone along with the boundary conditions have been linked with the equations to solve the whole equations. The model predictions ( e.g., the solidification constants and the effective partition ratio) agree with the generally accepted values and with a separately performed numerical analysis. The solidus temperature predicted by the model is in the intermediate range of the reported formulas. The model and Neuman's solution are consistent in the low carbon range. A conventional numerical heat analysis ( i.e., an equivalent specific heat method using the solidus temperature predicted by the model) is consistent with the model predictions for Fe-C plain steels. The model presented herein simplifies the computations to solve the solute- and heat-transfer simultaneous equations while searching for a solidus temperature as a part of the solution. Thus, this model can reduce the complexity of analyses considering the heat- and solute-transfer phenomena in the mushy zone.

  11. A unified momentum equation approach for computing thermal residual stresses during melting and solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Haram; Ki, Hyungson

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we present a novel numerical method for computing thermal residual stresses from a viewpoint of fluid-structure interaction (FSI). In a thermal processing of a material, residual stresses are developed as the material undergoes melting and solidification, and liquid, solid, and a mixture of liquid and solid (or mushy state) coexist and interact with each other during the process. In order to accurately account for the stress development during phase changes, we derived a unified momentum equation from the momentum equations of incompressible fluids and elastoplastic solids. In this approach, the whole fluid-structure system is treated as a single continuum, and the interaction between fluid and solid phases across the mushy zone is naturally taken into account in a monolithic way. For thermal analysis, an enthalpy-based method was employed. As a numerical example, a two-dimensional laser heating problem was considered, where a carbon steel sheet was heated by a Gaussian laser beam. Momentum and energy equations were discretized on a uniform Cartesian grid in a finite volume framework, and temperature-dependent material properties were used. The austenite-martensite phase transformation of carbon steel was also considered. In this study, the effects of solid strains, fluid flow, mushy zone size, and laser heating time on residual stress formation were investigated.

  12. Prediction of Hot Tearing Using a Dimensionless Niyama Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Charles; Beckermann, Christoph

    2014-08-01

    The dimensionless form of the well-known Niyama criterion is extended to include the effect of applied strain. Under applied tensile strain, the pressure drop in the mushy zone is enhanced and pores grow beyond typical shrinkage porosity without deformation. This porosity growth can be expected to align perpendicular to the applied strain and to contribute to hot tearing. A model to capture this coupled effect of solidification shrinkage and applied strain on the mushy zone is derived. The dimensionless Niyama criterion can be used to determine the critical liquid fraction value below which porosity forms. This critical value is a function of alloy properties, solidification conditions, and strain rate. Once a dimensionless Niyama criterion value is obtained from thermal and mechanical simulation results, the corresponding shrinkage and deformation pore volume fractions can be calculated. The novelty of the proposed method lies in using the critical liquid fraction at the critical pressure drop within the mushy zone to determine the onset of hot tearing. The magnitude of pore growth due to shrinkage and deformation is plotted as a function of the dimensionless Niyama criterion for an Al-Cu alloy as an example. Furthermore, a typical hot tear "lambda"-shaped curve showing deformation pore volume as a function of alloy content is produced for two Niyama criterion values.

  13. Multi-scale simulation of single crystal hollow turbine blade manufactured by liquid metal cooling process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Liquid metal cooling (LMC process as a powerful directional solidification (DS technique is prospectively used to manufacture single crystal (SC turbine blades. An understanding of the temperature distribution and microstructure evolution in LMC process is required in order to improve the properties of the blades. For this reason, a multi-scale model coupling with the temperature field, grain growth and solute diffusion was established. The temperature distribution and mushy zone evolution of the hollow blade was simulated and discussed. According to the simulation results, the mushy zone might be convex and ahead of the ceramic beads at a lower withdrawal rate, while it will be concave and laggard at a higher withdrawal rate, and a uniform and horizontal mushy zone will be formed at a medium withdrawal rate. Grain growth of the blade at different withdrawal rates was also investigated. Single crystal structures were all selected out at three different withdrawal rates. Moreover, mis-orientation of the grains at 8 mm/min reached ~30°, while it was ~5° and ~15° at 10 mm/min and 12 mm/min, respectively. The model for predicting dendritic morphology was verified by corresponding experiment. Large scale for 2D dendritic distribution in the whole sections was investigated by experiment and simulation, and they presented a well agreement with each other. Keywords: Hollow blade, Single crystal, Multi-scale simulation, Liquid metal cooling

  14. Three-dimensional granular model of semi-solid metallic alloys undergoing solidification: Fluid flow and localization of feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sistaninia, M.; Phillion, A.B.; Drezet, J.-M.; Rappaz, M.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) granular model which simulates fluid flow within solidifying alloys with a globular microstructure, such as that found in grain refined Al alloys, is presented. The model geometry within a representative volume element (RVE) consists of a set of prismatic triangular elements representing the intergranular liquid channels. The pressure field within the liquid channels is calculated using a finite elements (FEs) method assuming a Poiseuille flow within each channel and flow conservation at triple lines. The fluid flow is induced by solidification shrinkage and openings at grain boundaries due to deformation of the coherent solid. The granular model predictions are validated against bulk data calculated with averaging techniques. The results show that a fluid flow simulation of globular semi-solid materials is able to reproduce both a map of the 3-D intergranular pressure and the localization of feeding within the mushy zone. A new hot cracking sensitivity coefficient is then proposed. Based on a mass balance performed over a solidifying isothermal volume element, this coefficient accounts for tensile deformation of the semi-solid domain and for the induced intergranular liquid feeding. The fluid flow model is then used to calculate the pressure drop in the mushy zone during the direct chill casting of aluminum alloy billets. The predicted pressure demonstrates that deep in the mushy zone where the permeability is low the local pressure can be significantly lower than the pressure predicted by averaging techniques.

  15. Macrosegregation During Re-melting and Holding of Directionally Solidified Al-7 wt.% Si Alloy in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, M.; Ghods, M.; Angart, S. G.; Grugel, R. N.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2017-08-01

    As-cast aluminum-7 wt.% ailicon alloy sample rods were re-melted and directionally solidified on Earth which resulted in uniform dendritically aligned arrays. These arrays were then partially back-melted through an imposed, and constant, temperature gradient in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station. The mushy zones that developed in the seed crystals were held for different periods prior to initiating directional solidification. Upon return, examination of the initial mushy-zone regions exhibited significant macrosegregation in terms of a solute-depleted zone that increased as a function of the holding time. The silicon (solute) content in these regions was measured on prepared longitudinal sections by electron microprobe analysis as well as by determining the fraction eutectic on several transverse sections. The silicon content was found to increase up the temperature gradient resulting in significant silicon concentration immediately ahead of the mushy-zone tips. The measured macrosegregation agrees well with calculations from a mathematical model developed to simulate the re-melting and holding process. The results, due to processing in a microgravity environment where buoyancy and thermosolutal convection are minimized, serve as benchmark solidification data.

  16. Polydimethyl siloxane based nanocomposites with antibiofilm properties for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, G Gomathi; Murthy, P Sriyutha; Das, Arindam; Sathya, S; Nankar, Rakesh; Venugopalan, V P; Doble, Mukesh

    2017-07-01

    Polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) is an excellent implant material for biomedical applications, but often fails as it is prone to microbial colonization which forms biofilms. In the present study CuO, CTAB capped CuO, and ZnO nanoparticles were tested as nanofillers to enhance the antibiofilm property of PDMS against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In general S. aurues (Gram positive and more hydrophobic) favor PDMS surface than glass while E. coli (Gram negative and more hydrophilic) behaves in a reverse way. Incorporation of nanofillers renders the PDMS surface antibacterial and reduces the attachment of both bacteria. These surfaces are also not cytotoxic nor show any cell damage. Contact angle of the material and the cell surface hydrophobicity influenced the extent of bacterial attachment. Cell viability in biofilms was dependent on the antimicrobial property of the nanoparticles incorporated in the PDMS matrix. Simple regression relationships were able to predict the bacterial attachment and number of dead cells on these nanocomposites. Among the nanocomposites tested, PDMS incorporated with CTAB (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide)-capped CuO appears to be the best antibacterial material with good cyto-compatibility. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1075-1082, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Development of design solutions for spray ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omel'chenko, M.P.; Minasyan, R.G.; Kranzfeld, Ja.L.; Zaruba, V.C.; Baranov, Yu.A.; Sorokin, M.Ja.; Jegorov, A.V.; Khashchina, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of process design of spray cooling systems for responsible consumers of up-to-date reactor building are discussed in this paper. Development in design principles with respect to problem solving of operational reliability increase and ecological efficiency of nuclear power equipment is shown. The structural solutions of basin antifiltration shield are spoken in detail. The results of experimental physical-mathematical and climatic studies as well as comparative tests of bituminous asphalt emulsive mastic and mushy asphalt are reported. The directions of up-to-date researches on improvement of concept of spray coolers are indicated

  18. Bubble Induced Disruption of a Planar Solid-Liquid Interface During Controlled Directional Solidification in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.; Anilkumar, Amrutur V.

    2013-01-01

    Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) experiments were conducted in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station with the intent of better understanding the role entrained porosity/bubbles play during controlled directional solidification. The planar interface in a slowing growing succinonitrile - 0.24 wt% water alloy was being observed when a nitrogen bubble traversed the mushy zone and remained at the solid-liquid interface. Breakdown of the interface to shallow cells subsequently occurred, and was later evaluated using down-linked data from a nearby thermocouple. These results and other detrimental effects due to the presence of bubbles during solidification processing in a microgravity environment are presented and discussed.

  19. Evaluating Primary Dendrite Trunk Diameters in Directionally Solidified Al-Si Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    The primary dendrite trunk diameters of Al-Si alloys that were directionally solidified over a range of processing conditions have been measured. These data are analyzed with a model based primarily on an assessment of secondary dendrite arm dissolution in the mushy zone. Good fit with the experimental data is seen and it is suggested that the primary dendrite trunk diameter is a useful metric that correlates well with the actual solidification processing parameters. These results are placed in context with the limited results from the aluminium - 7 wt. % silicon samples directionally solidified aboard the International Space Station as part of the MICAST project.

  20. Experiments on melt droplets falling into a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data and analysis related to melt droplets falling into a water pool. A binary CaO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt mixture is used to study the influence of melt superheat and water subcooling on droplet deformation and fragmentation. For the conditions studied (We {<=} 1000), the surface tension of the melt droplet and the film boiling stability greatly affect the fragmentation behaviour. If the melt temperature is between the liquidus and solidus point (mushy zone) or if the film boiling is stable due to a relatively low subcooling, the droplet deformation and fragmentation are mitigated. This behaviour can be related to the effective Weber number (We) of the melt droplet upon entry into the water pool. Similar phenomena can be expected also for interactions of corium (UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}) and water, which are characterized by a potentially fast transformation of melt into the mushy zone and by particularly stable film boiling. (author)

  1. Directional Solidification Microstructure of a Ni-Based Superalloy: Influence of a Weak Transverse Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A Ni-based superalloy CMSX-6 was directionally solidified at various drawing speeds (5–20 μm·s−1 and diameters (4 mm, 12 mm under a 0.5 T weak transverse magnetic field. The results show that the application of a weak transverse magnetic field significantly modified the solidification microstructure. It was found that if the drawing speed was lower than 10 μm·s−1, the magnetic field caused extensive macro-segregation in the mushy zone, and a change in the mushy zone length. The magnetic field significantly decreases the size of γ’ and the content of γ-γ’ eutectic. The formation of macro-segregation under a weak magnetic field was attributed to the interdendritic solute transport driven by the thermoelectric magnetic convection (TEMC. The γ’ phase refinement could be attributed to a decrease in nucleation activation energy owing to the magnetic field during solid phase transformation. The change of element segregation is responsible for the content decrease of γ-γ’ eutectic.

  2. Dual Phase Lag Model of Melting Process in Domain of Metal Film Subjected to an External Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochnacki B.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Heating process in the domain of thin metal film subjected to a strong laser pulse are discussed. The mathematical model of the process considered is based on the dual-phase-lag equation (DPLE which results from the generalized form of the Fourier law. This approach is, first of all, used in the case of micro-scale heat transfer problems (the extremely short duration, extreme temperature gradients and very small geometrical dimensions of the domain considered. The external heating (a laser action is substituted by the introduction of internal heat source to the DPLE. To model the melting process in domain of pure metal (chromium the approach basing on the artificial mushy zone introduction is used and the main goal of investigation is the verification of influence of the artificial mushy zone ‘width’ on the results of melting modeling. At the stage of numerical modeling the author’s version of the Control Volume Method is used. In the final part of the paper the examples of computations and conclusions are presented.

  3. Shrinkage Porosity Criterion and Its Application to A 5.5 Ton Steel Ingot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang C.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the distribution of shrinkage porosity in steel ingot efficiently and accurately, a criterion R√L and a method to obtain its threshold value were proposed. The criterion R√L was derived based on the solidification characteristics of steel ingot and pressure gradient in the mushy zone, in which the physical properties, the thermal parameters, the structure of the mushy zone and the secondary dendrite arm spacing were all taken into consideration. The threshold value of the criterion R√L was obtained with combination of numerical simulation of ingot solidification and total solidification shrinkage rate. Prediction of the shrinkage porosity in a 5.5 ton ingot of 2Cr13 steel with criterion R√L>0.21 m · °C1/2 · s−3/2 agreed well with the results of experimental sectioning. Based on this criterion, optimization of the ingot was carried out by decreasing the height-to-diameter ratio and increasing the taper, which successfully eliminated the centreline porosity and further proved the applicability of this criterion.

  4. Magma Chambers, Thermal Energy, and the Unsuccessful Search for a Magma Chamber Thermostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazner, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Although the traditional concept that plutons are the frozen corpses of huge, highly liquid magma chambers ("big red blobs") is losing favor, the related notion that magma bodies can spend long periods of time (~106years) in a mushy, highly crystalline state is widely accepted. However, analysis of the thermal balance of magmatic systems indicates that it is difficult to maintain a significant portion in a simmering, mushy state, whether or not the system is eutectic-like. Magma bodies cool primarily by loss of heat to the Earth's surface. The balance between cooling via energy loss to the surface and heating via magma accretion can be denoted as M = ρLa/q, where ρ is magma density, L is latent heat of crystallization, a is the vertical rate of magma accretion, and q is surface heat flux. If M>1, then magma accretion outpaces cooling and a magma chamber forms. For reasonable values of ρ, L, and q, the rate of accretion amust be > ~15 mm/yr to form a persistent volume above the solidus. This rate is extremely high, an order of magnitude faster than estimated pluton-filling rates, and would produce a body 10 km thick in 700 ka, an order of magnitude faster than geochronology indicates. Regardless of the rate of magma supply, the proportion of crystals in the system must vary dramatically with depth at any given time owing to transfer of heat. Mechanical stirring (e.g., by convection) could serve to homogenize crystal content in a magma body, but this is unachievable in crystal-rich, locked-up magma. Without convection the lower part of the magma body becomes much hotter than the top—a process familiar to anyone who has scorched a pot of oatmeal. Thermal models that succeed in producing persistent, large bodies of magma rely on scenarios that are unrealistic (e.g., omitting heat loss to the planet's surface), self-fulfilling prophecies (e.g., setting unnaturally high temperatures as fixed boundary conditions), or physically unreasonable (e.g., magma is intruded

  5. Slush Fund: Modeling the Multiphase Physics of Oceanic Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffo, J.; Schmidt, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of ice interacting with an ocean, both on Earth and throughout the solar system, and its crucial role as the mediator of exchange between the hydrosphere below and atmosphere above, have made quantifying the thermodynamic, chemical, and physical properties of the ice highly desirable. While direct observations of these quantities exist, their scarcity increases with the difficulty of obtainment; the basal surfaces of terrestrial ice shelves remain largely unexplored and the icy interiors of moons like Europa and Enceladus have never been directly observed. Our understanding of these entities thus relies on numerical simulation, and the efficacy of their incorporation into larger systems models is dependent on the accuracy of these initial simulations. One characteristic of seawater, likely shared by the oceans of icy moons, is that it is a solution. As such, when it is frozen a majority of the solute is rejected from the forming ice, concentrating in interstitial pockets and channels, producing a two-component reactive porous media known as a mushy layer. The multiphase nature of this layer affects the evolution and dynamics of the overlying ice mass. Additionally ice can form in the water column and accrete onto the basal surface of these ice masses via buoyancy driven sedimentation as frazil or platelet ice. Numerical models hoping to accurately represent ice-ocean interactions should include the multiphase behavior of these two phenomena. While models of sea ice have begun to incorporate multiphase physics into their capabilities, no models of ice shelves/shells explicitly account for the two-phase behavior of the ice-ocean interface. Here we present a 1D multiphase model of floating oceanic ice that includes parameterizations of both density driven advection within the `mushy layer' and buoyancy driven sedimentation. The model is validated against contemporary sea ice models and observational data. Environmental stresses such as supercooling and

  6. Corium phase equilibria based on MASCA, METCOR and CORPHAD results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I.; Mezentseva, L.P. [Grebenshikov Institute of Silicate Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences (ISCh RAS), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Krushinov, E.V.; Kotova, S.Yu.; Kosarevsky, R.A. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire IRSN/DPAM, St Paul lez Durance (France); Bottomley, D. [EUROPAISCHE KOMMISSION, Joint Research Centre Institut fuer Transurane (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fichot, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire IRSN/DPAM, St Paul lez Durance (France); Fischer, M. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: Manfred.Fischer@areva.com

    2008-10-15

    Experimental data on component partitioning between suboxidized corium melt and steel in the in-vessel melt retention (IVR) conditions are compared. The data are produced within the OECD MASCA program and the ISTC CORPHAD project under close-to-isothermal conditions and in the ISTC METCOR project under thermal gradient conditions. Chemical equilibrium in the U-Zr-Fe(Cr,Ni,...)-O system is reached in all experiments. In MASCA tests the molten pool formed under inert atmosphere has two immiscible liquids, oxygen-enriched (oxidic) and oxygen-depleted (metallic), resulting of the miscibility gap of the mentioned system. Sub-system data of the U-Zr-Fe(Cr,Ni,...)-O phase diagram investigated within the ISTC CORPHAD project are interpreted in relation with the MASCA results. In METCOR tests the equilibrium is established between oxidic liquid and mushy metallic part of the system. Results of comparison are discussed and the implications for IVR noted.

  7. Feeding and Distribution of Porosity in Cast Al-Si Alloys as Function of Alloy Composition and Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Taylor, John A.; Easton, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Unmodified, Na-modified, and Sr-modified castings of Al-7 pct Si and Al-12.5 pct Si alloys were cast in molds in which it was possible to create different cooling conditions. It is shown how solidification influences the distribution of porosity at the surface and the center of the castings...... of the casting, while Sr-modified castings solidify in a mushy manner that creates a more homogeneous distribution of porosity in the casting. The amount of porosity was highest in the Sr-modified alloys, lower in the Na-modified alloys, and lowest in the unmodified alloys. The size of the porosity-free layer...... as a function of modification and Si content in sand- and chill-cast samples. Eutectic modification, Si content, and cooling conditions have a great impact on the distribution of porosity. Unmodified and Na-modified castings are more easily fed with porosity tending to congregate near the centerline...

  8. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn-36at.%Ni peritectic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-04-12

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn-36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure.

  9. Elimination of Hot Tears in Steel Castings by Means of Solidification Pattern Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Tutum, Cem Celal; Thorborg, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    A methodology of how to exploit the Niyama criterion for the elimination of various defects such as centerline porosity, macrosegregation, and hot tearing in steel castings is presented. The tendency of forming centerline porosity is governed by the temperature distribution close to the end...... of the solidification interval, specifically by thermal gradients and cooling rates. The physics behind macrosegregation and hot tears indicate that these two defects also are dependent heavily on thermal gradients and pressure drop in the mushy zone. The objective of this work is to show that by optimizing...... the solidification pattern, i.e., establishing directional and progressive solidification with the help of the Niyama criterion, macrosegregation and hot tearing issues can be both minimized or eliminated entirely. An original casting layout was simulated using a transient three-dimensional (3-D) thermal fluid model...

  10. Rolling force prediction for strip casting using theoretical model and artificial intelligence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Guang-ming; LI Cheng-gang; ZHOU Guo-ping; LIU Zhen-yu; WU Di; WANG Guo-dong; LIU Xiang-hua

    2010-01-01

    Rolling force for strip casting of 1Cr17 ferritic stainless steel was predicted using theoretical model and artificial intelligence.Solution zone was classified into two parts by kiss point position during casting strip.Navier-Stokes equation in fluid mechanics and stream function were introduced to analyze the rheological property of liquid zone and mushy zone,and deduce the analytic equation of unit compression stress distribution.The traditional hot rolling model was still used in the solid zone.Neural networks based on feedforward training algorithm in Bayesian regularization were introduced to build model for kiss point position.The results show that calculation accuracy for verification data of 94.67% is in the range of+7.0%,which indicates that the predicting accuracy of this model is very high.

  11. Modeling of Melting and Resolidification in Domain of Metal Film Subjected to a Laser Pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majchrzak E.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal processes in domain of thin metal film subjected to a strong laser pulse are discussed. The heating of domain considered causes the melting and next (after the end of beam impact the resolidification of metal superficial layer. The laser action (a time dependent bell-type function is taken into account by the introduction of internal heat source in the energy equation describing the heat transfer in domain of metal film. Taking into account the extremely short duration, extreme temperature gradients and very small geometrical dimensions of the domain considered, the mathematical model of the process is based on the dual phase lag equation supplemented by the suitable boundary-initial conditions. To model the phase transitions the artificial mushy zone is introduced. At the stage of numerical modeling the Control Volume Method is used. The examples of computations are also presented.

  12. Disruption of an Aligned Dendritic Network by Bubbles During Re-Melting in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.; Anilkumar, Amrutur V.

    2012-01-01

    The quiescent Microgravity environment can be quite dynamic. Thermocapillary flow about "large" static bubbles on the order of 1mm in diameter was easily observed by following smaller tracer bubbles. The bubble induced flow was seen to disrupt a large dendritic array, effectively distributing free branches about the solid-liquid interface. "Small" dynamic bubbles were observed to travel at fast velocities through the mushy zone with the implication of bringing/detaching/redistributing dendrite arm fragments at the solid-liquid interface. Large and small bubbles effectively re-orient/re-distribute dendrite branches/arms/fragments at the solid liquid interface. Subsequent initiation of controlled directional solidification results in growth of dendrites having random orientations which significantly compromises the desired science.

  13. Simulation and Experimental Study on the Steady Conduction Solution for Continuous Rheo-Casting for A356 Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duc, Do Minh; Hai, Nguyen Hong; Quang, Pham

    2017-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic modeling of a continuous rheo-casting technology was conducted, consistent with the manufacturing of 3 "m"m"-"t"h"i"n plates made of aluminum alloy A356. The A numerical simulation on of the stabilizing time of the material crystallization was carried out using the ANSYS FLUENT code. Solidification and melting models were simulated with heat transfer and solid-liquid phase transformation involving the latent heat of crystallization were simulated. The calculated temperature distribution and the evolution of cooling rate through the material were examined and used to clarify their influence on microstructure, and further investigated with hardness testing. The thickness of the mushy zone was determined for the steady conduction solution of the continuous rheo-casting process.

  14. Simulation and Experimental Study on the Steady Conduction Solution for Continuous Rheo-Casting for A356 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duc, Do Minh; Hai, Nguyen Hong; Quang, Pham [Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2017-03-15

    Computational fluid dynamic modeling of a continuous rheo-casting technology was conducted, consistent with the manufacturing of 3 {sup mm-thin} plates made of aluminum alloy A356. The A numerical simulation on of the stabilizing time of the material crystallization was carried out using the ANSYS FLUENT code. Solidification and melting models were simulated with heat transfer and solid-liquid phase transformation involving the latent heat of crystallization were simulated. The calculated temperature distribution and the evolution of cooling rate through the material were examined and used to clarify their influence on microstructure, and further investigated with hardness testing. The thickness of the mushy zone was determined for the steady conduction solution of the continuous rheo-casting process.

  15. Existence and regularity of solutions of a phase field model for solidification with convection of pure materials in two dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luiz Boldrini

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the existence and regularity of weak solutions of a phase field type model for pure material solidification in presence of natural convection. We assume that the non-stationary solidification process occurs in a two dimensional bounded domain. The governing equations of the model are the phase field equation coupled with a nonlinear heat equation and a modified Navier-Stokes equation. These equations include buoyancy forces modelled by Boussinesq approximation and a Carman-Koseny term to model the flow in mushy regions. Since these modified Navier-Stokes equations only hold in the non-solid regions, which are not known a priori, we have a free boundary-value problem.

  16. Macrosegregation and Grain Formation Caused by Convection Associated with Directional Solidification Through Cross-Section Increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, Masoud; Lauer, Mark; Tewari, Surendra; Poirier, David; Grugel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Cylindrical Al-7 wt% Silicon, Al-19 wt% Copper and Lead-6 wt% Antimony alloy samples were directionally solidified (DS) with liquid above, solid below, and gravity pointing down, in graphite crucibles having an abrupt cross-sectional increase. These alloys have similar solidification shrinkage but are expected to have different degrees of thermosolutal convection during solidification. Microstructures in the DS samples in the vicinity of the section change have been studied in order to examine the effect of convection associated with the combined influence of thermosolutal effects and solidification shrinkage. Extensive radial and axial macrosegregation associated with cross-section change is observed. It also appears that steepling and local primary alpha-phase remelting resulting from convection are responsible for stray grain formation at the reentrant corners. Preliminary results from a numerical model, which includes solidification shrinkage and thermosolutal convection in the mushy zone, indicate that these regions are prone to solutal remelting of dendrites.

  17. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot, exhibits C and E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, D. R.; Maples, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    A computer model which describes the solidification of a binary metal alloy in an insulated rectangular mold with a temperature gradient is presented. A numerical technique, applicable to a broad class of moving boundary problems, was implemented therein. The solidification model described is used to calculate the macrosegregation within the solidified casting by coupling the equations for liquid flow in the solid/liquid or mushy zone with the energy equation for heat flow throughout the ingot and thermal convection in the bulk liquid portion. The rate of development of the solid can be automatically calculated by the model. Numerical analysis of such solidification parameters as enthalpy and boundary layer flow is displayed. On-line user interface and software documentation are presented.

  18. Macrosegregation Caused by Convection Associated with Directional Solidification through Cross-Section Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, M.; Lauer, M.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R..; Grugel, R. N.

    2015-01-01

    Al-7 wt% Si and Pb-6 wt% Sb alloy samples were directionally solidified (DS), with liquid above and solid below and gravity pointing down, in cylindrical graphite crucibles through an abrupt cross-section change. Fraction eutectic distribution in the microstructure, primary dendrite spacing and primary dendrite trunk diameters have been measured in the DS samples in the vicinity of section change in order to examine the effect of convection associated with the combined influence of thermosolutal factors and solidification shrinkage. It is observed that convection not only produces extensive radial and axial macrosegregation near cross-section change, it also affects the dendritic array morphology. Primary dendrite spacing and primary dendrite trunk diameter, both, are influenced by this convection. In addition to the experimental results, preliminary results from a numerical model which includes solidification shrinkage and thermosolutal convection in the mushy zone in its analysis will also be presented

  19. Positive segregation as a function of buoyancy force during steel ingot solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radovic, Zarko; Jaukovic, Nada; Lalovic, Milisav; Tadic, Nebojsa

    2008-01-01

    We analyze theoretically and experimentally solute redistribution in the dendritic solidification process and positive segregation during solidification of steel ingots. Positive segregation is mainly caused by liquid flow in the mushy zone. Changes in the liquid steel velocity are caused by the temperature gradient and by the increase in the solid fraction during solidification. The effects of buoyancy and of the change in the solid fraction on segregation intensity are analyzed. The relationships between the density change, liquid fraction and the steel composition are considered. Such elements as W, Ni, Mo and Cr decrease the effect of the density variations, i.e. they show smaller tendency to segregate. Based on the modeling and experimental results, coefficients are provided controlling the effects of chemical composition, secondary dendrite arm spacing and the solid fraction.

  20. A Cellular Automaton / Finite Element model for predicting grain texture development in galvanized coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, G.; Avettand-Fènoël, M.-N.; Iosta, A.; Foct, J.

    2011-01-01

    Hot-dipping galvanizing process is a widely used and efficient way to protect steel from corrosion. We propose to master the microstructure of zinc grains by investigating the relevant process parameters. In order to improve the texture of this coating, we model grain nucleation and growth processes and simulate the zinc solid phase development. A coupling scheme model has been applied with this aim. This model improves a previous two-dimensional model of the solidification process. It couples a cellular automaton (CA) approach and a finite element (FE) method. CA grid and FE mesh are superimposed on the same domain. The grain development is simulated at the micro-scale based on the CA grid. A nucleation law is defined using a Gaussian probability and a random set of nucleating cells. A crystallographic orientation is defined for each one with a choice of Euler's angle (Ψ,θ,φ). A small growing shape is then associated to each cell in the mushy domain and a dendrite tip kinetics is defined using the model of Kurz [2]. The six directions of basal plane and the two perpendicular directions develop in each mushy cell. During each time step, cell temperature and solid fraction are then determined at micro-scale using the enthalpy conservation relation and variations are reassigned at macro-scale. This coupling scheme model enables to simulate the three-dimensional growing kinetics of the zinc grain in a two-dimensional approach. Grain structure evolutions for various cooling times have been simulated. Final grain structure has been compared to EBSD measurements. We show that the preferentially growth of dendrite arms in the basal plane of zinc grains is correctly predicted. The described coupling scheme model could be applied for simulated other product or manufacturing processes. It constitutes an approach gathering both micro and macro scale models.

  1. A rapid mechanism to remobilize and homogenize highly crystalline magma bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgisser, Alain; Bergantz, George W

    2011-03-10

    The largest products of magmatic activity on Earth, the great bodies of granite and their corresponding large eruptions, have a dual nature: homogeneity at the large scale and spatial and temporal heterogeneity at the small scale. This duality calls for a mechanism that selectively removes the large-scale heterogeneities associated with the incremental assembly of these magmatic systems and yet occurs rapidly despite crystal-rich, viscous conditions seemingly resistant to mixing. Here we show that a simple dynamic template can unify a wide range of apparently contradictory observations from both large plutonic bodies and volcanic systems by a mechanism of rapid remobilization (unzipping) of highly viscous crystal-rich mushes. We demonstrate that this remobilization can lead to rapid overturn and produce the observed juxtaposition of magmatic materials with very disparate ages and complex chemical zoning. What distinguishes our model is the recognition that the process has two stages. Initially, a stiff mushy magma is reheated from below, producing a reduction in crystallinity that leads to the growth of a subjacent buoyant mobile layer. When the thickening mobile layer becomes sufficiently buoyant, it penetrates the overlying viscous mushy magma. This second stage rapidly exports homogenized material from the lower mobile layer to the top of the system, and leads to partial overturn within the viscous mush itself as an additional mechanism of mixing. Model outputs illustrate that unzipping can rapidly produce large amounts of mobile magma available for eruption. The agreement between calculated and observed unzipping rates for historical eruptions at Pinatubo and at Montserrat demonstrates the general applicability of the model. This mechanism furthers our understanding of both the formation of periodically homogenized plutons (crust building) and of ignimbrites by large eruptions.

  2. An automatic granular structure generation and finite element analysis of heterogeneous semi-solid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifi, Hamid; Larouche, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The quality of cast metal products depends on the capacity of the semi-solid metal to sustain the stresses generated during the casting. Predicting the evolution of these stresses with accuracy in the solidification interval should be highly helpful to avoid the formation of defects like hot tearing. This task is however very difficult because of the heterogeneous nature of the material. In this paper, we propose to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of a metal during solidification using a mesh generation technique of the heterogeneous semi-solid material for a finite element analysis at the microscopic level. This task is done on a two-dimensional (2D) domain in which the granular structure of the solid phase is generated surrounded by an intergranular and interdendritc liquid phase. Some basic solid grains are first constructed and projected in the 2D domain with random orientations and scale factors. Depending on their orientation, the basic grains are combined to produce larger grains or separated by a liquid film. Different basic grain shapes can produce different granular structures of the mushy zone. As a result, using this automatic grain generation procedure, we can investigate the effect of grain shapes and sizes on the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the semi-solid material. The granular models are automatically converted to the finite element meshes. The solid grains and the liquid phase are meshed properly using quadrilateral elements. This method has been used to simulate the microstructure of a binary aluminium–copper alloy (Al–5.8 wt% Cu) when the fraction solid is 0.92. Using the finite element method and the Mie–Grüneisen equation of state for the liquid phase, the transient mechanical behaviour of the mushy zone under tensile loading has been investigated. The stress distribution and the bridges, which are formed during the tensile loading, have been detected. (paper)

  3. Numerical model of the lowermost Mississippi River as an alluvial-bedrock reach: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viparelli, E.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Mohrig, D. C.; Parker, G.

    2012-12-01

    Recent field studies reveal that the river bed of the Lower Mississippi River is characterized by a transition from alluvium (upstream) to bedrock (downstream). In particular, in the downstream 250 km of the river, fields of actively migrating bedforms alternate with deep zones where a consolidated substratum is exposed. Here we present a first version of a one-dimensional numerical model able to capture the alluvial-bedrock transition in the lowermost Mississippi River, defined herein as the 500-km reach between the Old River Control Structure and the Gulf of Mexico. The flow is assumed to be steady, and the cross-section is divided in two regions, the river channel and the floodplain. The streamwise variation of channel and floodplain geometry is described with synthetic relations derived from field observations. Flow resistance in the river channel is computed with the formulation for low-slope, large sand bed rivers due to Wright and Parker, while a Chezy-type formulation is implemented on the floodplain. Sediment is modeled in terms of bed material and wash load. Suspended load is computed with the Wright-Parker formulation. This treatment allows either uniform sediment or a mixture of different grain sizes, and accounts for stratification effects. Bedload transport rates are estimated with the relation for sediment mixtures of Ashida and Michiue. Previous work documents reasonable agreement between these load relations and field measurements. Washload is routed through the system solving the equation of mass conservation of sediment in suspension in the water column. The gradual transition from the alluvial reach to the bedrock reach is modeled in terms of a "mushy" layer of specified thickness overlying the non-erodible substrate. In the case of a fully alluvial reach, the channel bed elevation is above this mushy layer, while in the case of partial alluvial cover of the substratum, the channel bed elevation is within the mushy layer. Variations in base

  4. Advanced modeling of solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousquet-Melou, P.; Fichot, F.; Goyeau, B.; Gobin, D.; Quintard, M.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical and numerical macroscopic modeling of the solidification of binary mixtures is presented. The growth of a solid-liquid region (mushy zone), represented by a non-homogeneous porous medium, is considered. A macroscopic model for momentum, heat and mass transfer during solidification is derived using the volume averaging method, and the effective transport properties (permeability, effective diffusivities, mass exchange coefficients) are defined by associated closure problems (set of microscopic balance equations). Consequently, the effects of the dendritic geometry (tortuosity) and of microscopic transfer phenomena (dispersion, interfacial exchange) are introduced in the averaged balance equations and in the representation of the effective transport coefficients. This closure method provides an original approach of solidification modeling. The resulting macroscopic model is based on the local thermal equilibrium assumption (one-temperature model) while a two-phase description of macroscopic species transfer is introduced using solid and liquid mass exchange coefficients. The phase diagram is used to predict the solid and liquid equilibrium concentrations at the solid-liquid interface. This two-phase approach extends the classical limiting cases that correspond to the lever-rule and Scheil descriptions. (authors)

  5. Three Types of Earth's Inner Core Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, D.; Wen, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's inner core boundary (ICB) is the site where the liquid outer core solidifies and the solid inner core grows. Thus, the fine-scale structure of the ICB is important for our understanding of the thermo-compositional state of the Earth's core. In this study, we collect a large set of seismic records with high-quality pre-critical PKiKP and PcP phase pairs, recorded by two dense seismic arrays, Hi-net in Japan and USArray in US. This dataset samples the ICB regions beneath East Asia, Mexico and the Bering Sea. We use differential travel times, amplitude ratios and waveform differences between PKiKP and PcP phases to constrain fine-scale structure of the ICB. The sampled ICB can be grouped into three types based on their seismic characteristics: (1) a simple ICB with a flat and sharp boundary, (2) a bumpy ICB with topographic height changes of 10 km, and (3) a localized mushy ICB with laterally varying thicknesses of 4-8 km. The laterally varying fine-scale structure of the ICB indicates existence of complex small-scale forces at the surface and a laterally varying solidification process of the inner core due to lateral variation of thermo-compositional condition near the ICB.

  6. Phase-field modelling of β(Ti) solidification in Ti-45at.%Al: columnar dendrite growth at various gravity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viardin, A.; Berger, R.; Sturz, L.; Apel, M.; Hecht, U.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of solutal convection on the solidification of γ titanium aluminides, specifically on β(Ti) dendrite growth, is not well known. With the aim of supporting directional solidification experiments under hyper-gravity using a large diameter centrifuge, 2D-phase field simulations of β(Ti) dendrite growth have been performed for the binary alloy Ti-45at.%Al and various gravity scenarios. Both, the direction and magnitude of the gravity vector were varied systematically in order to reveal the subtle interplay between the convective flow pattern and mushy zone characteristics. In this presentation, gravity effects are discussed for early dendrite growth. For selected cases the evolution on longer timescales is also analyse of and oscillatory modes leading to dynamically stable steady state growth are outlined. In a dedicated simulation series forced flow is superimposed, as to mimic thermally driven fluid flow expected to establish on the macroscopic scale (sample size) in the centrifugal experiments. Above a certain threshold this flow turns dominant and precludes solutally driven convective effects.

  7. On numerical modeling of low-head direct chill ingot caster for magnesium alloy AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainul Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive 3D turbulent CFD study has been carried out to simulate a Low-Head (LH vertical Direct Chill (DC rolling ingot caster for the common magnesium alloy AZ31. The model used in this study takes into account the coupled laminar/turbulent melt flow and solidification aspects of the process and is based on the control-volume finite-difference approach. Following the aluminum/magnesium DC casting industrial practices, the LH mold is taken as 30 mm with a hot top of 60 mm. The previously verified in-house code has been modified to model the present casting process. Important quantitative results are obtained for four casting speeds, for three inlet melt pouring temperatures (superheats and for three metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficients for the steady state operational phase of the caster. The variable cooling water temperatures reported by the industry are considered for the primary and secondary cooling zones during the simulations. Specifically, the temperature and velocity fields, sump depth and sump profiles, mushy region thickness, solid shell thickness at the exit of the mold and axial temperature profiles at the center and at three strategic locations at the surface of the slab are presented and discussed.

  8. Semi-continuous casting of magnesium alloy AZ91 using a filtered melt delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainul Hasan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D numerical simulation of an industrial-sized slab caster for magnesium alloy AZ91 has been carried out for the steady state operational phase of the caster. The simulated model consists of an open-top melt delivery system fitted with a porous filter near the hot-top. The melt flow through the porous filter was modeled on the basis of Brinkmann-Forchimier-Extended non-Darcy model for turbulent flow. An in-house 3-D CFD code was modified to account for the melt flow through the porous filter. Results are obtained for four casting speeds namely, 40, 60, 80, and 100 mm/min. The metal-mold contact region as well as the convective heat transfer coefficient at the mold wall were also varied. In addition to the above, the Darcy number for the porous media was also changed. All parametric studies were performed for a fixed inlet melt superheat of 64 °C. The results are presented pictorially in the form of temperature and velocity fields. The sump depth, mushy region thickness, solid shell thickness at the exit of the mold and axial temperature profiles are also presented and correlated with the casting speed through regression analysis.

  9. Development of a Compact and Efficient Ice Thermal Energy Storage Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaguchi, Kengo; Ishikawa, Masatoshi; Muta, Kenji; Yoshino, Kiyotaka; Hayashi, Hiroko; Baba, Yoshiyuki

    In the present study, the authors propose the use of a low concentration aqueous solution as phase change material for static-type ice-storage-vessels, instead of pure water commonly used today. If an aqueous solution with low concentration is used, even when a large amount of solution (aqueous ethylene glycol in this study) is solidified and bridging of ice developed around cold tubes occurs, the pressure increase could be prevented by the existence of a continuous liquid phase in the solid-liquid two-phase layer (mushy layer) which opens to an air gap at the top of a vessel. Therefore, one can continue to solidify an aqueous solution after bridging, achieving a high ice packing factor (IPF). First, experiments using small-scale test cells have been conducted to confirm the present idea, and then we have performed experiments using a large vessel with an early practical size. It was seen that a large pressure increase is prevented for the initial concentration of the solution C0 of 1.0%, and IPF obtained using the solution is much greater than 0.65 using pure water for which the solidification must be stopped before the bridging.

  10. Simulations of Macrosegregation with consideration of inclusion effect in solidifying carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y F; Chen, Y; Kang, X H; Fu, P X; Liu, H W; Li, D Z

    2015-01-01

    During casting of steel ingots, the inclusions such as oxide, sulfide will inevitably exist in the melt. These inclusions will flow upward together with light solutes during solidification due to their lower density relative to the steel melt, which therefore causes impacts on the thermo-solutal convection in the melt and final solute distribution. Hence, a macrosegregation model that considers the effects of inclusions on melt flow in the mushy zone is established. Of the new model two important parameters, the inclusion capturing probability by solid, k p , and the original volume fraction, n 0 , are systematically studied in terms of simulations, which shows that decreasing k p or increasing n 0 leads to stronger ascending flow in the melt. And then as a validation example, the model was used to predict the macrosegregation in a 3.3-ton steel ingot. The prediction demonstrates that with consideration of inclusions, the melt convection strength is enhanced and thus the zones of macrosegregation are expanded comparing to simulations without taking account of inclusions. Further comparison with experiment results indicates that a better agreement of the carbon segregation along the centerline of the ingot can be achieved when considering the inclusion buoyancy. (paper)

  11. Formation mechanism of channel segregation in carbon steels by inclusion flotation: X-ray microtomography characterization and multi-phase flow modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Yan Fei; Chen, Yun; Li, Dian Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental dissections of steel ingots and multi-scale simulations have led to the discovery of a potential driving force for channel segregation: the flotation of oxide-based inclusion (D. Li et al., Nat. Commun. 5:5572 (2014)). Further experimental analysis and numerical modeling are necessary to clarify this mechanism in detail. In this work, the inclusions in a carbon steel ingot that exhibits severe channel segregations were characterized by the 3D X-ray microtomography, which revealed a significant enrichment and growth of inclusions in the channels. Based on above microtomography characterization, a 2D macrosegregation model encompassing the inclusion flotation was established. In the model, the motions of solid inclusions and liquid were described using the multi-phase flow scheme within the Euler-Lagrange framework. The benchmark simulations showed that sufficient inclusion populations with appropriate sizes are capable of altering the local flow patterns and destabilize the mushy zone, initiating the subsequent channel segregation. The continuous interplay between melt convection, inclusion flotation and solidification eventually causes the formation of macroscale channel. The predicted sizes and volume fraction of inclusions that are able to trigger the channel segregation effectively are consistent with the data obtained via microtomography characterization. The macrosegregation model was then applied to predict the channel segregations in an industrial carbon steel ingot. A rather good agreement of A-segregates was achieved between the simulation and the dissected ingot.

  12. Effect of modified mold shell on the microstructure and tensile fracture morphology of single-crystal nickel-base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weitai; Zhao, Yutao; Sun, Shaochun; Liu, Manping; Ma, Dexin; Liang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Cunlong; Tao, Ran

    2018-04-01

    The mold shell used for single-crystal turbine blades preparation was modified from conventional process to fiber reinforcement technology. The wall thickness was decreased by 32.3 percent (pct) than the conventional process. Then these two mold shells were used to produce single crystal samples of nickel-base superalloy in a Bridgman furnace. The local temperature curves were recorded in the process. The results show that the modified mold shell can increase the temperature gradient in the mushy zone than the conventional mold shell. The primary and secondary dendrite arm space were reduced by 8 pct and 12 pct, respectively. Moreover, both the area fraction and mean size of the γ‧/γ eutectic were declined, as well as the dendritic segregation tendency. Therefore it contributed to the lower residual eutectic and micro-porosity in the heat-treated microstructure. Further, fracture surface of the samples made by modified mold shell exhibited smaller facets and more uniform dimples in the size and shape.

  13. Analysis of conduction–radiation heat transfer during phase change process of semitransparent materials using lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroufi, Arman; Aghanajafi, Cyrus

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with the analysis of solidification of a 2-D semitransparent material using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Both conduction and radiation terms in governing energy equation were computed using the LBM. First, the LBM formulation regarding conduction component was validated and the results analyzed. Next, the results involving phase change or radiation term in the LBM were compared with the finite volume method (FVM). The results show good accuracy and less time consumption during LBM implementation. Finally, temperature distribution, the location of solid-liquid front, mushy zone thickness and the effects of heat transfer parameters were studied. -- Highlights: ► Solidification of 2-D semitransparent material is studied. ► Both conduction and radiation were computed using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). ► LBM results validated by solving three benchmark problems. ► Effects of various parameters were studied on temperature distributions. ► Results show good accuracy and less time consumption during LBM implementation.

  14. Gravitational Acceleration Effects on Macrosegregation: Experiment and Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Torres, J.; Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Sen, S.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were performed under terrestrial gravity (1g) and during parabolic flights (10-2 g) to study the solidification and macrosegregation patterns of Al-Cu alloys. Alloys having 2% and 5% Cu were solidified against a chill at two different cooling rates. Microscopic and Electron Microprobe characterization was used to produce microstructural and macrosegregation maps. In all cases positive segregation occurred next to the chill because shrinkage flow, as expected. This positive segregation was higher in the low-g samples, apparently because of the higher heat transfer coefficient. A 2-D computational model was used to explain the experimental results. The continuum formulation was employed to describe the macroscopic transports of mass, energy, and momentum, associated with the solidification phenomena, for a two-phase system. The model considers that liquid flow is driven by thermal and solutal buoyancy, and by solidification shrinkage. The solidification event was divided into two stages. In the first one, the liquid containing freely moving equiaxed grains was described through the relative viscosity concept. In the second stage, when a fixed dendritic network was formed after dendritic coherency, the mushy zone was treated as a porous medium. The macrosegregation maps and the cooling curves obtained during experiments were used for validation of the solidification and segregation model. The model can explain the solidification and macrosegregation patterns and the differences between low- and high-gravity results.

  15. A comparative EBSP study of microstructure and microtexture formation from undercooled Ni99B1 melts solidified on an electrostatic levitator and an electromagnetic levitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mingjun; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Nagashio, Kosuke; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko; Yoda, Shinichi

    2006-01-01

    Ni 99 B 1 alloys were solidified by containerless processing at various melt undercoolings on an electrostatic levitator (ESL) and an electromagnetic levitator (EML). A scanning electron microscope in combination with an electron backscatter diffraction pattern mapping technique was employed to reveal microstructures and microtextures formed on these two facilities. The microstructure consists of well-developed primary dendrites with coarse secondary arms in the alloys solidified on the ESL at low and medium undercooling levels, whereas equiaxed grains are yielded in alloys solidified on the EML at almost the same undercoolings. Further analysis indicates that the melt flow induced by the electromagnetic field in the EML may play a significant role in promoting fragmentation of primary dendrites in the mushy zone and thus resulting in equiaxed grains. In contrast, the primary dendrites in the alloy processed on the ESL can fully develop in the absence of melt flow. The fluid flow in the sample on the EML can rotate, move, and displace surviving fragments, yielding a random distribution of grain orientation and thus leading to a random microtexture at low and medium undercoolings. At high undercoolings, refined equiaxed grains can be obtained on both the ESL and the EML and the influence of melt flow on refinement seems negligible due to the enhanced driving force in capillarity and solute effects. A great number of coherent annealing twins are formed, making the pole figures more complex and random

  16. A comparative EBSP study of microstructure and microtexture formation from undercooled Ni{sub 99}B{sub 1} melts solidified on an electrostatic levitator and an electromagnetic levitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Mingjun [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Tsukuba Space Center, ISS Science Project Office, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)]. E-mail: li.mingjun@aist.go.jp; Ishikawa, Takehiko [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Tsukuba Space Center, ISS Science Project Office, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Nagashio, Kosuke [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara Campus, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara Campus, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Yoda, Shinichi [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Tsukuba Space Center, ISS Science Project Office, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2006-08-15

    Ni{sub 99}B{sub 1} alloys were solidified by containerless processing at various melt undercoolings on an electrostatic levitator (ESL) and an electromagnetic levitator (EML). A scanning electron microscope in combination with an electron backscatter diffraction pattern mapping technique was employed to reveal microstructures and microtextures formed on these two facilities. The microstructure consists of well-developed primary dendrites with coarse secondary arms in the alloys solidified on the ESL at low and medium undercooling levels, whereas equiaxed grains are yielded in alloys solidified on the EML at almost the same undercoolings. Further analysis indicates that the melt flow induced by the electromagnetic field in the EML may play a significant role in promoting fragmentation of primary dendrites in the mushy zone and thus resulting in equiaxed grains. In contrast, the primary dendrites in the alloy processed on the ESL can fully develop in the absence of melt flow. The fluid flow in the sample on the EML can rotate, move, and displace surviving fragments, yielding a random distribution of grain orientation and thus leading to a random microtexture at low and medium undercoolings. At high undercoolings, refined equiaxed grains can be obtained on both the ESL and the EML and the influence of melt flow on refinement seems negligible due to the enhanced driving force in capillarity and solute effects. A great number of coherent annealing twins are formed, making the pole figures more complex and random.

  17. Solidification characteristics and segregation behavior of a P-containing Ni-Fe-Cr-based alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changshuai; Su, Haijun; Guo, YongAn; Guo, Jianting; Zhou, Lanzhang

    2017-09-01

    Solidification characteristics and segregation behavior of a P-containing Ni-Fe-Cr-based alloy, considered as boiler and turbine materials in 700 °C advanced ultra-supercritical coal-fired power plants, have been investigated by differential thermal analysis and directional solidification quenching technique. Results reveal that P decreases the solidus temperature, but only has negligible influence on liquidus temperature. After P was added, the solidification sequence has no apparent change, but the width of the mushy zone increases and dendritic structures become coarser. Moreover, P increases the amount and changes the morphology of MC carbide. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis reveals that P has obvious influence on the segregation behavior of the constitute elements with equilibrium partition coefficients (ki) far away from unity, whereas has negligible effect on the constituent elements with ki close to unity and has more influence on the final stage of solidification than at early stage. The distribution profiles reveal that P atoms pile up ahead of the solid/liquid (S/L) interface and strongly segregate to the interdendritic liquid region. The influence of P on solidification characteristics and segregation behavior of Ni-Fe-Cr-based alloy could be attributed to the accumulation of P ahead of the S/L interface during solidification.

  18. 3-D inverse solution for continuous casting taking an air cap into consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Nowak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a 3-D numerical solution of the inverse boundary problem for a continuous casting process of an aluminium alloy. Since the verified information on the heat flux distribution is crucial for a good design of a mould, effective cooling system and generally the whole caster, the main goal of the analysis presented within the paper was an identification of the heat fluxes along the external walls of the ingot. In the study an enthalpy-porosity technique implemented in a commercial Fluent package was used for modelling the solidification process. In this method, the phase change interface was determined on the basis of the liquid fraction approach. Moreover, the mathematical model included the pull velocity, the temperature-dependent properties for a liquid phase, mushy zone and solid phase, and a spatially local distribution of the thermal contact resistance between the ingot and crystallizer walls. In the inverse procedure, a sensitivity analysis was employed for the estimation of the boundary conditions retrieval. Although, the measured temperatures required to solve the problem are always burdened by measurement errors, a comparison of the measured and retrieved values showed a high accuracy of the computations.

  19. Porosity formation in Al-Si casting alloys: role of Sr oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Samuel, A.M.; Samuel, F.H.; Doty, H.W.; Valtierra, S.

    2002-01-01

    The strength and quality of an Al-Si alloy casting are determined by its microstructure and the amount of porosity present in the casting. Modification is one of the processes used to improve the microstructural quality, where the addition of a modifying agent alters the shape of the eutectic Si from an acicular to a fibrous form that is extremely beneficial to the mechanical properties. Among various modifiers, strontium, although easy to handle and resistant to fading, also causes porosity formation in these alloys, attributed variously to an increase in the hydrogen level of the melt, feedability problems in the mushy zone, changes in the mode of eutectic nucleation, etc. The present study shows how the presence of oxides is responsible for the porosity formation, and that the difference in porosity characteristics with the addition of Sr depends on the amount of Sr oxides present the solidified structure. Both Sr and Al oxides are favourable sites for the nucleation of other microconstituents. A number of experimental (binary Al-Si) and industrial (319 and 356) alloys have been studied, to cover various alloy freezing ranges. Thermal analysis, optical microscopy, SEM/EDX and EPMA analyses were employed to obtain the results. (author)

  20. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni peritectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-01-01

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure. PMID:27066761

  1. Effect of thermodiffusion on the fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification of molten metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jafar-Salehi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a transient Finite Element (FE method has been employed to solve the transport equations to investigate the heat transfer and fluid flow and the effect of thermodiffusion on vertical solidification of a binary molten metal alloy, forming a rod. The binary system considered in this study is SnBi composed of 65% Sn and 35% Bi subjected to bottom cooling. It is found that the flow of molten metal at the boundary of the mushy region plays an important role in the shape and geometry of the zone. The presence of thermodiffusion shows considerable difference in the composition of the solidified rod, compared with the one without considering the effect of thermodiffusion. Thermodiffusion also causes a faster solidification and a more uniform concentration distribution. The results of this study may be extended to similar binary and multicomponent systems in which a temperature gradient exists and the Soret coefficient is large enough so as to affect the fluid flow and concentration of the species.

  2. Formation of intermetallic phases in AlSi7Fe1 alloy processed under microgravity and forced fluid flow conditions and their influence on the permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, S.; Ratke, L.; Zimmermann, G.; Budenkova, O.

    2016-03-01

    Ternary Al-6.5wt.%Si-0.93wt.%Fe alloy samples were directionally solidified on-board of the International Space Station ISS in the ESA payload Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) equipped with Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) under both purely diffusive and stimulated convective conditions induced by a rotating magnetic field. Using different analysis techniques the shape and distribution of the intermetallic phase β-Al5SiFe in the dendritic microstructure was investigated, to study the influence of solidification velocity and fluid flow on the size and spatial arrangement of intermetallics. Deep etching as well as 3-dimensional computer tomography measurements characterized the size and the shape of β-Al5SiFe platelets: Diffusive growth results in a rather homogeneous distribution of intermetallic phases, whereas forced flow promotes an increase in the amount and the size of β-Al5SiFe platelets in the centre region of the samples. The β-Al5SiFe intermetallics can form not only simple platelets, but also be curved, branched, crossed, interacting with dendrites and porosity located. This leads to formation of large and complex groups of Fe-rich intermetallics, which reduce the melt flow between dendrites leading to lower permeability of the mushy zone and might significantly decrease feeding ability in castings.

  3. NUMERICAL EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SOFT-MELTING PROPERTIES ON THE KINETIC OF (CAFE2 O4 -CA2 FE2 O5 FORMATION IN THE IRON ORE SINTERING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Adilson de Castro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model able to predict the influence of soft-melting properties of the blend of raw materials used in the iron ore sintering process in the kinetic formation of calcium ferrite and di-calcium ferrite constituents. The model is based on the simultaneous solution of transport equations of Momentum, energy and chemical species in multiphase multicomponent systems coupled with the chemical reactions kinetics and phase transformations that occur within the sinter bed. The numerical solution is obtained using the finite volume method and the model is validated using monitoring data from an industrial scale sintering plant. After validation, the model was used to predict processing conditions using raw materials with different soft-melting properties. Results indicate that the temperatures of starting soft-melting, shrinkage and melting range are the main parameters to be controlled in order to attain liquid phases formation responsible to confer good mechanical and reducibility properties for the sinter product. In this study was found that raw materials with high soft-melting temperature and wilder temperature of mushy zone could decrease up to 30% the calcium ferrites formation and hence deteriorates the metallurgical properties of the sinter.

  4. Solidification of porous medium saturated with aqueous solution in a rectangular cell. ; Discussion on influence of initial concentration of solution and mean diameter of beads. Kukei sonai no suiyoeki de mitasareta takoshitsutai no gyoko. ; Shoki nodo to beads no heikin chokkei no eikyo ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, K [Miyazaki University, Miyazaki (Japan). Faculty of engineering; Okada, M [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering; Murakami, M [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yabushita, Y [Sony Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1993-11-25

    Studies have been made for the purpose of analyzing solidification phenomenon of ground in relation to freezing construction method used in subway, water supply, and sewage constructions. Experimental studies have been carried out on solidification process of porous medium saturated with aqueous solution to discover influence of initial concentration of the solution and diameter of beads that constitute a porous medium. The experiment was performed by solidifying the porous medium sequentially from a side wall with lower temperature in a rectangular experimental tank with a height and a width of 100 mm filled with NaCl aqueous solution and beads. As a result, it was discovered that, if the initial concentration is low, the temperature difference is little between the upper part and the lower part of the experimental tank, and natural convection in the liquid-phase region is suppressed because of rising solidification temperature; the natural convection is suppressed in the liquid-phase region; and the boundary face between the mushy region and the liquid-phase region moves quickly. Further, the concentration rise in the liquid-phase region has slowed down despite that the solidification region is large enough. The smaller the mean diameter of beads, the faster the growth rate on the boundary face, hence the natural convection in the tank has been suppressed, and the growth rate on the boundary face has increased. In addition, the concentration stratification in the liquid-phase region does not expand, but is formed only on the bottom. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Method of radioactive waste processing and equipment therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Skaba, V.; Ditl, P.

    1988-01-01

    Mushy or liquid radioactive wastes are mixed with chemical additives, e.g., aluminium sulfate, colloidal silicon oxide, formic acid and cement suspension. The mix is heated to 100 to 320 degC. By drying the waste and by chemical reaction, a bulk intermediate product will be obtained which is homogenized with molten bitumen or organic polymers. The mass is then poured into containers where it will harden and will then be transported to the depository. The advantage of the method is that the final product is a stable mass resistant to separation, leaching and erosion, showing long-term storage safety. The main components of the installation are a mixed reactor, a doser of bulk material and a homogenizer which are series connected in that order. The apparatus is mounted on a support structure which may be divided into at least two parts. The advantage of this facility is that it is easily transported and can thereby be used for processing waste at source. (E.S.). 2 figs

  6. On the formation of white-spot defects in a superalloy VAR ingot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignard, Jean Francois; Soller, Aude; Jourdan, Julien; Bellot, Jean-Pierre; Jardy, Alain [Institut Jean Lamour (UMR 7198), Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, Nancy Cedex (France)

    2011-07-15

    For the production of nickel-based superalloys for the aerospace industry, strict control of the macrostructure of the product is necessary to avoid the appearance of potentially fatal defects. Our study focuses on the prevention of ''white spots'' in the alloy IN 718. These defects, which are small volumes of a few millimeters of characteristic length, are depleted in niobium. They are known to result from the fall of metal fragments in the liquid pool during VAR processing. According to their history in the liquid metal, these fragments could not being remelted before being trapped in the mushy zone and then give rise to defects. A model calculates the heat transfer in such a precursor to simulate its melting during his stay in the bath. The validation of the predicted melting kinetics requires a series of immersive experiences of synthetic defects in a metal bath. The model and experiments have demonstrated the initial solidification of a layer of metal around the precursor. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. The multiphase physics of sea ice: a review for model developers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Hunke

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Rather than being solid throughout, sea ice contains liquid brine inclusions, solid salts, microalgae, trace elements, gases, and other impurities which all exist in the interstices of a porous, solid ice matrix. This multiphase structure of sea ice arises from the fact that the salt that exists in seawater cannot be incorporated into lattice sites in the pure ice component of sea ice, but remains in liquid solution. Depending on the ice permeability (determined by temperature, salinity and gas content, this brine can drain from the ice, taking other sea ice constituents with it. Thus, sea ice salinity and microstructure are tightly interconnected and play a significant role in polar ecosystems and climate. As large-scale climate modeling efforts move toward "earth system" simulations that include biological and chemical cycles, renewed interest in the multiphase physics of sea ice has strengthened research initiatives to observe, understand and model this complex system. This review article provides an overview of these efforts, highlighting known difficulties and requisite observations for further progress in the field. We focus on mushy layer theory, which describes general multiphase materials, and on numerical approaches now being explored to model the multiphase evolution of sea ice and its interaction with chemical, biological and climate systems.

  8. Application of a Pore Fraction Hot Tearing Model to Directionally Solidified and Direct Chill Cast Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Ruifeng; Phillion, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    Hot tearing susceptibility is commonly assessed using a pressure drop equation in the mushy zone that includes the effects of both tensile deformation perpendicular to the thermal gradient as well as shrinkage feeding. In this study, a Pore Fraction hot tearing model, recently developed by Monroe and Beckermann (JOM 66:1439-1445, 2014), is extended to additionally include the effect of strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient. The deformation and shrinkage pore fractions are obtained on the basis of the dimensionless Niyama criterion and a scaling variable method. First, the model is applied to the binary Al-Cu system under conditions of directional solidification. It is shown that for the same Niyama criterion, a decrease in the cooling rate increases both the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions because of an increase in the time spent in the brittle temperature region. Second, the model is applied to the industrial aluminum alloy AA5182 as part of a finite element simulation of the Direct Chill (DC) casting process. It is shown that an increase in the casting speed during DC casting increases the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions, causing the maximum point of pore fraction to move towards the base of the casting. These results demonstrate that including the strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient significantly improves the predictive quality of hot tearing criteria based on the pressure drop equation.

  9. Mesoscopic simulation of dendritic growth observed in x-ray video microscopy during directional solidification of Al-Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaleau, Pierre; Beckermann, Christoph; Mathiesen, Ragnvald H.; Arnberg, Lars

    2010-01-01

    A mesoscopic model is developed to simulate microstructures observed in situ by X-ray video microscopy during directional solidification of Al-Cu alloys in a Hele-Shaw cell. In the model, a volume-averaged species conservation equation is solved to obtain the solute concentration and solid fraction fields, and an analytical stagnant film model is used to predict the motion of the dendrite envelopes. The model is carefully validated in several test cases. Then, the model is applied to simulate the columnar dendritic microstructures observed in the X-ray video microscopy experiments for two different alloy compositions. Reasonable agreement is found between the measured and predicted dendrite envelope shapes, solid fractions, and solute concentration fields. The predicted size of the mushy zone and the extent of the undercooled melt region ahead of the columnar front agree well with the in situ experimental observations. The simulation results show quantitative agreement with the internal solid fraction variations measured from the radiographs. The present model is also able to realistically simulate a primary dendrite trunk spacing adjustment that was observed in one of the experiments. Overall, the present study represents the first successful validation of a solidification model using real time, in situ data from an experiment with a metallic alloy. Considerable additional research is needed to account in the model for the effect of gravity driven melt convection. (author)

  10. Effect of Anode Change on Heat Transfer and Magneto-hydrodynamic Flow in Aluminum Reduction Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Baokuan; Fafard, Mario

    2016-02-01

    In order to explore the impact of anode replacement on heat transfer and magneto-hydrodynamic flow in aluminum smelting cells, a transient three-dimensional coupled mathematical model has been developed. With a steady state magnetic field, an electrical potential approach was used to obtain electromagnetic fields. Joule heating and Lorentz force, which were the source terms in the energy and momentum equations, were updated at each iteration. The phase change of molten electrolyte (bath) was modeled by an enthalpy-based technique in which the mushy zone was treated as a porous medium with porosity equal to the liquid fraction. A reasonable agreement between the test data and simulated results was achieved. Under normal conditions, the bath at the middle of the cell is hotter, while becoming colder at the four corners. Due to the heat extracted from the bath, the temperature of the new cold anode increases over time. The temperature of the bath under the new cold anode therefore quickly drops, resulting in a decrease of the electrical conductivity. More Joule effect is created. In addition, the bath under the new cold anode gradually freezes and flows more slowly. The temperature of the new anode located at the middle of the cell rises faster because of the warmer bath. It is easier to eliminate the effect of anode change when it occurs in the middle of the cell.

  11. Numerical Investigation on the Impact of Anode Change on Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Aluminum Smelting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Gosselin, Louis; Fafard, Mario; Peng, Jianping; Li, Baokuan

    2016-04-01

    In order to understand the impact of anode change on heat transfer and magnetohydrodynamic flow in aluminum smelting cells, a transient three-dimensional (3D) coupled mathematical model has been developed. The solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations were simultaneously implemented by the finite volume method with full coupling of the Joule heating and Lorentz force through solving the electrical potential equation. The volume of fluid approach was employed to describe the two-phase flow. The phase change of molten electrolyte (bath) as well as molten aluminum (metal) was modeled by an enthalpy-based technique, where the mushy zone is treated as a porous medium with a porosity equal to the liquid fraction. The effect of the new anode temperature on recovery time was also analyzed. A reasonable agreement between the test data and simulated results is obtained. The results indicate that the temperature of the bath under cold anodes first decreases reaching the minimal value and rises under the effect of increasing Joule heating, and finally returns to steady state. The colder bath decays the velocity, and the around ledge becomes thicker. The lowest temperature of the bath below new anodes increases from 1118 K to 1143 K (845 °C to 870 °C) with the new anode temperature ranging from 298 K to 498 K (25°C to 225°C), and the recovery time reduces from 22.5 to 20 hours.

  12. Modeling of columnar and equiaxed solidification of binary mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, P.

    2005-12-01

    This work deals with the modelling of dendritic solidification in binary mixtures. Large scale phenomena are represented by volume averaging of the local conservation equations. This method allows to rigorously derive the partial differential equations of averaged fields and the closure problems associated to the deviations. Such problems can be resolved numerically on periodic cells, representative of dendritic structures, in order to give a precise evaluation of macroscopic transfer coefficients (Drag coefficients, exchange coefficients, diffusion-dispersion tensors...). The method had already been applied for a model of columnar dendritic mushy zone and it is extended to the case of equiaxed dendritic solidification, where solid grains can move. The two-phase flow is modelled with an Eulerian-Eulerian approach and the novelty is to account for the dispersion of solid velocity through the kinetic agitation of the particles. A coupling of the two models is proposed thanks to an original adaptation of the columnar model, allowing for undercooling calculation: a solid-liquid interfacial area density is introduced and calculated. At last, direct numerical simulations of crystal growth are proposed with a diffuse interface method for a representation of local phenomena. (author)

  13. Macrosegregation Due to Convection in Al-19Cu Alloy Directionally Solidified Through an Abrupt Expansion in Cross-Section: A Comparison with Al-7Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, M.; Lauer, M.; Grugel, R. N.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2017-10-01

    Hypoeutectic Al-19 wt.% Cu alloys were directionally solidified at two different growth speeds in cylindrical molds that featured an abrupt increase in cross-section, from 3.2 to 9.5 mm in diameter. The effects of thermosolutal convection and shrinkage flow induced by the cross-section change on macrosegregation were investigated. Dendrite clustering and extensive radial macrosegregation were seen, particularly in the larger cross-section after expansion. Negative longitudinal macrosegregation right after the cross-section increase was observed; the extent of macrosegregation, however, decreases with increasing growth speed. Both thermal and flow effects due to cross-section change were seen to influence the radial macrosegregation immediately before, and after the expansion. Radial macrosegregation pattern was found to be changing as the mushy zone enters the larger cross-section region above the cross-section change where the solidification is in its unsteady state. The effect of the solutal expansion coefficient on macrosegregation was studied by comparing the degree of thermosolutal convection in Al-19 wt.% Cu with a previous study in which we investigated Al-7 wt.% Si. A two-dimensional model accounting for both shrinkage and thermosolutal convection was used to simulate the resulting steepling, as well as the axial and radial macrosegregation. The experimentally observed macrosegregation associated with the expansion during directional solidification is well predicted by the numerical simulations.

  14. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  15. Elimination of Hot Tears in Steel Castings by Means of Solidification Pattern Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotas, Petr; Tutum, Cem Celal; Thorborg, Jesper; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2012-06-01

    A methodology of how to exploit the Niyama criterion for the elimination of various defects such as centerline porosity, macrosegregation, and hot tearing in steel castings is presented. The tendency of forming centerline porosity is governed by the temperature distribution close to the end of the solidification interval, specifically by thermal gradients and cooling rates. The physics behind macrosegregation and hot tears indicate that these two defects also are dependent heavily on thermal gradients and pressure drop in the mushy zone. The objective of this work is to show that by optimizing the solidification pattern, i.e., establishing directional and progressive solidification with the help of the Niyama criterion, macrosegregation and hot tearing issues can be both minimized or eliminated entirely. An original casting layout was simulated using a transient three-dimensional (3-D) thermal fluid model incorporated in a commercial simulation software package to determine potential flaws and inadequacies. Based on the initial casting process assessment, multiobjective optimization of the solidification pattern of the considered steel part followed. That is, the multiobjective optimization problem of choosing the proper riser and chill designs has been investigated using genetic algorithms while simultaneously considering their impact on centerline porosity, the macrosegregation pattern, and primarily on hot tear formation.

  16. Modeling of columnar and equiaxed solidification of binary mixtures; Modelisation de la solidification colonnaire et equiaxe de melanges binaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, P

    2005-12-15

    This work deals with the modelling of dendritic solidification in binary mixtures. Large scale phenomena are represented by volume averaging of the local conservation equations. This method allows to rigorously derive the partial differential equations of averaged fields and the closure problems associated to the deviations. Such problems can be resolved numerically on periodic cells, representative of dendritic structures, in order to give a precise evaluation of macroscopic transfer coefficients (Drag coefficients, exchange coefficients, diffusion-dispersion tensors...). The method had already been applied for a model of columnar dendritic mushy zone and it is extended to the case of equiaxed dendritic solidification, where solid grains can move. The two-phase flow is modelled with an Eulerian-Eulerian approach and the novelty is to account for the dispersion of solid velocity through the kinetic agitation of the particles. A coupling of the two models is proposed thanks to an original adaptation of the columnar model, allowing for undercooling calculation: a solid-liquid interfacial area density is introduced and calculated. At last, direct numerical simulations of crystal growth are proposed with a diffuse interface method for a representation of local phenomena. (author)

  17. Freckle Defect Formation near the Casting Interfaces of Directionally Solidified Superalloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jianping; Ma, Dexin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Fu; Sun, Baode; Dong, Anping; Li, Fei; Bührig-Polaczek, Andreas

    2016-11-16

    Freckle defects usually appear on the surface of castings and industrial ingots during the directional solidification process and most of them are located near the interface between the shell mold and superalloys. Ceramic cores create more interfaces in the directionally solidified (DS) and single crystal (SX) hollow turbine blades. In order to investigate the location of freckle occurrence in superalloys, superalloy CM247 LC was directionally solidified in an industrial-sized Bridgman furnace. Instead of ceramic cores, Alumina tubes were used inside of the casting specimens. It was found that freckles occur not only on the casting external surfaces, but also appear near the internal interfaces between the ceramic core and superalloys. Meanwhile, the size, initial position, and area of freckle were investigated in various diameters of the specimens. The initial position of the freckle chain reduces when the diameter of the rods increase. Freckle area follows a linear relationship in various diameters and the average freckle fraction is 1.1% of cross sectional area of casting specimens. The flow of liquid metal near the interfaces was stronger than that in the interdendritic region in the mushy zone, and explained why freckle tends to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of castings. This new phenomenon suggests that freckles are more likely to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of the hollow turbine blades.

  18. Freckle Defect Formation near the Casting Interfaces of Directionally Solidified Superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Hong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Freckle defects usually appear on the surface of castings and industrial ingots during the directional solidification process and most of them are located near the interface between the shell mold and superalloys. Ceramic cores create more interfaces in the directionally solidified (DS and single crystal (SX hollow turbine blades. In order to investigate the location of freckle occurrence in superalloys, superalloy CM247 LC was directionally solidified in an industrial-sized Bridgman furnace. Instead of ceramic cores, Alumina tubes were used inside of the casting specimens. It was found that freckles occur not only on the casting external surfaces, but also appear near the internal interfaces between the ceramic core and superalloys. Meanwhile, the size, initial position, and area of freckle were investigated in various diameters of the specimens. The initial position of the freckle chain reduces when the diameter of the rods increase. Freckle area follows a linear relationship in various diameters and the average freckle fraction is 1.1% of cross sectional area of casting specimens. The flow of liquid metal near the interfaces was stronger than that in the interdendritic region in the mushy zone, and explained why freckle tends to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of castings. This new phenomenon suggests that freckles are more likely to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of the hollow turbine blades.

  19. Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling of Additive Manufacturing of Advanced Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Frank; Newkirk, Joseph; Fan, Zhiqiang; Sparks, Todd; Chen, Xueyang; Fletcher, Kenneth; Zhang, Jingwei; Zhang, Yunlu; Kumar, Kannan Suresh; Karnati, Sreekar

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this proposed project is to research and develop a prediction tool for advanced additive manufacturing (AAM) processes for advanced materials and develop experimental methods to provide fundamental properties and establish validation data. Aircraft structures and engines demand materials that are stronger, useable at much higher temperatures, provide less acoustic transmission, and enable more aeroelastic tailoring than those currently used. Significant improvements in properties can only be achieved by processing the materials under nonequilibrium conditions, such as AAM processes. AAM processes encompass a class of processes that use a focused heat source to create a melt pool on a substrate. Examples include Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication and Direct Metal Deposition. These types of additive processes enable fabrication of parts directly from CAD drawings. To achieve the desired material properties and geometries of the final structure, assessing the impact of process parameters and predicting optimized conditions with numerical modeling as an effective prediction tool is necessary. The targets for the processing are multiple and at different spatial scales, and the physical phenomena associated occur in multiphysics and multiscale. In this project, the research work has been developed to model AAM processes in a multiscale and multiphysics approach. A macroscale model was developed to investigate the residual stresses and distortion in AAM processes. A sequentially coupled, thermomechanical, finite element model was developed and validated experimentally. The results showed the temperature distribution, residual stress, and deformation within the formed deposits and substrates. A mesoscale model was developed to include heat transfer, phase change with mushy zone, incompressible free surface flow, solute redistribution, and surface tension. Because of excessive computing time needed, a parallel computing approach was also tested. In addition

  20. A study on corium behaviour under external vessel cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik; Kang, Kyung Ho; Koo, Kil Mo; Kim, Hee Dong

    2000-04-01

    This study presents the results of evaluation and analysis on the second phase of the RASPLAV project for three years between July 1, 1997 and June 30, 2000. In the RASPLAV Phase II study, two large-scale experiments of RASPLAV-AW-200-3, 4 were conducted to estimate the heat flux distribution in the corium and thermal interaction between the corium and the reactor vessel. Several small-scale experiments such as TULPAN, TF, and STF were conducted to analyze thermal stratification and additive effect of core materials on corium behavior. The Salt experiments were conducted to estimate the crust and the mushy region formation, as well as natural convection heat transfer in the corium. Material properties of the corium and the salt were measured in the RASPLAV project. During the RASPLAV-AW-200-3 test, approximately 22 kg of the corium leaked from the test furnace, because Fe from the FeO, which was additive to reduce the melting temperature of fuel pellet, interacted with Tungsten protector. It is concluded from the AW-200-3 test results that the oxidized U-Zr-O is not separated. From the RASPLAV-AW-200-4 test results, the C-32 fuel with the miscibility gap and low content of carbon was not separated thermally. The carbon is known as a dominant factor in the thermal stratification of the corium from the small and medium scale test results such as TULPAN, TF, and STF. The fuel composition, test method and condition in the RASPLAV-AW-2003,4 were selected using the small and medium scale test results. It is confirmed from the Salt test that the analytical model of the CONV code predicts heat transfer with crust formation in the molten pool very well.

  1. Autolytic degradation of skipjack tuna during heating as affected by initial quality and processing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Nicola J; Amato, Penny M; Giesbrecht, Francis; Lanier, Tyre C

    2012-02-01

    Several factors were studied as affecting protein degradation and texture of skipjack tuna muscle following ambient pressure thermal processing (precooking). These included degree of mushy tuna syndrome (MTS) evidenced in the raw meat, raw meat pH, abusive thawing/holding, and precooking temperature/time. Slurries and intact pieces from frozen skipjack tuna, either tempered for 2 h or thawed and held at 25 °C for 22 h (abusive treatment) were heated at temperatures ranging from 40 to 80 °C for up to 2 h, and also at 90 °C for 1 h, with or without prior adjustment of pH to 5 or 7 to favor cathepsin or calpain activity, respectively. Proteolysis of precooked samples was monitored by Lowry assay and SDS-PAGE; cooked texture of intact meat was measured using a Kramer shear press and by sensory profile analysis. Proteolysis maximally occurred in slurries of skipjack tuna muscle that had been abusively stored (22 h at 25 °C) and adjusted to pH 5 prior to heating at 55 °C. Intact pieces of tuna abusively thawed/held for 22 h with subsequent heating at 55 °C also evidenced the most proteolysis and were the least firm in texture. Raw fish that evidenced higher severity of MTS when raw displayed higher levels of proteolysis prior to cooking, which were further increased after cooking at 55 °C. The kinetic data presented here can be used to optimize processing conditions for skipjack tuna canning to minimize textural degradation and optimize quality. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Towards true 3D textural analysis; using your crystal mush wisely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.; Pankhurst, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal cargo that is found in volcanic and plutonic rocks contains a wealth of information about magmatic mush processes, crystallisation history, crystal entrainment and recycling. Phenocryst populations predominantly record episodes of growth/nucleation and bulk geochemical changes within an evolving crystal-melt body. Ante- and xeno-crysts provide useful clues to the nature of mush interaction with wall rock and with principal magma(s). Furthermore, crystal evolutions (core to rim) record pathways through pressure, temperature and compositional space. These can often illustrate complex recycling within systems, describing the plumbing architecture. Understanding this architecture underpins our knowledge of how igneous systems can interact with the crust, grow, freeze, re-mobilise and prime for eruption. Initially, 2D studies produced corrected 3D crystal size distributions to help provide information about nucleation and residence times. It immediately became clear that crystal shape is an important factor in determining the confidence placed upon 3D reconstructions of 2D data. Additionally studies utilised serial sections of medium- to coarse-grain-size populations which allowed 3D reconstruction using modelling software to be improved, since size and shape etc. can be directly constrained. Finally the advent of textural studies using X-ray tomography has revolutionised the way in which we can inspect the crystal cargo in mushy systems, allowing us to image in great detail crystal packing arrangements, 3D CSDs, shapes and orientations etc. The latest most innovative studies use X-ray micro-computed tomography to rapidly characterise chemical populations within the crystal cargo, adding a further dimension to this approach, and implies the ability to untangle magmatic chemical components to better understand their individual and combined evolution. In this contribution key examples of the different types of textural analysis techniques in 2D and 3D

  3. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral docusate in the management of constipation in hospice patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumi, Yoko; Wilson, Mitchell P; Szafran, Olga; Spooner, G Richard

    2013-01-01

    The stool softener docusate is widely used in the management of constipation in hospice patients. There is little experimental evidence to support this practice, and no randomized trials have been conducted in the hospice setting. To assess the efficacy of docusate in hospice patients. This was a 10-day, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of docusate and sennosides vs. placebo and sennosides in hospice patients in Edmonton, Alberta. Patients were included if they were age 18 years or older, able to take oral medications, did not have a gastrointestinal stoma, and had a Palliative Performance Scale score of 20% or more. The primary outcome measures were stool frequency, volume, and consistency. Secondary outcomes were patient perceptions of bowel movements (difficulty and completeness of evacuation) and bowel-related interventions. A total of 74 patients were randomized into the study (35 to the docusate group and 39 to the placebo group). There were neither significant differences between the groups in stool frequency, volume, or consistency, nor in difficulty or completeness of evacuation. On the Bristol Stool Form Scale, more patients in the placebo group had Type 4 (smooth and soft) and Type 5 (soft blobs) stool, whereas in the docusate group, more had Type 3 (sausage like) and Type 6 (mushy) stool (P=0.01). There was no significant benefit of docusate plus sennosides compared with placebo plus sennosides in managing constipation in hospice patients. Docusate use should be considered on an individual basis. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Brinicles as a case of inverse chemical gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Escribano, Bruno; González, Diego L; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Tuval, Idan

    2013-06-25

    Brinicles are hollow tubes of ice from centimeters to meters in length that form under floating sea ice in the polar oceans when dense, cold brine drains downward from sea ice to seawater close to its freezing point. When this extremely cold brine leaves the ice, it freezes the water it comes into contact with: a hollow tube of ice-a brinicle-growing downward around the plume of descending brine. We show that brinicles can be understood as a form of the self-assembled tubular precipitation structures termed chemical gardens, which are plantlike structures formed on placing together a soluble metal salt, often in the form of a seed crystal, and an aqueous solution of one of many anions, often silicate. On one hand, in the case of classical chemical gardens, an osmotic pressure difference across a semipermeable precipitation membrane that filters solutions by rejecting the solute leads to an inflow of water and to its rupture. The internal solution, generally being lighter than the external solution, flows up through the break, and as it does so, a tube grows upward by precipitation around the jet of internal solution. Such chemical-garden tubes can grow to many centimeters in length. In the case of brinicles, on the other hand, in floating sea ice we have porous ice in a mushy layer that filters out water, by freezing it, and allows concentrated brine through. Again there is an osmotic pressure difference leading to a continuing ingress of seawater in a siphon pump mechanism that is sustained as long as the ice continues to freeze. Because the brine that is pumped out is denser than the seawater and descends rather than rises, a brinicle is a downward-growing tube of ice, an inverse chemical garden.

  5. A study on corium melt pool behavior under external vessel cooling : investigation of the first phase research results in the OECD RASPLAV project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik; Kim, Hee Dong; Yoo, Kun Joong

    1998-04-01

    The scope and contents of the OECD RASPLAV program are to investigate natural convection heat transfer in the corium, chemical and mechanical interaction between the corium and the reactor vessel, crust formation of the corium, and thermal behaviour of the corium by experiments and model development during external vessel cooling to prevent reactor vessel failure in severe accidents of nuclear power plant. This study includes evaluation and analysis of the RASPLAV V phase I results for three years between July 1, 1994 and June 30, 1997. These results supply technical basis for our experimental program on severe accident research. Two large-scale experiments of RASPLAV-AW-between the corium and the reactor vessel. Several small-scale experiments were conducted to analyze thermal stratification in the corium. The salt experiments were conducted to estimate the crust and the mushy region formation, and natural convection heat transfer in the corium. In the analytical studies, pre and post analysis of the RASPLAV-AW-200 experiments and evaluation of the salt test results have been performed using CONV 2 and 3D computer codes, which were developed during RASPLAV program phase I. Low density corium was separated from the high density corium during the RASPLAV-AW-200 tests and the TULPAN test, which was a new finding in the RASPLAV project phase I. From the salts test, heat flux distribution in the side wall heating case is similar to the direct internal heat generation case, and the crust formation is a little effect on heat transfer rate. The results of CONV 2 and 3 D were very well with with the experimental results. The results of RASLAV project phase I, such as furnace design and the techniques on fuel melting, are very helpful to our severe accident experimental program. (author). 57 refs., 13 tabs., 52 figs.

  6. Production, pathways and budgets of melts in mid-ocean ridges: An enthalpy based thermo-mechanical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Nibir; Sarkar, Shamik; Baruah, Amiya; Dutta, Urmi

    2018-04-01

    Using an enthalpy based thermo-mechanical model we provide a theoretical evaluation of melt production beneath mid-ocean ridges (MORs), and demonstrate how the melts subsequently develop their pathways to sustain the major ridge processes. Our model employs a Darcy idealization of the two-phase (solid-melt) system, accounting enthalpy (ΔH) as a function of temperature dependent liquid fraction (ϕ). Random thermal perturbations imposed in this model set in local convection that drive melts to flow through porosity controlled pathways with a typical mushroom-like 3D structure. We present across- and along-MOR axis model profiles to show the mode of occurrence of melt-rich zones within mushy regions, connected to deeper sources by single or multiple feeders. The upwelling of melts experiences two synchronous processes: 1) solidification-accretion, and 2) eruption, retaining a large melt fraction in the framework of mantle dynamics. Using a bifurcation analysis we determine the threshold condition for melt eruption, and estimate the potential volumes of eruptible melts (∼3.7 × 106 m3/yr) and sub-crustal solidified masses (∼1-8.8 × 106 m3/yr) on an axis length of 500 km. The solidification process far dominates over the eruption process in the initial phase, but declines rapidly on a time scale (t) of 1 Myr. Consequently, the eruption rate takes over the solidification rate, but attains nearly a steady value as t > 1.5 Myr. We finally present a melt budget, where a maximum of ∼5% of the total upwelling melt volume is available for eruption, whereas ∼19% for deeper level solidification; the rest continue to participate in the sub-crustal processes.

  7. Entretien avec Runar Døving : croquant, craquant et croustillant dans la culture alimentaire norvégienne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Amilien

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Runar Døving, anthropologue spécialiste des habitudes alimentaires en Norvège, répond dans cet entretien à des questions sur le craquant, le croquant et le croustillant dans la culture de l’alimentation norvégienne. Réponses et questions s’enchainent au fil de l’interview et permettent un certain nombre de réflexions et d’éclaircissements sur le craquant comme caractéristique alimentaire, culinaire et culturelle. Le craquant semble essentiellement reposer sur une structure binaire, souvent dichotomiste, opposant le craquant au mou, le croquant au doux et par la même le masculin au féminin, voire le croustillant moderne et décadent des chips à la sécurisante douceur culturelle des pommes de terres à l’eau.Runar Døving is an anthropologist who has been working for many years on food habits in Norway. In this paper he answers questions about the value that crunchy and crispy food may have in Norwegian food culture. The text links questions and answers together in a way that presents thoughts and perspectives about the culinary and cultural aspects of the crunchy and the crispy. The crunchy seems to be built on a dual structure based on the many oppositions between the crunchy and the soft, the crispy and the mushy, which actually remind one of masculine and feminine, and even the modern decadent aspects of potato crisps that contrasts with the secure smoothness of boiled potatoes.

  8. Municipal solid waste processing and separation employing wet torrefaction for alternative fuel production and aluminum reclamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu'min, Gea Fardias; Prawisudha, Pandji; Zaini, Ilman Nuran; Aziz, Muhammad; Pasek, Ari Darmawan

    2017-09-01

    This study employs wet torrefaction process (also known as hydrothermal) at low temperature. This process simultaneously acts as waste processing and separation of mixed waste, for subsequent utilization as an alternative fuel. The process is also applied for the delamination and separation of non-recyclable laminated aluminum waste into separable aluminum and plastic. A 2.5-L reactor was used to examine the wet torrefaction process at temperatures below 200°C. It was observed that the processed mixed waste was converted into two different products: a mushy organic part and a bulky plastic part. Using mechanical separation, the two products can be separated into a granular organic product and a plastic bulk for further treatment. TGA analysis showed that no changes in the plastic composition and no intrusion from plastic fraction to the organic fraction. It can be proclaimed that both fractions have been completely separated by wet torrefaction. The separated plastic fraction product obtained from the wet torrefaction treatment also contained relatively high calorific value (approximately 44MJ/kg), therefore, justifying its use as an alternative fuel. The non-recyclable plastic fraction of laminated aluminum was observed to be delaminated and separated from its aluminum counterpart at a temperature of 170°C using an additional acetic acid concentration of 3%, leaving less than 25% of the plastic content in the aluminum part. Plastic products from both samples had high calorific values of more than 30MJ/kg, which is sufficient to be converted and used as a fuel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A study on corium behaviour under external vessel cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik; Kang, Kyung Ho; Koo, Kil Mo; Kim, Hee Dong

    2000-04-01

    This study presents the results of evaluation and analysis on the second phase of the RASPLAV project for three years between July 1, 1997 and June 30, 2000. In the RASPLAV Phase II study, two large-scale experiments of RASPLAV-AW-200-3, 4 were conducted to estimate the heat flux distribution in the corium and thermal interaction between the corium and the reactor vessel. Several small-scale experiments such as TULPAN, TF, and STF were conducted to analyze thermal stratification and additive effect of core materials on corium behavior. The Salt experiments were conducted to estimate the crust and the mushy region formation, as well as natural convection heat transfer in the corium. Material properties of the corium and the salt were measured in the RASPLAV project. During the RASPLAV-AW-200-3 test, approximately 22 kg of the corium leaked from the test furnace, because Fe from the FeO, which was additive to reduce the melting temperature of fuel pellet, interacted with Tungsten protector. It is concluded from the AW-200-3 test results that the oxidized U-Zr-O is not separated. From the RASPLAV-AW-200-4 test results, the C-32 fuel with the miscibility gap and low content of carbon was not separated thermally. The carbon is known as a dominant factor in the thermal stratification of the corium from the small and medium scale test results such as TULPAN, TF, and STF. The fuel composition, test method and condition in the RASPLAV-AW-2003,4 were selected using the small and medium scale test results. It is confirmed from the Salt test that the analytical model of the CONV code predicts heat transfer with crust formation in the molten pool very well

  10. Investigation of Heat Transfer and Magnetohydrodynamic Flow in Electroslag Remelting Furnace Using Vibrating Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Qiang; Lou, Yanchun; Chen, Rui; Song, Zhaowei; Li, Baokuan

    2016-01-01

    A transient three-dimensional (3D) coupled mathematical model has been developed to understand the effect of a vibrating electrode on the electromagnetic, two-phase flow and temperature fields as well as the solidification in the electroslag remelting (ESR) process. With the magnetohydrodynamic model, the Joule heating and Lorentz force, which are the source terms in the energy and momentum equations, are recalculated at each iteration as a function of the phase distribution. The influence of the vibrating electrode on the formation of the metal droplet is demonstrated by the volume of fluid approach. Additionally, the solidification of the metal is modeled by an enthalpy-based technique, in which the mushy zone is treated as a porous medium with porosity equal to the liquid fraction. The present work is the first attempt to investigate the innovative technology of the ESR process with a vibrating electrode by a transient 3D comprehensive model. A reasonable agreement between the experiment and simulation is obtained. The results indicate that the whole process is presented as a periodic activity. When the metal droplets fall from the tip of the electrode, the horizontal component of velocity will generate electrode vibration. This will lead to the distribution variation of the flow field in the slag layer. The variation of temperature distribution occurs regularly and is periodically accompanied by the behavior of the falling metal droplets. With the decreasing vibrating frequency and amplitude, the relative velocity of the electrode and molten slag increase accordingly. The diameter of the molten droplets, the maximum temperature and the depth of the molten pool gradually become smaller, lower and shallower.

  11. Design, materials and R and D issues of innovative thermal contact joints for high heat flux applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Haines, J.; Tillack, M.S.; Ulrickson, M.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma facing components in fusion machines are designed with a layer of sacrificial armour material facing the plasma and a high-conductivity material in contact with the coolant. One of the most critical issues associated with making the proposed design concept work, from a power handling point of view, is achieving the necessary contact conductance between the armour and the heat sink.This paper presents a novel idea for the interface joint between the sacrificial armour and the actively cooled permanent heat sink. It consists of a thermal bond layer of a binary or more complex alloy, treated in the semi-solid region in such a way as to lead to a fine dispersion of a globular solid phase into a liquid matrix (rheocast process). The alloy in this ''mushy state'' exhibits a time-dependent, shear rate-dependent viscosity, which is maintained reversibly when the material is solidified and heated again in the semi-solid state. The function of the thermal bond layer is to facilitate heat transfer between the replaceable armour and the permanent heat sink without building up excessive thermal stresses, as in conventional brazed joints, and allow an easy replacement whenever needed without disturbing the coolant system. No contact pressure is required in this case to provide the desired heat transfer conductance, and the reversible thixotropic properties of the rheocast material should guarantee the stability of the layer in the semi-solid conditions.Key design, material and testing issues are identified and discussed in this paper with emphasis on specific needs for future research and development work. Examples of suitable material options which are being considered are reported together with some initial heat transfer analysis results. (orig.)

  12. A meshless approach to thermomechanics of DC casting of aluminium billets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavrič, B; Šarler, B

    2016-01-01

    The ability to model thermomechanics in DC casting is important due to the technological challenges caused by physical phenomena such as different ingot distortions, cracking, hot tearing and residual stress. Many thermomechanical models already exist and usually take into account three contributions: elastic, thermal expansion, and viscoplastic to model the mushy zone. These models are, in a vast majority, solved by the finite element method. In the present work the elastic model that accounts for linear thermal expansion is considered. The method used for solving the model is of a novel meshless type and extends our previous meshless attempts in solving fluid mechanics problems. The solution to the problem is constructed using collocation on the overlapping subdomains, which are composed of computational nodes. Multiquadric radial basis functions, augmented by monomials, are used for the displacement interpolation. The interpolation is constructed in such a manner that it readily satisfies the boundary conditions. The discretization results in construction of a global square sparse matrix representing the system of linear equations for the displacement field. The developed method has many advantages. The system of equations can be easily constructed and efficiently solved. There is no need to perform expensive meshing of the domain and the formulation of the method is similar in two and three dimensions. Since no meshing is required, the nodes can easily be added or removed, which allows for efficient adaption of the node arrangement density. The order of convergence, estimated through an analytically solvable test, can be adjusted through the number of interpolation nodes in the subdomain, with 6 nodes being enough for the second order convergence. Simulations of axisymmetric mechanical problems, associated with low frequency electromagnetic DC casting are presented. (paper)

  13. Analysis of internal crack in a six-ton P91 ingot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-an Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available P91 is a new kind of heat-resistant and high-tensile steel. It can be extruded after ingot casting and can be widely used for different pipes in power plants. However, due to its mushy freezing characteristics, a lack of feeding in the ingot center often generates many defects, such as porosity and crack. A six-ton P91 ingot was cast and sliced, and a representative part of the longitudinal section was inspected in more detail. The morphology of crack-like defects was examined by X-ray high energy industrial CT and reconstructed by 3D software. There are five main portions of defects larger than 200 mm3, four of which are interconnected. These initiated from continuous liquid film, and then were torn apart by excessive tensile stress within the brittle temperature range (BTR. The 3D FEM analysis of thermo-mechanical simulation was carried out to analyze the formation of porosity and internal crack defects. The results of shrinkage porosity and Niyama values revealed that the center of the ingot suffers from inadequate feeding. Several criteria based on thermal and mechanical models were used to evaluate the susceptibility of hot crack formation. The Clyne and Davies’ criterion and Katgerman’s criterion successfully predicted the high hot crack susceptibility in the ingot center. Six typical locations in the longitudinal section had been chosen for analysis of the stresses and strains evolution during the BTR. Locations in the defects region showed the highest tensile stresses and relative high strain values, while other locations showed either low tensile stresses or low strain values. In conclusion, hot crack develops only when stress and strain exceed a threshold value at the same time during the BTR.

  14. Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Subodh K.

    2006-01-09

    A successful four-year project on the modeling and optimization of direct chill (DC) casting to reduce ingot cracking has been completed. The project involved close collaboration among private industries, national laboratories, and universities. During the four-year project, 16 quarterly meetings brought the industrial partners and the research team together for discussion of research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot. The collaborative research resulted in several major accomplishments or findings: (1) Surface cracks were shown to be a result of hot tearing rather than cold cracks, as was thought before this project. These cracks form on the surface of a DC cast ingot just above the impingement point of the secondary cooling water jets. The cracks form along dendrite and grain boundaries, where solute and impurity elements are highly segregated. This understanding led to the development of a new technique for determining the mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zone of alloys and to thermodynamic predictions of the hot tearing propensity of DC cast ingots. (2) The apparent heat transfer coefficient (HTC) at the ingot surface in the water cooling region during DC casting was determined on the basis of temperature measurements in commercial DC casting ingots and an inverse heat transfer analysis. HTCs were calculated as a function of temperature and time, and covered the different regimes of heat transfer expected during DC casting. The calculated values were extrapolated to include the effect of water flow rate. The calculated HTCs had a peak at around 200 C, corresponding to the high heat transfer rates during nucleate boiling, and the profile was consistent with similar data published in the literature. (3) A new method, termed the

  15. Mechanisms of microstructure formation under the influence of ultrasonic vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakita, Milan

    Positive effects of ultrasound on crystallization have been known for almost 90 years. Application of ultrasound has been very successful in many industries, most notably in chemistry, creating a new branch of science - sonochemistry. However, ultrasonication has not found wide commercial application in the solidification processing. The reason for that is the complexity of underlying phenomena and the lack of predicting models which correlate processing parameters with the properties of a product. The purpose of this study is to give some contribution toward better understanding of mechanisms that lead to changes in the solidifying microstructure. It has been found that, under experimental conditions used in this work, cavitation-induced nucleation is the major contributor to the grain refinement. Ultrasonication at minimal supercoolings is expected to give maximal grain refinement. Dendrite fragmentation has not shown to be a significant contributor to the grain refinement. Dendrite fragmentation is maximal if done by bubbles that come in contact with the solidifying phase, or that are created there. Alloys/solutions with long solidification interval, or wide mushy zone, are expected to exhibit more dendrite fragmentation. Bubbles are recognized as a crucial feature in ultrasonication. Their size distribution in the liquid phase prior to ultrasonication dictates the cavitation threshold and intensity of cavitation. For the first time, radiation pressure has been recognized as potentially significant factor in grain refinement. In the experimental setup used in this study, acoustic pressure at the main (driving) frequency is not substantial to cause significant fragmentation, and only dendrites close to the sonotrode were fragmented. However, application of ultrasound with frequencies that are several times higher than the current industrial practice could substantially increase dendrite fragmentation. Appearance of fractional harmonics has also been recognized

  16. U.S. Geological Survey activities related to American Indians and Alaska Natives: Fiscal years 2007 and 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1800s, John Wesley Powell, the second director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), followed his interest in the tribes of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau and studied their cultures, languages, and surroundings. From that early time, the USGS has recognized the importance of Native knowledge and living in harmony with nature as complements to the USGS mission to better understand the Earth. Combining traditional ecological knowledge with empirical studies allows the USGS and Native American governments, organizations, and people to increase their mutual understanding and respect for this land. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and is not responsible for regulations or land management. Climate change is a major current issue affecting Native lives and traditions throughout the United States. Climate projections for the coming century indicate an increasing probability for more frequent and more severe droughts in the Southwest, including the Navajo Nation. Erosion has claimed Native homes in Alaska. Fish have become inedible due to diseases that turn their flesh mushy. Native people who rely on or who are culturally sustained by hunting, fishing, and using local plants are living with climate change now. The traditional knowledge of Native peoples enriches and confirms the work of USGS scientists. The results are truly synergistic-greater than the sum of their parts. Traditional ecological knowledge is respected and increasingly used in USGS studies-when the holders of that knowledge choose to share it. The USGS respects the rights of Native people to maintain their patrimony of traditional ecological knowledge. The USGS studies can help Tribes, Native organizations, and natural resource professionals manage Native lands and resources with the best available unbiased data and information that can be added to their traditional knowledge. Wise Native leaders have noted that traditional

  17. A coupled analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer and deformation behavior of solidifying shell in continuously cast beam blank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Eui; Yeo, Tae Jung; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Yoon, Jong Kyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul Nat` l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Heung Nam [Oxford Center for Advanced Materials and Composites, Department of Materials, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    A mathematical model for a coupled analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer and deformation behavior in the continuously cast beam blank has been developed. The fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification in the mold region were analyzed with 3-dimensional finite difference method (FDM) based on control volume method. A body fitted coordinate system was introduced for the complex geometry of the beam blank. The effects of turbulence and natural convection of molten steel were taken into account in determining the fluid flow in the strand. The thermo-elasto-plastic deformation behavior in the cast strand and the formation of air gap between the solidifying shell and the mold were analyzed by the finite element method (FEM) using the 2-dimensional slice temperature profile calculated by the FDM. The heat flow between the strand and the mold was evaluated by the coupled analysis between the fluid flow-heat transfer analysis and the thermo-elasto-plastic stress analysis. In order to determine the solid fraction in the mushy zone, the microsegregation of solute element was assessed. The effects of fluid flow on the heat transfer, the solidification of steel and the distribution of shell thickness during the casting of the beam blank were simulated. The deformation behavior of the solidifying shell and the possibility of cracking of the strand were also investigated. The recirculating flows were developed in the regions of the web and the flange tip. The impinging of the inlet flow from the nozzle retarded the growing of solidifying shell in the regions of the fillet and the flange. The air gap between the strand and the mold was formed near the region of the corner of the flange tip. At the initial stage of casting, the probability of the surface cracking was high in the regions of the fillet and the flange tip. After the middle stage of casting, the internal cracking was predicted in the regions of the flange tip, and between the fillet and the flange tip. (author) 38

  18. The effect of Lactobacillus brevis KB290 against irritable bowel syndrome: a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami Katsumi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional disorder of the digestive tract that causes chronic abdominal symptoms. We evaluated the effects of Lactobacillus brevis KB290 (KB290, which has been demonstrated to be effective at improving bowel movements and the composition of intestinal microflora, on IBS symptoms. Methods We performed a placebo control double-blind cross matched trial. Thirty-five males and females (aged 6 years and above who had been diagnosed with IBS according to the Rome III criteria were divided into 2 groups, and after a 4-week pre-trial observation period, they were administered test capsules containing KB290 or placebo for 4 weeks (consumption period I. Then, the capsule administration was suspended for 4 weeks in both groups (washout period, before the opposite capsules were administered for a further 4 weeks (consumption period II. Fecal samples were collected on the first day of the pre-consumption observation period, the last day of consumption period I, the last day of the washout period, and the last day of consumption period II. In addition, the subjects’ IBS symptoms and quality of life (QOL and any adverse events that they experienced were evaluated. Results No significant difference in IBS symptoms was noted among the various periods. However, the mean QOL scores were improved during the test capsule consumption. The frequencies of watery and mushy feces were significantly lower in the test capsule consumption period than during the pre-consumption observation period, and the frequency of abdominal pain was significantly reduced in the test capsule consumption period compared with the other periods. The frequency of the genus Bifidobacterium was significantly higher, and that of the genus Clostridium was significantly lower, after the test capsule consumption than after the placebo consumption. The frequencies of the genera Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Enterococcus were also

  19. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Innovative Semi-Solid Metal (SSM) Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diran Apelian

    2012-08-15

    Semi-solid metal (SSM) processing has emerged as an attractive method for near-net-shape manufacturing due to the distinct advantages it holds over conventional near-net-shape forming technologies. These advantages include lower cycle time, increased die life, reduced porosity, reduced solidification shrinkage, improved mechanical properties, etc. SSM processing techniques can not only produce the complex dimensional details (e.g. thin-walled sections) associated with conventional high-pressure die castings, but also can produce high integrity castings currently attainable only with squeeze and low-pressure permanent mold casting processes. There are two primary semi-solid processing routes, (a) thixocasting and (b) rheocasting. In the thixocasting route, one starts from a non-dendritic solid precursor material that is specially prepared by a primary aluminum manufacturer, using continuous casting methods. Upon reheating this material into the mushy (a.k.a. "two-phase") zone, a thixotropic slurry is formed, which becomes the feed for the casting operation. In the rheocasting route (a.k.a. "slurry-on-demand" or "SoD"), one starts from the liquid state, and the thixotropic slurry is formed directly from the melt via careful thermal management of the system; the slurry is subsequently fed into the die cavity. Of these two routes, rheocasting is favored in that there is no premium added to the billet cost, and the scrap recycling issues are alleviated. The CRP (Trade Marked) is a process where the molten metal flows through a reactor prior to casting. The role of the reactor is to ensure that copious nucleation takes place and that the nuclei are well distributed throughout the system prior to entering the casting cavity. The CRP (Trade Marked) has been successfully applied in hyper-eutectic Al-Si alloys (i.e., 390 alloy) where two liquids of equal or different compositions and temperatures are mixed in the reactor and creating a SSM slurry. The process has been mostly

  20. Epidemiology of functional diarrhea and comparison with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: a population-based survey in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Fang Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of functional diarrhea and its impacts on Chinese remain unclear, and there are no data on the comparative epidemiology of functional diarrhea and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D. This study was to explore the epidemiology of functional diarrhea and its impacts, and to identify its distinction from IBS-D. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 16078 respondents, who were interviewed under a randomized stratified multi-stage sampling design in five cities of China. All respondents completed the modified Rome II questionnaire, and the 36-item Short Form health survey (SF-36 was used for assessing health-related quality of life in 20% of the sample. Overall, 248 respondents (1.54% had functional diarrhea and 277 (1.72% had IBS-D. Functional diarrhea was positively associated with increasing age and body mass index (trend test P<0.05. The three most common symptoms for at least 3 weeks in the past months were loose, mushy or watery stools (n = 203, 81.85%, more than three bowel movements a day (n = 100, 40.32% and having to rush to the toilet to have a bowel movement (n = 72, 29.03%. Meaningful impairment was observed in 5 of the 8 SF-36 domains in respondents with functional diarrhea. The demographics are mostly similar between the respondents with functional diarrhea and IBS-D; however, respondents with IBS-D had more frequent symptoms of diarrhea and even lower scores in SF-36 domains than those with functional diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of functional diarrhea in China is substantially lower than that in Western countries and relatively higher than that in other Asian countries. It impaired health-related quality of life, and respondents with IBS-D have even worse quality of life. Further population-based studies are needed to investigate the epidemiology of functional diarrhea and the differences between functional diarrhea and IBS-D.

  1. A coupled analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer and deformation behavior of solidifying shell in continuously cast beam blank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Eui; Yeo, Tae Jung; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Yoon, Jong Kyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul Nat`l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Heung Nam [Oxford Center for Advanced Materials and Composites, Department of Materials, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    A mathematical model for a coupled analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer and deformation behavior in the continuously cast beam blank has been developed. The fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification in the mold region were analyzed with 3-dimensional finite difference method (FDM) based on control volume method. A body fitted coordinate system was introduced for the complex geometry of the beam blank. The effects of turbulence and natural convection of molten steel were taken into account in determining the fluid flow in the strand. The thermo-elasto-plastic deformation behavior in the cast strand and the formation of air gap between the solidifying shell and the mold were analyzed by the finite element method (FEM) using the 2-dimensional slice temperature profile calculated by the FDM. The heat flow between the strand and the mold was evaluated by the coupled analysis between the fluid flow-heat transfer analysis and the thermo-elasto-plastic stress analysis. In order to determine the solid fraction in the mushy zone, the microsegregation of solute element was assessed. The effects of fluid flow on the heat transfer, the solidification of steel and the distribution of shell thickness during the casting of the beam blank were simulated. The deformation behavior of the solidifying shell and the possibility of cracking of the strand were also investigated. The recirculating flows were developed in the regions of the web and the flange tip. The impinging of the inlet flow from the nozzle retarded the growing of solidifying shell in the regions of the fillet and the flange. The air gap between the strand and the mold was formed near the region of the corner of the flange tip. At the initial stage of casting, the probability of the surface cracking was high in the regions of the fillet and the flange tip. After the middle stage of casting, the internal cracking was predicted in the regions of the flange tip, and between the fillet and the flange tip. (author) 38

  2. Investigating Magmatic Processes in the Lower Levels of Mantle-derived Magmatic Systems: The Age & Emplacement of the Kunene Anorthosite Complex (SW Angola)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, B.; Bybee, G. M.; Owen-Smith, T.; Lehmann, J.; Brower, A. M.; Ashwal, L. D.; Hill, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Our understanding of mantle-derived magmatic systems has shifted from a notion of upper crustal, melt-dominated magma chambers that feed short-lived volcanic eruptions, to a view of more long-lived trans-crustal, mush-dominated systems. Proterozoic massif-type anorthosite systems are voluminous, plagioclase-dominated plutonic suites with ubiquitous intermediate compositions (An 50 ± 10) that represent mantle-derived magmas initially ponded at Moho depths and crystallized polybarically until emplacement at mid-crustal levels. Thus, these systems provide unique insight into magma storage and processing in the lower reaches of the magma mush column, where such interpretation has previously relied on cumulate xenoliths in lavas, geophysical data and experimental/numerical modeling. We present new CA-ID-TIMS ages and a series of detailed field observations from the largest Proterozoic anorthosite massif on Earth, the Kunene Anorthosite Complex (KAC) of SW Angola. Field structures indicate that (i) the bulk of the material was emplaced in the form of crystal mushes, as both plutons and sheet-like intrusions; (ii) prolonged magmatism led to cumulate disaggregation (block structure development) and remobilization, producing considerable textural heterogeneity; (iii) crystal-rich magmatic flow induced localized recrystallization and the development of protoclastic (mortar) textures; and (iv) late residual melts were able to migrate locally prior to complete solidification. Dating of pegmatitic pods entrained from cumulate zones at the base of the crust (1500 ± 13 Ma) and their host anorthosites (1375-1438 Ma) reveals time periods in the range of 60-120 Myr between the earliest products of the system and the final mushes emplaced at higher crustal levels. Therefore, the KAC represents a complex, mushy magmatic system that developed over a long period of time. Not only do these observations help in refining our understanding of Proterozoic anorthosite petrogenesis, they

  3. On the Preconditioning of a Newton-Krylov Solver for a High-Order reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin Discretization of All-Speed Compressible Flow with Phase Change for Application in Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, Brian T. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2017-05-17

    This dissertation focuses on the development of a fully-implicit, high-order compressible ow solver with phase change. The work is motivated by laser-induced phase change applications, particularly by the need to develop large-scale multi-physics simulations of the selective laser melting (SLM) process in metal additive manufacturing (3D printing). Simulations of the SLM process require precise tracking of multi-material solid-liquid-gas interfaces, due to laser-induced melting/ solidi cation and evaporation/condensation of metal powder in an ambient gas. These rapid density variations and phase change processes tightly couple the governing equations, requiring a fully compressible framework to robustly capture the rapid density variations of the ambient gas and the melting/evaporation of the metal powder. For non-isothermal phase change, the velocity is gradually suppressed through the mushy region by a variable viscosity and Darcy source term model. The governing equations are discretized up to 4th-order accuracy with our reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin spatial discretization scheme and up to 5th-order accuracy with L-stable fully implicit time discretization schemes (BDF2 and ESDIRK3-5). The resulting set of non-linear equations is solved using a robust Newton-Krylov method, with the Jacobian-free version of the GMRES solver for linear iterations. Due to the sti nes associated with the acoustic waves and thermal and viscous/material strength e ects, preconditioning the GMRES solver is essential. A robust and scalable approximate block factorization preconditioner was developed, which utilizes the velocity-pressure (vP) and velocity-temperature (vT) Schur complement systems. This multigrid block reduction preconditioning technique converges for high CFL/Fourier numbers and exhibits excellent parallel and algorithmic scalability on classic benchmark problems in uid dynamics (lid-driven cavity ow and natural convection heat transfer) as well as for laser

  4. The Fractional Step Method Applied to Simulations of Natural Convective Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Heinrich, Juan C.; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes research done to apply the Fractional Step Method to finite-element simulations of natural convective flows in pure liquids, permeable media, and in a directionally solidified metal alloy casting. The Fractional Step Method has been applied commonly to high Reynold's number flow simulations, but is less common for low Reynold's number flows, such as natural convection in liquids and in permeable media. The Fractional Step Method offers increased speed and reduced memory requirements by allowing non-coupled solution of the pressure and the velocity components. The Fractional Step Method has particular benefits for predicting flows in a directionally solidified alloy, since other methods presently employed are not very efficient. Previously, the most suitable method for predicting flows in a directionally solidified binary alloy was the penalty method. The penalty method requires direct matrix solvers, due to the penalty term. The Fractional Step Method allows iterative solution of the finite element stiffness matrices, thereby allowing more efficient solution of the matrices. The Fractional Step Method also lends itself to parallel processing, since the velocity component stiffness matrices can be built and solved independently of each other. The finite-element simulations of a directionally solidified casting are used to predict macrosegregation in directionally solidified castings. In particular, the finite-element simulations predict the existence of 'channels' within the processing mushy zone and subsequently 'freckles' within the fully processed solid, which are known to result from macrosegregation, or what is often referred to as thermo-solutal convection. These freckles cause material property non-uniformities in directionally solidified castings; therefore many of these castings are scrapped. The phenomenon of natural convection in an alloy under-going directional solidification, or thermo-solutal convection, will be explained. The

  5. Space Science Reference Guide, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Renee (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Contaminants; Bands on Europa;Big Mountain, Big Landslide on Jupiter's Moon, Io; Cratering of the Moon; Europa's Salty Surface; The Europa Scene in the Voyager-Galileo Era; Explosive Volcanic Eruptions on the Moon; Ice on the Bone Dry Moon; Jupiter's Hot, Mushy Moon; The Moon Beyond 2002 ; Phases of the Moon; The Ph-D Project: Manned Expedition to the Moons of Mars; and Possible Life in a Europan Ocean.

  6. The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation and Analysis of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2009-09-01

    indispensable for scrutinizing flow physics, on the other hand, the validated CFD method can be used to generate necessary data for validation of the accident analysis models. Given the insights gained from the CFD study, physics-based models and computationally-efficient tools are developed for multi-dimensional simulations of transient thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the lower plenum of a LWR during the late phase of an in-vessel core melt progression. To describe natural convection heat transfer in an internally heated volume, and molten metal layer heated from below and cooled from the top (and side) walls, the Effective Convectivity Models (ECM) are developed and implemented in a commercial CFD code. The ECM uses directional heat transfer characteristic velocities to transport the heat to cooled boundaries. The heat transport and interactions are represented through an energy-conservation formulation. The ECM then enables 3D heat transfer simulations of a homogeneous (and stratified) melt pool formed in the LWR lower head. In order to describe phase-change heat transfer associated with core debris or binary mixture (e.g. in a molten metal layer), a temperature-based enthalpy formulation is employed in the Phase-change ECM (so called the PECM). The PECM is capable to represent natural convection heat transfer in a mushy zone. Simple formulation of the PECM method allows implementing different models of mushy zone heat transfer for non-eutectic mixtures. For a non-eutectic binary mixture, compositional convection associated with concentration gradients can be taken into account. The developed models are validated against both existing experimental data and the CFD-generated data. ECM and PECM simulations show a superior computational efficiency compared to the CFD simulation method. The ECM and PECM methods are applied to predict thermal loads imposed on the vessel wall and Control Rod Guide Tubes (CRGTs) during core debris heatup and melting in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR

  7. Aluminum alloy weldability. Identification of weld solidification cracking mechanisms through novel experimental technique and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    et al. (2000) revealed that crack growth is controlled by local strain rate conditions. Finally, a simplified strain partition model provides a link between critical strain rates measured across the weld and predicted at grain boundaries within the mushy zone. Although based on simplified assumptions, predicted and measured critical strain rate values are of the same order of magnitude. However, because of a longer mushy zone experienced at higher 4043 filler dilution related to a reduction in cooling rate, these models predict a lower weldability with increasing filler dilution, in contradiction with experimental observations. Combining the crack initiation and growth models suggests that hydrogen and strain rate, respectively, determine crack formation. An hypothetical hydrogen - strain rate map defines conceptually the conditions for cracking, suggesting better weldability at low weld metal hydrogen content. With the aid of the modified varestraint test (MVT) and a controlled hydrogen contamination system, results, presented in the form of ram speed - hydrogen map, revealed that hydrogen has little effect on crack growth, providing support to the proposed cracking models. However, a drop in weldability corresponding to the peak in weld metal hydrogen supersaturation suggests a different solidification cracking mechanism, where cavitation supports crack growth. (orig.)

  8. Breakup of jet and drops during premixing phase of fuel coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haraldsson, Haraldur Oskar

    2000-05-01

    deals with simulation of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. A high order Navier-Stokes solver is employed along with the front tracking Level-Set algorithm, to eliminate numerical diffusion. The effect of surface tension and viscosity on the development of instabilities is investigated. Three regimes are identified, and delineated, based on Weber and Ohnesorge numbers. The third chapter is devoted to breakup of liquid drops in water. The emphasis is directed towards delineating the roles which melt to coolant heat transfer, melt solidification, melt fusion heat and melt mushy zone play in the fragmentation process. Coolant temperature is found to have a significant impact on the droplet fragmentation behaviour for subcooled conditions. The melt superheat greatly affects the characteristic time for solidification, and thus strongly affects the deepness of the fragmentation process. The fusion heat of the eutectic melt contributes significantly to the solidification time scale, and thereby enables the eutectic melt drop to feature deeper fragmentation. The presence of the mushy zone during the phase change of the non-eutectic melts significantly prevents these melt drops from completing the deformation and fragmentation process, especially when the melt superheat is small. An instability analysis on the crust breakup was performed. A modified dimensionless Aeroelastic number Ae * is obtained as a criteria for breakup of the plain crust. It is found that the modified Aeroelastic number can be employed to evaluate the breakup behaviour of a droplet with a thin solidified layer on its surface

  9. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  10. Io after Galileo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Rosaly M C; Williams, David A

    2005-01-01

    Io, the volcanically active innermost large moon of Jupiter, was a target of intense study during the recently completed NASA Galileo mission to Jupiter (1989-2003). Galileo's suite of instruments obtained unprecedented observations of Io, including high spatial resolution imaging in the visible and infrared. This paper reviews the insights gained about Io's surface, atmosphere and space environment during the Galileo mission. Io is thought to have a large Fe-FeS core, whose radius is slightly less than half the radius of Io and whose mass is 20% of the moon. The lack of an intrinsic magnetic field implies that the core is either completely solid or completely liquid. The mantle of Io appears to undergo a high degree of partial melting (20-50% molten) that produces ultramafic lavas dominated by Mg-rich orthopyroxene in an apparent 'mushy magma ocean', suggesting an undifferentiated mantle. The crust of Io is thought to be rigid, 20-30 km thick, cold away from volcanic heat sources and composed of mafic to ultramafic silicates. Tidal flexing due to Io's orbital resonance produces ∼100 m tides at the surface, generating heat that powers Io's volcanism. Silicate volcanism appears to be dominant at most hot spots, although secondary sulfur volcanism may be important in some areas. The key discoveries of the Galileo era at Io were: (1) the detection of high-temperature volcanism (ultramafic, superheated mafic or 'ceramic'); (2) the detection of both S 2 and SO 2 gas in Ionian plumes; (3) the distinction between eruption styles, including between Pelean plumes (originating from central vents) and Promethean plumes (originating from silicate lava flow fronts); (4) the relationship between mountains and paterae, which indicates that many paterae are formed as magma preferentially ascends along tectonic faults associated with mountain building; (5) the lack of detection of an intrinsic magnetic field; (6) a new estimate of global heat flow; and (7) increased understanding

  11. Rapid Crystallization of the Bishop Magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualda, G. A.; Anderson, A. T.; Sutton, S. R.

    2007-12-01

    is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the shortest durations derived from geochronology. In the current paradigm, this implies that the Bishop magma existed virtually free of crystals for 100-200 ka. Occasional recharge of the system could cause resorption of crystals. The challenge, however, is to explain how a large- volume, liquid- and volatile-rich system, was prevented from erupting for over 100 ka. The trouble is such that it puts into question the whole concept of a long-lived, liquid-rich magma body. Evidence has accumulated to show that the Bishop magma was stratified and did not convect during crystallization, the stratification was established prior to phenocryst crystallization, and crystal migration did not significantly perturb the stratification. All these are simpler to explain if liquid-rich magma only existed for a short period of time, and we estimate the time as being on the order of 1 ka. The geospeedometric timescale inferred can be reconciled with the geochronological evidence if we interpret zircon crystallization ages as reflecting episodic growth in response to waxing and waning of a mushy body, rather than continuous crystallization from liquid-rich magma in a long-lived, large-volume magma body. We speculate that only after 100-200 ka did favorable conditions emerge and allowed for the generation of a large volume of liquid-rich magma. Once such a body of magma was established, it progressed rather quickly towards eruption.

  12. Breakup of jet and drops during premixing phase of fuel coolant interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsson, Haraldur Oskar

    2000-05-01

    second chapter deals with simulation of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. A high order Navier-Stokes solver is employed along with the front tracking Level-Set algorithm, to eliminate numerical diffusion. The effect of surface tension and viscosity on the development of instabilities is investigated. Three regimes are identified, and delineated, based on Weber and Ohnesorge numbers. The third chapter is devoted to breakup of liquid drops in water. The emphasis is directed towards delineating the roles which melt to coolant heat transfer, melt solidification, melt fusion heat and melt mushy zone play in the fragmentation process. Coolant temperature is found to have a significant impact on the droplet fragmentation behaviour for subcooled conditions. The melt superheat greatly affects the characteristic time for solidification, and thus strongly affects the deepness of the fragmentation process.(abstract truncated)

  13. Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.K.; Ningileri, S.; Long, Z.; Saito, K.; Khraisheh, M.; Hassan, M.H.; Kuwana, K.; Han, Q.; Viswanathan, S.; Sabau, A.S.; Clark, J.; Hyrn, J. (ANL)

    2006-08-15

    the ingot before rolling, and by eliminating butt sawing. Full-scale industrial implementation of the results of the proposed research would lead to energy savings in excess of 6 trillion Btu by the year 2020. The research undertaken in this project aimed to achieve this objective by a collaboration of industry, university, and national laboratory personnel through Secat, Inc., a consortium of aluminum companies. During the four-year project, the industrial partners and the research team met in 16 quarterly meetings to discuss research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot production. The project focused on the development of a fundamental understanding of ingot cracking and detailed models of thermal conditions, solidification, microstructural evolution, and stress development during the initial transient in DC castings of the aluminum alloys 3004 and 5182. The microstructure of the DC casting ingots was systematically characterized. Carefully designed experiments were carried out at the national laboratory and university facilities as well as at the industrial locations using the industrial production facilities. The advanced computational capabilities of the national laboratories were used for thermodynamic and kinetic simulations of phase transformation, heat transfer and fluid flow, solidification, and stress-strain evolution during DC casting. The achievements of the project are the following: (1) Identified the nature of crack formation during DC casting; (2) Developed a novel method for determining the mechanical properties of an alloy at the nonequilibrium mushy zone of the alloy; (3) Measured heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) between the solidifying ingot and the cooling water jet; (4) Determined the material constitutive model at high temperatures